EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial of new triple inhaler shows 20 percent reduction in COPD flare-upsFlare-ups in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the UK's fourth leading cause of death, can be reduced by 20 percent by a combined triple inhaler, according to the results of a trial of more than 2,000 people conducted by the University of Manchester.
30min
Ars Technica

Letting unauthorized immigrants get driver’s licenses makes roads safer Enlarge / Shards of car glass on the street (credit: Getty | Berezko ) States that let unauthorized immigrants get driver’s licenses make their roads safer for all, a new study suggests. After implementing one such law in January 2015, California saw a 7- to 10-percent statewide drop in hit-and-run accidents that year , Stanford researchers report Monday in PNAS . That equates to roughly 4,000 fe
31min
WIRED

What Does Congress Care About? Check Their Browsing Histories Buying Congress' browsing history will likely never happen. But you can still get a glimpse at what your representatives are looking at online. The post What Does Congress Care About? Check Their Browsing Histories appeared first on WIRED .
37min
The Atlantic

Rick and Morty’s ‘Surprise’ Season-Three Launch This post contains spoilers for the new season-three episode of Rick and Morty . On October 4, 2015, the Adult Swim animated sci-fi series Rick and Morty aired its season-two finale. The episode, “The Wedding Squanchers,” built to a Red Wedding-esque massacre on a planet 6,000 light-years away from Earth, and an interstellar manhunt that drove the dysfunctional central family, the Smiths, and the
45min
Gizmodo

Nikon Tries to Right the Sinking Ship With a Stupid Swarovski Replica Image: Screenshot Nikon is, ostensibly, a remarkable company. Sure, it had to lay off quite a few people last year , and back in February, it cancelled a hotly anticipated line of cameras . But Nikon’s a tech-based company that’s managed to innovate and survive a hundred years. Nikon started as an optics company and has endured as one, even as photography has evolved considerably. Few companies c
45min
Gizmodo

Yosemite National Park to Offer Peep Show for Bear Fans Image: Nigel Voaden Do you like the thought of peeping on your own big, hairy bear wearing a black collar from the comfort of your own home? Well, Yosemite National Park may be making your dreams come true. No, the park hasn’t created some leather daddy adoration society, as wonderful as that may sound. Instead, the park is sharing the location of some of the big hairy beasts to better protect bo
52min
Gizmodo

Verizon to Turn AOL and Yahoo Into Some Kind of Weird Cult or Something Image: AP Folks, the moment we’ve all been waiting for is finally official: Verizon is going to combine Yahoo (huh?) and AOL (what?) into one useless conglomerate called “Oath.” Holy shit! Oath? What a wacky name. A tweet this afternoon from the AOL CEO Tim Armstrong appeared to confirm earlier rumblings that the dusty internet companies will combine into one even dustier Frankenstein. They’re ev
1h
Live Science

Joe Biden: 'It's Time to Double Down' on Cancer ResearchWherever former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden goes, people ask him about cancer.
1h
Ars Technica

Pushing apps to the edge, Fly.io puts middleware in the cloud Enlarge (credit: fly.io ) The development model for Internet applications has weirdly followed, in many ways, the model developers have used for enterprise applications. First, there was the highly-centralized "mainframe" model of CGI. Then as browsers got beefier, next came the "client-server" model of JavaScript-laden Web pages (and code-heavy mobile apps) doing all the display-side work using
1h
The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: “Bardic Symbols” by Walt Whitman This week marks 157 years since Walt Whitman’s poetry first appeared in the April issue of The Atlantic . Library of Congress Now celebrated as “America’s Bard” and read widely as one of the country’s most popular poets, Whitman first reached out to Atlantic co-founder Ralph Waldo Emerson from creative obscurity. In 1855 he sent Emerson a copy of his recently self-published poetry collection, Lea
1h
The Atlantic

Did Susan Rice Do Anything Wrong By Asking to 'Unmask' Trump Officials? Ever since Devin Nunes’s mysterious announcement of supposed surveillance of Trump transition team members two weeks ago, the story has operated on two levels. The first is why Nunes behaved the way he did—with mysterious cloak-and-dagger maneuvers—and who he got his information from. It now appears that despite rushing to brief President Trump on his news, the GOP chairman of the House Intellige
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: 41 Votes to Midnight Today in 5 Lines The Senate Judiciary Committee voted to send Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination to the full Senate for a final confirmation vote, but it won’t be easy: Senate Democrats have reached the 41 votes required to filibuster his confirmation, and if they do so, Republicans have hinted that they’ll resort to the so-called “nuclear option”—changing the rules to confirm Gorsuch
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Bringing Owls Into the LightAn illustrated natural history book highlights the diversity of the world’s owls, from beloved species to rare, enigmatic ones.
1h
Big Think

12 Reasons We Should All Be More Impractical in Life Seemingly impractical things include pleasure reading, an overactive imagination, and the liberal arts. Each is commonly derided by all too practical people. Each is vital to us all. Read More
1h
TEDTalks (video)

Political common ground in a polarized United States | Gretchen Carlson, David BrooksHow can we bridge the gap between left and right to have a wiser, more connected political conversation? Journalist Gretchen Carlson and op-ed columnist David Brooks share insights on the tensions at the heart of American politics today -- and where we can find common ground. Followed by a rousing performance of "America the Beautiful" by Vy Higginsen's Gospel Choir of Harlem.
1h
Gizmodo

This New Amber Discovery Is Like the Start of Jurassic Park but With Ancient Monkeys [Updated] Image: George Poinar Jr. A tick sucks some monkey blood. A monkey’s grooming partner picks the tick off. The tick lands in some sap. The whole thing fossilizes. Scientists discover the cells inside the tick in the amber. They turn the blood cells into monkey clones and you’ve essentially got some sort of Jurassic Park in real life. That might actually be happening after one well-known scientist’s
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Monkey business produces rare preserved blood in amber fossilsTwo monkeys grooming each other about 20-30 million years ago may have helped produce a remarkable new find - the first fossilized red blood cells from a mammal, preserved so perfectly in amber that they appear to have been prepared for display in a laboratory.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists in Staffordshire switch on futuristic-looking forest to measure carbon impactThe launch of the giant outdoor experiment will see trees engulfed by high levels of carbon dioxide.
1h
Gizmodo

Meet the Women Trying to Revolutionize Abortion Access at California Universities Students United for Reproductive Justice at Berkeley co-directors Marandah Field-Elliot, Adiba Khan and Elizabeth Wells worked to remove financial, logistical, and academic barriers to accessing medication abortion on their campus. (Image: Mikaela Raphael) For more than a year, there’s been a pioneering effort underway by students at UC Berkeley to dramatically broaden the access that women on ca
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight history over time shows higher risk of death for overweight, obese peoplePeople who are obese or overweight at some point in their adult lives have an elevated risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health.
1h
Gizmodo

All the Ways the Marvel Netflix Shows Avoid Mentioning the Marvel Movies Image: Netflix Marvel’s cinematic universe is all connected... in theory . When it comes to the TV shows, they have to be as vague as they can when they refer to a character or event from the films—while the films ignore them wholesale. Here’s a round up of the silliest avoidances from across Daredevil , Luke Cage , Jessica Jones , and Iron Fist . The First Avengers Movie The Incident ( Daredevil
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Charter won't have to compete with other cable companies nowFederal regulators are letting Charter out of a requirement that would have forced it to compete with other broadband providers and possibly cut prices.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoking hot: UC study finds heat of hookah pipe the biggest health culprit for smokersHookah-tobacco users might want to rethink how they heat up their water pipes, based on research by chemists at the University of Cincinnati. Tobacco in hookah pipes is normally burned with specially made charcoal briquettes, which can contain heavy metals or other toxins. But a study by the University of Cincinnati found that a popular alternative -- electric heating disks sold in most tobacco sh
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Montana joins others in effort to bolster internet privacyStates have started writing their own legislation to protect broadband privacy after Congress voted to repeal regulations that would have required internet providers to obtain their customers' consent before collecting their personal information.
2h
Quanta Magazine

Solution: ‘A Ticking Evolutionary Clock’ Carrie Arnold’s article, “ Evolution Runs Faster on Short Timescales ,” explored new research showing that genetic changes that are quite brisk when measured over a few generations seem to slow down considerably when measured over millions of years. Our March puzzle attempted to see if such a result could be reproduced in a simple hypothetical DNA sequence. Question 1: Imagine a gene that is 108
2h
The Atlantic

Five Came Back and the Frightening Power of Propaganda When the director John Huston arrived at San Pietro in southern Italy to film a crucial World War II battle in 1943, he was greeted with its aftermath. The small mountain town had been completely obliterated by invading Allied troops and the retreating Nazi army; more than 16,000 American troops lay dead as a result. Huston turned his cameras on the fallen soldiers, filming shocking footage of th
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Is consciousness just an illusion?Cognitive scientist Daniel Dennett believes the human brain might not be that special.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biochar provides high-definition electron pathways in soilCornell University scientists have discovered a new high-definition system that allows electrons to travel through soil farther and more efficiently than previously thought.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug combination shows benefit in RAS-driven cancersDana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists report a number of patients in a small study with RAS-driven lung, ovarian, and thyroid cancers got long-term clinical benefit from a combination of two drugs that targeted molecular pathways controlled by the RAS gene.
2h
Big Think

You’re Being Spied on by ISPs. Time to Setup a VPN and Fight Back. Your Internet Service Providers are collecting and selling your browsing history. Does that bother you? If so, it may be time to setup a Virtual Private Network (VPN) to better encrypt your data and spoof your location. Read More
2h
Popular Science

Mosquitoes and ticks are going to eat us all alive this summer Science Bust out the bug repellant An unusually warm winter followed by a wet and warm spring creates the perfect breeding ground for nuisance insects. Read on:…
2h
Popular Science

29 ways to make your kitchen better Gadgets Spice up your kitchen life with some cool cooking doodads. Spice up your kitchen with some cooking doodads. It's time to update the essentials you got in college.Read on.
2h
Gizmodo

Five Disturbingly Weird Things That Happen in The Boss Baby I took my daughter to Boss Baby —an animated movie about a talking infant who wears a suit—because I like hearing her laugh. Little did I know I’d be looking upon horrors beyond imagining in the number one movie in America. The Boss Baby is, in the main, not good. I laughed at times, mostly at unexpected nerd references, but the film feels way too broad, like a bunch of predictable gags wrapped a
2h
Ars Technica

This is what emulated Breath of the Wild looks like at 4K resolution Be sure to take this video full screen and full resolution on a nice monitor to see just how good Breath of the Wild can look. On standard Nintendo hardware, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild runs at a bare bones HD resolution of 720p, or up to 900p when using the Nintendo Switch in docked mode. Using the power of a Wii U emulator called CEMU , though, devoted coders have now got the game r
2h
WIRED

Apple’s Making Its Own GPU to Control Its Own Destiny Graphics are the future. And Apple's not leaving the future up to someone else. The post Apple’s Making Its Own GPU to Control Its Own Destiny appeared first on WIRED .
2h
WIRED

Thanks to Twitter, Ghost in the Shell Never Stood a Ghost of a Chance The failed US adaptation of the beloved Japanese hit has been the source of internet frustration for years. Maybe Hollywood should have been listening. The post Thanks to Twitter, Ghost in the Shell Never Stood a Ghost of a Chance appeared first on WIRED .
2h
WIRED

Sure, Atlanta Can Fix Its Freeway—or Build a Ramp to Jump It A section of I-85 in Atlanta collapsed and will take months to repair. Here is my idea to fix the road that won't take as long. The post Sure, Atlanta Can Fix Its Freeway—or Build a Ramp to Jump It appeared first on WIRED .
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers 'iron out' graphene's wrinklesEngineers at MIT have found a way to make graphene with fewer wrinkles, and to iron out the wrinkles that do appear. After fabricating and then flattening out the graphene, the researchers tested its electrical conductivity. They found each wafer exhibited uniform performance, meaning that electrons flowed freely across each wafer, at similar speeds, even across previously wrinkled regions.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug combination boost PARP inhibitor response in resistant ovarian cancerA new Dana-Farber study shows patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer who wouldn't be expected to respond to a PARP inhibitor had partial shrinkage of their tumor with the addition of a kinase inhibitor.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Set strawberry alarm clock for post-apple bloomGrowers who time their strawberries to bloom just after apples do, can reap a better harvest, according to new research.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women experience high rates of health insurance 'churn' before and after childbirthA high percentage of women in the US move in and out of health insurance coverage -- sometimes referred to as 'churn' -- in the months before and after childbirth, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Low-income women experience the brunt of these insurance disruptions, which cause coverage gaps that can lead to adverse health outcomes.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers 'iron out' graphene's wrinklesFrom an electron's point of view, graphene must be a hair-raising thrill ride. For years, scientists have observed that electrons can blitz through graphene at velocities approaching the speed of light, far faster than they can travel through silicon and other semiconducting materials.
2h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: After Badger Buries Entire Cow Carcass, Scientists Go to the TapeResearchers wondered what happened to the calf carcass they’d left outside for scavengers. A badger buried it, they found — then built a home next door.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Out-of-body experiments show kids’ budding sense of selfSensing that “my body is me” starts early and develops over many years.
2h
New Scientist - News

Prehistoric humans made jewellery out of exotic island animalsPendants made from the finger bone of a bear cuscus and beads from the tooth of a babirusa pig show the artistry of humans in Australasia 30,000 years ago
3h
Live Science

In Ice Age Indonesia, People Were Making Jewelry and ArtArt and jewelry dating back to the last ice age have been unearthed in a cave in Indonesia —a discovery that suggests the people who lived there at that time were more culturally advanced than some experts previously thought.
3h
Live Science

Climate Change Incited Wars Among the Classic MayaA new study of the relationship between climate change and clashes among the Classic Maya explicitly links temperature increases with growing conflicts.
3h
The Atlantic

Trump and the Cycle of Democracy Promotion The Trump administration’s decision to welcome Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to Washington this week is being described as a shift away from previous administrations’ emphasis on human rights. Sisi, a former military chief, toppled a democratically elected government in 2013 and presided over the worst mass killing of protesters in modern Egyptian history. He has brutally suppressed pol
3h
Gizmodo

Trump Was Instructed Not to Delete Tweets Illegally Image: Getty Remember the day after the inauguration? Okay, we were hungover, too, but do you remember how Trump might have violated federal records-keeping laws by illegally deleting his tweets while in office? Turns out, the National Archives also heard about that and took action. David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, recently replied to a letter from Senators Claire McCaskill and Tom
3h
The Scientist RSS

Evaluating Epigenome-Targeting Cancer TherapiesAt the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watch their steps: Yosemite tracks journey of bears onlineWildlife enthusiasts around the world can now follow the daily journey of Yosemite National Park's black bears from their laptops and smartphones, tracking the iconic animals as they lope up steep canyons and cross vast distances in search of food and mates.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google: machine learning may fix ad placement disputeGoogle on Monday said it will apply machine smarts and outside eyes to help ensure brands don't find ads paired with hateful videos on YouTube.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monkey business produces rare preserved blood in amber fossilsTwo monkeys grooming each other about 20-30 million years ago may have helped produce a remarkable new find - the first fossilized red blood cells from a mammal, preserved so perfectly in amber that they appear to have been prepared for display in a laboratory.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storm-scanning satellites enter operations phaseNASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission has successfully completed its development and commissioning phase and moved into the operations phase. The constellation of eight microsatellites—the first engineered and fabricated by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)—has now started on-orbit instrument calibration and validation and is on track to collect data for the 2017 hur
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trends in college attendance rates in rural AmericaThe benefits of obtaining a college degree are higher than ever in the current economy, as researchers estimate that by the year 2020, 65 percent of all jobs will require postsecondary education.
3h
Gizmodo

Stock Up On Insanely Popular ExOfficio Underwear With Amazon's BOGO 50% Off Sale BOGO 50% Off ExOfficio underwear ExOfficio underwear are not only one of your favorite underwear by an incredible margin, they’re also a Bestseller . While they had their own 25% off sale on their site, right now on Amazon, you stock up with a BOGO 50% off sale (shipped and sold by Amazon directly). Some styles and colors are cheaper on Amazon and some aren’t, so it may take some comparing to get
3h
Big Think

To Be Happier, More Productive at Work, Adjust Your Level of Complaining A new study suggests you should show "sportsmanship" instead of complaining about problems at work. Read More
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Self-Driving and Electric Cars Are Going to Have Tons of Strange Effects on SocietyAutonomy and electrification will have bigger impacts on the world than you might expect.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers obtain Bose-Einstein condensate with nickel chlorideAt temperatures close to absolute zero and in the presence of a very intense magnetic field, nickel chloride behaves like a Bose-Einstein condensate, so that the properties of a large group of atoms can be described using a single equation, a single wave function. This discovery makes calculations possible that would otherwise be impracticable.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A promising strategy to increase activity in antimicrobial peptidesIn an article published recently in Plos One, researchers from INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre reported a strategy that could lead to the discovery of new cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) with greatly enhanced antimicrobial properties. The peptide modified for the study retained considerable activity against biofilms responsible for increasing the severity of various infection
3h
WIRED

Hackers Are Emptying ATMs With a Single Drilled Hole and $15 Worth of Gear Step aside, ATM skimmers. This new attack empties out all the cash in minutes. The post Hackers Are Emptying ATMs With a Single Drilled Hole and $15 Worth of Gear appeared first on WIRED .
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers uncover prehistoric art and ornaments from Indonesian 'Ice Age'A joint Indonesian-Australian team has unearthed a rare collection of prehistoric art and 'jewellery' objects from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, dating in some instances to as early as 30,000 years ago.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Android apps can conspire to mine information from your smartphoneMobile phones have increasingly become the repository for the details that drive our everyday lives. But researchers have recently discovered that the same apps we regularly use on our phones to organize lunch dates, make convenient online purchases, and communicate the most intimate details of our existence have secretly been colluding to mine our information.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood vessels and the immune system talk to each otherTumor blood vessels and the immune system influence each other's functions, and propose that considering these bilateral effects in cancer therapy might improve outcomes, researchers have found.
3h
Gizmodo

Sonequa Martin-Green's Star Trek: Discovery Character Has a Brand New Name Image: CBS It feels like we’ve known forever that the central figure in Star Trek: Discovery wouldn’t be the captain . And it feels like we’ve known forever that Sonequa Martin-Green ( The Walking Dead ) would be that character . But the character’s name has changed. Previously, Martin-Green was going to be playing Lieutenant Commander Rainsford. As of today, Star Trek.com and the Star Trek: Disc
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New species evolve faster as mountains formMountains, like rainforests, are hotbeds of biodiversity. But scientists aren't sure why. For years, they've thought that it might be related to the new environments that arise when mountains form -- as plants and animals adapt to the new micro-habitats forming along mountainsides, they divide into new species at a faster rate than usual. But there was little hard proof supporting this hypothesis
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When human illness rises, the environment suffers, tooA toxic environment is known to create health problems for people, but sick people can also create health problems for the environment. Around Kenya's Lake Victoria, a fishing community where locals battle high rates of disease and a depleted fish stock, scientists found that human illness exacerbates unsustainable fishing practices.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients in intensive care feel better with light adapted to the time of dayThe light environment in intensive care affects how patients feel -- even a year after completed hospitalization -- new research suggests. With light adapted to the time of day, health even improves for patients who are barely conscious when they are admitted for care.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From fish to forests, conflicts to coffee: Humans affected by species on the moveA new international study led by scientists from IMAS and the University of Tasmania's Centre for Marine Socioecology has highlighted how humans are being affected by climate-driven changes in the distribution of land, marine and freshwater species around the world.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pitt researchers identify new brain pathway that controls hand movementsNeuroscientists have discovered a new brain pathway that could underlie our ability to make the coordinated hand movements needed to reach out and manipulate objects in our immediate surroundings.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meningitis bacteria adapting to STI niche, genetic analysis showsN. meningitidis, usually associated with meningitis and sepsis, is the cause of a recent cluster of sexually transmitted infections in Columbus, Ohio and in other US cities. The bacterium appears to be adapting to a urogenital environment, an analysis of its DNA shows.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomarker identified for likely aggressive, early stage breast cancerWhitehead Institute scientists have identified a gene that could help clinicians discern which patients have aggressive forms of early stage breast cancer, which could prevent hundreds of thousands of women from undergoing unnecessary treatment and save millions of dollars.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecules in the body more visible in new detection system, say scientistsScientists at the University of York have developed a technique that will enhance the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover prehistoric art and ornaments from Indonesian 'Ice Age'Griffith University archaeologists are part of a joint Indonesian-Australian team that has unearthed a rare collection of prehistoric art and 'jewellery' objects from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, dating in some instances to as early as 30,000 years ago.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New species evolve faster as mountains formMountains, like rainforests, are hotbeds of biodiversity. But scientists aren't sure why. For years, they've thought that it might be related to the new environments that arise when mountains form -- as plants and animals adapt to the new micro-habitats forming along mountainsides, they divide into new species at a faster rate than usual. But there was little hard proof supporting this hypothesis
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria parasites soften our cells' defenses in order to invadeMalaria parasites cause red blood cells to become bendier, helping the parasites to enter and cause infection, says a new study.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When human illness rises, the environment suffers, tooA toxic environment is known to create health problems for people, but sick people can also create health problems for the environment. Around Kenya's Lake Victoria, a fishing community where locals battle high rates of disease and a depleted fish stock, scientists found that human illness exacerbates unsustainable fishing practices.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds more childhood cancer survivors would likely benefit from genetic screeningSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital has completed the first whole genome sequencing of cancer survivors and found that 12 percent of childhood cancer survivors carry mutations linked to an increased risk of cancer.
3h
Live Science

Boy or Girl? Text Alerts to Deliver Gender of April the Giraffe's CalfApril's many fans can sign up for text alerts for when April goes into labor and for the first disclosure of the newborn's gender.
3h
Science : NPR

The Taste Of Wine Isn't All In Your Head, But Your Brain Sure Helps Savoring the flavor of wine activates more gray matter than solving a complex math problem, according to neuroscientist Gordon Shepherd. His new book, Neurenology, explores your brain on wine. (Image credit: Alex Reynolds/NPR)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Girls are better at masking autism than boysGirls with autism have relatively good social skills, which means that their autism is often not recognized. And autism manifests itself in girls differently from in boys, suggests a new report.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Telomere length predicts cancer riskThe length of the 'caps' of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics. Longer-than-expected telomeres -- which are composed of repeated sequences of DNA and are shortened every time a cell divides -- are associated with an increased cancer risk.
3h
The Atlantic

Going Nuclear for Neil Gorsuch Updated at 4:18 p.m. ET Senate Democrats said Monday they have the required 41 votes to sustain a filibuster against Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation. Assuming none of the 41 senators change their minds before the final vote later this week, the Senate’s Republican majority will almost certainly invoke the so-called “nuclear option” to rewrite the legislative chamber’s rules and
4h
The Atlantic

Above Canada and Greenland With NASA's Operation IceBridge Getty Images photographer Mario Tama just returned from the Arctic, after accompanying researchers with NASA's Operation IceBridge as they flew sets of eight-hour research flights above parts of Canada, Greenland, and the Arctic Ocean on their Arctic spring campaign. Scientists are monitoring Arctic ice loss and studying how polar ice has evolved over the past nine years. The flights were conduct
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electronic synapses that can learn: Towards an artificial brain?Researchers have created an artificial synapse capable of learning autonomously. They were also able to model the device, which is essential for developing more complex circuits.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New experimental drug offers hope for menopausal women with frequent menopausal hot flushesWomen plagued by frequent hot flushes during the menopause could cut the number of flushes by almost three-quarters, thanks to a new drug compound.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deploying an ancient defense to kill cancerWhat if your body's ancient defenses against invading bacteria could be hijacked to help kill cancer? In a small sarcoma trial, scientists have found signs of immune attack after injections of a bacteria-inspired drug.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny plankton wields biological 'gatling gun' in microbial Wild WestResearchers have obtained an unprecedented view of the 'ballistic' weaponry of planktonic microbes, including one that can fire projectiles as if wielding a Gatling gun.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jumping droplets whisk away hotspots in electronicsEngineers have developed a technology to cool hotspots in high-performance electronics using the same physical phenomenon that cleans the wings of cicadas.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoscopic golden springs change color of twisted lightScientists have used gold spring-shaped coils 5,000 times thinner than human hairs with powerful lasers to enable the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could improve pharmaceutical design, telecommunications and nanorobotics.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover prehistoric art and ornaments from Indonesian 'Ice Age'The Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution (ARCHE) team, based in Griffith's Environmental Futures Research Institute, together with Indonesian colleagues, have shed new light on 'Ice Age' human culture and symbolism in a paper published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria parasites soften our cells' defenses in order to invadeMalaria parasites cause red blood cells to become bendier, helping the parasites to enter and cause infection, says a new study.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecules in the body more visible in new detection system, say scientistsScientists at the University of York have developed a technique that will enhance the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying disease.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species evolve faster as mountains formMountains, like rainforests, are hotbeds of biodiversity. But scientists aren't sure why. For years, they've thought that it might be related to the new environments that arise when mountains form— as plants and animals adapt to the new micro-habitats and their populations become isolated by increasingly rugged terrain, they divide into new species at a faster rate than usual. However, there was l
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When human illness rises, the environment suffers, tooA toxic environment is known to create health problems for people, but sick people can also create health problems for the environment. Around Kenya's Lake Victoria, a fishing community where locals battle high rates of disease and a depleted fish stock, scientists found that human illness exacerbates unsustainable fishing practices.
4h
Ars Technica

Hieronymus Bosch action figures are the greatest thing from any dimension If you love action figures and medieval insanity (and who doesn't?), you need to make room in your display cabinets for these incredible recreations of figures from the paintings of 15th century artist Hieronymus Bosch . A famous late Medieval painter, Bosch's work focused entirely on Christian themes, often depicting heaven and hell in imaginatively lurid detail. These delightfully demonic figur
4h
Ars Technica

Tesla: No algorithm prevents sudden acceleration into fixed objects Federal court documents Tesla is the subject of a proposed class-action lawsuit alleging that its Model X and Model S vehicles are prone to sudden, unintended acceleration (SUA). A number of owners are claiming that their electric vehicles suddenly drove through a garage or into a wall either by human or computer error—and at least 23 accounts of Teslas experiencing unintended acceleration are on
4h
Gizmodo

In Their War With The Wall Street Journal, Top YouTubers Just Played Themselves Ethan Klein, aka h3h3Productions Over the last couple of weeks, anger has been bubbling on YouTube over the news that major brands pulled advertisements on the platform in an effort to avoid being matched with objectionable content. The reports, which were published by the Wall Street Journal , were met with such skepticism that they sparked scandalous conspiracy theories among YouTube’s top crea
4h
The Atlantic

Trump's TV Obsession Is a First President Trump loves Fox & Friends . At 6:24 a.m. on Monday, Trump gushed on Twitter about the “amazing reporting” on the morning talk show. A week earlier he instructed the nation to “watch @foxandfriends now” for their exemplary Russia coverage. He tweeted about the program, hosted by Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade, seven times in March alone, and recently brought it up in a
4h
The Atlantic

'Donald Trump' Gets a Comedy Central Series One of the texts found in the tomb of Tutankhamun, unsealed in 1923 for the first time since the 14th century B.C., was the Enigmatic Book of the Netherworld , a funerary text that described how Ra, god of the sun, was thought to have reunited with Osiris, god of the afterlife. One of the text’s illustrations features an early version of an ancient symbol: the ouroboros , the snake that devours i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New indications of gradual decline of dinosaurs before the end of the cretaceous periodThe gradual decline of the dinosaurs and pterosaurs presumably came before the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid and the global mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period, new research suggests. Studies also indicate that bird species spread and diversified at the same time the dinosaurs disappeared.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find shoulder pad foam layer plays role in fewer concussionsSimon Fraser University researchers have found that a simple modification to hockey players' shoulder pads could have an impact on shoulder-to-head contact, the most common cause of concussions in ice hockey.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monkey business produces rare preserved blood in amber fossilsTwo monkeys grooming each other about 20-30 million years ago may have helped produce a remarkable new find - the first fossilized red blood cells from a mammal, preserved so perfectly in amber that they appear to have been prepared for display in a laboratory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret to staying motivatedResearchers have discovered that our source of motivation switches about halfway through the process of pursuing a goal. People who lose interest in reaching a goal may benefit from trying different motivation strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening the dark genome for diseaseResearchers have developed a method to swiftly screen non-coding DNA for links to diseases with complicated genetic components. The technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, schizophrenia and many others, and lead to new treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some head and neck cancer patients benefit from continued checkpoint inhibitor treatmentNew research suggests that some patients with head and neck cancers can benefit by continuing treatment with an immunotherapy drug after their tumors show signs of enlargement according to investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
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Amazon-grundlægger fremviser turistbus til rummetBlue Origin har offentliggjort de første billeder af New Shepards passagerkapsel, der skal bringe rige turister til kanten af rummet.
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Popular Science

A foldable, adjustable phone stand for 79 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets Prop up your devices for $17. Prop up your devices for $17. I'd buy it. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exposure to BPA Substitute, BPS, Multiplies Breast Cancer CellsBisphenol S (BPS), a substitute for the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in the plastic industry, shows the potential for increasing the aggressiveness of breast cancer through its behavior as an endocrine-disrupting chemical, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutant lifestyles: Researchers uncover a potent genetic element in Earth's smallest life formsA potent genetic element has been uncovered in Earth's smallest life forms. A multitude of previously unidentified microorganisms possess a genetic element that enables them to self-mutate.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spray-on memory could enable bendable digital storageResearchers have created a new 'spray-on' digital memory using only an aerosol jet printer and nanoparticle ink. The device, which is analogous to a 4-bit flash drive, is the first fully-printed digital memory suitable for practical use in simple electronics such as environmental sensors or RFID tags. Because it is jet-printed, it could be used to build programmable electronic devices on flexible
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Here's one secret to successful schools that costs nothingMost factors that help make schools successful cost lots of money -- think teachers, technology and textbooks. But a new study suggests one factor that doesn't need any cash to implement can play an important role in helping students succeed at even the most disadvantaged schools. That factor is what scientists call social capital.
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Ars Technica

Russia’s hack of State Department was “hand-to-hand” combat Enlarge (credit: AgnosticPreachersKid ) Russia's 2014 hack of an unclassified State Department computer system was much more aggressive than previously reported, with one official describing it as "hand-to-hand combat," according to an article published Monday by The Washington Post . Over a 24-hour period, top US network defenders repeatedly ejected the intruders. Just as quickly, the intruders
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trends in college attendance rates in rural AmericaThe benefits of obtaining a college degree are higher than ever in the current economy, as researchers estimate that by the year 2020, 65 percent of all jobs will require postsecondary education.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skin cancer finding provides hope for patients with rare type of melanomaA team of researchers report a significant genetic association linked to an aggressive form of melanoma in a study published today in the journal Genome Research. Led by investigators at TGen -- in collaboration with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Mayo Clinic -- researchers identified a protein target that opens a window into acral lentiginous mel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell innovation regrows rotator cuffsRotator cuff problems are common, with about two million people afflicted and about 300,000 rotator cuff repair surgeries every year in the US. Surgeons have many techniques to reconnect the tendon to the bone. The problem is that often they don't stay reconnected. Now, a team of researchers from UConn Health has found a way to regenerate rotator cuff tendons after they're torn and make a stronger
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds significant variability in doctors' angioplasty death ratesSome doctors have higher or lower than expected death rates from coronary angioplasty procedures, also known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); however, doctors should not be judged solely on the rate of patients who die from the procedure. The rate is highly variable over time, according to a study today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rock exposed in World War I trenches offers new fossil findAn unusual fossil find is giving scientists new ideas about how some of the earliest animals on Earth came to dominate the world's oceans.
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Gizmodo

There's an X-Files Children's Book Coming So Your Kids Can Fall in Love with Mulder and Scully Too Images: EW If you’re a geeky parent who wants to introduce your kids to the X-Files without fueling a year’s worth of nightmares, publisher Quirk Books will be releasing a children’s book starring kid versions of Fox Mulder and Dana Scully , doing some detective work while camping in the backyard. Image: EW As Entertainment Weekly reveals, in The X-Files: Earth Children Are Weird , featuring illu
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Gizmodo

Onlooker To Faraday Future Prototype: “Is That The Model 3?" Like pretty much every other carmaker, Faraday Future tests their pre-production mules out on city roads, where they can be in full view of the public. Two members of the public saw this Faraday Future FF 91 mule out for a drive in Los Angeles (right by Trashy Lingerie, even), and their reaction was one that will make Faraday Future marketing people weep a little bit at their desks today. Here it
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The Atlantic

Egypt Is Trump Country In one of his first acts in office, President Donald Trump phoned his Egyptian counterpart, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The symbolism was telling: Sisi wasn’t just another Arab autocrat but one of the region’s most repressive. The Trump-Sisi mutual appreciation society of two continues this week during President Sisi’s much-hyped (in Egypt) visit to Washington. The authoritarian instinct is easily reco
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The Atlantic

Why Watching People Break Up on YouTube Is So Addictive There are a few schools of social-media breakup etiquette. In my experience, most people simply hope that nobody notices their Facebook relationship status turn blank and profile picture turn solo. Some—as I’ve done in the past—temporarily deactivate their accounts. Others opt for vague sadposting. Only a brave few acknowledge the uncoupling publicly. For YouTube stars, though, the bar is differe
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The Atlantic

What Makes a Good Landing Site on Mars? Three years from now, NASA will launch another rover to Mars, where it will scour the surface for traces of ancient life, signs that the planet may have once been habitable. Around the same time, if Elon Musk meets his deadline, SpaceX will send the first commercial spacecraft to land on the planet. About a decade later, humans might arrive, ready to open a new chapter in human history. But where
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Ars Technica

Charter won’t have to compete against other ISPs thanks to FCC decision The Federal Communications Commission has voted to eliminate a merger requirement that would have forced Charter Communications to expand its network into the territory of other high-speed broadband providers. The FCC's approval of the Charter/Time Warner Cable merger last year required Charter to deploy broadband with download speeds of 60Mbps to at least two million residential and small busine
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Ars Technica

iOS 10.3.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad Enlarge iOS 10.3.1 is out. The release notes don't specify what it fixes that wasn't addressed in the wide-ranging iOS 10.3 update released just a week ago, but we do know that this new update includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad. Specifically, according to the more detailed notes on Apple's security page , 10.3.1 addresses a buffer overflow that could be exploited
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutant lifestylesResearchers uncover a potent genetic element in Earth's smallest life forms.
5h
NYT > Science

Do Seas Make Us Sick? Surfers May Have the AnswerResearchers are studying the effects of antibiotic-resistant genes in the oceans.
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New Scientist - News

First ever cavefish discovered in Europe evolved super-fastA remote underground cave system in Germany has yielded a ghost-like cavefish that evolved as recently as 16,000 years ago
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New Scientist - News

Eggs get less fertile with age because of chaotic cell divisionMouse experiments suggest disordered cell division makes eggs become less viable as females age, hinting there might be a way to counteract this in women
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter drops egg icon in battle with internet 'trolls'An egg icon that for years marked profiles of new Twitter users was gone Monday, a victim of "trolls" who often hid behind them to launch anonymous online attacks.
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Big Think

How Optimistic Are You? It Probably Depends on Your Age New research reveals we frequently worry about aging. Ironically, as we become older and the effects of aging set in, we tend to become more optimistic about life. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stress a common seizure trigger in epilepsy, study affirmsThe relationship between stress and seizures has been well documented over the last 50 years. A recent review article looks at the stress-seizure relationship and how adopting stress reduction techniques may provide benefit as a low risk form of treatment.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Magnetic brain stimulation causes weight loss by making gut bacteria healthierA new study finds that a noninvasive electromagnetic brain stimulation technique helps obese people lose weight, partly by changing the composition of their intestinal bacteria -- the so-called gut microbiota.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robot epigenetics: Adding complexity to embodied robot evolutionFor the first time, researchers in the field of evolutionary robotics have used physically embodied robots to study epigenetic effects on robot evolution. The study confirms the great importance of taking epigenetic factors into account and provides a conceptual and physical methodology for this type of research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early life antibiotic use linked to inflammatory gut diseases in adulthoodA new research report involving mice shows that antibiotic use very early in life that alters the normal development/growth of gut bacteria, may contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease, and potentially other inflammatory diseases like asthma and multiple sclerosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Close connection between deep currents and climateThe Labrador Sea in the northwestern Atlantic is one of the key regions of the global ocean circulation. Scientists have been operating an array of oceanographic observatories there since 1997. It monitors the currents from the surface to the seabed. Oceanographers recently published an analysis of their data obtained from 1997 to 2014. It shows a close connection between deep currents and climate
5h
Ars Technica

DOJ warns companies seeking H-1B visas: Don’t discriminate against US citizens Enlarge (credit: US Customs and Border Protection ) As the government begins approving H-1B applications for the year, the Justice Department has issued a public warning to employers seeking those visas not to use them to harbor bias against US-based workers. "The Justice Department will not tolerate employers misusing the H-1B visa process to discriminate against US workers," said Acting Assista
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Gizmodo

Future Teens Will Probably Have Better Fake IDs Than We Did Image: PLOS One Getting your fake ID snatched at 3am from a curmudgeonly bouncer is an embarrassing rite of passage too many of us have had to endure. Even if it’s followed by a cathartic cry over a dollar slice of pizza, the experience is a distinctly humiliating one. But the good news is, there’s hope for the thirsty teens of tomorrow: a new study suggests that future fake IDs may be created us
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Gizmodo

Your Favorite Shower Heads Are Back On Sale, Including Our Top Seller For Just $16 Delta 75152 , $16 | Delta 58467 In2ition , $73 | Delta 58480-PK In2ition , $92 One of the best investments you can make in your own happiness is upgrading the crappy shower head that came with your house or apartment. Delta makes your favorite models , and we’ve spotted deals on three different options today. First up is the top-selling Delta 75152 , now down to an all-time low $16. Aside from a
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Viden

Dårlig luft i soveværelset forringer din præstationsevneHar du styr på udluftningen? Ellers opfordrer DTU-lektor dig til at få det.
5h
Ars Technica

Tesla delivers 25,418 vehicles in 2017’s first quarter as EV market grows Enlarge / The P100D at rest. (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) On Sunday Tesla said that it had delivered 25,418 cars in 2017’s first quarter, which is a record for the company. This sales figure puts Tesla on track to meet its stated goal of delivering 47,000 to 50,000 Model S and Model X vehicles in the first half of 2017. The company’s electric vehicle (EV) deliveries have been closely watched after s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ladies, this is why fertility declines with ageResearchers have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. Thanks to cutting-edge microscopy techniques, they observed for the first time a specific defect in the eggs of older mice. This defect may also be found in the eggs of older women. The choreography of cell division goes awry, and causes errors in the sharing of chromosomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photonic crystal and nanowire combo advances 'photonic integration'While bigger nanowires can improve light confinement and performance, it increases both energy consumption and device footprint -- both of which are considered 'fatal' when it comes to integration. Addressing this problem, researchers came up with an approach that involves combining a sub-wavelength nanowire with a photonic crystal platform.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How melanoma tumors formResearchers have documented in continuous, real time how melanoma cells form tumors. The team report the process is similar to that of breast cancer cells and have successfully screened for two antibodies that stopped tumor formation in both cancers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lanes at Newark airport automatically retrieve luggage binsIt's every traveler's nightmare: You're running late for a flight and the person in front of you in the security line has taken the only two available luggage bins and is slowly putting items in, one by one.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

National Archives to White House: Save all Trump tweets (Update)The National Archives and Records Administration has told the White House to keep each of President Donald Trump's tweets, even those he deletes or corrects, and the White House has agreed.
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The Atlantic

Girls Crashes Back to Earth Of the five previous season finales of Girls , the least satisfying have been the episodes that have surrendered earnestly to fantasy. Like Hannah, deep in the clutches of her OCD, being “saved” by Adam at the end of season two, or the flash-forward to her walking in the snow with Fran at the end of season four. Both moments felt like attempts to draw neat lines under characters who were anything
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Who Here Believes in Science?"Big Data reveals the red-blue divide persists even when people order science books from Amazon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science

Q&A: What Happens to Spores in Space?Microbes can survive in outer space, but are harmed by the ultraviolet radiation found beyond the ozone layer.
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NYT > Science

Take a Number: What Makes a City Ant? Maybe Just 100 Years of EvolutionA century or so of evolution may have allowed tiny acorn ants to thrive in a warm, urban environment.
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Gizmodo

How Spider-Man: Homecoming Will Distinguish Itself From the Other Spider-Man Movies When you’re the sixth Spider-Man movie in 15 years, you better be able to distinguish yourself from what came before. In the case of Spider-Man: Homecoming , everything is different. Almost nothing you remember from the previous films will return. There’s a new studio, lead actor, supporting actors, creative team, suit, tone, universe, villain character, and more—and there’s no origin story, no D
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Traumatic brain injuries leave women prone to mental health problemsTraumatic brain injuries affect the body's stress axis differently in female and male mice, according to research presented at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla. The results could help explain why women who experience blast injuries face a greater risk of developing mental health problems than men.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain signals after a meal respond to food pictures more in obese than lean kidsBrain signals that should help tell us we are full after eating appear to be dulled in obese children, according to preliminary results of a new study being presented Monday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes control is more difficult for night-shift workersPeople with type 2 diabetes have poorer control over their blood glucose levels when they work the night shift compared with those who work in the daytime or are unemployed, a new study finds. The study results, to be presented Monday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla., showed that poor long-term glycemic, or blood sugar, control, was independent of what workers ate or
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In US military, white kids, officers' kids more likely to use diabetes technologyEven with equal access to healthcare in the United States military, significant disparities in caring for children with type 1 diabetes still exist, new research reports. The results of the study will be presented Monday, April 3, at ENDO 2017, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with higher thyroid hormone levels lose more weight after bariatric surgeryPatients who have higher levels of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) lose more weight after bariatric surgery, new research from Portugal reports. The study results will be presented in a poster Monday, April 3, at ENDO 2017, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New interferon shows promise against hepatitis B in cell culture, and animal modelHepatitis B is notoriously difficult to eradicate with currently available agents. Now, in a new study, a novel form of 'pegylated' interferon-β has reduced hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in experimental human-derived cells and in mice more effectively than the conventional pegylated interferon-α2a, suggesting that it could lead to improved treatment for hepatitis B infection in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deploying an ancient defense to kill cancerWhat if your body's ancient defenses against invading bacteria could be hijacked to help kill cancer? In a small sarcoma trial, Fred Hutch scientists led by Dr. Seth Pollack see signs of immune attack after injections of a bacteria-inspired drug.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny black holes enable a new type of photodetector for high speed dataTiny 'black holes' on a silicon wafer make for a new type of photodetector that could move more data at lower cost around the world or across a datacenter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US states begin legal action on Trump energy delayTwelve US states and municipalities on Monday announced legal action against the Trump administration over delayed or stalled enforcement of energy saving standards for various consumer and commercial products.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spray-on memory could enable bendable digital storageUSB flash drives are already common accessories in offices and college campuses. But thanks to the rise in printable electronics, digital storage devices like these may soon be everywhere—including on our groceries, pill bottles and even clothing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Man moves paralyzed legs using device that stimulates spinal cordElectrical stimulation was used on the spinal cord of a patient in a new study, and combined with intense physical therapy, the man intentionally moved his paralyzed legs, stood and made steplike motions for the first time in three years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stretching the boundaries of neural implantsNew nanowire-coated, stretchy, multifunction fibers can be used to stimulate and monitor the spinal cord while subjects are in motion, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprise discovery of Europe's first cave fishResearchers have discovered the first European cave fish. A hobby cave diver first sighted the fish, a loach in the genus Barbatula, living in a hard-to-reach, underground water system in South Germany.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Real-world massage is effective treatment for low back pain, study showsReal-world massage therapy to be an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, researchers found in a first study of its kind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Then and now: How glaciers around the world are meltingOver the past decade, scientists and photographers keep returning to the world's glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want others to see how a warming planet is melting masses of ice in a series of before-and-after photos.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mutant lifestyles: Researchers uncover a potent genetic element in Earth's smallest life formsIt's the stuff of science fiction, though there's nothing fiction about it: Researchers have discovered a multitude of previously unidentified microorganisms possess a genetic element that enables them to self-mutate.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Graphene-based sieve turns seawater into drinking waterThe development could help provide clean drinking water for millions of people who lack access to safe sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprise discovery of Europe's first cave fishResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 3 have discovered the first European cave fish. A hobby cave diver first sighted the fish, a loach in the genus Barbatula, living in a hard-to-reach, underground water system in South Germany.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spray-on memory could enable bendable digital storageDuke University researchers have created a new 'spray-on' digital memory using only an aerosol jet printer and nanoparticle ink. The device, which is analogous to a 4-bit flash drive, is the first fully-printed digital memory suitable for practical use in simple electronics such as environmental sensors or RFID tags. Because it is jet-printed, it could be used to build programmable electronic devi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research measures potentially damaging free radicals in cigarette smokeSmoking cigarettes can lead to illness and death. Free radicals, which are atoms or groups of atoms with unpaired electrons, in inhaled smoke are thought to be partly responsible for making smokers sick. Now researchers from Penn State College of Medicine and College of Agricultural Sciences report a method for measuring free radicals in cigarette smoke that could help improve our understanding of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover clue about how tiny microbes self-mutateResearchers have discovered that previously unidentified microorganisms have a genetic element that enables them to self-mutate. What's more, these organisms are so plentiful they dramatically expand the diversity of the tree of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients who trust the medical profession are more likely to take their high blood pressure medicinePatients who had higher levels of trust took their blood pressure medicine more often than those who had lower levels of trust.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depressed veterans with heart disease face financial barriers to careVeterans living with heart disease and depression were more likely to report problems affording medical visits and prescription drugs and were more likely to delay seeking medical care. More than 20 percent of veterans with cardiovascular disease also suffered from depression in 2013.
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Viden

Teknologi afslører oldtidsmenneskers hemmelighederEn DNA-test har afsløret, at Danmarks ældste kvinde i virkeligheden var en mand. Et eksempel på, at nye metoder bringer os tættere på de mennesker, der levede for længe siden.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes associated with Erdheim-Chester disease also linked to cancerNewly identified genes associated with Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD), an ultra-rare disease, are also linked to cancer, according to a new study. Thus, ECD should be considered a type of cancer and treated by oncologists. A new clinical trial -- enrolling ECD patients now -- will test the use of the drugs dabrafenib and trametinib.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new approach to amplifying DNAAnalyzing DNA is useful for a number of vital applications. This includes diagnosis and monitoring of diseases, identification of criminals, and studying the function of a targeted segment of DNA. However, methods used for analyses often require more DNA than may be available in a typical sample. A new polymerase chain reaction method could help the amplification process, and thus develop robust a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Double Vortices Give Mosquitoes a BoostOur understanding of how insects fly didn’t explain how mosquitoes managed to stay on the wing. It took eight slow-motion cameras to help researchers reveal how mosquito wing beats shape the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

HTC Vive’s first-ever price drop lasts just one day this week Nearly one year later, we're still not tired of using this image of Ars UK's Seb Anthony to illustrate Vive stories. For nearly a year now , HTC's SteamVR-based Vive headset has remained stubbornly set at its launch price of $800. That will change for a single day on Wednesday, when HTC has announced it will lower the Vive's price to $700 in celebration of the headset's first anniversary (down fr
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The Atlantic

How Significant Is the Music Industry's Rebound? Last week, the Recording Industry Association of America broke good news for the sector it monitors: Music revenues in 2016 were the highest they’ve been in eight years, and year-over-year gains of 11.4 percent were the largest percentage increase seen since 1998. This growth has been almost entirely driven by the rise of streaming, the technology long discussed as the potential savior of the bel
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Hunt for cancer 'tipping point' heats up 'Pre-cancer' genome atlas proposed to track tumours as they turn from benign to dangerous. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21759
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress a common seizure trigger in epilepsy, UC study affirmsThe relationship between stress and seizures has been well documented over the last 50 years. A recent review article in the European journal Seizure, by researchers at University of Cincinnati Epilepsy Center at the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute, looks at the stress-seizure relationship and how adopting stress reduction techniques may provide benefit as a low risk form of treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2017An ORNL-led team is bringing together quantum, high-performance and neuromorphic computing architectures to address complex issues that, if resolved, could clear the way for more flexible, efficient technologies in intelligent computing; ORNL is using electron beam precision to instantly adhere cathode coatings for lithium-ion batteries; ORNL created an approach to get a better look at plant cell
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ladies, this is why fertility declines with ageResearchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. Thanks to cutting-edge microscopy techniques, they observed for the first time a specific defect in the eggs of older mice. This defect may also be found in the eggs of older women. The choreography of cell division goes awry, and causes errors in the shari
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprise discovery of Europe's first cave fishResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 3 have discovered the first European cave fish. A hobby cave diver first sighted the fish, a loach in the genus Barbatula, living in a hard-to-reach, underground water system in South Germany.
6h
cognitive science

A new paper in JEP:General looks at people's ability to detect errors in judgments of short durations. May help to explain how people learn to coordinate movements involving delays. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

Google: Please Don't Look at Our Very Tiny Ad Problem Philipp Schindler, left, in 2010 (Image: Getty) It’s been a tough few weeks for Google. Several companies have pulled their ads from its network after various news outlets revealed that those ads have appeared on extremist, racist, or otherwise offensive videos. But never fear. A Google executive says the problem is, actually , small. And not just very small, in fact. Not even very, very small. B
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Ars Technica

Brain cancer patients live longer wearing electric cap designed to zap tumors Enlarge (credit: Novocure ) An electric skull cap designed to zap cancer cells trying to grow in the brains of wearers proved useful at improving patient survival in a five-year clinical trial . When combined with standard chemotherapy, the cap more than doubled five-year survival rates of brain cancer patients—from 5 percent to 13 percent—researchers reported Sunday at the annual meeting of the
6h
Live Science

'Bill Nye Saves the World' Trailer | VideoScience deniers, beware! Bill Nye is coming to Netflix with a new show that challenges i inspires curiosity and wonder in every 30-minute episode.
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Ars Technica

After vote to kill privacy rules, users try to “pollute” their Web history Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Gary Waters) While the US government is giving ISPs free rein to track their customers’ Internet usage for purposes of serving personalized advertisements, some Internet users are determined to fill their browsing history with junk so ISPs can’t discover their real browsing habits. Scripts and browser extensions might be able to fill your Web history with random se
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Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: March 2017 Here they are, the monthly stats for March! Managing to squeeze in several bipolar fields alongside our first Scythe-controlled marathon, we ended the month at 90 cells, a very good showing! Toward the beginning of the month we also debuted our Scythe Complete bonus as a beta feature, which we’ll be continuing to observe; in the interim we’ve doled out many tasty bonuses for our Scythes. Check ou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surge in coal pollution led to smaller newborns: studyIn fresh evidence about the dangers of coal pollution, a scientist on Monday said a switch to coal-fired power in a southern US state after a nuclear accident in 1979 led to a sharp fall in birthweight, a benchmark of health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multi-university effort to advance materials, define the future of mobilityThree MIT-affiliated research teams will receive about $10M in funding as part of a $35M materials science discovery program launched by the Toyota Research Institute (TRI). Provided over four years, the support to MIT researchers will be primarily directed at scientific discoveries and advancing a technology that underpins the future of mobility and autonomous systems: energy storage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar Dynamics Observatory captured trio of solar flares April 2-3The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. The first peaked at 4:02 a.m. EDT on April 2, the second peaked at 4:33 p.m. EDT on April 2, and the third peaked at 10:29 a.m. EDT on April 3. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of the three events. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare can
7h
WIRED

Russian Hackers Have Used the Same Backdoor for Two Decades A twenty-year-old record of one of the earliest ever cyberespionage campaigns suggests the same spy group still be alive and hacking. The post Russian Hackers Have Used the Same Backdoor for Two Decades appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Detroit Is Stomping Silicon Valley in the Self-Driving Car Race Manufacturing muscle gives old-school automakers the edge on companies like Uber and Google. The post Detroit Is Stomping Silicon Valley in the Self-Driving Car Race appeared first on WIRED .
7h
Live Science

What the Bacteria in Your Mouth May Reveal About Your Cancer RiskThe bacteria in your mouth may be linked to your risk of certain cancers.
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Science | The Guardian

Switch from nuclear to coal-fired power linked to low birth weight in US region Study reveals fall in birth weight in areas of the Tennessee Valley which had greatest boom in coal-fired power plant activity following nuclear closures Children in a region of the US were born smaller after the area switched from nuclear plants to coal-fired power stations, new research has found. The study looked at of the impact of nuclear power plant closures in the aftermath of the Three Mi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's solar dynamics observatory captured trio of solar flares April 2-3The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of the three events.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technology could end costly crude oil pipeline blockagesGetting crude oil from the wellhead to its downstream destination can be literally stopped in its tracks when components of the oil known as asphaltenes clump together, reducing the flow or causing a complete blockage. A petroleum engineer from the University of Houston has reported building a prototype device to address the problem, which currently requires the use of chemical dispersants and inh
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Gizmodo

Rare Images Suggest Thunderstorms From Space Are Even Weirder Than We Thought View of blue jets, taken from the ISS. (Image: ESA) Lightning is a beautiful but dangerous beast: While we’re pretty good at observing it from the ground—and occasionally, being struck by it —there’s still some mystery about how the electrical discharges in the upper layers of our atmosphere actually work. The names given to these discharges (e.g. red sprites, pixies, elves) sound like the musing
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New Scientist - News

Synthetic humans help computers understand how real people actA huge database of virtual figures that move like real people is helping computer vision systems understand what they're seeing when they look at us
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Ars Technica

Google shuts down Google Maps’ editing tools Enlarge Google has shut down Google Map Maker. A support page went up over the weekend declaring that Map Maker is closed but that "many of its features are being integrated into Google Maps." Map Maker was a Wikipedia-style Map editing service that launched in 2008. The site created a sandbox version of Google Maps and gave users powerful editing tools, allowing them to build roads, terrain, lan
7h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

🌴Take A Tropical Break And Explore The Hawaiian Islands in Virtual Reality! (360 Video) Every day in the Hawaiian Islands is magic. This unique place is filled with stunning natural beauty, exciting adventure and people who embody the aloha spirit. For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. iPhone: http://apple.co/1Kl14XA Android: http://bit.ly/1Kl1bCy Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery
7h
Futurity.org

Do long telomeres indicate higher cancer risk? New research links longer-than-expected telomeres—repeated sequences of DNA that shorten every time a cell divides—with an increased cancer risk. “Telomeres and cancer clearly have a complex relationship,” says Jian-Min Yuan, chair in cancer prevention at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. “Our hope is that by understanding this relationship, we may be able to predict which people are
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clicks, snaps and howls drowned out by the noise of shipsFar from being the silent, dreamlike landscape we often imagine, the sea is peppered with animal sounds, a chorus of clicks, snaps and howls.
7h
The Atlantic

Egypt and America Are Destined to Disappoint Each Other Updated on April 3 at 2:30 p.m. ET Donald Trump hosts Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi Monday at the White House. I predict this will be the high-water mark of U.S.-Egyptian relations in the Trump years, because there is no way either party will meet the high expectations of the other going forward. On the one hand, this warming of relations between the United States and Egypt is overdue.
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Futurity.org

‘Starry glue’ may keep body clocks on schedule Astroglia, not just neurons, play a role in the biological clocks that dictate daily fluctuations in most body functions, including core body temperature and alertness, according to experiments in mice. Asked to define the body’s master clock, biologists would say it is two small spheres—the suprachiasmatic nuclei, or SCN—in the brain that consist of 20,000 neurons. They likely wouldn’t even ment
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Gizmodo

Someone Finally Hijacked Deep Learning Tech to Create More Than Nightmares Image: UC Berkeley / Gizmodo It’s been almost two years since Google liquefied our brains with its Deep Dream neural network and the nightmare-inducing images the technology created . But now, a team from the University of California, Berkeley is sort of doing the opposite —emphasis on “sort of.” The Berkeley team built a new type of deep learning software, dubbed CycleGAN, that can convert impre
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Easter Candy, $4 Phone Cases, Free Chipotle Guac, and More $4 phone cases , Easter candy , and $24 Wilson basketballs lead off Monday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals $4 Galaxy S8 and LG G6 Cases The Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus (and to a lesser extent, the LG G6 ) are the new belles of the Android ball, and you can dress them up in the case of your choice for just $4. Check out the full li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From supersymmetry to the Standard Model: New results from the ATLAS experimentAt the 2017 Moriond conference, the ATLAS Experiment at CERN presented its first results examining the combined 2015/2016 LHC data. Thanks to outstanding performance of the CERN accelerator complex, this new dataset is almost three times larger than that available at ICHEP, the last major particle physics conference held in August 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German researchers sequence rye genome for first timeScientists in Germany have for the first time mapped the entire genome of rye, a cereal known for its hardy properties.
7h
Ars Technica

Ubisoft rebalances For Honor’s unlockables amid outcry Enlarge Ubisoft has made it easier to unlock content without paying money in For Honor , rolling out an update that heavily increases the drop rate for the in-game "Steel" used to access new items and abilities. The update, which launched on Friday , increases the amount of Steel generated by in-game matches, Daily Orders, Side Orders, and Community Orders by anywhere from 25 to 200 percent. All
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weedy rice, which differs genetically from wild and crop rice, is adapted for undercover life in agricultural fieldsA new study in the April 3 issue of Nature Genetics describes an ancestry.com-type adventure that reveals the deep history of a family, including some disreputable relatives. But the family in this case is Asian rice (Oryza sativa), and the disreputable relatives are the weedy cousins of domesticated rice.
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Science | The Guardian

What makes people express moral outrage? | Zachary K Rothschild and Lucas A KeeferDisplays of public anger, or moral outrage, are more visible than ever. But the reasons for this are more complicated than you might think When 109 travellers entering the United States were detained by an executive order blocking citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries, tens of thousands of Americans gathered all over the country to voice their anger. The policy had little to no direct effe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stretching the boundaries of neural implantsNew nanowire-coated, stretchy, multifunction fibers can be used to stimulate and monitor the spinal cord while subjects are in motion, MIT researchers report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny plankton wields biological 'Gatling gun' in microbial Wild WestResearchers have obtained an unprecedented view of the 'ballistic' weaponry of planktonic microbes, including one that can fire projectiles as if wielding a Gatling gun.
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Popular Science

Dolphins beat up octopuses before eating them, and the reason is kind of horrifying Animals In this food fight you either win or you die In general, it’s best for your food to not kill you. Dolphins agree, which is why they thrash their octopus around a bit before they chow down. Read on:…
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Brazilian scientists reeling as federal funds slashed by nearly half After years of austerity, researchers fear that the latest dramatic cut will destroy the country's science. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21766
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Gizmodo

Delicious Maple Syrup Enlisted in Bitter Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance Image: LadyDragonflyCC April Fools is over so you can believe me when I say: Scientists are trying to see if maple syrup can be used to help fight antibiotic resistance. Sweet. Around two million Americans each year suffer from bacterial diseases resistant to antibiotics, and 23,000 die, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Partially inspired by folk medicine, scientists d
7h
Live Science

Relatively Pricey: Einstein Letter Fetches $54K at AuctionAn Einstein letter shows a generous spirit and a little criticism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photonic crystal and nanowire combo advances 'photonic integration'Contrary to the tremendous success story of electronic integration, photonic integration is still in its infancy. One the most serious obstacles it faces is the need to use a variety of materials to achieve different functions—unlike electronic integration. To complicate matters further, many of the materials required for photonic integration aren't compatible with silicon integration technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man moves paralyzed legs using device that stimulates spinal cordMayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique experiment set to reveal the effects of climate change on the forests of the futureA major new decade-long experiment by scientists at the University of Birmingham to study the impact of climate and environmental change on woodlands launches today.(Monday, April 3, 2017).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gallbladder removal is common -- but is it necessary?Johns Hopkins researchers say that the findings they published in the current edition of The American Journal of Gastroenterology could have important implications for the field of personalized medicine.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early climate 'payback' with higher emission reductionsClimate scientists have shown the early mitigation needed to limit eventual warming below potentially dangerous levels has a climate 'payback' much earlier than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbes on ice sheets produce bioreactive carbon that is exported to downstream ecosystemsGlaciers and ice sheets have recently been considered significant sources of organic carbon and provide nutrients to downstream marine ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New experimental drug offers hope for menopausal women with frequent hot flushesWomen plagued by frequent hot flushes during the menopause could cut the number of flushes by almost three-quarters, thanks to a new drug compound.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic brain stimulation causes weight loss by making gut bacteria healthierA new study finds that a noninvasive electromagnetic brain stimulation technique helps obese people lose weight, partly by changing the composition of their intestinal bacteria -- the so-called gut microbiota. Results of the technique, called deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS), will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-calorie sweeteners promote fat accumulation in human fatLow-calorie, artificial sweeteners appear to play havoc with the body's metabolism, and large consumption of these sugar substitutes could promote fat accumulation, especially in people who are already obese, preliminary research suggests. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial pancreas improves blood sugar control in young kidsAn artificial pancreas, which delivers insulin in an automated way to individuals with type 1 diabetes, appears to be safe and effective for use in children ages 5 to 8 years, a new study finds. Results will be presented Tuesday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New natural estrogen-progesterone capsule reduces postmenopausal hot flashesA natural, or bioidentical, combined estradiol-progesterone capsule (TX-001HR) significantly decreases the frequency and severity of moderate to severe hot flashes in postmenopausal women, the Replenish study finds. Results of this phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial will be presented Monday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program equips rural primary care providers to manage complex diabetesPrimary care providers (PCPs) and community health workers in rural areas of New Mexico gained confidence in in their ability to manage patients with complex diabetes by participating in a videoconferencing educational program led by diabetes specialists, a new study found. Results, which will be presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla., suggest that these p
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New simple tool can help identify people at high risk for prediabetesThe time to maximal sugar level during an oral glucose tolerance test is associated with higher risk for prediabetes and could give important information about the ability of the pancreas to secrete insulin, according to research presented at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla. This simple tool could help to identify people who may benefit from early treatment
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Book purchases of liberals and conservatives reveal partisan divisionReader preferences for liberal or conservative political books also attract them to different types of science books, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Chicago and Yale and Cornell universities. The result supports observations that the divisiveness of politics in the United States has spread to scientific communication as well, endangering the role of science as polit
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jumping droplets whisk away hotspots in electronicsEngineers have developed a technology to cool hotspots in high-performance electronics using the same physical phenomenon that cleans the wings of cicadas.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking waterGraphene-oxide membranes have attracted considerable attention as promising candidates for new filtration technologies. Now the much sought-after development of making membranes capable of sieving common salts has been achieved.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millendo announces publication of positive phase 2 data for MLE4901 for treatment of VMSMillendo Therapeutics today announced the publication of positive data from a Phase 2 investigator-initiated clinical trial of MLE4901 for the treatment of menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS), which are defined as hot flushes/flashes and night sweats.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prostate cancer screening rates appear to level after recent dropDeclines in prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing that came after changes in government screening guidelines have abated in recent years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood vessels and the immune system talk to each other; implications for cancer treatmentResearchers at Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that tumor blood vessels and the immune system influence each other's functions, and propose that considering these bilateral effects in cancer therapy might improve outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is early pregnancy BMI associated with increased risk of childhood epilepsy?Increased risk for childhood epilepsy was associated with maternal overweight or obesity in early pregnancy in a study of babies born in Sweden, according to a study published online by JAMA Neurology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global decline in deaths among children, adolescents but progress unevenDeaths among children and adolescents decreased worldwide from nearly 14.2 million deaths in 1990 to just over 7.2 million deaths in 2015 but this global progress has been uneven, according to a new article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Domesticated rice goes rogueWe tend to assume that domestication is a one-way street and that, once domesticated, crop plants stay domesticated. A new study of rice shows, however, that different methods of farming change the evolutionary pressures on crop plants, and the plants easily 'de-domesticate,' evolving to take advantage of these opportunities.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny black holes enable a new type of photodetector for high speed dataTiny 'black holes' on a silicon wafer make for a new type of photodetector that could move more data at lower cost around the world or across a datacenter. The technology, developed by electrical engineers at UC Davis and W&WSens Devices, Inc. of Los Altos, Calif., a Silicon Valley startup, is described in a paper published April 3 in the journal Nature Photonics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

iTango: New technique studies neuromodulation in real timeDynamic modulation of neuronal pathways underlies behavior, but only limited tools exist to explore these effects. Researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience has recently developed a technique, iTango, with a newly designed gene expression system that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate neuromodulation in real time. iTango uses a light-sensitive labeling system and wil
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photonic crystal and nanowire combo advances 'photonic integration'While bigger nanowires can improve light confinement and performance, it increases both energy consumption and device footprint -- both of which are considered 'fatal' when it comes to integration. Addressing this problem, researchers came up with an approach that involves combining a sub-wavelength nanowire with a photonic crystal platform, which they report this week in the journal APL Photonics
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Good communication helps improve outcomes for heart patientsPatients who said they communicated effectively with their healthcare providers were more likely to report the use of prescribed statin drugs and aspirin. Patients with good healthcare provider communication were less likely to go to the emergency room.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny black holes enable a new type of photodetector for high speed dataTiny "black holes" on a silicon wafer make for a new type of photodetector that could move more data at lower cost around the world or across a datacenter. The technology, developed by electrical engineers at the University of California, Davis, and W&WSens Devices, Inc. of Los Altos, Calif., a Silicon Valley startup, is described in a paper published April 3 in the journal Nature Photonics.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Close connection between deep currents and climateMild winters in northern Europe, rainfall in western Africa, hurricanes in North America -the energy transported around the world by the global ocean circulation affects the climate as well as regional weather phenomena. One of the key regions for the ocean circulation is the Labrador Sea between North America and Greenland. There warm, saline waters coming from the south near the sea surface cool
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscopy—biomass close-upOak Ridge National Laboratory scientists created an approach to get a better look at plant cell wall characteristics at high resolution as they create more efficient, less costly methods to deconstruct biomass.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Batteries—quick coatingsScientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using the precision of an electron beam to instantly adhere cathode coatings for lithium-ion batteries—a leap in efficiency that saves energy, reduces production and capital costs, and eliminates the use of toxic solvents.
8h
WIRED

Myopic Political Bubbles Apply to Science Books, Too People buy science books for the same reasons they buy politics books: To reinforce their ideological beliefs. The post Myopic Political Bubbles Apply to Science Books, Too appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Nuclear power policy in the ’80s caused low birth weights after coal stepped in The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant. (credit: Nuclear Regulatory Commission ) After the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor meltdown in Pennsylvania in 1979, regulators moved to overhaul safety requirements for nuclear power plants. This led to the temporary closure of some older nuclear power plants governed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) when they couldn’t meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Babies cry most in UK, Canada, Italy, NetherlandsPsychologists have created world's first universal charts for normal amount of crying in babies during first three months. On average, babies around the world cry for around 2 hours per day in first two weeks, peak at 2 hours 15 mins at six weeks -- and crying reduces to 1 hour 10 minutes by week twelve. Their study found that babies cry more in Britain, Canada and Italy, than the rest of the worl
8h
The Atlantic

CSI: Walmart A highly secured digital-forensics laboratory sits tucked inside an enormous complex of low, boxy buildings in Bentonville, Arkansas. To get in, analysts have to scan their hands and enter a unique password. Inside, they comb through video-surveillance records and spirit data out of devices that have seen better days, like a hard drive that had been crushed with a hammer and dropped from a third-
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Science | The Guardian

Conservatives and liberals united only by interest in dinosaurs, study shows Can an interest in science unite a divided society? No, concludes research based on reading habits of those from right and left of the political spectrum Hopes that science and its unending quest for the truth can mend the cracks in a divided society have taken a hit as new research has found liberals and conservatives share little common ground on the subject – apart from a fascination with dino
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking waterGraphene-oxide membranes have attracted considerable attention as promising candidates for new filtration technologies. Now the much sought-after development of making membranes capable of sieving common salts has been achieved.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jumping droplets whisk away hotspots in electronicsEngineers have developed a technology to cool hotspots in high-performance electronics using the same physical phenomenon that cleans the wings of cicadas.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Book purchases of liberals and conservatives reveal partisan divisionReader preferences for liberal or conservative political books also attract them to different types of science books, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Chicago and Yale and Cornell universities. The result supports observations that the divisiveness of politics in the United States has spread to scientific communication as well, endangering the role of science as polit
8h
Ingeniøren

50.000 ton Tyra-skrot skal væk – men danske virksomheder mangler erfaringUnder renoveringen af gasfeltet Tyra i Nordsøen skal 50.000 ton skrot fjernes. Trods manglende erfaringer mener branchen, at danske ingeniørvirksomheder kan hjælpe med at løse opgaven.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Screen Detects Functional Gene RegulationA CRISPR-Cas9–based method probes the regulatory roles of noncoding DNA sequences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

E-cigarette flavors linked to use in youth and young adults, researchers reportFlavored e-cigarettes and e-cigarette marketing could be increasing e-cigarette use among youth and young adults, according to researchers.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glassfrogs show surprising diversity of parental strategiesIn many species, glassfrog mothers brood their eggs during the night the eggs are fertilized, research has found. Scientists repor that this care improves the survival of the eggs, while in almost a third of species glassfrog fathers stay on guard for much longer periods.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Say Medieval Villagers Mutilated Corpses to Prevent a Zombie Apocalypse Knife-marks on external surfaces of two rib fragments. (Image: Historic England) The discovery of mutilated and burnt human bones in an English grave pit supports the theory that medieval villagers thought the dead could rise from their graves, spreading disease and attacking the living. A new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science shows the extent to which medieval Englanders s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early climate 'payback' with higher emission reductionsClimate scientists at the Met Office Hadley Centre have shown that the early mitigation needed to limit eventual warming below potentially dangerous levels has a climate 'payback' much earlier than previously thought.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes on ice sheets produce bioreactive carbon that is exported to downstream ecosystemsGlaciers and ice sheets have recently been considered significant sources of organic carbon and provide nutrients to downstream marine ecosystems.
8h
TEDTalks (video)

Know your worth, and then ask for it | Casey BrownYour boss probably isn't paying you what you're worth -- instead, they're paying you what they think you're worth. Take the time to learn how to shape their thinking. Pricing consultant Casey Brown shares helpful stories and learnings that can help you better communicate your value and get paid for your excellence.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Uber Is Engaged in Psychological Warfare with Its DriversBy cajoling its workers to stay out on the streets longer, it can provide a better service without an increase in costs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Latino language and subgroup data are lacking but key to addressing health disparitiesLatinos are the largest racial and ethnic group in the United States, and they comprise two-thirds of Americans with limited English proficiency (LEP). Language and Latino subgroup data are critical for public health and social justice, but are not routinely collected.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscopy -- Biomass close-upOak Ridge National Laboratory scientists created an approach to get a better look at plant cell wall characteristics at high resolution as they create more efficient, less costly methods to deconstruct biomass.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Batteries -- quick coatingsScientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using the precision of an electron beam to instantly adhere cathode coatings for lithium-ion batteries -- a leap in efficiency that saves energy, reduces production and capital costs, and eliminates the use of toxic solvents.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Close connection between deep currents and climateThe Labrador Sea in the northwestern Atlantic is one of the key regions of the global ocean circulation. The GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has been operating an array of oceanographic observatories there since 1997. It monitors the currents from the surface to the seabed. In the Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans, GEOMAR oceanographers recently published an analysis of their
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advanced FDG-PET image analysis identifies cell mutations in cancer patientsResearchers have used positron emission tomography (PET) to successfully identify genetic cell mutations that can cause lung cancer. The research, published in the featured article of the April 2017 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, shows that an advanced image analysis technique, radiomics, can noninvasively identify underlying cell mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (N
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Progesterone and bisexuality: Is there a link?Bisexuality is quite common among men and women whose mothers received additional doses of the sex hormone progesterone while pregnant. This is one of the findings of a study led by June Reinisch, Director Emerita of The Kinsey Institute in the US, published in Springer's journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. The study tracked the sexual development of 34 Danes whose mothers were treated with the h
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computing -- quantum deepIn a first for deep learning, an Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led team is bringing together quantum, high-performance and neuromorphic computing architectures to address complex issues that, if resolved, could clear the way for more flexible, efficient technologies in intelligent computing.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ethics complicate clinical interpretation & reporting of human genome sequence resultsMedical use of a patient's genomic sequence information can improve diagnostic capabilities and enable personalized therapies, but technical and practical barriers to understanding the clinical implications of sequence data and interpreting them for patients are contributing to ongoing ethical concerns.
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Popular Science

This stuff melts your crappy fast fashion into fabric stronger than cotton Environment Closing the loop A new technique may bring us one step closer to perfect fabric recycling. Read on:…
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Popular Science

Fertilizer has saved billions of lives, but it also has a dark side Science Excerpt: Pandora’s Lab: Seven Stories of Science Gone Wrong What's in your soil? Read on:…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where the Jordan stops flowingA new study conducted at Tel Aviv University and published in the journal Water Research argues that Israel's Jordan River may be a useful case study for the challenges facing stream restoration initiatives around the world. The Jordan River has been ravaged by unbridled population growth and defunct sewage treatment plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computing—quantum deepIn a first for deep learning, an Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led team is bringing together quantum, high-performance and neuromorphic computing architectures to address complex issues that, if resolved, could clear the way for more flexible, efficient technologies in intelligent computing.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rock exposed in World War I trenches offers new fossil findAn unusual fossil find is giving scientists new ideas about how some of the earliest animals on Earth came to dominate the world's oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds one secret to successful schools that costs nothingMost factors that help make schools successful cost lots of money - think teachers, technology and textbooks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Harms of nighttime light exposure passed to offspringAnimals can pass the damaging effects of nighttime light exposure to their offspring, a new study has found, adding to a growing body of evidence that there's a health cost to our increasingly illuminated nights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New archaeological evidence throws light on efforts to resist 'the living dead'A new scientific study of medieval human bones, excavated from a deserted English village, suggests the corpses they came from were burnt and mutilated. Researchers from the University of Southampton and Historic England believe this was carried out by villagers who believed that it would stop the corpses rising from their graves and menacing the living.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children with autism find understanding facial expressions difficult but make similar mistakes as peers, new study findsYoung people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing and distinguishing between different facial expressions, according to research from one of the largest studies to look at emotion recognition in children and adolescents with ASC.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool uses behavioral cues to assess pain in ICU patients who can't communicateA new Behavior Pain Assessment Tool (BPAT) provides a simple way to evaluate pain in critically ill patients -- including those who aren't able to communicate their pain verbally, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where the Jordan stops flowingA new study conducted at Tel Aviv University argues that Israel's Jordan River may be a useful case study for the challenges facing stream restoration initiatives around the world.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diagnosing cancerScientists have established a process for identifying biomarkers for the diagnosis of different types of cancer. With the aid of a specific type of infrared spectroscopy, the researchers applied an automated and label-free approach to detect tumor tissue in a biopsy or tissue sample. This, in turn, facilitates detailed protein analyses in the next step.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report links early life antibiotic use to inflammatory gut diseases in adulthoodA new research report in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology involving mice shows that antibiotic use very early in life that alters the normal development/growth of gut bacteria, may contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease, and potentially other inflammatory diseases like asthma and multiple sclerosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is gender affirmative treatment effective for coexisting gender dysphoria and psychosis?A new study demonstrates that gender dysphoria in individuals with coexisting psychotic disorders can be adequately diagnosed and safely treated with gender affirming psychological, endocrine, and surgical therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rock exposed in World War I trenches offers new fossil findAn unusual fossil find is giving scientists new ideas about how some of the earliest animals on Earth came to dominate the world's oceans.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIPT's researchers come up with clean technology to make low molecular weight chitosanResearchers at MIPT have developed a new technique for obtaining low molecular weight water-soluble chitin and chitosan. The proposed method relies on chitin and chitosan degradation by electron-beam plasma in a special plasmachemical reactor, which was designed and tested by the team. The new technology reduces the time needed to produce water-soluble oligosaccharides of chitin and chitosan from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers document how melanoma tumors formUniversity of Iowa researchers have documented in continuous, real time how melanoma cells form tumors. The team report the process is similar to that of breast cancer cells and have successfully screened for two antibodies that stopped tumor formation in both cancers. Results published in the journal PLOS One.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is Climate Change Producing Too Many Female Sea Turtles?Warmer conditions birth more females, whereas cooler ones produce males -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Virtual' interferometers may overcome scale issues for optical quantum computersIt's not the size of the interferometer that matters; it's how you use it. So claim a team of researchers from RMIT University, the University of Sydney and University of Technology Sydney, who have devised an entirely new way of implementing large-scale interferometers that will dramatically miniaturise optical processing circuitry.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conductive graphene ink wins science photography competition's top prizeAn image of spectacular swirling graphene ink in alcohol, which can be used to print electrical circuits onto paper, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large-area chemical imaging reveals original paint layers on Ghent altarpieceConsidered the pinnacle of mediaeval painting, the Ghent Altarpiece was painted around 1432 by Jan van Eyck and probably his brother Hubert. It is currently undergoing the most extensive conservation treatment for more than a century. The decision to remove all overpaint was underpinned by scientific arguments: Belgian researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie about their use of "chemica
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbial colonizers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate changeEcosystems created by melting glaciers in the Arctic are sensitive to climate change and human activity, new research indicates.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do smart songbirds always get the girl?Compelling evidence shows females prefer mates with better cognitive abilities in a number of animals and even humans. For male songbirds, their ability to sing complex songs has been suggested to signal cognitive ability and is vital for attracting females as well as repelling rival males. What's not clear is how female songbirds can judge the cognitive abilities of potential mates, which is a ne
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep learning algorithm created that could boost drug developmentCombining computer science and chemistry, researchers show how an advanced form of machine learning that works off small amounts of data can be used to solve problems in drug discovery.
8h
Popular Science

Make your laptop battery last all day DIY Steps to reducing your battery anxiety No time is a good time for your laptop battery to die, but follow a few straightforward tips, and you can still have plenty of power left by the end of the day.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring pollen using an aircraftPlant pollen and fungal spores can be found at variable heights in the air, even at elevations up to 2000 meters. This is the conclusion of a report by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technical University of Munich together with Greek colleagues, which was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Hitherto it was assumed that such allergens are mainly present close to where they ar
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbial colonizers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate changeA team of researchers from the University of Bristol have recently shown that ecosystems created by melting glaciers in the Arctic are sensitive to climate change and human activity.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Do smart songbirds always get the girl?If the early bird catches the worm, then does the smart songbird get the girl? That's what a researcher at Florida Atlantic University and collaborators from the University of Miami, Duke University, and the College of Charleston were determined to find out in a new study published in the journal Animal Cognition. Compelling evidence shows females prefer mates with better cognitive abilities in a
8h
WIRED

Cantina Talk: A Vicious New Kind of AT-AT Could Debut in The Last Jedi If the rumors are true, the lumbering new walkers are very gorilla-like. The post Cantina Talk: A Vicious New Kind of AT-AT Could Debut in The Last Jedi appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart diseasePeople living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal pertussis vaccination reduces risk for newborns by more than 90 percentAmong infants of women who received the Tdap pertussis booster vaccine during pregnancy, the risk of contracting pertussis was reduced by an estimated 91 percent during the first two months of life -- the critical period before they can receive their first childhood acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccination.
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Ingeniøren

Enhedslisten og Dansk Folkeparti vil stille krav til skolernes indeklimaBeviserne på, at det dårlige indeklima i de danske skoler påvirker eleverne alvorligt, hober sig op. Og selv om skolerne er kommunernes ansvar, er Folketinget nødt til at gribe ind, mener både Enhedslisten og DF.
8h
Live Science

Spring Ahead with Science on Netflix in AprilScience springs into action on Netflix in April.
8h
The Atlantic

The Unfit President When Teddy Roosevelt was in office, he had the White House basement coated with mats. An avid martial artist, the 26th president wanted to be able to grapple and practice judo throws without leaving his home. Then the youngest man to assume the presidency (he was 42), he injected a certain vigor into the role: He invited accomplished boxers to the White House to spar with him, he led ambassadors
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Gizmodo

War Has Come on The Walking Dead, and It's About Damn Time Rick is about to have a bad day. All Images: AMC This was the episode. The one we’d be waiting for. After a season of being under the evil thumb of Negan, Rick and the gang were finally ready to wage all out war on The Walking Dead ’s greatest villain. Revenge was imminent. Or, so we thought. Revenge only sort of happened, and that’s mostly okay. Let’s start from the big picture and work our way
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Science | The Guardian

Race for Life’s branding is cliched and infantile. It’s time to sink the pink | Phoebe-Jane BoydOf course Cancer Research UK’s campaign is a worthy cause. But its nauseous pinkification reasserts gender stereotypes – and puts off donors Beset upon by pink fluff on all sides, like awaking to find yourself trapped in Barbara Cartland’ s musty closet, we’re once more in the midst of Race for Life fundraising season . It’s an important and worthy cause, and yet many hearts (soft, kind hearts) ca
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Live Science

Become a Master of Artificial Intelligence with Online Course Bundle (Sponsored)With the Complete Machine Learning Bundle (available for only $39), you’ll gain the skills you need to turn your computer into your greatest ally.
8h
Live Science

This Viscoelastic Putty Will Swallow Magnets Whole (Sponsored)Micron-sized iron particles are embedded in this silvery goo, allowing you to make it come alive with the help of a magnet.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows real-world massage is effective treatment for low back painIn the first study of its kind, researchers found real-world massage therapy to be an effective treatment for chronic low back pain.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Restoration based on chemistryConsidered the pinnacle of mediaeval painting, the Ghent Altarpiece was painted around 1432 by Jan van Eyck and probably his brother Hubert. It is currently undergoing the most extensive conservation treatment for more than a century. The decision to remove all overpaint was underpinned by scientific arguments: Belgian researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie about their use of 'chemica
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monitoring pollen using an aircraftPlant pollen and fungal spores can be found at variable heights in the air, even at elevations up to 2,000 meters. This is the conclusion of a report by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technical University of Munich together with Greek colleagues, which was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Hitherto it was assumed that such allergens are mainly present close to where they a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds 1 secret to successful schools that costs nothingMost factors that help make schools successful cost lots of money -- think teachers, technology and textbooks. But a new study suggests one factor that doesn't need any cash to implement can play an important role in helping students succeed at even the most disadvantaged schools. That factor is what scientists call social capital.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robot epigenetics: Adding complexity to embodied robot evolutionFor the first time, researchers in the field of evolutionary robotics have used physically embodied robots to study epigenetic effects on robot evolution. The study confirms the great importance of taking epigenetic factors into account and provides a conceptual and physical methodology for this type of research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn researchers use new imaging to show key enzyme in ovarian cancerA new imaging test may provide the ability to identify ovarian cancer patients who are candidates for an emerging treatment that targets a key enzyme cancer cells need to survive.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study IDs ways to encourage 'refuge' planting, slowing resistance to Bt cropsA new study finds a significant shortfall in the amount of 'refuge' cropland being planted in North Carolina -- likely increasing the rate at which crop pests will evolve the ability to safely devour genetically engineered Bt crops. However, the study also identified actions that may make farmers more likely to plant refuge crops in the future.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Virtual' interferometers may overcome scale issues for optical quantum computersA team of researchers from RMIT, the University of Sydney and UTS have devised an entirely new way of implementing large-scale interferometers that will dramatically miniaturize optical processing circuitry.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New archaeological evidence throws light on efforts to resist 'the living dead'A new scientific study of medieval human bones, excavated from a deserted English village, suggests the corpses they came from were burnt and mutilated. Researchers from the University of Southampton and Historic England believe this was carried out by villagers who believed that it would stop the corpses rising from their graves and menacing the living.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boys from low income families move lessParents' income and educational level are associated with their children's physical activity and screen time, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Lower income and educational levels were associated with less supervised physical activity in particular. In boys, these were also associated with more screen time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estetrol (E4) shows promise as a safe, effective drug for use in advanced prostate cancerThe natural fetal estrogen estetrol, also called E4, is being tested as a new drug that may help treat advanced prostate cancer, according to an ongoing industry-sponsored study from the Netherlands. The final results will be presented in a poster on Saturday, April 1, at ENDO 2017, the annual scientific meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hormones are behind hernias of the groin in elderly men, study suggestsResearchers have identified an apparent cause of inguinal hernia, or groin hernia, in older men: altered sex hormone levels that weaken and scar muscle tissue in the lower abdomen. Results of their study using an animal model will be presented Monday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher anabolic hormone levels predict lower risk of worsening frailty in menA new study suggests that middle-age and elderly men are less likely to develop worsening frailty if they have high levels of certain anabolic hormones, which are muscle- and bone-building hormones. The study results will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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Futurity.org

Stock index can also detect small earthquakes A tracker borrowed from stock traders can help detect the gradual movement of tectonic plates—what are called “slow slip” earthquakes. These movements do not unleash damaging amounts of seismic energy, but scientists are just beginning to understand how they may be linked to the “big one.” The new technique can quickly pinpoint slow slips from a single Global Positioning System station. It uses t
8h
Gizmodo

Choose From Over a Dozen Galaxy S8 and LG G6 Cases For $4 Each The Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus (and to a lesser extent, the LG G6 ) are the new belles of the Android ball, and you can dress them up in the case of your choice for just $4. Check out the full list below, and be sure to note the promo codes. Note : If you’re having trouble with the code, make sure you’re purchasing from the listing sold by Ringke and NOT fulfilled by Amazon. You’ll still get f
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ancient Bones Reveal Girl's Tough Life in Early AmericasTeenage mother who lived 12,000 years ago was malnourished but still roamed widely -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species of tree living crab found in Western GhatsA recent research paper in The Journal of Crustacean Biology reveals a new genus and new species of tree crab in Kerala, southern India. Known scientifically as the "Kani maranjandu," it is substantially different from other congeners. Its distinguishing characters include: the structure of its hard upper shell, as well as its male abdominal structure and reproductive parts, and of course, its dia
9h
New Scientist - News

Oldest dust ever spotted in the universe seen in distant galaxyWe’ve spotted dust in a galaxy whose light reaches us from when the universe was only 600 million years old – a game changer for studying the earliest galaxies
9h
The Atlantic

Tribeca Film Festival and The Atlantic Announce Finalists for Tribeca X Award New York, NY (April 3, 2017) – The Tribeca Film Festival , presented by AT&T, and The Atlantic—through its in-house content studio, Atlantic Re:think —today announced the finalists for the second annual Tribeca X Award. Ten finalists, 9 short films and 1 Virtual Reality project, were selected from a field of 600 entries that represent the best in storytelling at the intersection of advertising an
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

First fluorescent frogs might see each others’ glowA polka dot frog, the first known fluorescent amphibian, may get a visibility boost in twilight and moonlight.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasmaResearchers have discovered the mechanisms behind reliable nuclear fusion by observing solitary perturbation (SP) structures within microseconds from the onset of the pedestal erosion, suggesting a strong correlation between SP generation and the pedestal collapse. This observation is to provide solid experimental data to identify the governing equations for the mechanisms behind SP generation and
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pathology Atlas to be previewed at AACR17A demo version of a new Pathology Atlas will be presented on April 2-5 at the annual meeting of American Association of Cancer Research (AACR17) in Washington, DC. Launched by the Human Protein Atlas consortium in Sweden, the new atlas provides researchers information about the relationship of expression levels of human genes with the clinical outcome in nearly 8,000 cancer patients.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Society considers people with mental illnesses to be more dangerous than they areHow dangerous does the general public consider mentally ill people to be? Scientists at the University of Basel and the University Psychiatric Clinics Basel have investigated the factors that influence social stigma. The journal Scientific Reports published the results.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Negative regulator stops extreme immune response to parasite, averting multi-organ damageA new study from Osaka University identified a role for the BATF2 protein in negatively regulating the immune response to infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is responsible for Chagas disease. BATF2 was shown to inhibit production of the IL-23 cytokine, thus limiting immunopathology mediated by another cytokine, IL-17. This furthers understanding of the host response to pa
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reversing aging now possible!DGIST's research team identified the mechanism of reversible recovery of aging cells by inducing lysosomal activation. The team opened a new horizon of aging recovery research by changing the irreversibility paradigm of aging.
9h
Ingeniøren

Tværbane-tvisten i Kastrup bekymrer transportministerenOle Birk Olesen ser med stor bekymring på, at SAS og Københavns Lufthavne er dybt uenige om lukningen af tværbanen i en omfattende udbygning af Københavns Lufthavn.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New security procedures secure the intelligent factoryAt the Hannover Messe from April 24 to 28, 2017, Fraunhofer researchers will present two new procedures for the protection of Industrie 4.0 production facilities (Hall 2, Booth C16/C22): here, a self-learning system recognizes security incidents in manufacturing facilities without knowledge of the underlying system architecture. Hardware-based security modules report manipulation tests on machines
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Determining when India collided with Asia to form the Himalayan mountainsThe collision between the Indian subcontinent and the Asian landmass resulted in the formation of the Himalayan Mountains and the rise of the Tibetan Plateau, with consequent major climatic and environmental changes around our planet. Placing precise constraints on the timing of the India-Asia continental collision is essential to understanding the subsequent geological and topographic evolution o
9h
Gizmodo

How to Make Your Social Media Accounts as Private as Possible Maintaining social media accounts while staying as anonymous as possible isn’t easy— just ask the Director of the FBI —but you can put your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other accounts into a locked-down, private mode to evade detection. When your social media accounts are locked down people can’t see what’s inside without your permission. This is great if you want to stay up to date with clo
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Genetic Details of Controversial "3-Parent Baby" RevealedThe child's parents have decided to forgo long-term monitoring by researchers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Jupiter on 25 February 2017Earth is about to pass between the Sun and Jupiter, placing the giant planet opposite the Sun on 7 April. This event is termed 'opposition' by astronomers, and takes place roughly every 13 months. This is the length of time Earth takes to travel around the Sun relative to Jupiter's nearly 12-year orbit about five times further away.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neurobiologists discover important characteristics of the motion detector in the fly brainIn order to react to changes in the environment in good time, the brain must analyze the signals it receives from the eyes rapidly and accurately. For example, the ability to recognise the direction in which an approaching car is moving is vital to the survival of modern humans in cities. Using the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila as a model, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiolo
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study identifies ways to encourage 'refuge' planting, slowing resistance to Bt cropsA new study from North Carolina State University finds a significant shortfall in the amount of "refuge" cropland being planted in North Carolina – likely increasing the rate at which crop pests will evolve the ability to safely devour genetically engineered Bt crops. However, the study also identified actions that may make farmers more likely to plant refuge crops in the future.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More objective than human hearingIn industrial production, the testing of machines and products by means of acoustic signals still takes a niche role. At the Hannover Messe 2017, Fraunhofer is exhibiting a cognitive system that detects erroneous sounds more objectively than the human ear (Hall 2, Booth C16/C22). The technology has successfully passed the initial practical tests and there detected up to 99 percent of the errors.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique experiment set to reveal the effects of climate change on the forests of the futureA major new decade-long experiment to study the impact of climate and environmental change on woodlands is launching today.
9h
The Atlantic

Public Universities Get an Education in Private Industry At the University of California, Davis, researchers are regularly invited to attend on-campus meet-and-greets with potential corporate funders to discuss possible sponsorship opportunities. Handshakes and business cards are routinely exchanged—so are nondisclosure agreements. Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist at U.C. Davis, says such meetings and the attendant nondisclosure agreements are
9h
Dagens Medicin

Forløbsprogram for lænderyglidelser passer ikke ind i praksissektorenMedarbejdere bakker op om forløbsprogram for lænderyglidelser, men det er endnu kun blevet implementeret i lille omfang i praksissektoren, viser evaluering fra KORA.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoscopic golden springs could unravel twisted moleculesUniversity of Bath scientists have used gold spring-shaped coils 5,000 times thinner than human hairs and powerful lasers to enable the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could improve pharmaceutical design, telecommunications and nanorobotics.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The dynamic surface tension of waterThe surface tension of a liquid is a measure of the cohesive forces that hold the molecules together. It is responsible for a water drop assuming a spherical shape and for the effects of surfactants to produce bubbles and foams. The value of the surface tension of water at room temperature is known accurately to four significant figures and is recommended as a standard for the calibration of other
9h
Ars Technica

NASA is planning a daring repair mission to save a $2 billion particle detector NASA The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has served during the last six years as a silent witness to the formation of the universe, quietly collecting about 100 billion cosmic rays, particles, and nuclei with energies up to 1 trillion electron volts. "The results show unexpected phenomena—they are not predicted by current cosmic ray models—and this is changing our understanding of the cosmos," princi
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The worrying state of Mediterranean fish stocksFish stocks in the Mediterranean Sea are deteriorating at an alarming rate. A recent analysis by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) shows that 93% of the assessed fish stocks are overexploited, and a number of them are on the verge of depletion. In addition, the Mediterranean Sea has lost 41% of its marine mammals and 34% of the total fish population over the past 50 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronic synapses that can learn: towards an artificial brain?Researchers from the CNRS, Thales, and the Universities of Bordeaux, Paris-Sud, and Evry have created an artificial synapse capable of learning autonomously. They were also able to model the device, which is essential for developing more complex circuits. The research was published in Nature Communications on April 3, 2017.
9h
Gizmodo

Chemistry Should Only Be Taught Using Gorgeous Microscopic Footage of Chemical Reactions GIF: Vimeo Hands-on experiments can make studying chemistry slightly more enjoyable, but the bulk of the learning usually comes from a massive and boring textbook. Maybe the world would have more aspiring chemists if classes were instead taught using these microscopic videos of chemical reactions happening right before your eyes. The Beauty of Science created Precipitation3 , a short film capture
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Substituting nurse practitioners, physician assistants & nurses for physicians older careSubstituting nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurses for physicians in healthcare for the aging population may achieve healthcare quality at least as good as care provided by physicians, according to a review of published studies.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoscopic golden springs change color of twisted lightUniversity of Bath scientists have used gold spring-shaped coils 5,000 times thinner than human hairs with powerful lasers to enable the detection of twisted molecules, and the applications could improve pharmaceutical design, telecommunications and nanorobotics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identification of protein crucial to lymphatic system developmentAn Osaka University-led team identified a role for the extracellular matrix protein Polydom in the later stages of lymphatic system development. Mice lacking Polydom died immediately after birth as a result of defective lymphatic system maturation. Polydom was found to be secreted by the mesenchymal cells that surround lymphatic vessels rather than by the endothelial cells of the vessel walls them
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Science | The Guardian

Images that show another side of science – in pictures These are the winning entries from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council photo competition 2017, which allows researchers and doctoral students to share another side of their work Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren

Kamp om reddit udspiller sig på et virtuelt lærred - resultatet er mildt sagt underholdende En ny subreddit lader brugerne farve et kæmpe, virtuelt lærred. Territorielle konflikter, mystiske sorte huller og en aggressiv LGBT bevægelse har præget projektets første to døgn, men det udvikler sig konstant. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/internettets-krige-bliver-oejeblikket-udkaempet-paa-stort-virtuelt-laerred-1075218 Version2
9h
Ingeniøren

Alverdens data sikres i 1.000 år på lysfølsom film På øen Svalbard i Norge har et norsk firma topsikret en gammel, forladt kulmine. Her kan alle verdens lande gemme de vigtigste data og derved sikre dem mod verdens undergang. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/norge-skal-alverdens-data-sikres-mod-apokalypsen-1075183 Version2
9h
Ingeniøren

Papirfly-design baner vejen for supersonisk flyvning over landLockheed Martin og Nasa arbejder på at skabe et fly, hvis flytype slet ikke findes endnu. Nemlig et fly som både er supersonisk og helt stille.
9h
Ingeniøren

Forskere advarer: Intensiv markdyrkning øger risikoen for vandmangelMange afgrøder kan kun dyrkes ved hjælp af kunstvanding, der belaster grundvandsressourcerne. Derfor er der behov for at se på en omlægning af produktionen, fastslår forskere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building block of thermal computer operates at 600 K(Phys.org)—Researchers have built the hottest thermal diode to date, which operates at temperatures of more than 600 K (326 °C). Thermal diodes may serve as the building blocks of future thermal computers, which could run at temperatures at which today's electronic computers would quickly overheat and stop working.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers capture dinoflagellate on video shooting harpoons at prey(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has filmed for the first time a type of single-cell organism, a dinoflagellate, shooting its harpoon-like organelle at prey as a means of capture. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they managed to capture the tiny creatures in action and what they learned by watching them engage with prey.
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Futurity.org

Incredibly thin silver for touchscreens won’t tarnish Scientists have laid down the thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive exposure to air. This could change the production of touchscreens and flat or flexible displays. The work could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. By combining the silver with a l
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Ars Technica

Imagination Technologies’ shares collapse after Apple ditches Brit chip designer (credit: Imagination Technologies) A year on from Apple being locked in potential buyout talks with Imagination Technologies , the iPhone maker is set to abandon the British chip design company. Shares in Imagination were in free-fall on Monday morning, after it confirmed it would lose its biggest customer by 2019. "Apple is of a view that it will no longer use the group’s intellectual property i
9h
WIRED

EVs Are Dangerously Quiet. Here’s What They Could Sound Like Electric cars will make cities eerily quiet … and that presents a big problem. The post EVs Are Dangerously Quiet. Here's What They Could Sound Like appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulating fast, technology-driven trading may have unintended consequencesRegulatory changes aimed at encouraging very fast, technology-driven trading on the JSE may have some unintended consequences.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technique for 'three-parent baby' revealedDetails of a pioneering IVF technique using mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) have been published, giving hope to those families with inheritable mitochondrial disorders that they may be able to have healthy children in the future.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alcohol abuse even before pregnancy may harm offspringMothers who binge drink before they become pregnant may be more likely to have children with high blood sugar and other changes in glucose function that increase their risk of developing diabetes as adults, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AACR: New model paves way for immune therapies against colorectal cancerStudy presented at AACR 2017 describes a new 'humanized mouse' model of colorectal cancer, allowing researchers to test new drugs and new drug combinations against the disease and potentially opening the door to immunotherapy for the larger, microsatellite-stable population of colorectal cancer patients.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do smart songbirds always get the girl?Compelling evidence shows females prefer mates with better cognitive abilities in a number of animals and even humans. For male songbirds, their ability to sing complex songs has been suggested to signal cognitive ability and is vital for attracting females as well as repelling rival males. What's not clear is how female songbirds can judge the cognitive abilities of potential mates, which is a ne
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbial colonizers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate changeA team of researchers from the University of Bristol have recently shown that ecosystems created by melting glaciers in the Arctic are sensitive to climate change and human activity.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The carpenter enzyme gives DNA the snipEnzyme follows a two-step verification system before cutting and repairing DNA damage.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mysterious cosmic explosion puzzles astronomersA mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AACR study sheds light on dark side of tumor suppressor gene, p53AACR 2017 study picks apart the dark side of gene p53 to show that other genes, Mdm2 and now for the first time Mdm4, keep mutated p53 in check.
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Ars Technica

Roland founder and TR-808 creator Ikutaro Kakehashi dies at age 87 (credit: Roland) Ikutaro Kakehashi, the founder of pioneering electronic instrument company Roland, has died aged 87. Kakehashi's influence on both the development of electronic music and the pop charts is enduring. Following the founding of Roland in the 1970s, Kakehashi—an accomplished engineer—set his sights on developing a sophisticated electronic drum machine, which culminated with the relea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyborgs at work: employees getting implanted with microchipsThe syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger. Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee's hand. Another "cyborg" is created.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme follows a two-step verification system before cutting and repairing DNA damageMicroscopes that reveal the hidden complexities of life down to the nanoscale level have shown in exquisite detail how an enzyme involved in DNA repair works its molecular magic.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find orbit of Mars hosts remains of ancient mini-planetsThe planet Mars shares its orbit with a handful of small asteroids, the so-called Trojans. Now an international team of astronomers using the Very Large Telescope in Chile have found that most of these objects share a common composition; they are likely the remains of a mini-planet that was destroyed by a collision long ago. The findings are reported in a paper to appear in Monthly Notices of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where old satellites go to dieMeteosat-7, EUMETSAT's oldest operational meteorological satellite, tomorrow begins its final journey to the great graveyard orbit in the sky.
10h
New Scientist - News

Medieval people mutilated the deceased to ward off zombiesAnalysis of bones from the 11th to 14th centuries from a village in Yorkshire, UK, shows they have been burnt and mutilated – in an attempt to keep them dead
10h
Gizmodo

Even More Rumors of Departures Coming to Doctor Who Get a first fleeting glimpse at an Avengers: Infinity War foe. G.I. Joe is heading towards a movie reboot. Nicole Kidman talks about joining Aquaman . Pilou Asbæk promises some shit-stirring for Euron Greyjoy in Game of Thrones ’ next season. Plus, new Wonder Woman pictures, and new teasers for Alien: Covenant . To me, my Spoilers! G.I. Joe The third live-action G.I. Joe film has been cancelled i
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After 25 years of trying, why aren't we environmentally sustainable yet?In 1992, more than 170 countries came together at the Rio Earth Summit and agreed to pursue sustainable development, protect biological diversity, prevent dangerous interference with climate systems, and conserve forests. But, 25 years later, the natural systems on which humanity relies continue to be degraded.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why South Africa's social grants aren't eradicating malnutritionA national sigh of relief should follow the Constitutional Court ruling that ensures the uninterrupted payment of social grants in South Africa. And some praise might follow the slight increases in monthly social grant payments to more than 17 million South Africans, as announced in the national budget in February. But these increases don't go far enough to address South Africa's persistent malnut
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Visualizing scientific big data in informative and interactive waysHumans are visual creatures: our brain processes images 60,000 times faster than text, and 90 percent of information sent to the brain is visual. Visualization is becoming increasingly useful in the era of big data, in which we are generating so much data at such high rates that we cannot keep up with making sense of it all. In particular, visual analytics—a research discipline that combines autom
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where's your county seat? A modern mathematical method for calculating centers of geographyPeople have long been intrigued by figuring out the center of the places where we live.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique dolphin strategy delivers dangerous octopus for dinnerFor wild predators, catching, killing and eating prey can sometimes be a risky business. We can see this on the African savannah, where a well-aimed kick from a zebra can spell trouble for a hungry lion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemicals that cure malaria can kill weeds tooPlant biologists at The University of Western Australia have revealed the relationship between plants and the parasite that causes malaria is close enough to mean many antimalarial drugs are effective herbicides.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New species of tree living crab found in Western GhatsA recent research paper in The Journal of Crustacean Biology reveals a new genus and new species of tree crab in Kerala, southern India. Known scientifically as the 'Kani maranjandu,' it is substantially different from other congeners. Its distinguishing characters include: the structure of its hard upper shell, as well as its male abdominal structure and reproductive parts, and of course, its dia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticle treatment could improve immunotherapy against cancerIn preliminary findings that will be presented Sunday, April 2, at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2017, UNC Lineberger researchers report on a preclinical study into the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Towards a mathematical theory of PID controlA latest research gives a simple and analytic design method for the PID (proportional-integral-derivative) parameters for second order nonlinear uncertain systems, and establishes a mathematical theory for global stability and asymptotic regulation of the closed-loop control systems, which is of high value for both PID control theory and its wide practice. Science China Information Sciences report
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study to investigate links between cybercrime and autistic traitsA new project between the University's Centre for Applied Autism Research, the charity Research Autism and the cybercrime unit of the National Crime Agency (NCA) - launched today (Monday 3 April) - will examine the links between cybercrime and autistic-like personality traits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding gas flow for improved clean energy applicationsScientists have designed mathematical expressions that more accurately estimate gas movement through nanosized pores. This could help improve fuel cell development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Open-source software unlocks 3-D view of nanomaterialsNow it's possible for anyone to see and share 3-D nanoscale imagery with a new open-source software platform developed by researchers at the University of Michigan, Cornell University and open-source software company Kitware Inc.
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Dagens Medicin

Dybt bekymrende udtalelser fra Lif og styrelseLaver industrien forsøg for at vise, at deres produkter virker, eller for at teste om de virker?
10h
The Atlantic

Stories From Another Time, for Our Times: ‘We Do Our Part’ Tales from yesterday, for tomorrow. To the extent I spent any time studying in college, it was to learn about American history. The main impression the lectures and readings left on me was the realization that the country has always had big, serious problems. Slavery, violence, corruption, injustice—things were worst-ever during the Civil War, but if you choose your decade, you can name the corre
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The Atlantic

The Explosions on St. Petersburg's Metro Here’s what we know: —Russia’s National Antiterrorism Committee said at least nine people are dead and 20 wounded. The health minister put the death toll at 10. —The center said there was one explosion inside a car as the train was traveling between Tekhnologichesky Institut and Sennaya Ploshchad. Previous reports said there were two blasts—one at Tekhnologichesky Institut and the other at Sennay
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Integrating caregivers at discharge significantly cuts patient readmissionsSystematically integrating informal caregivers into the discharge planning process for elderly patients reduces hospital readmissions by a quarter, a University of Pittsburgh Health Policy Institute analysis discovered. The study is the first to quantify the post-discharge impact of caregiver integration into discharge planning on healthcare costs and resource utilization. The finding validates th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with lung cancers responsive to immunotherapy drug beat standard odds of survivalMore than seven years after the start of one of the first clinical trials of the immunotherapy drug nivolumab, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report that the five-year survival estimate for a limited subset of people with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer taking the drug is 16 percent, compared with a historical survival rate for that group of 1 to 4 percent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beyond genomics: Using proteomics to target tumorsDr. Amanda Paulovich, whose lab has a leading role in the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot, will speak April 5 at the AACR annual meeting about her lab's pioneering methods to measure proteins that serve as tumor markers.
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Gizmodo

You Won't Have to Hunt For Deals In Amazon's Easter Candy Gold Box Easter Candy Gold Box Whether you celebrate Easter, or just really love candy, today’s Amazon Gold Box will put you in a sugar coma. Inside , you’ll find Easter-themed treats from Mars, Brach’s, Oreo, and Lindt, plus some healthier options from Golden State Fruit that are sure to infuriate your kids. The Gold Box prices are already great, but several options also have a 10% coupon you can clip fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover high-def electron pathways in soilAll plants need electrons to aid biological and chemical tasks. Cornell scientists have discovered a new high-definition system that allows electrons to travel through soil farther and more efficiently than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parasitic wasp may aid battle against diseases spread by mosquitoesScientists at the University of Georgia are using lessons learned from a parasitic wasp to gain insights into how mosquito-borne diseases, like malaria and the Zika virus, evade detection by their hosts' immune systems, enabling them infect other animals, including humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Model predicts number of species yet to be discovered regionallyMany scientists have developed models to predict the total number of species on Earth—including those not yet discovered—of an animal or plant group, but University of Chicago researchers have developed the first such model that breaks the number down by region, providing a valuable new tool for biodiversity inventory and analysis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Star Wars 'superlaser' may no longer be sci-fiIn a world-leading study researchers at Macquarie University have proven a method for multiplying laser power using diamond, demonstrating that a laser similar to the Star Wars 'superlaser' may no longer remain in science fiction.
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The Scientist RSS

Fat?s Influence on CancerResearchers at the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting discuss the roles of adipose tissue and inflammation in the growth and spread of tumors.
10h
WIRED

6 Epic Caving Instagrams Let You Spelunk From Your Desk Love adventure but not a fan of tight spaces? Explore caves on Instagram instead. The post 6 Epic Caving Instagrams Let You Spelunk From Your Desk appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Risk analysis for CO2 sequestration at enhanced oil recovery sitesCarbon dioxide (CO2) is an attractive displacing agent for enhanced oil recovery. Because a large portion of the injected CO2 remains in place in depleted reservoirs after enhanced oil recovery, this method could also be an option for permanently sequestering CO2 to mitigate global warming. Los Alamos scientists and collaborators have developed a generic multi-scale statistical framework for CO2 a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remains of a new pyramid discovered in EgyptA top antiquities official says an Egyptian excavation team has discovered the remains of a new pyramid that dates back to the 13th Dynasty, some 3,700 years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU tightens rules on sourcing conflict mineralsThe European Union is introducing new rules to help prevent minerals being used to finance armed conflicts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nepal to relocate five rare one-horned rhinosConservationists on Monday captured a rare one-horned rhinoceros in Nepal as part of an attempt to increase the number of the vulnerable animals, which are prized by wildlife poachers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can pure maple syrup help reduce chronic inflammation?The first-ever global symposium, solely dedicated to sharing the latest scientific discoveries on the potential health benefits of 100 percent pure maple products from Canada, took place on April 2 in San Francisco at the 253rd annual meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telomere length predicts cancer riskThe length of the 'caps' of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists will report today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. Longer-than-expected telomeres -- which are composed of repeated sequences of DNA and are shortened every time a cell div
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford researchers create deep learning algorithm that could boost drug developmentCombining computer science and chemistry, researchers show how an advanced form of machine learning that works off small amounts of data can be used to solve problems in drug discovery.
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Futurity.org

Bird bones say ocean food chain got shorter Bones of the Hawaiian petrel, an endangered species, show the birds have experienced a significant shift in food resources most likely during the past 100 years—possibly due to industrial fishing practices. “The bird is acting like a sentinel for what’s happening in the ocean.” The study, in the current issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B , offers insight into how an ocean food web has ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Android apps can conspire to mine information from your smartphoneMobile phones have increasingly become the repository for the details that drive our everyday lives. But Virginia Tech researchers have recently discovered that the same apps we regularly use on our phones to organize lunch dates, make convenient online purchases, and communicate the most intimate details of our existence have secretly been colluding to mine our information.
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The Scientist RSS

TS Picks: April 3, 2017USDA posting few animal inspections; HHS secretary proposes cutting indirect research expenses; science journalism vs. fake news
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Can the Amazon Save the Planet?Scientists climb to perilous heights to gauge how much carbon dioxide the rainforest is absorbing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Ars Technica

The route to high-speed quantum computing is paved with error Enlarge / Unfortunately, determing quantum computing speed is not as easy as deciding on the track like ol' Robert Kerr did for Canada at the 1908 British Amateur Athletic Association (AAA) Championships. (credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images) When it comes to quantum computing , mostly I get excited about experimental results rather than ideas for new hardware. New devices—or new ways to im
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Dagens Medicin

S og DF vil sænke krav til fedmekirurgiRegeringen og regionerne bør følge de kliniske retningslinjer for, hvornår det er mest gavnligt at tilbyde svært overvægtige en fedmeoperation, mener Socialdemokraterne og Dansk Folkeparti, der vil sænke BMI-grænsen for hvornår, patienter får tilbudt operation.
11h
The Atlantic

Today's News: April 3, 2017 —The Senate Judiciary Committee begins deliberations today on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. Republicans need five more Democratic votes to overcome a filibuster that Democrats have vowed to mount on the nomination. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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Popular Science

The factories of the future could float in space Space Orbital manufacturing is already paving the way for better solar panels, faster internet, cleaner computer chips, and lab-grown human hearts Eventually, if it takes off, orbital fabrication could revolutionize the way we make things. Read on:…
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Popular Science

How to scramble an egg Gadgets And what's happening while you do it The perfect goods for scrambling an egg. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds 'dire' lack of interest in maths careers among Australian studentsAn Australian study into why students choose science, mathematics, engineering and technology (STEM) careers has revealed a "dire" lack of interest in careers focused on mathematics.
11h
WIRED

Trump Has Done Nothing to Fix America’s Tech Talent Shortage The US is systematically failing to produce homegrown tech talent. Trump has yet to come up with the faintest glimmer of a plan to address the problem. The post Trump Has Done Nothing to Fix America's Tech Talent Shortage appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Wellness Apps Evade the FDA, Only to Land In Court Last week, the New York Attorney General's office settled lawsuits forcing three app developers to stop promising health-tech miracles. The post Wellness Apps Evade the FDA, Only to Land In Court appeared first on WIRED .
11h
WIRED

Swing Things: 7 Tech Tools to Improve Your Golf Game You don't have to play in the Masters to take advantage of souped up golf clubs, Bluetooth swing analysis, and hyper-realistic golf simulators. The post Swing Things: 7 Tech Tools to Improve Your Golf Game appeared first on WIRED .
11h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Tail EyesFollowing treatment with a migraine drug, blind tadpoles were able to process visual information through eyes transplanted onto their tails.
12h
Gizmodo

Social Media Cries 'Fake News' After Reuters Pulls Story About Jared Kushner in Iraq [Updated: Reuters Confirms Kushner in Iraq] Senior advisor to President Trump, Jared Kushner, watches Vice President Mike Pence administer the oath of office to US Ambassador to Israel David M. Friedman on March 29, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) Jared Kushner has a lot on his plate right now. As a senior advisor (and son-in-law) to President Trump, Kushner is heading the new White House Office of American Innovation , engaging i
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Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Specimens’ goes behind the scenes of Chicago’s Field MuseumThe Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago puts seldom-seen specimens on display in a new exhibit to highlight the crucial role of museum objects in scientific research.
12h
Live Science

28 New Dead Sea Scrolls Fragments Sold in USTwenty-eight fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls that were purchased from the antiquities market have yet to be published, but are now sitting in three U.S. institutions.
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Live Science

In Photos: Dead Sea Scrolls in AmericaHere's a look at the fragments of Dead Sea Scrolls that have been sold on the antiquities market and are currently in institutions in the U.S.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Should the Science March Stick Exclusively to Science?Yes, if science were simply an abstract, mechanical, purely objective enterprise—but it's not -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Aquariums flout Japan's ban on dolphin catching methodAquariums are quitting a Japanese zoo body to avoid a ban on a controversial method of catching dolphins.
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Dagens Medicin

#15 Psykisk sygdom, bryd tavsheden!Ida og Camilla bevæger sig ind i en abstrakt og ukendt verden. En verden som også er kendt som psykiatrien. Hvad er skizofreni? Hvordan er det at være indlagt? Hvor mange i Danmark har en diagnose? Er der et tabu ift. at snakke om psykisk sygdom? Spørgsmålene er mange, og svarerne er overraskende – selv for de to værter på programmet. I studiet fortæller Thorbjørn, som har lidt af paranoid skizofr
12h
Live Science

7 Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls RevealedFrom virtual unwrapping to old-fashioned archaeological excavation, scientists are using a variety of techniques to reveal new information about the Dead Sea Scrolls.
12h
Ingeniøren

Undervisningsminister: Vi skal have skabere - ikke bare brugere - af it Skolernes indførelse af iPads har rejst kritik blandt flere it-fagfolk. Nu nedsætter undervisningsministeren en rådgivningsgruppe, der skal højne udbyttet af it-investeringer i undervisningen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/minister-vi-skal-have-skabere-ikke-bare-brugere-it-1075178 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren

»Bilindustrien har snydt, men kun Volkswagen har tilstået«Dansk EU-parlamentariker: Bilindustrien har snydt med vilje, de nationale myndigheder har forsømt markedskontrollen, og EU har kendt til misforholdet uden at gribe ind.
12h
New Scientist - News

Philosophers of knowledge, your time has comeIn the current crisis over truth, what we need is a way to separate facts from falsehoods. Step forward epistemologists – those who study knowledge
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New Scientist - News

Android apps share data between them without your permissionPairs of Android apps on the Google Play store are able to work together to sneak extra privileges and access information without the user’s knowledge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher creates chemical system that mimics early cell behaviorA Harvard researcher seeking a model for the earliest cells has created a system that self-assembles from a chemical soup into cell-like structures that grow, move in response to light, replicate when destroyed, and exhibit signs of rudimentary evolutionary selection.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Android apps can conspire to mine information from your smartphone'What this study shows undeniably with real-world evidence over and over again is that app behavior, whether it is intentional or not, can pose a security breach depending on the kinds of apps you have on your phone,' said researcher Gang Wang.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers hoping to directly capture image of a black holeAstronomers want to record an image of the heart of our galaxy for the first time: a global collaboration of radio dishes is to take a detailed look at the black hole which is assumed to be located there. This Event Horizon Telescope links observatories all over the world to form a huge telescope, from Europe via Chile and Hawaii right down to the South Pole. IRAM's 30-metre telescope, an installa
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rubbery, multifunctional fibers could be used to study spinal cord neurons and potentially restore functionImplantable fibers have been an enormous boon to brain research, allowing scientists to stimulate specific targets in the brain and monitor electrical responses. But similar studies in the nerves of the spinal cord, which might ultimately lead to treatments to alleviate spinal cord injuries, have been more difficult to carry out. That's because the spine flexes and stretches as the body moves, and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronaut study gives voice to people with disabilitiesWhen his father was diagnosed with a debilitating disease four years ago, it sparked Ivo Vieira into developing a novel means of communication for people coping with extreme limitations, building on technology originally explored to help ESA astronauts in space.
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Science | The Guardian

The first shovelful: introducing our new archaeology and anthropology blog Meet the experts behind the Past and the Curious, who will be digging deep to bring Guardian readers the inside scoop on archaeology and anthropology Here we go, a new archaeology and anthropology blog, bringing you tombs, treasures, tribes and high adventure. Well maybe; we’re hoping there’ll be even more interesting and unexpected things than those to be honest. There’s plenty more going on tha
13h
The Atlantic

What Does 'Cultural Appropriation' Actually Mean? Last month, the long-running debate about cultural appropriation was rekindled when several protests over a painting at the Whitney Museum made national headlines. “Open Casket” depicted the body of Emmett Till, whose 1955 lynching helped galvanize the Civil Rights Movement. The artist, Dana Schutz, says the inspiration for the painting of the murdered 14-year-old came from listening to interview
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The space weather forecast for Proxima Centauri BProxima Centauri, the closest star to the Earth (only 4.28 light-years away) is getting a lot of attention these days. It hosts a planet, Proxima Cen b, whose mass is about 1.3 Earth-mass (though it could be larger, depending on the angle at which we are viewing it). Moreover, Proxima Cen b orbits the star in its habitable zone. Proxima Cen itself is an M-dwarf star with a mass only about one-tent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device produces hydrogen peroxide for water purificationLimited access to clean water is a major issue for billions of people in the developing world, where water sources are often contaminated with urban, industrial and agricultural waste. Many disease-causing organisms and organic pollutants can be quickly removed from water using hydrogen peroxide without leaving any harmful residual chemicals. However, producing and distributing hydrogen peroxide i
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers convert grass into biofuelResearchers at Ghent University (Belgium, Europe) have developed a process that turns grass into biofuel.
13h
Ingeniøren

Hackere gør fjernsyn til overvågningsenhed med falske tv-signaler Den nye angrebsmetode kræver ingen adgang til de smart-Tv's, der er mål for angrebet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyt-hackertrick-indlejrer-angrebskode-transmissionssignaler-1075170 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren

Danmarks nye selvkørende minibus bygges på minifabrik i BerlinFirmaet Local Motors ved at færdiggøre et autonomt køretøj til dansk forsøgsordning. Ingeniøren har prøvekørt minibussen i Tyskland.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New slowly evolving Type Ibn supernova discovered(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected a new slowly evolving Type Ibn supernova as part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). The new event, designated OGLE-2014-SN-13, has the longest rise time ever observed in Type Ibn supernovae. The discovery is described in a paper published Mar. 23 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigating status of goldenseal in PennsylvaniaFunded by a $50,000 grant from the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are conducting an 18-month study of the forest herb goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) in Pennsylvania.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shares in UK chipmaker dive 66 pct after Apple ends contractShares in chipmaker Imagination Technologies have plunged 66 percent after announcing that Apple plans to stop using its products.
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Ingeniøren

Fældet af uddannelsesloftet: »Det føles lidt som at hælde det hele i afløbet«Kristian og hans medstuderende er ved at tage en dobbelt diplomingeniøruddannelse. Men uddannelsesloftet forhindrer dem nu i at gøre uddannelsen færdig.
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Science | The Guardian

Bloodthirsty chomp-monster or sensitive lover? Time to rethink Tyrannosaurus rex | Brian SwitekNo other dinosaur has sunk its teeth so deeply into our imagination, yet the focus on its hunting means we’re surprised to discover it was a real, living animal We’re over 66 million years too late to know what tyrannosaurus mating rituals entailed. Whether the immense carnivores courted like oversized albatrosses, offered gifts of semi-rotted triceratops meat, or simply got down to business witho
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Dagens Medicin

P-piller kan give langvarig beskyttelse mod kræft Lavere risiko for en række kræftformer blandt kvinder, der har brugt p-piller, viser data fra langvarigt opfølgningsstudie.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elimination of specific neurons outside the brain triggers obesityA research team from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (Portugal) developed a new genetic technique that allows the elimination of specific neurons of the peripheral nervous system without affecting the brain. Using this novel technique in mice, the researchers were able to study the function of the neurons that innervate the adipose tissue, and saw that their elimination results in mice pounding up
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International scientific teams find potential approach against parasitesResearch teams from the National Institutes of Health and abroad have identified the first inhibitor of an enzyme long thought to be a potential drug target for fighting disease-causing parasites and bacteria. The team, led by NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and University of Tokyo scientists, sorted through more than 1 trillion small protein fragments called cyclic pept
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to clamp down on cyanide fishingSpraying cyanide in tropical seas can quickly and cheaply stun fish, allowing them to be easily captured and sold. But most countries where aquarium fish are collected have outlawed the method, which damages corals. Catching perpetrators, however, is difficult. Now researchers are developing a handheld device for detecting cyanide fishing that could help clamp down on the destructive practice. The
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Altering the immune system to reverse paralysis (video)In the ultimate betrayal, one's own immune system can turn against the protective sheath that envelops neurons in the brain, leaving the body paralyzed. Researchers have developed an experimental treatment that tames the wayward immune system in rodents, returning the power of movement to paralyzed mice. The approach may someday combat autoimmune diseases in humans. The researchers will present th
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A 'bionic leaf' could help feed the worldIn the second half of the 20th century, an agricultural boom called the 'green revolution' was largely credited with averting a global food crisis. Now, the problem of feeding the world's growing population looms again. To help address the challenge, researchers present at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society a 'bionic' leaf that uses bacteria, sunlight, water a
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ridding the oceans of plastics by turning the waste into valuable fuelBillions of pounds of plastic waste are littering the world's oceans. Now, a Ph.D. organic chemist and a sailboat captain report that they are developing a process to reuse certain plastics, transforming them from worthless trash into a valuable diesel fuel with a small mobile reactor that could operate on land or at sea. They will present their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of t
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Sniffing' urine to detect prostate cancer could prevent unnecessary biopsiesOn the list of dreaded medical tests, a prostate biopsy probably ranks fairly high. The procedure requires sticking a needle into the prostate gland to remove tissue samples, and the majority of men who undergo the uncomfortable test don't require treatment. Today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, scientists report progress toward minimizing unnecessary p
13h
New Scientist - News

Debate rages over controversial copyright standard for the webThe World Wide Web Consortium has proposed standardising a copyright mechanism in browsers. But critics say it’s a security risk and threatens the open web
14h
The Atlantic

Justice Thomas's Doubts About Civil Forfeiture The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of appeals from the nation’s lower courts each year. It declines to hear almost all of them. But for Justice Clarence Thomas, one of those rejected cases earlier this month gave him the chance to challenge a widely criticized police practice: civil forfeiture. Leonard v. Texas reached the Court after Lisa Leonard sought to overturn Texas’s seizure of roug
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International scientific teams find potential approach against parasitesResearch teams from the National Institutes of Health and abroad have identified the first inhibitor of an enzyme long thought to be a potential drug target for fighting disease-causing parasites and bacteria. The teams, led by NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and University of Tokyo scientists, sorted through more than 1 trillion small protein fragments called cy
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A 'bionic leaf' could help feed the worldIn the second half of the 20th century, the mass use of fertilizer was part of an agricultural boom called the "green revolution" that was largely credited with averting a global food crisis. Now, the challenge of feeding the world looms again as the population continues to balloon. To help spur the next agricultural revolution, researchers have invented a "bionic" leaf that uses bacteria, sunligh
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to clamp down on cyanide fishingSpraying cyanide near coral reefs teeming with tropical creatures can quickly and cheaply stun ornamental fish that can then be scooped up and sold around the world. The practice supplies pet stores but often leaves behind damaged coral and dead fish exposed to too much of the toxin. Countries where aquarium fish are collected have outlawed the method decades ago, but catching perpetrators is diff
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ridding the oceans of plastics by turning the waste into valuable fuelBillions of pounds of plastic waste are littering the world's oceans. Now, a Ph.D. organic chemist and a sailboat captain report that they are developing a process to reuse certain plastics, transforming them from worthless trash into a valuable diesel fuel with a small mobile reactor. They envision the technology could someday be implemented globally on land and possibly placed on boats to conver
14h
Big Think

From Living Inside Asteroids to Solar Arks, a Scientist Designs the Space Colonies of the Future New research explains how to build different types of outposts in space. Read More
14h
Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Kæmpe ingeniørjagt hos Krüger, MAN Diesel & Turbo og Dong - Tjek de nyeste jobopslag På ugens liste er jobmulighederne mange. Se opslagene som for eksempel miljøingeniør på Grønland, som barselvikar i Forsvaret eller som international kontraktmanager i Krüger. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-kaempe-ingenioerjagt-hos-kruger-man-diesel-turbo-dong-7375 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A biomarker for cancer of the oropharynxA growing number of cases of oropharyngeal cancer are considered to be a consequence of infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now revealed that a single blood sample test for specific antibodies can identify persons who are at a high risk of developing this type of cancer 10 years or more before cancer diagnosis.
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Dagens Medicin

Industrien skærer i prisen på sygehusmedicinRabataftale sikrer årlige besparelser på op til 90 mio. kr. regionernes budgetter.
14h
Viden

Grønne delebiler vil på børsen for at vokse i EuropaSelskabet Green Mobility vil noteres på den lille børs First North. Det skal give penge til flere delebiler.
15h
cognitive science

Cortard’s Syndrome: Help Me Doctor, I’m Dead! submitted by /u/Geordie_Murray [link] [comments]
15h
Ingeniøren

Dansk Fjernvarme: Ny afgiftsanalyse fremmer slet ikke overskudsvarmenDansk Fjernvarme giver ny afgiftsanalyse dumpekarakter, fordi dens anbefalinger stort set ikke fører til øget anvendelse af overskudsvarme i Danmark.
15h
Live Science

Kids' Risk of Dying from Flu Lower When VaccinatedResearchers looked at the cases of nearly 300 U.S. children who died from the flu over four flu seasons.
15h
Live Science

Celiac Disease and Anorexia May Be Linked in WomenA new study suggests that celiac disease has more than just a few symptoms in common with anorexia nervosa.
15h
Science-Based Medicine

Contrary to what we are frequently told, we are not “losing the war on cancer”A common narrative about cancer is that we are making no progress in our fight against it. Fortunately, the actual data do not agree. Yes, too many people still die of cancer and progress is slow, but it's not correct to claim that we are losing the war on cancer.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mysterious bursts of energy do come from outer spaceFast Radio Bursts present one of modern astronomy's greatest mysteries: what or who in the Universe is transmitting short bursts of radio energy across the cosmos?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's 'selfie monkey' threatened by hunger for its meatThe crested black macaque shot to fame when one of the monkeys snapped grinning selfies and became embroiled in a US court battle—but the tussle over copyright is the least of the rare animal's worries.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Industry, academic partners team up to fight fake newsA global alliance of tech industry and academic organizations unveiled plans on Monday to work together to combat the spread of "fake news" and improve public understanding of journalism.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK shale gas extraction could be reduced by limited space to develop wellsOnly a quarter of the shale gas contained in one of the UK's largest reserves might be recoverable because of limited space to develop the wells needed to extract it, according to new research.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists mobilise against 'fear of facts' in age of TrumpScientists are learning even if you ignore politics, politics won't ignore you.
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Science | The Guardian

Israel's medical marijuana pioneers look to cash in on $20bn market Country has seen 500 companies apply to join ‘green rush’ in cannabis products after more than 100 studies in pharmaceutical use In a small pharmaceutical lab in Jerusalem, a complex construction of rubber tubes, pumps and a brass pipe sits on a worktop. A prototype device, its purpose is to “smoke” cannabis to remove its active constituents and turn them into powder, with the hope that the resul
17h

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