Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to detect illicit drone filming developedA new technique to detect a drone camera illicitly capturing video is revealed in a new study by cyber security researchers in Israel. The study addresses increasing concerns about the proliferation of drone use for personal and business applications and how it is impinging on privacy and safety.
27min
Big Think
The Bilingual Brain: Why One Size Doesn’t Fit AllThere is more than one type of bilingualism. Read More
46min
Science-Based Medicine
The Elephant in the Compounding PharmacyContaminated products from compounding pharmacies have harmed and even killed patients. Quality control measures are being implemented, but there is a bigger problem: the injudicious use of untested and potentially dangerous treatments.
44min
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Youth using alternative tobacco products are more likely to smoke one year laterNonsmoking adolescents who use e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or tobacco water pipes are more likely to start smoking conventional cigarettes within a year, according to new research.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast-tracking T-cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsResearchers have developed a material-based T-cell-expansion method using APC-mimetic biomaterial scaffolds, which helps achieve greater expansion of primary mouse and human T cells than existing methods.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy systemA team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stop the clots, spare the coagulationIn the fight to cure thromboinflammatory diseases, one of the target molecules is thrombin, a protein that promotes inflammation and can cause blood clots. However, inhibiting thrombin too much can lead to uncontrolled bleeding, limiting the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Now, researchers have found that a class of small molecule called 'parmodulins' can reduce inflammation without compromising n
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flipping the switch: Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasisResearchers have shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warnPinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and strokeStarting periods early -- before the age of 12 -- is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.
59min
Science | The Guardian
Achoo! Why letting out an explosive sneeze is safer than stifling itFollowing the case of a man who ruptured this throat, medics say holding in a sneeze can cause ear damage or a brain aneurysm In a season where colds are rife, holding your nose and closing your mouth might seem like a considerate alternative to an explosive “Achoo!”. But doctors have warned of the dangers of such a move after a man was found to have ruptured the back of his throat when attemptin
1h
Science | The Guardian
Early menarche and menopause linked to cardiovascular disease risk – studyIncrease screening for women who start their periods at a young age or those reaching menopause early, experts suggest Women who start their periods at an early age, or experience an early menopause, are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. While researchers say it is not clear whether reproductive factors are driving the increased risks, they say that more frequent s
1h
Live Science
Here's a Perfect Example of Why You Shouldn't Stifle Your SneezeA 34-year-old man in England ruptured his throat when he tried to stop a sneeze.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV adsTeenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
History of humanity does not require rewriting: The case of UntermassfeldIn a newly published study, researchers refute a recent publication regarding the dispersal of humans in Europe.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Normal tissue BRCA1 methylation associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancerNormal tissue BRCA1 methylation is associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancer and may occur as a prenatal event. These findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'A new study suggests that key geological markers align towards a start for the Anthropocene somewhere between 1952 to 1955, based on signals from nuclear testing and fossil fuel burning.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The more competitive, the more passionate in romantic relationships, study findsAmericans are more passionate toward their romantic partners than Japanese people are because Americans live in social environments in which people have greater freedom to choose and replace their partners, a team of Japanese researchers suggest.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens who were severely bullied as children at higher risk of suicidal thoughts, mental health issueTeens who were severely bullied as children by peers are at higher risk of mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviours, according to new research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depressionThe common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of depression, according to a new analysis.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, researchers have developed a new class of robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year. Using these unparalleled data, the researchers have identified the starting point for the explosive spring phytoplankton
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesConjugated tetraenes are important key substructures in electronic materials, natural products and pharmaceutical molecules. However, they are difficult to synthesize. Now, researchers in Japan have achieved a new synthetic route of conjugated tetraenes from inexpensive and easily available 1,3-butadiene and substituted acetylenes by a one-pot approach under mild conditions.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultracold neutron source: Yield improved by factor of 3.5Researchers have improved the yield of its ultracold neutron source by a factor of 3.5 to 8.5 ultracold neutrons per cubic centimeter.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Power stations in cells may protect brain against Parkinson´sA new study shows that impairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson’s disease.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomaterials with 'logic gates' release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersScientists have announced that they have built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system -- known as a hydrogel -- that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its freight only when specific physiological conditions are met.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential brain-machine interface for hand paralysisA brain-machine interface that combines brain stimulation with a robotic device controlling hand movement increases the output of pathways connecting the brain and spinal cord, according to a study of healthy adults. This work could have implications for restoring function in stroke patients with hand paralysis.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in gutsScientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment. The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were col
3h
Big Think
What If You Could Recall Forgotten Memories?New research from MIT is shedding light on how our brain forms and recalls memories. Read More
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New application for acoustics helps estimate marine life populationsResearchers have for the first time have used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes that aid spinal cord healing in lamprey also present in humans, researchers discoverMany of the genes involved in natural repair of the injured spinal cord of the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, according to a new study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youthOver half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a new study.
3h
Popular Science
I’ve dived in hundreds of underwater caves hunting for new forms of lifeScience My primary focus is searching for new forms of life—mostly white, eyeless crustaceans. To study the biology and ecology of coastal, saltwater caves and the marine fauna that inhabit them, my cave diving partners and I head underground and underwater to…
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impact of relatedness on grandmothers’ desire to care for their grandchildrenHistorically, grandmothers have been important to their grandchildren, and the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during the times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study shows that X-chromosome relatedness be
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A matter of mobility: New strategy for drug discoveryA joint industry/academia study of a cancer target protein reveals unusual relation between binding site flexibility and drug-target lifetime. The results suggest a new strategy for drug discovery.
4h
Live Science
Brain Connections Set Creative Thinkers ApartBeing creative is all about making connections — in your brain, that is.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stop the clots, spare the coagulationIn the fight to cure thromboinflammatory diseases, one of the target molecules is thrombin, a protein that promotes inflammation and can cause blood clots. However, inhibiting thrombin too much can lead to uncontrolled bleeding, limiting the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Now, researchers from BIDMC and the Wyss Institute have found that a class of small molecule called 'parmodulins' can reduce i
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Carnegie Mellon dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over timePublished in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the model now gives researchers a tool that extends past observing static networks at a single snapshot in time, which is hugely beneficial since network data are usually dynamic.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United StatesWith medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that US life expectancy would improve. Yet there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality during the last three decades. Penn researchers say a rise in obesity is to blame, slowing declines in death rates by a half-percentage point per year. The scientists estimate that rising obesity was about twice as
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same familyA Queen Mary University of London study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy systemA team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifting barriers to citizenship for low-income immigrantsGaining citizenship brings life-changing opportunities, but high application fees make it unaffordable for many immigrants who are ineligible for a federal waiver. When the NaturalizeNY program offered vouchers covering the fee, recipients were twice as likely to apply. Local and federal governments can take action to make citizenship affordable for all.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance compositesA team of researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has demonstrated a novel 3-D printing method that yields unprecedented control of the arrangement of short fibers embedded in polymer matrices. They used this additive manufacturing technique to program fiber orientation within epoxy composites in specified locations, enabling the creation of str
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the countryConflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf childrenMRI brain scans can predict language improvement after a cochlear implant, laying the foundation for creation of brain specific therapy.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiat Chrysler won't sell Jeep: CEOSergio Marchionne, CEO of Fiat Chrysler (FCA), swatted down speculation Monday that he might sell the group's popular Jeep brand and forecasted a future strategic plan by June in anticipation of his retirement.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Detroit launch, BMW aims to reignite US car salesBMW, which has been losing ground in the US luxury market to Mercedes, is hoping to turn the tide with a spate of new SUV offerings.
4h
Big Think
Why a “Genius” Scientist Thinks Our Consciousness Originates at the Quantum LevelDo our minds have quantum structures that give rise to consciousness? Sir Roger Penrose, one of the world's most famous scientists, believes this and can explain how it works. Read More
4h
Science | The Guardian
Creative thought has a pattern of its own, brain activity scans revealPeople who are flexible, original thinkers show signature forms of connectivity in their brains, study shows Donatella Versace finds it in the conflict of ideas, Jack White under pressure of deadlines. For William S Burroughs, an old Dadaist trick helped: cutting pages into pieces and rearranging the words. Every artist has their own way of generating original ideas, but what is happening inside
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Black Death 'spread by humans not rats'Human body lice, rather than rat fleas, spread plague during the Black Death, a study simulating the outbreak suggests.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifting barriers to citizenship for low-income immigrantsTaking the Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony is an emotional moment for many immigrants, and for good reason: it is the culmination of an often arduous process and many years of striving. Citizenship also opens a new chapter marked by possibility, from better job prospects to full participation in civic life.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over timeResearchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new dynamic statistical model to visualize changing patterns in networks, including gene expression during developmental periods of the brain.
4h
Viden
7 måder kroppen forandrer sig på i rummetSlatne muskler, dårligt syn og noget der ligner knogleskørhed: Astronauter må forberede sig på lidt af hvert.
5h
New Scientist - News
Mount Etna may not really be a ‘proper’ volcano at allItaly’s famous volcano Mount Etna may be fed mostly by hot water and carbon dioxide, with only a small dose of molten rock to make it resemble a classic volcano
5h
New Scientist - News
DNA of man who died in 1827 recreated from his living relativesThe DNA of Hans Jonaton, an ex-slave who fled to Iceland in 1802, has been reconstructed using only the genes of his descendants
5h
New Scientist - News
Clever maths will stop hackers spying on the quantum internetQuantum communications are theoretically secure, but keeping a complex quantum network unhackable in practice is more difficult than expected
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identifiedResearchers have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this devastating colonial epidemic.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nature has more than one way to make methaneBiochemists report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation.
5h
Viden
Drop Bali og Barcelona: Nu går turen til solsystemetBjergbestigning på Mars eller pub crawl på Venus? Her får du den ultimative rejseguide til vores solsystem.
5h
Blog » Languages » English
Surprise Happy HourIt’s Martin Luther King day here in America. Today we celebrate equality and progress. Despite the news, the world is actually doing better than ever. For a dive through historical data showing that nearly every metric, from access to healthcare and electricity to wealth and education, is on the rise, check out Oxford University’s Our World in Data and continue the conversation about our ever-imp
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insulating bricks with microscopic bubblesThe calculation is simple: the better a building is insulated, the less heat is lost in winter - and the less energy is needed to achieve a comfortable room temperature.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We will treat cancer by making it 'slim down'For years, attempts have been made to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation of cancer cells: they need metabolites to grow and proliferate as much as a vehicle needs gasoline or electricity to move. However, until now it was not known which metabolites cancer cells actually need. Medical researchers have now identified one of the mechanisms behind this process.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to scientists. Using a set of gyroscopes linked together, physicists explored the behavior of a material whose structure is arranged randomly, instead of an orderly lattice. They found they could set off one-way ripples around the edges, much like spectators in a sports arena -- a 'topological wave,' characteristic of a particu
5h
Science : NPR
Altering A Species: Darwin's Shopping ListFew scientific discoveries have caused as much excitement as that of editing our genes; yet we owe some of the most stunning wonders around us to old-fashioned breeding practices, says Jimena Canales. (Image credit: dan_wrench/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preterm babies may suffer setbacks in auditory brain development, speechPreterm babies born early in the third trimester of pregnancy are likely to experience delays in the development of the auditory cortex, a brain region essential to hearing and understanding sound, a new study reveals. Such delays are associated with speech and language impairments at age 2, the researchers found.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring the neuroscience of behavioral therapy in ratsPsychotherapy may improve symptoms of psychiatric disorders by increasing activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, suggests a study of rats exposed to chronic stress. The research, published in JNeurosci, is a step toward understanding how the brain processes influenced by behavioral therapy may be targeted to improve treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How preterm birth may impact language developmentAltered development of a part of the auditory cortex in preterm infants is associated with poorer language skills in early childhood, finds a brain imaging study of very early-born babies in a neonatal intensive care unit. The research, published in eNeuro, suggests that developmental disturbances to this brain region may underlie speech and language difficulties observed in this population.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential brain-machine interface for hand paralysisA brain-machine interface that combines brain stimulation with a robotic device controlling hand movement increases the output of pathways connecting the brain and spinal cord, according to a study of healthy adults published in JNeurosci. This work could have implications for restoring function in stroke patients with hand paralysis.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar fuels: better efficiency using microwiresResearchers have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen). Using only earth-abundant materials, they developed the most efficient conversion method to date. The trick was to decouple the site where sunlight is captured from the site where the conve
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes that repair spinal cord in fish are also in humans, researchers findMany of the genes that repair an injured spinal cord in a fish called the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, researchers report.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electronic modulation of carotid sinus nerve can be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes in ratsIn a new study in rats, researchers have demonstrated that is possible to restore insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis by modulating electrically the carotid sinus nerve, the sensitive nerve that connects the carotid body with the brain.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Will Your Baby Like Cilantro? These Genetic Tests Say They Can TellA growing set of direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies like BabyGlimpse are aimed at new, expecting, and aspiring parents. But beware their claims.
6h
The Atlantic
The Least Racist People We’ve Ever InterviewedPresident Donald Trump briefly took questions from reporters at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Sunday. A White House transcript shows the following exchange: Reporter: What is your response to people who say you are a racist? Trump: No, no, I'm not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed, that I can tell you. We at The Atlantic have a bi
6h
Popular Science
Get off the couch and under a barbell with this weightlifting starter kitGadgets You don't need to be The Mountain from Game of Thrones to start moving mass. You don't need to be The Mountain from Game of Thrones to start moving mass. This is powerlifting 101.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny dinosaur may have dazzled mates with rainbow ruff and a bony crestAncient dinosaurs were adorned in some amazing ways, from the horns of the triceratops to the plates and spikes of the stegosaurus. A newly discovered, bird-like dinosaur fossil from China contains evidence that could add a new accessory to the list: a shaggy ruff of rainbow feathers.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From greenhouse gases to plastics: New catalyst for recycling carbon dioxide discoveredImagine if we could take CO2, that most notorious of greenhouse gases, and convert it into something useful. Something like plastic, for example. The positive effects could be dramatic, both diverting CO2 from the atmosphere and reducing the need for fossil fuels to make products.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CEO: Mercedes may miss emission goal if electrics don't sellIf customers don't buy electric and more efficient cars and trucks, then Mercedes may not be able to meet government-imposed carbon dioxide emissions standards across the globe, its top executive says.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D-printed underwater vortex sensor mimics whiskers of sea animalA new study has shown that a fully 3D-printed whisker sensor made of polyurethane, graphene, and copper tape can detect underwater vortexes with very high sensitivity. The simple design, mechanical reliability, and low-cost fabrication method contribute to the important commercial implications of this versatile new sensor, as described in an article in Soft Robotics
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seized ivory probed for clues that could help save elephantsScientists are using information gleaned from both illegal ivory art and elephant dung to provide clues that could help save the lives of pachyderms that are being slaughtered for their tusks in Africa.
7h
NYT > Science
The Healing Edge: After Surgery in the Womb, a Baby Kicks Up HopeBaby Boy Royer, who underwent an operation for spina bifida as a fetus, had the biggest defect that the surgical team had attempted to repair.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Le smartphone? France has another term in mindSmartphones may have become ubiquitous in France, but the country's language mavens hope there's still time to keep the word from becoming ensconced in everyday speech.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At Detroit auto show, trucks and SUVs are kingCar makers appealed to Americans' deep love of SUVs and trucks on Monday at the Detroit Auto Show, unveiling a host of choices from luxurious to utilitarian, while also beefing up the humble sedan.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredRoughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological pro
7h
Big Think
Top Vets Reject Homeopathic Treatment for Animals as Primary CareThe Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons issued a statement to remind its members of their fundamental obligation to science-based medicine and animal welfare. Read More
7h
Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Le Sudoku français est arrivé!The solutions (and hints) for today’s puzzles. In my puzzle blog earlier today , I set you four Garam puzzles. You can see (and print out) the puzzles by clicking on this link . Continue reading...
7h
Viden
SpaceX's genbrugs-rumkapsel bringer rumforsøg hjem til JordenEfter en lille måned hos Den Internationale Rumstation er SpaceX's genbrugte Dragon-rumkapsel vendt tilbage til Jorden.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredRoughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological pro
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected familiesResearchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe -- potentially fatal -- mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother. The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbor mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immunosuppressive cells in newborns play important role in controlling inflammation in early lifeNew research led by The Wistar Institute, in collaboration with Sun Yat-sen University in China, has characterized the transitory presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in mouse and human newborns, revealing a critical role of these cells in regulation of inflammation in the early stages of life.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsA team led by David Mooney at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) is now reporting in Nature Biotechnology a material-based T-cell-expansion method using APC-mimetic biomaterial scaffolds, which helps achieve greater expansion of primary mouse and human T cells than existing methods.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomaterials with 'logic gates' release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersScientists at the University of Washington announced that they have built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system -- known as a hydrogel -- that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its freight only when specific physiological conditions are met.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to University of Chicago scientists. Using a set of gyroscopes linked together, physicists explored the behavior of a material whose structure is arranged randomly, instead of an orderly lattice. They found they could set off one-way ripples around the edges, much like spectators in a sports arena -- a 'topological wave,' chara
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identifiedResearchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Harvard University and the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasisResearchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature has more than one way to make methane, say Utah State University biochemistsUtah State University biochemists, with collaborators from the University of Washington and Montana State University, report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation.
8h
The Atlantic
A New Clue to the Mystery Disease That Once Killed Most of MexicoIn the decades after Hernán Cortés invaded Mexico, one of the worst epidemics in human history swept through the new Spanish colony. A mysterious disease called “cocolitzli” appeared first in 1545 and then again in 1576, each time killing millions of the native population. “From morning to sunset,” wrote a Franciscan friar who witness the epidemic, “the priests did nothing else but carry the dead
8h
Science : NPR
Salmonella May Have Caused Massive Aztec Epidemic, Study FindsThe 16th century epidemic, likely set off or exacerbated by European invaders, was one of the most deadly in human history. New evidence traces it to a type of salmonella that causes a deadly fever. (Image credit: Alexandre Meneghini/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
500 years later, scientists finger germ behind Mexican 'pestilence'In 1545, disaster struck Mexico's Aztec nation when people started coming down with high fevers and headaches, bleeding from the eyes, mouth and nose. Death generally followed in three or four days.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to University of Chicago scientists.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature has more than one way to make methane, say biochemistsMethane is a potent greenhouse gas, trapping more solar radiation on Earth than carbon dioxide. It's also the primary component of natural gas, a critical fuel source for heating and other uses. For these reasons and more, scientists are keenly interested in how the gas is made.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers program biomaterials with 'logic gates' that release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersDrug treatments can save lives, but sometimes they also carry unintended costs. After all, the same therapeutics that target pathogens and tumors can also harm healthy cells.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsImmunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenting cell (APC) to expand their numbers and stay alive. Adoptive cell transfer procedures are mimicking exactly
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredAn unexpected source of methane in the environment has been inadvertently discovered.
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The Atlantic
Hawaii and the Horror of Human ErrorThe Cold War came to an end, somehow, without any of the world’s tens of thousands of nuclear warheads being fired. But there were decades-worth of close calls, high alerts, and simple mistakes that inched world leaders shockingly close to catastrophe. Saturday’s terrifying, 38-minute episode in Hawaii will not go down as one of those close calls: Residents of the state waited for the bombs to fa
8h
Ingeniøren
Kinesisk rakettrin styrter og eksploderer nær landsbyEt booster-raket fra den kinesiske Long March 3B eksploderede nær en landsby, da den faldt til jorden efter brug.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
School climate and diversity may affect students’ delinquent behaviorsIn a new study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students’ delinquent behaviors.
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Viden
VIDEO: Rumteleskop har ligget på is i månedsvisNASAs kommende rumobservatorie, James Webb-teleskopet, har tilbragt ni måneder i en gigantisk dybfryser. Nu tøes det op.
9h
Live Science
Photos: This Dinosaur's Feathers Shimmered with IridescenceDuring the Jurassic period, about 161 million years ago, a duck-size dinosaur dazzled its fellow paleo-beasts with its rainbow-colored, iridescent feathers.
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Live Science
Little 'Rainbow' Dinosaur Discovered by Farmer in ChinaThis is the oldest iridescent dinosaur on record.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Tech Troubles Behind Hawaii’s False Missile Alert
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Ingeniøren
Ny metode kan afsløre ulovlige droneoptagelserNu bliver det muligt at afsløre, om en drone faktisk optager video, når den flyver over et hus eller et andet objekt. Det viser nyt studie fra Ben Gurion Universitetet i Israel.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Honda, Volvo, Ford scoop awards at Detroit auto showThe Detroit auto show handed out its self-proclaimed "Oscars of the auto industry" on Monday, rewarding Honda, Volvo and Ford amid a crowded slate of new truck, SUV and crossover unveilings.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German startup AUTO1 gets $558 million Softbank investmentJapan's Softbank is investing 460 million euros ($558 million) in German used car trading platform AUTO1.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France wants tougher rules on bitcoin to avoid criminal useFrance's finance minister says he wants new regulation targeted at virtual currencies, to stop them from being used for tax evasion, financing terrorism and other crime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data sourceThe next phase in data collection is right under your feet.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Underskriftindsamling fortsætterIndsamling af underskrifter med mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed udvides fra Facebook-grupper til også at omfatte underskrifter via nyoprettet hjemmeside, og har nu rundet 6.000 underskrifter fra læger.
9h
Feed: All Latest
6 GoPro Tips For Skiing and Snowboarding ShotsGet great results from your GoPro or other action cam as you capture your snowy heroics ... and your legendary bails.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Researchers Race to Devise a Roadside Test for Driving While HighCould a sensor-studded brain cap pick up signs of impairment? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
AI Beats Humans at a Reading Comprehension, But It Still Doesn’t Truly Comprehend Language
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Commonalities in brains of people with Huntington's disease and Parkinson's diseaseA new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New source of world’s deadliest toxin discoveredResearchers have identified genes encoding a previously undiscovered version of the botulinum neurotoxin in bacteria from a cow’s gut.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA calculated heavy rainfall leading to California mudslidesWinter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on Jan. 9. NASA calculated the amount of rain fall between Jan. 8 and 10, 2018 and calculated the potential for landslides.
9h
Popular Science
How to keep your iPhone but switch to Google or Microsoft appsDIY Your guide to a new software ecosystem. Apple may want you to use its own iPhone apps. But Google and Microsoft make excellent iOS apps too. Here's how they can replace Apple's software ecosystem.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artisanal allure of Lamborghini marvels of modernityThe Lamborghini factory in Sant'Agata Bolognese feels like an Aladdin's Cave of luxury Italian cars—a winning mix of modernity and craftsmanship which saw the company celebrate record production levels last year.
10h
Viden
Ud med nyheder: Facebook-ændring stikker medier en lussingIndhold fra familie og venner opprioriteres. Medier og reklamer vil omvendt tabe eksponering, vurderer iagttagere.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Digital strategi skal styrke vidensdeling i sundhedssektorenSundhedsministeriet har mandag lanceret en ny strategi for digital sundhed, der skal sikre sammenhæng i sundhedsvæsenet. Optimering af it-systemer på sundhedsområdet er nødvendig, mener Lægeforeningen.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Progressive eugenics is hardly history – the science and politics have just evolvedEugenics has been science's toxic brand since the end of World War II. The point was driven home yet again recently when Toby Young, appointee to the UK's newly established Office of Students, was denounced in the House of Commons for having written favourably of "progressive eugenics". Young resigned from the post the following day amid complaints about a series of other tweets and comments made
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youthOver half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
10h
Ingeniøren
Mystikken breder sig efter hemmeligholdt, mislykket satellitopsendelseAmerikanske politikerne spørger til, hvad der gik galt for nylig under den militært klassificerede opsendelse af en satellit.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How we created a mini 'gamma ray burst' in the lab for the first timeGamma ray bursts, intense explosions of light, are the brightest events ever observed in the universe – lasting no longer than seconds or minutes. Some are so luminous that they can be observed with the naked eye, such as the burst "GRB 080319B" discovered by NASA's Swift GRB Explorer mission on March 19, 2008.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infrared photometric observations reveal insights into the nature of the dwarf nova V2051 OphiuchiBrazilian astronomers have performed photometric observations of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph during its quiescent period, which revealed important insights into the nature of this object. The results were presented in a paper published January 4 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's dystopian social credit system is a harbinger of the global age of the algorithmThe Chinese government's ongoing attempts to create a social credit system aimed at rating the trustworthiness of people and companies have generated equal measures of fascination and anxiety around the world. Social credit is depicted as something uniquely Chinese – a nefarious and perverse digital innovation that could only be conceived of and carried out by a regime like the Chinese Communist P
10h
The Atlantic
Five Decades of White BacklashOn April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated. In response, a week later President Lyndon B. Johnson scrambled to sign into law the Fair Housing Act, a final major civil-rights bill that had languished for years under the strain of white backlash to the civil-rights movement . Five years later a New York developer and his son—then only a few years out of college—became two of the fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why Instagram might be affecting your mental health (and what you can do about it)New research out of Notre Dame is digging into why social media isn't always good for us, especially if you're young and female.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Britain's Next Megaproject: A Coast-to-Coast Forest50 million new trees will repopulate one of the least wooded parts of the country—and offer a natural escape from several cities in the north.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Kylo's Shirtless Look Is a Problem for Star Wars CosplayersHigh-waisted tights are much harder to find than you might think.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Are Taking Extreme Steps to Help Corals SurviveScientists are urgently transplanting, fertilizing and enhancing corals to help them adapt to warmer oceans, but rebuilding entire reefs will be daunting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU tasks experts to find ways to fight fake newsThe European Union has set up an expert group to help identify fake news and propose ways to tackle the problem amid concern that false information is influencing elections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers measure single atoms in a graphene 'petri-dish'Researchers working at The University of Manchester have shown new possibilities for observing nanomaterials in liquids by creating a graphene 'petri-dish'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe's lost forests – study shows coverage has halved over six millenniaMore than half of Europe's forests have disappeared over the past 6,000 years thanks to increasing demand for agricultural land and the use of wood as a source of fuel, new research led by the University of Plymouth suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A brief history of fitness technologyHave you recently taken ownership of a shiny new activity tracking device? For many people, the essential fitness kit now includes gadgets designed not for sitting and staring at a screen, but for encouraging users to get up and move.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A matter of mobility: multidisciplinary paper suggests new strategy for drug discoveryA joint industry/academia study of a cancer target protein reveals unusual relation between binding site flexibility and drug-target lifetime. The results, published in Nature Communications, suggest a new strategy for drug discovery. The research was done in the framework of the Kinetics for Drug Discovery K4DD consortium, supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New record at ultracold neutron source in MainzSome 10 years ago, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) entered a new field of research by starting to generate ultracold neutrons (UCN) for use in fundamental research in physics. The participating physicists and chemists now report another major breakthrough. They have been able to increase the UCN yield of their source by a factor of 3.5. This means that the prerequisites are now in place
10h
Dagens Medicin
To forskere får hæderspris fra DiabetesforeningenMarit Eika Jørgensen og Reimar W. Thomsen er blevet hædret med Niels Schwartz Sørensens Prisen 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Luminescent lizardsChameleons are known to communicate with conspecifics by altering their surface coloration. Munich researchers have now found that the bony tubercles on the heads of many species fluoresce under UV light and form impressive patterns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cows exude lots of methane, but taxing beef won't cut emissionsWill taxing meat products based on their carbon footprint reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve public health? The answer is maybe, but not notably —and it will come with significant costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows how Olympic Games affect the stock marketNew research reveals how global sports events such as the Olympic Games can affect stock market activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another chance for the last man hanged in Dundee?A re-examination of the medical evidence which led to the execution of William Bury, the last man hanged in Dundee 129 years ago, will be staged at a public mock trial next month, organised by the University of Dundee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advancing cloud with memory disaggregationHere at IBM Research – Ireland, we are rethinking the very foundations on which the cloud is built. We are developing a concept and prototype for low-power and high-utilization disaggregated cloud data centres that break known boundaries, enabling the dynamic creation of fit-for-purpose computing environments from a pool of disaggregated resources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A black cockatoo's journey back to the wildWould you know what to do if you found a sick or injured black cockatoo?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More research needed for responsible peatland management in IndonesiaIndonesian peatland researchers recently gathered in Bogor, Indonesia, to examine the effectiveness of the latest government regulation on peatlands. We found some shortcomings, one being that the regulation isn't well supported by scientific evidence.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the future of work necessarily glamorous? Digital nomads and 'van life'Digital nomadism continues its steady rise in most western countries. It consists of a mobile lifestyle that encompasses corporate remote workers, freelancers and entrepreneurs. Laptops, smartphones, wi-fi connections, coworking spaces, coffee shops and public libraries are some of the key components of this new work culture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When a country's towns and villages face extinctionIt is predicted that 896 towns and villages across Japan will no longer be viable by 2040 (see map below or an interactive Japanese version here). A former minister for internal affairs, Hiroya Masuda, describes this as "local extinction".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of lemur found on MadagascarA team of researchers with members from the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, Global Wildlife Conservation and the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership has discovered a new species of lemur living in southeastern Madagascar. In their paper published in the journal Primate Conservation, the group describes features of the new species, some of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why it might be time to eradicate sex segregation in sportsIn many areas, gender equality has been improving gradually. But this is not the case in sport, where women continue to be banned for being insufficiently feminine to be permitted to compete.
11h
Ingeniøren
Strid om en tikrone: Forbrugere skal selv tjekke fjernaflæst vandmåler17.000 forbrugere er blevet bedt om at aflæse deres vandmåler manuelt, selvom den kan fjernaflæses digitalt. Problemet er: Hvad koster data nu om dage?
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The Scientist RSS
DOE-Sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Cut 100 More JobsPrevious layoffs affected research areas including climate change and fusion energy.
11h
Big Think
How the Mediterranean Diet Can Help You Live Live Longer and Think BetterNew studies support the benefits of the Mediterrean Diet. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Kew Gardens’ Temperate House to reopen after £41m restorationRare plants among hundreds of specimens being planted in new beds at world’s largest surviving Victorian glasshouse The scrawny trunk and dull leathery spiky leaves of one of the rarest plants in the world will soon be admired in a new light at Kew Gardens, as Encephalartos woodii flourishes again at the north end of the restored Temperate House, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world. As
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Science | The Guardian
Toughen up, senior snowflakes, swearing at work is good for us | André SpicerEvidence suggests that older people are more offended by foul language, but perhaps they should embrace it and find something else to complain about Taking offence has become hobby number one among the young. According to some, today’s teens and twentysomethings are part of generation snowflake . These fragile souls are supposed to find any intrusion into their carefully curated digital universe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What do cold snaps have to do with climate change?A record-shattering cold gripped the Northeastern United States during late December and early January. Meanwhile, a so-called bomb-cyclone brought in Winter Storm Grayson with its blizzard winds and heavy snowfall. Is all of this extreme weather normal, a product of global warming, or perhaps bone-chilling evidence that our climate is not really heating up after all?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How women in media won some pay equality in the 1970s, and why they're still fighting todayBBC China editor Carrie Gracie resigned her position last week in an open letter protesting the BBC's "illegal" gender pay inequality and "the culture of secrecy that helps perpetuate it". The Equalities and Human Rights Commission is investigating Gracie's claims. A BBC spokesperson has responded, saying:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective chargeFor the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists have accidentally found the oldest ever butterfly or moth fossilsButterflies and moths, the Lepidoptera, are among the most beautiful of insects, familiar to almost everyone through thousands of different species from all around the world. But how they evolved has been something of a mystery to scientists because of a surprising lack of Lepidoptera fossils.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The stories behind Aboriginal star names now recognised by the world's astronomical bodyFour stars in the night sky have been formally recognised by their Australian Aboriginal names.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soft material inspired by grasshoppers for better electrode adhesiveResearchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new type of health-monitoring electrode that exhibits optimum adhesion to skin and can record high quality signals. Two young spin-off founders want to turn it into a marketable product as early as this year.
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New Scientist - News
Copycat justice has turned US counties into execution hotspotsCriminals assigned the death penalty are five times more likely to be executed in some US counties than in others – a trend that some argue is unconstitutional
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New Scientist - News
Science helped cause the opioid crisis – now it must make amendsA US commission recommending how to solve the painkiller addiction killing 175 Americans a day also shows how opinion got in the way of fact to help cause the problem
11h
Feed: All Latest
A Child Abuse Prediction Model Fails Poor FamiliesWhy Pittsburgh’s predictive analytics misdiagnoses child maltreatment and prescribes the wrong solutions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart buildings that can manage our electricity needsResearchers at EPFL have developed a system that can be installed in a building to collect data on people's energy usage. The aim is then to send this data directly to a smart electric grid that will allocate resources optimally.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Hot topicCan a series of scorching summers be blamed on climate change, and what do they tell us?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint for future flexible displaysFlexible ultrahigh resolution displays have benefits for next-generation mobile electronics, such as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices. KAUST has developed a unique transistor architecture that boosts the performance of the display circuitry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enzyme from briny deep resurrected in the labMysterious microbes that thrive in hot and super-salty brine lakes at the bottom of the Red Sea could yield a treasure trove of new enzymes for industrial applications—if only scientists had access to their biological bounty.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A burning ambition for clean fuelFuel combustion chemist Mani Sarathy began his research career as an environmental engineer studying the environmental impact of pollution. But before long, Sarathy realized that the most effective way to mitigate environmental damage was to stop pollution at its source. Sarathy tells us, "I got into combustion research to look at how we could maximize engine efficiency and minimize exhaust emissi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology for diagnosing immunity to EbolaA promising new approach to detect immunity to Ebola virus infection has been developed by researchers from i-sense in a collaboration between UCL and Imperial College London.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light may unlock a new quantum dance for electrons in grapheneA team of researchers has devised a simple way to tune a hallmark quantum effect in graphene—the material formed from a single layer of carbon atoms—by bathing it in light. Their theoretical work, which was published recently in Physical Review Letters , suggests a way to realize novel quantum behavior that was previously predicted but has so far remained inaccessible in experiments.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Huge oil spill left after burning tanker sinks off ChinaFuel from the Sanchi has spread over more than 100 sq km and could badly damage marine life.
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Science | The Guardian
Don't knock the flu jab – it’s a modern miracleAs the flu season begins to ramp up, so too do the annual complaints about the vaccine “ The flu jab DOESN’T work, officials admit ,” scolded a recent headline from the Daily Mail . Meanwhile, in the comments under that article, and in shadier regions of the internet, conspiracy theorists are having their usual annual field day: the flu vaccine actually makes people sick; the World Health Organis
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Feed: All Latest
Don’t Blame Social Media for the "Oprah For President" Talk—Blame Everyone.Mass disdain for the political system makes it easy for anyone with a social network to launch themselves into politics.
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Feed: All Latest
Texas Instruments' New Headlights Dazzle With a Million PixelsToo bad federal regulations won't allow the cool tech on American roads.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Tiny scales in ancient lagoon may be the first fossil evidence of the moth-butterfly lineFancy liquid-sipper mouthparts might have evolved before the great burst of flower evolution
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Science : NPR
Oregon Artist Turns Dead Creatures Into Beautiful CompositionsChristopher Marley only uses specimens that have died from natural causes or been caught as fishing bycatch. Then he freeze-dries them, which is why they seem so alive in his artwork. (Image credit: Christopher Marley Studio)
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The Atlantic
The Trump Protest-Song Boom, in the Eye of HistoryThe first anniversary of Donald Trump’s presidency is also the first anniversary of a landmark weekend for art and politics. Trump’s inauguration festivities brought Toby Keith and 3 Doors Down to the National Mall—amid rumors that bigger performers had turned down invitations. Then came the Women’s March, in which pink-hatted protestors sang taunts at the new president, activists and pop stars s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK's Guardian daily goes tabloid to cut costsBritain's Guardian newspaper has adopted a new tabloid format and a re-designed masthead with simple black lettering from Monday as part of a drive to cut costs.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeking music edge, Apple buys song recognition app ShazamApple said Monday that it would buy leading song recognition app Shazam in a fresh bid to secure an edge in the intensifying battle of streaming services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change alters plant growthGlobal warming affects more than just plant biodiversity—it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plant growth. In Current Biology, the group presents its latest findings on the mechanism controlling growth a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists observe particles acting coherently as they undergo phase transitionsThe common link between liquid-crystal TVs and the birth of the universe, when you look at the big picture, is that they are both characterized by the intriguing phenomenon in which matter abruptly changes states.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Jupiter's colorful cloud beltsColorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter's southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists unravel mystery of stable fullerenesScientists at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have explained the stability of nitrogen-doped fullerenes, which makes their industrial production and application easier. The article was published in Physica E: Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, the ERC remOcean project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d"Océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots: biogeochemical profiling floats, the first robots able to collect data in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sanchi oil spill contamination could take three months to reach mainlandWater contaminated by the oil currently leaking into the ocean from the Sanchi tanker collision is likely to take at least three months to reach land, and if it does the Korean coast is the most likely location. However, the oil's fate is highly uncertain, as it may burn, evaporate, or mix into the surface ocean and contaminate the environment for an extended duration.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Alexa, What Are You Doing with My Family's Personal Info?Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant and several smart-home technologies that debuted at last week’s CES add convenience but also raise privacy concerns -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochemists show how evolution combines a nutrient sensor from existing elementsA team led by the Freiburg biochemist Prof. Dr. Susana Andrade has characterized a protein that enables certain microorganisms to recognize and absorb ammonium in their environment. Ammonium is considered a toxin that pollutes ecosystems—but for these bacteria it represents an important nutrient and energy source. The researchers have published their findings in the scientific journal Nature Commu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subtle changes in chemical structure can affect drug toxicityNUS pharmaceutical scientists have discovered the mechanisms involved when small chemical modifications to certain pharmaceutical drugs may cause harm instead of improving treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesConjugated tetraenes are important key substructures in electronic materials, natural products and pharmaceutical molecules. However, they are difficult to synthesize. They are conventionally prepared by repetitions of the stoichiometric reactions using phosphorus reagents and subsequent reduction and partial oxidation. For making one C=C double bond, one needs to conduct 3 step reactions by this
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future weather forecasting—it's all in the 'MRI' of cloudsAnalyzing and determining the structure of clouds remains a challenge for scientists trying to forecast weather. A team of researchers at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), led by Professor Pavlos Kollias, is using news types or radar in combination with current meteorology technology to take an "MRI" of clouds. In the same way an MRI and other imaging te
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Floating on air' after surgeons remove 19kg tumourWatch surgeons as they remove a 19.5kg tumour from a woman's body.
13h
The Scientist RSS
Californias Owls Being Exposed to Rat PoisonResearchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state's 50,000 or so marijuana farms.
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The Atlantic
Can Government Officials Have You Arrested for Speaking to Them?If a citizen speaks at a public meeting and says something a politician doesn’t like, can the citizen be arrested, cuffed, and carted off to the hoosegow? Suppose that, during this fraught encounter, the citizen violates some law—even by accident, even one no one has ever heard of, even one dug up after the fact—does that make her arrest constitutional? Deyshia Hargrave, meet Fane Lozman. You nee
13h
The Atlantic
How the Tet Offensive Undermined American Faith in GovernmentWhen Americans wince upon hearing presidents make proclamations about foreign policy, the legacy of the 1968 Tet Offensive looms large. On January 30, at the start of the sacred Vietnamese holiday of Tet, which celebrated the start of the new lunar year, the North Vietnamese and the Vietcong launched a massive military offensive that proved the battle raging in Southeast Asia was far from over, a
13h
Ingeniøren
OL-ingeniør: Sådan sniger du toptræning ind i en hektisk hverdagJob, familie, OL. Tre krævende ting i livet, som civilingeniør og langrendsløber ved OL i Sydkorea Martin Møller skal få til at spille.
13h
Ingeniøren
Undervisningsminister: Ingen ordentlige retningslinjer for brug af data om børnMerete Riisager vurderer, at der mangler dataetiske principper, efter kommuner har brugt trivselsdata om børn og unge til sagsbehandling.
13h
Ingeniøren
Smart grid-system skal udnytte Samsøs vedvarende energiHvis Samsø skal udnytte den egenproducerede vedvarende energi til fulde, er det nødvendigt at gentænke måden, den distribueres på.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turkey unveils route of 45 km 'Istanbul Canal'The Turkish government on Monday unveiled the route of its planned new canal for Istanbul, a hugely ambitious 45 kilometre (28 mile) project designed to be its answer to the famed artificial shipping lanes in Panama or Egypt's Suez.
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Psykiske arbejdsskader rammer hårdere end fysiskeMedarbejdere, der får stress eller andre psykiske lidelser på jobbet, står langt ringere...
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying species via environmental DNAEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationIn a new commentary in the journal Nature Climate Change, IIASA researchers argue that a broader range of scenarios is needed to support international policymakers in limiting climate change to under 2°C above pre-industrial levels, and to avoid potential negative environmental and social consequences of carbon dioxide removal on a massive scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists found excitons in nickel oxide for the first timeRussian scientists from Ural Federal University (UrFU), together with their colleagues from Institute of Metal Physics of the Ural Department of Russian Academy of Sciences, have studied fundamental characteristics of nickel oxide nanocrystals and found excitons on the light absorption edge for the first time. An exciton is an electron-hole pair bound with electrostatic coupling that migrates in a
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frequent growth events and fast growth rates of fine aerosol particles in BeijingSerious environmental problems have arisen alongside the rapid economic development of China, including the well-known issue of haze pollution. Not only does haze bring low atmospheric visibility, causing traffic-related problems, but it can also damage human health, and affect other aspects of the weather and climate, directly or indirectly. Secondary aerosol formation and rapid increases in aero
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maintaining canola oil qualityCanola and other edible oils are easily affected by light irradiation or heat treatment. Since such processes deteriorate the oil quality, affecting flavor, understanding this oxidation process is imperative to identify effective quality control measures, such as the best way to package or store oil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Renault posts record year for car salesRenault sold a record number of cars last year, the French carmaker said Monday, with global unit sales reaching 3.76 million, a rise of 8.5 percent over 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's fifth largest diamond discovered in LesothoA diamond thought to be the fifth largest of gem quality ever found has been discovered in Lesotho, miner Gem Diamonds said Monday, and could be worth as much as $40 million.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feinstein Institute discovers genes that repair spinal cord in fish are also in humansNorthwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Associate Professor Ona E. Bloom, PhD, along with colleagues at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), published today in Scientific Reports that many of the genes that repair an injured spinal cord in a fish called the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes that aid spinal cord healing in lamprey also present in humans, MBL team discoversMany of the genes involved in natural repair of the injured spinal cord of the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, according to a study by a collaborative group of scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and other institutions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New application for acoustics helps estimate marine life populationsResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego were part of an international team that for the first time used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, an ERC project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year. Using these unparalleled data, the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use hydroacoustics to find abundance of marine life in reserve is 4 times greater than in surrounding watersResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego were part of an international team that for the first time used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
14h
Dagens Medicin
Læge bliver løsgænger i regionsrådMarianne Mørk Mathiesen melder sig ud af Liberal Alliance i protest
14h
Science : NPR
For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than ProofSequencing the DNA of cancer tumors to help pinpoint treatment is an emerging element of precision medicine. While patients and doctors alike want these tests, they often don't benefit patients. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)
14h
Dagens Medicin
Nytænkning som løftestang for diabetes og folkesundhedenDer opstod en ny model, da en erhvervsdrivende fond og det offentlige sundhedsvæsen for et år siden etablerede den store satsning Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Men kan en satsning på et enkelt område virkelig være til gavn for alle? Min påstand er ja!
15h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens batteri kan være lavet af vand og saltMed en øgning af spændingen i en battericelle til 2,6 volt kan vand og salt være et bud på fremtidens elektrolyt til stationære anvendelser.
15h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rekordmange ledige stillinger for ingeniører og naturvidenskaberePå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Earworm melodies with strange aspects' – what happens when AI makes musicThe first full-length mainstream music album co-written with the help of artificial intelligence (AI) was released on 12 January and experts believe that the science behind it could lead to a whole new style of music composition.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lava flowing from Philippine volcano, thousands evacuatedMore than 9,000 people have evacuated the area around the Philippines' most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus overtakes Boeing, says could halt A380 programme (Update)European aerospace giant Airbus overtook arch-rival Boeing in terms of aircraft orders last year, but warned that it could cease making its A380 jet if it does not receive any more orders for the supersize plane.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid tax and trade concerns, Detroit auto show offers nostalgia, glamorThe Detroit auto show arrived Sunday with showman's flair, as the car industry tied its latest offerings to American nostalgia and Hollywood glamor.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's SoftBank Group soars on listing reportsShares in Japan's SoftBank Group soared six percent Monday on reports it could list its mobile unit, raising up to $18 billion in one of the country's biggest public offerings.
17h
Ingeniøren
Sundhedsplatformen sender ikke-anonymiserede sundhedsdata til USAVi har brug for en forventningsafstemning om, hvordan man håndterer sundhedsdata, mener formand for Patientdataforeningen.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Le Sudoku français est arrivé!Savour a new puzzle from across the Channel Bonjour guzzleurs! Today’s puzzle comes from France. It is called Garam, and provides some spice for the brain.... Continue reading...
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen reports record global car sales in 2017Volkswagen said Sunday that its namesake brand sold more vehicles worldwide in 2017 than ever before, a sign it is recovering from a bruising emissions-cheating scandal three years ago.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First method to detect illicit drone filming developedThe first technique to detect a drone camera illicitly capturing video is revealed in a new study published by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Weizmann Institute of Science cyber security researchers. The study addresses increasing concerns about the proliferation of drone use for personal and business applications and how it is impinging on privacy and safety.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Psychotherapist Philippa Perry's guide to resilience in the workplaceWant to be less stressed in 2018? The author and broadcaster advises on how to deal with difficult times at work Your strength is not in your resilience, it is in recognising and owning your vulnerability. We need to be ourselves with other people for most of the time, not just the person we feel we ought to be. If you are in a business environment where everyone seems to be wearing a “game-face”
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to 'carefully' review GM request on autonomous car: ChaoRegulators will "carefully and responsibly" review General Motors' request to test an autonomous car without a steering wheel, US Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said Sunday.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch millers get fresh wind in their sailsAn icy wind blows the windmill's soaring sails, turning them quickly and cranking the large stone wheels inside in a time-honoured method of grinding grain.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Gene editing – and what it really means to rewrite the code of lifeWe now have a precise way to correct, replace or even delete faulty DNA. Ian Sample explains the science, the risks and what the future may hold So what is gene editing? Scientists liken it to the find and replace feature used to correct misspellings in documents written on a computer. Instead of fixing words, gene editing rewrites DNA, the biological code that makes up the instruction manuals of
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesTUAT researchers have achieved the new synthetic route of conjugated tetraenes from inexpensive and easily available 1,3-butadiene and substituted acetylenes by a one-pot approach under mild conditions. This is the most straightforward synthetic method ever reported. This new method has been published in the ACS journal, Organometallics.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The presence of sexual violence in neighborhoods erodes feelings of safetyFeelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighborhood are significantly tied to women's -- but not men's -- perceptions of its safety, according to new research.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts seek to standardize treatments for childhood rheumatic diseasesPediatric rheumatic diseases are a varied group of rare diseases including juvenile forms of arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. Currently, there is considerable variability in how patients with these diseases are treated in clinical practice, making it difficult to understand which therapies work best.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An emergency response to Canada's opioid overdose crisisTo help address the opioid overdose epidemic, Canada should develop a regulated program to distribute opioids and prevent deaths, argues a commentary in CMAJ.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depressionThe common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of depression, according to an analysis in CMAJ.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens who were severely bullied as children at higher risk of suicidal thoughts, mental health issueTeens who were severely bullied as children by peers are at higher risk of mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviours, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First method to detect illicit drone filming developed'The beauty of this research is that someone using only a laptop and an object that flickers can detect if someone is using a drone to spy on them,' says Ben Nassi, a Ph.D. student in the BGU Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering and a researcher at the BGU Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC). 'While it has been possible to detect a drone, now someone can also tell if it is
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sanchi oil spill contamination could take three months to reach mainlandWater contaminated by the oil currently leaking into the ocean from the Sanchi tanker collision is likely to take at least three months to reach land, and if it does the Korean coast is the most likely location. However, the oil's fate is highly uncertain, as it may burn, evaporate, or mix into the surface ocean and contaminate the environment for an extended duration.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aerial vehicle flying freely with independently controlled main wingsProfessor Dongsoo Har and his team in Cho Chun Shik Graduate School of Green Transportation in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) lately developed an aerial vehicle that is able to control the main wings separately and independently.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel real-time undersea wireless communications and surveillance technologyResearchers will design, deploy and evaluate a first-of-its-kind software-defined testbed for real-time undersea wireless communications (data, voice, and video streaming) and surveillance.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Estrogen-mimicking compounds in foods may reduce effectiveness of breast cancer treatmentA new study suggests breast cancer patients taking palbociclib/letrozole combination therapy should avoid foods rich in xenoestrogens.
20h
Ingeniøren
Barsel: Fem regler, du bør kendeHusk alle de vigtige detaljer, når du skal søge barsel. Jobfinder giver en guide til ansatte i det offentlige, medarbejdere i det private og studerende under uddannelse.
20h
Ingeniøren
DSB forsøgte at ændre Rigsrevisionens kritik af IC4-arbejdetDSB forsøgte flere gange at påvirke konklusionen i Rigsrevisionens beretning om forløbet med IC4, viser aktindsigt.
20h
The Atlantic
The Humiliation of Aziz AnsariAziz Ansari MisconductSexual mores in the West have changed so rapidly over the past 100 years that by the time you reach 50, intimate accounts of commonplace sexual events of the young seem like science fiction: You understand the vocabulary and the sentence structure, but all of the events take place in outer space. You’re just too old. This was my experience reading the account of one young woman’s alleged sexual e
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NHS bowel scope uptake boosted by a fifth when patients sent reassuring remindersBowel scope screening increased by more than a fifth (21.5 percent) when people were sent additional reminders with a leaflet that addressed common concerns, according to a new study funded by Cancer Research UK.
1d
Futurity.org
The Milky Way ate 11 other galaxiesAstronomers have discovered 11 new stellar streams—remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way. The finding is among the highlights of the first three years of survey data from the Dark Energy Survey —research on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies as well as stars in our own galaxy. This image shows the entire Dark Energy Survey field of v
1d
Science-Based Medicine
The final push to pass a federal version of the cruel sham of “right-to-try” is under wayRight-to-try laws are a cruel sham that claim to help terminally ill patients by providing them with earlier access to experimental therapeutics, even though they do very little in this regard. Promoted primarily by the libertarian think tank the Goldwater Institute, in reality they are a strategy to weaken the FDA's regulatory power to assure that marketed drugs are safe and effective. Now, a fin
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Futurity.org
Making these nanotube fibers by hand is actually fasterA new method to quickly produce fibers from carbon nanotubes is both handmade and high tech. The method allows researchers to make short lengths of strong, conductive fibers from small samples of bulk nanotubes in about an hour. In 2013, Rice University chemist Matteo Pasquali found a way to spin full spools of thread-like nanotube fibers for aerospace, automotive, medical, and smart-clothing app
1d
Futurity.org
Watch: Drones give closer view of active volcanoWith the help of drones, researchers are investigating an active Nicaraguan volcano that could pose a hazard to millions of people. Masaya volcano is located in an active volcanic and seismic zone and is nearby Managua, Nicaragua’s capital. The researchers are using many methods, including drones, to study how the volcano and surrounding earth are changing over time. The drones are able to captur
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Futurity.org
Marijuana farms are poisoning spotted owlsNorthern spotted owls and other wildlife are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, and illegal marijuana farms are the most likely source point, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 7 of 10 northern spotted owls collected tested positive for rat poison—as did 40 percent of 84 barred owls. The study is the first published account of anticoagulant rodenticide i
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electronic modulation of carotid sinus nerve can be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes in ratsThe team lead by Sílvia Vilares Conde, from CEDOC-NOVA Medical School, in collaboration with the pharmaceutical company Galvani Bioelectronics, demonstrated through findings in rats that is possible to restore insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, by modulating electrically the carotid sinus nerve, the sensitive nerve that connects the carotid body with the brain.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Tickle Is Out Of Jail And Ready To Straighten Up And Fly Right | Moonshiners#Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Tim and JT take Tickle out for his first meal as a free man in nearly a year. Will he be able to stay out of trouble? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https://t
1d

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Big Think
Hints of the 4th Dimension Have Been Detected by PhysicistsWhat would it be like to experience the 4 th dimension? Read More
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cryptocurrency rivals snap at Bitcoin's heelsBitcoin may be the most famous cryptocurrency but, despite a dizzying rise, it's not the most lucrative one and far from alone in a universe that counts 1,400 rivals, and counting.
3h
Ingeniøren
Storebæltsbroen holder formen med robotter og wearablesFygende saltvand, bremsende lastbiler og blød bund får hele tiden Storebæltsbroen til at bevæge sig. Det slider på den 20-årige dame, der nu går digitaliseringens vej for at holde sig ung.
10h

LATEST

New Scientist - News
Surfers may be swallowing bacteria and spreading it to othersSurfers seem to swallow more antibiotic resistant bacteria from polluted water than swimmers. They may also be spreading it to vulnerable people they know
2min
Science | The Guardian
Starwatch: Mars and Jupiter reward early risersThe two planets appear close together this week and are conspicuous in the pre-dawn sky in the constellation Libra A pair of bright planets reward early risers this week. Mars and Jupiter are close together in the constellation Libra. Despite being more than three times closer to Earth, Mars will appear dimmer than Jupiter. This is because Jupiter is 21 times the diameter of Mars, and possesses b
13min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detroit auto show begins amid talk of NAFTA, tax cutsThe Detroit Auto Show shifted into full gear Sunday with international trade and tax cuts dominating the conversation, even as an optimistic industry raced to meet Americans' seemingly insatiable appetite for trucks and SUVs.
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippines' Mayon volcano alert raised as eruption fearedThe Philippines raised the alert level for the country's most active volcano twice in 24 hours Sunday, meaning that a hazardous eruption is possible within days.
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous cars: Still many questions to answerAutonomous driving is generating talk at this year's Detroit Auto Show after being a star at last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
25min
Big Think
From Ho Chi Minh Street to Boris Nemtsov Plaza: a History of the Undiplomatic Street Name ChangeStreet names can cause diplomatic offence - and sometimes, that's exactly why they're there. Read More
44min
Scientific American Content: Global
Roots of Unity Turns 5Happy birthday, dear blog! -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
50min
Science | The Guardian
Milkshake ​​duck announced as Macquarie Dictionary’s word of the yearRacist milkshake drinking duck has come to define a particular thread of the internet’s collective fickleness Finally, justice for milkshake duck. The racist milkshake drinking duck which has come to define a particular thread of the internet’s collective fickleness was announced as the Macquarie Dictionary’s word of the year for 2017 on Monday. Continue reading...
2h
The Atlantic
Pandemonium and Rage in HawaiiWhy would my 22-year-old brother be calling so early on a Saturday morning? I’d ignored the first call. But the second time the phone rang, I picked it up. He was panicking, his voice trembling uncharacteristically: He’d just received the emergency alert warning of a ballistic missile that was heading for Hawaii, where I’m from, and where he and my family still live. “THIS IS NOT A DRILL,” the al
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin fever hits US real estate marketBitcoin fever has hit the US real estate market, especially that of Florida, offering foreign investors a way to dodge currency controls at home and US economic sanctions.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
C&A fashion chain eyes sale to Chinese investorsThe billionaire family that owns Dutch clothing retailer C&A is on the brink of selling the chain to Chinese investors, a German media report said Sunday.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detroit Auto Show opens on SundayThe Detroit Auto Show kicks off Sunday, with pickup trucks and SUVs expected to take center stage in a sign of their growing might in the US car market.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippine volcano rumbles back to life, thousands evacuatedThe Philippines' most active volcano rumbled back to life Sunday with lava rising to its crater in a gentle eruption that has prompted authorities to evacuate thousands of villagers.
3h
The Atlantic
Saturday Night Live Takes a Swipe at Celebrity JournalismSaturday Night Live has so far struggled to produce memorable comedy about the Harvey Weinstein scandal and the #MeToo movement. The ongoing revelations about sexual assault and institutional misogyny in Hollywood have proven too much of a moving target for the show, which has seemed a little creatively adrift overall after its big ratings comeback during the 2016 election. But Saturday night’s e
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in gutsScientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment.The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were colo
3h
Popular Science
Remember those 'spot the difference' games? Here’s why your brain is so bad at them.Head Trip They entertained you for entire minutes at the dentist's office. When we view something, we notice big features and fail to zero in on less important details.
4h
Big Think
U.S. Government Has a Top-Secret Airline That Flies to Area 51 and It's HiringA top-secret government airline that flies to locations like Area 51 is put in a spotlight by a recent ad and an unexpected connection to the Las Vegas shooting. Read More
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Paleo Profile: The Bryant's SharkDistinctive teeth mark the discovery of a new prehistoric shark species. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Big Think
4 Ways How Blockchain, the Technology Behind Bitcoin, Can Transform EducationA new study highlights how blockchain technology can be a game-changer in education. Read More
5h
Big Think
Does the Story of Adam & Eve Work Scientifically?How much genetic diversity is actually needed to keep a population healthy? Read More
5h
The Atlantic
Low-Wage Workers Finally Get a RaiseThe labor market is near full employment . The jobless rate is low. The economy is adding tens of thousands of jobs each month, and—at last—wages and earnings are increasing for workers at or just above the minimum wage. Indeed, Walmart on Thursday announced that it would provide a wage hike to and expand benefits for employees across the country, with 85,000 workers with two decades of seniority
6h
Live Science
Wild 360-Degree Video Lets You See the Milky Way As a Giant Black Hole WouldA new 360-degree simulation that uses data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory is helping astronomers better understand more than 22 stellar giants found at the center of the Milky Way galaxy.
6h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Eftersøgningen af MH370 genoptagesSpecialskib lastet med otte højteknologiske undervandsdroner med avanceret sonar ligger klar til at undersøge havbunden i hidtil usete detaljer efter det forsvundne fly.
6h
Feed: All Latest
How Dirt Could Save Us From Antibiotic-Resistant SuperbugsOne chemist thinks he’s found a way for us to outrun the lethal juggernaut of antibiotic resistance.
6h
Feed: All Latest
How Gore-Tex Went From Accident to Outdoor EssentialGore-Tex, the waterproof material in your favorite jacket—and boots and ski pants—was born by accident.
6h
The Atlantic
'I Think People Have to Find Ways to Send a Message'Representative John Lewis, the Georgia Democrat who was one of the key leaders of the civil-rights movement before his election to Congress, announced Friday that he would skip President Donald Trump’s State of the Union Address, to be delivered by the president on January 30. “We cannot let someone go around insulting our brothers and sisters from another part of the world,” Lewis told me. “If t
7h
Feed: All Latest
Trump's 'Shithole Countries' Comment Tops This Week's Internet NewsThere was no way social media was going to let the president’s comments go uncommented upon.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Readers Respond to the September 2017 IssueLetters to the editor from the September 2017 issue of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Mohamed Omar's Favorite TheoremThe Harvey Mudd math professor tells us what dessert pairs best with Burnside’s Lemma -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Science : NPR
Making The Case That Discrimination Is Bad For Your HealthThe researcher who coined the term "weathering" talks with Gene Demby about health, hard data, and why it took so long for people to come around to the idea that discrimination hurts bodies. (Image credit: Becky Harlan/NPR)
8h
Viden
SPIL Kvalt, mast og brændt: 24 måder at dø i rummetForholdene i vores solsystem er ekstreme. Vi har sendt Andreas Mogensen ud i rummet, så du kan teste, hvordan hans krop reagerer på de ekstreme påvirkninger.
8h
Feed: All Latest
The 'Doublespeak' of Responsible EncryptionIt's a new name for an old argument: that public agencies fighting crime and terrorism must have access to our private communications—for our own good.
8h
Ingeniøren
Film og tv i 2018: Verden er smadret – hvad gør vi nu?Hvilke trækplastre for teknisk interesserede (med hang til katastrofer) byder biograferne og tv på i 2018? Her er to film med hver sin vinkel på, hvad der følger i en verden, som er ødelagt af krig eller klimaforandringer. Og så er der også masser af muligheder hos streamingtjenesterne.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Kritisk læge afviser at mødes med styrelseProtest mod den strammere kurs fra Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har søndag middag fået opbakning fra 4.950 læger via lukket gruppe på Facebook.
9h
Viden
Kig op! 2018 byder på 8 spektakulære begivenheder i solsystemetI løbet af året byder solsystemet på både måneformørkelser, massive meteorsværme og en billedskøn blodmåne. Her er din astronomiske kalender for 2018.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Why an Old Theory of Everything Is Gaining New LifeFor decades, physicists have struggled to create a quantum theory of gravity. Now an approach that dates to the 1970s is attracting newfound attention.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Boeing's Skunk Works Cargo Drone Is a Heavy LifterEventually, it should be able to fly as far as 20 miles, carrying 500 pounds )or 400 large Domino's pizzas.
9h
The Atlantic
Diet Coke's Moment of PanicWith sales of Diet Coke in a prolonged rut, Coca-Cola announced last Wednesday that it is tweaking the design of its most famous zero-calorie soft-drink can to be more slender and colorful. It is also launching several new flavors of Diet Coke, including “Feisty Cherry,” “Twisted Mango,” and “Zesty Blood Orange.” "You don’t mess with a good thing," Coca-Cola said in its statement. But, quite to t
9h
Viden
Sexuel frigørelse og prævention: Få den lille pilles lange historieDu har selvfølgelig hørt om p-piller. Men ved du egentlig hvad, det lille "p" er en forkortelse for?
10h
The Atlantic
A Perfectly Postmodern White House BookThe reviews of Fire and Fury are in, and they are pretty furious themselves. Michael Wolff, author of the best-selling expose of the Trump White House, has been accused of every kind of journalistic malfeasance: reconstructing scenes he couldn’t have witnessed, retelling gossip as if it were gospel, letting his sources’ agendas drive his portrayals. President Trump himself has attacked the book a
10h
The Atlantic
Instead of Work Requirements, Why Not a Jobs Guarantee?The Trump administration has been signaling for months that it plans to implement conservative reforms to core federal welfare programs, including by allowing states to have work requirements for Medicaid. So it was no surprise on Thursday when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued guidance for “state efforts to test incentives that make participation in work or other community en
10h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #35: Forstå euforien omkring bitcoinPodcast: Bitcoin stiger og falder i værdi. Men hvad handler det egentlig om – det der med kryptovaluta?
10h
The Atlantic
Can France's Far-Right Reinvent Itself?Through much of the last two years, the populist far-right seemed poised to conquer France. In the surreal aftermath of Trump and Brexit, the prospect of a victory by Marine Le Pen, the leader of the National Front (FN), felt alarmingly possible. After decades of mounting racism and economic insecurity, Western democracies were lashing out at the ballot box. But today, eight months after the Fren
12h
cognitive science
Adam Smith: Specialization and Neurobiologysubmitted by /u/IdeasInHat [link] [comments]
12h
Ingeniøren
Motorer vinder stadigt større udbredelse i skibePetroleums- og benzinmotorer har store fordele frem for dampmaskinen og vinder indpas både i lystbåde, fiskerbåde og andre skibe. Skibskonstruktør Aage H. Larsen forklarer i Ingeniøren i 1909 om skibsmotoren og dens anvendelse.
12h
Science | The Guardian
How dependent should you and your partner be on each other? Personality quizIf you both have similar ‘differentiation of self’ scores, your relationship may run more smoothly Does absence make the heart grow fonder? Or is it more a case of out of sight, out of mind? Should you and your partner give each other space, or spend every possible moment together? To find out, give the statements below a rating between 1 (not at all true) and 6 (very true), and have your partner
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can early symptoms predict bipolar disorder? Evidence shows differing patterns of risk factorsTwo patterns of antecedent or 'prodromal' psychiatric symptoms may help to identify young persons at increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD), according to a new analysis.
16h
Science | The Guardian
Tiny dinosaur that roamed ‘lost world’ between Australia and Antarctica identifiedFossils found in 113-million-year-old rocks in Victoria lead to discovery of turkey-sized herbivore which lived in rift valley More than 10 years after fossils were discovered sticking out of a rock platform in Victoria’s remote south-west, scientists have identified a new dinosaur that once roamed the “lost world” between Australia and Antarctica. Foot and tail fossils found in 113-million-year-
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How flowering plants conquered the worldScientists solve Darwin's "abominable mystery": How flowers rapidly evolved and spread across the globe.
21h
Big Think
Google's Latest Acquisition? Sound Without SpeakersGiven the premium placed on slender, lightweight mobile technology, the removal of speakers could free up space inside Google devices. No speakers necessary. Read More
21h
Feed: All Latest
How the False Hawaii Missile Warning Could Have HappenedAnd where was the federal government?
22h
Science : NPR
Rescues Continue In California Mudslide ZonesSearch and rescue operations in Southern California continue for people still missing after this week's massive mudslides and debris flow. Many areas are still unreachable in Santa Barbara County.
22h



New Scientist - News
Tiny individual decisions really could help avert climate chaosA new computer model has shown individual decisions can massively influence how bad global warming might get. Time to take the human factor seriously, says Adam Corner
21h
Ingeniøren
Virksomheder holder øje med millioner af menneskers følelser i realtidDet er blevet nemt at holde øje med kunders og vælgeres reaktioner på tværs af sociale medier i realtid. Fænomenet social big data boomer blandt virksomheder, partier, organisationer og forskere.
11h

LATEST

The Atlantic
The Internet Broke Emergency AlertsHawaii Missile AlertIt’s hard to imagine a worse way to be awoken on a Saturday morning in paradise than with a blaring klaxon accompanying a government alert about an inbound ballistic missile attack. But that’s exactly what happened to more than 1.5 million residents of and visitors to Hawaii this morning. “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII,” the emergency alert read, in all-caps, on smartphones. “SEEK IM
17min
The Atlantic
What the Hell Happened in Hawaii?Early this morning, residents of Hawaii received an emergency alert on their cell phones and on their television screens : “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.” If that wasn’t enough to spark panic in a state where Cold War-era nuclear-attack alert sirens have been undergoing testing, the warning ended with those five dreaded words: “THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” Following
16min
The Atlantic
A New American Leader Rises in ISISThe clues are out there, if you know where to look. Scattered across far-flung corners of the internet, there is evidence that Zulfi Hoxha, the son of an Albanian-American pizza-shop owner from New Jersey, had sinister plans. First there’s the defunct Twitter profile, which at one point engaged in a conversation with a State Department counter-propaganda account about the Islamic State. Then ther
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Baby Panda Yuan Meng makes debut in FranceThe first panda ever born in France has gone on display to the public.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbial signal recognition stems from existing building blocksScientists have characterized a protein that enables certain microorganisms to recognize and absorb ammonium in their environment. Ammonium is considered a toxin that pollutes ecosystems - but for these bacteria it represents an important nutrient and energy source.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired roboticsBioengineers have developed a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What stars will hatch from the Tarantula Nebula? NASA's flying observatory seeks to find outTo have a full picture of the lives of massive stars, researchers need to study them in all stages – from when they're a mass of unformed gas and dust, to their often dynamic end-of-life explosions.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air France-KLM denies bidding for troubled AlitaliaThe Air France-KLM group on Saturday denied it had made an offer for ailing airline Alitalia, a day after Italy's industry minister listed it among three bidders.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Company, Idaho regulators at odds over battery storage planAn Idaho-based energy development company is asking federal authorities to declare state regulators in violation of a law intended to promote alternative energy in a case that could have far-reaching ramifications for emerging battery-storage technologies.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea levels off Dutch coast highest ever recorded in 2017Storm surges and tidal cycles caused record sea levels along the coast of the Netherlands last year, a Dutch marine institute has found.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wolf found in northern Belgium, first time in over 100 yearsA wild wolf has been found in the northern Belgian region of Flanders for the first time in more than a century, an environmental group said Saturday.
3h
cognitive science
'Alien megastructures' debunked. Why are we so quick to assume it's aliens?submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
4h
Science-Based Medicine
Remembrance of Things PastWell maybe not “memorializing his dandyism and parvenu hijinks even as he revealed their essential hollowness” but Flies in the Ointment: Essays on Supplements, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (SCAM) is now available on Amazon and is A carefully selected and edited compendium of the best of Dr. Mark Crislip (the Puswhisperer’s) blog posts from sciencebasedmedicine.org. The sections have bee
4h
Popular Science
Inside the biggest nuclear power plant tear-down in the U.S.Energy Unbuilding an atomic giant. Unbuilding an atomic giant, from cooling it to burying it.
4h
Big Think
Women Are More Likely to Survive a Crisis Than MenGirl babies may have one distinct advantage over boy babies. But what is it? Read More
4h
Big Think
Stunning New Paper Explains How Inequality in America Keeps GrowingComprehensive new study of economic history paints a frightening future. Read More
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Connecting Kindergartners and Coding without a Screen in the World of Unstructured PlayThe KIBO robot tries to balance the huge potential young children have for learning with the physical realities of how they like to play. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Science : NPR
Helping Strangers May Help Teens' Self-EsteemAdolescents are under more pressure than ever, and many suffer from depression and anxiety. But new research suggests that volunteering to help strangers makes them feel better about themselves. (Image credit: Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images)
6h
Viden
Efterskolekok: De unge har slet ikke brug for alt det kødPå Horne Efterskole har man skåret ned på kødet for jorden, klimaet og kvalitetens skyld.
6h
The Atlantic
No, #MeToo Isn't McCarthyismOne of the criticisms of the #MeToo movement that’s emerged and re-emerged most tenaciously over the past few months is that women are consistently conflating major crimes with minor ones. Violent sexual assault isn’t the same thing as a swat on the behind in a crowded bar. Targeted sexual harassment isn’t the same thing as a clumsy pass after too many vodka sodas have been consumed. But this is
6h
Viden
Guide til supermarkedet: Sådan spiser du klimavenligtHvad skal man egentlig vælge og vælge fra, når man putter mad i indkøbskurven? Eksperterne fra Klimatestamentet på P1 giver deres bud.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Crescent Moon's Innovative Snowshoe Is Built Like a Flip-FlopThese all-foam snowshoes from Crescent Moon might look low-tech, but the combination of cleats and tire-like treads provide ample traction.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Wolf of a Different ColorFor the first time, researchers spot a black maned wolf -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ingeniøren
Mars er leveringsdygtig i gode byggematerialerNasa vil gerne vide, hvordan man bedst muligt kan 3D-printe bebyggelser på den røde planet – hvis overflade i øvrigt er velegnet til fremstilling af mursten.
8h
Ingeniøren
Perklorater forpester marsjordPlanter vokser, og regn­­­- or­me formerer sig lystigt i marsagtig jord, men indholdet af perklorater er et stort problem, hvis der skal dyrkes afgrøder på Mars.
8h
Live Science
Goopy GIF: You Can't Look Away from This Mesmerizing ExperimentA weird GIF highlights the magic of ferrofluids.
8h
Live Science
Writing a To-Do List Before Bed Could Help You SleepFive minutes should be enough.
8h
Live Science
Scientists 3D-Printed Squishy, Brain-Like Tissue for the 1st TimeA new 3D-printing technique can create tissues as soft as a human's squishy brain or spongy lungs — something that has not been possible before.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: An Actual ShitholeBeetles cherish the dung they live and feed on.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Meltdown, Spectre, Malicious Apps, and More of This Week's Security NewsMeltdown, Spectre, malicious Android apps, and more of the week's top security news.
9h
The Atlantic
The Perfect Storm Behind This Year's Nasty Flu SeasonEvery winter brings cautionary tales that the flu—just the regular old flu—can kill. And the cautionary tales this year are hard to beat. Twenty-one-year-old Kyler Baughman, for example, a fitness buff who liked to show off his six-pack, recently died a few days after getting a runny nose . According to the numbers, this year’s flu season is in fact worse than usual. It got started early, and it’
9h
The Atlantic
Pushing Out Immigrants Isn't About the EconomyGerman Benitez has started two small businesses, both of them restaurants in the city of Gaithersburg, Maryland. His main restaurant, Jazmin Cuisine, employs nine people. He seems like one of the last people any politician interested in job creation would want to kick out of the country. And yet, on Monday, he learned that the U.S. government is planning to do just that. Benitez, who is 54, is fr
9h
Big Think
Mark Epstein, MD – I, Me, Mine – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #130While the unchecked ego might be popular at parties, it can get us into all kinds of trouble. Mark Epstein, MD combines psychotherapy and Buddhism to help people live with the self. Read More
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
When to Worry About Your Blood Pressure130/80 is the new high blood pressure threshold. What should your personal blood pressure goal be and when should you worry? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Feed: All Latest
Space Photos of the Week: Home Is Where the Supermassive Black Hole IsAt the heart of our own Milky Way galaxy is a big, black hole—and NASA just snapped a photo of it.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook's Adam Mosseri on Why You'll See Less Video, More From FriendsFacebook's vice president for newsfeed explains the thinking behind recent changes in the algorithm that determines what 2 billion people see on the social network.
10h
Feed: All Latest
'Black Mirror' Should Not Be a Shared UniverseThe show's most recent season hinted that its episodes are connected—but it should stay an anthology series.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Virgin Hyperloop One Is Bringing Elon Musk's Dream to LifeThe Richard Branson-backed venture wants to launch a commercial hyperloop in 2021, and it's got work to do.
10h
The Atlantic
Why It’s a Bad Idea to Launch Rockets Over LandOn Friday morning in China, a rocket blasted off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in the Sichuan province with a pair of navigation satellites bound for orbit around Earth. As the rocket climbed higher and higher, the four strap-on boosters that launched with it began to fall away. This is supposed to happen; the boosters provide extra lift in the minutes after launch, and when they burn
10h
The Atlantic
Overhauling Japan's High-Stakes University-Admission SystemThis weekend, more than 580,000 Japanese high-school seniors will take the country’s standardized university-entrance exam, known as the National Center Test for University Admissions. This test, commonly referred to simply as the “Center Test,” is the culmination of years of intense preparation that begins as early as kindergarten. Mothers pray in special Shinto shrines for their children’s succ
10h
The Atlantic
The Pop Innovations of a 50-Year-Old SoundtrackWhen Mike Nichols’s low-budget comedy-drama The Graduate premiered in December 1967, it arrived during a time of national unrest. Many Baby Boomers were pushing back against the status quo: The military draft and the escalation of the war in Vietnam, combined with movements calling for civil rights and women’s liberation, prompted students and activists to protest the political and social establi
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cloned Newmarket dachshund expecting puppiesMinnie Winnie was created by science after her owner won a competition.
10h
Big Think
You May Be Using This Flying Taxi in Two YearsBell Helicopter has just premiered its electric, self-piloting air taxi design at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Read More
11h
Science | The Guardian
Everything you've ever wanted to know about my colonoscopy (but never dared to ask)When I had rectal bleeding, I went for a colonoscopy. The doctor prescribed more fiber – but could anxiety be the source of the pain in my backside? The thing about writers – the thing that makes us hated and occasionally liked – is that very often we have our heads up our asses. There are two ways that people in my profession can address this. We could develop a deeper sense of humility, looking
11h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump and a Century-Old Argument About Who's Allowed in AmericaPresident Trump’s reported suggestion that the United States needs fewer immigrants from “shithole countries” and more from those like Norway revives an argument made vigorously a century ago—though in less profane terms—only to be discredited in the decades that followed. In 1907, alarmed by the arrival of more than a million immigrants per year, Congress established a commission to determine ex
11h
The Atlantic
Doubting MLK During a Strike in MemphisGibson “Nibs” Stroupe is a recently retired pastor who spent decades presiding over the proudly multicultural Oakhurst Presbyterian Church in Decatur, Georgia. He traces his ministry and the ideas that informed it back to 1968, and shared his experiences with me after learning of The Atlantic’s exploration of that year . He wrote: I was a senior at what was then Southwestern Presbyterian Universi
11h
NYT > Science
Uranium Miners Pushed Hard for a Comeback. They Got Their Wish.Hundreds of mining claims fall neatly outside the new boundaries of Bears Ears National Monument, and a Navajo town scarred by uranium is bracing for new woes.
11h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Squid That Sink to the Ocean’s Floor When They DieSome squid sink to the ocean floor when they die, researchers found, and they make take a lot of carbon down there with them.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
1.5 C climate goal 'very unlikely' but doable: draft UN reportThe Paris Agreement goal of capping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius will slip beyond reach unless nations act now to slash carbon pollution, curb energy demand, and suck CO2 from the air, according to a draft UN report.
11h
The Atlantic
How's Democracy Holding Up After Trump's First Year?In late 2016, shortly after the U.S. presidential election, two Harvard political scientists posed a bleak question in The New York Times : “Is Donald Trump a Threat to Democracy?” Now they’re out with an even more bleakly titled book— How Democracies Die —that seeks to answer that question by drawing on a year’s worth of evidence. At the core of the book is an apparent contradiction. Steven Levi
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook move will play out in long-term: analystsFacebook's move to highlight posts from friends and family over those from brands and publications follows months of turmoil for the social network and will result in lower advertising revenue—at least in the short-term, analysts said.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Italian govt mulling three offers for ailing AlitaliaItaly's government said Friday it is considering three bids for troubled airline Alitalia from Lufthansa, EasyJet and a private equity firm, and hopes to have a deal wrapped up by May.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin shouldn't become the new Swiss bank account: MnuchinDominant digital currency bitcoin should not be allowed to become the Swiss bank account of the modern era used to hide illicit activity, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Classified US satellite launched from California after delayA rocket carrying a classified U.S. satellite has blasted off from California.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Man's best friend goes high tech at gadget festTechnology is going to the dogs. And to cats and horses, for that matter, as high-end gadgetry showcased at this week's Consumer Electronics Show offered ways that smart devices can improve the lives of animals and their human friends.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US report raps Alibaba's Taobao, others for pirated goodsAlibaba's Taobao website and numerous public markets around the world were cited Friday as purveyors of hundreds of thousands of dollars in pirated goods in the US government's annual "notorious markets" review.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Death toll from California mudslides rises to 18Authorities in southern California said Friday they had discovered the body of an elderly man killed by mudslides that battered the region earlier this week, lifting the overall death toll to 18.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developer halts plans after likely Civil War graves foundDevelopers say they're halting plans for a project in Tennessee after archaeologists discovered what they believe are graves on a site near a Civil War fort built by slaves.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US review shows pesticides harm threatened salmon, whalesFederal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Top takeaways from Consumers Electronics ShowThe 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, which concluded Friday in Las Vegas, drew some 4,000 exhibitors from dozens of countries and more than 170,000 attendees, showcased some of the latest from the technology world.
12h
Viden
Kølige pletter kan beskytte skovens dyr mod klimaforandringerTemperaturstigninger truer en række af skovens dyr. Men vi kan hjælpe dem ved at sikre kølige beskyttelseszoner.
12h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 13, 2018This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
12h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Er det mest sikkert at køre hurtigt eller langsomt over Storebæltsbroen i stormvejr?En læser tænker, om det mon ikke er sikrest at køre hurtigt over Storebæltsbroen, når vinden blæser. Det mener Sund & Bælt ikke.
13h
Big Think
You Can Watch Carl Sagan's 'Cosmos' Marathon Right Now, For FreeYou can watch the Cosmos marathon right now, for free! Read More
16h
Scientific American Content: Global
Which Came First: The Proboscis or the Flower?A new fossil find reveals that the sucking tongue of butterflies—or proboscis—appears to have evolved before the emergence of flowers. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
NYT > Science
C.D.C. Postpones Session Preparing Us for Nuclear WarAfter the agency’s workshop attracted considerable media attention, especially given President Trump’s recent words with North Korea, the session has been postponed.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Female engineers set for successThe UK has the lowest percentage of female engineering professionals in Europe, at less than 10%.
21h
New Scientist - News
You may be making cryptocurrency for hackers without realisingThousands of websites are tricking people into mining cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, adblockers might be the only way to stop them
21h
New Scientist - News
Voice assistants dominate CES as Google plays catchup with AlexaGoogle had more than 350 voice-controlled devices at the Consumer Electronics Show, including speakers, cars, and a giant toy town complete with a railway
21h
New Scientist - News
We may be able to see mountains and valleys on distant worldsIf alien planets have canyons and mountains like ours, we may be able to catch a glimpse of them in an exoplanet’s shadow as it passes in front of its star
21h
New Scientist - News
The universe still seems to be expanding faster than it ought toThe universe is expanding but our measurements of the rate are all over the place and they just got worse, so we can’t tell when the cosmos is going to die
21h
New Scientist - News
Even a small cut in global warming will help slow sea level riseLimiting climate change to 1.5 °C instead of 2 °C, even if we overshoot at first and then bring temperatures back down, will ease the rise in sea levels
21h
Popular Science
The Montecito mudslide is a tragic reminder to respect our soilEnvironment “A nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” The Monetico mudslide is another chapter in a long history of American soil conservation.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Smallest cat in world: Footage of rare animalThey weigh about 1kg and their eyes are six times more powerful than ours.
22h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: When a President Insults the WorldWhat We’re Following Trump’s Offensive Comments: During a meeting Thursday with lawmakers about immigration policy, President Trump reportedly spoke disparagingly of immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador, and Africa, asking, “Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?” (He also reportedly said he’d prefer that more immigrants come from Norway, but not many are likely to do
22h
NYT > Science
Dr. Ronald Fieve, 87, Dies; Pioneered Lithium to Treat Mood SwingsDr. Fieve and a colleague identified lithium as the first naturally occurring medication to prevent and control a specific psychiatric disorder.
22h
NYT > Science
To Get Medicaid in Kentucky, Many Will Have to Work. Advocates for the Poor Say They Will Sue.Led by the state’s Republican governor, the plan calls for many Medicaid recipients ages 19-64 to work at least 20 hours a week, beginning in July.
22h
Futurity.org
Drug keeps mouse memory sharp after West NileThe ongoing neurological deficits caused by West Nile virus infecting the brain may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain’s ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones, a new study with mice suggests. When researchers used an arthritis drug to reduce the inflammation, the animals’ ability to learn and remember remained sharp. “…targeting the inflammation with the arthri
22h
Big Think
Your Facebook News Feed Is About Undergo a Massive ChangeThe social media behemoth wants you to use their platform less, not more, than before. Read More
22h
Popular Science
Cold weather is the best time to look at—and photograph—the night skyDIY Grab your coat and your camera, then head out under the stars. Winter is a fantastic time to capture night sky photos.
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
How To Move A Giant Boulder | Gold Rush#GoldRush | Friday 9p Andy and Logan encounter some giant boulders on Sluice Box Hill blocking any chance of delivering pay dirt. Can they work together to move a 100,000-pound boulder with just two excavators? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery
23h
Live Science
US Launches Spy Satellite on Secret MissionThe NROL-47 spacecraft soared into Earth orbit today (Jan. 12), riding atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Medium rocket that lifted off from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base at 5:11 p.m. EST (2211 GMT; 2:11 p.m. local California time).
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Insult to InjuryToday in 5 Lines President Trump said he used “tough” language during a meeting with lawmakers Thursday, but denied using the term “shithole” to describe some countries. Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, who was present for the meeting, confirmed that Trump made the remark, which he called “vile and racist,” while Republican Senators Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia said they don’t
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
X-ray navigation could open up new frontiers for robotic spacecraftIn a technology first, a team of engineers has demonstrated fully autonomous X-ray navigation in space -- a capability that could revolutionize NASA's ability in the future to pilot robotic spacecraft to the far reaches of the solar system and beyond.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Science Community's "S**thole countries" ProblemIt's easy (and right) to criticize Trump for his vulgar dismissal of developing countries, but scientists harbor their own prejudice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Viden
Uforståelig forskning? Nu vil forskere udbrede nyt i pixibøgerMålet er at give vigtig forskning et liv uden for de støvede forskningsrapporter.
23h
Live Science
Wild Rumors Fly as Pentagon Shuts Down Questions on Secretive 'Zuma' MissionIt's been perhaps the weirdest week of news and mysteries in the history of private spaceflight. And it's ending in a swirl of confusion, silence, and whispers at the Pentagon.
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Spaceships could use blinking dead stars to chart their wayTiming signals from five pulsars allowed scientists to pinpoint an experiment’s place in space.
1d
Science : NPR
Scientists Say A Fluctuating Jet Stream May Be Causing Extreme Weather EventsA new study says unusual patterns of the polar jet stream circling the Northern Hemisphere may have led to dramatic weather in Europe and North America. (Image credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
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t



EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil in your own homeThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finnish firm detects new Intel security flawA new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday.
12h
Ingeniøren
Justitsminister afviser at forbyde masseovervågningJustitsministeren finder det for vigtigt, at politiet har adgang til oplysninger om danskernes færden og telefonsamtaler, til at han vil ændre de danske logningsregler, som er i strid med EU-retten. Han venter i stedet på fælles EU-retningslinjer.
10h

LATEST

Science : NPR
Scientists Say A Fluctuating Jet Stream May Be Causing Extreme Weather EventsA new study says unusual patterns of the polar jet stream circling the Northern Hemisphere may have led to dramatic weather in Europe and North America. (Image credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
now
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain functionNeuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugsMicroscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But researchers have now confirmed a new drug compound kills drug-resistant C. auris
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum leap: Computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theoryA group of researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can early symptoms predict bipolar disorder? Evidence shows differing patterns of risk factorsTwo patterns of antecedent or 'prodromal' psychiatric symptoms may help to identify young persons at increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD), according to a new analysis in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
26min
Scientific American Content: Global
Looming Landslide Stokes Fears, May Help Disaster PredictionsRattlesnake Ridge is collapsing in Washington State. As residents hurry to safety, scientists try to figure out which way rocks will fall -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
28min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Trio of dead stars upholds a key part of Einstein’s theory of gravityA cosmic test fails to topple the strong equivalence principle.
32min
Live Science
'Alien' Shark with Goblin-Like Jaws Hauled Up from the Deep SeaImagine this fearsome sight: an ink-black shark with gnarly, needle-like teeth; creepy, glass-like eyes; a glowing belly and a potentially extendable jaw. That's what scientists saw when they pulled up this rare creature, along with four of its pals.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Localized cooling of the heart limits damage caused by a heart attackResearchers have succeeded in the localized cooling of the heart during a heart attack, a world first. By cooling part of the heart prior to and following angioplasty, the cardiologists believe that the damage from a heart attack can be limited.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Species identification in the water bottleEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, researchers systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the monitoring of water bodies.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology will create brain wiring diagramsScientists have developed new technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPsThe emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast-moving electrons create current in organic solar cellsResearchers at Purdue University have identified the mechanism that allows organic solar cells to create a charge, solving a longstanding puzzle in physics, according to a paper published Friday (Jan. 12) in the journal Science Advances.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With headbands, sensor socks, wearable tech seeks medical inroadsWant to manage your stress? A "neurofeedback" headband could help. Need to be sure your elderly father is taking his medication? Attach a sensor to his sock.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stingray-inspired soft biobotUCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't let skiing and snowboarding injuries take you downhillSkiing and snowboarding are fun winter sports. As the popularity of these winter sports continue to rise, according to a review article published in the Jan. 1, 2018, issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the number of skier and snowboarder injuries also continues to rise.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn-led team uncovers the physiology behind the hour-long mating call of midshipman fishA new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers provides an explanation for how Pacific midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour, entailing 360,000 muscle contractions.
1h
Big Think
This Ancient Mnemonic Technique Builds a Palace of MemoryImagined memory palaces are still used by memory champions and the few who practice the memory arts, but they are best known from Greco-Roman times. Read More
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in ZambiaA new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteriesScientists have observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infectionsBy analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer fr
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: If We Ever Get to Mars, the Beer Might Not Be BadCollege students at Villanova University found that hops, leafy greens, carrots and scallions all could grow in an approximation of Martian dirt.
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Swiss Consider the Lobster. It Feels Pain, They Decide.The Swiss government has banned tossing lobsters and other crustaceans into boiling water. But what’s the science behind that decision?
1h
NYT > Science
Q&A: Eyes in the SkiesInstead of sending probes to faraway planets, why not hitch them to comets?
1h
Feed: All Latest
Clashes Over the Future of Gene Therapy and Crispr at the US's Biggest Biotech MeetingAfter 30 years in the making, gene therapy is finally an FDA-approved reality. What comes next—and how will Crispr get a slice of the action?
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Map of the “Darknet” Suggests Your Local Drug Pusher Now Works OnlineThe first-ever global map of the online drug trade shows it’s not that different from the offline one.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired roboticsUCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.
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The Atlantic
'People Who Are Different Are Not the Problem in America'Donald TrumpThis year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day carries additional significance, as it marks the 50th anniversary of his tragic death. In April of 1968, King was killed in Memphis, Tennessee, at the hands of a ruthless murderer who was filled with hate and racism. One of the reasons we, as Americans and citizens around the world, remember King’s legacy is his call to freedom and racial unity through love a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to map miniature brain circuitsIn a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur 'fossil' in your own homeThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can Muesli help against arthritis?It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapyThe failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationA new article lays the groundwork for alternative climate mitigation scenarios that place less reliance on unproven negative emissions technologies in the future.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's diseaseCurrent therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. Researcher have now documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect of two neurotrophic factor
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight lineBiologists are studying the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.
1h
Live Science
Why Scientists Just Created the Creepiest Robot Baby You'll Ever SeeThis dirt-dispersing robot-baby torso will crawl out of the lab and into your nightmares.
1h
Live Science
Don't Eat Laundry Pods: Why the 'Tide Pod Challenge' Is So DangerousTeens are deliberately eating laundry pods as part of a new online fad called the Tide Pod Challenge.
1h
Science : NPR
Southern California Hillsides Remain Vulnerable After Deadly MudslidesDeadly mudslides occured in Santa Barbara County, Calif., after heavy rain pushed debris down fire-scarred hillsides. If it rains again, more debris could be swept down the mountains. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
2h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Snowy Sahara, Dancing Devils, Cryptocurrency J-PopThe Singapore Zoo shows off its babies, a church emerges from a drying reservoir in Spain, a different church is torn down for a coal mine in Germany, ice blankets in the U.S., fog drifts in the U.K., Saudi Arabia opens its first automotive showroom solely dedicated to women, and much more.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteriesA collaboration led by scientists at Brookhaven has observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in ZambiaA new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient
2h
Live Science
Even Chemists Are Baffled by This GIF of a Droplet Spiraling to Its DoomWhy does this drop of liquid look like a spinning galaxy? It's complicated.
2h
Popular Science
A six pack won’t make you a better runner, but these deep core exercises mightHealth Your deep core muscles aren't visible, but they could prevent chronic back pain. Runners who have weaker deep core muscles could be more likely to experience chronic back pain than runners with stronger ones.
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Science | The Guardian
Great Barrier Reef tourism spokesman attacks scientist over slump in visitorsCol McKenzie calls on government to stop funding work of Terry Hughes, saying tourists ‘won’t do long-haul trips when they think the reef is dead’ A Queensland tourism representative has called one of the Great Barrier Reef’s leading researchers “a dick”, blaming the professor for a downturn in tourism growth at the state’s greatest natural asset. Col McKenzie, the head of the Association of Mari
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Develop a Technique to Regenerate the Mouse ThymusThe discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients' recovery following treatment.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and simultaneously protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage fr
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infectionsBy analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer fr
2h
The Atlantic
What It Took to Save a North Korean Defector's LifeSEOUL, South Korea—In late November, a 24-year-old North Korean soldier dashed across the demilitarized zone separating North from South Korea. He barely escaped with his life as his former comrades opened fire at his back. The medical team at Ajou University Trauma Center in Suwon, about 20 miles south of Seoul, had no idea who he was when less than 25 minutes later, a military helicopter bearin
2h
The Atlantic
A Foreboding Similarity in Today’s Oceans and a 94-Million-Year-Old CatastropheThe ocean is losing its oxygen. Last week, in a sweeping analysis in the journal Science , scientists put it starkly: Over the past 50 years, the volume of the ocean with no oxygen at all has quadrupled, while oxygen-deprived swaths of the open seas have expanded by the size of the European Union. The culprits are familiar: global warming and pollution. Warmer seawater both holds less oxygen and
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fatThe fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorderThe approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New warning system discovered in the immune defenseResearchers have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: What Facebook's shift could mean to users, businessesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergIn coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have "meaningful" conversations with—something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which "Big Bang Theory" character yo
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Therapy Could Make Cancer Care More Unequal, and This Map Shows WhyRevolutionary new cancer treatments won’t be available in many rural areas of the U.S.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virgin Galactic conducts 7th glide test of spacecraftVirgin Galactic says the latest glide test of its space tourism rocket plane was a success, nearly reaching the speed of sound high over California.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A look at Facebook's changes over the years in what you seeFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook is once again tweaking what you see to focus more on personal connections and take the spotlight off brands and news articles.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Pollution is endangering the future of astronomyAstronomers discuss multiple threats from pollution that will make it harder to observe the night sky.
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Science | The Guardian
Having one’s royal cake and eating it | Brief lettersMeghan Markle handshake | Apple’s tax payment | No bull | Tabloid Guardian | Philip Hammond | Rude place names Meghan Markle visits a community radio station and meets staff on a magazine collective, in response to their invitation. She provides both with masses of invaluable publicity and, it appears, generates a great deal of pleasure. But, oh dear me, the magazine’s deputy editor, Charlie Brink
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara CoastNOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows importance of second pediatric blood-pressure screeningNearly one-quarter of children and teens who had their blood pressure screened at a primary care appointment showed a reading in the hypertensive range, but less than half of those readings could be confirmed after the blood pressure was repeated, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study released today in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension. The research shows the importance of taking a second
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugsMicroscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But in a recent Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy study, researchers confirmed a
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explain how snakes can crawl in a straight lineSnakes are known for their iconic S-shaped movements. But they have a less noticeable skill that gives them a unique superpower.
3h
Feed: All Latest
Meltdown and Spectre Patches Have Caused Serious Performance IssuesTwo of the worst vulnerabilities in years are slowly being fixed—but at a cost to consumers and companies alike.
3h
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 33. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Below, gadgets that are awesome, rad, and random.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara CoastNOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia.
4h
Science | The Guardian
Workplaces 'should cater for menopause as they do for pregnancy'Exclusive: A new study shows that a simple set of CBT exercises can help with symptoms, yet many workplaces have no policies in place to support women Workplaces should start catering for the menopause in a comparable way to pregnancy, according to one of Britain’s leading women’s health experts. Myra Hunter, emeritus professor of clinical health psychology at King’s College London said that meno
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Science : NPR
VIDEO: Take A Trip Through The Orion Nebula, A Baby Star NurseryThe constellation Orion is home to a busy, glowing nebula. Data from telescopes has been used to create a three-minute, three-dimensional tour around its colorful caverns and bright star clusters. (Image credit: NASA)
4h
Live Science
Why Do Hurricanes Have Eyes? Scientists Still Don't Really KnowA new paper offers the most complete model yet of how a hurricane gets its eye.
4h
Viden
Skype-samtaler bliver snart privateBåde lydsamtaler og beskeder mellem to personer er på vej til at blive totalt krypteret - hvis du aktiverer det.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Why Canada Looks like the Next Bitcoin-Mining Haven
4h
Live Science
You Have the Flu. Should You Go to the Doctor, or Wait It Out?When you have the flu, one choice looms large in front of your feverish eyes: Should you drag your aching body out in the cold to go to the doctor or hospital, or should you just wrap yourself in blankets, drink fluids and stay put?
4h
The Atlantic
Brain Cells Share Information Using a Gene that Came From VirusesHundreds of millions of years ago, at a time when back-boned animals were just starting to crawl onto land, one such creature became infected by a virus. It was a retrovirus, capable of smuggling its genes into the DNA of its host. And as sometimes happens, those genes stayed put. They were passed on to the animal’s children and grandchildren. And as these viral genes cascaded through the generat
4h
NYT > Science
War’s Other Victims: AnimalsOver decades, armed conflict has reduced animal populations in Africa more than any other factor, according to new research.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to map miniature brain circuitsIn a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer's gene-determined 'immune landscape' dictates progression of prostate tumorsThe field of immunotherapy -- the harnessing of patients' own immune systems to fend off cancer -- is revolutionizing cancer treatment today. However, clinical trials often show marked improvements in only small subsets of patients, suggesting that as-yet unidentified variations among tumors result in distinct paths of disease progression and response to therapy.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's diseaseCurrent therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. As part of her PhD thesis, Catalina Requejo, documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect o
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
What to Expect from Cryptocurrency in 2018You've heard of Bitcoin and possibly some others, but the major competitors, including central banks, have not even entered the market yet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Is What Your Dashboard of the Future Looks Like
4h
The Atlantic
Animals Have Culture, TooIn this episode of Animalism featuring The Atlantic science writer Ed Yong , we investigate fascinating examples of culture in the animal kingdom, including the bizarre traditions of Capuchin monkeys in Costa Rica, the long-held fashion trends of bottlenose dolphins in Australia’s Shark Bay, and the incredible "Top 20" music charts of humpback whales, which have a structure that strongly resemble
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Blog » Languages » English
Everest vs. Mariana Trench: Results!Whoa, that’s like… deep, man. The winning team this week is Team Mariana Trench! Congratulations to all on a battle well fought, and enjoy your bonuses! Leaderboard: Artwork by Zoe Gillette
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New warning system discovered in the immune defenseResearchers at Linköping University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results have been published in the scientific journal PNAS, and may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum leap: computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theoryA group of Michigan State University researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight lineUniversity of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne studied the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel. His study titled 'Crawling without Wiggling' was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorderThe approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pitt study suggests risk management approach to combat EMS fatigueExtended shift work has historically been linked to interrupted sleep patterns and risk of injury, and is a persistent problem for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel who are tasked with delivering acute care under significant pressure. New guidelines, written by a team led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists aim to mitigate the effects of fatigue by addressing the imp
5h
Popular Science
Scientists are making carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleumNexus Media News Cheaper, plant-based carbon fiber could be used to make lighter cars that consume less fuel. Scientists say it may soon be possible to make carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum, driving down costs, making the material more widely available for use in…
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Viden
Facebook vil blande sig i dit sociale liv: Det kan du forventeFacebook vil af med de passive 'scrollere' og få dig til at kommunikere mere med dine nærmeste.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can muesli help against arthritis?It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How climate change alters plant growthGlobal warming affects more than just plant biodiversity -- it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plant growth. In the current edition of the internationally renowned journal "Current Biology", the group p
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher discovers commonalities in brains of people with HD and PDA new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosateBfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in ag
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systemsThe paper, titled "Collocated ionosonde and dense GPS/GLONASS network measurements of midlatitude MSTIDs", covers the first ever complex analysis of MSTIDs obtained by two methods of radio sounding. MSTIDs, which are huge wave perturbations somewhat resembling aurora borealis, are invisible in midlatitude areas.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New therapeutic approach for advanced lung diseaseResearchers have demonstrated the potential of a new class of drugs for the treatment of refractory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, i.e. COPD. Incurable to date, the disease is one of the most frequent causes of death worldwide and is typically triggered by smoking. In the current preclinical study, two anti-inflammatory substances have proved more effective than preparations used to date.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The negative impact of climate change on freshwater bodiesA lot of research is being conducted into the acidification of the world's oceans. A recent study has proved that freshwater bodies are likewise affected. Rising carbon dioxide levels could upset the balance of species.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How to put the power of law in people's hands | Vivek MaruWhat can you do when the wheels of justice don't turn fast enough? Or when they don't turn at all? Vivek Maru is working to transform the relationship between people and law, turning law from an abstraction or threat into something that everyone can understand, use and shape. Instead of relying solely on lawyers, Maru started a global network of community paralegals, or barefoot lawyers, who serve
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
AI Could Diagnose Your Heart Attack on the Phone—Even If You’re Not the Caller
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Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: The Smart Home Is Here. Are We Ready?This week on the show, we talk about the proliferation of smart home tech. Recorded live at CES.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fatThe fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How far to the nearest city? Global map of travel time to cities publishedThe Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, provided expert input on the mapping of urban accessibility worldwide to support global and local decision-making on development and environmental policies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapyThe failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, wildfires and flooding. The new research is the first reconstruction of historical changes in the North Atlantic jet stream prior to the 20th century. By using tree rings, the researchers developed a historical look at the position of the North
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults.
5h
Science : NPR
Science Says That To Fight Ignorance, We Must Start By Admitting Our OwnThe best way to defend everything we really do know, according to science, is to begin by admitting our own ignorance — to ask "What don't you know?" says astrophysicist Adam Frank. (Image credit: robuart/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Y Combinator Will Give You $1 Million to Try to Cure Aging
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's TCS signs 'largest deal' worth $2 billionIndia's largest IT services company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) on Friday announced bagging its biggest new deal valued over $2 billion from a US-based insurance company, a day after reporting a slide in its quarterly earnings.
6h
Futurity.org
Rebuilding after tsunami helped segregate Banda AcehIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. New research identifies an unfortunate result of the reconstruction: lower-income residents are now disproportionately exposed to coastal hazards. The massive tsunami leveled nearly half of the city and killed an estimated 160,000 people across the province. Countless others lost their families, homes, and everything they ow
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Futurity.org
This enzyme could be a drug target for Huntington’sResearchers have identified a new drug target for treating Huntington’s disease, a fatal neurological disorder for which there currently is no cure or preventative therapy. Huntington’s is an inherited disorder caused by a defect in a single gene, which causes mutant proteins to aggregate in cells. The disease triggers the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, producing severe physic
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Futurity.org
To tally seniors in poverty, go beyond incomeMore older Americans live in deprivation than official US statistics suggest, according to research in a new book. In her research, Shatakshee Dhongde, associate professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, found that 12.27 percent of senior citizens were deprived in two or more crucial areas, including multiple disabilities, low income, a lack of education, and severe housing burden. “The main
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanismsNew research has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per yearAsthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White graphene makes ceramics multifunctionalBilayer white graphene combined with a ceramic creates a multifunctional material with high strength and toughness, according to new research. The material may be suitable for construction and refractory materials and applications in the nuclear industry, oil and gas, aerospace and other areas that require high-performance composites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Urban insects are more resilient in extreme weatherA new study will help researchers understand how to make predictions and conservation decisions about how organisms living in cities will respond to catastrophic weather events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A major step forward in organic electronicsResearchers have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate impacts of deforestationDeforestation is likely to warm the climate even more than originally thought, scientists warn. Research has found reactive gases emitted by trees and vegetation have an overall cooling effect on our climate, meaning deforestation would lead to higher temperatures than previously anticipated as less of the gases would be created.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell-rich cord blood donations could increase by 'nudging' parents, study suggestsA two-year study of expectant mothers in Milan, Italy, has found that cord blood donations increased significantly when parents received information about the procedure and 'prompts' to indicate their interest in donating at both early and late stages of their pregnancies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biomarkers for colorectal cancerResearchers have found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrowResearchers have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell.
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Big Think
NASA Discovers Clean-Water Ice Just Below Mars' SurfaceMars Ice WaterThe thick sheets of ice at these eight sites could provide the reservoir of water necessary for human expeditions to Mars. Read More
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Species identification in the water bottleEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationA new article lays the groundwork for alternative climate mitigation scenarios that place less reliance on unproven negative emissions technologies in the future.
6h
Ingeniøren
Her er Siemens-toget, der skal køre på Københavns letbaneAvenio-togene, som passagererne i Københavns forstæder kan sætte sig til rette i i 2024, samles i Wien og kører blandt andet i Siemens' hjemby München og i en hybridudgave i Qatar.
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Ingeniøren
Københavns nye letbanetog er en videreudvikling af gammel kendingModsat Aarhus og Odense har København valgt tog fra Siemens til at køre på den kommende letbane i forstæderne. Siemens-togene kører bl.a. i München.
6h
NYT > Science
Inside the Global Relay Race to Deliver Moly-99The isotope is a cancer-detecting necessity, but is decays within days and isn’t made in North America. A company is rushing to build a plant in Wisconsin to change that.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosisTuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotube fibers in a jiffyScientists are making short carbon nanotube fibers by hand as a way to quickly test materials before spinning industrial quantities of fiber for aerospace, automotive, medical and smart-clothing applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functionsCycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. Researchers have now found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on men's sexual and urinary function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts sayA new article focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touchResearchers have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memoryA protein pivotal to how the brain acquires knowledge originated from a chance evolutionary event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. The protein, called Arc, is involved in storing long-term memories and learning. But new research shows that Arc looks and acts like a protein from viruses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Developing a secure, un-hackable quantum networkA method of securely communicating between multiple quantum devices has been developed by a team of scientists, bringing forward the reality of a large-scale, un-hackable quantum network.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in natureA study has found that children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Teachers could teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. Outdoor lessons may be an inexpensive and convenient way to improve student engagement.
6h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningens formand: Underskriftindsamling sender alvorligt signalStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed bør lytte til lægernes protester og ændre adfærd, mener Lægeforeningens formand Andreas Rudkjøbing.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Augmented reality 'sandbox' shows how gravity worksAt the University of Iowa, you can see how gravity works by playing in the sand.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists found excitons in nickel oxide for the first time'We first found excitons with charge transfer at the boundary of fundamental adsorption in nickel oxide and at the impurity adsorption edge in magnesium oxide. These results may be of interest to specialists in theoretical physics who study the band structure of oxides with strong correlations. NiO has been considered as prototype of such oxides for a long time, and many calculation schemes have b
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
NASA Is Worried About the Safety of Commercial Space Launches
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Scientific American Content: Global
Protected Wildlife Is a Major Casualty In War-Torn Areas of AfricaDuring war, rates of ivory poaching go up and animal reproduction declines -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogsExperts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archeology of our Milky Way's ancient hubA new analysis of about 10,000 normal Sun-like stars in the Milky Way's bulge reveals that our galaxy’s hub is a dynamic environment of variously aged stars zipping around at different speeds.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in CameroonBoth the etiology and demographics of podoconiosis, a non-infectious disease which causes massive swelling of the legs, are poorly understood. To help contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis knowledge, researchers have now described the distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth diseaseA human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responsesGenetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research.
7h
Popular Science
We asked for your best photos of frozen soap bubbles—and wow, did you deliverDIY PopSci readers made their own DIY ice orbs When temperatures plunge, there's only one thing to do: Try a Popular Science DIY project that lets you freeze soap bubbles into gorgeous ice.
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Popular Science
Even as we use more gadgets, American energy consumption is droppingGadgets More appliances? No problem. Although we're tied to more gadgets than ever, these appliances are growing so efficient that per-capita power use dropped 7 percent between 2010 and 2016.
7h
Ingeniøren
Dansk professor: Videnskabelig artikel risikerer at blive til grinRussiske forskere mener, at naturlige sandstensformationer er opstået på måder, der er helt sammenlignelige med mekaniske optimeringsmetoder. Det er rent vrøvl, siger Ole Sigmund fra DTU.
7h
Live Science
'Raw' Diet for Pets Not As Healthy As You Might ThinkA "raw" diet for pets carries risks of their exposure to parasites and bacteria.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Sahara snowThe Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission has captured rare snowfall in northwest Algeria, on the edge of the Sahara desert.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain functionMcLean neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maintaining canola oil qualityCanola and other edible oils are easily affected by light irradiation or heat treatment. Since such processes deteriorate the oil quality such as flavor or taste, understanding this process, called oxidation, is imperative to identify effective measures to control the oil quality such as the best way to package or store oil.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequent growth events and fast growth rates of fine aerosol particles in BeijingSecondary aerosol formation and rapid increases in aerosol particle sizes are believed to play important roles in haze formation. However, some simple but important questions remain unanswered, such as: How frequently and how fast do fine aerosol particles grow? And what affects their rates of growth?
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adult-friendly emergency department staff help reduce hospital admissionsWhen older adults arrive at a hospital's emergency department, they may face unexpected challenges. To address these challenges, geriatrics experts have developed special programs such as the "Geriatric Emergency Department Innovations in Care through Workforce, Informatics, and Structural Enhancements" (GEDI WISE) program.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks canWriting a 'to-do' list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a new study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook Promises to Build a “More Meaningful” News FeedFacebook Mark Zuckerberg
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cognitive science
Cognitive Test Prep Strategies For SAT/ACTsubmitted by /u/MorpheusLearning [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating light beams in curved spaceBy shining a laser along the inside shell of an incandescent light bulb, physicists have performed the first experimental demonstration of an accelerating light beam in curved space. Rather than moving along a geodesic trajectory (the shortest path on a curved surface), the accelerating beam bends away from the geodesic trajectory as a result of its acceleration.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says community involvement may entice consumers to shop in-storeIncreased pressure from large online retailers is reducing brick-and-mortar retailers' sales and profits, causing numerous store closings on both local and national levels. But community engagement may be an answer for local retailers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology will create brain wiring diagramsScientists from Caltech have developed a technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Celluloid Ceiling study finds women still largely underrepresented in HollywoodThe thriving #MeToo movement together with "Time's Up," a legal defense fund designed to help women combat sexual discrimination and harassment, underscore the struggle of women to succeed in male-dominated workplaces – including Hollywood.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lanternfish reveal how ocean warming impacts the twilight zoneA new study from the British Antarctic Survey shows how lanternfish, small bioluminescent fish, are likely to respond to the warming of the Southern Ocean.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secretin protein with a crownBacteria are consummate survivalists. They are aided in this by their ability to assimilate DNA from their surroundings, which allows them to constantly acquire new characteristics. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics and Goethe University in Frankfurt have now gained new insights into exactly how bacteria import DNA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet Africa's bird master of vocal imitationSinging a duet in a foreign language isn't just for opera stars—red-capped robin-chats do it too. These orange-brown birds with grey wings can imitate the sounds of 40 other bird species, even other species' high-speed duets.
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The Atlantic
The State of the Food Industry Is RottenIf Netflix’s Chef’s Table is a delectable exercise in the art of haute cuisine food porn , Rotten , its newest docuseries, is more of an appetite suppressant. Over six episodes, the show tackles a variety of afflictions blighting the food industry, from a glut of diluted Chinese honey undercutting American beekeepers to mafiosi-like power grabs in New England fisheries. Rotten ’s scope is wide, a
7h
Feed: All Latest
Tech Companies Are Complicit in Censoring Iran ProtestsOpinion: Google, Twitter, and Signal should take steps to ensure their tools aren’t restricting Iranian’s free speech.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ancient Moth WingsThe 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College LondonThe university says it is launching an investigation into the meeting, which was held by one of its senior lecturers.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Thirsty cityWith water usage and droughts across the globe rising, the race is on to manage water more efficiently.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How green are the Tories?Theresa May's environment policy pledge is the latest step in the party's journey on the issue.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research scientists discover new production pathway for plant SOS signalsWhen harmful insects attack a plant, it defends itself. It forms protective substances that are poisonous for the insects. This defense response is activated by messengers, jasmonates. Their biosynthesis had been deemed to have been elucidated for almost two decades. But now plant physiologists from the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart and the National Center for Biotechnology (CNB-CSIC) in Ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do we need to know about prime numbers with millions of digits?Prime numbers are more than just numbers that can only be divided by themselves and one. They are a mathematical mystery, the secrets of which mathematicians have been trying to uncover ever since Euclid proved that they have no end.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the cosmic colossus RCS2J2327 heavier than allowed?An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Argelander Institute for Astronomy has mapped the mass distribution in a distant galaxy cluster (RCS2J2327). This cosmic colossus is located in the constellation Pisces at a distance of approximately 6.4 billion light years. According to current research results it consists of about 85 percent invisible dark matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CT-scan study makes it possible to 3-D print the skull of the dinosaur species massospondylusThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dams in Africa could add risk to power supplies down the lineIn the 1980s and 1990s parts of Africa saw a surge in dam building for energy production. After a brief hiatus there has been renewed interested. Many new construction projects are planned and underway across sub-Saharan Africa.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MDI Biological Laboratory discovery could lead to new therapies for diabeticsNew research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chem
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Citizen science bags five-planet haulAstronomy enthusiasts help to confirm the existence of a five-planet system orbiting a far-off star.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schools can't tackle child literacy levels alone—it takes a villageThe recently released NAPLAN 2017 results and findings from the latest Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) have got Australia talking again about how our children are faring when it comes to literacy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature article turns theory of stellar evolution upside-downThis week, Nature published an article that could challenge the theory of stellar evolution.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM seeks US approval for car with no steering wheelGM Cruise AVGeneral Motors is seeking approval from US regulators for an autonomous vehicle with no steering wheel or pedals, the automaker announced Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a new source of world's deadliest toxinResearchers from the Quadram Institute have identified genes encoding a previously undiscovered version of the botulinum neurotoxin in bacteria from a cow's gut.
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Futurity.org
How certain quantum dots shine so brightlyResearchers have found an explanation for why a certain class of quantum dots shines with such incredibly bright colors. The nanocrystals in question contain caesium lead halide compounds arranged in a perovskite lattice structure. Three years ago, Maksym Kovalenko, a professor at ETH Zurich and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), succeeded in creating nano
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New nanotweezers able to move sub-micrometer size objects in fluidsTwo researchers with the Indian Institute of Science have developed tiny tweezers that can manipulate objects in fluids as small as an individual bacterium. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, Souvik Ghosh and Ambarish Ghosh describe their nanotweezers and how well they work.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
E-learning will not erode African knowledgeWhen people discuss the challenges related to e-learning (the use of electronic technology to facilitate learning), they tend to focus on access. This can mean access to financial resources to buy equipment as well as geographical constraints: some regions are simply too remote and underdeveloped to be properly connected to the internet – or even the electricity grid – which are of course both cru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collaboration between scientists and stakeholders vital to climate readiness in AlaskaAs a U.S. state, Alaska is unique not only for its massive size but also for its reserves of natural resources and its land management. Over 60 percent of the state is federally owned, and the majority of the remainder is either state land, university land or owned by Alaska Native corporations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why thawing permafrost mattersIn Bethel, Alaska, walls are splitting, houses are collapsing, and the main road looks like a kiddy rollercoaster. In the coastal town of Kongiganak, sinking cemeteries prevent Alaskans from burying their dead in the ground. The village of Shishmaref, located on an island five miles from the western Alaska mainland, has eroded so much that it is contemplating total relocation. These communities ar
8h
Popular Science
Here's why your body stores more fat in certain placesFat Month We’re talkin’ bout sex (hormones), baby. We’re a little obsessed with moving fat around. And no, we’re not talking about stealing bags of liposuction fat to make soap.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computersOver the past five decades, standard computer processors have gotten increasingly faster. In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only so closely together, before they overlap or short-circuit. If companies are to continue building ever-faster computers, something will need to change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves and other radiation across the universe.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fuel aerosols reducing pollution of the environmentA resource-efficient technology for the production of fuel aerosols has been developed at Tomsk Polytechnic University. The development can be used to quickly ignite the boilers of thermal power plants and boiler houses, in the combustion chambers of diesel generators, as well as in internal combustion engines of cars. TPU technology will contribute to the cost-effective use of fuels and the reduc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New smart sensor to help farmers spot lameness in sheepA new smart wearable device that can automatically detect lameness in sheep is being developed by veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham and industry partners Intel and Farm Wizard.
8h
Viden
Ingen panik: Sikkerhedshuller i næsten alle computere er snart lappetIT-ekspert opdagede et alvorligt sikkerhedshul i millioner af computere. Men han opfordrer til, at man ikke går i panik.
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Live Science
Huge Glaciers Found Hiding Beneath Mars SurfaceThe newfound sheets are buried by just a few feet of Martian dirt in some places, meaning it might be accessible to future crewed missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientists are monitoring whale health by using drones to collect their blowMacquarie University researchers have led the design and construction of a new system that can be fitted to a custom-built, waterproof drone in order to sample whale microbiota – the combination of natural bacterial colonies that live in an organism – by flying over and collecting the exhaled vapours from their blowholes. The collaborative research project, which involved an array of experts inclu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive worms spreading in Arboretum forests, limited effects so farWhen researchers found invasive Asian jumping worms at the University of Wisconsin–Madison Arboretum in 2013, they spotted an opportunity to follow the invaders, and their effects, from the beginning.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Please Do Not Assault the Towering Robot That Roams WalmartAt over six feet tall, Bossa Nova navigates the aisles of Walmart on its own, blasting shelves with light and snapping photos.
8h
Science-Based Medicine
Legionnaires’ Disease: The Other Disneyland OutbreakAs 2017 came to a close, Disneyland again played a role in the outbreak of an infectious disease, this one much more deadly than measles.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ancient Moth WingThe 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Amid Criticism, University of Rochester President Steps DownAcademics had expressed disapproval with the college's handling of sexual harassment allegations made against a brain sciences professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New exotic phenomena seen in photonic crystalsTopological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. Now, a team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has found novel topological phenomena in a different class of systems—open systems, where energy or material can ent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GeoCarb—a new view of carbon over the AmericasA new NASA Earth science mission in the early stages of design may achieve a transformational advance in our understanding of the global carbon cycle by mapping concentrations of key carbon gases from a new vantage point: geostationary orbit. Satellites in geostationary orbit travel at the same speed as Earth's rotation, allowing them to remain over the same place on Earth's surface at all times.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shark biologist teams up with aerospace engineer to discover behaviors of oceanic whitetipsOceanic whitetip sharks move with extreme efficiency, exploiting physics to maximize their energy surplus for both hunting and downtime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The nanoscopic structure that locks up our genesFor decades, scientists could only speculate about the shape of heterochromatin, a type of chromatin that consists of tightly packed DNA and proteins. Recently, however, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University (OIST) and Waseda University have been able to define its structure thanks to new, high-contrast imaging in cryo-electron microscopy. Their work
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research opening for atomically thin metal nanostructuresResearchers at the Nanoscience Center at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, have made a new opening in nanomaterial research. Opening's essence resides in the exclusive use of metallic elements in flat, atomically thin nanostructures.
9h
The Atlantic
The Commuter Is a Train Worth CatchingFor years now, there’s been a particular genre of action cinema that has consistently lured moviegoers to the box office—films in which Liam Neeson has “ a very particular set of skills .” Starting with Taken in 2008, Neeson began a second life as a gritty hero, someone with a talent for violence and a long, but explosive, fuse. Within this genre is an even more exciting sub-genre: films in which
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Live Science
Why Women Have the Survival Advantage in Times of CrisisWomen have a longer life expectancy than men do under normal circumstances, and now a new study from Denmark and Germany reveals that women also outlive men even in the worst of times.
9h
Live Science
Serena Williams' Blood Clot After Childbirth: How Does It Happen?Tennis star Serena Williams has revealed that she experienced potentially life-threatening blood clots after giving birth to her daughter last year.
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Live Science
Silk Road Travelers' Ancient Knowledge May Have Irrigated DesertMore than 1,700 years ago, ancient farmers in China transformed one of Earth's driest deserts into farmland, possibly by using ancient knowledge of irrigation passed along by Silk Road travelers, a new study finds.
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Feed: All Latest
A Clever Radio Trick Can Tell If a Drone Is Watching YouA quirk of video compression lets spy targets see what the drone watching them sees.
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Feed: All Latest
CES 2018 in Photos: A Glimpse of the Gadget ZaninessCES Las Vegas ShowAs we wrap up at CES 2018, here's a peek into the massive gadget show through the lens of WIRED photographer Amy Lombard.
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Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om Spectre, batteritog og undervandsrobotterIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, sætter i denne uge fokus på it-sårbarhederne Meltdown og Spectre, der giver store udfordringer i disse uger. Batteritog er igen kommet på dagsordenen, og sprøjtegifte er måske ikke så farlige for os, hævder en ny undersøgelse.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Carcass RaceA surprising relationship between mammalian and avian scavengers might tell us something about how humans evolved -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
Enighed om skitse til gebyrløsningMinisterium, styrelse, regioner og læger er enige om, at det stærkt kritiserede vagtlæge-gebyr skal sløjfes.
9h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A one-man audio-visual musical phenomenon | Jacob CollierJacob Collier is a one-man band and force of nature. In a dynamic, colorful performance, he recreates the magical room at his home in London where he produces music, performing three songs in which he sings every part and plays every instrument -- accompanied by kaleidoscopic visuals that take cues from the music and grow in real time.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Resistance to Common Germs Poses a Hurdle to New Gene TherapiesExposure to everyday pathogens generates an immune response that could interfere with CRISPR-based gene-editing treatment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Dagens Medicin
Flere tusinde læger underskriver mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed2.700 læger har i skrivende stund skrevet under på brev til styrelsen, som opfordrer til at fokusere mindre på bebrejdelser af sundhedspersonale, der begår fejl, og i stedet fokusere på læring og den kliniske virkelighed, sundhedspersonalet arbejder under.
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Science : NPR
Researchers Spot Massive Black Hole In Double 'Burp'The cosmic sinkhole is at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years from Earth and supports the theory that such objects can switch their power output on and off in relatively short time-scales. (Image credit: NASA , ESA, and J. Comerford (University of Colorado-Boulder))
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Dagens Medicin
Benspænd kan forsinke speciale i akutmedicinEtableringen af det nye akutmedicinske speciale bliver mødt med talrige bekymringer fra eksisterende specialer, og det forsinker arbejdet med at skabe en målbeskrivelse for det nye speciale. Ledende overlæge i akutmedicin er nervøs for, om det er realistisk at holde fast i planen om at besætte de første introduktionsstillinger til sommer.
10h
Ingeniøren
Kortvarig luftforurening dræber, selvom grænseværdier overholdesFå dages stigninger i luftens indhold af ozon og fine partikler fører til akutte dødsfald blandt ældre.
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Dagens Medicin
Den stædige læge og landingspladsenI sine 30 år som praktiserende læge i Thyborøn har Hans Asger Holmsgaard lagt arm med regions- og folketingspolitikerne. Kamppladsen har været akutberedskabet og slagene mange, det seneste om akut- lægehelikopteren. Et slag, som praksislægen vandt, og i dag kan helikopteren lande på græsplænen ved siden af klinikken. Den lander i snit hver femte dag i Lemvig Kommune.
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Dagens Medicin
Psykisk syge skal være herre i eget livRegion Hovedstadens Psykiatri gør op med ambulant behandling, hvor den syge enten møder op på et center eller permanent får intensiv behandling i eget hjem. Fra årsskiftet vil flere udgående teams overgå til en mere fleksibel model, hvor behandlingen kun er intensiv, når den syge er i krise. Det skal give hurtigere fodfæste og forebygge indlæggelser.
10h
Big Think
Do Near-Death Experiences Prove That an Afterlife Exists?The scientific quest for immortality is predicated on the belief that evidence may already exist in the form of Near-Death Experiences and reincarnation. Read More
10h
Ingeniøren
Nyt it-system indkaldte sygepleje til død patientIkke bare i Aarhus men også i Odsherred Kommune er et system med elektroniske omsorgsjournaler alvorlige problemer, bl.a. med manglende medicinering.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
See a 360-degree visualization of the center of the Milky WayA 360-degree simulation, made with data from several telescopes, shows the center of the Milky Way as seen from the galaxy’s supermassive black hole.
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Dagens Medicin
Her er de bedste afdelinger til psykiatriDagens Medicin udpeger de bedste afdelinger til udredning og behandling af centrale sygdomsområder inden for psykiatri, ADHD, skizofreni, og depression.
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Dagens Medicin
Kvalitetstal bærer præg af underrapporteringDanmarks bedste til behandling af depression 2018
11h
Ingeniøren
OVERBLIK: Sådan kan et nyt energiforlig skrues sammenPolitikerne er kommet på prøve: Ny finansiering, indblanding fra EU og billig sol og vind er nye præmisser for energipolitikken frem mod 2030.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A major step forward in organic electronicsResearchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growthResearchers at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) have discovered that the members of a protein family associated with the internal clocks of plants act sequentially to limit plant growth until the end of the night. This could help researchers to understand how plants deal with different kinds of stress that affect their growth, such as drought or high temperature.
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Dagens Medicin
Midtjylland skiller sig positivt udDanmarks bedste til behandling af skizofreni 2018
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Dagens Medicin
Ny smerteklinik vil tilbyde cannabis-recepterNy smerteklinik, oprindeligt initieret af Klaus Riskær Petersen, har fået flere patienthenvendelser om cannabis-medicin allerede inden sin fysiske åbning. Virksomhedsansvarlig læge ser frem til at gå fordomsfrit ind i ny forsøgsordning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What sort of stream networks do scientific ideas flow along?"Panta rhei, everything flows." If Heraclitus of Ephesus was correct, ideas, like rivers, should flow. Tracking the flow of ordinary ideas can be difficult. In the case of scientific ideas, it is much easier. The researchers exchanging them usually produce joint publications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First, Pizza Hut began delivering beer. Now, a self-driving car may bring your pizzaYour delivery order from Pizza Hut may eventually arrive in a self-driving car.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber in Cheops' pyramid?In early November 2017, Nature published the results of the Scan Pyramids project, led by Mehdi Tayoubi (Hip Institute, Paris) and Kunihiro Morishima (University of Nagoya, Japan). It found a "huge void," at least 30 meters long, within the Pyramid of Cheops. Discovering its function and content clearly is a most passionate challenge for archaeologists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, wildfires and flooding. The new research published in Nature Communications is the first reconstruction of historical changes in the North Atlantic jet stream prior to the 20th century. By using tree rings, the researchers developed a historica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An innovative PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse modelsIn the Jan. 12, 2018, Scientific Reports, a research team describes early tests of a minimally-invasive way to assess myelin damage -- the hallmark of multiple sclerosis -- using positron emission tomography (PET). This approach could be used to follow MS lesions over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart functionScientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Device lets you keep your eyes on the roadNow, this is cool and more important, useful.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orlando startup faces off with high-profile investor on podcast; new guided-tour city app launchesAn Orlando entrepreneur impressed a high-profile startup backer on the experienced investor's podcast recently, although the host wasn't exactly excited that she was from Orlando.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The complexities of clouds and the seeds that make themClouds are complicated. Each cloud formation depends on the timing of the water cycle, in which water evaporates from Earth's surface, condensates in the atmosphere and falls back down, as well as the types of aerosols in the atmosphere.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires and flooding, reports a University of Arizona-led team.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BMW drives to new sales record but still lags MercedesGerman high-end carmaker BMW said Friday it booked record sales for the seventh year in a row in 2017, but continued to trail rival Mercedes-Benz.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nepal accesses internet through China, ending India monopolyNepal opened an optical fiber link across the Himalayan mountains to China on Friday, ending years of dependency on India for internet access.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets for kids still big at tech show despite concernsThe children's section at the giant Consumer Electronics Show this week touted "innovations that enable 21st century kids to learn and play smarter than ever.​"
12h



Science | The Guardian
Scientists criticise trend for raw meat pet food after analysis finds pathogensThe trend for feeding dogs and cats raw meat has been criticised by scientists, who say it often contains bacteria and parasites that could pose dangers to both pets and their owners. A growing trend has seen pet owners plump for products such as meat, bones and organs which can be bought frozen and then thawed before being fed to dogs and cats. Among the ideas fuelling the movement is that these
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California's water saving brings bonus effectsCredit: CC0 Public Domain Water-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters . Measures to cut water use by 25 per cent across California were implemented
1h
Ingeniøren
Danmark er dybt afhængigt af træpiller, flis og brændeNår energipolitikerne i de kommende måneder skal forhandle om et nyt energiforlig, bør de forholde sig til de store mængder biomasse i form af afgiftsfrie træpiller, brænde og træflis, der har fyldt kraftværker, ovne og fyr siden årtusindskiftet. Det mener en række eksperter og aktører, Ingeniøren har talt med. I 2016 udgjorde biomasse 55 pct. af den vedvarende energi, som forsyner danske forbrug
5h

LATEST

Dagens Medicin
Få afdelinger opfylder standarderneBehandlingen af børn og unge med ADHD lever sjældent op kvalitetsmålene
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Dagens Medicin
Novo Nordisk Fonden giver 156 mio. kr. til Danish Diabetes AcademyBevilling skal bl.a. bruges til uddannelse af et større antal danske diabetesforskere.
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Dagens Medicin
Akutmedicinere har krav på opbakning og respektDe etablerede specialer skylder på dette tidspunkt at vise en reel respekt for, at der rent faktisk er truffet en beslutning om at indføre et nyt speciale i akutmedicin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thailand seizes large elephant tusks worth over $450,000Thai customs officials display seized ivory during a press conference in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. Thai authorities seized 148 kilograms full elephant tusk and 31 tusk fragments originating from Nigeria destined for China worth over 15 million baht ($469,800). (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit) Thai authorities have seized 148 kilograms (326 pounds) of African elephant ivory, including thre
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Ingeniøren
Ny blogger på ing.dk: Hvornår slukker solen?I slutningen af juli præsenterede Ingeniøren en række korte videoer om universet lavet af den unge danske astrofysiker Sarah Pearson, der for tiden er ph.d.-studerende ved Columbia University i New York. De blev sommerens helt store hit på ing.dk. De kommende seks fredage tager vi fat på resten af sæson 1 af ‘Med Sarah i universet’, som henvender sig både til de generelt nysgerrige uden særlige f
49min
Dagens Medicin
Forår med indbygget bombeMistilliden, der er opstået mellem personale og ledelsen i Region Hovedstaden, er uholdbar.
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Viden
General Motors vil sende 2.500 biler uden rat og pedaler på gadenHvis General Motors får sin vilje, vil en flåde af Chevrolet Bolt EV-biler uden rat og pedaler være klar til at samle passagerer op på de amerikanske gader og veje i 2019. USA's største bilproducent, der har haft travlt med at teste sine selvkørende biler i gaderne i San Francisco, har netop sendt en anmodning til de nationale trafikmyndigheder om tilladelse til at lancere en taxa-service. - Det
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Dagens Medicin
Tør man begynde at håbe på et bedre 1813?At ventetiden går den forkerte vej, sætter kun streg under, at 1813 er en dårlig idé og har været det fra starten.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blue skies in China's capital spark joy, scepticismThis winter, save a few grey days, the Beijing sky has been a brilliant blue Every day for the last five years, Zou Yi has photographed Beijing's smog-cloaked skyline from his 13th-floor apartment, but there is something different in the air this year. This winter, save a few grey days, the sky has been a brilliant blue, suggesting the city may finally be making progress against air pollution—an
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dozens still unaccounted for in California mudslidesA home is surrounded by mud and debris caused by a massive mudslide in Montecito, California Authorities in southern California said Thursday that dozens of residents were still unaccounted for after powerful mudslides that have killed 17 people, including four children, and destroyed homes in a region already pummeled by massive wildfires. Heavy rain on Tuesday, which followed 10 months of droug
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook edits feeds to bring less news, more sharingFacebook Mark ZuckerbergIn this April 18, 2017, file photo, conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference in San Jose, Calif. Facebook said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that it is tweaking what people see to make their time on it more "meaningful." The changes come as Facebook faces criticism that social media can make people feel depressed and isolated. (AP Photo/Noah Berger
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India launches rocket carrying dozens of satellitesIndia launched a rocket carrying dozens of satellites from India and six other countries Friday from its island space center. A. S. Kiran Kumar, chairman of the Indian Space Research Organization, said the satellites successfully reached orbit after the polar satellite launch vehicle took off from Sriharikota, an island off Andhra Pradesh state in the country's southeast.. Apart from two Indian
1h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Ørsted, Bloom og Netcompany jagter it-professionellePå dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, specialister, projektledere og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogsExperts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets (RMBDs), instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods. In the Vet Record today, a team of researchers based in The Netherlands say these diets may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, and as such may pose a risk to both animal and human health. Feeding RMBDs
1h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Kunstig intelligens kan afsløre din krops sande alder11. januar 2018 Kunstig intelligens kan afsløre din krops sande alder Kunstig intelligens Ny kunstig intelligens måler din biologiske alder med stor præcision. Det kan afsløre, om livsstilsændringer og medicinske præparater øger sandsynligheden for et langt og sundt liv. Det viser ny international forskning lavet i samarbejde med Center for Sund Aldring på Københavns Universitet. En ny kunstig in
1h
Viden
Facebook opdaterer nyhedsstrøm for at gøre plads til vennerFacebook har torsdag oplyst, at det vil gennemføre store opdateringer af sit system. Det sker for at sætte familiemedlemmer og venner over kendte og fansider i brugernes nyhedsstrøm. Det vil ifølge Facebook selv føre til, at folk vil bruge mindre tid på det sociale medie. Facebooks administrerende direktør, Mark Zuckerberg, har tidligere sagt, at det er en prioritet for Facebook, at man skal brin
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK satellite to make movies from spaceImage copyright EARTH-i Image caption Artwork: Manufacturer SSTL calls it Carbonite, but Earth-i refers to the satellite as VividX2 A British satellite has gone into orbit on an Indian rocket to acquire full-colour, high-definition video of the surface of the Earth. The demonstrator is expected to pave the way for a series of at least 15 such spacecraft, which will be operated by the Guildford-ba
2h
Ingeniøren
Meltdown og Spectre varsler ilde for 2018Knaldene fra bordbomber og raketter havde dårligt lagt sig, før nytårets lydkulisse fik følgeskab af endnu et brag. Denne gang fra en sikkerhedsbombe i den it-hardware, de fleste af os anvender. Få dage inde i 2018, den 3. januar, blev sløret nemlig løftet for to sårbarheder, der har fået de malende navne Meltdown og Spectre. Der er som sådan ikke noget usædvanligt i, at der dukker mere eller min
3h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Vi siger det én gang til – få nu styr på de energiafgifter!Meget godt kan vi fremhæve Danmark for, når vi sidste år atter en gang satte rekord i produktionen af vindmøllestrøm: 43 procent af vores el hev vi ud af vinden. Men vi er ikke særlig begavede til at få det optimale ud af strømmen. Danmark har været fremme i skoene med at bygge milliarddyre kabler til udlandet, så vi kan sende el til Norge, når det stormer over landet – og importere, når det er v
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digital technology is helping women to explore their sexualityWomen who consume Internet pornography are using technology to explore their sexuality and connect with others to discuss their sexual interests, according to research from the University of Waterloo. The qualitative study involved in-depth discussions with 28 women across the spectrum of sexual identities who had consumed online erotic material. Through the interviews, researchers found that por
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative condition that causes the decline of cognitive function and the inability to carry out daily life
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per yearIMAGE: Asthma costs top $80 billion per year, according to CDC study. view more Credit: ATS Jan. 12, 2018-- Asthma costs the U.S. economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society . In " The Economic Burden of Asthma in the United States, 2008-2013 ," r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Age is not a risk factor for complications after surgery among older patientsTORONTO, Jan. 12, 2018--Among older patients, frailty and cognitive impairment before surgery are associated with developing complications after surgery, but age is not, a new study suggests. In addition to frailty, depressive symptoms and smoking were also associated with developing postoperative complications following elective surgery, according to the systematic review, published online today
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Veterans who learn Transcendental Meditation find relief from PTSD, new study showsA study published in Military Medicine showed that after 30 days of practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique, 80 percent of the 46 veterans and active-duty personnel no longer had PTSD. All participants had been clinically diagnosed with PTSD using a standard assessment. By comparison, standard treatments for PTSD--prolonged exposure therapy, cognitive processing therapy, and medication-
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify immune cells that keep gut fungi under controlImmune cells that process food and bacterial antigens in the intestines control the intestinal population of fungi, according to a new study. Defects in the fungus-fighting abilities of these cells may contribute to some cases of Crohn's disease and other forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Babies stir up clouds of bio-gunk when they crawlWhen babies crawl, their movement across floors, especially carpeted surfaces, kicks up high levels of dirt, skin cells, bacteria, pollen, and fungal spores, a new study has found. The infants inhale a dose of bio bits in their lungs that is four times (per kilogram of body mass) what an adult would breathe walking across the same floor.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
And the Award for Most Nauseating Self-Driving Car Goes to …In many ways this year’s CES looked a lot more like an autonomous-car show than a consumer electronics show. There were announcements aplenty from the likes of Ford, Baidu, Toyota, and others about self-driving vehicles, upcoming driving tests, and new partners. In a parking lot across from the Las Vegas Convention Center, several companies offered rides; you could even schedule a ride in a self-
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnified and stretched out image of extremely distant galaxyAn intensive survey deep into the universe by NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes has yielded the proverbial needle-in-a-haystack: the farthest galaxy yet seen in an image that has been stretched and amplified by a phenomenon called gravitational lensing.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dengue takes low and slow approach to replicationDengue virus slowly takes over the endoplasmic reticulum, the production site for a subset of host proteins, and steers clear of the cytosol, the fluid-filled space where the majority of host cellular proteins are synthesized. Its viral RNA template is translated into protein in such an inefficient, lackadaisical manner that it doesn't trip alarms.
4h
Ingeniøren
Sådan bliver du uundværlig for din chefMåden, dine kolleger og chef ser dig på, afgøres ikke kun af dine evner. Faktisk betyder flere faktorer næsten mere end dine kompetencer, når din leder skal vurdere dit værd for virksomheden. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Ofte vil det bunde i subjektive indtryk og personlige oplevelser. Præcis af den grund bør du kende til et par tricks, der får dig til at se godt ud i din chefs øjne. K
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
California's water saving brings bonus effectsWater-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Northern corn leaf blight genes identified in new studyMidwestern corn growers know the symptoms of northern corn leaf blight all too well: greenish-gray lesions on the leaves that can add up to major yield losses if not detected and treated early. Corn resistance genes have been identified, but the fungal disease has found ways to sneak around corn's defenses. Now, researchers have discovered how the fungus is outsmarting corn, and they may be able t
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
All in the family: Focused genomic comparisonsAspergillus fungi are pathogens, decomposers, and important sources of biotechnologically-important enzymes. Scientists now report the first outcome from the large-scale sequencing of 300+ Aspergillus species. These findings are a proof of concept of novel methods to functionally annotate genomes to more quickly identify genes of interest.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tagged tiger shark proving unstoppableFor more than a decade, researchers have been tagging and tracking sharks in order to study their migratory patterns and more. One tiger shark - Andy - is now the longest-ever tracked tiger shark, providing years worth of data for researchers.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supermassive black hole caught burping — twiceAstronomers have caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy snacking on gas and then "burping" — not once, but twice.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why the Republican Party may have an advantage when it rains: Voters change their mindsBad weather affects US voter turnout and election outcomes with past research demonstrating that the Republican Party has the advantage. A new study finds that the Republican Party's advantage when it rains may be due in part to voters changing their partisan preference that day.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Closed marriage: An orchid that never bloomsA flower identified as Lecanorchis nigricans has been revealed to be a different identity, Lecanorchis nigricans var. patipetala. Both species are self-pollinating, but the flowers of the true L. nigricans never open.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swiss archaeologist discovers the earliest tomb of a Scythian princeDeep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, a Swiss archaeologist has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest -- and that it may be harboring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protecting corridors is critical to preserving genetic diversity in tigers, and mizimising extinction, study findsTigers have lost 95% of their historical range, and what remains is highly fragmented. According to a new study, high traffic roads and densely populated urban areas are a severe impediment to tiger movement between fragments. Unplanned development in the future will result in loss of connectivity and an increased possibility of extinction for several tiger populations. To ensure future persistenc
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spider eat spider: Scientists discover 18 new spider-hunting pelican spiders in MadagascarScientists examined and analyzed hundreds of pelican spiders both in the field in Madagascar and through study of pelican spiders preserved in museum collections. Their analysis sorted the spiders studied into 26 different species -- 18 of which have never before been described. The new species add to scientists' understanding of Madagascar's renowned biodiversity, and will help scientists investi
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Huge black hole blasts out 'double burp'Image copyright NASA/Stsci/CXC Image caption Arrows point to the the two burps of gas coming from the black hole; the top arrow points to the newer burp and the bottom arrow points to the older one Astronomers have caught a massive black hole letting out a 'double burp' after binging on hot gas. When cosmic gas comes near one of these sinkholes, it gets sucked it in - but some of the energy is re
6h
Feed: All Latest
How a Mudslide Becomes a Deadly Tsunami of Rocks and SludgeThe mudslides earlier this week that killed 17 people—eight more remain missing—came as a terrifying surprise in the early morning to the enclaves of Montecito and Summerland, nestled into the California coastline just southeast of Santa Barbara. But in most respects, they were also entirely predictable—and predicted. The Thomas Fire, the largest wildfire in California history, burned almost 450
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
A plastic-free high street by 2042?Many high street stores use plastic to protect their fruit and vegetables.
7h
Live Science
Cahokia: North America's First CityCahokia was a city that, at its peak from A.D. 1050-1200, was larger than many European cities, including London. The city was spread out over six square miles (16 square kilometers) and encompassed at least 120 mounds and a population between 10,000 and 20,000 people. Located across the Mississippi River from modern-day St. Louis, it was the largest pre-Columbian city north of Mexico. The
7h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook Tweaks Newsfeed to Favor Content from Friends, FamilyIn November, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg started sprinkling a new phrase, or perhaps a new idea, into his quarterly call with investors . “It's important to remember that Facebook is about bringing people closer together and enabling meaningful social interactions,” he said. Research, he continued, demonstrates that interactions with friends and family on social media is particularly “meaningful
7h
Futurity.org
Screen time may alter the way preschoolers napIncreased media use is linked to preschoolers getting less sleep at night and more sleep during the day, report researchers. “…children with televisions in their bedrooms were 127 percent more likely to engage in sneaky media use…” Previous research indicates that children ages two to five should only use screen media for about one hour a day to ensure their healthy growth and development. This g
7h
Popular Science
Meet the amateur astronomers who track secretive spy satellites for funWhat the heck happened to Zuma? We know that the super-secret satellite was built by Northrop Grumman for an agency of the United States Government, and that SpaceX launched it on Sunday, January 7. But what we know is vastly outweighed by what we don’t know . We’re not sure which agency the satellite was built for, and while SpaceX has stated that their Falcon 9 rocket “did everything correctly
8h
Science : NPR
The High Cost Of Medical Marijuana Causes Pain In VermontMaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from the opioid painkillers she was prescribed for chronic nerve pain. "I felt tired all the time and I was still in pain," she says. Marijuana works better for her, but costs $200 per month out-of-pocket. Emily Corwin/VPR hide caption toggle caption Emily Corwin/VPR MaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from th
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
California's water saving brings bonus effectsWater-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters . Measures to cut water use by 25 per cent across California were implemented in 2015, following a four-
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast, IBM back blockchain fundComcast Corp.'s venture capital arm and IBM Corp. have agreed to finance MState, a fund that invests in early-stage firms looking to sell blockchain-based services to big corporations. The fund's first investment is in BlockDaemon, a New York firm founded by Konstantine Richter (formerly of Lookbooks) which promises clients "one-click deployment" to access blockchain nodes using the Hyperledger F
9h
Futurity.org
3D images of fat reveal new targets in obesity fightThree-dimensional images of fat cells, the first of their kind, are the latest tactic in the ongoing fight against the global obesity epidemic. The image below is part of a new report that reveals the inner workings of fat tissue in mice and identifies potential targets for new drugs to treat and prevent obesity and diabetes. A 3D image of the neural projections in a fat cell. (Credit: Rockefelle
9h
Live Science
Out-of-This-World Diamond-Studded Rock Just Got Even WeirderThe diamonds that are studding the Hypatia stone probably formed from the shock when the space rock blasted through Earth's atmosphere. Credit: Shutterstock A tiny chunk of stone that looks like nothing else ever seen in the solar system might be even weirder than scientists thought. The Hypatia stone was found in southwestern Egypt in 1996. It was hardly more than a pebble, just 1.3 inches
9h
Big Think
What I Learned about Disability and Infanticide from Peter SingerIn the 1970s, the Australian moral philosopher Peter Singer, perhaps best-known for his book Animal Liberation (1975), began to argue that it is ethical to give parents the option (in consultation with doctors) to euthanise infants with disabilities. He mostly, but not exclusively, discussed severe forms of disabilities such as spina bifida or anencephaly. In Practical Ethics (1979) , Singer expl
9h
Popular Science
CES 2018: Day four and the gadgets are getting weirdThe first flashy days of CES are over, which means we’re getting into the weirder—and often more interesting—parts of the show. Start with a smart toilet? Sure, why not. Kohler made a really fancy, smart toilet At first glance, you could almost believe the Numi from Kohler is a high-end gaming PC, with its wacky square form factor and glowing lights. In reality, however, it’s a toilet with Alexa
9h
Futurity.org
A bit of white graphene could give ceramics extra powersAdding a little ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride to ceramics could give them outstanding properties, according to new research. Rouzbeh Shahsavari, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University, suggests the incorporation of ultrathin hBN sheets between layers of calcium-silicates would make an interesting bilayer crystal with multifunctional properties. These
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nurse staffing levels linked to patient satisfactionIMAGE: Penn Nursing. view more Credit: Penn Nursing PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA & LONDON, ENGLAND (January 11, 2018) - Satisfaction with care in hospitals declines when patients believe there are not enough nurses on wards, according to a new study based on the NHS Inpatient Survey published in the BMJ Open . Only 14 per cent of patients who reported there was never or rarely enough nurses on
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogsExperts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets (RMBDs), instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods. In the Vet Record today, a team of researchers based in The Netherlands say these diets may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, and as such may pose a risk to both animal and human health. Feeding RMBDs
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPsThe emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners (GPs), published in the online journal BMJ Open . Dysfunctional working relationships and unsupportive/bullying colleagues, combined with the fear of making mistakes, complaints, and inspections, add to the
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients' unfavorable views of hospital care strongly linked to nurse numbersPatients' unfavourable views of hospital care in England are strongly linked to insufficient numbers of nurses on duty, rather than uncaring staff, indicates observational research published in the online journal BMJ Open . Increasing the registered nurse headcount may boost satisfaction with the quality of care, conclude the researchers, who base their findings on national survey data from patie
9h
Futurity.org
Predator’s pee warns mud crabs of attackResearchers have identified two chemicals in the urine of predatory blue crabs that warn mud crabs of an impending attack. Beyond decoding crab-eat-crab alarm triggers, pinpointing the compounds for the first time opens new doors to understanding how chemicals invisibly regulate marine wildlife. “You might call trigonelline and homarine fear-inducing cues.” The findings, which appear in the Proce
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
18 new species of pelican spiders discoveredDespite their name, pelican spiders aren’t massive, fish-eating monstrosities. In fact, the shy spiders in the family Archaeidae are as long as a grain of rice and are a threat only to other spiders. Discovering a new species of these tiny Madagascar spiders is tough, but Hannah Wood has done just that — 18 times over. Wood, an arachnologist at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History i
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study reveals adverse impact of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes on pregnancy outcomesA new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) reveals that both type 2 (T2D) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with complications during pregnancy including stillbirths and emergency Caesarean sections, as well as increasing the risk of infant mortality. The research was conducted by Dr Sharon Mackin, a Clinical Research Fe
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cuttlefish hear bow wave of looming dangerImagine trying to get close to your dinner only for it to be swept aside by your approach; this is the scenario faced by aquatic creatures every day as they try to snap up a tasty morsel. 'It is impossible to eat something underwater without creating a hydrodynamic disturbance', says Maria Wilson from the University of Southern Denmark, describing how a predator's approach is heralded by a bow wa
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tableau goes Hyper to keep up with customers' data needsTableau Software is revamping a core part of its technology to analyze data faster, a move intended to keep up with its customers' increasing big-data needs. The Seattle company , which makes software to visualize analytics, is introducing its so-called Hyper engine in a software update Wednesday. The technology is designed to make the data-visualization process five times faster, meaning busines
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cuttlefish hear bow wave of looming dangerImagine trying to get close to your dinner only for it to be swept aside by your approach; this is the scenario faced by aquatic creatures every day as they try to snap up a tasty morsel. "It is impossible to eat something underwater without creating a hydrodynamic disturbance," says Maria Wilson from the University of Southern Denmark, describing how a predator's approach is heralded by a bow wa
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US says snow-loving lynx no longer need special protectionWildlife officials say Canada lynx no longer need special protections in the United States following measures to preserve populations of the snow-loving wild cats.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
French glitches put technology under reviewThe goal-line technology system, provided by German company GoalControl, was "suspended immediately" by French football authorities after incidents in League Cup games on Wednesday between Amiens and Paris Saint-Germain and Angers and Montpellier The debate on using technology to help football referees took a twist on Thursday as the French league suspended its use of goal-line reviews following
10h
Feed: All Latest
Skype Introduces End-to-End Encrypted Texts and VoiceSkype Conversations SignalSkype has more than 300 million monthly users, making it one of the most popular chat platforms in the world. Now, they'll all be able to benefit from a crucial privacy protection: Microsoft announced Thursday that Skype will offer end-to-end encryption for audio calls, text, and multimedia messages through a feature called Private Conversations. Skype will use the robust, open-source Signal Prot
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA calculated heavy rainfall leading to California mudslidesNASA's IMERG analysis of Jan. 8 through 10, 2018 revealed that the heaviest rainfall occurred over the Sacramento Valley where over 8 inches (203 mm) were indicated. A rainfall total of 5 inches (127 mm) was reported in Ventura County. Credit: NASA/JAXA/Hal Pierce Winter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on January 9. NASA calcu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are millennials gender rebels or returning to tradition?"Where the Millennials Will Take Us: A New Generation Wrestles with the Gender Structure" by Barbara Risman, UIC professor of sociology and distinguished professor of liberal arts and sciences. Credit: Oxford University Some research suggests that millennials are pushing boundaries by not only rejecting traditional distinctions between the sexes, both at home and at work, but also refusing to acc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Northern corn leaf blight genes identified in new studyMidwestern corn growers know the symptoms of northern corn leaf blight all too well: greenish-gray lesions on the leaves that can add up to major yield losses if not detected and treated early. Resistance genes have been identified in corn, but the fungal disease has found ways to sneak around corn's defenses. Now, researchers have figured out how the fungus is outsmarting corn, and they may be a
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Novel Nanomaterial Highlights Path to Cheaper Carbon CaptureY Combinator Will Give You $1 Million to Stop Aging The famed startup incubator Y Combinator put out a call for companies that want to increase human longevity and “health span.” Who they want: Founders with new ideas for treating old-age diseases like Alzheimer’s, “but we will also consider more radical… Read more The famed startup incubator Y Combinator put out a call for companies that want
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All in the family: Focused genomic comparisonsColonies of Aspergillus (clockwise from top left): A. campestris; A. ochraceoroseus; and, A.steynii. These 3 species were among those whose genomes were sequenced in the study published ahead the week of Jan. 8, 2018 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Credit: Kirstine Ellen Lyhne, DTU Found in microbial communities around the world, Aspergillus fungi are pathogens, decompose
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New on MIT Technology Review
Y Combinator Will Give You $1 Million to Stop AgingY Combinator Will Give You $1 Million to Stop Aging The famed startup incubator Y Combinator put out a call for companies that want to increase human longevity and “health-span.” Who they want: Founders with new ideas for treating old-age diseases like Alzheimer’s, “but we will also consider more radical… Read more The famed startup incubator Y Combinator put out a call for companies that want
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts call for action to address physician burnout in nephrologyWashington, DC (January 11, 2018) -- Kidney specialists face increasing work demands, high rates of burnout, and declining interest in nephrology as a career. A group of articles publishing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) sheds light on how that these factors threaten to reduce job satisfaction and impair the delivery of high-quality care
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The Atlantic
Moira Donegan Tells Her Own StoryI created the shitty men in media list . I am the real author of the #shittymediamen list . It was me. It was me. It was me. Briefly, they were all Spartacus. On Tuesday, rumors emerged that Harper’s magazine might be publishing the identity of the woman who created the Shitty Media Men list , a spreadsheet shared among an initially small group of women who work in media to warn them about predat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Baylor study suggests jotting down tasks canWriting a "to-do" list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a Baylor University study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities. "We live in a 24/7 culture in which our to-do lists seem to be constantly growing and causing us to worry about unfinished tasks at bedtime,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All in the family: Focused genomic comparisonsIMAGE: Colonies of Aspergillus (clockwise from top left): A. campestris; A. ochraceoroseus; and, A.steynii. These 3 species were among those whose genomes were sequenced in the study published ahead the week... view more Credit: Kirstine Ellen Lyhne, DTU Found in microbial communities around the world, Aspergillus fungi are pathogens, decomposers, and important sources of biotechnologically-i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA calculated heavy rainfall leading to California mudslidesWinter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on January 9. NASA calculated the amount of rain fall between January 8 and 10, 2018 and calculated the potential for landslides. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a landslide potential map was generated by the global Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
By altering bone marrow, training can prepare innate immune system for future challengesResearchers have discovered how the innate immune system, which responds more generally to dangers detected in the body, can be trained to 'remember' past threats and respond more robustly to future challenges.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism: Brain circuit controls social behavior identifiedA new study has identified a key brain region of the neural circuit that controls social behavior. Increasing the activity of this region, called the habenula, led to social problems in rodents, whereas decreasing activity of the region prevented social problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teenagers gamble away their educationThe odds are stacked against teenagers who regularly gamble. A new study shows that a 14-year-old who gambles is more likely to struggle at school.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast food makes the immune system more aggressive in the long termThe immune system reacts similarly to a high fat and high calorie diet as to a bacterial infection. Unhealthy food seems to make the body's defenses more aggressive in the long term. Even long after switching to a healthy diet, inflammation towards innate immune stimulation is more pronounced. These changes may be involved in the development of arteriosclerosis and diabetes.
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Science | The Guardian
Starwatch: Farewell and thanks for 43 years of guiding us through the night skyA s readers of Starwatch already know , after supplying the monthly star notes to the Guardian for 43 years, Alan Pickup is standing down. We bid him a fond farewell. It all started with a trip to hospital back in 1974. Alan Pickup was visiting the astronomer Norman Matthew, the Guardian’s Night Sky columnist, and found Norman fretting about the column’s rapidly approaching deadline. He volunteer
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Rising CO2 in lakes could keep water fleas from raising their spiky defensesRising carbon dioxide levels could leave some tiny lake dwellers defenseless. Like the oceans, some lakes are experiencing increasing levels of the greenhouse gas, a new study shows. And too much CO 2 in the water may leave water fleas, an important part of many lake food webs, too sleepy to fend off predators. Detailed observations of lake chemistry over long periods of time are rare. But resear
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No planets needed for rings around stars: Disk patterns can self-generateA new study shows rings, arcs and spirals in disks around stars may not be caused by planets. They may self-generate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brown dwarfs found sprinkled among newborn stars in Orion NebulaAstronomers have uncovered the largest known population of brown dwarfs sprinkled among newborn stars in the Orion Nebula.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyesBiologists look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What happens when your brain's support cells aren't so supportive?Salk scientists use gene expression to understand how astrocytes change with age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The brain's GPS has a buddy systemBrain cells that reflect self position relative to others have been identified in the rat hippocampus. Sometimes these representations are processed jointly by the same cells, depending on a rat's goals and actions. This discovery deepens our understanding of the hippocampus and its role as the brain's positioning system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The nanoscopic structure that locks up our genesWireless headphones, two yo-yos connected by a string, earmuffs: all these items could be used to describe a tiny structure inside a cell's nucleus. For decades, scientists could only speculate about the shape of heterochromatin, a type of chromatin -- which consists of tightly packed DNA and proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasiteResearchers have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in 262 parasite cell lines of Plasmodium falciparum -- protozoan pathogens that cause malaria -- that are resistant to 37 diverse antimalarial compounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growthResearchers have discovered that the members of a protein family from the plant internal clock act sequentially to limit the plant growth until the end of the night. This knowledge could help to understand how plants face different kinds of stress that affect their growth, such as drought or high temperature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Northern corn leaf blight genes identified in new studyURBANA, Ill. - Midwestern corn growers know the symptoms of northern corn leaf blight all too well: greenish-gray lesions on the leaves that can add up to major yield losses if not detected and treated early. Resistance genes have been identified in corn, but the fungal disease has found ways to sneak around corn's defenses. Now, researchers have figured out how the fungus is outsmarting corn, an
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Big Think
Australian Fires Are Being Set by Legendary Pyromaniacal RaptorsThe aboriginal people of northern Australia have spoken of them for at least a century: “Firehawks” who carry fire through the sky, dropping it to the ground to spark flames that drive prey out of hiding. These creatures are even characters in certain Dreaming ceremonies. Indigenous author Phillip Waipuldanya Roberts wrote in his 1964 biography, “I have seen a hawk pick up a smouldering stick in
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Want to be more creative? Go for a walk | Marily OppezzoWhen trying to come up with a new idea, we all have times when we get stuck. But according to research by behavioral and learning scientist Marily Oppezzo, getting up and going for a walk might be all it takes to get your creative juices flowing. In this fun, fast talk, she explains how walking could help you get the most out of your next brainstorm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests many gay and bisexual men are skeptical, but attitudes are on the riseDr. Jonathon Rendina (@ProfRendina), an Assistant Professor at Hunter College and Director of Quantitative Methods at Hunter's Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training (CHEST; @CHESTNYC), and Dr. Jeffrey Parsons (@DrJeffParsons), Distinguished Professor at Hunter and Director of CHEST, have published a new paper in the Journal of the International AIDS Society focused on gay and bisexual men
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New on MIT Technology Review
I Rode in a Car in Las Vegas. Its Driver Was in Silicon ValleyA car with an empty driver’s seat slowly pulled up in front of me at the MGM Grand Las Vegas the other night. It wasn’t exactly a driverless car, though; my driver was just sitting 540 miles away in Mountain View, California. The car belongs to a startup called Phantom Auto , which is building technology to let a remote human driver take over briefly for autonomous vehicles when they get into sit
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Ung ingeniør fandt formlen på cykelrekordIngeniøren udgives af Mediehuset Ingeniøren A/S . Powered by Drupal. Ingeniøren leverer nyheder om teknologi og naturvidenskab for fagfolk og interesserede; artikler, blogs, debat, infografik, video. Kalvebod Brygge 33 , 1550 København V - Danmark Tlf. 33 26 53 00
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toy-maker VTech to pay $650,000 to settle FTC charges over children's privacy violationsAn electronic toy-maker has agreed to pay $650,000 to settle charges from the Federal Trade Commission that it collected personal information on hundreds of thousands of children without their parents knowing. VTech Electronics, whose North American operations are based in Arlington Heights, Ill., says it did notify parents and the allegations are based on technical provisions of a children 's pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify immune cells that keep gut fungi under controlImmune cells that process food and bacterial antigens in the intestines control the intestinal population of fungi, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. Defects in the fungus-fighting abilities of these cells may contribute to some cases of Crohn's disease and other forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The findings, published Jan. 11 in Science , illuminate a str
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Variation between strains may account for differences in vulnerability to infectionScientists have long sought to explain why people respond differently to bacterial infections. In the case of TB, for example, less than 10 percent of those infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop severe lung disease, while others remain symptom-free. In some cases, genetic defects have been shown to make the human immune system susceptible to infection. Yet human genetics may not be the
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The Atlantic
How It Became Normal to Ignore Texts and EmailsThe defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. In person, or on the phone, those responses come astoundingly quickly: After one person has spoken, the other replies in an average of just 200 milliseconds . In recent decades, written communication has caught up—or at least come as close as it’s likely to get to mimicking the speed o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyesMars Ice WaterA Hogna wolf spider shows off his magnificent visual system consisting of four pairs of eyes around the front and sides of his head, giving him a near 360-degree view. Credit: Sean McCann With the increasing advantages of DNA sequencing, University of Cincinnati biologists are unraveling many evolutionary mysteries behind the complex world of spider vision. Looking closely at the mysterious genet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble and Spitzer team up to find magnified and stretched out image of distant galaxyThis is a Hubble Space Telescope image of the farthest galaxy yet seen in an image that has been stretched and amplified by a phenomenon called gravitational lensing. The embryonic galaxy, named SPT0615-JD, existed when the universe was just 500 million years old. Though a few other primitive galaxies have been seen at this early epoch, they have essentially all looked like red dots, given their
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Faint galactic glow: Intriguing organic molecule benzonitrile in interstellar spaceAstronomers have made the first definitive interstellar detection of benzonitrile, an intriguing organic molecule that helps to chemically link simple carbon-based molecules and truly massive ones known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This discovery is a vital clue in a 30-year-old mystery: identifying the source of a faint infrared glow that permeates the Milky Way and other galaxies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyesIMAGE: A Hogna wolf spider shows off his magnificent visual system consisting of four pairs of eyes around the front and sides of his head, giving him a near 360-degree view.... view more Credit: Sean McCann With the increasing advantages of DNA sequencing, University of Cincinnati biologists are unraveling many evolutionary mysteries behind the complex world of spider vision. Looking close
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No planets needed: NASA study shows disk patterns can self-generateWhen exoplanet scientists first spotted patterns in disks of dust and gas around young stars, they thought newly formed planets might be the cause. But a recent NASA study cautions that there may be another explanation -- one that doesn't involve planets at all. Exoplanet hunters watch stars for a few telltale signs that there might be planets in orbit, like changes in the color and brightness of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble probes the archeology of our Milky Way's ancient hubhis Hubble Space Telescope image of a sparkling jewel box full of stars captures the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. Aging red giant stars coexist with their more plentiful younger cousins, the smaller, white, Sun-like stars, in this crowded region of our galaxy’s ancient central hub, or bulge. Most of the bright blue stars in the image are probably recently formed stars located in the foreground,
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: You Won’t Like This News About Bedbugs, Ticks and the ‘Bomb Cyclone’“Cold is widely thought of as a fairly ineffective way to deal with bed bugs,” said Mr. White. Even a prolonged polar-vortex-bomb-cyclone death trap probably wouldn’t be enough. Mr. White said he once received an email from someone who tried to freeze bedbugs out of a sofa on a snowbank in a super cold Canadian city. Three months later, they were still alive. Stink bugs and other home invaders Ph
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NYT > Science
That Recent Brutally Cold Weather? It’s Getting RarerBut Dr. Tebaldi, a statistician who lives in Colorado, where she works at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, acknowledged that the study might provide little comfort to Northeasterners who experienced the bone-chilling cold during the last week of December and the first week of January. While Arctic air is milder because of climate change, the question of whether global warm
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Science : NPR
Thick, 'Rather Clean' Ice Sheets Are Spotted On MarsMars Ice WaterThe researchers used the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to make observations about ice on Mars. NASA hide caption toggle caption NASA The researchers used the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to make observations about ice on Mars. NASA Scientists say that images from Mars show large slopes of ice – and provide a hint at how they were formed. One likely theory involves snowfall on the red planet. The res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble finds substellar objects in the Orion NebulaIn an unprecedented deep survey for small, faint objects in the Orion Nebula, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered the largest known population of brown dwarfs sprinkled among newborn stars. Looking in the vicinity of the survey stars, researchers not only found several very-low-mass brown dwarf companions, but also three giant planets. They even found an example of bina
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dengue takes low and slow approach to replicationIMAGE: These cultured cells include one (center) that is infected with a common strain of dengue virus. The genomic material of the virus is highlighted in magenta, and is localized to... view more Credit: Jessica Child DURHAM, N.C. - A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emergency department program for older adults cuts hospitalizations by 33 percentCHICAGO --- Roughly one third of all older patients age 65 and older visiting emergency departments nationwide are admitted to the hospital. But an emergency department program focused on geriatric transitional care has reduced the risk of unnecessary admission of older patients at Northwestern Medicine by 33 percent, according to a new study from Northwestern Univeristy, Mount Sinai Medical Cent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA space telescopes provide a 3-D journey through the Orion NebulaThis image showcases both the visible and infrared visualizations of the Orion Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, F. Summers, G. Bacon, Z. Levay, J. DePasquale, L. Frattare, M. Robberto and M. Gennaro (STScI), and R. Hurt (Caltech/IPAC) Astronomers and visualization specialists from NASA's Universe of Learning program have combined visible and infrared vision of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers catch supermassive black hole burping—twiceCredit: University of Colorado at Boulder A team led by CU Boulder researchers has caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy snacking on gas and then "burping"—not once, but twice. CU Boulder Assistant Professor Julie Comerford, who led the study, said the supermassive black hole under study appears to have belched – essentially blasting out jets of bright light from the gas it inhaled
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Citizen scientists discover five-planet systemIn its search for exoplanets -- planets outside of our solar system -- NASA's Kepler telescope trails behind Earth, measuring the brightness of stars that may potentially host planets. The instrument identifies potential planets around other stars by looking for dips in the brightness of the stars that occur when planets cross in front of, or transit, them. Typically, computer programs flag the st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steep slopes on Mars reveal structure of buried ice on Red PlanetMars Ice WaterResearchers have found eight sites where thick deposits of ice beneath Mars' surface are exposed in faces of eroding slopes. The ice was likely deposited as snow long ago. The deposits hold clues about Mars' climate history and also may make frozen water more accessible than previously thought to future robotic or human exploration missions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in northwest CaliforniaSpotted owls and barred owls are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a new study. Proposition 64, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state, went into effect this month and is expected to intensify the issue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking bad metals with neutronsBy combining the latest developments in neutron scattering and theory, researchers are close to predicting phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism in strongly correlated electron systems. It is likely that the next advances in superconductivity and magnetism will come from such systems, but they might also be used in completely new ways such as quantum computing.
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The Atlantic
Photos of California's Deadly MudslidesThe massive wildfires that scorched parts of Southern California last month left hillsides devoid of vegetation and covered with ash and a dried-out layer of topsoil. On Tuesday, heavy rains fell north of Los Angeles, turning many of these hillsides into torrents of mud and boulders that destroyed dozens of homes and damaged hundreds more. At the moment, 17 deaths have been reported, as search an
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Not all strep infections are alike and it may have nothing to do with youOne person infected with strep bacteria might get a painful sore throat; another might face a life-threatening blood infection. Now, scientists are trying to pin down why. Variation between individuals’ immune systems may not be entirely to blame. Instead, extra genes picked up by some pathogens can cause different strains to have wildly different effects on the immune system , even in the same p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic coil springs accelerate particles on the SunThis images show the measurements performed by the SECCHI/EUVI-instrument onboard STEREO from 29 April 2014. The image on the left was taken ten minutes prior to the one on the right. The emissions of extreme ultraviolet light (at a wavelength of 304 Å) clearly show a helical motion of the plasma flows. Credit: © NASA/MPS In April and July 2014, the Sun emitted three jets of energetic particles i
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Scientific American Content: Global
Like Oceans, Freshwater Is Also AcidifyingScientists have known for some time the ocean is acidifying because of climate change. The seas’ absorption of human-generated carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is well documented, along with the harm it is causing ocean creatures like shellfish. But what about freshwater? Is it also soaking up atmospheric carbon? A new paper published today in Current Biology presents some of the first evid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientists discover five-planet systemArtist’s visualization of the K2-138 system, the first multi-planet system discovered by citizen scientists. The central star is slightly smaller and cooler than our sun. The five known planets are all between the size of Earth and Neptune; planet b may potentially be rocky, but planets c, d, e, and f likely contain large amounts of ice and gas. All five planets have orbital periods shorter than
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the worldResearchers have found that flowering plants have small cells relative to other major plant groups, made possible by a greatly reduced genome size, and this may explain how they became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rising CO2 is causing trouble in freshwaters too, study suggestsAs carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere rise, more CO2 gets absorbed into seawater. As a result, the world's oceans have grown more acidic over time, causing a wide range of well-documented problems for marine animals and ecosystems. Now, researchers present some of the first evidence that similar things are happening in freshwaters too.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Possible lava tube skylights discovered near the North Pole of the MoonOne of the highest resolution NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images showing some of the newly discovered lava tube skylight candidates at Philolaus Crater near the North Pole of the Moon (NASA/Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter/SETI Institute/Mars Institute/Pascal Lee). The SETI Institute and the Mars Institute announced today the discovery of small pits in a large crater near the North Pole of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GBT detection unlocks exploration of 'aromatic' interstellar chemistryThis is a widefield image of the Taurus Molecular Cloud and surrounding sky, taken from Charlottesville, VA on January 2, 2018. The molecular cloud is the dark, obscured region in the upper left of the image, where the gas and dust are blocking the stars behind the cloud from view. To the right of the image is the Pleiades cluster, and in the bottom left is the star Aldebaran. The image was captu
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Popular Science
This strange condition makes you feel like you just burnt your mouth on hot coffee—indefinitelyThe pain came without warning. It was February of last year, and the man was eating dinner. He’d just reached for a glass of wine. “It really burned my mouth when I started to drink,” says Greg (the healthcare worker in Toronto asked for his name to be changed). The odd and disquieting sensation had no apparent cause—no burns or cuts or other injuries. Yet the burning and tingling Greg felt on hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No planets needed: NASA study shows disk patterns can self-generateArcs, rings and spirals appear in the debris disk around the star HD 141569A. The black region in the center is caused by a mask that blocks direct light from the star. This image incorporates observations made in June and August 2015 using the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument. Credit: NASA/Hubble/Konishi et al. 2016 When exoplanet scientists first spotted patterns in disks of dust and ga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble finds substellar objects in the Orion NebulaThis image is part of a Hubble Space Telescope survey for low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planets in the Orion Nebula. Each symbol identifies a pair of objects, which can be seen in the symbol’s center as a single dot of light. Special image processing techniques were used to separate the starlight into a pair of objects. The thicker inner circle represents the primary body, and the thinner out
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Scientific American Content: Global
Gender Discrimination in Science is Especially CommonAs the national conversation about how women are treated in the workplace continues, a new Pew Research Center report finds that half of women working in science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) jobs report experiencing discrimination at work due to their gender, more than women in non-STEM jobs (41 percent) and far more than men working in STEM jobs (19 percent). Discrimination comes in ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women and men military veterans, childhood adversity and alcohol and drug useIMAGE: Public health scientist Elizabeth Evans at UMass Amherst suggests, after study, that when people join the military or access health care as veterans would be good times to assess and... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Results of a national study led by public health scientist Elizabeth Evans at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at the U.S. Department
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancerIMAGE: RAS oncogenes work in pairs, known as "dimers. " view more Credit: UT Southwestern DALLAS - Jan. 11, 2018 - Mutated RAS genes are some of the most common genetic drivers of cancer, especially in aggressive cancers like pancreatic and lung cancer, but no medicines that target RAS are available despite decades of effort. Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Failed outpatient sterilization procedures not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes: StudyBOSTON-- While the risk of pregnancy is low after female sterilization procedures, 60 percent of pregnancies that do occur result in a live birth, according to a new study. Researchers looked at data from close to 1,000 pregnancies after failed outpatient and surgical sterilization procedures and found that while neither option was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, outpatient procedures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The coming of age of gene therapy: A review of the past and path forwardIMAGE: A new gene is injected into an adenovirus vector, which is used to introduce the modified DNA into a human cell. If the treatment is successful, the new gene will... view more Credit: US National Library of Medicine After three decades of hopes tempered by setbacks, gene therapy--the process of treating a disease by modifying a person's DNA--is no longer the future of medicine, but is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GBT detection unlocks exploration of 'aromatic' interstellar chemistryIMAGE: The aromatic molecule benzonitrile was detected by the GBT in the Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 (TMC-1). view more Credit: B. McGuire, B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF) Summary: Astronomers using the Green Bank Telescope have made the first definitive interstellar detection of benzonitrile, an intriguing organic molecule that helps to chemically link simple carbon-based molecules and truly massive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breaking bad metals with neutronsIMAGE: A comparison of the theoretical calculations (top row) and inelastic neutron scattering data from ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (bottom row) shows the excellent agreement between the two. The... view more Credit: DOE/Argonne National Laboratory By exploiting the properties of neutrons to probe electrons in a metal, a team of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (D
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH study supports use of short-term HIV treatment interruption in clinical trialsA short-term pause in HIV treatment during a carefully monitored clinical trial does not lead to lasting expansion of the HIV reservoir nor cause irreversible damage to the immune system, new findings suggest. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) benefits the health of people living with HIV, prolongs their lives and prevents transmission of the virus to others. If taken daily as directed, ART can re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasiteResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues across the country and around the world, have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in 262 parasite cell lines of Plasmodium falciparum -- protozoan pathogens that cause malaria -- that are resistant to 37 diverse antimalarial compounds. The study, publi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the animal brain deciphers the locations of animals nearbyTwo new studies have identified a subset of neurons in the bat and rat hippocampi, respectively, that specifically encode the spatial position of others of the same species. While scientists have been able to identify neurons that help an organism decipher its own spatial location, surprisingly little is known about how the positions of other animals, relative to the self, are represented in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the malarial parasite is evading our arsenal of drugsA team of researchers has identified numerous mutations that allow the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum to become resistant to treatment. Knowing the identity of genes that impart multidrug resistance is important for the design of new drugs, and for understanding how existing therapeutics can lose their efficacy in clinical settings. Worldwide, hundreds of thousands of people die f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organic molecule benzonitrile detected in spaceIMAGE: This is a widefield image of the Taurus Molecular Cloud and surrounding sky, taken from Charlottesville, VA on January 2, 2018. The molecular cloud is the dark, obscured region in... view more Credit: Brett A. McGuire Scientists studying a cold molecular cloud of the Taurus region with radio telescopes have detected the presence of a particular organic molecule called benzonitrile. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiple sites rich in water ice found on MarsErosion on Mars is exposing deposits of water ice, starting at depths as shallow as one to two meters below the surface and extending 100 meters or more. The ice is a critical target for science and exploration: it affects modern geomorphology, is expected to preserve a record of climate history, influences the planet's habitability, and may be a potential resource for future exploration. Whilst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain's GPS has a buddy systemIMAGE: These are the four types of spatial models for the hippocampus that are proposed in this paper. view more Credit: RIKEN To be successful as a social animal, you need to know where you stand relative to others. Brain cells that perform precisely this function--locating the 'self' and others in space--have now been identified. In rats, the same brain area that stores the animal's own l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH researchers report first 3-D structure of DHHC enzymesIMAGE: Human DHHC20 (yellow) is embedded in the Golgi membrane (green), a compartment located inside cells. DHHC20 attaches a fatty acid chain (white) to a target protein (blue, foreground), which anchors... view more Credit: Credit: Jeremy Swan, NICHD/NIH The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins--enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer--explains how they f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responsesIMAGE: Scanning electron micrograph of S. aureus bacteria escaping destruction by human white blood cells. view more Credit: NIAID via Flickr Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens . Previous research has found that different people va
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Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth diseaseA human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease. Issac Too of the National University of Singapore and colleagues highlight this finding in a new PLOS Pathogens study. Hand, foot, and mouth disease is usually mild, with symptoms such as skin rash and fever. However, espe
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Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in CameroonBoth the etiology and demographics of podoconiosis, a non-infectious disease which causes massive swelling of the legs, are poorly understood. To help contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis knowledge, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described the distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon. Podoconiosis, a non-filarial form of elephantiasis which was identi
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Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the worldScientists have found an explanation for how flowering plants became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world -- a problem that Charles Darwin called an 'abominable mystery'. In a study publishing on January 11 in the open access journal PLOS Biology , Kevin Simonin and Adam Roddy, from San Francisco State University and Yale University respectively, found that flowering plants have sma
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New Scientist - News
Mars has ice sheets 130 metres thick hiding below its red dustMars Ice WaterRoving on thick ice NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS By Leah Crane Just below the surface, Mars is full of ice. New observations have revealed steep cliffs cut out of thick sheets of ice, which may be able to tell us about the planet’s climate over the past millions of years. We know from previous radar studies that ice abounds just under Mars’s dusty surface, but where exactly it is in the Martian crus
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New Scientist - News
UK’s plastic bag ban is a pitiful attempt at a greener futureTough on plastic bags, but it’s not enough Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty By Michael Le Page Prime Minister Theresa May today unveiled the UK government’s long-awaited 25-year plan for improving the environment . It contains much talk about protecting wildlife, making the country cleaner and greener, and so on. It all sounds wonderful, but it is mostly waffle. “The government’s 25-year environm
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New Scientist - News
Hidden exoplanets could be revealed by echoing lightA shadow may not be the only way to spot alien worlds NASA, ESA, L. Calçada By Shannon Hall Echoes can reveal the unseen. Similar to how a killer whale can “see” through pitch-black water by bouncing high-frequency sound waves off objects, we could use light to discover exoplanets. Whenever a star emits a bright flare of radiation, some of its light may reach Earth where astronomers will meas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Steep slopes on Mars reveal structure of buried iceMars Ice WaterCredit: NASA Buried glaciers have been spotted on Mars, offering new hints about how much water may be accessible on the Red Planet and where it is located, researchers said Thursday. Although ice has long been known to exist on Mars, a better understanding of its depth and location could be vital to future human explorers, said the report in the US journal Science . Erosion has exposed eight i
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Live Science
The 'Black Hole' Optical Illusion of the Bird of Paradise ExplainedBlack doesn't get much blacker than the plumage of male birds of paradise, and new research reveals why. The blackest feathers of these rainforest birds are fundamentally differently shaped, on a microscopic level, compared with regular black feathers. The nanostructure of the feather makes them particularly prone to scattering and reabsorbing light, and that in turn makes them not only
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Big Think
New Study Suggests CRISPR-Cas9 May Not Work In Many PeopleThe story began in 1987 when Yoshimumi Ishino of Osaka University discovered that clusters of short sequences in certain bacterial DNA could target DNA within viruses. These palindromic clusters clusters were held together by spacer materials, and eventually came to be known as “Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats,” abbreviated as “CRISPR.” Researchers found that protein fam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Article provides detailed look at participants in Golden Retriever Lifetime StudyBlaze, shown here in Durango, Colo., is the last enrolled dog in the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. Credit: Dr. Sharon Albright, Morris Animal Foundation What do 3,044 golden retrievers across the nation have in common? They are the principal players in the second published scientific paper from Morris Animal Foundation's groundbreaking Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, highlighting characterist
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Scientists Discover Clean Water Ice Just Below Mars' SurfaceLocked away beneath the surface of Mars are vast quantities of water ice. But the properties of that ice—how pure it is, how deep it goes, what shape it takes—remain a mystery to planetary geologists. Those things matter to mission planners, too: Future visitors to Mars , be they short-term sojourners or long-term settlers, will need to understand the planet's subsurface ice reserves if they want
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touchHuman embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (green) showing nuclei in blue. Left: with retinoic acid added. Right: with retinoic acid and BMP4 added, creating proprioceptive sensory interneurons (pink). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/ Stem Cell Reports Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for the first time, coaxe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Joyce soaking northwestern Australia coastOn Jan. 11 at 12:54 a.m. EST (0554 UTC) NOAA's JPSS-1 or NOAA-20 satellite showed Joyce's center just off the coast, while bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center extended toward the northwest over the Southern Indian Ocean, and toward the southeast over Western Australia. Credit: NOAA/NASA Rapid Response Team Tropical Cyclone Joyce, formerly known as tropical cyclone 5S, was moving south
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Babies stir up clouds of bio-gunk when they crawlWEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- When babies crawl, their movement across floors, especially carpeted surfaces, kicks up high levels of dirt, skin cells, bacteria, pollen, and fungal spores, a new study has found. The infants inhale a dose of bio bits in their lungs that is four times (per kilogram of body mass) what an adult would breathe walking across the same floor. As alarming as that sounds, lead re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A look at participants in Morris Animal Foundation golden retriever lifetime studyDENVER/Jan. 11, 2017 - What do 3,044 golden retrievers across the nation have in common? They are the principal players in the second published scientific paper from Morris Animal Foundation 's groundbreaking Golden Retriever Lifetime Study , highlighting characteristics of the dogs in this landmark study, including age, medical condition, preventive care and more. Published in the November issue
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Joyce soaking northwestern Australia coastIMAGE: On Jan. 11 at 12:54 a.m. EST (0554 UTC) NOAA's JPSS-1 or NOAA-20 satellite showed Joyce's center just off the coast, while bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center extended... view more Credit: Credits: NOAA/NASA Rapid Response Team Tropical Cyclone Joyce, formerly known as tropical cyclone 5S, was moving south along the coast of Cape Leveque, Western Australia on Jan. 11 when a
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Viden
Forskere har dna-bevis: Der er en ulv i NordjyllandForskerne har nu klart bevis for, at der er en ulv i Nordjylland. Og ikke nok med det: de kan også sige præcis hvilken ulv, der er tale om - og at der ikke er tale om én, vi tidligere har haft her i landet. En dna-prøve taget i Vesthimmerland den 23. november afslørede nemlig, at ulven er en hanulv, der stammer fra et ulvekobbel med base nær den tyske by Lübtheen, der ligger 80 km sydøst for Hamb
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Science : NPR
The Flu Goes ViralHave you been feeling under the weather? You’re not alone. From Australia to California to your sofa, the flu has hit the world hard this year, and it might get worse From the New York Times : Even in the absence of a pandemic, a severe flu year kills nearly 650,000 people worldwide, while a mild one kills just under 300,000, the study concluded. In recent years, the C.D.C. estimates, flu has kil
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Shallow ice sheets discovered on Mars could aid future astronautsIn the Jan. 20 SN : the race to Mars, hormone replacement therapy’s second chance, soap bubble snow globes, a far-out quasar, climate change’s extreme results, an indiscriminate snake fungus and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasiteThis photomicrograph of a blood smear contains a macro- and microgametocyte of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Credit: Wikipedia. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues across the country and around the world, have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in 262 parasite cell lines of Plasmodi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking bad metals with neutronsA comparison of the theoretical calculations (top row) and inelastic neutron scattering data from ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (bottom row) shows the excellent agreement between the two. The three figures represent different slices through the four-dimensional scattering volumes produced by the electronic excitations. Credit: DOE/Argonne National Laboratory By exploiting the properties o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report first 3-D structure of DHHC enzymesHuman DHHC20 (yellow) is embedded in the Golgi membrane (green), a compartment located inside cells. DHHC20 attaches a fatty acid chain (white) to a target protein (blue, foreground), which anchors the protein to the Golgi membrane. Credit: Jeremy Swan, NICHD/NIH The first three-dimensional structure of DHHC proteins—enzymes involved in many cellular processes, including cancer—explains how they
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the worldCredit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists have found an explanation for how flowering plants became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world—a problem that Charles Darwin called an 'abominable mystery'. In a study publishing on January 11 in the open access journal PLOS Biology , Kevin Simonin and Adam Roddy, from San Francisco State University and Yale University respectively, found that fl
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Quanta Magazine
With ‘Downsized’ DNA, Flowering Plants Took Over the WorldWhen people consider evolutionary events related to the origin and diversification of new species and groups, they tend to emphasize novel adaptations — specific genes giving rise to new, beneficial traits. But a growing body of research suggests that in some cases, that deciding factor may be something much more fundamental: size. In a paper published today in PLOS Biology , a pair of researcher
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Scientific American Content: Global
Molecular Clue to the Mystery of Carbon's Cosmic Origin UncoveredSome 18 percent of the human body’s weight is carbon. The simple element is considered the backbone of life, and is also abundant in Earth’s rocks, atmosphere and oceans. Scientists don’t know how carbon first appeared on our planet, but now astronomers have discovered a special molecule in space that could help trace this essential element back to its source. Researchers using the Green Bank
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Facebook, Twitter Under Fire From Activist InvestorsA big pension fund and an activist investment firm Thursday said they had filed shareholder proposals pushing Facebook and Twitter to take more responsibility for managing content on their platforms, including mistreatment of women, fake news, election interference, violence, and hate speech—in other words, the same issues that have kept social-media giants in the crosshairs for the past year. Th
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Live Science
Don't Touch the Monkeys! Florida Macaques Carry Virus Lethal to HumansMonkeys infected with the herpes B virus may be symptom-free, but in people the virus can be fatal. Credit: Shutterstock Visitors to Florida's Silver Springs State Park should avoid monkeying around with the reserve's feral macaques; officials warn that the primates carry a strain of the herpes virus that can be fatal to humans. About 175 free-roaming rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ) inha
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Investigation Questions Transparency for Failed TB VaxThe BMJ inquiry finds that researchers presented only select results from animal experiments when applying for funding and approval for human trials.
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Frankenstein lives onSummary It was 200 years ago that Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was published. Over the decades, this gothic tale has captured the popular imagination through the numerous theater productions and films it inspired. The story is commonly taken to imply a dire warning about the dangers of scientific hubris. Just mention the name Frankenstein and laypersons think of scientis
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News at a glanceAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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DOE pushes for useful quantum computingAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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In Pakistan, surveillance for polio reveals a paradoxAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Earth scientists list top priorities for space missionsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cuba's 100-year plan for climate changeAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cliffs of ice spied on MarsMars Ice WaterAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The long shadow of FrankensteinSummary In January 1818, Mary Shelley published her book Frankenstein , a terrifying story of a doctor who builds a creature from scavenged body parts, then recoils in horror, spurns it, and sees his friends and family destroyed by the monster. Two hundred years later, Frankenstein is still essential reading for anyone working in science. In this special issue, Science examines the lasting legacy
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How a horror story haunts scienceSummary In conceiving her novel Frankenstein , Mary Shelley was influenced by the nascent medical science of the day and by early experiments on electricity. In return, Frankenstein has haunted science ever since. Shelley's book and subsequent films and plays have become what one author calls "the governing myth of modern biology": a cautionary tale of scientific hubris. The scientific literature
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Creating a modern monsterSummary When Mary Shelley published her story of Victor Frankenstein and his misshapen monster in 1818, she provided little detail about how exactly the doctor built his creation, except that "the dissecting room and the slaughter-house furnished many of [his] materials" and that he infused "a spark of being in the lifeless thing." But what if Shelley had written her book today? Here is an overvi
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Taming the monsters of tomorrowSummary In Mary Shelley's novel, the scientist Victor Frankenstein fears that creating a female companion to his unhappy monster could lead to a "race of devils" that could drive humanity extinct. Today, some scientists worry about scientific advances in the real world that could kill all of humanity, or at least end civilization as we know it. Some two dozen researchers at three academic centers
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A glossary of FrankenwordsSummary Along with fears about scientific overreach, Mary Shelley's novel has inspired hundreds of whimsical names for products and phenomena—from Frankencells and Frankengenes to Frankenslime and Frankenswine. Here's a selection.
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Detecting the building blocks of aromaticsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Improbable Big BirdsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Malaria parasite evolution in a test tubeAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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TRPM channels come into focusAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Coherent excitations revealed and calculatedAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Silencing stemness in T cell differentiationAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Global science for city policySummary Research and data are increasingly at the heart of how we conceive of urban governance. Urban control rooms and city dashboards championed by cities like Chicago, São Paulo, and London have been promising real-time snapshots and tracking over time of urban systems, via geolocated mobility data sets, social media inputs, environmental sensors, and other tools ( 1 ). At the international le
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Revisit a cautionary classicAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Our idiosyncraciesAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The next generation's Frankenstein filmsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The representation of others in spaceAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Neutrons peek into f-electron bandsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Water ice cliffs on MarsMars Ice WaterAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Rapid hybrid speciation in Darwin's finchesAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Phagocytes patrol intestinal fungiAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Volcanic eruptions in the deep seaAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The many roles of ATMAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cholera pathogen zaps competitionAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Mesoporous metal-organic frameworksAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The interferon boomerangAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Architecture of the TRPM subfamilyAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Epigenetic modulation of effector T cellsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A shared historyAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A specific interstellar aromatic moleculeAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Dissecting Plasmodium drug resistanceAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Fattening up proteinsAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Gene therapy: The power of persistenceAAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Seeing the real thingColorized view of the Golgi complex surrounded by COPI-coated vesicles and other organelles CREDIT: Y. S. BYKOV ET AL., ELIFE 10.7554/ELIFE.32493 (2017) Membrane trafficking within the Golgi complex is mediated by COPI (coat protein complex I)-coated vesicles. Much is known about these vesicles and coats from in vitro studies, but their makeup in situ is less well understood. Bykov et al. used cr
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A death knell for relapsed leukemia?A subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) experience partial or even complete remissions after treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Almost invariably, however, the disease returns and is often fatal. Relapse has been attributed to the expansion of preexisting leukemic clones that are resistant to therapy. In a preclinical study, Pan et al. investigated whether better e
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Multiple strategies needed to improve agricultural productivityShifts in behavior and process will facilitate the integration of organic farming as a large-scale, sustainable agricultural approach. PHOTO: DON KLUMPP/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO The world will need 50% more agricultural output by 2050 to keep up with global population growth. Muller et al. ask whether organic agriculture is compatible with producing enough food to feed the world in a sustainable manner.
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Labs, lectures, and gender differencesGendered performance differences (GPDs) remain an issue in ensuring equitable access in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Matz et al. systematically measured performance gaps across STEM courses to further investigate the contribution of GPDs to performance and/or persistence in STEM. This report is the first wide-ranging, multi-institution assessment of GPDs, encompassing
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CRISPR corrects deafness in miceLimited treatment options are available for individuals with hereditary hearing loss. CRISPR-Cas9 editing can be used as molecular scissors that snip out mutant DNA sequences to permit gene repair. Gao et al. asked whether the Cas9 cutting enzyme could be used to correct genetic deafness caused by dominant mutations in the Tmc1 gene. The researchers performed a lipid-mediated delivery of Cas9-RNA
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Make no bones about titaniumTitanium and its alloys with aluminum or niobium have been used for medical implants, such as metal plates to hold fractured bones together, because titanium bonds well to bone. However, pure titanium is much stiffer than bone material, and it can shield the surrounding bone from normal loads and stresses. This causes the bone to weaken because remodeling depends on stress history. Takizawa et al
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Science current issue
Shifting zwitterion reactivityPhosphines are often ligands for transition metal catalysts, but they can catalyze reactions at unsaturated carbon atoms by forming phosphonium zwitterions. For example, triphenylphosphine forms a zwitterion with methylvinylketone that acts as a nucleophile to convert n -alkyl aldehydes to β-hydroxy enones (the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction). Bauer et al. show that when the reaction is conducted
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The epigenetic control of stemness in CD8+ T cell fate commitmentAfter priming, naïve CD8 + T lymphocytes establish specific heritable transcription programs that define progression to long-lasting memory cells or to short-lived effector cells. Although lineage specification is critical for protection, it remains unclear how chromatin dynamics contributes to the control of gene expression programs. We explored the role of gene silencing by the histone methylt
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Coherent band excitations in CePd3: A comparison of neutron scattering and ab initio theoryIn common with many strongly correlated electron systems, intermediate valence compounds are believed to display a crossover from a high-temperature regime of incoherently fluctuating local moments to a low-temperature regime of coherent hybridized bands. We show that inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of CePd 3 provides a benchmark for ab initio calc
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Mapping the malaria parasite druggable genome by using in vitro evolution and chemogenomicsChemogenetic characterization through in vitro evolution combined with whole-genome analysis can identify antimalarial drug targets and drug-resistance genes. We performed a genome analysis of 262 Plasmodium falciparum parasites resistant to 37 diverse compounds. We found 159 gene amplifications and 148 nonsynonymous changes in 83 genes associated with drug-resistance acquisition, where gene ampl
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Science current issue
Exposed subsurface ice sheets in the Martian mid-latitudesThick deposits cover broad regions of the Martian mid-latitudes with a smooth mantle; erosion in these regions creates scarps that expose the internal structure of the mantle. We investigated eight of these locations and found that they expose deposits of water ice that can be >100 meters thick, extending downward from depths as shallow as 1 to 2 meters below the surface. The scarps are actively
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Detection of the aromatic molecule benzonitrile (c-C6H5CN) in the interstellar mediumPolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles are thought to be widespread throughout the universe, because these classes of molecules are probably responsible for the unidentified infrared bands, a set of emission features seen in numerous Galactic and extragalactic sources. Despite their expected ubiquity, astronomical identification of specific aromatic molecul
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Science current issue
Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystalsWe constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional–ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent–induced
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Antagonism toward the intestinal microbiota and its effect on Vibrio cholerae virulenceThe bacterial type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a nanomachine that delivers toxic effector proteins into target cells, killing them. In mice, we found that the Vibrio cholerae T6SS attacks members of the host commensal microbiota in vivo, facilitating the pathogen’s colonization of the gut. This microbial antagonistic interaction drives measurable changes in the pathogenicity of V. cholerae thro
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Spatial representations of self and other in the hippocampusAn animal’s awareness of its location in space depends on the activity of place cells in the hippocampus. How the brain encodes the spatial position of others has not yet been identified. We investigated neuronal representations of other animals’ locations in the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus with an observational T-maze task in which one rat was required to observe another rat’s trajector
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Social place-cells in the bat hippocampusSocial animals have to know the spatial positions of conspecifics. However, it is unknown how the position of others is represented in the brain. We designed a spatial observational-learning task, in which an observer bat mimicked a demonstrator bat while we recorded hippocampal dorsal-CA1 neurons from the observer bat. A neuronal subpopulation represented the position of the other bat, in alloce
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Rapid hybrid speciation in Darwins finchesHomoploid hybrid speciation in animals has been inferred frequently from patterns of variation, but few examples have withstood critical scrutiny. Here we report a directly documented example, from its origin to reproductive isolation. An immigrant Darwin’s finch to Daphne Major in the Galápagos archipelago initiated a new genetic lineage by breeding with a resident finch ( Geospiza fortis ). Gen
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Structure of the human TRPM4 ion channel in a lipid nanodiscTransient receptor potential (TRP) melastatin 4 (TRPM4) is a widely expressed cation channel associated with a variety of cardiovascular disorders. TRPM4 is activated by increased intracellular calcium in a voltage-dependent manner but, unlike many other TRP channels, is permeable to monovalent cations only. Here we present two structures of full-length human TRPM4 embedded in lipid nanodiscs at
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CX3CR1+ mononuclear phagocytes control immunity to intestinal fungiIntestinal fungi are an important component of the microbiota, and recent studies have unveiled their potential in modulating host immune homeostasis and inflammatory disease. Nonetheless, the mechanisms governing immunity to gut fungal communities (mycobiota) remain unknown. We identified CX3CR1 + mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs) as being essential for the initiation of innate and adaptive immune r
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Science current issue
Structure of the cold- and menthol-sensing ion channel TRPM8Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) cation channels are polymodal sensors that are involved in a variety of physiological processes. Within the TRPM family, member 8 (TRPM8) is the primary cold and menthol sensor in humans. We determined the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the full-length TRPM8 from the collared flycatcher at an overall resolution of ~4.1 ångstroms. Our TRPM8 str
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New ProductsSummary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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My second life as a teacherFor most of my educational and professional life, I pursued a fairly standard trajectory. A bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy, a master's in optical physics, and a Ph.D. in astronomy prepared me for a postdoctoral fellowship and subsequent work as a scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. I moved on to a visiting professorship and then a research professorship at Tufts Universit
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Gene therapy comes of ageGene therapy: The power of persistence Nearly 50 years after the concept was first proposed, gene therapy is now considered a promising treatment option for several human diseases. The path to success has been long and tortuous. Serious adverse effects were encountered in early clinical studies, but this fueled basic research that led to safer and more efficient gene transfer vectors. Gene therap
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Fatty acyl recognition and transfer by an integral membrane S-acyltransferaseDHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys) palmitoyltransferases are eukaryotic integral membrane enzymes that catalyze protein palmitoylation, which is important in a range of physiological processes, including small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) signaling, cell adhesion, and neuronal receptor scaffolding. We present crystal structures of two DHHC palmitoyltransferases and a covalent intermediate mimic. The act
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA scientists make cells that enable the sense of touchIMAGE: Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (green) showing nuclei in blue. Left: with retinoic acid added. Right: with retinoic acid and BMP4 added, creating proprioceptive sensory interneurons (pink). view more Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Stem Cell Reports Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for t
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Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mysteryIMAGE: In a paper published in the journal Physical Review E , Dr. William Anderson, a fluid dynamics expert at the University of Texas at Dallas, proposes a solution to a Martian... view more Credit: University of Texas at Dallas By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Hubble telescope ramps up search for Europa’s watery plumesOXON HILL, Md. — Astronomers may soon know for sure if Europa is spouting off. After finding signs that Jupiter’s icy moon emits repeating plumes of water near its southern pole, astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope hope to detect more evidence of the geysers. “The statistical significance is starting to look pretty good,” astronomer William Sparks of the Space Telescope Science Institute
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Top European chefs take electric pulse fishing off the menuElectric pulse fishing involves dragging electrically charged lines just above the seafloor that shock marine life up from low-lying positions into trawling nets More than 200 top chefs across Europe have pledged to stop sourcing seafood obtained by electric pulse fishing, days before an EU vote that could expand the use of the controversial technique, an ocean advocacy group said Thursday. "We r
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Live Science
This Bird 'Eyeball' Survived 120 Million YearsThe fossil of an ancient bird discovered in Liaoning, China: The black box shows where the bird's well-preserved, fossilized eye tissues are located. Credit: Tanaka G. et al./Heliyon Scientists have discovered a surprisingly "visionary" detail about a dinosaur-age bird that had a tooth-filled beak: It could likely see in color. An analysis of the 120-million-year-old bird revealed that the
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NYT > Science
Boston Museum Tries New System for Protecting Artwork: A Dog’s NoseThey wondered: Could Ms. Luongo train Riley to detect insects that tend to eat through textiles and wood when given the chance? If so, it would be another layer of defense against critters that can pose a long-term threat to the artwork. As is, the museum has a variety of pest-control tactics, including quarantining new artwork before it’s placed in galleries. But no amount of prevention tactics
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patient education brochure provides low-cost solution to avoid diversion of unused OpioidsCHICAGO (Jan. 11, 2018): Unused prescription painkillers lying around the home have proven to be a major source of drugs supplying the nation's opioid epidemic, 1 but a new patient education brochure that describes safe disposal practices of unused pain pills can be a low-cost and effective way of getting patients to properly dispose of their leftover medications, according to study results publi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smokingQuitting smoking is among the top New Year's resolutions, but is notoriously difficult to do and often requires multiple attempts and strategies. A growing body of research points to using a harm minimization approach for smoking cessation. Harm minimization recognizes that while quitting smoking altogether is ideal, reducing exposure to harmful cigarette smoke by switching to safer nicotine prod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancerAn international team, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually. The tool, described in the January 11 online issue of the BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal ), may potentially be used to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stevie Wonder wows crowd on 'smart' piano at tech showTrying to distinguish your product among the thousands at the CES gadget show is no easy feat, so it helps when music legend Stevie Wonder pays an unexpected visit.
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New on MIT Technology Review
South Korea’s Cryptocurrency Trading Ban Is No Done DealSouth Korea’s Cryptocurrency Trading Ban Is No Done Deal The government of South Korea is considering a ban on cryptocurrency trading, but it’s by no means guaranteed to come into effect. The news: The nation’s justice minister revealed that the government is preparing legislation that would ban cryptocurrency… Read more The government of South Korea is considering a ban on cryptocurrency tradi
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Viden
EU vil bruge 7,5 milliarder på fire computereEU vil investere 7,5 milliarder kroner i fire supercomputere. To af disse skal være i absolut verdensklasse, mens de to andre bliver et niveau under. Ambitionen er, at computerne skal stå færdige i 2020. Det oplyser Europa-Kommissionen i en pressemeddelelse . - Supercomputere er den motor, der driver den digitale økonomi. Det er et barsk kapløb, og EU halter på nuværende tidspunkt bagefter: Vi ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carmaker PSA picks new head of British unit VauxhallPeugeot put their man in the driver's seat at Vauxhall French auto giant PSA, maker of Citroen and Peugeot vehicles, on Thursday picked the group's sales and marketing boss Stephen Norman to run its troubled UK brand Vauxhall. Norman will become managing director of Vauxhall Motors and Opel Ireland with effect from February 1, Vauxhall said in a statement just days after it axed 250 more jobs at
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New on MIT Technology Review
Finally, a Robot Smart Enough to Hand You the Wrench You NeedBeware robots bearing power tools. The robot shown here, called ARMAR-6, could be one of the most advanced robotic helpers tested to date. But it could also mark the beginning of further encroachment by robots into areas of manual work. ARMAR-6 can already respond to simple voice commands in useful ways. Ask it to hand you a wrench, for example, and it will ask which one before giving you the cor
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New on MIT Technology Review
The House Passed a Bill to Renew a Controversial Foreign Surveillance ToolNYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate Change New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expensive preparations for rising sea levels and extreme weather. BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are all being taken to court by the city, reports the… Read more New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expens
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The Atlantic
Shawn Brimley's TownWe live in an era in which writers lament the end of expertise as a virtue and the president of the United States proudly eschews the nuances and details of his own policies, preferring to spend his days watching television. Nonetheless, elsewhere in the federal government each day, committed men and women from the three branches of government study, formulate, and execute public policy to serve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbnb 'disappointed' by Amsterdam plan to cut rentalsPointing out it contributed millions in tourist taxes in 2015 and 2016, Airbnb is challenging a Dutch ruling halving the limit for private home rentals in Amsterdam Rent-a-room giant Airbnb has voiced disappointment in Amsterdam's plans to impose a 30-day limit on letting private homes, saying it will harm the local economy. "We have built a responsible home sharing community on Airbnb benefiting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yamaha motorcycle comes on command at CES eventYamaha's 'Motoroid' concept electric motorcycle reaches speeds topping 200 kilometers per hour but is blind, relying on pre-programmed routes With a wave, Kinji Asamura summoned a riderless motorcycle to his side in the Yamaha booth at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week. The concept electric motorcycle , called 'Motoroid,' then balanced in position, holding its place even when A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insight into climate impacts of deforestationCredit: Wikipedia. Deforestation is likely to warm the climate even more than originally thought, scientists warn. An international team of scientists, led by the University of Leeds, studied the way that reactive gases emitted by trees and vegetation affect the climate. Their research, published today in Nature Communications , found these reactive gases cool our climate, meaning deforestation w
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Ingeniøren
100 år med symmetri, superheterodynprincip og spansk sygeSkal man tro Knut Hamsun, gælder det, at om hundrede år er alting glemt . Det kan være der noget rigtigt i, men alting er nu lige godt nok et stærkt udtryk. Noget husker vi – eller bør huske – selv efter hundrede år. Det er også tilfældet med 1918, som jo var et markant år i verdenshistorien med afslutningen af Første Verdenskrig, som resulterede i et helt nyt europæisk landkort. Også inden for d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New studies aim to boost social science methods in conservation researchScientists have produced a series of papers designed to improve research on conservation and the environment. A group of researchers, led by the University of Exeter, have contributed to a special issue of the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution to examine commonly used social science techniques and provide a checklist for scientists to follow. Traditional conservation biology has been domin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pulses of light to encrypt data and protect security of cryptocurrenciesOrganic-molecule enhanced frequency comb. A single input laser (left) enters the spherical frequency comb generator that includes a single layer of organic molecules (4-diethylamino(styryl)]pyridinium, DASP). The light orbits inside the sphere over 10,000x in a few nanoseconds, interacting with the molecules during each orbit and resulting in the generation of the frequency comb. Credit: Vinh Die
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine learning predicts new details of geothermal heat flux beneath the Greenland Ice SheetGeothermal heat flux predictions for Greenland. Direct GHF measurements from the coastal rock cores, inferences from ice cores, and additional Gaussian-fit GHF data around ice core sites are used as training samples. Predictions are shown for three different values. The white dashed region roughly shows the extent of elevated heat flux and a possible trajectory of Greenland's movement over the Ic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing a secure, un-hackable netCredit: CC0 Public Domain A method of securely communicating between multiple quantum devices has been developed by a UCL-led team of scientists, bringing forward the reality of a large-scale, un- hackable quantum network. To date, communicating via quantum networks has only been possible between two devices of known provenance that have been built securely. With the EU and UK committing €1 bil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team makes short nanotube samples by hand to dramatically cut production timeThread-like fibers created with a new, rapid method at Rice University are made of billions of carbon nanotubes that can be quickly aligned by shear force between slides. Credit: Complex Forms of Complex Fluids/Rice University The terms "handmade" and "high tech" are not commonly found in the same sentence, but they both apply to a Rice University method to quickly produce fibers from carbon nano
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists shed light on new low-cost material for seeing in the darkDr. Wendy Sarney uses the molecular beam epitaxy machine at the US Army Research Laboratory to produce infrared detector materials with a new synthesis process. Credit: US Army Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Stony Brook University have developed a new synthesis process for low-cost fabrication of a material previously discounted in literature for high-sensitivity infrared cam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA team first to demonstrate X-ray navigation in spaceNICER's mirror assemblies concentrate X-rays onto silicon detectors to gather data that probes the interior makeup of neutron stars, including those that appear to flash regularly, called pulsars. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Keith Gendreau In a technology first, a team of NASA engineers has demonstrated fully autonomous X-ray navigation in space—a capability that could revolutioniz
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Army scientists improve human-agent teaming by making AI agents more transparentThe Autonomous Squad Member is a small ground robot that interacts with and communicates with an infantry squad. As part of the overall ASM program, Chen and colleagues developed transparency visualization concepts, which they used to investigate the effects of agent transparency levels on operator performance. Informed by the SAT model, the ASM's user interface features an '"at a glance" transpa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Correct warm-up reduces soccer injuries in children by halfA warm-up program developed specially for children reduces soccer injuries by around 50 percent. Sports scientists from the University of Basel reported these findings in the academic journal Sports Medicine. A total of 243 teams comprising around 3,900 children from four European countries took part in the study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulses of light to encrypt data and protect security of cryptocurrenciesIMAGE: This is an image of organic-molecule enhanced frequency comb. A single input laser (left) enters the spherical frequency comb generator that includes a single layer of organic molecules (4-diethylamino(styryl)]pyridinium,... view more Credit: Vinh Diep and Alexa Hudnut Data travels through thousands of miles of fiber optic cables underneath the world's oceans--via pulses of light. An
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai research discovers possible link between Crohn's & Parkinson's in Jewish populationMount Sinai Researchers have just discovered that patients in the Ashkenazi Jewish population with Crohn's disease (a chronic inflammatory of the digestive system) are more likely to carry the LRRK2 gene mutation. This gene is the major genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, which is a movement disorder. The study's findings, published in the January 10, 2018 issue of Science Translational Medicin
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Big Think
The Sanskrit Effect: How Verbal Recitation Boosts Cognitive FunctionYou hear a lot of strange theories in yoga studios. In my 20 years of practicing yoga I’ve listened to plenty of suspect claims based on intuition rather than verified science, regardless of modern yogis calling the system an “ancient science.” That said, yoga holds up well in certain regards, for pain, flexibility, and stress. Now, you can add to this list the recitation of Sanskrit mantras. I’v
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Science : NPR
Is This Gorilla Mother Consciously Protecting Her Baby?Pasika and her infant have been traveling alone for more than seven months. Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund hide caption toggle caption Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund Pasika and her infant have been traveling alone for more than seven months. Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund In a post published by the conservation organization Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International (DFGFI) last month, the behavior of a mountain goril
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Volcano Survey Accounts for Materials Ejected from a VolcanoNew Volcano Survey Accounts for Materials Ejected from a Volcano Researchers used autonomous and remotely operated underwater vehicles to survey the Havre volcano in the Pacific Ocean, leading to a new discovery about submarine volcano deposits. Tags: Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now!
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic 'switches' behind human brain evolutionResearchers have developed the first map of gene regulation in human neurogenesis, the process by which neural stem cells turn into brain cells and the cerebral cortex expands in size. The scientists identified factors that govern the growth of our brains and, in some cases, set the stage for several brain disorders that appear later in life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biologists create toolkit for tuning genetic circuitsScientists have created a toolkit for synthetic biologists who need to precisely tune the input and output levels of genetic circuits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Machine learning predicts new details of geothermal heat flux beneath the Greenland Ice SheetA new article uses machine learning for the first time to craft an improved model for understanding geothermal heat flux -- heat emanating from the Earth's interior -- below the Greenland Ice Sheet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone therapy may reduce eating disorder symptoms in transgender peopleThe study was led by academics at the universities of Nottingham and Loughborough who recommend that clinicians working at eating disorder services should assess patients for gender identity issues and refer them to transgender health services to be evaluated for hormone treatment. Professor Jon Arcelus, of the Institute of Mental Health, based at the University of Nottingham, and at the Nottingh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shedding some light on life in the ArcticIMAGE: UD marine scientist Jonathan Cohen studies winter darkness in the Arctic. view more Credit: University of Delaware Light is an important cue for nearly all life on Earth. Plants use light for photosynthesis, animals use light to set sleep cycles, and marine organisms use light to find food, avoid predators and even hide in plain sight. Since 2014, University of Delaware marine scie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functionsNew York, Jan. 11, 2018 - Cycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. In a new report in The Journal of Urology ® , researchers found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosisTuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, a Montreal team of researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB. These groundbreaking find
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast food makes the immune system more aggressive in the long termIMAGE: Prof. Dr. Eicke Latz and Dr. Anette Christ from the Institute for Innate Immunity of the University of Bonn investigated this question in a study. view more Credit: Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn The immune system reacts similarly to a high fat and high calorie diet as to a bacterial infection. This is shown by a recent study led by the University of Bonn. Particularly disturbing: Unhealthy food
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosisMONTREAL, Jan. 11, 2018 - Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims a life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, a Montreal team of researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to make them kill
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Estrogen-mimicking compounds in foods may reduce effectiveness of breast cancer treatmentLA JOLLA, CA - Jan. 11, 2018 - Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered that two estrogen-mimicking compounds found in many foods appear to potently reverse the effects of palbociclib/letrozole, a popular drug combination for treating breast cancer. The study, published today in the journal Cell Chemical Biology , suggests that exposure to chemical compounds called
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
By altering bone marrow, training can prepare innate immune system for future challengesWhen you receive a vaccine against a disease like polio or influenza, your immune system gears up to defend against that particular infection. If you wind up getting chickenpox instead, or even a slightly different strain of the flu, you would be out of luck. That's because traditional vaccines enlist the adaptive immune system, the functions of which are carried out largely by hyperspecific T an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growthIMAGE: These are Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The seedling on the left is a wild-type and the one at the right has a mutation in the CDF5 gene that produces the protein... view more Credit: Guiomar Martín The recent award of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to the three American researchers Hall, Rosbash and Young for their "discoveries of molecular mechanisms controllin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in northwest CaliforniaIMAGE: This is a Northern spotted owl. view more Credit: J. Mark Higley/Hoopa Tribal Forestry Wildlife species are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, with the California Academy of Sciences. The study, released Jan. 11 in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-lasting adaptations of the innate immune system through the bone marrowOur immune system consists of two parts: innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Both help in fighting diseases but there is one big difference. Our innate immune system works rapidly and non-specifically: it destroys all invading organisms. Our adaptive immune system is more accurate: these immune cells are able to distinguish between the body's own cells and foreign cells. If they encounter an i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The nanoscopic structure that locks up our genesIMAGE: Made up of nucleosomes -- roll-shaped bundles of DNA and protein -- heterochromatin is connected by a velcro-like feature called Heterochromatin Protein 1. view more Credit: (Image: Yoshimasa Takizawa/OIST) Wireless headphones, two yo-yos connected by a string, earmuffs: all these items could be used to describe a tiny structure inside a cell's nucleus. For decades, scientists co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memorySALT LAKE CITY - A protein involved in cognition and storing long-term memories looks and acts like a protein from viruses. The protein, called Arc, has properties similar to those that viruses use for infecting host cells, and originated from a chance evolutionary event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. The prospect that virus-like proteins could be the basis for a n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Super-adsorbent MOF captures twice its weight in waterIMAGE: This figure shows the structure Hydrolytically stable and highly porous Cr-soc-MOF-1, which can capture twice its weight in adsorbed water. view more Credit: Prof. Mohamed Eddaoudi (KAUST) Material chemists in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have developed a superporous solid made up of a patchwork of metal ions and organic linkers (a metal-organic framework, or MOF) that can suck up to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising CO2 is causing trouble in freshwaters too, study suggestsIMAGE: Predator induced defenses in Daphnia longicephala (top row, credit: Linda Weiss) and Daphnia pulex (bottom row, credit: Sina Becker). Left shows an undefended morphotype, right shows the defended morphotype. Insert... view more Credit: Linda Weiss and Sina Becker As carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere rise, more CO2 gets absorbed into seawater. As a result, the world's ocea
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New on MIT Technology Review
China Is Hoovering Up a Lot of the World’s Tech TalentNYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate Change New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expensive preparations for rising sea levels and extreme weather. BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are all being taken to court by the city, reports the… Read more New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expens
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Live Science
Owls Dying Near Marijuana Farms (Here's Why)Northern spotted owls in some California counties are succumbing to rat poison used by marijuana growers. Credit: Shutterstock If asked, spotted owls would likely vote against marijuana legalization . New research reveals that several species, including the northern spotted owl, are succumbing to rat poison from thousands of "unpermitted private marijuana grow sites" in the northwestern Cal
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New Scientist - News
Mystery dark matter may be ordinary neutrons that have decayedVOLKER SPRINGEL/MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR ASTROPHYSICS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY By Anil Ananthaswamy The humble neutron could be hiding a deep, dark secret. For 20 years, two experiments that measure the lifetime of a neutron have been at odds. Now it seems that disconnect may be the result of neutrons occasionally decaying into particles of dark matter, the stuff that is thought to make up most
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Science | The Guardian
Five things to remember after getting the dreaded cancer diagnosis | Ranjana SrivastavaA mid the greetings of the new year arrives a simple text message, “What do you think?” The story is familiar enough but this time, the cast is different. The patient is related to my childhood friend and across continents and time zone, I feel it all. The desperate bid to find an oncologist, the labyrinth of investigations, the profusion of advice, and above all, the acrid taste of fear arising
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Popular Science
2017's natural disasters are going to cost usIt often felt like 2017 was just a serious of epic disasters, and now we have empirical proof. 2017 was a historic year for weather and climate hazards, according to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, with 16 severe weather events that each cost more than a billion dollars. 2017 now ties with 2011 for the highest-ever frequency of these costly weather events. And t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotube fibers in a jiffyIMAGE: Thread-like fibers created with a new, rapid method at Rice University are made of billions of carbon nanotubes that can be quickly aligned by shear force between slides. view more Credit: Complex Forms of Complex Fluids/Rice University HOUSTON - (Jan. 11, 2018) - The terms "handmade" and "high tech" are not commonly found in the same sentence, but they both apply to a Rice U
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UT Dallas study: Recent spikes in homicide rates don't tell whole storyIMAGE: This is Dr. Andrew P. Wheeler. view more Credit: The University of Texas at Dallas Recent spikes in homicide rates across the nation have been attributed to causes ranging from civil unrest to the opioid epidemic, but new UT Dallas research published in the journal Homicide Studies found a much simpler explanation: The increases follow predictable fluctuations in rates over the past
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Developing a secure, un-hackable netA method of securely communicating between multiple quantum devices has been developed by a UCL-led team of scientists, bringing forward the reality of a large-scale, un- hackable quantum network. To date, communicating via quantum networks has only been possible between two devices of known provenance that have been built securely. With the EU and UK committing €1 billion and £270 million* r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Population-specific deep biomarkers of agingIMAGE: Insilico Medicine develops a novel deep-learning based hematological human aging clock. view more Credit: Insilico Medicine Thursday, Jan. 11th, Baltimore, MD - Today, Insilico Medicine, Inc., a Baltimore-based company specializing in the application of artificial intelligence for drug discovery, biomarker development and aging research, announced a publication of a research paper ti
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NYT > Science
Matter: Climate Change Is Altering Lakes and Streams, Study SuggestsThese tiny, shrimplike creatures filter algae and microbes from water. They are devoured in turn by small fish, which are eaten by bigger fish. If rising carbon dioxide were to affect water fleas, Dr. Weiss reasoned, it could influence the entire lake ecosystem. Water fleas use a bizarre but sophisticated defense to escape predators. They can sense chemicals given off by fish in their vicinity, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising CO2 is causing trouble in freshwaters too, study suggestsPredator induced defenses in Daphnia longicephala (top row, credit: Linda Weiss) and Daphnia pulex (bottom row, credit: Sina Becker). Left shows an undefended morphotype, right shows the defended morphotype. Insert shows magnification of expressed neckteeth. These morphological features render Daphnia less susceptible to predators. When the expression of these defensive traits is hampered by high
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Super-adsorbent MOF captures twice its weight in waterThis figure shows the structure Hydrolytically stable and highly porous Cr-soc-MOF-1, which can capture twice its weight in adsorbed water. Credit: Prof. Mohamed Eddaoudi (KAUST) Material chemists in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have developed a superporous solid made up of a patchwork of metal ions and organic linkers (a metal-organic framework, or MOF) that can suck up to 200% of its own weight
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New on MIT Technology Review
No, Ripple Isn’t the Next BitcoinNot all cryptocurrencies are created equal. Don’t tell that to investors in XRP, though. In the last month the currency owned by Ripple, a company that bills itself as using blockchain technology to build the payment system of the future, soared in price by a whopping 700 percent. XRP’s overall value pushed up to nearly $150 billion and briefly made Chris Larsen, Ripple’s cofounder, one of the ri
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Live Science
Going into Space Crushes the Delicate Nerves in Your EyeballsAstronaut Ed White performed the first American spacewalk during the Gemini 4 mission on June 3, 1965. Credit: NASA Two delicate, bundled stalks of nerve tissue erupt forward from the brain, slip between gaps in the backs of each eyeball, and attach themselves gently to the rear of each retina. These are the optic nerves, the transmitters linking human beings to their powers of sight. And now r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines genetic link between epilepsy and mood disordersJan. 11, 2018 -- Mood disorders, including depression, are the most common comorbid conditions in individuals with epilepsy, but the cause remains unclear, according to a latest study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Rutgers University. The findings suggest that there may be a shared genetic susceptibility to these conditions, expressed only in people wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell-rich cord blood donations could increase by 'nudging' parents, study suggestsIMAGE: Nicola Lacetera is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management at the University of Toronto Mississauga, with a cross-appointment to the University's Rotman School of Management. He is also... view more Credit: Rotman School Toronto - It contains potentially lifesaving stem cells that can treat a host of blood-based cancers and other diseases. Yet the blood found in newbor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army scientists improve human-agent teaming by making AI agents more transparentIMAGE: The Autonomous Squad Member is a small ground robot that interacts with and communicates with an infantry squad. As part of the overall ASM program, Chen and colleagues developed transparency... view more Credit: Photo Courtesy Dr. Jessie Y. Chen U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists developed ways to improve collaboration between humans and artificially intelligent agents in two
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New studies aim to boost social science methods in conservation researchScientists have produced a series of papers designed to improve research on conservation and the environment. A group of researchers, led by the University of Exeter, have contributed to a special issue of the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution to examine commonly used social science techniques and provide a checklist for scientists to follow. Traditional conservation biology has been domin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers map out genetic 'switches' behind human brain evolutionIMAGE: UCLA researchers mapped the genetic on/off switches driving neurogenesis in the brain and shaping the expansion of human cortex. The image shows schematics of slices of the mouse, macaque and... view more Credit: Luis de la Torre-Ubieta/UCLA Health FINDINGS UCLA researchers have developed the first map of gene regulation in human neurogenesis, the process by which neural stem c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Machine learning predicts new details of geothermal heat flux beneath the Greenland Ice SheetIMAGE: These are geothermal heat flux predictions for Greenland. Direct GHF measurements from the coastal rock cores, inferences from ice cores, and additional Gaussian-fit GHF data around ice core sites are... view more Credit: KU News Service LAWRENCE -- A paper appearing in Geophysical Research Letters uses machine learning to craft an improved model for understanding geothermal heat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracing how disaster impacts escalate will improve emergency responsesMapping common pathways along which the effects of natural and man-made disasters travel allows more flexible and resilient responses in the future, according to UCL researchers. Naturally occurring extreme space weather events or man-made cyber security attacks affect critical infrastructure through shared points of vulnerability, causing disasters to cascade into scenarios that threaten life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are women really under-represented in clinical trials?Several studies have reported a lack of gender diversity in clinical trials, with trials including mostly adult males; however, a recent review of publicly available registration data of clinical trials at the US Food and Drug Administration for the most frequently prescribed drug classes found no evidence of any systemic significant under-representation of women. The findings are published in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insight into climate impacts of deforestationDeforestation is likely to warm the climate even more than originally thought, scientists warn. An international team of scientists, led by the University of Leeds, studied the way that reactive gases emitted by trees and vegetation affect the climate. Their research, published today in Nature Communications , found these reactive gases cool our climate, meaning deforestation would lead to higher
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The Scientist RSS
How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Theresa May defends 'long-term' plastic waste planMedia playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Theresa May: A plan to 'nurture' environment Theresa May has defended her 25-year plan to protect the environment as campaigners called for "emergency" action now. The prime minister said her long-term strategy, including eradicating all avoidable plastic waste in the UK by 2042, would allow future generations to "enjoy a beautiful enviro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A major step forward in organic electronicsIMAGE: These are the worlds first complementary electrochemical logic circuits. view more Credit: Thor Balkhed Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectroni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big pharma playing system to secure lucrative funding deals in Central EuropeNew research, from an international group of health policy experts led by the University of Bath (UK), reports a mixed picture of transparency in public decisions-making around new medicine approvals in Poland, one of Europe's largest pharmaceutical markets. Despite a troubled relationship with the European Commission, Poland has been hailed as a leader in modernising its assessment systems in es
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New AI technology significantly improves human kidney analysis(Boston)--The ability to quantify the extent of kidney damage and predict the life remaining in the kidney, using an image obtained at the time when a patient visits the hospital for a kidney biopsy, now is possible using a computer model based on artificial intelligence (AI). The findings, which appear in the journal Kidney International Reports , can help make predictions at the point-of-care a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMass Amherst team reports gambling research results to Massachusetts Gaming CommissionIMAGE: Epidemiologist Rachel Volberg at UMass Amherst, lead investigator of the first major cohort study of adult gambling in the US, says results will lead researchers to think about gambling behavior... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Results of a baseline study on gambling behavior in Massachusetts that establishes how people participated - or not - in gambling prior to
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Science | The Guardian
Fragments of book recovered from wreck of Blackbeard's shipThe notorious 18th-century pirate Blackbeard may have whiled away the hours between raids by curling up with a good book, according to a new discovery. Archaeological conservators in North Carolina working on the wreckage of Blackbeard’s flagship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, found 16 tiny fragments of paper “in a mess of wet sludge” that had been in the chamber of a cannon. They worked for months t
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Dana Foundation
Brain in the NewsImage: Shutterstock Are you subscribed to Brain in the News? Our free, monthly periodical has been circulating around the globe by the tens of thousands since 1994, keeping readers up to date with trending stories in the field of neuroscience. In each issue, you’ll find articles sourced online from laboratories, universities, prestigious magazines and newspapers, and the researchers themselves. E
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NeuWrite San Diego
A Tribute to Ben BarresA Tribute to Ben Barres Posted by Catie Profaci on January 11, 2018 in Neuroscience | Leave a comment I will never forget the first time I met Ben Barres. It was October, 2015 and I was in Chicago for the annual Society for Neuroscience conference. I was absentmindedly walking through the conference hall lobby one evening when I noticed Ben and a few former Barres lab scientists standing in a sma
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Ingeniøren
Oprydning for millioner: Danmark betaler for at fjerne amerikansk forurening i GrønlandForvitrede kraner. Krøllede jerndragere fra flyhangarer. Bæltekøretøjer. Landingsbaner. Kemikalier. Og hundredvis af rustne olietønder dumpet i fjeldet. Efterladenskaberne fra USA’s militære aktiviteter under under Anden Verdenskrig og den kolde krig ligger overalt i landet og omfatter lidt af hvert. Affaldet og uviljen mod at rydde op har frustreret grønlænderne i årtier. Nu får de en hjælpende
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban insects are more resilient in extreme weatherAmy Savage searches New York City medians for ants as cars pass by. Credit: Lauren Nichols A study led by Amy Savage, a Rutgers University-Camden assistant professor of biology, will help researchers understand how to make predictions and conservation decisions about how organisms living in cities will respond to catastrophic weather events. Savage's analysis, conducted in New York City, compared
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Scientific American Content: Global
River Floods Will Threaten Tens of Millions in Next 25 YearsClimate change will put tens of millions more people around the world at risk of exposure to flooding rivers over the next 25 years, an alarming new study reports—unless policymakers invest in significant adaptation measures. While rising sea levels can increase the risk of coastal flooding, the study focuses instead on fluvial floods, which happen when rivers overflow their banks. As global
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Scientific American Content: Global
Build a Rubber Band–Powered CarKey concepts Physics Potential energy Kinetic energy Conservation of energy Simple machine Introduction Admit it, you’ve probably launched a rubber band at least once—pulled one end back, and let it go flying. Did you ever suspect that rubber bands could also be a fun way to learn about physics and engineering? Find out in this project where you’ll build a rubber band–powered car.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Urban insects are more resilient in extreme weatherCAMDEN - A study led by Amy Savage, a Rutgers University-Camden assistant professor of biology, will help researchers understand how to make predictions and conservation decisions about how organisms living in cities will respond to catastrophic weather events. Savage's analysis, conducted in New York City, compared the diversity of arthropods - insects such as ants, bees, beetles, and wasps - th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White graphene makes ceramics multifunctionalIMAGE: Bilayer white graphene (middle layer) combined with calcium-silicate creates a multifunctional ceramic with high strength and toughness, according to a Rice University lab. The material may be suitable for construction... view more Credit: Rouzbeh Shahsavari/Rice University A little hBN in ceramics could give them outstanding properties, according to a Rice University scientist. Ro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers engineer ultra-sensitive temperature sensorCan a "thermometer" consist of a thin film or tiny (micrometer or even nanometer scale) particles, operate in real time and in very well-defined regions with a spatial resolution ranging from a centimeter to a micrometer, and be capable of measuring temperatures with exceptional sensitivity in a wide band between 80 kelvin (minus 193 °C) and 750 kelvin (476 °C)? The answer is yes. The device, c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice University biologists create toolkit for tuning genetic circuitsIMAGE: This is Escherichia coli . view more Credit: National Institutes of Health Rice University scientists have created a toolkit for synthetic biologists who need to precisely tune the input and output levels of genetic circuits. The research, which is online in Nature Communications , is a boon for life scientists who systematically engineer bacteria and other organisms to perform
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Big Think
Why This Popular Dating Website Can't Call Itself "Scientifically Proven" AnymoreIt is truly a golden age for introverts who want to find love but hate going out. The advent of online dating allows people to find love anytime or anywhere, and often from the comfort of their own homes. While some of the apps and websites, notably Tinder, are superficial in nature, others have found their niche in trying to match users based on compatibility. Some achieve this by reducing the s
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Ingeniøren
Nets skal drifte NemID, indtil MitID en dag bliver klarDigitaliseringsstyrelsen har opbrugt alle muligheder for at forlænge kontrakten om NemID med Nets, men NemID’s afløser – nu kendt som MitID – er kun lige kommet i udbud. Derfor har styrelsen nu med en såkaldt profylaksebekendtgørelse meddelt, at der er lavet en ny aftale med Nets - uden et egentligt udbud - der sikrer drift af NemID indtil midten af 2021 til en pris på 128 millioner. »Det er en k
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How record collectors find lost music and preserve our cultural heritage | Alexis CharpentierFor generations, record collectors have played a vital role in the preservation of musical and cultural heritage by "digging" for obscure music created by overlooked artists. Alexis Charpentier shares his love of records -- and stories of how collectors have given forgotten music a second chance at being heard. Learn more about the culture of record digging (and, maybe, pick up a new hobby) with t
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoonSign up to get more from The Economist Get 3 free articles per week, daily newsletters and more.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google Photos Still Has a Problem with GorillasNYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate Change New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expensive preparations for rising sea levels and extreme weather. BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are all being taken to court by the city, reports the… Read more New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expens
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Science : NPR
Does Serena Williams Have The Willpower To Ace The 'Marshmallow Test'?German and Cameroonian kids were part of a recent experiment based on the classic "marshmallow test": Put a single treat before a child but tell the child if he or she waits, say, 10 minutes, a second treat will be given. Nathalie Dieterle for NPR hide caption toggle caption Nathalie Dieterle for NPR German and Cameroonian kids were part of a recent experiment based on the classic "marshmallow te
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Kitchen welfareImage copyright Getty Images Image caption Lobsters may not exhibit recognisable symptoms of pain, but that doesn't mean they don't experience it, say some scientists "Lobster is one of those rare foods that you cook from a live state," the recipe says. "Quickly plunge lobsters head-first into the boiling water... Boil for 15 minutes," the recipe then instructs . It's the tried-and-trusted method
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in natureA study recently published in open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology has found that 9-10 year-old children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Strikingly, this "nature effect" allowed teachers to teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. The results suggest that outdoor lessons may be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screeningIMAGE: This is professor Björn Strander, Sahlgrenksa Academy, Sweden. view more Credit: Photo by Malin Arnesson The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One , makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as wom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What happens when your brain's support cells aren't so supportive?IMAGE: The researchers from left: Matthew Boisvert and Nicola Allen. view more Credit: Salk Institute LA JOLLA -- (Jan. 10, 2018) Potentially explaining why even healthy brains don't function well with age, Salk researchers have discovered that genes that are switched on early in brain development to sever connections between neurons as the brain fine-tunes, are again activated in aging
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Viden
Pladespilleren lever det gode liv på tech-messe i Las VegasPå den årlige CES-messe i Las Vegas præsenteres gadgets i alle afskygninger fra både de store producenter, og nogle du sikkert ikke har hørt om. Nogle af messens evergreens er bærbare computere, musikanlæg og fladskærms-tv. Det er produkter, der kan sælges i millionvis, fordi de er en fast del af mange forbrugeres liv. Derfor præsenteres de også med pomp og pragt på messen. Men der er også andre
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Scientific American Content: Global
Busting 10 Common Myths about the "Greatest Pandemic in History"The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918 . Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population. Half a billion people were infected. Especially remarkable was th
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The Scientist RSS
The Art of Cell Line DevelopmentCell line development (CLD), like a work of art, requires a harmonious interplay between many disparate elements to create a cohesive whole. These elements each present their own potential issues, which need to be overcome in order to optimize productivity. Learn about what problems can affect your CLD processes, and how automation can help solve them, with this poster from Beckman Coulter!
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rising temperatures turning major sea turtle population femaleScientists have used a new research approach to show that warming temperatures are turning one of the world's largest sea turtle colonies almost entirely female, running the risk that the colony cannot sustain itself in coming decades, newly published research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not beliefIn contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists.
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Futurity.org
This fast radio burst is unusually twistyAstronomers have found that fast radio burst FRB 121102—a brief, gigantic pulse of radio waves from 3 billion light years away—passes through a veil of magnetized plasma. This causes the cosmic blasts to “shout and twist, ” which will help the scientists determine the source. “This sort of enormous Faraday rotation is extremely rare.” The “shouting” represents the bursts, and the “twisting” descr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon looks to build on 1st season of NFL streamingAmazon had a mostly successful debut into live streaming of major sports events, with increased audience and an improved viewing experience in its first season showing NFL games. The question looking ahead is how aggressively will Amazon be in the sports streaming landscape? "It's too soon to say," said Jim DeLorenzo, the head of Amazon Sports. "We're just in the early stages here. We were defi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virus cause of more than 170 dolphin deaths in BrazilBrazilian scientists say a virus is the main cause for the death of close to 200 gray dolphins in little more than 40 days on the coast of Rio de Janeiro state.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Retaliatory violence between police and citizens is primed by social mediaDoes social media coverage of fatal police-citizen incidents act as a virtual contagion? If a member of the public is killed by police, does it lead to future violence against law enforcement? Conversely, if an officer is killed in the line of duty, does it lead to future violence against citizens? These are some of the questions raised in a new study published today in the scientific journal PLO
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why the Republican Party may have an advantage when it rains: Voters change their mindsBad weather affects U.S. voter turnout and election outcomes with past research demonstrating that the Republican Party has the advantage. A new study by researchers at Dartmouth College and The Australian National University finds that the Republican Party's advantage when it rains may be due in part to voters changing their partisan preference that day. The study published in American Politics
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Live Science
Pelican Spiders Are the Weirdest-Looking Assassins You'll Ever SeeThe pelican spider's long neck and beak-like pincers give it an almost birdy appearance. Don't be fooled: they're stone cold killers. Credit: Hannah Wood, Smithsonian Once upon a time, 165 million years ago, there lived a spider who looked like a pelican. About the size of a grain of rice and just as quiet, the pelican spider tiptoed under foliage in the leafy parts of the world, looking for pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maintaining tiger connectivity and minimising extinction into the next centuryTigers have lost 95% of their historical range, and what remains is highly fragmented. According to this study, high traffic roads and densely populated urban areas are a severe impediment to tiger movement between fragments. Unplanned development in the future will result in loss of connectivity and an increased possibility of extinction for several tiger populations. To ensure future persistenc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teenagers gamble away their educationThe odds are stacked against teenagers who regularly gamble. A new study in Springer's Journal of Gambling Studies shows that a 14-year-old who gambles is more likely to struggle at school. The study was led by Frank Vitaro of the University of Montreal, Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center and the Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment in Canada. In this long-term population-b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies brain circuit controlling social behaviorA new study by researchers at Roche in Basel, Switzerland has identified a key brain region of the neural circuit that controls social behavior. Increasing the activity of this region, called the habenula, led to social problems in rodents, whereas decreasing activity of the region prevented social problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maintaining tiger connectivity and minimizing extinction into the next centuryThe study was undertaken by a team of researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), the Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT), the Foundation for Ecological Research, Advocacy and Learning (FERAL), and the University of Montana. The team used genetic information collected on field from tiger faecal samples, to understand how landscape features--like roads and agriculture--impac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New biomarkers for colorectal cancerResearchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why the Republican Party may have an advantage when it rains: Voters change their mindsBad weather affects U.S. voter turnout and election outcomes with past research demonstrating that the Republican Party has the advantage. A new study by researchers at Dartmouth College and The Australian National University finds that the Republican Party's advantage when it rains may be due in part to voters changing their partisan preference that day. The study published in American Politics
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New expert guidance on contact precautions for drug-resistant infectionsNEW YORK (Jan. 11, 2018) - New expert guidance released today by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America advises hospitals on determining when they can safely discontinue contact precautions for patients with multi-drug resistant bacteria. The framework, published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , addresses how long hospital staff should use these safety protocols to red
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spider eat spider: Scientists discover 18 new spider-hunting pelican spiders in MadagascarIMAGE: Pelican spiders are beautiful and iconic Madagascan spiders. They have a bizarre appearance, with a long "neck " and chelicerae ( "jaws ") that are used to prey on other spiders from a... view more Credit: Nikolaj Scharff In 1854, a curious-looking spider was found preserved in 50 million-year-old amber. With an elongated neck-like structure and long mouthparts that protruded f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retaliatory violence between police and citizens is primed by social mediaDoes social media coverage of fatal police-citizen incidents act as a virtual contagion? If a member of the public is killed by police, does it lead to future violence against law enforcement? Conversely, if an officer is killed in the line of duty, does it lead to future violence against citizens? These are some of the questions raised in a new study published today in the scientific journal PLO
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NYT > Science
Gajah Makmur Journal: Wildlife Detectives Pursue the Case of Dwindling Elephants in IndonesiaFurther complicating matters in these cases, villagers are often reluctant to give information to the police that could get community members in trouble, said Supintri Yohar, a field coordinator for Auriga, a local conservation organization. The wildlife society’s detectives typically approach poaching suspects, often posing as buyers, to track wildlife parts to market, and then deliver evidence
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkeyEight years after the discovery of a new primate species in Myanmar, scientists have released a new report revealing how the 'snubby' is faring.
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Feed: All Latest
Moog Music Drummer From Another Mother (DFAM): Price, Specs, Release DateThe folks at Moog Music aren't content just making ridiculously fun synthesizers, iPad apps , and effects boxes for creative musicians. The company now is dipping into percussion—it's newest product, announced today, is a drum machine called the Drummer From Another Mother. Well, hang on. It's not exactly a drum machine. It's a monophonic, semi-modular, analog percussion synthesizer. That's a lot
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New on MIT Technology Review
Finally, a Drone That Could Lift a RefrigeratorNYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate Change New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expensive preparations for rising sea levels and extreme weather. BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are all being taken to court by the city, reports the… Read more New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expens
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic inflammation causing loss of muscle massElevated levels of the inflammation marker CRP in the blood is an underlying cause of the loss of muscle mass in elderly persons, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As climate is warming up, more bird nests are destroyed in Finnish farmlandIMAGE: This is a lapwing's nest on sowed field. view more Credit: Andrea Santangeli Finnish farmers are adapting to the warming climate by anticipating the time when they sow their fields in the spring. At the same time, birds have also advanced the time of breeding as the spring temperatures are becoming milder in response to climate change. A new study shows that birds have shifted the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clothes make the woman: Less empathy towards women showing more skinThe way we appear, the way we look, has always been a crucial element in every social interaction, romantic or not. The use of sexualized representations of the individual, with a consequent emphasis on sexual body parts, is, especially in western society, a common way to induce emotions (especially pleasure) with the goal to increase the hedonic value of the associated object (see everyday media
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines link between epilepsy and mood disordersMood disorders, including depression, are the most common comorbid conditions in individuals with epilepsy, but the cause remains unclear. Results from a new Epilepsia study suggest that there may be a shared genetic susceptibility to these conditions, expressed only in people with focal epilepsy (in which seizures start in one part of the brain). In the study, which included 60 unusual families
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spider eat spider: Scientists discover 18 new spider-hunting pelican spiders in MadagascarEriauchenius milajaneae (pictured above) is one of the 18 new species of pelican spiders from Madagascar described by the scientists. This species was named after Wood's daughter, and is known only from one remote mountain in the southeast of Madagascar. Wood made a field expedition to this mountain to find this spider in 2008 but was unsuccessful. So far, this species is only known from two fema
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Science-Based Medicine
Medical Marijuana: Where is the evidence?This year will bring a Canada Day for the history books. Only July 1, 2018, recreational marijuana (also called cannabis) will be legalized and regulated in Canada . The federal Cannabis Act creates a legal framework for producing, possessing and selling marijuana across Canada, meaning that each Canadian province will set its own rules to oversee its distribution, subject to federal government c
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Scientific American Content: Global
Climate Scientists Unlock the Secrets of Blue CarbonTidal wetlands come in many forms, but they could be more alike below the surface than anyone realized. Whether it’s a mangrove forest in Florida, a freshwater swamp in Virginia or a saltwater marsh in Oregon, the amount of carbon locked in a soil sample from each of these coastal ecosystems is roughly the same. That’s the surprising message from a new analysis of some 1,900 soil cores collec
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Sådan bruger ung ingeniør fagets værktøjer til at slå cykelrekordMartin Toft Madsen, cykelrytter og fuldtidsingeniør, bruger alle ingeniørfagets værktøjer på cykelbanen. Følg hans sidste træning inden dagens forsøg på at slå den danske timerekord.
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Popular Science
How to choose the best smart TV for your viewing habitsThe right smart TV can vastly improve your home entertainment, filling your living room with on-demand content from Netflix , Hulu, Amazon Prime , and other streaming companies. But choosing the perfect set for your viewing habits means deciding on the screen resolution, display technology, and of course the platform that will serve as the device's brains. Smart-TV specs can seem confusing, but w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Objectification of women results in lack of empathySexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. Researchers have shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mediterranean diet may help protect older adults from becoming frailAn analysis of published studies indicates that following the Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of frailty in older individuals. The findings suggest that a diet emphasizing primarily plant-based foods -- such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts -- may help keep people healthy and independent as they age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turkey-sized dinosaur from Australia preserved in an ancient log-jamThe partial skeleton of a new species of turkey-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been discovered in 113-million-year-old rocks in southeastern Australia. The fossilized tail and foot bones give new insight into the diversity of small, bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs called ornithopods that roamed the great rift valley that once existed between Australia and Antarctica.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVFFreezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher-ranked colleges don't necessarily provide a better educational experienceCollege rankings dominate the conversation regarding quality in postsecondary education, but new research reveals that rankings have little to no relationship to student engagement, an important indicator of collegiate quality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair'Decorating' cardiac stem cells with platelet nanovesicles can increase the stem cells' ability to find and remain at the site of heart attack injury and enhance their effectiveness in treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in Northwest CaliforniaNorthern spotted owl. Credit: J. Mark Higley/Hoopa Tribal Forestry Wildlife species are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, with the California Academy of Sciences. The study, released Jan. 11 in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology , sh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Sandia balloon-borne infrasound sensor array detects explosionsSandia National Laboratories geophysicists Danny Bowman, left, and Sarah Albert display an infrasound sensor and the box used to protect the sensors from the extreme temperatures experienced by balloons that take the sensors twice as high as commercial jets fly. Credit: Randy Montoya Sheets of plastic similar to that used for garbage bags, packing tape, some string, a little charcoal dust and a w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: China's space station Tiangong-1Credit: A. Figer This vivid image shows China's space station Tiangong-1 – the name means 'heavenly palace' – and was captured by French astrophotographer Alain Figer on 27 November 2017. It was taken from a ski area in the Hautes-Alpes region of southeast France as the station passed overhead near dusk. The station is seen at lower right as a white streak, resulting from the exposure of several
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cheops' pyramid: Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber?IMAGE: North-south section of the Great Pyramid showing (dust-filled area) the hypothetical project of the chamber, in connection with the lower southern shaft. The upper southern shaft does not intersects the... view more Credit: Giulio Magli In early November 2017, Nature published the results of the Scan Pyramids project, led by Mehdi Tayoubi (Hip Institute, Paris) and Kunihiro Moris
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrowResearchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. Cell division is a fundamental biological process which ensures that, following the replication of the mother cell's genome, the two sets of chromosomes are equally distributed between two daughter cells. Chromosomes are segreg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What sort of stream networks do scientific ideas flow along?IMAGE: This is a graph showing the flow of ideas initiated by Prof. H. Eugene Stanley. Connections between collaborators show the existence of several clearly visible sub-networks, corresponding to scientific communities... view more Credit: IFJ PAN When scientists have an interesting idea, the result is usually a joint publication. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Closed marriage: An orchid that never bloomsIMAGE: Figure 1: L. nigricans in Iwata, Nishimuro County, Wakayama prefecture. The flowers never bloom, but the plant still fruits view more Credit: Kenji Suetsugu Lecanorchis nigricansin Kami City, Kochi Prefecture. Timelapse footage created from shots taken every 30 minutes between July 27 and August 27, 2017. The plant does not bloom for the whole month, but despite this it still b
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Dagens Medicin
Inhabil overlæge forstår ingenting: Det er højst mærkværdigtBåde Region Midtjyllands jurister og Ankestyrelsen mener, at ledende overlæge og regionsrådsmedlem Ulrich Fredberg (V) er inhabil, og dermed ikke kan sidde i regionens hospitalsudvalg. Fredberg selv er uforstående.
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Dagens Medicin
Forhastet lovforslag kan føre os tilbage til 2007I stedet for at haste et uigennemtænkt forslag igennem bør man sætte sig sammen med personer, der rent faktisk ved noget om området, og få lavet en mere langsigtet plan for, hvad der er man vil med akupunkturen i Danmark.
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New on MIT Technology Review
NYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate ChangeNYC to Big Oil: It’s Time to Pay for Climate Change New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expensive preparations for rising sea levels and extreme weather. BP, Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are all being taken to court by the city, reports the… Read more New York City is suing five of the world's biggest oil firms in a bid to cover expens
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's TCS records 3.6% decline in quarterly profitsIndia's biggest IT sourcing firm Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) on Thursday reported a 3.6 percent fall in quarterly earnings due to falling demand for its banking and financial services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers implement 3-qubit Grover search on a quantum computerThe three stages of the 3-qubit Grover search algorithm: initialization, oracle, and amplification. Credit: C. Figgatt et al. Published in Nature Communications Searching large, unordered databases for a desired item is a time-consuming task for classical computers, but quantum computers are expected to perform these searches much more quickly. Previous research has shown that Grover's search alg
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Scientific American Content: Global
Gun Terrorism Is the Deadliest KindTerrorist bombings garner a lot of news coverage—but gun assaults are often more coldly efficient. Although firearms are used in only a small fraction of terror strikes, a recent study found that on a per-attack basis, guns are four times deadlier than other methods in high-income countries. “What was surprising was the lethality of firearm attacks compared with other things like explosions a
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Dagens Medicin
Dialogmøde skal finde løsninger på vægtlægegebyrI dag mødes læger, regioner, Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed for i fællesskab at kortlægge problemstillingen med vagtlægerne og at finde en løsning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not beliefIn contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath. Previous studies in the USA have shown that adults that strongly reject evolution are often highly educated but reject the scientific consensus owing to conflicts wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cervical lesions change fastest in Hispanics, slowest in blacks--for better and worseIMAGE: Hispanic women progressed the fastest, moving from the innocuous ASC-US stage to worrisome HSIL lesions within 17.6 months, whereas black women took 27.6 months to reach that critical state. However,... view more Credit: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association CHICAGO--January 11, 2018--Physicians determining treatment options following abnormal Pap smears now have another factor t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The complexities of clouds and the seeds that make themClouds are complicated. Each cloud formation depends on the timing of the water cycle--in which water evaporates from Earth's surface, condensates in the atmosphere and falls back down--as well as the types of aerosols in the atmosphere. In an effort to understand exactly how the micro and macro cloud properties interact with atmospheric particles, a collaborative research team conducted a modeli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why did the passenger pigeon die out?The passenger pigeon was once among the most numerous species on Earth. The last passenger pigeon died in the Cinncinati Zoo just over 100 years ago. How did it all go so wrong?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hiding from a warmer climate in the forestGlobal warming threatens forest plants adapted to cooler temperatures. An international team of scientists have unraveled where these species could survive within colder spots in the same forest. The findings can help to understand the effect of climate change on forest biodiversity and what we can do to protect it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkeyInfant Myanmar or black snub-nosed monkey. Credit: Shaohua Dong Eight years after the discovery of a new primate species in Myanmar, scientists have released a new report revealing how the 'snubby' is faring. Scientists and conservation teams from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Dali University and the German Primate Center just published a comprehensive conservation status review of one of th
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Astronomers Trace Fast Radio Burst to Extreme Cosmic NeighborhoodOn Christmas Eve 2016, Andrew Seymour, an astronomer at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, kissed his 4-year-old daughter, Cora Lee, goodnight, telling her he was off to track Santa. He walked to the well-worn telescope, occasionally passing revelers riding horses through the empty streets—a common sight in Arecibo during the holidays. Sometimes a lonely firework would light up in the distan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US cold snap was a freak of nature, quick analysis findsConsider this cold comfort: A quick study of the brutal American cold snap found that the Arctic blast really wasn't global warming but a freak of nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists create toolkit for tuning genetic circuitsEscherichia coli. Credit: NIAID Rice University scientists have created a toolkit for synthetic biologists who need to precisely tune the input and output levels of genetic circuits. The research, which is online in Nature Communications, is a boon for life scientists who systematically engineer bacteria and other organisms to perform tasks they wouldn't naturally do. "Probiotics are one exampl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White graphene makes ceramics multifunctionalBilayer white graphene (middle layer) combined with calcium-silicate creates a multifunctional ceramic with high strength and toughness, according to a Rice University lab. The material may be suitable for construction and refractory materials and applications in the nuclear industry, oil and gas, aerospace and other areas that require high-performance composites. Credit: Rouzbeh Shahsavari A lit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify the link between light and chloroplast developmentSchematic overview about the molecular mechanism linking light and chloroplast development (created by Daria Chrobok): When light is received for the first time by the cell, etioplasts (top left side) develop into chloroplasts (top right side). The photosystem II (PSII) starts to use the light energy to split water. The released electrons are transferred over the electron transport chain consisti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cold-stunned manatees, sea turtles warming up at SeaWorldVisiting a colleague in Germany in 2012, Boston College Research Professor Paul K. Strother was examining soil samples for pollen, spores, pieces of plants and insect legs - organic debris that might otherwise have been considered ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising temperatures turning major sea turtle population femaleA green sea turtle returns to the water following examination by researchers. A new study finds that green sea turtle colonies in the northern Great Barrier Reef are producing almost all female hatchlings. Credit: Michael Jensen/NOAA Fisheries Scientists have used a new research approach to show that warming temperatures are turning one of the world's largest sea turtle colonies almost entirely f
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New Scientist - News
Study proves that humblebragging really is the worstFamously #humble James Gourley/REX/Shutterstock By Alice Klein “Just won GQ style award in Germany. Obviously they made a mistake. I wonder how long till they come take it back.” If this tweet by actor Jared Leto sets your teeth on edge, you’re not alone. A study has revealed that feigning modesty while boasting – a practice known as “humblebragging” – annoys people even more than outright se
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New Scientist - News
The smart humanoid robot that will help in grocery warehousesThe ARMAR-6 robot is designed to help maintenance workers Karlsruhe Institute of Technology By Sally Adee If armies of Terminators start wiping out humanity, their ancestors might be traced to an upmarket grocery home delivery service that sells fancy toilet roll. Ocado Technology, the innovation arm of the grocery retailer, today unveiled the first prototype of its SecondHands project , a hu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover workings of first promising Marburg virus treatmentScientists have discovered the workings of the first promising treatment for Marburg virus, a pathogen with the same pandemic potential as Ebola virus.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Better Instruments Give Scientists a New Way to Study the CosmosOn the morning of August 17 last year, a new era of astronomy dawned with a flash in the sky. The burst of gamma rays, glimpsed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, came from the merger of two neutron stars (extremely dense objects formed when massive stars collapse and die) somewhere in the universe. But gamma rays weren't the only thing the merger produced. Within seconds of Fermi's detectio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As climate warms, more bird nests are destroyed in Finnish farmlandsLapwing nest Andrea Santangeli. Credit: University of Helsinki A new study shows that birds have shifted the time of their breeding much more quickly than Finnish farmers are anticipating their sowing times. This means that more birds are laying their eggs on fields that are still to be sown, a mismatch in timing that is most likely fatal for the bird nests. "As the eggs of curlew and lapwings ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why children should be taught to build a positive online presenceRather than just teaching children about internet safety and reducing their digital footprint, we should also encourage them to curate a positive digital footprint which will be an asset for them in their future. Today's children are prolific users of the internet. Concern has been raised about the future impact of the digital footprints they are generating. While much discussion of this issue fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising temperatures turning major sea turtle population femaleIMAGE: A green sea turtle returns to the water following examination by researchers. A new study finds that green sea turtle colonies in the northern Great Barrier Reef are producing almost... view more Credit: Michael Jensen/NOAA Fisheries Scientists have used a new research approach to show that warming temperatures are turning one of the world's largest sea turtle colonies almost entirely fema
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cognitive science
A new paper in Psychological Science suggests that praising kids for being smart may lead them to cheat.A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Everything you never wanted to know about bed bugs, and moreCimex lectularius. Credit: CDC/Wikimedia If some insects could save the world, others do their best to seriously complicate life on earth. Among them the prize perhaps goes to the bed bug , which after decades of absence has returned to our homes, hotels and public facilities to seriously disturb us. These intrepid little insects aren't picky about where they set up shop – luxury suites and hospi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A call to report researcher gender to help with replication in research effortsFlowchart identifying the key players responsible for policy changes within science. As shown, the initiation of a crisis can induce change through several mechanisms. Prominent among these are changes in policy recommendations from government funding sources, in addition to policy changes at journals, universities, and independent funding agencies. Credit: Science Advances (2018). DOI: 10.1126/s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four tough actions that would help fight the global plastic crisisCredit: Albert Karimov / shutterstock The environmental impact of plastic is finally receiving the attention it deserves. This is partly down to the BBC's Blue Planet II highlighting the problem of ocean plastics. But it's also because the Chinese government has recently imposed quality restrictions on the import of recyclable materials, in an attempt to address domestic concerns over pollution a
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Image of the Day: Elephants at SunsetConflict threatens already at-risk wildlife populations and conservation efforts in war-torn areas.
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The Scientist RSS
US Interior Department Adopts Political Screening Process for GrantsThe new policy affects academic and nonprofit grants and cooperative agreements exceeding $50,000.
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The Scientist RSS
Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left SidesThese mothers and babies keep each other in their left visual fields during maternal care, which aids right-hemisphere processing.
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