EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows global photosynthesis on the riseResearchers found a global historic record by analyzing gases trapped in Antarctic snow to see the rapid rise in photosynthesis over the past 200 years.
2min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Into the DNA of a coral reef predatorResearchers from OIST and Australia have sequenced and decoded for the first time the genome of the crown-of-thorns starfish, paving the way for the biocontrol of this invasive predator responsible for the destruction of coral reefs across Indo-Pacific oceans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Powers of attraction could decimate deadly starfishAn American who fell in love with both the Great Barrier Reef and his wife via The University of Queensland has led a breakthrough discovery that could protect one of the Seven Natural Wonders.Husband-and-wife Professor Bernard Degnan and Associate Professor Sandie Degnan, believe they, along with research colleagues, can use the powers of attraction to decimate one of the reef's fiercest enemies.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants have been helping to offset climate change, but now it's up to usPlants are currently removing more CO2 from the air than they did 200 years ago, according to new work from Carnegie's Joe Berry and led by J. Elliott Campbell of UC Merced. The team's findings, which are published in Nature, affirm estimates used in models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-ray study reveals long-sought insights into potential drug targetX-ray studies done in part at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have produced surprising insights into the workings of a hormone receptor associated with blood pressure regulation. Researchers believe it could be a target for new medicines related to cardiovascular conditions, neuropathic pain and tissue growth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catch shares slow the 'race to fish'A detailed analysis of 39 US fisheries by Duke University economists shows that catch share programs slow the 'race to fish,' reducing costs and occupational hazards for fishermen, improving product quality, and allowing fishers to better time their catches to market demand. By demonstrating these results in 39 different fisheries, the new finding can inform the current debate over expanding the u
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-ray study reveals long-sought insights into potential drug targetResearchers hope to design a new generation of drugs against an array of deadly diseases. One of the key challenges is understanding a particular class of proteins adorning cell surfaces, which are the targets of the majority of pharmaceutical drugs.ASU's Biodesign Institute, along with a team led by Haitao Zhang and Vadim Cherezov of USC have examined one promising drug target in luminous detail,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer, Stanford researchers sayPudgy roundworms storing a particular type of fat live longer than their more svelte counterparts, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nerve cells actively repress alternative cell fates, Stanford researchers findA neural cell maintains its identity by actively suppressing the expression of genes associated with non-neuronal cell types, including skin, heart, lung, cartilage and liver, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Science : NPR

The Race To Fish Slows Down. Why That's Good For Fish, Fishermen And Diners Catch shares allot fishermen a portion of the catch in advance, in hopes of keeping them from racing each other to sea, sometimes in risky climes. They're controversial. They also work, a study finds. (Image credit: Courtesy of John Rae)
3min
New Scientist - News

Facebook will use photo-matching tech to take down revenge pornSharing private sexual images without consent is illegal in many places. Facebook has announced new tools to stop so-called revenge porn images spreading
7min
The Atlantic

Stephen Bannon, Trump's Most Controversial Adviser, Exits the NSC President Trump took office with an unconventional pick as National Security Adviser, and an unusual structure for his National Security Council. Now, both are gone. White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s removal from the principals’ committee of the National Security Council on Wednesday may signal a shift towards normalcy for the NSC, which spent much of the last few months mired in contro
8min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Massive red, dead galaxy spotted in young universeA hefty red, dead galaxy may raise questions about how galaxies formed in the early universe.
15min
NYT > Science

Matter: Antarctic Ice Reveals Earth’s Accelerating Plant GrowthScientists compiling a record of the atmosphere based on air trapped in Antarctic ice found that rising carbon dioxide has accelerated plant growth.
19min
NYT > Science

Coal Is on the Way Out at Electric Utilities, No Matter What Trump SaysUtilities are turning to natural gas, wind and solar to create power, a roadblock to the president’s efforts to revive the coal industry.
19min
Gizmodo

This Ancient Stellar Blob Could Change Our Understanding of How Galaxies Form Elliptical galaxy IC 2006. Not the galaxy that the researchers are talking about, but you get the idea (Image: ESA/Hubble & NASA/ Flickr ) Only a billion or so years after the universe formed, a galaxy far more massive than our own and a fraction of the size blazed into existence. Just half a billion years later—less than the amount of time it took life to emerge and evolve into humans on Earth—t
20min
Gizmodo

Scientists Are Getting Closer to Understanding Where All the Antimatter Has Gone From Nature: “The fiber shroud of the liquid argon veto and the copper head for mounting the germanium strings. View from bottom.” Image: V. Wagner, GERDA collaboration You and me, we’re matter. Everyone you know is matter. Everything on Earth, spare a few particles, is matter. Most of the things in space are matter. But we don’t have convincing reasons why there should be so much more matter tha
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Catch shares slow the 'race to fish'A detailed analysis of 39 U.S. fisheries by Duke University economists offers strong new evidence that catch shares curb the "race to fish" that compresses fishing seasons.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows global photosynthesis on the risePlant photosynthesis was stable for hundreds of years before the industrial revolution, but grew rapidly in the 20th century, according to new research published today in Nature.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powers of attraction could decimate deadly starfishAn American who fell in love with both the Great Barrier Reef and his wife via The University of Queensland has led a breakthrough discovery that could protect one of the Seven Natural Wonders. Husband-and-wife Professor Bernard Degnan and Associate Professor Sandie Degnan, believe they, along with research colleagues, can use the powers of attraction to decimate one of the reef's fiercest enemies
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray study reveals long-sought insights into potential drug targetResearchers hope to design a new generation of drugs against an array of deadly diseases. The task, however, is costly, arduous and often ineffective. One of the key challenges is understanding a particular class of proteins adorning cell surfaces, which are the targets of the majority of pharmaceutical drugs.
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New step toward the treatment of myotubular myopathy gene therapy restores strength and prolongs lives in affected dogsA team of researchers has demonstrated the efficacy of administration of a therapeutic vector by a single intravenous injection and identified the dose that restores long-term muscular strength in a large animal model of the disease.
23min
Live Science

Fetus Brought Partway Out of Womb for Tumor SurgeryWhile the procedure was underway, the team constantly monitored the fetus's heart.
24min
NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Dolphin’s Recipe for OctopusScientists know that dolphins eat octopus, but until now they had not documented how they managed to eat such a dangerous meal.
25min
Science : NPR

Experts Suspect Nerve Agent Was Used In Syrian Attack An attack on a rebel-held region of Syria on Tuesday has killed dozens of people. Video and eyewitness reports suggest powerful chemical weapons are responsible.
32min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predicting the limits of friction: Scientists look at properties of materialMaterials scientists have developed a model to predict the limits of friction behavior of metals based on materials properties -- how hard you can push on materials or how much current you can put through them before they stop working properly.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Probiotics benefit in Schizophrenia shaped by yeast infectionsIn a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast inf
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biological age-predicting 'epigenetic clock' for studying how to extend lifespanIn order to measure and test the effects of interventions in the lab, investigators have developed an age-predicting clock designed for studies in mice. The new clock accurately predicts mouse biological age and the effects of genetic and dietary factors, giving the scientific community a new tool to better understand aging and test new interventions.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technology could offer cheaper, faster food testingResearchers have come up with a new way to test food for bacterial contamination. The test is based on a novel type of liquid droplet that can bind to bacterial proteins. This interaction, which can be detected either by the naked eye or with a smartphone, could offer a much faster and cheaper alternative to existing food safety tests.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers develop novel lens for super-resolution imagingA novel lens for super-resolution imaging has been created that breaks resolution limitations in microscopy and has potential applications in high precision failure inspection and biological research.
38min
Ars Technica

Ajit Pai says broadband market too competitive for strict privacy rules Enlarge / Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai listens during a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai and his counterpart at the Federal Trade Commission today argued that strict privacy rules for ISPs aren't necessary in part because the broadband market is more competit
44min
Gizmodo

Steve Rogers Just Made the First Major Move of Secret Empire Image: Marvel Comics. Art by Javier Pina, Andres Guinaldo, Rachelle Rosenberg, and Joe Caramagna The die is cast. After months of working covertly to bring his plans as an Agent of Hydra to fruition, Steve Rogers, the original Captain America, has made his first big step toward the incoming Secret Empire event . And even though we’ve been waiting for this to happen, it’s a pretty surprising move
50min
Scientific American Content: Global

Did Bedbugs Bite Early Humans? Pest's Oldest Relatives Found in OregonSome 11,000 years ago humans may have been in contact with the parasites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
52min
Ars Technica

Posting Persona 5 spoilers could get you hit with account suspension Enlarge While it's quite clear that video game publishers have the legal right to restrict the broadcast of their games however they want, few companies actually place many restrictions on enthusiastic fans who want to share their own gameplay with the world. Atlus became a major exception to that rule this week, threatening to issue takedown notices for Persona 5 videos that spoil important stor
55min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fruits and vegetables' latest superpower? Lowering blood pressureNew study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher links increased dietary potassium with lower blood pressure.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cover, crimp, cultivate?Can organic growers fight weeds and increase soil health? To grow crops organically, farmers fight weeds with chemical-free weapons. But it takes heavy tractors to efficiently turn soil and rip out weeds, compressing the soil. And after a field is turned, heavy rains and wind can erode the exposed soil. Researchers are working to get the best of both worlds.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The redomestication of wolvesGray wolves provide an important case study for understanding ecosystem effects when apex predators reoccupy their former ranges. These species often rely on anthropogenic food sources, which has broad implications for ecosystem restoration efforts and the possibility of human-wildlife conflict.
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No rest for the aged: As people get older, sleep quantity and quality declineAs people get older, they sleep less and wake up more frequently. Despite the thousands of sitcom jokes about it, these shifts in sleeping habits have a dark side. A recent review of scientific literature published in Neuron April 5 found that aging adults may be losing their ability to produce deep, restorative sleep. Furthermore, older people are likely paying for lost sleep both mentally and ph
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Schizophrenia signs in mice linked to uncoordinated firing of brain cells, says studyResearchers at Columbia University have discovered that a small group of neurons fired haphazardly in mice with signs of schizophrenia. The findings suggest that a breakdown in the synchronized behavior of these brain cells could produce the classic disordered thinking and perceptions associated with the disease. The study, which may be the first to test the idea that schizophrenia arises from dis
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Call to phase out lead bullets at shooting rangesWhile there is no safe level of lead exposure, US health bodies regard 5 micrograms per deciliter of blood as the level that is cause for concern. This research finds that people using shooting ranges can record blood-lead levels as high as 40 micrograms.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Born to love superheroesA new study demonstrates that human infants recognize heroic acts from early stages of development, suggesting that our sense of justice -- and likewise, adoration for heroes -- is innate. The scientists see this as explaining why kids and adults alike have a never-ending love affair with superhero stories in popular culture.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut microbe may improve fatty liverOral administration of a commensal gut microbe, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, improves fatty liver in mice. F. prausnitzii is considered one of the most important bacterial indicators of a healthy gut. It has been shown to reduce inflammatory diseases in mice but its effects on liver have never before been studied.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Raccoon dog represents a more acute risk than raccoon as vector for transmission of local parasitesThe raccoon and the raccoon dog are two non-indigenous animal species that have become established in Europe in the past decades. Their increasing abundance has not only made them the most common carnivore species in some countries, but has also made them of interest to parasitologists as potential hosts for diseases. A team of researchers has now analyzed samples from both species in Austria. The
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Administration of steroid to extremely preterm infants not associated with adverse effects on neurodevelopmentThe administration of low-dose hydrocortisone to extremely preterm infants was not associated with any adverse effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years of age, according to a study.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach developed by humanists and scientists maps evolution of literatureA classicist, biologist and computer scientist all walk into a room—what comes next isn't the punchline but a new method to analyze relationships among ancient Latin and Greek texts, developed in part by researchers from The University of Texas at Austin.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hospitality industry should standardize safety, improve perceptions of sophisticationIn recent years, "experience-based" hospitality companies, such as Airbnb, have experienced a meteoric rise in revenue and new customers. Experience-based hospitality companies allow travelers to book homes and apartments rather than hotels, currently is the second-most profitable hospitality brand, only trailing Hilton Hotels and Resorts. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found signifi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's new spectrometer to help future crews cope with cosmic radiationOne of the main health concerns of living and working in space is the long-term exposure to high levels of radiation. NASA scientists have developed a new device to monitor radiation exposure to neutrons and are testing it on the International Space Station.
1h
Ars Technica

Report: Google plotting a Google Home/Google Wifi combo device Enlarge / Google Home + Google Wi-Fi = Whatever this new product is. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Google's home strategy is a little conflicted right now. Aside from the TV-focused Chromecast, Google's strategy revolves around Google Home , a Google Assistant voice appliance and speaker, and Google Wifi , a mesh Wi-Fi router. Google's sales pitch for these two devices is pretty similar: multiple Google H
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cognitive science

What it means to do cognitive science research submitted by /u/quartzyteam [link] [comments]
1h
The Atlantic

The Karmic Universe of Better Call Saul It has always seemed likely that Better Call Saul ’s tale of the well-meaning lawyer Jimmy McGill turning into the criminal accomplice Saul Goodman would parallel Walter White's transformation on Breaking Bad . But so far, AMC’s spinoff series has focused less on big, bloody dilemmas of the kind White faced than on small, almost banal decisions Jimmy makes between honesty and loyalty, honesty and
1h
The Atlantic

An Uncomfortably Familiar Problem for a Trump Nominee Federal judge Neil Gorsuch allegedly copied text and language from several sources without proper attribution in two of his written works, throwing an 11th-hour curveball into the Senate confirmation process for President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. BuzzFeed first published excerpts of Gorsuch’s 2006 book on euthanasia Tuesday night that showed strong similarities between his writing and a 198
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Gizmodo

MST3K's New Villain Felicia Day Explains How a Simple Act of Evil Got Her the Role Felicia Day as Kinga Forrester and Patton Oswalt as TV’s Son of TV’s Frank. Image: Netflix. Felicia Day was famously mistreated by Dr. Horrible, but now the lab coat is on the other back. As Kinga Forrester, the new Mad tormenting Jonah and the ‘Bots on the upcoming Mystery Science Theater 3000 , it’s her turn to be evil—and not just on-screen. Here, Day relates her serious bad movie cred and exp
1h
WIRED

Building an AI Chip Saved Google From Building a Dozen New Data Centers Google has detailed its TPU---and the tremendous savings that came with it. The post Building an AI Chip Saved Google From Building a Dozen New Data Centers appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Taser stuns law enforcement world, offers free body cameras to all US police Enlarge / A body camera from Taser is seen during a press conference at City Hall September 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. (credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / Getty Images News ) Taser, the company whose electronic stun guns have become a household name, is now offering a groundbreaking deal to all American law enforcement: free body cameras and a year’s worth of access to the company’s cloud storage serv
1h
Futurity.org

Anti-alcohol program could make fighting HIV cheaper Scaling up an anti-alcohol program to combat HIV in Kenya could make that effort cheaper, say researchers. Alcohol may be a factor in more than 13 percent of deaths from infectious diseases, including HIV. Experts say drinking undermines the fight against the virus in two main ways: it makes transmission through risky sex more likely and undermines health by relaxing the rigor with which infected
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach developed by humanists and scientists maps evolution of literatureA classicist, biologist and computer scientist all walk into a room -- what comes next isn't the punchline but a new method to analyze relationships among ancient Latin and Greek texts, developed in part by researchers from The University of Texas at Austin.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experience-based hospitality should standardize safety to continue successUniversity of Missouri researchers have found significant differences in how men and women view the experience-based hospitality industry, and the findings could help the young industry continue to grow.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The redomestication of wolvesOn landscapes around the world, environmental change is bringing people and large carnivores together—but the union is not without its problems. Human-wildlife conflict is on the rise as development continues unabated and apex predators begin to reoccupy their former ranges. Further complicating matters, many of these species are now reliant on anthropogenic, or human, foods, including livestock,
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Quantum Computing Now Has a Powerful Search ToolQuantum search algorithms could change the face of computing now that physicists have shown how to execute them on a scalable device.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How insulin-producing cells show their ageThis research opens up an entirely new set of questions about the development of type 2 diabetes. Scientists show that known diversity in beta cells may be driven by differently aged beta cell populations within the pancreas.They also demonstrate that the aging of beta cells, with associated losses of their insulin secretion, can be accelerated by insulin resistance.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nitrogen, phosphorus from fertilizers and pet waste polluting urban waterNew research points to lawn fertilizers and pet waste as the dominant sources of nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants in seven sub-watersheds of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-harm linked to violence towards othersThere is a link between self-harm and the risk of violent criminality, according to new research.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes key to killer bee's successResearchers have sequenced the genomes of Africanized bees that have invaded large parts of the world to find out what makes them so extraordinarily successful. One particular region in the genome caught the researchers' attention and the genes found there could be part of the explanation for the aggressive advances of these hybrid bees.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon nanotubes self-assemble into tiny transistorsCarbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, but they are difficult to handle. Scientists have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potentially explosive methane gas mobile in groundwater, poses safety risk: U of G studyPotentially explosive methane gas leaking from energy wells may travel extensively through groundwater and pose a safety risk, according to a new study. It will also escape into the atmosphere as a powerful greenhouse gas.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studying the brain's suspension system in TBIsTraumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious. New research takes a closer at this 'suspension system' and the insight it could provide to prevent TBI.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When industrial robots overheat: Continuous fitness check predicts potential machine faultsIt keeps a constant eye on the condition of the machine, it carries out diagnostic analyses and it notifies the operator when a part needs to be replaced. The research team has developed an early warning system for industrial assembly, handling and packaging processes. Intelligent sensors continuously collect a wide array of measurement data from inside plant machinery and compare the signal patte
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Participation in a weight management program reduces job absenteeismIndividuals with obesity who enrolled in a structured weight loss program report fewer hours missed from work after six months in the program, according to a study being presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proton beam power boosted with pulsed lasers, promising better proton therapiesScientists have demonstrated multiple sharp, ultra-short laser pulses that promise new types of proton-beam systems potentially useful in areas such as cancer treatment. By combining the pulses to effectively create longer pulses, high-energy charged particles can be produced at laser intensities 100 times less than predicted by previous theoretical models. These findings provide insights into con
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Platelets instead of quantum dotsA model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation has been created by a team of scientists. Using pyrite, they also managed to confirm their theory.
1h
Live Science

Movie Villains Often Have Skin Diseases: Why Docs Are UpsetSome dermatologists are taking issue with Hollywood's tendency to depict villains with distinctive skin features.
1h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

This Last Alaskan Is Heading Home #LastAlaskans | Wednesdays at 10/9c After a health scare forced him to spend several months in the lower 48, Bob Harte prepares to return home to his cabin. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/the-last-alaskans/ More Alaskans! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-last-alaskans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: htt
1h
The Atlantic

How the GOP Could Use Science’s Reform Movement Against It Over the past decade, scientists have been wrestling with the possibility that many published findings may not actually be true. The worry is that poorly designed studies, intense pressures to publish eye-catching results , and—more rarely—misconduct, have led to a “reproducibility crisis.” In a survey of 1,500 researchers , conducted last year by the leading journal Nature , 90 percent agreed th
1h
The Atlantic

Advertisers Are Ditching Bill O’Reilly Over Harassment Allegations In a recurring segment on his show, The O’Reilly Factor , Bill O’Reilly likes to take on an “Unresolved Problem,” something he judges the media and national conversation at large to have glossed over without a close enough look. Now O’Reilly and his network are facing an unresolved problem of their own, in the wake of the publication of a New York Times investigation that found that he and his em
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

First study finds neonic pesticides in US drinking waterScientists in the US find traces of the most widely used insecticides in tap water for the first time.
1h
Ars Technica

Flattr micropayment service gets acquired by Adblock Plus Flattr co-founder Peter Sunde at a conference in 2011. (credit: SHARE Conference ) Eyeo, the parent company of Adblock Plus, has acquired the micropayment company Flattr, following a year-long collaboration period . "We share almost identical values of making the Internet safe and fair for everyone," said Flattr cofounder Peter Sunde in a press release about the acquisition . "We’re excited to co
1h
Popular Science

Why NASA is going to vaporize one of its best spacecraft Space Cassini's "grand finale" begins April 23 The Cassini spacecraft will meet a very violent end—but for a good reason. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Board Games, Star Wars, $18 Bidet, and More A huge Amazon board game sale , Star Wars trilogies , and a $4 keychain multitool lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals 5,000mAh Kmashi Battery Pack , $6 with code I3VWAP3L | 10,000mAh , $9 with code USNL22D5 | 15,000mAh , $13 with code BY6YG3UB These KMASHI battery packs don’t include fancy features like Quick Charge t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK court rules in ground-breaking tech patent caseBritain's High Court has ruled that it can decide what mobile phone makers should pay to use patented technology that is essential to make mobile networks function.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paving the way for the redefinition of the unit of temperatureAt present, the kelvin is literally based on no more than water—on the triple point of water, to be more precise. The base unit of temperature is therefore dependent on a material whose properties may vary. But this is about to change: In the fall of 2018, the kelvin, as well as all the other units of the International System of Units (SI), will be redefined to rest on a solid and invariable found
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Ars Technica

Liberal and conservative book buyers like different kinds of science (credit: Photograph by CCAC North Library ) Though science is supposed to be about objective interpretations, science often finds itself at the heart of political debates. The intermingling of political and scientific beliefs leads to a pretty obvious question: does political affiliation inform consumption of science, or does consumption of science inform political leanings? A recent paper publis
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Gizmodo

Here Are All the Jobs the Patent Office Can't Fill Because of Trump's Stupid Hiring Freeze President Trump groans in unspeakable pleasure thinking about all the jobs he’s destroying in government in a photo from March 30, 2017 (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Donald Trump would like to be known as the Jobs President. But one of his first actions after taking office was to institute a federal hiring freeze. That means thousands of jobs are being left vacant indefinitely until th
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Ingeniøren

Venstre: Et »alvorligt svigt« fra BanedanmarkBanedanmark har ikke oplyst Folketinget tilstrækkeligt om risikoen ved den storstilede udskiftning af landets togsignaler, som nu er ramt af forsinkelser og fordyrelser, siger Venstres Kristian Pihl Lorentzen. Han er den seneste af en række politikere fra forligskredsen bag projektet, der kritise...
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Addressing addictionsA new study by Queen's University researcher Susan Brogly has revealed that 25 percent of women suffering from a prenatal opioid dependence were not being treated for their addiction. Using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, the study also shows rising numbers of affected mother-infant pairs and associated health care costs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ready for the new kelvin!Scientists from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have determined the Boltzmann constant by means of a dielectric-constant gas thermometer with such accuracy that all obstacles to the redefinition of the unit of temperature, the kelvin, have been removed. The results have been published in the current edition of the specialist journal Metrologia.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impostor feelings fuel negative mental health outcomes for minority students, studyWhile perceived discrimination on college campuses compromises the self-esteem, well-being and mental health of ethnic minority students, new psychology research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests the impostor phenomenon may worsen these effects.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New function discovered for compound that may help slow agingResearchers have found that a compound called rapamycin has unusual properties that may help address neurologic damage such as Alzheimer's disease, and reduce the cellular senescence associated with aging.
1h
Popular Science

The best Chromebook add-ons and tricks DIY Make the most of your Google-powered laptop Learn how to use your Chromebook offline, unlock it with your smartphone, safely share it with others, install Android apps, and more.
1h
Viden

Pensionist har løst et af verdens sværeste matematiske problemer
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Live Science

Iron Man-Style Exosuit Turns Inventor into Real-Life SuperheroResidents of the quiet town of Salisbury, in the south of England, had no clue until last week that their neighbor, a 38-year-old oil trader named Richard Browning, is a real-life Iron Man in the making.
1h
Ars Technica

Getting antibiotics as a baby may have lasting effects on brain, behavior Enlarge (credit: Getty | VOISIN ) Banishing bacteria from the body with antibiotics around birth may cause haywire signals in the brain and lasting behavioral changes, a series of studies suggests. In the latest study, involving only mice, researchers found that low doses of penicillin given to pups before and after birth spurred changes in their blood-brain barrier and brain chemistry. The mice
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Futurity.org

Female entrepreneurs feel pressure to act ‘feminine’ online Female entrepreneurs report feeling pressure to conduct business online in a traditionally feminine way, a new study suggests. This includes maintaining social media personas that display modesty, sociality, and “an aura of decorum”—the same restrictions that often apply to women in off-line business settings. “I doubt workers—male or female—in traditionally masculine-coded industries such as sci
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Cross Section: Lawrence Krauss - Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis asks theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and science communicator Professor Lawrence Krauss about the secrets of the universe
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Science | The Guardian

Cross Section: Lawrence Krauss - Science Weekly podcast Nicola Davis asks theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and science communicator Professor Lawrence Krauss about the secrets of the universe Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Why is there something rather than nothing? How did life begin? And what are the secrets of our universe? These are just a handful of the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish study shows important genome interactions in animal cellsIn a new study, researchers examined how the interaction of two genomes in animal cells -- the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes -- interact to affect adaptation of the Atlantic killifish to different temperatures. They showed that although these genomes are separate physical entities, the mitochondrial genome affects the evolution of the nuclear genome, the genetic material responsible for variat
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Futurity.org

Liberals and conservatives read different science books Our preferences for liberal or conservative political books also attract us to different types of science books, according to a new study. The result supports observations that the divisiveness of politics in the United States has spread to scientific communication as well. While readers on the political left and right exhibited shared level of interest in science books, an analysis led by the Un
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This Week from AGU: Weak solar activity could expose aircrews to higher radiationImpending weak solar activity could expose aircrews to higher radiation levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovering how insulin-producing cells show their ageThis research opens up an entirely new set of questions about the development of type 2 diabetes. Joslin Diabetes Center scientists show that known diversity in beta cells may be driven by differently aged beta cell populations within the pancreas.They also demonstrate that the aging of beta cells, with associated losses of their insulin secretion, can be accelerated by insulin resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-harm linked to violence towards othersThere is a link between self-harm and the risk of violent criminality, according to a Swedish registry study carried out by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and published in the scientific journal JAMA Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What are common dermatologic features of classic movie villains?Dermatologic features are used in movies to contrast good and evil in heroes and villains. So what features are common?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insurance expansion associated with increase in surgical treatment of thyroid cancerThe 2006 Massachusetts health reform, a model for the Affordable Care Act, was associated with significant increases in surgical intervention for thyroid cancer, specifically among nonwhite populations, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monthly high-dose vitamin D supplementation does not prevent cardiovascular diseaseResults of a large randomized trial indicate that monthly high-dose vitamin D supplementation does not prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany launches new military unit to combat cyberattacksGermany has launched a new military unit dedicated to thwarting cyberattacks and responding if necessary.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dead humpback whale washes up on NYC beachMarine biologists will try to determine what killed a humpback whale whose carcass has washed up on a New York City beach.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Are Electric Airplanes Finally About to Take Off?New startups want to reduce emissions and noise by electrifying aircraft, but better batteries remain a stumbling block.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canadian accused in Yahoo hack has bail hearingThe lawyer for a Canadian man accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails said Wednesday he has taken steps to ensure his client won't flee if he's released on bail.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First world survey finds 9,600 tree species risk extinctionThe first ever global database of trees on Wednesday revealed that 9,600 tree species are threatened with extinction and identified a total of 60,065 in existence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: What makes for effective partnerships with Indigenous nations on the environment?Protecting the environment often draws on a collaboration between community members, non-government organizations, academia, and, local, state and federal agencies. Indigenous nations however, are often invited to participate in an initiative after it has already begun to take shape. Indigenous partners are most likely to remain engaged in multi-actor collaborations when they are viewed as equal p
2h
WIRED

Airbus Plans to Stuff 80 More People Into Its Biggest Jet The good news? Airlines may not be interested. The post Airbus Plans to Stuff 80 More People Into Its Biggest Jet appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

This Super-Retro Case Makes Your iPhone Look Like a Vintage Mac Just in case you wondered what the iPhone would have looked like in 1984. The post This Super-Retro Case Makes Your iPhone Look Like a Vintage Mac appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

Big screen baddies and their skin conditions unpicked by dermatologists Film villains are often depicted with all manner of skin traits - and the association is damaging, say researchers Bulbous noses, warts and dark circles under the eyes are among the skin conditions commonly used by filmmakers to indicate villains, researchers have found. A study by a team of US dermatologists has highlighted that while heroes of the silver screen typically have barely a mark on t
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NYT > Science

Life on Mars: Get to Know the CrewSix people are living in isolation for eight months on a volcano in Hawaii as part of a study to simulate human exploration of Mars. In the second episode of this 360-video series, we find out how they are settling in — and how they clean the toilet.
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Gizmodo

Michael Bay Says There Are 14 Transformers Movies Already Written and My Eyes Are Not Ready Image: Paramount At CinemaCon last week, Michael Bay was asked if he was actually going to be leaving the Transformers franchise this time. He not only said that he’d like to do one more, but that there were already 14 stories ready to go in that universe. Speaking with MTV’s Josh Horowitz , Bay answered the question about whether or not he was leaving by waffling a bit. He then said that there w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clientsWhen advising on animal health and welfare, veterinarians often struggle to engage with the motivational needs of their clients. New research has shown a change is needed in how veterinarians communicate with and advise animal owners, to promote engagement with their advice and protect the animals in their care.
2h
TEDTalks (video)

The conversation we're not having about digital child abuse | Sebastián BortnikWe need to talk to kids about the risks they face online, says information security expert Sebastián Bortnik. In this talk, Bortnik discusses the issue of "grooming" -- the sexual predation of children by adults on the internet -- and outlines the conversations we need to start having about technology to keep our kids safe. (In Spanish with English subtitles)
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Ars Technica

How do you deal with CS:GO gambling? Legitimize it Enlarge Over the past year, the once underground phenomenon of betting on e-sports hit the mainstream. Valve—developer of the first-person shooter Counter-Strike: Global Offensive , one of the biggest games in e-sports—found itself on the receiving end of angry parents, civil lawsuits , and government intervention that accused it of facilitating unregulated third-party gambling websites. It didn'
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Ars Technica

LG G6 review: LG’s “personal best” still can’t compare to Samsung SPECS AT A GLANCE: LG G6 SCREEN 2880×1440 5.7" (564ppi) IPS LCD OS Android 7.0 CPU Quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 (two 2.35GHz Kryo cores and two 1.6 GHz Kryo cores) RAM 4GB GPU Adreno 530 STORAGE 32GB NETWORKING 802.11b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.2, GPS, NFC PORTS USB 3.1 Type-C, 3.5mm headphone jack CAMERA Dual 13MP rear cameras, 5MP front camera SIZE 148.9 x 71.9 x 7.9 mm (5.86 x 2.83 x 0.31 in) W
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Spiderman' worm-snails discovered on Florida shipwreckWhat's brightly colored, lives on shipwrecks, filter-feeds like a whale, and shoots webs like Spiderman? If you can't readily come up with an answer, that's okay: until now, such animals weren't known to science. But as of today, scientists have announced the discovery of a new species of snail that ticks all those boxes. According to its discoverer, the snail shows "amazing adaptations and are ki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research links decline in hemlock forests to changes in water resourcesAn insect infestation that is killing hemlock trees in New England forests is having a significant impact on the water resources of forested ecosystems that provide essential water supplies to one of the nation's most populous regions, according to research by Indiana University geographers and colleagues at three universities in Massachusetts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potentially explosive methane gas mobile in groundwater, poses safety risk: studyPotentially explosive methane gas leaking from energy wells may travel extensively through groundwater and pose a safety risk, according to a new study by University of Guelph researchers.
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Popular Science

Death by banana peel? Black hole? The science behind your most absurd nightmares. Health A new book investigates the lighter side of death Is there any real science behind imaginary (and imaginative) deaths? Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: What makes for effective partnerships with Indigenous nations on the environment?Protecting the environment often draws on a collaboration between community members, NGOs, academia, and, local, state and federal agencies. Indigenous partners are most likely to remain engaged in multi-actor collaborations when they are viewed as equal partners, when non-Indigenous actors have taken the time to understand their relationship to the environment and how they view the world, accordi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children at risk of diabetes should be screened by HbA1C, oral glucose tolerance testsDoctors should add an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to their hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) when they screen high-risk children for prediabetes and diabetes, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D deficiency may indicate cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese childrenIn overweight and obese children and adolescents, vitamin D deficiency is associated with early markers of cardiovascular disease, a new study reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel method for the fabrication of active-matrix 3-D pressure sensorsA recent study, affiliated with UNIST has created a three-dimensional, tactile sensor that could detect wide pressure ranges from human body weight to a finger touch. This new sensor with transparent features is capable of generating an electrical signal based on the sensed touch actions, also, consumes far less electricity than conventional pressure sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No sugar coating, but sweet nonethelessComplex neurotechnological devices are required to directly select and influence brain waves inside the skull's interior. Although it has become relatively easy to implement the devices, researchers are still faced with challenges when trying to keep them running properly in living organisms over time. But that could be changing now, thanks to a new method from Freiburg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whiteflies provide insight into stabilizing manmade drones during takeoffWhen whiteflies take off, they don't just spread their wings and fly. Just .03 of an inch long, these tiny insects possess a variety of sophisticated techniques that provide them with exceptional stability in the air. Tel Aviv University researchers now say that they may hold the secret to stabilizing the take-off of small robotic manmade flyers such as miniaturized drones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neonicotinoids detected in drinking water in agricultural areaConcern over the use of neonicotinoid pesticides is growing as studies find them in rivers and streams, and link them with declining bee populations and health effects in other animals. Now researchers report that in some areas, drinking water also contains the substances—but they also have found that one treatment method can remove most of the pesticides. The study, conducted in Iowa, appears in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon nanotubes self-assemble into tiny transistorsCarbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, but they are difficult to handle. University of Groningen scientists, together with colleagues from the University of Wuppertal and IBM Zurich, have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes. The results were published in the journal Advanced M
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The Atlantic

Avenging a One-Star Review With Digital Sabotage On Saturday, an unhappy customer vented online about an internet-connected garage-door opener he’d bought on Amazon. It was the sort of short, unremarkable comment that’s left thousands upon thousands of times a day by disgruntled shoppers who can’t get the gizmos they just brought home to work. The device, Garadget , connects to existing garage-door hardware. It lets users remotely open and clos
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Live Science

Chemical Attack in Syria: What's the Science Behind Nerve Agents?Nearly 60 people, including 11 children, died during a chemical attack in Syria's northern Idlib province yesterday (April 4), according to news sources. The deadly gas has yet to be identified, but experts suspect it's a type of nerve agent.
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Ars Technica

North Korea tests missile in what may be step toward mobile ICBM Enlarge / North Korean images of a Pukguksong-2 missile launch in February. Another test of the improved solid-fueled missile was conducted this morning. Wednesday morning, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea successfully launched what the US Pacific Command has identified as a KN-15 medium-range ballistic missile—a solid-fuel rocket based on enhancements to the submarine-launched “Pukgukso
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predicting the limits of friction: Team looks at properties of materialNormally, bare metal sliding against bare metal is not a good thing. Friction will destroy pistons in an engine, for example, without lubrication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

73% of academics say access to research data helps them in their work; 34% do not publish their dataCombining results from bibliometric analyses, a global sample of researcher opinions and case-study interviews, a new report reveals that although the benefits of open research data are well known, in practice, confusion remains within the researcher community around when and how to share research data.
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Gizmodo

Dude Turns His Weird Cat's Meow Into a Sick Electro Track “Cat music” is a funny YouTube search , filled with lullabies for kittens and clips of cats singing. But what happens when you take a cat’s meow, cut it up, and turn it into a club banger? Great things, my friend. Great things. YouTube team Fred V & Grafix did just that in a new video involving the tortured meows of a long-nosed Siamese and some music production software. In just two minutes, you
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Futurity.org

This drug-testing device has a vagina, cervix, and uterus Scientists have built a miniature female reproductive tract using human tissue. They want to use it to screen new drugs for women. The ultimate goal is to use stem cells to create personalized models of a patient’s reproductive system. “This will help us develop individualized treatments and see how females may metabolize drugs differently from males,” says lead investigator Teresa Woodruff, a re
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Latest Headlines | Science News

If there are curious young minds, science will surviveActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the unending search for scientific knowledge.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Readers question mental health researchMaintaining mental health, protecting ocean critters and more in reader feedback.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nitrogen, phosphorus from fertilizers and pet waste polluting urban waterNew research from the University of Minnesota points to lawn fertilizers and pet waste as the dominant sources of nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants in seven sub-watersheds of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weak grip a strong predictor of metabolic disease and disability in adultsA simple test to determine a person's grip strength may be a predictor of developing metabolic disorders in middle or older age, a new cross-continental study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists engineer sugarcane to produce biodiesel, more sugar for ethanolA multi-institutional team has proven sugarcane can be genetically engineered to produce oil in its leaves and stems for biodiesel production. Surprisingly, the modified sugarcane plants also produced more sugar, which could be used for ethanol production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drugs widely used in cancer therapy increase toxicity of chemotherapy in miceA short-term fast appears to counteract increases in blood sugar caused by common cancer drugs and protect healthy cells in mice from becoming too vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to new research.
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Popular Science

Here's what it's like to get thrown into a volcano Entertainment Book excerpt: And then you're dead Let’s say you were pitched into a volcano. Your first question: Will you sink or float? Read on:…
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Science | The Guardian

Perimeter Lecture: how to bake Pi - making abstract mathematics palatable The relationship between physics and maths is deep and satisfying, even before cake gets involved, as Eugenia Cheng will demonstrate - with edible examples The power of mathematics to help us understand the natural world is remarkable. Physical laws and principles are very often expressed as mathematical equations. Practically, they allow us to predict real events and develop sophisticated techno
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Brazilian budget woes, negative results and botany in the digital era The week in science: 31 March–6 April 2017. Nature 544 10 doi: 10.1038/544010a
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The Atlantic

The Quiet Death of an Anti-Apartheid Hero Uncle Kathy was the quiet one. In movies and TV shows depicting South Africa’s apartheid struggle, he stood in the shadows of A-listers like Nelson Mandela or Govan Mbeki, ready to offer a chunk of expository dialogue or a well-timed joke. Ahmed Mohamed “Uncle Kathy” Kathrada was, according to these reenactments, a background figure, a gnomic Leatherman tool employed by writers, and occasionally
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Born to love superheroes: Japanese research into the roots of justice may contain hints for solving social illsWe recognize justice before we can talk, reports a research team in Nature Human Behaviour.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reconstruct space history with ancient textsIce cores and ancient sediments can be gleaned for clues to weather and climate in the past. But astronomical phenomena—such as solar flares or auroras—at best leave only faint environmental traces lacking in specificity. So how can we accurately track ancient astronomical events?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Earth's CO2 Could Spike to a Level Not Seen Since the DinosaursScientists are still trying to figure out what that might mean for life on Earth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Adam Wainwright Threw One Of The Worst Pitches Ever On Purpose | Jezebel Sofia Vergara’s Ex Deadspin Adam Wainwright Threw One Of The Worst Pitches Ever On Purpose | Jezebel Sofia Vergara’s Ex Called Her ‘Rude’ and ‘Classless’ For Speaking Spanish in Front of Him | The Root New Recording Reveals North Miami Cop Knew There Was No Gun When He Shot Unarmed Therapist | Fusion The Twitter Jokes About Kendall Jenner’s Insanely Awful Pepsi Ad Have Been Very, Very Good |
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clientsWhen advising on animal health and welfare, veterinarians often struggle to engage with the motivational needs of their clients. New research has shown a change is needed in how veterinarians communicate with and advise animal owners, to promote engagement with their advice and protect the animals in their care.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potentially explosive methane gas mobile in groundwater, poses safety risk: U of G studyPotentially explosive methane gas leaking from energy wells may travel extensively through groundwater and pose a safety risk, according to a new study by University of Guelph researchers. It will also escape into the atmosphere as a powerful greenhouse gas.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

House fly mortality by artificial sweetener: Starvation, not toxicityWhile recent headlines have noted the potential insecticidal properties of common artificial sweeteners, don't go sprinkling Truvia around your home just yet. A new study on house flies suggests insects likely aren't poisoned by sweeteners -- they just die of malnutrition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computation scientists find social norms required for the transition to cooperative societiesWhat role the diversity of social norms can play in the process of evolving cooperation by means of evolutionary computation methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to hack a cellA new study outlines a new simplified platform to target and program mammalian cells as genetic circuits, even complex ones, more quickly and efficiently.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Renewable energy needed to drive uptake of electric vehiclesPlugging into renewable energy sources outweighs the cost and short driving ranges for consumers intending to buy electric vehicles, according to a new study. In a new article, experts say that environmental performance -- or being green -- was more important than price or range confidence for electric vehicle consumers.
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Gizmodo

Stop Flushing Your Money Away On Excess Toilet Paper: This Bidet Is Only $18 Oak Leaf Mechanical Bidet , $18 with code MFK5GPE5 A lot of people are reflexively appalled by the idea of a bidet, which makes no sense, because they’re amazing . Today on Amazon, you can score one from Oak Leaf for $18 with promo code MFK5GPE5, one of the best prices we’ve ever seen on one of these. That’s basically nothing for a product you’ll use (hopefully) every day, but this deal could sel
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Gizmodo

Watch How a Beloved Spacecraft Will Die in Saturn's Atmosphere Image: NASA/George Dvorsky As if we already weren’t sad enough about Cassini’s imminent demise, NASA has now created a video so that we can watch what the spacecraft’s final moments will look like when it smashes into Saturn’s atmosphere on September 15th. Over the last 13 years , NASA’s Cassini orbiter has conducted some of the most important science around Saturn and its moons. The images and i
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Gizmodo

Motorola's Terrible 'Rap Video' Is a Great Reminder of Its Irrelevance Forty-four years ago this week, Motorola placed the first phone call from a mobile phone. That’s a genuinely big moment, and as someone who is glued to my smartphone for at least 18 hours a day, I’m very glad that happened. Unfortunately, Motorola decided to use that moment as a “hook” for a very bad Hamilton-esque video spot, bragging on about the company’s history. And just as Hamilton-homages
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NYT > Science

Economic Scene: To Curb Global Warming, Science Fiction May Become FactGeoengineering, providing methods to offset climate change by applying scientific fixes rather than changing old habits, may have found its moment.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Tiny Detection Chip Could Find Methane Leaks AutonomouslyIBM will soon field-test technology that sees methane leaking from oil and gas well pads -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Launch of high-tech telescope construction to explore the mysteries of the universeAmerican, German, and Canadian scientists are planning to explore the formation of stars and galaxies as well as the mysteries of the universe's beginnings with an entirely new kind of telescope. The launch of construction work on the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT-prime) is scheduled for this year. It is named after its location, a 5,612 meter-high mountain in the Chilean Atacama Desert
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Ingeniøren

Jyske fjernvarmekunder betaler regningen for afgiftsændringerFjernvarmekunder i Aalborg og Trekantsområdet skal betale henholdsvis 350 kr. og 560 kr. mere om året for varme. Fjernvarmeselskaber vil nemlig miste en hidtidig afgiftsfritagelse, hvis en række ændringer af afgiften på overskudsvarme vedtages.
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Ingeniøren

Russiske hackere har lænset adskillige hæveautomater med et metalbor og billig hardware Pludselig sprøjtede 5,5 mio. kr. ud af 8 hæveautomater på en enkelt nat https://www.version2.dk/artikel/pludselig-sproejtede-55-mio-kr-ud-8-haeveautomater-paa-enkelt-nat-1075299 Version2
3h
WIRED

Tech Firms Striving For Diversity Fixate On The Wrong Metric Opinion: To fix its diversity problem, Silicon Valley companies need to start analyzing statistics for individual teams. The post Tech Firms Striving For Diversity Fixate On The Wrong Metric appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

That Cool Dialect on The Expanse Mashes Up 6 Languages Belter is more than an accent. It's full-fledged language that speaks to outsiderness. The post That Cool Dialect on The Expanse Mashes Up 6 Languages appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts debate the advantages of using stem cells for predictive toxicology screeningAn esteemed panel of scientists and clinicians with expertise in developmental biology and toxicology examined the potential benefits and current limitations of using stem cell-based tissue and organ models to screen for the toxicity of chemicals and drugs in the laboratory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whiteflies provide insight into stabilizing manmade drones during takeoffTel Aviv University research explores how the whitefly, a tiny insect, successfully takes off without flapping its wings. This may hold the secret to stabilizing the take-off of small robotic manmade flyers such as miniaturized drones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biological age-predicting 'epigenetic clock' for studying how to extend lifespanIn order to measure and test the effects of interventions in the lab, BWH investigators have developed an age-predicting clock designed for studies in mice. The new clock accurately predicts mouse biological age and the effects of genetic and dietary factors, giving the scientific community a new tool to better understand aging and test new interventions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are biobank donor families worried about a confidentiality breach?A new study examines how well families that donate tissue to a biobank -- or decide not to donate -- understand the risk and implications of a potential confidentiality breach.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

73 percent of academics say access to research data helps them in their work; 34 percent do not publish their dataCombining results from bibliometric analyses, a global sample of researcher opinions and case-study interviews, a new report reveals that although the benefits of open research data are well known, in practice, confusion remains within the researcher community around when and how to share research data.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No sugar coating, but sweet nonethelessFirst long-term stabile brain implant developed based on an anti-inflammatory coating.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technology could offer cheaper, faster food testingMIT researchers have come up with a new way to test food for bacterial contamination. The test is based on a novel type of liquid droplet that can bind to bacterial proteins. This interaction, which can be detected either by the naked eye or with a smartphone, could offer a much faster and cheaper alternative to existing food safety tests.
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Gizmodo

This Plane With KFC Buckets for Wings Flies Remarkably Well In the land of no wings, the KFC bucket is king. That’s the theory YouTube supergeek Peter Sripol set out to prove recently by building an RC plane with nothing but greasy KFC buckets for wings. And guess what: it worked. You’re probably thinking that a bucket-winged airplane that can actually fly is some sort of tardy April Fool’s joke. However, there’s sound science that explains how cylinders
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we should tax meat that contains antibioticsThe use of antibiotics in meat production is a major contributor to one of the biggest threats facing human health in the 21st century: antibiotic resistance. Finding a solution to this requires us to start taking responsibility for our actions. While one person eating meat has an imperceptible effect on antibiotic resistance, multiply that by millions of people around the world and you have a glo
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Deal with News OverloadThis week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen explains what news overload is doing to us and how to take control. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eagles migrate through bad weather to arrive in time to nestMigration is tough, and birds do everything they can to optimize it. How do factors like weather and experience affect the strategies they choose? A new study shows that older, more experienced Golden Eagles actually migrate in poorer weather conditions and cover less ground than their younger counterparts, but for a good reason -- they're timing their efforts around raising the next generation of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Spiderman' worm-snails discovered on Florida shipwreckScientists have discovered a new species of worm-snail on a shipwreck in the Florida Keys. The new species, which is colorful and shoots mucus webs to trap food, is likely an invasive species from the Indo-Pacific and could have important coral reef conservation implications.
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Futurity.org

Most Americans want big warning labels on cigarettes A majority of US smokers and nonsmokers who responded to a randomized telephone survey say they support increasing the size of warning labels to cover 25 percent, 50 percent, and as much as 75 percent of cigarette packs. “These findings show there is national public support for implementing larger pack warnings in the United States,” says Adam Goldstein, professor in the UNC School of Medicine De
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Big Think

The Cliché Question That, When Asked, Improves Kids' Well Being “What do you want to be when you grow up?” is one of those cliché questions that adults ask automatically. It turns out that the answer may reveal a lot about an adolescent’s health. Read More
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Gizmodo

These Self-Learning Robot Arms Teach Each Other How to Pick Up Unfamiliar Objects GIF: YouTube It’s all but certain that human workers in factories and fulfillment centers are a dying breed. The last nail in their coffin might be a new robotic arm from a company called RightHand Robotics that’s not only able to teach itself how to pick up objects it’s never handled before, but it can also share what it learns with other robot arms around the world. One of the biggest challenge
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New on MIT Technology Review

Pokémon Go’s Legacy, Salad-Making Robots, and Electric Airplanes—The Download, April 5, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate-driven species on the move are changing (almost) everythingLast year in Paris, for the very first time, English sparkling wine beat champagne in a blind tasting event. Well established French Champagne houses have started buying fields in Britain to grow grapes, and even the royal family is investing in this new venture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Czech court to decide on alleged LinkedIn hacker extraditionA Russian man who faces charges in the United States of hacking and stealing information from computers at LinkedIn, Dropbox and other San Francisco Bay Area companies can be extradited either to the United States or Russia, the state prosecution in Prague said on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany threatens online giants with 50 mn euro hate speech finesGermany on Wednesday took the European lead in cracking down against hate speech and fake news, threatening social media giants with fines of up to 50 million euros if they failed to remove offensive posts promptly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can social media connect science and society?Social media is society's favourite platform for sharing, seeking and consuming information – what role is there for the scientific community in this environment?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genes key to killer bee's successIn a new study, researchers from Uppsala University sequenced the genomes of Africanized bees that have invaded large parts of the world to find out what makes them so extraordinarily successful. One particular region in the genome caught the researchers' attention and the genes found there could be part of the explanation for the aggressive advances of these hybrid bees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Isotopes with ocean circulation informationThe distribution of a radioactive thorium isotope is important in multiple aspects of oceanograpy. In his new publication, Yiming Luo has revisited the issue on processes influencing the distribution in the water column.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The missed opportunity of mindfulness for organisational changeA new study has found that mindfulness can be used to achieve successful change in organisations. Cranfield and The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) carried out an in-depth analysis looking beyond the value of mindfulness-based techniques and outcomes for individuals to consider their potential impact at a strategic level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Print your own masterpieces and digital pens—the brave new world of the museumPeople can now access much of Sydney's Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences' extensive collection online. High-resolution images of more than 130,000 objects are available for viewing on a new, mobile-friendly collections website.
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Ingeniøren

Billigere varer i Vesten betyder større dødelighed i ØstenNy forskning viser, at luftforurening ikke kun rammer områder, hvor udledningen sker. Globale luftstrømme sender forureningen rundt om kloden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial: Abiraterone acetate responses even after initial hormone therapy failureResults of a 40-person clinical trial published in JAMA Oncology show that 13 percent of prostate cancer patients deemed 'hormone refractory' did, in fact, have strong responses to treatment with the next-generation hormonal drug abiraterone acetate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sodium citrate spray could temporarily restore sense of smellA substance commonly used to treat bladder issues could temporarily treat people who have lost their sense of smell, according to research published in the journal Clinical Otolaryngology.A study by the University of East Anglia (UEA) with the Smell & Taste clinic at the James Paget University Hospital showed sodium citrate nasal spray could offer temporary improvement in the ability to smell for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New step towards the treatment of myotubular myopathy gene therapy restores strength and prolongs lives in affected dogsA team of researchers in France demonstrated the efficacy of administration of a therapeutic vector by a single intravenous injection and identified the dose that restores long-term muscular strength in a large animal model of the disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon nanotubes self-assemble into tiny transistorsCarbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, but they are difficult to handle. University of Groningen scientists, together with colleagues from the University of Wuppertal and IBM Zurich, have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes. The results were published in the journal Advanced M
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes key to killer bee's successIn a new study, researchers from Uppsala University sequenced the genomes of Africanized bees that have invaded large parts of the world to find out what makes them so extraordinarily successful. One particular region in the genome caught the researchers' attention and the genes found there could be part of the explanation for the aggressive advances of these hybrid bees.
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Ars Technica

Microsoft opens up on Windows telemetry, tells us most of what data it collects (credit: Mike Mozart ) Microsoft has published the full range of data that Windows 10 version 1703, the Creators Update, will collect in its default "basic" telemetry setting. The company has also provided details on the kinds of information that can be captured in the optional "full" telemetry setting. Since it was first released there has been widespread concern about Windows 10's data collecti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neonicotinoids detected in drinking water in agricultural areaConcern over the use of neonicotinoid pesticides is growing as studies find them in rivers and streams, and link them with declining bee populations and health effects in other animals. Now researchers report that in some areas, drinking water also contains the substances -- but they also have found that one treatment method can remove most of the pesticides.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using Instagram can increase adolescents' closeness to friendsAdolescents' use of Instagram actually strengthened the closeness of their friendships, new research has found. However, investigators warn that frequent use can also lead to an increase in depressed moods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North America, study revealsA study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Be more patient? Imagine thatBy using functional MRI (fMRI) to look inside the brain, neuroscientists found that imagination is a pathway toward patience. Imagining an outcome before acting upon an impulse may help increase patience without relying on increased willpower.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-dose penicillin in early life induces long-term changes in behaviorLow-dose penicillin taken late in pregnancy and in early life of mice offspring, changes behavior and the balance of microbes in the gut. While these studies have been performed in mice, they point to popular increasing concerns about the long-term effects of antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neptune's journey during early planet formation was 'smooth and calm'A major discovery has been made on the formation of icy bodies within the Kuiper Belt, unlocking unique evidence that Neptune's movement during early planet formation was a 'smooth and calm' journey.
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Gizmodo

Another Twist in the Saga of Daniel Craig's Bond Future There’s new details about a planet in Star Wars: The Last Jedi . A familiar Dino will return for Jurassic World 2 . Steven Moffat teases a rather unorthodox, yet humongous, Doctor Who spoiler. Iain Glen discusses Jorah’s future on Game of Thrones . Plus, rumors of a returning foe for Jessica Jones season 2. Spoilers now! James Bond 25 After all the will-he-wont-he hubbub of discussion surrounding
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New measurements suggest 'antineutrino anomaly' fueled by modeling errorResults from a new scientific study may shed light on a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called "reactor antineutrino anomaly," which has puzzled physicists since 2011.
3h
The Atlantic

Jeff Sessions's Blind Eye One of the effects of racial segregation is that it fractures reality, so that the daily occurrences of one world can be entirely invisible, even fantastic, to another. When the town of Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in protest during the summer of 2014, in the aftermath of Michael Brown’s shooting at the hands of police officer Darren Wilson, millions of Americans were shocked, both at the ferocity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farmers can profit economically and politically by addressing climate changePresident Trump, congressional Republicans and most American farmers share common positions on climate change: They question the science showing human activity is altering the global climate and are skeptical of using public policy to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Policies believed to stabilize the financial system may actually do the opposite, study finds(Phys.org)—Researchers have found that some of the current financial policies aimed at increasing the stability of financial networks may actually be driving them toward instability. The problem arises because these policies typically focus on the stability of individual banks—but due to the complex nature of networks, what's good for individual banks may not be good for the banking system as a wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watching rust transform into ironUsing a state-of-the-art microscopy technique, experimenters at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have witnessed a slow-motion, atomic-scale transformation of rust—iron oxide—back to pure iron metal, in all of its chemical steps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Focus on kinetics for better drug developmentPotential drugs that seem promising in the lab, but don't show any activity in a person: they cost the industry an incredible amount of time and money. That's why Indira Nederpelt focuses on a more efficient search for new drugs in her PhD, by determining the kinetics of a potential drug earlier on in the drug development process.
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Dagens Medicin

Enhedslisten vil frede Herlev Hospital: »Det er ikke nødvendigt at fyre« Herlev Hospital er allerede nu så presset på pengepungen, at det skal spare i alt 45 mio – en millionbesparelse ledelsen vil tage fra lønbudgettet. Enhedslisten vurderer, at der er penge nok i kassen til at undgå fyringer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ideal for kangaroos -- out of the pouch, but still living at homeYoung kangaroos are more likely to survive in the wild if they spend more time alone with their mothers than among others of their own species. They are also larger and heavier than other young kangaroos of comparable age when they spend more time with their mother, according to the findings of Wendy King of the University of Queensland in Australia, published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecol
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Born to love superheroesA Kyoto-based study appearing in Nature Human Behavior demonstrates that human infants recognize heroic acts from early stages of development, suggesting that our sense of justice -- and likewise, adoration for heroes -- is innate. The scientists see this as explaining why kids and adults alike have a never-ending love affair with superhero stories in popular culture.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists determined the time of extinction of ancient porcupinesA team of specialists that included scientists from Siberia, the Urals, and the University of Arizona, USA, conducted radiocarbon dating of the teeth and bones of ancient porcupines found in the caves of Gorny Altai and the Urals. They established that these thermophilic animals lived in these territories up to 30,000-40,000 years ago and died out with the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithms can exploit human perception in graph designResearchers have recently found an algorithmic approach to automatically improve the design of scatterplots by exploiting models and measures of human perception.'With our new algorithmic method, we can optimize the design of the scatterplot for any data and analysis tasks the user requires,' explains Professor Antti Oulasvirta.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel method for the fabrication of active-matrix 3-D pressure sensorsA new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), developed a transistor-type active-matrix pressure sensor using foldable substrate and air-dielectric layer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Raccoon dog is a more acute risk than raccoon as vector for local parasitesThe increasing abundance of raccoons and raccoon dogs made them of interest to parasitologists as potential hosts for diseases. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now analyzed samples in Austria. The raccoon dog was shown to serve as an additional host for local parasites. It represents a risk as a host of zoonotic parasites, such as the fox tapeworm or trichina worms. The raccoons sampled, as they
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Charting the skies of historyIce cores and ancient sediments can be gleaned for clues to weather and climate in the past. But astronomical phenomena -- such as solar flares or auroras -- at best leave only faint environmental traces lacking in specificity. Now in a collaborative effort between researchers at Kyoto University and Japan's National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and National Institute of Japanese Literature
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish eyes to help understand human inherited blindnessDiscovery of a gene in zebrafish that triggers congenital blindness could lead to a suitable cure for similar disease in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young researchers head to Capitol Hill to advocate for scienceYoung scientists from colleges and universities across the United States will arrive on Capitol Hill on Thursday to talk with senators and representatives about the value of biomedical research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medscape doctor survey shows: Boost in job satisfaction, gender pay gap, race disparitiesAccording to Medscape's Annual Physician Compensation Report, African-American physicians earn 15 percent less than their white colleagues, but are happier than white physicians in their jobs. In addition, the survey reveals that male physicians between ages 55-69 make 27 percent more than women, however, the pay gap shrinks to 18 percent in physicians under age 34.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modeling protein interactions simplified with computer serverProteins are the most abundant substance in living cells aside from water, and their interactions with cellular functions are crucial to healthy life. When proteins fall short of their intended function or interact in an unusual way, these disruptions often lead to disease development. By modeling the structure of protein interactions – a process that has been complicated for researchers for years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With new technology, mathematicians turn numbers into artOnce upon a time, mathematicians imagined their job was to discover new mathematics and then let others explain it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithms can exploit human perception in graph designScatterplots are widely used in various disciplines and areas beyond sciences to visually communicate relationships between two data variables. Yet, very few users realize the effect the visual design of scatterplots can have on the human perception and understanding. Moreover, default designs of scatterplots often represent the data poorly, and manually fine tuning the design is difficult.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raccoon dog represents a more acute risk than raccoon as vector for transmission of local parasitesThe raccoon and the raccoon dog are two non-indigenous animal species that have become established in Europe in the past decades. Their increasing abundance has not only made them the most common carnivore species in some countries, but has also made them of interest to parasitologists as potential hosts for diseases. A team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna has now analysed samples from both s
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How science can help cities prepare for attacks on metro systemsTokyo, Moscow, Madrid, London, Brussels, and now St Petersburg. These major cities have all suffered attacks on their metro systems. The most recent events in St Petersburg, where a metro bombing killed at least 14 people, remind us of the challenges faced by underground transport systems in keeping people safe during an emergency. This is where engineering and psychology research can come in usef
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How tides affect the groundwater under our feetWhen returning from a swim in the ocean, sometimes it seems as though your towel has moved. Of course, it's just that the water line has shifted.
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Ars Technica

This six-year-old video from SpaceX is both prescient and pure troll SpaceX Six years ago SpaceX had launched its Falcon 9 rocket just twice and fished pieces out of the ocean after each mission. Nevertheless, the company's founder, Elon Musk, decided it was time for a big public reveal of his plans—a fully reusable launch system to significantly lower the cost of access to space. "Now, we could fail," he said, during a September 2011 event at the National Press C
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Futurity.org

Cow-like chewing probably helped humans survive The jaw structure and mechanics of almost all modern mammals may have something to do with why humans are still here today. A new study proposes that mammal teeth, jaw bones, and muscles evolved to produce side-to-side motions of the jaw, or yaw, that allowed our earliest ancestors to grind food with their molars and eat a more diversified diet. These changes may have been a contributing factor t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superimposing two lattices of similar periods to control and localize lightBrighter LEDs and more efficient solar cells are two potential applications for A*STAR's research into lattice structures that can slow or trap light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The transformation of an advanced synthetic intermediate into a whole family of naturally occurring moleculesA research collaboration between A*STAR and the University of Oxford has generated a simple and efficient approach for assembling organic molecules that show promise as therapeutic drugs. The team drew on a strategy favored by the pharmaceutical industry, devising a synthetic route to an advanced intermediate that, late in the synthesis, could be diversified into five target molecules.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A revolution in lightat the small scaleLight behaves in rather tame and predictable ways when interacting with everyday objects—it travels in straight lines, rebounds when it hits shiny surfaces, and gets bent by lenses. But weird and wonderful things start to happen when light interacts with very small objects. Nanoparticles, for example, which are collections of atoms as small as a virus, can act as mini-antennas, and small disks of
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New Scientist - News

Syria chemical attack looks like nerve gas – and was no accidentVictims' symptoms suggest yesterday's Syrian government air strike may have used sarin, and other evidence discounts a stray hit on a rebel weapons cache
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Female fertility is maintained by a newly discovered molecular mechanism that freezes the cell cycle in egg cellsGenetic studies in mice have identified a molecular mechanism crucial to maintaining egg cells in a dormant state to ensure female fertility. This work by A*STAR identifies a potential method to prevent infertility when the mechanism goes wrong.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eating the gut contents of young fish lengthens life of older killifish(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany has found that middle-age killifish fed the gut contents of younger killifish lived longer than normal. In their paper uploaded to the bioRxiv preprint server, the team describes their experiments with killifish, what they found and where they plan to take their research in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New extended ionized gas clouds detected in Abell 1367 cluster(Phys.org)—Astronomers have found six new extended ionized gas clouds (EIGs) in the galaxy cluster Abell 1367 (also known as the Leo Cluster). The discovery expands the current list of the cluster's known EIGs to 11 and provides new clues about the evolution of this group of galaxies. The researchers detailed their findings in a paper published Mar. 30 on arXiv.org.
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Ars Technica

Amazon outbids Twitter for rights to livestream Thursday Night Football games Enlarge (credit: Daniel Spiess ) Thursday Night Football has a new Internet home this year. Amazon reached an agreement with the National Football League for the rights to stream 10 Thursday Night Football games during the 2017 season. According to reports , Amazon paid $50 million for the rights, which is about five times more than the $10 million Twitter paid for the same rights to last season'
4h
WIRED

If an AI Doesn’t Take Your Job, It Will Design Your Office Autodesk's AI creates floor plans that try to make all workers happy. The post If an AI Doesn't Take Your Job, It Will Design Your Office appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

India’s Most Polluted River Actually Bubbles With Toxic Foam Zacharie Rabehi's ethereal photos document some of New Delhi's most polluted sites. The post India's Most Polluted River Actually Bubbles With Toxic Foam appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Spotify finally lets artists restrict new albums to premium subscribers Enlarge (credit: Ollie Millington / Getty Images) Two years after reports that Spotify might let labels limit new albums to paying subscribers , Universal Music Group—one of the "big three" music publishers—has finally inked such a deal with the streaming music giant. The deal allows Universal Music to make some albums available only to those who subscribe to Spotify's £10/month premium service,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Addictive nut's derivatives could help smokers break the nicotine habitAs many as 600 million people in Asia chew areca nuts with betel leaves, sometimes adding tobacco leaves. Many users are addicted to this harmful preparation, which can create a sense of euphoria. Yet researchers have now discovered that compounds derived from the nut could help cigarette smokers -- as well as betel quid chewers -- kick their habits.
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New Scientist - News

World’s largest canary discovered on island of giants and dwarfsAn odd-looking bird named the “new finch” is actually the planet’s biggest canary – and it lives with other largest and smallest species on an isolated island
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists unravel effect of ENSO and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on the East Asian winter monsoonBased on the observations and models' simulation, Drs. HAO Xin and HE Shengping found that the out-of-phase relationship between the variations in ENSO-like mode and the EAWM was significantly intensified when the AMO and ENSO-like SST anomalies are in phase.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Performance of the RegCM4 regional climate model over ChinaThe RegCM series of models are widely used throughout the world and in China. Applications range from paleo and present-day climate simulation, to mechanistic analyses, studies of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols, and climate change projections. Recently, a long-term simulation was conducted with the corporation of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Nati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Probiotics benefit in schizophrenia shaped by yeast infectionsIn a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Love it or hate it: Marmite may affect brain functionScientists at the University of York have discovered a potential link between eating Marmite and activity in the brain, through the apparent increase of a chemical messenger associated with healthy brain function.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

E-cigarette regulations may affect their effectiveness for smoking cessationA study published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, reveals that regulations on electronic cigarettes (ECs) may impact their effectiveness as a cessation tool. This study might help explain some of the mixed results on the effectiveness of ECs that has been published in the literature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research links decline in hemlock forests to changes in water resourcesAn insect infestation that is killing hemlock trees in New England forests is having a significant impact on the water resources of forested ecosystems that provide essential water supplies to one of the nation's most populous regions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting the limits of friction: Sandia looks at properties of materialSandia National Laboratories materials scientists have developed a model to predict the limits of friction behavior of metals based on materials properties -- how hard you can push on materials or how much current you can put through them before they stop working properly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Call to phase out lead bullets at shooting rangesWhile there is no safe level of lead exposure, US health bodies regard 5 micrograms per deciliter of blood as the level that is cause for concern. This research finds that people using shooting ranges can record blood-lead levels as high as 40 micrograms.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

CRISPR had a life before it became a gene-editing toolBefore it was a tool, CRISPR was a weapon in the never-ending war between microbes and viruses
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Gizmodo

How to Survive the Next Catastrophic Pandemic Illustration: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo Experts say it’s not a matter of if, but when a global scale pandemic will wipe out millions of people. And we are grossly unprepared for the next major outbreak. But in the event of a devastating pandemic—whether it be triggered by a mutated strain of an existing virus or a bioengineered terror weapon—there are some practical things you can do, both before and dur
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why We Love Dad's Old Sweater“Authentic objects” keep us company -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

'Mating' Robots Take a Fast-Forward Leap in Digital DarwinismA new study assesses the evolutionary dynamics of physically embodied robots — and it suggests that we're mashing the fast-forward button on the impending robotic revolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Phase II trial: Rice bran adds microbiome diversity, slows growth of colon cancer cellsToday at the AACR, University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers at Colorado State University present results of a phase II clinical trial of 29 people exploring the effects of adding rice bran or navy beans to the diets of colorectal cancer survivors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pre-existing immunity to dengue and West Nile may cause increased risk in Zika-infectedAs the Zika virus continues to spread rapidly across the globe, it might pose a particular risk to people previously infected with two related viruses, dengue and West Nile, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found. Their study, published in the journal Science, may help explain the severe manifestations of Zika virus infection observed in specific populations, includi
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Ingeniøren

Undersøger havnetunnel i to etagerEn ny østlig ringvej under København kan blive Danmarks første to-etagers vejtunnel. Nu går den to år lange forundersøgelse i gang.
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Gizmodo

Restock Your Board Game Cabinet With Amazon's Buy Two, Get One Free Sale If your board game collection is gathering dust, it’s time to freshen up your options with Amazon’s Buy Two, Get One Free sale . Over 30 options are available (as of now, some will likely sell out), including popular titles like Munchkin and Tokaido , Carcassonne , and Ticket To Ride Europe (which is far superior to the North American version, for what it’s worth), plus expansions for games you m
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Science-Based Medicine

Nigeria Court Ruling on Benzene in Soft DrinksA Nigerian court condemned the current level of benzene found in local soft drinks. Was this decision reasonable given the evidence? Is there something else going on here?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Screening Status Quo Misses Most Children with AutismVast majority go undiagnosed until after age 3, new research shows -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can we use solar energy to make fertilizer right on the farm?Bread is often called the staff of life, but that label might be more accurately applied to nitrogen, the element that soil bacteria pluck from the atmosphere and chemically alter to help spur the growth of plants, which ultimately nourish livestock and humans as well.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer burden for aging US HIV population projected to shiftIn findings presented at the 2017 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting on April 5, a UNC-Chapel Hill researcher, in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reports the total number of HIV-positive cancer patients in the United States is projected to decrease through 2030. They also expect to see a shift in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neonicotinoids detected in drinking water in agricultural areaConcern over the use of neonicotinoid pesticides is growing as studies find them in rivers and streams, and link them with declining bee populations and health effects in other animals. Now researchers report that in some areas, drinking water also contains the substances -- but they also have found that one treatment method can remove most of the pesticides. The study, conducted in Iowa, appears
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Futurity.org

Will ‘platelets’ replace quantum dots in your TV? Tiny crystals called quantum dots are used in LCD TVs to enhance color and image quality. A few years ago, scientists discovered a new type of crystal called nanoplatelets. Like quantum dots, these two-dimensional structures are just a few nanometers in size, but have a more uniform flat, rectangular shape. They are extremely thin, often just the width of a few atomic layers, giving the platelets
5h
WIRED

Facebook’s Midwest Move Bursts Tech’s Bicoastal Bubble Facebook's new data center in Nebraska promises jobs beyond tech's coastal enclaves—and infrastructure no less vital to the US economy than roads and bridges. The post Facebook's Midwest Move Bursts Tech's Bicoastal Bubble appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Flight Lab: NASA’s Global Hawk Drones Make Science, Not War NASA's "science birds" fly high over vicious hurricanes, measure airborne pollutants, and help researchers figure out if it's going to be an El Niño year. The post Flight Lab: NASA's Global Hawk Drones Make Science, Not War appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

America's Space Commanders Rattle Their Lightsabers This week, thousands of space industry types from around the world are gathered in a resort in Colorado Springs, Colorado, for the the Space Symposium, a major annual conference. Attendees spend three days hearing from dozens of professionals in the commercial, civilian, and military space sectors, as well as leaders of space agencies from 15 countries. On Monday, some spent the day tweeting pict
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical Cyclone Debbie has blown a hole in the Australian winter vegetable supplyCyclone Debbie, which lashed the Queensland coast a week ago, has hit farmers hard in the area around Bowen – a crucial supplier of vegetables to Sydney, Melbourne and much of eastern Australia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eavesdropping on the particular chatter on the sub-atomic worldMuch like two friendly neighbors getting together to chat over a cup of coffee, the minuscule particles in our sub-atomic world also come together to engage in a kind of conversation. Now, nuclear scientists are developing tools to allow them to listen in on the particles' gab fests and learn more about how they stick together to build our visible universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using nanoparticles to detect deadly virusesA system composed of two different types of nanoparticles can be used to accurately, sensitively and quickly detect viruses.
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Live Science

Newfound 'Spider-Man' Snail Is an Expert Web SlingerA new species of colorful marine snail slings webs like Spider-Man and is "kind of cute."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The power of day careOne of the first, formal evaluations of a day care program in India for low-income households could provide empirical evidence that will improve gender equality across the country and beyond.
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Dagens Medicin

PLO og Diabetesforeningen lancerer nyt fælles udspil Almen praksis skal styrkes for at kunne håndtere fremtidens voksende gruppe af diabetespatienter, mener PLO og Diabetesforeningen.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Alan Alda's Crusade to Make Science Talk a Jargon-Free ZoneA livestreamed event will showcase the actor/writer/director's passion for making science comprehensible and compelling for normal humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

12 economic truths about climate changeOver the next 70 years, every state in the U.S. is expected to experience increasing temperatures, according to a new report on the economic facts of climate change, co-authored by Northwestern University professor Diane Schanzenbach, director of The Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution.
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New Scientist - News

Neglect and drug trade led to Colombian landslide disasterPeople who snort coke may have contributed to the landslide that devastated the town of Mocoa in Colombia, killing hundreds
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The Scientist RSS

Speaking of Cancer ResearchNotable quotes from this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert suggests focusing on shared values rather than climate changeFor a leading scientist, Rob Jackson has what may seem a strange remedy for the deeply polarized national debate on climate change: look past the science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technology could offer cheaper, faster food testingThe foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157 causes an estimated 73,000 illnesses and 60 deaths every year in the United States. Better safety tests could help avoid some of the illnesses caused by this strain of E. coli and other harmful bacteria, according to MIT researchers who have come up with a possible new solution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The ALMA array in Chile joins global VLBI arrays for unprecedented leap in resolving powerA powerful new array of radio telescopes is being deployed for the first time this week, as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile joins a global network of antennas poised to make some of the highest resolution images that astronomers have ever obtained. The improved level of detail is equivalent to being able to count the stitches on a baseball from 8,000 miles away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Sentinel-1 sees Mocoa landslideSentinel-1 radar coverage from before and after the 1 April 2017 mudslide in Mocoa, Colombia, shows the extent of movement of the disaster that claimed over 260 lives, injured hundreds more and left scores displaced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Body heat could electrically power IoT devices, medical monitors using a woven, thermoelectric flexible fabricA Purdue University-developed technology that can be woven into a specially designed fabric could help harness human body heat and provide energy to power Internet of things (IoT) devices including heart and respiration monitors and fulfill other uses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual hyperspectral images could determine plant health, assist in crop management, grocery shoppingPurdue researchers are developing technology that could allow users to quickly determine the health of plants in the field and of fruits and vegetables in groceries through the translation of digital images on smartphones into virtual hyperspectral images.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Missing puzzle piece' to help solve the infamous Travelling Salesman ProblemA "missing puzzle piece" to help solve the infamous Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) has been developed in Australia, researchers say.
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Live Science

Hail Mary! 9 Amazing Tales of Virgin Births in the Animal KingdomForget what you know about the birds and the bees: Sometimes you just have to take matters into your own hands.
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Live Science

Photos: Mutilated Corpses May Reflect Medieval Belief in Walking DeadA pit of human remains in England show signs that the living were protecting themselves from zombies.
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Live Science

Walking Dead? Medieval Villagers Zombie-Proofed Their CorpsesArchaeologists in England think they've found evidence of medieval methods to prevent the dead from walking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Few keep track of their personal data on the netAccording to a study by computer science researchers at Karlstad University, few people know how their personal data are collected, used, shared and accessed. The new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), coming into effect in 2018, will include higher demands on the possibility for users to access their own personal information.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Works In ProgressAn NIH survey of 351 individuals in the research community has shown that many are supportive of interim research products like preprints.
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Popular Science

Yes, 50 million years ago the earth was hotter. Here's why climate change is still a major problem Environment We've got 99 problems and CO 2 is number one A combination of more CO2 and a hotter sun means the Earth is in for unprecedented warming—and humans are along for the ride. Read on:…
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The Atlantic

The Patriarchy Hates the Moon Like most unhappy young men, in my teenage years I went to war with the moon. Stumbling drunk out of boring parties late at night, I’d feel the thing glaring at me from its smug and lofty seat, indifferent and implacable, a faint sneer etched into its face. Looking into the moon means looking into the vertiginous hugeness of history: It’s the same lump of rock seen by kings and heroes for all tho
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 5, 2017 —Russia says rebels are responsible for yesterday’s deadly chemical attack in Syria. More here —Advertisers flee Fox’s O’Reilly Factor following allegations the show’s host has been repeatedly accused of sexual harassment. More here —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers develop novel lens for super-resolution imagingA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has developed a novel lens for super-resolution imaging which breaks resolution limitations in microscopy and has potential applications in high precision failure inspection and biological research.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Morten Høyer modtager kræftlægernes ærespris Morten Høyer, leder af Dansk Center for partikelterapi, har modtaget årets ærespris fra Dansk Selskab for Klinisk Onkologi
5h
The Scientist RSS

Proposed NIH Cuts Hit Bipartisan Opposition in CongressBoth Democrats and Republications criticize the Trump administration’s plan to cut funding for biomedical research.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

3 Big Myths about Modern AgricultureMyths get in the way of our ability to restore degraded soils that can feed the world using fewer chemicals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Spiderman' worm-snails discovered on Florida shipwreckScientists have discovered a new species of worm-snail on a shipwreck in the Florida Keys. The new species, which is colorful and shoots mucus webs to trap food, is likely an invasive species from the Indo-Pacific and could have important coral reef conservation implications.
5h
Ingeniøren

Direktør i it-firma: Branchen har stærkt brug for it-superhelte I morgen kårer Mediehuset Ingeniøren de største it-talenter i landet. Konkurrencen er med til at bekæmpe it-branchens største udfordringer ved at hylde hverdagens it-helte, mener CEO og stifter i Netcompany. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/direktoer-it-firma-branchen-har-staerkt-brug-it-superhelte-7435 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
WIRED

Everyone Loses When Your Employer Owns Your Facebook Account Companies controlling Facebook accounts associated with former employees might be legal, but it robs those employees of a platform they personally built. The post Everyone Loses When Your Employer Owns Your Facebook Account appeared first on WIRED .
6h
WIRED

Review: Alienware 13 Gaming Laptop Alienware's new 13.3-incher is the first gaming rig on the market with an OLED display. The post Review: Alienware 13 Gaming Laptop appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Science | The Guardian

Egypt’s real treasure: diving with sharks in the Red Sea Egypt’s diving is spectacular, and could help revive the country’s tourism industry – but only if the value of its marine life is recognised and protected To say the Egyptian economy, much reliant on tourism, has seen a turbulent time of late, would be a woeful understatement. As you travel along the Red Sea coast from Hurghada, through Safaga, and El Quseir, the litter-strewn landscape of low hi
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronic control to ensure photovoltaic systems always work at maximum powerThe Advanced Control Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Systems Engineering and Automation has developed a control system designed to ensure that photovoltaic generators always work at their maximum power point by adapting them in terms of the level of solar irradiance and the load connected to the system.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energyResearchers from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) have developed a novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources. This method can assess the future exploitable technical potential of wind and solar PV energy, as well as their capacity to replace existing energy generation assets. Furthermore, it can forecast fossil fuel savings and facilitate reductions in greenhouse g
6h
Ars Technica

Uber’s Levandowski really doesn’t want to talk about any Waymo documents Enlarge / A technician sits in an Uber self-driving car on September 13, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (credit: ANGELO MERENDINO/AFP/Getty Images ) When Uber bought Anthony Levandowski's startup Otto for $680 million, an unnamed third party conducted a "due diligence review." Now, Levandowski and his lawyers are fighting hard to keep that review under wraps. Google's Waymo self-driving car sp
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Is a Drunk Witness a Bad Witness?Eyewitness memory appears to be largely unaffected by mild or even moderate alcohol consumption -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Hard Truth about the Rhino Horn "Aphrodisiac" MarketMedia coverage hyping the supposed use of rhino horn to pump up sex drive does no favors for conservation efforts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Ingeniøren

Landbrugsrapport finkæmmet: Omstridt CBS-forsker skyldig i brud på god forskningspraksisTroels Troelsen gjorde sig ikke skyldig i videnskabelig uredelighed, men brød sig med god forskningspraksis i forbindelse med udarbejdelse af omstridt landbrugsrapport.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Rigsrevisionen skal kulegrave akutordning Rigsrevisionen er gået ind i sagen om 1813 for at se på, om kvaliteten af akuttelefonen er i orden.
6h
WIRED

Coastal Inundation Reveals the Upside of Climate Change Coastal cities worldwide are pumping more than $280 billion a year into an Adaptation Economy, an amount increasing by more than 4 percent annually. The post Coastal Inundation Reveals the Upside of Climate Change appeared first on WIRED .
7h
WIRED

Disasters Don’t Have to End in Dystopias The difference between utopia and dystopia isn't how well everything runs. It's about what happens when everything fails. The post Disasters Don’t Have to End in Dystopias appeared first on WIRED .
7h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

Webinar on Informed Consent - Dr. Dianne Gove The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
7h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

Webinar on Informed Consent - Dr. Stephen Rainey The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
7h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

Webinar on Informed Consent - Dr. Daniela Ovadia The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
7h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

Webinar on Informed Consent - Prof. Søren Holm The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How the genomics revolution could finally help Africa New investments promise to get precision medicine and precision public health off the ground. But experts debate how much work needs to be done first. Nature 544 20 doi: 10.1038/544020a
7h
Science : NPR

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons? Some modern shoulder-fired weapons produce blast waves powerful enough to rattle the brain. A $30 million study aims to help the military figure out how much blast exposure, over time, is too much. (Image credit: Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS)
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Green laser light probes metals for hidden damageImagine being able to check the structural integrity of an airplane, ship or bridge, without having to dismantle it or remove any material for testing, which could further compromise the structure. That's the promise of a new laser-based technique that chemists are developing to reveal hidden damage in metals.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Addictive nut's derivatives could help smokers break the nicotine habitAs many as 600 million people in Southeast Asia chew areca nuts with betel leaves, sometimes adding tobacco leaves. Many users are addicted to this harmful "betel quid" preparation, which can create a sense of euphoria and alertness. Yet researchers have now discovered that compounds derived from the nut could help cigarette smokers—as well as betel quid chewers—kick their habits.
7h
Ingeniøren

Svenskere whitehat-hacker 15.000 dollars til velgørenhed Fem svenske sikkerhedsfolk har kørt et projekt med pentesting af virksomheder, der har betalt med penge til velgørenhed. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/svenskere-whitehat-hacker-15000-dollars-velgoerenhed-1075274 Version2
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductorSeaweed, the edible algae with a long history in some Asian cuisines, and which has also become part of the Western foodie culture, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers have made a seaweed-derived material to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using Instagram can increase adolescents' closeness to friendsYour food, your vacation, your carefully curated life—all posted for your friends in a filtered image. Some may scoff at adolescents' use of social media networks as they pine for likes. Is this just frivolous behavior? Or are they really just solidifying their social connections to friends? A recent study by a researcher at the University of Leuven found that adolescents' use of Instagram actuall
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make progress on unravelling the puzzle of merging black holesAstrophysicists at the University of Birmingham have made progress in understanding a key mystery of gravitational-wave astrophysics: how two black holes can come together and merge.
7h
The Atlantic

Did the President Incite a Riot? I’ve had to look long and hard to find examples of presidential candidates who feared legal trouble because of speeches they made. So far the list is Thomas Jefferson, Eugene V. Debs, and Donald J. Trump. Of these three, only one—the current president—might actually be held legally responsible for incitement to violence. Trump may in fact have violated the law even after a century of First Amendm
7h
Dagens Medicin

Dansk forskning kan føre til ny behandling af æggestokkræftPatienter med æggestokkræft bliver ofte resistente over for kemoterapi, og derfor er der et stort behov for nye behandlingsmetoder.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Curbing alcohol to fight HIV could save money in KenyaExpanding a program in Kenya that fights the spread of HIV by curbing alcohol consumption could produce a net economic benefit, a new study projects.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists make progress on unravelling the puzzle of merging black holesAstrophysicists at the University of Birmingham have made progress in understanding a key mystery of gravitational-wave astrophysics: how two black holes can come together and merge.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using Instagram can increase adolescents' closeness to friendsA recent study by a researcher at the University of Leuven found that adolescents' use of Instagram actually strengthened the closeness of their friendships.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seaweed: From superfood to superconductorSeaweed, the edible algae with a long history in some Asian cuisines, and which has also become part of the Western foodie culture, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers report at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society progress toward a seaweed-derived material to h
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Green laser light probes metals for hidden damage (animation)Imagine being able to check the structural integrity of an airplane, ship or bridge, without having to dismantle it or remove any material for testing, which could further compromise the structure. That's the promise of a new laser-based technique that chemists are developing to reveal hidden damage in metals. They present their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Addictive nut's derivatives could help smokers break the nicotine habitAs many as 600 million people in Asia chew areca nuts with betel leaves, sometimes adding tobacco leaves. Many users are addicted to this harmful preparation, which can create a sense of euphoria. Yet researchers have now discovered that compounds derived from the nut could help cigarette smokers -- as well as betel quid chewers -- kick their habits. They present their work today at the 253rd Nati
7h
Viden

Bekymret Brinkmann: Gør smart teknologi os dummere?Hjælpsom teknologi risikerer at stjæle færdigheder fra os.
7h
Ingeniøren

Nordmænd planlægger tunnel, der bryder EUs sikkerhedskravTunnelen under Oslofjord afspærres hver anden dag ved ulykker. Den norske regering vil derfor udvide den med endnu et rør. Men det bliver for stejl for EUs sikkerhedskrav.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Event Horizon Telescope to try to capture images of elusive black hole edgeNetwork of radio observatories will attempt a first-ever glimpse at an event horizon.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Nordjylland vil sætte gang i nye praksisforsøg Region Nordjylland vil søge om lov til at etablere to praksisklinikker, der skal fungere som en integreret del af Regionshospitalet Nordjylland. Regionsrådsformand ser stor fordel i at kunne dele medarbejdere på nye måder.
8h
Ingeniøren

Dårligt engelsk skaber forvirring i flytrafikkenPiloter og flyveleder får lov at bestå sprogtest via vennetjenester og underhåndsaftaler.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Dansker bliver generalsekretær for europæiske urologerProfessor og overlæge Jens Sønksen er blevet valgt til at stå i spidsen for det kliniske område i EAU, den europæiske sammenslutning af urologer.
8h
Viden

Barn med DNA fra tre personer: Sundt på sin 1-års fødselsdagLæger fortæller nu detaljer om, hvordan de skabte barnet med DNA fra to kvinder og en mand.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eagles migrate through bad weather to arrive in time to nestMigration is tough, and birds do everything they can to optimize it. How do factors like weather and experience affect the strategies they choose? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that older, more experienced Golden Eagles actually migrate in poorer weather conditions and cover less ground than their younger counterparts, but for a good reason—they're timing their efforts ar
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sandpiper detectives pinpoint trouble spots in continent-wide migrationUnderstanding and managing migratory animal populations requires knowing what's going on with them during all stages of their annual cycle—and how those stages affect each other. The annual cycle can be especially difficult to study for species that breed in the Arctic and winter in South America. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tackles this problem for Semipalmated Sandpi
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mexico to put endangered vaquita porpoises in refugeIn a bid to save the world's smallest species of porpoise from extinction, the Mexican government announced plans Tuesday to place some of them in a temporary refuge.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ecological value of exotic water plants equals that of indigenous speciesWhen it comes to their role in aquatic ecosystems, exotic water plants are generally no different than indigenous species. In fact, they can be an asset. That doesn't mean all exotic species should be given free rein. But they can be managed more effectively if you focus on their properties and not their place of origin. Ecologist Bart Grutters (NIOO-KNAW) will defend his PhD thesis research on We
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Allen Cell Explorer: data portal provides an unprecedented view into human stem cellsThe Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces the launch of the Allen Cell Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital window into the human cell. The website combines large-scale 3D imaging data, the first application of deep learning to create predictive models of cell organization, gene edited human stem cell lines and a growing suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell Explorer w
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Machine learning predicts the look of stem cells Website contains thousands of 3D stem cell images and could help with better understanding diseases like cancer. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21769
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drought shatters Turkana's dreams of a better futureIn just a few years water, oil and money would flow. Roads, schools and hospitals would follow. Turkana's generations of poverty and neglect in Kenya's arid north would end.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Netflix is looking for a thumbs-up as star ratings fade awayNetflix's video-streaming service is scrapping its familiar star-rating system, hoping to make it easier for its 94 million subscribers to signal whether they liked a movie or TV show.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bill to improve weather forecasts heads to president's deskThe National Weather Service would have to boost research—including some from private companies—to improve forecasts and storm warnings under a bill headed to the president's desk.
9h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Jennifer Zallen (MSKCC / HHMI): Building multicellular structures: New roles for Toll receptors How do cells know where to move during development? Zallen shows that Toll receptor expression directs cell movement during axis elongation in Drosophila embryos. https://www.ibiology.org/ibiology/building-multicellular-structures-development-new-roles-toll-receptors.html Talk Overview: A major challenge in developmental biology is to understand how cells move and interact to form complex multice
9h
WIRED

Massive 3-D Cell Library Teaches Computers How to Find Mitochondria Using images of 6,000 stem cells, scientists have created the first-ever deep learning model to predict how cells are organized. The post Massive 3-D Cell Library Teaches Computers How to Find Mitochondria appeared first on WIRED .
10h
Ingeniøren

Atomaffaldet bliver længere på Risø end forventetLangvarigt politisk tovtrækkeri har gjort det umuligt at følge den oprindelige tidsplan for et atomaffaldsfrit Risø i 2023. Det mener direktøren fra Dansk Dekommissionering.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Happy feet: why a 61m-year-old penguin foot has researchers dancing for joy Early evolution of modern birds is fuzzy, so a fossil foot showing unexpected diversity in penguins shortly after the dinosaurs went extinct is big news The theory that birds descended from bipedal dinosaurs, Coelurosaurs to be exact, is now well-established within the palaeontological community. With that one out of the way, bird palaeontologists can focus on more pressing issues, such as the or
10h
Science | The Guardian

Antibiotics overuse could increase bowel cancer risk, study finds Extended use increases chance of polyps forming in the colon, adding weight to evidence gut bacteria plays a key role in cancer development The overuse of antibiotics could increase a person’s risk of developing bowel cancer, the findings of a US study suggest. Research published in medical journal Gut found extended use of antibiotics significantly increased the chance of polyp formation in the
10h
Ingeniøren

De fleste ingeniører og it-folk vil læse denne artikel Ifølge førende ekspert i overbevisningens kunst burde overskriften her få ingeniører og it-folk til at læse videre, fordi vi har tendens til at gøre som andre. Her er ekspertens seks nøgler til, hvordan man overbeviser andre https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/de-fleste-ingenioerer-it-folk-vil-laese-denne-artikel-7306 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
The Atlantic

‘Our Erie’ Tells Its Story Some of the people behind a new video about economic and technological promise in Erie, Pennsylvania. We have met most of these people over the past year. ( Jefferson Educational Society of Erie.) As we’ve been working away on our book based on our “ American Futures ” travels over the past four years, my wife Deb and I have increasingly come to think of Erie, Pennsylvania, as the representative
10h
Dagens Medicin

To læger interesset i praksis i ghettoområde To læger har søgt om at overtage ledige kapaciteter i Tingbjerg, der har været uden praktiserende læger i mere end to år.
10h
Ingeniøren

Borgere til grin i offentlig digitalisering: Data tastet ind i felter ender i samme bunke Når du udfylder en ansøgning og sender den afsted til kommunen, går det hurtigt. Men bag skærmen hos sagsbehandlerne, er forløbet en hel del mere kompliceret. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/digitaliseringen-udebliver-bagved-skaermene-1075007 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren

Smuthul i indeklimakrav giver lov til 50 pct. højere luftforurening på skolerSelv om både Bygningsreglementet og Arbejdstilsynets vejledning siger, at CO2-koncentrationen ikke bør overstige 0,1 pct. af luftmængden, betyder nedrundingsregler, at koncentrationen kan være knap 50 pct. større.
12h
Gizmodo

Raccoons Playing With Soap Bubbles Prove That Raccoons Are Alright GIF Source: YouTube It seems like raccoons get a bad reputation. Many people believe that they are rodents and that impression isn’t helped by their tendency to eat garbage in the dark. But raccoons seem pretty cool to me. It’s time that their image gets some rehab and this video of a couple of raccoons popping bubbles while wearing outfits is a great place to start. Let’s just be clear that racc
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting -- and preventing -- psychiatric morbidity after ARDSA new study, published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, examined symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in long-term survivors of ARDS and any associated changes in cortisol levels in the patients.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weak grip a strong predictor of metabolic disease and disability in adultsA simple test to determine a person's grip strength may be a predictor of developing metabolic disorders in middle or older age, a new cross-continental study has found.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines social outcomes in young adults with childhood-onset epilepsyIn a recent study, young adults who developed uncomplicated epilepsy as children (meaning that they did not have other neurologic or intellectual impairment) had similar social outcomes as their siblings, but only if they had not experienced a seizure in at least five years.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Zealand's colorectal cancer rates are on the rise in young adultsA recent analysis found a decrease in the overall incidence of colorectal cancer in New Zealand, but an increased incidence of rectal cancer in those under 50 years of age.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overactive bladder drug linked with increased risk of depressionA recent study found that women with overactive bladder who received antimuscarinics were 38 percent more likely to be diagnosed with depressive disorder within the next three years than those who did not receive antimuscarinics.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could targeting oxtyocin help treat opioid addiction?A new review of published research indicates that the oxytocin system -- a key player in social reward and stress regulation -- is profoundly affected by opioid use. Therefore, it may be an important target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction and to prevent relapse.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Dose sparing' flu vaccine could boost productivity and vaccine availabilityThe currently licensed seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines contain 15 micrograms of viral hemagglutinin protein per strain for adults, and up to 60 micrograms for elderly individuals; however, due to recent shortages, reducing these doses would be highly desirable. A recent study has found that significant dose sparing is possible with the use of whole virion vaccines and aluminum adjuvants, wit
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pedometers increase activity and decrease fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis patientsProviding pedometers, with and without providing step targets, to individuals with rheumatoid arthritis increased activity levels and decreased fatigue in a recent study.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yoga helps patients with ulcerative colitisPatients with ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, often relapse at times of stress. In a clinical trial of 77 ulcerative colitis patients who were in clinical remission but were experiencing reduced quality of life, those assigned to 12 supervised 90-minute weekly sessions of yoga had a greater increase in quality of life and reduced activity of their colitis compared with th
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A mother's voice may help stabilize preterm infantsA recent review of published research indicates that hearing their mother's voice can benefit the health of preterm infants.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eagles migrate through bad weather to arrive in time to nestMigration is tough, and birds do everything they can to optimize it. How do factors like weather and experience affect the strategies they choose? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that older, more experienced Golden Eagles actually migrate in poorer weather conditions and cover less ground than their younger counterparts, but for a good reason -- they're timing their efforts
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sandpiper detectives pinpoint trouble spots in continent-wide migrationUnderstanding and managing migratory animal populations requires knowing what's going on with them during all stages of their annual cycle -- and how those stages affect each other. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tackles this problem for semipalmated sandpipers, historically one of the most widespread and numerous shorebird species of the western hemisphere, whose populat
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

A Robot with Its Head in the Cloud Tackles Warehouse PickingA dexterous new robotic gripper can manipulate unfamiliar objects, and it shares what it learns with a hive mind in the cloud.
13h
Gizmodo

Hospitals Deny Patients Organ Transplants for Smoking Weed Photo: Getty While the tension between state and federal laws has created a difficult situation for cannabis users, there’s another factor that is complicating the changing attitude towards weed: hospitals. Though it isn’t legally mandated, many hospitals won’t allow people who use weed to be placed on organ transplant waiting lists. According to an extensive report from Buzzfeed , policies for t
13h
Science | The Guardian

Alzheimer’s: ultrasound safely delivers drugs to damaged brains of mice Scientists at Queensland Brain Institute find noninvasive technique slows progression of Alzheimer’s disease in mice Australian researchers say they have made a promising step in the future treatment of Alzheimer’s disease after discovering ultrasound can effectively and safely deliver drugs to the damaged brain. Scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute found the noninvasive technique success
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living downwind of coal-fired power plant could increase risk of low birth weightDrawing on evidence from a Pennsylvania power plant located upwind of New Jersey, a group of researchers studied live singleton births that occurred from 1990 to 2006 in the area downwind of the plant. Infants born to mothers living as far as 20 to 30 miles downwind from the power plant were 6.5 percent more likely to be born with a low birth weight and 17.12 percent more likely to be born with a
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

There's a cost to 'bee-ing' too smartResearchers have discovered that smart bumblebees die sooner and don't collect as much food over their life spans as their less intelligent co-workers. Researchers suggest that the energy demands of intelligence eat up limited resources, leaving smart bees with less energy for foraging than their slower-learning counterparts. This is the first evidence of a learning-associated cost in the wild and
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Majority of incontinence treatments deliver poor resultsSurgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence – curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success. These are the findings of a comprehensive systematic overview of cure rates for the treatment of incontinence around the world during the last ten years.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two new mechanisms for herbicide resistance found in Palmer amaranthPalmer amaranth is a nightmare of a weed, causing yield losses up to 80 percent in severely infested soybean fields. It scoffs at farmers’ attempts at control, having evolved resistance to six classes of herbicides since its discovery in the United States 100 years ago. And now, scientists have discovered it has two new tricks up its sleeve.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Urine metabolites may help predict which obese teens will develop diabetesResearchers have discovered a unique metabolic 'signature' in the urine of diabetic, obese black teenagers that they say may become a way to predict the development of type 2 diabetes in people at risk.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding proteinResearchers have discovered how a fruit fly protein binds and regulates two different types of RNA target sequence. The study may help explain how various RNA-binding proteins, many of which are implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative disease, perform so many different functions in the cell.
14h
Ingeniøren

Studerende eller nyuddannet? Tjek joblisten for unge ingeniører og it-folk Praktikpladser, graduate-positioner, studiejobs og stillinger for nyuddannede. Se ugens liste med et bredt udvalg af jobmuligheder for den nye generation af ingeniører og it-professionelle. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/studerende-eller-nyuddannet-tjek-jobmuligheder-baade-ingenioerer-it-folk-7407 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
ArXiv Query

Guided Proofreading of Automatic Segmentations for ConnectomicsAutomatic cell image segmentation methods in connectomics produce merge and split errors, which require correction through proofreading. Previous research has identified the visual search for these errors as the bottleneck in interactive proofreading. To aid error correction, we develop two classifiers that automatically recommend candidate merges and splits to the user. These classifiers use a co
15h
The Scientist RSS

Essen BioScience: Real-Time Live-Cell AnalysisConventional approaches to cell analysis only capture a single time point, but change can happen in an instant, no matter what you’re doing.
16h
New Scientist - News

It has got harder to access sexual health services in the UKIn the UK, people should get a clinic appointment within 2 days 98 per cent of the time, but a study suggests fewer than 91 per cent of those with symptoms do
16h
Gizmodo

We Want All of This 2001: A Space Odyssey Swag HAL would approve too. Mondo—confirmed Stanley Kubrick fans who previously created sweaters patterned like The Shining rugs—just released a mountain of officially-licensed swag from the 1968 masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey . And we want it all. All the shirts, hoodies, you name it. You can get them all here , but first, feel free to drool over the photos. [ Mondo ]
16h
Ars Technica

Invader Zim will return to TV “soon-ish” with creator, original cast Invader Zim teaser for a new animated TV movie Invader Zim , the Nickelodeon animated series that ran for two seasons in the early '00s, will end its longtime television absence "soon-ish." The cable network announced its intentions on Tuesday in the form of a dry press release and a far-less-dry animated teaser. In the teaser, Zim, the series' neurotic titular alien, announces his evil intention
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex obsession a killer for male snakesSnake orgy research by an international team of scientists led from Sydney has confirmed a frenzied approach to the mating season is resulting in males ageing faster and dying earlier and in worse condition than their female counterparts, who prioritize body maintenance over short-term reproductive success.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Successful reversal of Vasalgel male contraceptive in rabbitsVasalgel is a polymer gel that is injected into the vas deferens to block the flow of sperm and create a long-lasting contraceptive effect. Today, results of a study in rabbits published in Basic and Clinical Andrology showed that the contraceptive could be reversed by a second injection that resulted in a rapid return of sperm flow.
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Gizmodo

Lego Macintosh Is a Miniature Classic That Actually Kind of Works Photo: Jannis Hermanns , CC There’s something about combining Lego and old Macintosh computers that is just irresistible for hobbyists. The latest edition to the canon is a cute little version of the Macintosh Classic from 1990 that uses a Raspberry Pi and an e-ink display to make it partially function. Best of all, you can have one on your desk because its creator has detailed how he built it. P
16h
The Neurocritic

What are the Big Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience? This year, the Cognitive Neuroscience Institute (CNI) and the Max-Planck-Society organized a symposium on Big Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience. I enjoyed this fun forum organized by David Poeppel and Mike Gazzaniga. The format included three pairs of speakers on the topics of memory, language, and action/motor who “consider[ed] some major challenges and cutting-edge advances, from molecular mechan
17h
The Atlantic

Borrowing Weighty Words in Wisława Szymborska’s ‘Under One Small Star’ In 1997’s “ Poland’s Blithe Spirit ,” our poetry editor David Barber perfectly describes the pleasure of discovering 1996 Nobel laureate Wisława Szymborska —“a supremely lucid and sublimely beguiling poet, as accessible as she is ineffable”—and her poems in translation: With their brisk and bracing wit, vivacious intelligence, and buoyant sense of play, hers are poems of abundant charm—so charmin
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Ingeniøren

Nyhed til virksomheder på Jobfinder: Nu kan I nemt nå de mange passive jobsøgere Jobfinder præsenterer ny funktion, der gør det lettere for virksomheder at nå de mange passive jobsøgere. Læs mere om den nye mulighed. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/nyhed-virksomheder-halvdelen-arbejdskraften-passive-jobsoegere-nu-kan-naa-dem-med-ny Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
17h
WIRED

Sorry, But Susan Rice Is Not Your ‘Smoking Gun’ This is no "gotcha" moment in the Trump surveillance saga. The post Sorry, But Susan Rice Is Not Your ‘Smoking Gun' appeared first on WIRED .
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sex obsession a killer for male snakesAn international team of scientists led by the University of Sydney has confirmed a frenzied approach to the mating season is resulting in males ageing faster and dying earlier and in worse condition than their female counterparts, who prioritise body-maintenance over short-term reproductive success.
17h
Gizmodo

The Direct to Consumer Couch Has Arrived (In Boxes) With Burrow Burrow The last time I bought a couch, I looked at more than 4000 before finally settling. Then I had to figure out if it would fit through my door. Like Casper , Burrow ships in boxes, and even vacuum packs its cushions in a similar way. Assembly is tool-free and ridiculously easy. In fact, because the .pdf instruction manual went to the email address of the previous incarnation of our company,
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

World is home to '60,000 tree species'Researchers estimate that there are 60,065 species of trees in the world.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living at home the best survival strategy for young kangaroosHaving a social life comes at a cost for grey kangaroos, with 'mingling' mothers reducing the chances of survival for their offspring. Lead author and recent University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences graduate Dr. Wendy King said young kangaroos that spent more time with their mothers grew faster and gained more weight than other joeys of the same age, while those that spent more time
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart attacks diagnosed quicker by new blood testScientists from King's College London have developed a new blood test that is more sensitive in detecting damaged heart muscle caused by a heart attack.
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Syria and Russia What We’re Following Chemical Warfare in Syria: President Bashar al-Assad’s government allegedly used a chemical agent against civilians in an attack that left 58 dead, including children, and at least 160 injured, according to a London-based human-rights group. Syria has been accused of using chemical weapons before, and agreed to destroy them in 2013, but evidence suggests Assad failed to honor
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Living at home the best survival strategy for young kangaroosHaving a social life comes at a cost for grey kangaroos, with 'mingling' mothers reducing the chances of survival for their offspring.
18h
WIRED

The Walking Dead Recap Season 7 Episode 16: Putting a Big “Cat” in “Catharsis” Who cares if you could see things coming? After a season like that, a reward was overdue. The post The Walking Dead Recap Season 7 Episode 16: Putting a Big "Cat" in "Catharsis" appeared first on WIRED .
18h
Live Science

With Personality Traits, You Are Who You LikePeople are tolerant of even their worst personality traits in others.
18h
The Atlantic

What Could Possibly Motivate a Chemical-Weapons Attack? BEIRUT—The horrifying reports of the latest war crime in Syria, which the Assad regime has been accused of carrying out—another apparent nerve gas attack against civilians, including children, this time in Idlib—manage, somehow, to shock us even after years of outrages that have dulled our sensibilities. At present, U.S. intelligence officials say the attack has the “fingerprints” of an Assad reg
18h
Big Think

Sweet Home Walabama? Portmanteau Toponyms as Double-edged Insults Two insults for the price of one Read More
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drought linked with human health risks in US analysisA Yale-led analysis of health claims in 22 US states found that severe drought conditions increased the risk of mortality -- and, in some cases, cardiovascular disease -- among adults 65 or over.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet Planetary Health: Food, climate, greenhouse gas emissions and healthIncreasing temperatures, water scarcity, availability of agricultural land, biodiversity loss and climate change threaten to reverse health gains seen over the last century. Improved understanding of the links between health and environmental change, and potential adaption strategies will be important in order to safeguard human health and the health of the planet on which we depend.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moderate changes in Indian diets could benefit both health and the environmentModerate changes to typical Indian diets could help to 'future proof' the Indian food system against the predicted decline in availability of groundwater over the coming decades, according to new research.
18h
Gizmodo

Michael Caine Has Been Tweeting For Almost Seven Years, and I'm Just Now Finding Out Image via Getty . Though it may seem pointless to keep tabs on a celebrity known for his immediately recognizable (and frequently mocked) cockney accent on a text-based medium one generally scrolls through on devices that have been muted, I strongly recommend that everyone improve their presumably terrible and offensive Twitter feeds by following Sir Michael Caine. The star of in legendary films
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Gizmodo

Lifehacker The Countries Actually Most Dangerous for Tourists | Kotaku Tips For Playing Persona 5 | Lifehacker The Countries Actually Most Dangerous for Tourists | Kotaku Tips For Playing Persona 5 | io9 Ian McKellen Explains Why He Refused to Play Dumbledore in Harry Potter | Jalopnik Storm Chasers Are Pissed These Idiots Drove Into A Tornado |
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Big Think

Is Universal Basic Income Possible in America? There is one essential ingredient missing, argues historian Yuval Noah Harari. Read More
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Big Think

Frustrated with Politics? Facebook Just Made It Easy to Contact Your Rep. Do you want your voice heard? Facebook recently unveiled a tool called Town Hall which makes it incredibly easy to contact your elected officials. By removing the friction of contacting politicians, Facebook may be creating a "social infrastructure" that increases civic engagement. Read More
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Gizmodo

Why You Should Always Walk on Escalators Photo: Getty On Tuesday, The New York Times decided to reignite the age old debate of walking versus standing on escalators. And do you know what the paper concluded? “ You shouldn’t walk on escalators .” This is a patently incorrect and essentially un-American conclusion for at least four reasons. Before we delve into our very detailed and organized argument in favor of walking on escalators, le
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Why graphene could be the solution to drinkable waterThe BBC's Pallab Ghosh has been finding out about a filter made from graphene that can turn salt water into drinking water.
19h
Gizmodo

Scientists Froze Some Grasshoppers Mid-Bang to Study Their Genitals The wrong species of grasshopper, but they fuckin’ (Image: Rkitko /Wikimedia Commons) You might not know this, but we’re in the midst of an insect shape-studying renaissance. MicroCT technology—basically a lab version of the CAT scanners found at hospitals—is increasingly allowing scientists to produce detailed three-dimensional images without destroying samples. So naturally, if we’re scanning e
19h
Gizmodo

10 Percent of Pregnant US Women With Zika Had Fetus Or Baby With Birth Defects Image: AP The US Centers for Disease Control has released a sobering new study detailing the birth defect rates among pregnant American women infected by the Zika virus. It’s as bad as we feared. The CDC Vital Signs study is the first comprehensive analysis of Zika-infected pregnant women entered into the US Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) from January 15 to December 27, 2016. The analysis, which
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Gizmodo

Right-Wing Billionaires Are Buying Themselves a New Constitution Days before the first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, as protests at Standing Rock intensified and the costliest wildfire in United States history burned across Big Sur, some 150 current and former state legislators gathered in Colonial Williamsburg for a weekend of role play—to debate amendments to the U.S. constitution. The event was led by Ken Ivory, a state representative fro
19h
Ars Technica

Lawmakers propose law requiring warrants to search electronics at US border Enlarge / Pedestrians crossing the northbound US border from Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro, California. People crossing the border are subject to having their electronics searched by US authorities. No warrant is needed. (credit: Punxsutawneyphil ) There's a big area in the US where the Constitution doesn't apply, at least when the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and s
19h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Rice in the Pressure Cooker Today in 5 Lines In an interview with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell, former National Security Advisor Susan Rice denied charges that she used intelligence information for political purposes. During a press conference, House Speaker Paul Ryan said the push to revive efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is in the “ conceptual stage right now ,” but didn’t offer a timeline for a new healt
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

So sheep may safely grazeFrom a large genome study, a team of French and Argentinian scientists may have successfully identified the mutations behind the sheep traits that shepherds began saving from the hunt -- for their prized wool.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

So sheep may safely grazeIn 1713, Johann Sebastian Bach once wrote a delightful cantata, "Sheep May Safely Graze," whose opening lyric boasts of shepherds protecting sheep from the ravages of the hunt.
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Gizmodo

How Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning Revived the Guardians of the Galaxy Image: Marvel Comics. Art by Paul Pelletier, Rick Magyar, and Nathan Fairbairn. It’s hard to imagine these days with their second movie on the way and Peter Quill’s abs liberally splayed across comic pages , but there was a time not long ago when the Guardians of the Galaxy were just a no-name, has-been Marvel team. That changed with Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning’s decision to revive the team in 20
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regardless of income and age, best investment strategy is to diversifyAs Tax Day approaches, many Americans will be making investment decisions for retirement. Conventional wisdom holds that young investors in lower income brackets benefit the most from investing in post-tax retirement vehicles such as Roth IRAs, while older, wealthier investors benefit from tax-deferred investment in accounts like traditional 401(k) plans and IRAs. New research from the University
20h
Science | The Guardian

Nasa's Cassini spacecraft to end 20-year mission by crashing into Saturn After 22 orbits between the planet and its rings, Nasa plans for Cassini to ‘break apart, melt, vaporize and become part of the very planet it left Earth to explore’ On its final mission, threading past hazardous cosmic dust and into hurricanes 1.2bn kilometers away, the Cassini spacecraft will end its 20-year journey with humanity’s closest ever look at what goes on in Saturn’s rings and within
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regardless of income and age, best investment strategy is to diversifyMichael O'Doherty, associate professor of finance in the Trulaske College of Business, developed a model to determine the optimal retirement savings decisions of households with access to both pre-tax and post-tax accounts. The model accounted for age, current income and taxable income from outside sources in retirement.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Groups sue to stop US use of cyanide predator killing trapsEnvironmental and animal-welfare groups have filed a lawsuit claiming the U.S. government is violating the Endangered Species Act by allowing the use of two predator-killing poisons.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Liver responds positively to leptin treatment in patients with lipodystrophyResearchers at Michigan Medicine have found the livers of patients with a rare disease that affects metabolism have responded positively to leptin therapy.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method identifies epileptic patients who can benefit from surgeryModel based on genetic information can be used to improve early prediction of the response to drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) candidates for surgery.
20h
Science : NPR

VIDEO: Badger Burying A Cow Surprises Scientists The researchers say it's the first time an American badger has been documented burying an animal larger than itself. It worked for five days and nights to accomplish the unexpected feat. (Image credit: Courtesy of Evan Buechley)
20h
Big Think

NASA Unveils How We’ll Get to Mars and Explore Deep Space No one yet knows what challenges will confront humans living in deep space. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlling forces between atoms, molecules, promising for '2-D hyperbolic' materialsA new approach to control forces and interactions between atoms and molecules, such as those employed by geckos to climb vertical surfaces, could bring advances in new materials for developing quantum light sources.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cassini mission prepares for 'grand finale' at SaturnNASA's Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since 2004, is about to begin the final chapter of its remarkable story. On Wednesday, April 26, the spacecraft will make the first in a series of dives through the 1,500-mile-wide (2,400-kilometer) gap between Saturn and its rings as part of the mission's grand finale.
20h
Gizmodo

The Unexpected Outcomes In These Videos Are More Satisfying Than You Think GIF: Vimeo An artist named Daihei Shibata created a series of interstitial shorts for a Japanese educational TV show called Design Ah. They mess with viewers’ expectations of what’s going to happen, except that the unexpected ways they play out are surprisingly even more satisfying to watch. There are currently three videos in Shibata’s It’s Different From What You Expected series, realized throu
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon drops appeal, to pay $70 mn for kids app buysAmazon has dropped its appeal of a US regulator's order and will pay refunds up to $70 million for app purchases by children on its tablet computers, officials said Tuesday.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to hack a cell: New platform makes it easier to program living cellsThe human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave by converting their genes into programmable circuits. A new study published by Assistant Professor Wilson Wong (BME) in Nature Biotechnology outlines
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to save animals by reducing roadkillHundreds of millions of animals are killed every year by road traffic. It's a sad statistic that Jochen Jaeger, associate professor of geography in Concordia's Faculty of Arts and Science, and his international colleagues hope to reduce.
20h
The Atlantic

Louis C.K.’s 2017 Is a Startling, Uncomfortable Return to Form Louis C.K.’s new special 2017 begins with the closest thing the stripped-down comedian can get to visual spectacle: the sight of him in a suit. Throughout his stratospheric rise as a stand-up, C.K. has always taken the stage in a black T-shirt and jeans, a workmanlike uniform for someone who thrives on a universal (if profane and often bleak) approach to his mostly observational comedy. In 2017 ,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Archaeologist explains innovation of 'fluting' ancient stone weaponryApproximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. Kent State University's Metin Eren, Ph.D., and his colleagues are
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find high cardiovascular risk even in normal weight individualsA new research study has found that approximately one-third of all individuals with a normal body mass index (BMI) had cardio-metabolic risk factors for heart disease, especially those of South Asian and Hispanic descent.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to hack a cellA new study published by Assistant Professor Wilson Wong in Nature Biotechnology outlines a new simplified platform to target and program mammalian cells as genetic circuits, even complex ones, more quickly and efficiently.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may treat autoimmunity in type 1 diabetesIn this issue of the JCI, researchers in Allan Zhao's lab at Guangdong University of Technology determined that dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids can diminish the inflammatory processes that contribute to development of type I diabetes.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of 'mini-brains' could change understanding of pain medicationThe human body's peripheral nervous system could be capable of interpreting its environment and modulating pain, neuroscientists have established, after successfully studying how rodents reacted to stimulation.
20h
Ars Technica

Utah Supreme Court ruling bars direct sales of Teslas through a subsidiary Enlarge / A Tesla showroom in California where direct sales are legal. (credit: Patrick Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images) In a decision on Monday, the Utah Supreme Court decided (PDF) that the state’s regulators could prohibit an auto manufacturer from having ownership interest in a dealer. In what the court called “a narrow, legal decision,” it said that it wouldn't weigh in on whether allowing
21h
NYT > Science

Why You Shouldn’t Walk on EscalatorsIf everyone stood two abreast, experts say, escalators would move more people more quickly. Good luck persuading anyone to do this.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologist explains innovation of 'fluting' ancient stone weaponryApproximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gray tin exhibits novel topological electronic properties in 3-DIn a surprising new discovery, alpha-tin, commonly called gray tin, exhibits a novel electronic phase when its crystal structure is strained, putting it in a rare new class of 3D materials called topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs). Only two other TDS materials are known to exist, discovered as recently as 2013. Alpha-tin now joins this class as its only simple-element member.
21h
Gizmodo

Everything We Know About Spider-Man's New High-Tech Suit in Homecoming The new Spider-suit is very high tech in Spider-Man Homecoming. Image: Sony In Spider-Man: Homecoming , Spider-Man’s suit is built by Tony Stark, which means it has tons of new features and upgrades—more like Iron Man’s get-up than the Spider-suit we’re all familiar with. On our set visit, we learned a lot more about the superhero’s new outfit. Like, for example, Peter doesn’t even know about the
21h
The Atlantic

Can Trump's Justice Department Undo Police Reform? In the closing days of the Obama administration, the Justice Department hurried to create facts on the ground about police reform. On January 12, eight days before the inauguration, DOJ reached a consent decree with the city of Baltimore to fix egregious constitutional violations by its police department. The next day, it released a lengthy report into abuses by the Chicago Police Department. Thi
21h
The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: ‘Articulation’ by Natasha Trethewey Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Natasha Trethewey began her two-year tenure as United States Poet Laureate in 2012, becoming the first African American, and the first Southerner, to receive the honor in decades. In “ Articulation ,” a poem from our June 2016 issue, Trethewey envisions her recently deceased mother after viewing an 18th-century portrait of Saint Gertrude: Miguel Cabrera / Dallas Museum
21h
The Atlantic

How Is Syria Still Using Chemical Weapons? The Assad regime has been accused of using chemical agents on rebels and civilians several times over more than six years of civil war in Syria. The first prominent attack came in 2013 in Ghouta, a Damascus suburb—about a year after Barack Obama declared that using such weapons would cross a “red line” and “would change our calculus” about intervening. That attack killed 1,000 people. The latest
21h
Ars Technica

Scientists capture video of dolphins risking death to eat octopus Bottlenose dolphins living off the coast of southwest Australia have a dilemma. The local octopuses are tasty and packed with protein, but they are also intelligent, fierce fighters. It's not enough to bite the cephalopods' heads off, because octopus nervous systems are so decentralized that their legs can continue the battle even when detached. Nevertheless, the dolphins have persisted in their
21h
WIRED

Let’s Study Air Resistance—With Coffee Filters Here's an experiment you can do at home to measure the drag coefficient for a falling object. The post Let's Study Air Resistance—With Coffee Filters appeared first on WIRED .
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gray tin exhibits novel topological electronic properties in 3-DIn a surprising new discovery, alpha-tin, commonly called gray tin, exhibits a novel electronic phase when its crystal structure is strained, putting it in a rare new class of 3-D materials called topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs). Only two other TDS materials are known to exist, discovered as recently as 2013. Alpha-tin now joins this class as its only simple-element member. This discovery hold
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers pinpoint new drug target for heart failure patientsResearchers led by Julian E. Stelzer, PhD, associate professor in the department of physiology and biophysics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, have found a new target for drug developers seeking straightforward ways to improve cardiac output in heart failure patients.
21h
Gizmodo

Save $41 On Netgear's Excellent Orbi Routers, and Get a Free Echo Dot Just Because NETGEAR Orbi 2-Pack + Echo Dot , $330 If you take your Wi-Fi seriously, and can’t abide dead spots, NETGEAR’s Orbi mesh routers are some of the best you can buy according to Gizmodo and The Wirecutter , and Amazon’s running an insane deal on the 2-pack right now. In addition to listing them for an all-time low $330, they’re also throwing in a free Echo Dot just for kicks . The previous $330 deal
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energyA novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources has now been developed by researchers. This method can help to assess the future exploitable technical potential of wind and solar PV energy, as well as their capacity to replace exiting generation assets. Furthermore, it can forecast fossil fuel savings and facilitate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecules in the body more visible in new detection system, say scientistsA technique that will enhance the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying disease has now been developed by researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shoulder pad foam layer plays role in fewer concussions, researchers findA simple modification to hockey players' shoulder pads could have an impact on shoulder-to-head contact, the most common cause of concussions in ice hockey, say researchers.
21h
Dana Foundation

Artificial Intelligence, Avatars, and the Future Most people first heard the word “avatar” from James Cameron’s Avatar , one of the top grossing films of all time. Some consider avatars an extension of the self that can save the world in the context of virtual reality or a video game. In Hinduism, avatars are considered incarnations of deities or immortals. The Hindu god Vishnu, for example, has many avatars, including the Buddha. Helping to so
21h
Big Think

1st Scientific Analysis of Suicide Notes Lends Insights into the Heartbreaking Act A team of researchers analyzed 1,280 suicide notes written between 2000 and 2009 to seek a new prevention strategy. Read More
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Gizmodo

Scary Uber Driver Arrested for Impersonating a Cop, Packing Heat, Using Sirens Image: Getty / Gizmodo There are stories about vigilante Uber drivers that are funny, and there are stories that are scary. The latest news from Charleston, South Carolina is a little bit of both—but with an extra dose of the psychotic. Uber driver David Stanley Hubbard was arrested on Saturday after a pair of passengers, apparently fearing for their lives, fled his vehicle at a stoplight. The co
21h
Live Science

About 10% of Pregnant Women with Zika Had Babies with Birth DefectsAbout 10 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. who contracted the Zika virus in 2016 had babies with birth defects related to the virus.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The inner lives of moleculesA new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action has been developed by researchers. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even 'healthy' weight gain raises pregnancy diabetes riskMothers who gain weight in the years leading up to pregnancy have an increased risk of gestational diabetes. Women gaining more than 2.5 percent of their body weight each year tripled their risk of gestational diabetes compared to women who maintained a stable weight. This risk doubled for women with a small weight gain (1.5 to 2.5 percent). Even women with small weight gains within the healthy BM
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Race ranks higher than pounds in diabetes, heart-health risksAmericans of South Asian descent are twice as likely as whites to have risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, when their weight is in the normal range, according to a study.
21h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Engineered immune cells boost leukemia survival for someEngineered immune cells can extend life for some leukemia patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supercomputers reveal how cell membranes keep cancer-causing proteins turned offTwo biophysicists have used supercomputers to show how cell membranes control the shape, and consequently the function, of a major cancer-causing protein.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nurse fellowship immerses Ph.D. students in nursing care while enhancing scientific inquiryThe Hillman Program in Nursing Innovation, developed the idea for an integrated B.S.N. to Ph.D. program to accelerate education opportunities for the next generation of nurse researchers. The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) was the first school to implement this idea and then took it a step further by developing an immersion experience in clinical nursing practice among
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Jumping droplets extinguish unpredictable hotspots in electronicsThe performance of electronic devices is constrained by their inability to evenly dissipate the waste heat they produce. Since the waste heat isn't uniformly distributed, hotspots are all too prevalent in electronics. While a few options for hotspot cooling exist, they don't work well for mobile hotspots, which move according to ever-changing computing tasks or power-amplification demands. In this
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kent State archaeologist explains innovation of 'fluting' ancient stone weaponryApproximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. Kent State University's Metin Eren, Ph.D., and his colleagues are
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Europe Is Dead Serious About Killing Off Diesel CarsCrippling tolls, massive fines for emissions cheats, and outright bans will help improve air quality.
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Gizmodo

Boeing's Proposed Deep Space Explorer Will Be Our Stepping Stone to Mars Image: Boeing With everyone in such a rush to get the hell off this planet , we’re gonna need some pretty sophisticated digs to ferry us to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Thankfully, Boeing’s all over it: On April 3rd, the company revealed its concepts for a lunar outpost and a deep space explorer. I’m not one to dole out compliments but damn do they look good. While details are still pretty thin on
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Streamlining mass production of printable electronicsWhile memory devices are becoming progressively more flexible, their ease of fabrication and integration in low performance applications have been generally been treated as being of secondary importance. But now, thanks to new work, this is about to change. In a new article, they present a proof of concept, using resistive memory that now paves the way for mass-producing printable electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising waysViscous fingering occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface. Such instabilities are encountered in a wide variety of fields. Understanding different aspects of this phenomenon, and the variables that can control things like instabilities and velocity distribution dynamics, can potentially offer
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biological evidence of 'atypical' chronic fatigue syndrome discovered by scientistsFor the first time, scientists report immune signatures differentiating two subgroups of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): 'classical' and 'atypical.' This complex, debilitating disease is characterized by symptoms ranging from extreme fatigue after exertion to difficulty concentrating, headaches, and muscle pain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

MERS-like coronavirus identified in Ugandan batA novel coronavirus has been identified in a bat from Uganda that is similar to the one causing Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in people, giving further credence to the theory that such viruses originate in bats.
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Gizmodo

Alan Tudyk Thought the Director of Rogue One Just Wanted to Talk to Him About I, Robot K-2SO played in performance capture by Alan Tudky. Image: Disney K-2SO is not the first robot Alan Tudyk has played. He also portrayed one in the 2004 Will Smith film I, Robot —and he initially thought that’s what Rogue One director Gareth Edwards wanted to talk to him about the first time they spoke. “I just thought he was asking me for information,” Tudyk told io9. “So I just had a conversation
22h
The Atlantic

Companies Can’t Solve the Gender Pay Gap All at Once It’s hard to capture all the factors that can hold women’s careers and wages back. While the famed 82-cents-per-dollar statistic helps to make a point about inequality, the gender pay gap is actually much more complex than a single figure. That’s why more and more companies are making an attempt to better understand how discrepancies happen, and what ongoing solutions might be. One straightforwar
22h
The Atlantic

A Tale of Two Air Strikes Three weeks ago, the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq and Syria appears to have carried out an airstrike in Mosul that killed upwards of 200 innocent civilians . Very sadly, I have enough experience with these kinds of incidents as a policymaker that I always want to wait to see the results of the U.S. military’s investigation before judging what happened. The U.S. military isn’t always correct in its
22h
Big Think

These 10 Rules Are How Denmark Won 'World's Happiest Country' — Three Times Denmark's 10 Jante Laws are grim, and yet they bring so much happiness. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Zika Appears to Cause Birth Defects in 1 in 10 PregnanciesNew findings provide the clearest picture yet of the risk to fetuses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Drastic Cuts to Brazil?s Federal Science BudgetThe 44 percent drop in funding is disproportionately large compared to overall reductions in government spending.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birth weight is risk factor for fatty liver disease in childrenThe impact of low and high birth weights in developing Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), a chronic disease that often leads to a need for organ transplantation, has been demonstrated in a new research study.
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Ars Technica

Uber exec accused of stealing IP from Google made $120M, but worked on the side Anthony Levandowski giving a presentation in Japan in 2011, when he worked for Google. (credit: shinnygogo ) New legal filings in the Waymo v. Uber litigation lay out more of Google's allegations against ex-Googler Anthony Levandowski, who now heads up Uber's self-driving car unit. According to a Google document filed in court yesterday, Levandowski created "competing side businesses" as early as
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Popular Science

Even our ancient ancestors had to deal with bed bugs Science Scientists uncover the oldest bed bug relative ever found For about as long as humans have been living in places, bed bugs have been infesting them. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mini brains from the petri dishA new method could push research into developmental brain disorders an important step forward. This is shown by a recent study in which the researchers investigated the development of a rare congenital brain defect. To do so, they converted skin cells from patients into so called induced pluripotent stem cells. From these ‘jack-of-all-trades’ cells, they generated brain organoids – small three-dim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Restaurants fatten up with food delivery appsA year ago Mendocino Farms didn't offer delivery at any of its 15 Southern California locations. Now Ellen Chen, co-founder of the artisanal sandwich chain, is knocking down restaurant walls to make room for delivery drivers.
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Live Science

Sunlight Powers This Touch-Sensitive, Prosthetic SkinThis synthetic skin that can be powered by sunlight.
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Live Science

Tick's Last Blood Meal Preserved for 20 Million Years | VideoScientists have discovered a fossil tick preserved in amber that holds red blood cells dating back some 20 million years.
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Live Science

Carbon Dioxide Could Reach Levels Unseen in 50 Million YearsThe world is on track to reach an ominous carbon dioxide milestone by mid-century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying the brain's suspension system in TBIsTraumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious. New research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer at this 'suspension system' and the ins
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Be more patient? Imagine thatBy using functional MRI (fMRI) to look inside the brain, neuroscientists Adrianna Jenkins, a UC Berkeley postdoctoral researcher, and Ming Hsu, an associate professor of marketing and neuroscience at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, found that imagination is a pathway toward patience. Imagining an outcome before acting upon an impulse may help increase patience without relying on increased w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to save animals by reducing roadkillOf the more than 40 roadkill prevention methods available, a new study shows that, overall, fences, with or without crossing structures, reduce roadkill by 54 percent, when considering all species combined.
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Ars Technica

Trump move to kill privacy rules opposed by 72% of Republicans, survey says Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) Although the move to eliminate Web browsing privacy rules was pushed through Congress by Republican lawmakers over the objections of Democrats, a new poll found that equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats approve of the rules and wanted them to be preserved. President Donald Trump yesterday signed the repeal of online privacy rules that would have limit
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Latest Headlines | Science News

When coal replaces a cleaner energy source, health is on the lineHealth concerns prompted a shift from nuclear power to coal. But that shift came with its own health troubles, a new study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new idea connects the synthesis of clays and the origin of metabolismThe question of how life has begun has fascinated scientists from many disciplines and it was the organic chemist Graham Cairns-Smith who proposed the theory for the origin of life starting from clays instead of polymers such as RNA.
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The Atlantic

Pete Souza’s Alternate Timeline In the days leading up to the presidential inauguration in January, Barack Obama’s supporters began mourning the outgoing White House administration. Prolonged disbelief over the outcome of the 2016 presidential election had given way to the realization that even deep disappointment would not stop the march of time. People shared their grief for the future and their gratitude for the quickly diss
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Ars Technica

Valve discusses user-centric changes to Steam’s game discovery problem Enlarge / Game discoverability... not an easy problem to tackle, as Steam knows all too well. (credit: Aurich / Getty / gopipgo) A decade ago, Steam was a carefully curated PC game marketplace where you could be confident that the relative handful of titles that showed up for sale were at least worth considering. Today, Steam is a vast and bloated superstore cluttered with thousands of new titles
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NYT > Science

One in 10 Pregnant Women With Zika in U.S. Have Babies With Birth DefectsA study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reinforced evidence that women infected in the first trimester were at greater risk of having babies with birth defects.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Youthful Poo Makes Aged Fish Live LongerThe gut microbes of young killifish can extend lifespans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Car-Sized Asteroid Buzzes Earth - About 10,100 Miles Away! | VideoAsteroid 2017 GM was first observed by the Mount Lemmon Survey in Arizona on April 3, 2017. On April 4, it came within 10,100 miles from Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study detects doubly accelerated electrons in collisions of galaxy clustersA cosmic phenomenon resulting from the acceleration of a gas cloud by a black hole and its reacceleration by the shock waves from the merging of two galaxy clusters, has been described by an international collaboration of astronomers. The study enriches scientists' understanding of the universe on the largest scale.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A staged approach to depression diagnosis could improve communication and treatmentA staged model of depression, ranging from wellness to distress to disorder, could make it easier for diverse groups to talk about depression and has the potential to improve the study of potential depression treatments, argues Vikram Patel of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in London, UK, in an Essay in PLOS Medicine in advance of World Health Day 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reused rocket back in port after satellite launch by SpaceXSpaceX's first reused rocket is back in port, five days after launching a satellite.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar eclipse mania spurs festivals, tours, sold-out hotelsGet ready for solar eclipse mania. Destinations in the path of the Aug. 21 eclipse, which will be visible in the U.S. along a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina, are going wild with plans for festivals, concerts and viewing parties .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North AmericaA study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago.
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Gizmodo

Ian McKellen Explains Why He Refused to Play Dumbledore in Harry Potter Image: New Line If you had to replace a beloved actor who unfortunately passed away in the middle of filming a franchise, you might go looking for someone who also had experience in the “long-bearded wizard” department. Unfortunately for Warner Bros., Ian McKellen refused to take up the Dumbledore mantle. On BBC’s HardTalk , McKellen told the story of why he turned down Dumbledore, in response to
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Ars Technica

Samsung’s Tizen is riddled with security flaws, amateurishly written Enlarge / Samsung's Smart TV interface, which seems to be running on Tizen. (credit: Samsung) Tizen, the open source operating system that Samsung uses on a range of Internet-of-Things devices and positions as a sometime competitor to Android, is chock full of egregious security flaws, according to Israeli researcher Amihai Neiderman. Samsung has been developing the operating system for many year
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Ars Technica

Microsoft will hand early Scorpio look to its biggest Xbox One critics The game-hardware analysts at Eurogamer subsidiary Digital Foundry appear to have gotten their hands on another major piece of upcoming gaming kit. This time, they're set to announce "exclusive" info about Microsoft's upcoming "Project Scorpio" revision to the Xbox One, but in a curious move, the outlet has pinned an exact date and time : Thursday, April 6, at 9am ET. As much as "upcoming news: n
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Science : NPR

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest Scientists eavesdropping in trees have decoded a high stakes game of hide and seek. Katydids rely on ultrasound to find mates and listen for bats, which use ultrasound to find the bugs, and eat them. (Image credit: Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images)
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Live Science

Souped-Up Bumper Car Speeds Past World Record at 100 MphAn engineer built the world's fastest bumper car for "Top Gear."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of siliconIt would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. (Not to mention the fact that it makes up an awful lot of the Earth's crust.) Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number fourteen.
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The Atlantic

Devastating Mudslides in Colombia Heavy rains in Colombia over the weekend caused rivers to overflow and sent mudslides crashing down on the town of Mocoa, burying neighborhoods in piles of mud, boulders,and shattered trees. At least 273 people were killed, and hundreds more injured and left homeless. Search teams are still looking for survivors, as some of the first funerals began to take place today. As Colombia's President Jua
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Less fear: How LSD affects the brainLSD reduces activity in the region of the brain related to the handling of negative emotions like fear, research shows. These results could affect the treatment of mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insight into leading viral cause of congenital birth defectsA new study has revealed why CMV -- a virus responsible for 1,000 birth defects a year in the UK -- is so adept at evading the immune system. The new findings could help in the development of treatments for this and other currently untreatable viruses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paternal nutrition affects offsprings' mental fitness, laboratory study showsThe father's lifestyle affects the cognitive skills of his offspring -- at least in mice. Scientists have now shown that if male rodents are fed a diet rich in folic acid, methionine and vitamin B12, their progeny do not perform well in memory tests. This suggests that the intake of high concentrations of such methyl donors could also have side effects in humans, for example, if they consume exces
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New rice fights off droughtNew strains of rice that are resistant to drought in real-world situations have now been developed by researchers. The study reports that transgenic rice modified with a gene from the Arabidopsis plant yield more rice than unmodified rice when subjected to stress brought by natural drought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North AmericaA study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of siliconIt would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number 14. The most-common form of silicon crystallizes in the same structure as diamond. New work shows that one form of silicon, Si-III, which is synthesized using a hig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marker may help predict success with extended-wear contact lensesA simple marker on eye examination may help vision care professionals predict which patients will have a higher or lower rate of problems after starting extended-wear contact lenses, reports a study in the April issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans, Stanford-led study findsA team led by researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine has demonstrated a way to diagnose cancer without resorting to surgery, raising the possibility of far fewer biopsies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drugs widely used in cancer therapy increase toxicity of chemotherapy in miceA short-term fast appears to counteract increases in blood sugar caused by common cancer drugs and protect healthy cells in mice from becoming too vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to new research from the University of Southern California.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hot spot of N2 fixation in the western tropical South Pacific pleads for a spatial decoupling between N2 fixation and denitrification [Biological Sciences]Nitrogen (N) is the building block of life. Quantifying the sources and sinks of N to the ocean is essential for predicting its productivity and potential carbon sequestration. In his paper, Gruber (1) seeks for “elusive marine nitrogen fixation” following results from Knapp et al. (2), who measured unexpectedly low...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Microbial competition and evolution in natural porous environments: Not that simple [Biological Sciences]In their recent article, Coyte et al. (1) use an innovative combination of microfluidic experiments, mechanistic models, and game theory to study the impact of physical microenvironments on the activity of bacteria in porous media. The authors find that hydrodynamics can profoundly affect how bacteria compete and evolve in these...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Baveye and Darnault: Useful models are simple and extendable [Biological Sciences]Model building is the art of selecting those aspects of a process that are relevant to the question being asked. John H. Holland (1) Baveye and Darnault (2) contend that our model (3) is too simple and that we should have considered more intricate biofilm distributions and other microbes than...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Numerosity representation is encoded in human subcortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Certain numerical abilities appear to be relatively ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, including the ability to recognize and differentiate relative quantities. This skill is present in human adults and children, as well as in nonhuman primates and, perhaps surprisingly, is also demonstrated by lower species such as mosquitofish and spiders,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recurrent rewiring and emergence of RNA regulatory networks [Biochemistry]Alterations in regulatory networks contribute to evolutionary change. Transcriptional networks are reconfigured by changes in the binding specificity of transcription factors and their cognate sites. The evolution of RNA–protein regulatory networks is far less understood. The PUF (Pumilio and FBF) family of RNA regulatory proteins controls the translation, stability, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inositol phosphates and phosphoinositides activate insulin-degrading enzyme, while phosphoinositides also mediate binding to endosomes [Biochemistry]Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) hydrolyzes bioactive peptides, including insulin, amylin, and the amyloid β peptides. Polyanions activate IDE toward some substrates, yet an endogenous polyanion activator has not yet been identified. Here we report that inositol phosphates (InsPs) and phosphatdidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs) serve as activators of IDE. InsPs and PtdInsPs interact...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

EGF and NRG induce phosphorylation of HER3/ERBB3 by EGFR using distinct oligomeric mechanisms [Biochemistry]Heteromeric interactions between the catalytically impaired human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER3/ERBB3) and its catalytically active homologs EGFR and HER2 are essential for their signaling. Different ligands can activate these receptor pairs but lead to divergent signaling outcomes through mechanisms that remain largely unknown. We used stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ion and inhibitor binding of the double-ring ion selectivity filter of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter [Biochemistry]The calcium (Ca2+) uniporter of mitochondria is a holocomplex consisting of the Ca2+-conducting channel, known as mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), and several accessory and regulatory components. A previous electrophysiology study found that the uniporter has high Ca2+ selectivity and conductance and this depends critically on the conserved amino acid sequence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Three-dimensional culture system identifies a new mode of cetuximab resistance and disease-relevant genes in colorectal cancer [Cell Biology]We previously reported that single cells from a human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line (HCA-7) formed either hollow single-layered polarized cysts or solid spiky masses when plated in 3D in type-I collagen. To begin in-depth analyses into whether clonal cysts and spiky masses possessed divergent properties, individual colonies of each...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hepatic FcRn regulates albumin homeostasis and susceptibility to liver injury [Cell Biology]The neonatal crystallizable fragment receptor (FcRn) is responsible for maintaining the long half-life and high levels of the two most abundant circulating proteins, albumin and IgG. In the latter case, the protective mechanism derives from FcRn binding to IgG in the weakly acidic environment contained within endosomes of hematopoietic and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dual-utility NLS drives RNF169-dependent DNA damage responses [Cell Biology]Loading of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and receptor-associated protein 80 (RAP80) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) drives cell cycle checkpoint activation but is counterproductive to high-fidelity DNA repair. ring finger protein 169 (RNF169) maintains the balance by limiting the deposition of DNA damage mediator proteins at the damaged chromatin. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Allele-specific non-CG DNA methylation marks domains of active chromatin in female mouse brain [Genetics]DNA methylation at gene promoters in a CG context is associated with transcriptional repression, including at genes silenced on the inactive X chromosome in females. Non-CG methylation (mCH) is a distinct feature of the neuronal epigenome that is differentially distributed between males and females on the X chromosome. However, little...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Activin-A co-opts IRF4 and AhR signaling to induce human regulatory T cells that restrain asthmatic responses [Immunology and Inflammation]Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells play a pivotal role in restraining human T-cell responses toward environmental allergens and protecting against allergic diseases. Still, the precise molecular cues that underlie their transcriptional and functional specification remain elusive. Here, we show that the cytokine activin-A instructs the generation of CD4+ T...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration [Immunology and Inflammation]Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP–like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Common nonmutational NOTCH1 activation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia [Medical Sciences]Activating mutations of NOTCH1 (a well-known oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) are present in ∼4–13% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, where they are associated with disease progression and chemorefractoriness. However, the specific role of NOTCH1 in leukemogenesis remains to be established. Here, we report that the active intracellular...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Discovery of scmR as a global regulator of secondary metabolism and virulence in Burkholderia thailandensis E264 [Microbiology]Bacteria produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have been invaluable in the clinic and in research. These metabolites are synthesized by dedicated biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs), which assemble architecturally complex molecules from simple building blocks. The majority of BGCs in a given bacterium are not expressed under normal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment [Microbiology]Orthomyxoviruses are an important family of RNA viruses, which include the various influenza viruses. Despite global efforts to eradicate orthomyxoviral pathogens, these infections remain pervasive. One such orthomyxovirus, infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), spreads easily throughout farmed and wild salmonids, constituting a significant economic burden. ISAV entry requires the interplay...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vivo optophysiology reveals that G-protein activation triggers osmotic swelling and increased light scattering of rod photoreceptors [Neuroscience]The light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors have been studied electrophysiologically for decades, largely with ex vivo approaches that disrupt the photoreceptors’ subretinal microenvironment. Here we report the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure light-driven signals of rod photoreceptors in vivo. Visible light stimulation over a 200-fold...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deficiency of a sulfotransferase for sialic acid-modified glycans mitigates Alzheimer’s pathology [Neuroscience]We previously showed that microglial keratan sulfate (KS) was induced in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the functional roles of the glycan and its synthetic enzyme in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a progressive disorder, are unclear. In our study, KS modified with sialic acids having a molecular mass...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BORC/kinesin-1 ensemble drives polarized transport of lysosomes into the axon [Neuroscience]The ability of lysosomes to move within the cytoplasm is important for many cellular functions. This ability is particularly critical in neurons, which comprise vast, highly differentiated domains such as the axon and dendrites. The mechanisms that control lysosome movement in these domains, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1 [Plant Biology]As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sensing relative signal in the Tgf-{beta}/Smad pathway [Systems Biology]How signaling pathways function reliably despite cellular variation remains a question in many systems. In the transforming growth factor-β (Tgf-β) pathway, exposure to ligand stimulates nuclear localization of Smad proteins, which then regulate target gene expression. Examining Smad3 dynamics in live reporter cells, we found evidence for fold-change detection. Although...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Progression of type 1 diabetes from the prediabetic stage is controlled by interferon-{alpha} signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]Blockade of IFN-α but not IFN-β signaling using either an antibody or a selective S1PR1 agonist, CYM-5442, prevented type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the mouse Rip-LCMV T1D model. First, treatment with antibody or CYM-5442 limited the migration of autoimmune “antiself” T cells to the external boundaries around the islets and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Meta-assessment of bias in science [Medical Sciences]Numerous biases are believed to affect the scientific literature, but their actual prevalence across disciplines is unknown. To gain a comprehensive picture of the potential imprint of bias in science, we probed for the most commonly postulated bias-related patterns and risk factors, in a large random sample of meta-analyses taken...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Triad of human cellular proteins, IRF2, FAM111A, and RFC3, restrict replication of orthopoxvirus SPI-1 host-range mutants [Microbiology]Viruses and their hosts can reach balanced states of evolution ensuring mutual survival, which makes it difficult to appreciate the underlying dynamics. To uncover hidden interactions, virus mutants that have lost defense genes may be used. Deletion of the gene that encodes serine protease inhibitor 1 (SPI-1) of rabbitpox virus...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Negative allosteric regulation of Enterococcus faecalis small alarmone synthetase RelQ by single-stranded RNA [Microbiology]The alarmone nucleotides guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) and tetraphosphate (ppGpp), collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp, are key regulators of bacterial growth, stress adaptation, pathogenicity, and antibiotic tolerance. We show that the tetrameric small alarmone synthetase (SAS) RelQ from the Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecalis is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein. RelQ’s enzym
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Self-identity reprogrammed by a single residue switch in a cell surface receptor of a social bacterium [Microbiology]The ability to recognize close kin confers survival benefits on single-celled microbes that live in complex and changing environments. Microbial kinship detection relies on perceptible cues that reflect relatedness between individuals, although the mechanisms underlying recognition in natural populations remain poorly understood. In myxobacteria, cells identify related individuals through a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular interactions and inhibition of the staphylococcal biofilm-forming protein SdrC [Microbiology]Staphylococcus aureus forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices using a variety of cell-surface proteins. There is growing evidence that specific homophilic interactions between these proteins represent an important mechanism of cell accumulation during biofilm formation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well-understood. Here we report the direct measurement...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Potent neuroprotection after stroke afforded by a double-knot spider-venom peptide that inhibits acid-sensing ion channel 1a [Pharmacology]Stroke is the second-leading cause of death worldwide, yet there are no drugs available to protect the brain from stroke-induced neuronal injury. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is the primary acid sensor in mammalian brain and a key mediator of acidosis-induced neuronal damage following cerebral ischemia. Genetic ablation and selective...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Priming GPCR signaling through the synergistic effect of two G proteins [Pharmacology]Although individual G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to activate one or more G proteins, the GPCR–G-protein interaction is viewed as a bimolecular event involving the formation of a ternary ligand–GPCR–G-protein complex. Here, we present evidence that individual GPCR–G-protein interactions can reinforce each other to enhance signaling through canonical downstream second...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of a putative binding site critical for general anesthetic activation of TRPA1 [Pharmacology]General anesthetics suppress CNS activity by modulating the function of membrane ion channels, in particular, by enhancing activity of GABAA receptors. In contrast, several volatile (isoflurane, desflurane) and i.v. (propofol) general anesthetics excite peripheral sensory nerves to cause pain and irritation upon administration. These noxious anesthetics activate transient receptor potential...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformational dynamics and role of the acidic pocket in ASIC pH-dependent gating [Physiology]Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated Na+ channels expressed in the nervous system, where they are involved in learning, fear behaviors, neurodegeneration, and pain sensation. In this work, we study the role in pH sensing of two regions of the ectodomain enriched in acidic residues: the acidic pocket, which faces...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Perceptual integration without conscious access [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The visual system has the remarkable ability to integrate fragmentary visual input into a perceptually organized collection of surfaces and objects, a process we refer to as perceptual integration. Despite a long tradition of perception research, it is not known whether access to consciousness is required to complete perceptual integration....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Species richness alone does not predict cultural ecosystem service value [Sustainability Science]Many biodiversity-ecosystem services studies omit cultural ecosystem services (CES) or use species richness as a proxy and assume that more species confer greater CES value. We studied wildflower viewing, a key biodiversity-based CES in amenity-based landscapes, in Southern Appalachian Mountain forests and asked (i) How do aesthetic preferences for wildflower...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Tang et al., High-throughput screening of rare metabolically active tumor cells in pleural effusion and peripheral blood of lung cancer patients [Correction]APPLIED BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, ENGINEERING Correction for “High-throughput screening of rare metabolically active tumor cells in pleural effusion and peripheral blood of lung cancer patients,” by Yin Tang, Zhuo Wang, Ziming Li, Jungwoo Kim, Yuliang Deng, Yan Li, James R. Heath, Wei Wei, Shun Lu, and Qihui Shi, which appeared in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Sterky et al., Carbonic anhydrase-related protein CA10 is an evolutionarily conserved pan-neurexin ligand [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Carbonic anhydrase-related protein CA10 is an evolutionarily conserved pan-neurexin ligand,” by Fredrik H. Sterky, Justin H. Trotter, Sung-Jin Lee, Christian V. Recktenwald, Xiao Du, Bo Zhou, Peng Zhou, Jochen Schwenk, Bernd Fakler, and Thomas C. Südhof, which appeared in issue 7, February 14, 2017, of Proc Natl...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Lee et al., MicroRNA-10a is crucial for endothelial response to different flow patterns via interaction of retinoid acid receptors and histone deacetylases [Correction]PHYSIOLOGY Correction for “MicroRNA-10a is crucial for endothelial response to different flow patterns via interaction of retinoid acid receptors and histone deacetylases,” by Ding-Yu Lee, Ting-Er Lin, Chih-I Lee, Jing Zhou, Yi-Hsuan Huang, Pei-Ling Lee, Yu-Tsung Shih, Shu Chien, and Jeng-Jiann Chiu, which appeared in issue 8, February 21, 2017,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction to Supporting Information for Rascon et al., Geometry-induced capillary emptying [SI Correction]APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for “Geometry-induced capillary emptying,” by Carlos Rascón, Andrew O. Parry, and Dirk G. A. L. Aarts, which appeared in issue 45, November 8, 2016, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (113:12633–12636; first published October 24, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1606217113). The authors note that on page...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Fluorescence in frogs Fluorescence in H. punctatus. Fluorescence is a fairly common phenomenon among aquatic vertebrates, such as sharks and ray-finned fishes, but rare among land-dwelling vertebrates, particularly amphibians, which count around 7,600 species among their number. Carlos Taboada et al. (pp. 3672–3677) report fluorescence in juveniles and adults of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

S. Jonathan Singer: A man who loved ideas and detested walls [Retrospectives]S. Jonathan Singer, “Jon” to one and all, died February 2, 2017, at the age of 92. Educated as a physical chemist, he transitioned gracefully by way of protein and immunochemistry to become a cell and molecular biologist of huge renown. His initial bout with fame came in 1949 when...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Devil is in the details for DNA mismatch repair [Biochemistry]Ensuring high-fidelity DNA replication is essential for maintaining genome stability in organisms from Escherichia coli to humans. This task requires an intricate network of cellular components that carries out replication and postreplication DNA repair (1). In eukaryotes, replication is carried out by Pol ε and Pol δ that synthesize the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Alpha-1 antitrypsin dysfunction and large artery stroke [Biochemistry]Ischemic stroke—that is, cerebral infarction causing stroke symptoms—is pathophysiologically and phenotypically heterogeneous. To address this heterogeneity, investigators have often chosen to study the genetics of ischemic stroke according to its less-heterogeneous phenotypes. Many systems have been developed and deployed for classifying ischemic stroke into subphenotypes. In pursuit of gene disc
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Epigenetic contribution to diversification [Genetics]Sexual propagation usually occurs between genetically similar partners belonging to a species, a subspecies, or a population. Breeding outside of these groups generates hybrids, progeny of parents with substantial genetic differences. In some cases, hybrids are more vigorous than each parent, a phenomenon called heterosis (1), which explains the success...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Data-based modeling of drug penetration relates human skin barrier function to the interplay of diffusivity and free-energy profiles [Applied Physical Sciences]Based on experimental concentration depth profiles of the antiinflammatory drug dexamethasone in human skin, we model the time-dependent drug penetration by the 1D general diffusion equation that accounts for spatial variations in the diffusivity and free energy. For this, we numerically invert the diffusion equation and thereby obtain the diffusivity...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reconstitution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase ϵ-dependent mismatch repair with purified proteins [Biochemistry]Mammalian and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mismatch repair (MMR) proteins catalyze two MMR reactions in vitro. In one, mispair binding by either the MutS homolog 2 (Msh2)–MutS homolog 6 (Msh6) or the Msh2–MutS homolog 3 (Msh3) stimulates 5′ to 3′ excision by exonuclease 1 (Exo1) from a single-strand break 5′ to the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Common coding variant in SERPINA1 increases the risk for large artery stroke [Biochemistry]Large artery atherosclerotic stroke (LAS) shows substantial heritability not explained by previous genome-wide association studies. Here, we explore the role of coding variation in LAS by analyzing variants on the HumanExome BeadChip in a total of 3,127 cases and 9,778 controls from Europe, Australia, and South Asia. We report on...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comprehensive and quantitative mapping of RNA-protein interactions across a transcribed eukaryotic genome [Biochemistry]RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the fate of nearly every transcript in a cell. However, no existing approach for studying these posttranscriptional gene regulators combines transcriptome-wide throughput and biophysical precision. Here, we describe an assay that accomplishes this. Using commonly available hardware, we built a customizable, open-source platform that leverages the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transition state mimics are valuable mechanistic probes for structural studies with the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 [Biochemistry]Coactivator associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) is a member of the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family and methylates a range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Overexpression of CARM1 is implicated in a number of cancers, and it is therefore seen as a potential therapeutic target. Peptide sequences derived from the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Prion protein dynamics before aggregation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Prion diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson disease, are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by misfolding followed by aggregation and accumulation of protein deposits in neuronal cells. Here we measure intramolecular polypeptide backbone reconfiguration as a way to understand the molecular basis of prion aggregation. Our hypothesis is that when...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of a headful DNA-packaging bacterial virus at 2.9 A resolution by electron cryo-microscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The enormous prevalence of tailed DNA bacteriophages on this planet is enabled by highly efficient self-assembly of hundreds of protein subunits into highly stable capsids. These capsids can stand with an internal pressure as high as ∼50 atmospheres as a result of the phage DNA-packaging process. Here we report the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ab initio solution of macromolecular crystal structures without direct methods [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The majority of macromolecular crystal structures are determined using the method of molecular replacement, in which known related structures are rotated and translated to provide an initial atomic model for the new structure. A theoretical understanding of the signal-to-noise ratio in likelihood-based molecular replacement searches has been developed to account...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Combining DNP NMR with segmental and specific labeling to study a yeast prion protein strain that is not parallel in-register [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The yeast prion protein Sup35NM is a self-propagating amyloid. Despite intense study, there is no consensus on the organization of monomers within Sup35NM fibrils. Some studies point to a β-helical arrangement, whereas others suggest a parallel in-register organization. Intermolecular contacts are often determined by experiments that probe long-range heteronuclear contacts...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

p97/VCP promotes degradation of CRBN substrate glutamine synthetase and neosubstrates [Cell Biology]Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an essential role in metabolism by catalyzing the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. Our recent study showed that CRBN, a direct protein target for the teratogenic and antitumor activities of immunomodulatory drugs such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide, recognizes an acetyl degron of GS,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic disruption of oncogenic Kras sensitizes lung cancer cells to Fas receptor-mediated apoptosis [Cell Biology]Genetic lesions that activate KRAS account for ∼30% of the 1.6 million annual cases of lung cancer. Despite clinical need, KRAS is still undruggable using traditional small-molecule drugs/inhibitors. When oncogenic Kras is suppressed by RNA interference, tumors initially regress but eventually recur and proliferate despite suppression of Kras. Here, we...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ultrathin dendrimer-graphene oxide composite film for stable cycling lithium-sulfur batteries [Chemistry]Lithium–sulfur batteries (Li–S batteries) have attracted intense interest because of their high specific capacity and low cost, although they are still hindered by severe capacity loss upon cycling caused by the soluble lithium polysulfide intermediates. Although many structure innovations at the material and device levels have been explored for the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Localized hepatic lobular regeneration by central-vein-associated lineage-restricted progenitors [Developmental Biology]The regeneration of organ morphology and function following tissue loss is critical to restore normal physiology, yet few cases are documented in mammalian postnatal life. Partial hepatectomy of the adult mammalian liver activates compensatory hepatocyte hypertrophy and cell division across remaining lobes, resulting in restitution of organ mass but with...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tropical dead zones and mass mortalities on coral reefs [Ecology]Degradation of coastal water quality in the form of low dissolved oxygen levels (hypoxia) can harm biodiversity, ecosystem function, and human wellbeing. Extreme hypoxic conditions along the coast, leading to what are often referred to as “dead zones,” are known primarily from temperate regions. However, little is known about the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Probabilistic models of species discovery and biodiversity comparisons [Ecology]Inferring large-scale processes that drive biodiversity hinges on understanding the phylogenetic and spatial pattern of species richness. However, clades and geographic regions are accumulating newly described species at an uneven rate, potentially affecting the stability of currently observed diversity patterns. Here, we present a probabilistic model of species discovery to...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs [Ecology]Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental evidence that parasites drive eco-evolutionary feedbacks [Ecology]Host resistance to parasites is a rapidly evolving trait that can influence how hosts modify ecosystems. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks may develop if the ecosystem effects of host resistance influence selection on subsequent host generations. In a mesocosm experiment, using a recently diverged (<100 generations) pair of lake and stream three-spined sticklebacks,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-capacity, low-tortuosity, and channel-guided lithium metal anode [Engineering]Lithium metal anode with the highest capacity and lowest anode potential is extremely attractive to battery technologies, but infinite volume change during the Li stripping/plating process results in cracks and fractures of the solid electrolyte interphase, low Coulombic efficiency, and dendritic growth of Li. Here, we use a carbonized wood...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials [Engineering]A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cerberus-Nodal-Lefty-Pitx signaling cascade controls left-right asymmetry in amphioxus [Evolution]Many bilaterally symmetrical animals develop genetically programmed left–right asymmetries. In vertebrates, this process is under the control of Nodal signaling, which is restricted to the left side by Nodal antagonists Cerberus and Lefty. Amphioxus, the earliest diverging chordate lineage, has profound left–right asymmetry as a larva. We show that Cerberus,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at neurogenetic loci in field experiments [Evolution]Most variation in behavior has a genetic basis, but the processes determining the level of diversity at behavioral loci are largely unknown for natural populations. Expression of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (Avpr1a) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) in specific regions of the brain regulates diverse social and reproductive behaviors in mammals,...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CRISPR-Cas9-guided oncogenic chromosomal translocations with conditional fusion protein expression in human mesenchymal cells [Genetics]Gene editing techniques have been extensively used to attempt to model recurrent genomic rearrangements found in tumor cells. These methods involve the induction of double-strand breaks at endogenous loci followed by the identification of breakpoint junctions within a population, which typically arise by nonhomologous end joining. The low frequency of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hybrid incompatibility caused by an epiallele [Genetics]Hybrid incompatibility resulting from deleterious gene combinations is thought to be an important step toward reproductive isolation and speciation. Here, we demonstrate involvement of a silent epiallele in hybrid incompatibility. In Arabidopsis thaliana accession Cvi-0, one of the two copies of a duplicated histidine biosynthesis gene, HISN6A, is mutated, making...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: Tarantula tint inspires new ways of making colors [Physics]Creatures of the night that stalk their prey underground are rarely clad in bright colors. But a surprising number of tarantulas—ground-dwelling, nocturnal predators—carry hairs that are a vivid shade of blue. Last year, researchers found that this hue was surprisingly common; it actually had evolved multiple times in different lineages...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stability of Ar(H2)2 to 358 GPa [Physics]“Chemical precompression” through introducing impurity atoms into hydrogen has been proposed as a method to facilitate metallization of hydrogen under external pressure. Here we selected Ar(H2)2, a hydrogen-rich compound with molecular hydrogen, to explore the effect of “doping” on the intermolecular interaction of H2 molecules and metallization at ultrahigh pressure....
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In negotiations, two jerks are better than oneNegotiations work best when both sides have matching personality traits—even if they’re both disagreeable—according to new research.
23h
Ars Technica

Louisiana Tech University patents file folders, then goes trolling (credit: USPTO) The Electronic Frontier Foundation is hoping that the saga of US Patent No. 8,473,532 will serve as a reminder that many universities aren't doing what they can to make the patent system work better. The '532 patent, "Method and apparatus for automatic organization for computer files," describes little more than a system of sorting files into folders. That alone would be enough to
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NYT > Science

One in 10 Pregnant Women With Zika in U.S. Have Babies With Birth DefectsA study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reinforced evidence that women infected in the first trimester were at greater risk of having babies with birth defects.
23h
Viden

Elon Musks næste plan: Computer og hjerne smelter sammenI sidste uge offentliggjorde it-milliardæren Elon Musk at han vil realisere et klassisk science fiction-scenarie: At forene hjerne og computer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are looks more important than personality when choosing a man?When mothers and daughters have to choose potential partners, they do not look much further than skin deep. Mothers will choose a man who is only reasonably attractive for their daughters. Daughters on the other hand prefer an attractive man, no matter how respectful, friendly, or intelligent he may be.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How songbirds teach themselves songsScientists typically think of songbirds' vocal development in terms of how one circuit in the brain learns a song. But researchers have now investigated how zebra finches learn songs from a different perspective. They studied how one part of its brain, which they dubbed the 'tutor,' teaches another part of its brain, the 'student.' They found that in order to teach effectively, the tutor must adap
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hair strands could reveal lifestyle secrets of criminalsHair fiber analysis, a forensic crime tool with a questionable past, could soon have a brighter future. That's thanks to the development of a more refined scientific technique, which could reveal much about a person's lifestyle, such as body mass, diet and exercise habits. These characteristics could then help investigators hone in on potential suspects.
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Gizmodo

What's the Best VPN Service? Image remixed from originals by SuriyaPhoto ( Shutterstock ) and musicman ( Shutterstock ). Last week, Congress voted to give internet service providers permission to sell your private browsing data . Huge dick move! The one good thing to come out of it though was a wave of interest in VPN services, which people should probably be using regardless . The problem? There are a lot of them out there,
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Gizmodo

New Alien: Covenant Footage Teases the Grim Fate of Noomi Rapace's Prometheus Character We’ve known for a while that Noomi Rapace would be reprising her role as Prometheus ’ Liz Shaw in Covenant —but now a rather oblique piece of viral marketing seems to have dropped a big hint about her appearance in the film. Last night, Fox dropped a new TV spot for the movie, set to John Denver’s classic “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” Check it out: It doesn’t offer that much new, but the quick f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NOAA's biggest ship comes home after longest voyageThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's largest oceanographic research vessel has returned to its homeport after the longest deployment of any ship in the agency's history.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Web pioneer slams UK, US calls to weaken encryptionBritish web pioneer Tim Berners-Lee on Tuesday slammed as a "bad idea" recent calls in Britain and the United States to weaken cyber encryption.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU parliament urges new checks to stop emissions cheatingEU lawmakers on Tuesday urged European authorities to quickly establish new checks to prevent automakers from cheating on emissions testing following the Volkswagen "dieselgate" scandal.
23h
Ars Technica

Amid “muffled sobs,” ex-prosecutor pleads guilty to illegal wiretapping Enlarge (credit: william87 / Getty Images Plus) On Monday, a former county prosecutor based in Brooklyn, New York, formally pleaded guilty to orchestrating an extensive illegal wiretapping scheme . By her own admission, while she still served as deputy chief of the Brooklyn District Attorney's Violent Criminal Enterprises Bureau, Tara Lenich forged a judge’s signatures to fraudulently authorize w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook loses search warrant challenge in New York courtFacebook has lost a legal fight against a New York City prosecutor who sought search warrants for hundreds of user accounts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Company intends to build amphibious planes in BrunswickAn aircraft manufacturer that intends to build two-seat, amphibious planes designed in Finland for the North American market is poised to become the first company to build planes at the former Brunswick Naval Air Station, officials said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microscopic molecular cars to race in FranceMicroscopic molecular vehicles piloted by chemists and physicists will line up in the world's first nano-car race in France this month—but don't expect to see anything with the naked eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA double helix structures crystalsEngineers have now succeeded in producing complex crystal lattices, so-called clathrates, from nanoparticles using DNA strands. The programmed synthesis of clathrates represents a template for the precision modelling of novel nanomaterials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Touch-sensitive, elastic fibers offer new interface for electronicsResearchers have created elastic, touch-sensitive fibers that can interface with electronic devices.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

‘Young poo’ makes aged fish live longer The gut microbes of young killifish can extend the lifespans of older fish – hinting at the microbiome’s role in ageing. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21770
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Popular Science

Three (very) young inventors using 3D printing to change the world DIY These designers, aged 11 to 17, have big ideas. Each of these young inventors had a different reason for designing printable projects, but they all had the same goal: to inspire and help others, and to change the…
23h
Popular Science

Navigating with GPS is making our brains lazy Technology Close Google Maps to get a mental workout Navigation apps like Google’s Waze reduce the amount of mental power it takes to get from one place to another—and researchers can now literally see the difference in…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Horizons halfway from Pluto to next flyby targetHow time and our spacecraft fly—especially when you're making history at 32,000 miles per hour. Continuing on its path through the outer regions of the solar system, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has now traveled half the distance from Pluto – its storied first target – to 2014 MU69, the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) it will fly past on Jan. 1, 2019. The spacecraft reached that milestone at midnight (
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The Atlantic

Does Every Person See Their Own Rainbow? Last year, Jason Allmon received a Father’s Day gift that went well beyond the hackneyed tie or mug; he got something that changed the way he saw the world. His family gave him a pair of glasses designed to help colorblind people, like Allmon, perceive colors better. Upon putting on the glasses and going outside, he gasped and pulled his hand to his mouth. “Shit, what’ve I been missing?” he wonde
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New drug delivery system shows promise for fighting solid tumorsA new cancer-drug delivery system shows the ability to exploit the oxygen-poor areas of solid tumors that make the growths resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment.
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Gizmodo

Equal Pay Day Is a Good Reminder of How Much It Still Sucks to Be a Woman in Tech Image: Getty Today is Equal Pay Day, which is so chosen because it marks , on average, how much longer a woman would have to work to make the same as a man did during the previous year. Women across the country are... well, not quite “celebrating,” but marking the day with events and protests , and probably more than a few private grievances about their overpaid shithead male colleagues and bosse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

London to impose new charges to cut 'lethal' pollutionDrivers of the most polluting cars will be charged to travel into the centre of London from 2019, Mayor Sadiq Khan said Tuesday, describing his city's air as "lethal".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experienced auditors better at fraud detection after a simple cue: studyA new study co-written by a pair of University of Illinois experts in audit and financial accounting finds that a simple cue can trigger a sizable increase in fraud detection among experienced auditors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputers reveal how cell membranes keep cancer-causing proteins turned offTwo biophysicists from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used supercomputers to show how cell membranes control the shape, and consequently the function, of a major cancer-causing protein. The protein, a small enzyme called K-Ras, is attached to cell membranes where it senses signals that originate outside the cell. During cancer, dysfunctional K-Ras then activates proteins i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Living downwind of coal-fired power plant could increase risk of low birth weightThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has studied the effects of coal-fired power plant emissions on premature mortality, nonfatal heart attacks, hospital and emergency room visits, acute bronchitis, upper and lower respiratory symptoms, aggravated asthma, and lost work days or school absences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Future carbon dioxide, climate warming potentially unprecedented in 420 million yearsOver the next 100 to 200 years, carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere will head towards values not seen since the Triassic period, 200 million years ago. Furthermore, by the 23rd century, the climate could reach a warmth not seen in 420 million years, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oldest remains of insects from bed bug genus found in OregonA cave in Oregon that is the site of some the oldest preserved evidence of human activity in North America was also once home to not-too-distant cousins of the common bed bug. Archaeologists describe remains found in caves near Paisley, Ore., that represent the oldest specimens of insects from the genus Cimex ever found, ranging between 5,100 and 11,000 years old.
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Gizmodo

This Test Could Settle the Loch Ness Monster Mystery Once and For All A Nessie sighting. Image: Wikimedia UFOs. Big Foot. The Loch Ness monster. All mythologies that have propagated to explain the unexplained, the things modern science can’t quite justify or illuminate. Now one New Zealand researcher hopes to use science to shed light on the lore. Neil Gemmell is a geneticist at the University of Otago whose lab focuses on ecology and conservation. His group uses w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists engineer sugarcane to produce biodiesel, more sugar for ethanolA multi-institutional team led by the University of Illinois have proven sugarcane can be genetically engineered to produce oil in its leaves and stems for biodiesel production. Surprisingly, the modified sugarcane plants also produced more sugar, which could be used for ethanol production.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking the protein-DNA bondThe verdict is in: too many single, flirty proteins can break up a strong relationship.
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Live Science

2nd Pyramid Bearing Pharaoh Ameny Qemau's Name Is FoundA 3,800-year-old pyramid found with a block bearing the name of pharaoh Ameny Qemau has been discovered at the site of Dahshur in Egypt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Individuals of victimized groups require group sincerity before giving forgivenessPublic and political apologies have steeply increased in recent times. Yet the sincerity of those apologies and how they are received by victims varies widely. Based on new social psychological research on group apologies, the sincerity of a collective apology is judged not so much by the inner state of the person issuing the apology but rather by the inner state of the group that the apologizer r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exploring the magic and mystery of mushrooms with the LA Mycological SocietyThere was a dump truck driver from Baldwin Park, a humanities professor from Long Beach, a conceptual artist from Altadena and a stay-at-home dad from Mid-City.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technique makes more efficient, independent hologramsNot far from where Edwin Land—the inventor of the Polaroid camera—made his pioneering discoveries about polarized light, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are continuing to unlock the power of polarization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate how songbirds teach themselves songsMusic can be a powerful form of expression. It's especially important for songbirds such as zebra finches, which learn the songs of their fathers in order to court mates.
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The Atlantic

Susan Rice's Careful Dance on Trump Surveillance Former National Security Advisor Susan Rice told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Tuesday she did not spy on President Trump or members of his team for political purposes, and that she had not leaked information gleaned from intelligence reports about them. But while she refused to confirm it directly, citing classified information, Rice seemed to imply she requested that members of the Trump team whose n
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The Atlantic

The Hasty Resurrection of the American Health Care Act It’s revival time for the American Health Care Act. The Republican repeal-and-replace plan for Obamacare died an unceremonious death last month when President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan abandoned the bill minutes before a floor vote that they knew was doomed to fail. But now, just in time for Easter, the bill has seemingly returned to life and is back under discussion on Capitol Hill. Vice
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The Atlantic

Colum McCann on Facing the Terror of the Blank Page By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Karl Ove Knausgaard, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean Good stories find a way to keep telling themselves, says the novelist Colum McCann, even after the original teller is long gone. In our conversation for this series, he discussed Wendell
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Has music streaming killed the instrumental intro?Remember those drawn-out, dramatic intros into the pop power ballads of the 80s? They’re all but gone in today’s chart toppers, according to new research, and listeners’ short attention spans may be to blame.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Few keep track of their personal data on onlineAccording to a study by computer science researchers, few people know how their personal data are collected, used, shared and accessed. The new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), coming into effect in 2018, will include higher demands on the possibility for users to access their own personal information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon techThe composition of vast swathes of granite found underneath much of the South West peninsula of Britain could offer a vital clue to where deposits of metals crucial for the production of many low carbon technologies can be found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers develop a new way to study key biological processesA novel way to obtain previously inaccessible insight into the functions of a group of essential proteins has been developed by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global growth of ecological, environmental citizen science is fueled by new technologyScientists have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fueled by advances in new technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbnb fans and critics both correct in home-sharing debate, says studyMost Airbnb hosts in Manhattan make less than $10,000 a year, but hosts who rent out their homes for more than 90 days each year make $20,000 or more, generating 80 percent of the revenue, says a new study by Columbia University researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Melting snow contains a toxic cocktail of pollutantsWith spring finally here and warmer temperatures just around the corner, snow will slowly melt away, releasing us from the clutches of winter. However, that's not the only thing that the melting snow will release. Researchers from McGill University and École de technologie supérieure in Montreal have found that urban snow accumulates a toxic cocktail from car emissions - pollutants that are in tur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continuous fitness check predicts potential machine faultsIt keeps a constant eye on the condition of the machine, it carries out diagnostic analyses and it notifies the operator when a part needs to be replaced. The research team led by Andreas Schütze at Saarland University has developed an early warning system for industrial assembly, handling and packaging processes. Intelligent sensors continuously collect a wide array of measurement data from insid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A self-healing, water-repellant coating that's ultra durableA self-healing, water-repellent, spray-on coating developed at the University of Michigan is hundreds of times more durable than its counterparts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two new mechanisms for herbicide resistance found in Palmer amaranthPalmer amaranth is a nightmare of a weed, causing yield losses up to 80 percent in severely infested soybean fields. It scoffs at farmers' attempts at control, having evolved resistance to six classes of herbicides since its discovery in the United States 100 years ago. And now, scientists have discovered it has two new tricks up its sleeve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Industry experts discuss advantages and risks of shifting data analytics to the cloudThought leaders in both cloud computing and big data examine the factors driving increasing numbers of companies to move their enterprises to the cloud, explore the synergy between the cloud and notebooks, and debate whether the cloud is able to provide the level of information security needed by enterprises in an insightful Expert Panel Discussion published in Big Data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research could help speed up the 3-D printing processA team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving silver nanowires for FTCEs with flash light interactionsFlexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are an essential element of flexible optoelectronics for next-generation wearable displays, augmented reality (AR), and the Internet of Things (IoTs). Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have received a great deal of attention as future FTCEs due to their great flexibility, material stability, and large-scale productivity. Despite these advantages, Ag NWs h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Has music streaming killed the instrumental intro?Remember those drawn-out, dramatic intros into the pop power ballads of the 80s? They're all but gone in today's chart toppers, according to new research, and listeners' short attention spans may be to blame.
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Blog » Languages » English

Wizard Lizard vs Escape Goat It’s time for some animal maaaaagic! But which kind of magic would you rather have? Actual wizardry obviously has its perks, but it could be argued that the slight-of-hand and daring escapes of the magician is even more skillful and impressive! Pick your team and let the battle begin! Wizard Lizard Surprised by the magic of these wizarding lizards? You shouldn’t be! Just check out this color-chan
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Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Struggle to Explain Mysterious X-Ray BurstThe brief flash of light from a far-distant galaxy is unlike any seen before -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Price awareness can be a buzzkillOur enjoyment of an experience or product decreases more quickly when we are aware of the price, new research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depressionFor years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers have found no evidence that the gene alters the impact stress has on depression.
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Live Science

Plankton Go Ballistic: Teensy Organisms Wield Impressive ArtilleryTiny plankton boast remarkably intricate weaponry.
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Live Science

In Photos: Tiny Plankton Show Off Advanced WeaponryScientists have found that two groups of single-celled dinoflagellates carry some complex machinery to capture prey. One tiny organism uses what looks like a mini Gatling gun, while another shoots out Spider-Man-like "webbing."
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Panda Playtime (360 Video) It’s time for panda recess at the Wolong National Nature Reserve in China! These one year old cubs are very curious and love to play. See what they get up to in this 360 video shot on a Nokia OZO. See more adorable pandas in Disneynature’s Born In China, in theatres on April 21st. Social Handles: https://www.facebook.com/Disneynature/ @Disneynature #BornInChina Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Piglets 'prefer blackcurrant to water', student saysStudy found piglets have "innate preference" for sweet flavours.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA analyzes storms that caused deadly Colombia mudslidesNASA conducted an analysis of the heavy rainfall that occurred over Colombia that triggered flooding and mudslides.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There's a cost to 'bee-ing' too smart, professor findsIt doesn't pay to be smart, at least for bumblebees, according to a new U of G study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experienced auditors better at fraud detection after a simple cueA simple cue can trigger a marked increase in fraud detection among veteran auditors, suggests a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Finger prosthesis provides clues to brain healthThe aim of a new study was to analyze how the brain interprets information from a virtual experience of touch, created by a finger prosthesis with artificial sensation. The result was – completely unexpectedly – a new method for measuring brain health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new blue gene: NKPD1 variant increases depression riskA study of people from an isolated village in the Netherlands reveals a link between rare variants in the gene NKPD1 and depressive symptoms. The study helps researchers understand the molecular pathology of the disease, which could eventually improve how depression is diagnosed and treated.
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Science : NPR

Taking Shortcuts In Drug Testing Can Put Patients At Risk Researchers use intermediate endpoints like how a drug lowers cholesterol to get a quick sense of whether the drug might improve health. But those shortcuts often don't show true benefits and harms. (Image credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biology explains why men kill big game like Cecil the lion—and how that behavior might be stoppedWhy do some humans engage in expensive ventures to hunt lions, elephants and other big-game species that often are endangered or otherwise threatened?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gene discovered that is driving drug resistanceA gene that is ‘revving the engine of cancer’ against the world’s most common breast cancer drug has been discovered by scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method may help myeloma patients avoid painful biopsiesEngineers at MIT have devised a microfluidic technique to capture and count circulating plasma cells from small samples of blood. The technique, which relies on conventional blood draws, may provide patients with a less painful test for multiple myeloma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Airbnb fans and critics both correct in home-sharing debate, says studyMost Airbnb hosts in Manhattan make less than $10,000 a year, but hosts who rent out their homes for more than 90 days each year make $20,000 or more, generating 80 percent of the revenue, says a new study by Columbia University researchers. They will present their findings on Wednesday, April 5, at the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)'s 2017 World Wide Web conference in Perth, Australia.
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Quanta Magazine

How to Quantify (and Fight) Gerrymandering Partisan gerrymandering — the practice of drawing voting districts to give one political party an unfair edge — is one of the few political issues that voters of all stripes find common cause in condemning. Voters should choose their elected officials, the thinking goes, rather than elected officials choosing their voters. The Supreme Court agrees, at least in theory: In 1986 it ruled that partis
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Ars Technica

IoT garage door opener maker bricks customer’s product after bad review (credit: Todd Martin ) Denis Grisak, the man behind the Internet-connected garage opener Garadget , is having a very bad week. Grisak and his Colorado-based company SoftComplex launched Garadget, a device built using Wi-Fi-based cloud connectivity from Particle , on Indiegogo earlier this year, hitting 209 percent of his launch goal in February. But this week, his response to an unhappy customer
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The Atlantic

We’d Like to Share Our Favorite Poems With You April is National Poetry Month, which makes it a good time to celebrate The Atlantic ’s literary heritage. As our poetry editor, David Barber, wrote in 2010 : For more than 150 years and counting, The Atlantic has published poetry in virtually every issue. It’s safe to assume our founding braintrust wouldn’t have had it any other way. Among their number were several poets of no uncertain stature,
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Live Science

Ballistic Plankton Shoot Their Prey | VideoThese tiny plankton aren't just passive ocean flotsam; they capture prey with tiny, intricate weaponry.
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Futurity.org

A bunch of new drugs show up in hair samples from festivals Hair analysis can be an effective way to get information about drug use, both intentional and unintentional. And it can help identify substances emerging in the drug market. Researchers studying new psychoactive substances (NPS) collected hair samples from 80 young adults outside of New York City nightclubs and dance festivals, from July through September of 2015. Hair samples were tested for 82
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Gizmodo

You Could Get Sick if You Follow Gwyneth Paltrow's Cookbook Recipes Gwyneth Paltrow. Image: Getty If your culinary philosophy includes the belief that no kitchen is complete without a bamboo matcha whisk or a box of gluten-free pancake mix, then Gwyneth Paltrow is probably the lifestyle guru for you. Along with promoting sex-dust smoothies and $66 jade vagina eggs , Gwyn is of course an avid home cook with a library of YouTube cooking demonstrations and three coo
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Mind of the PredatorCome to know the shark, the grizzly, the rattlesnake—all of them deeply misunderstood -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Evidence of ancient 'geological Brexit' revealedScientists have established how Britain physically split from the rest of Europe 450,000 years ago.
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Futurity.org

How birth defect virus tricks the immune system Scientists think they now know why congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is so effective at evading the immune system. The discovery could help treat the virus that is responsible for 1,000 birth defects a year in the UK alone. Congenital CMV is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in children and one of the main causes of childhood disability. The findings, published in the journal eLife , show
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking the protein-DNA bondA new Northwestern University study finds that unbound proteins in a cell break up protein-DNA bonds as they compete for the single-binding site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Set strawberry alarm clock for post-apple bloomGrowers who time their strawberries to bloom just after apples do can reap a better harvest, according to new Cornell University research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ER docs can pick your noseThe range of options for medicating emergency patients intranasally has greatly expanded in recent years and can even be preferable for certain patients, including children, according to the results of a paper published online last Thursday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('When to Pick the Nose: Out-of-Hospital and Emergency Department Intranasal Administration of Medications').
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Melting snow contains a toxic cocktail of pollutantsWith spring finally here and warmer temperatures just around the corner, snow will slowly melt away, releasing us from the clutches of winter. However, that's not the only thing that the melting snow will release. Researchers from McGill University and École de technologie supérieure in Montreal have found that urban snow accumulates a toxic cocktail from car emissions - pollutants that are in tur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mini brains from the petri dishA new method could push research into developmental brain disorders an important step forward. This is shown by a study at the University of Bonn in which the researchers investigated the development of a rare congenital brain defect. To do so, they converted skin cells from patients into induced pluripotent stem cells. From these 'jack-of-all-trades' cells, they generated brain organoids -- small
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New type of insulin-producing cell discoveredIn people with type I diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas die and are not replaced. Without these cells, the body loses the ability to control blood glucose. Researchers at UC Davis have now discovered a possible new route to regenerating beta cells, giving insight into the basic mechanisms behind healthy metabolism and diabetes. Eventually, such research could lead to better tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals the multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding proteinResearchers from Princeton University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have discovered how a fruit fly protein binds and regulates two different types of RNA target sequence. The study, which will be published April 4 in the journal Cell Reports, may help explain how various RNA-binding proteins, many of which are implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative disease, perfo
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Viden

Kæmpe anlæg skal gemme vind- og solenergi i naturgasnettetSkive bygger Danmarks første fuldskalaanlæg for opgradering af biogas ind i en ny grøn erhvervspark.
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Popular Science

20 helpful Amazon Echo voice commands for you to try DIY "Hey Alexa, listen up!" Take control of your smart devices with some well-chosen words. These Alexa commands work on the Amazon Echo, the Echo Dot, and the Amazon Tap.
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Science | The Guardian

Thousands of British children exposed to illegal levels of air pollution Exclusive : More than 2,000 schools and nurseries close to roads with damaging levels of diesel fumes, joint investigation by Guardian and Greenpeace reveals Check whether you child’s school is affected How have you been affected by air pollution? Hundreds of thousands of children are being exposed to illegal levels of damaging air pollution from diesel vehicles at schools and nurseries across En
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New Scientist - News

CO2 set to hit levels not seen in 50 million years by 2050We are pumping CO2 into the atmosphere so fast that by the middle of this century the gas could soar to its highest levels for 50 million years
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New Scientist - News

US bill restricts use of science in environmental policymakingThe so-called HONEST Act promises to end secrecy in science, but will in effect cripple the EPA’s ability to develop public health regulations, say concerned scientists
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The Atlantic

Why So Many Americans Are Saying Goodbye to Cities It was an April 1st headline, but the statistics were no joke. "People are fleeing New York at an alarming rate," the New York Post announced . And indeed, they are—sort of. For starters, a bit of terminology. The Census Bureau tracks two sorts of American movers. First, there are “domestic migrants,” who move from one U.S. county to another. Second, there are “international migrants,” who move f
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Ars Technica

BioWare says Mass Effect: Andromeda bugfixes and improvements are coming Enlarge / Peebee likes things short. Fewer cutscenes make her happy. We like Mass Effect: Andromeda and said so in our preliminary review , but the game has some problems and rough edges. We’re hip-deep in writing our final review, but it looks like we may be able to wipe a number of our complaints off the list while the writing is still in progress. In a blog post today, BioWare General Manager
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Ingeniøren

Så underskrev Trump - nu må internetudbydere frit handle med kundernes browserhistorik Præsident Donald Trump har nu underskrevet det lovforslag, som vil give internetudbyderne ret til at handle med kunders personlige oplysninger, heriblandt browserhistorikken. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saa-underskrev-trump-nu-maa-internetudbydere-frit-handle-med-kundernes-browserhistorik Version2
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Live Science

Healthy Lifestyle Really Does Decrease Your Risk of Certain CancersIt really may be worth it to follow experts' recommended cancer prevention guidelines, no matter your age, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supercomputers reveal how cell membranes keep cancer-causing proteins turned offTwo biophysicists from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used supercomputers to show how cell membranes control the shape, and consequently the function, of a major cancer-causing protein.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Forget about Climate ChangeWe should be embracing energy efficiency and the low-carbon economy because they promote jobs, national security and human health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

The World's Deadliest Scorpion Strike Is Even More Terrifying in Super Slow Motion The death stalker scorpion features a fast and accurate strike, making it one of the most formidable scorpions in the world. (Credit: Arie van der Meijden) It’s known as the “death stalker”—a four-inch-long predatory arachnid capable of whipping its tail at speeds reaching 51 inches per second. Footage shot with high-speed cameras shows how the death stalker and other scorpions use their deadly t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals the multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding proteinResearchers from Princeton University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have discovered how a fruit fly protein binds and regulates two different types of RNA target sequence. The study, which will be published April 4 in the journal Cell Reports, may help explain how various RNA-binding proteins, many of which are implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative disease, perfo
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Popular Science

What does vitamin C actually do? Health How one genius spread a massive myth that's persisted for decades How one genius spread a massive myth that's persisted for decades, and what we actually know about the mythical vitamin C. Read on:…
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

"Mr. Gold" Is Coming Up Short Of His Goal | Bering Sea Gold #BeringSeaGold | Wednesdays at 10/9c As a debilitating back injury threatens his season, tensions over money drive a wedge between Shawn Pomrenke and his father. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://www.discoverygo.com/bering-sea-gold More Gold! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/bering-sea-gold Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://w
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The Atlantic

The ‘Nuclear Option’ Won’t Dramatically Change the Senate The Senate is headed toward a showdown when President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee comes up for a final confirmation vote. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to invoke the so-called “nuclear option,” changing Senate rules so that Republicans can approve the nomination of Neil Gorsuch by a simple majority vote. The looming clash is the latest evidence that Congress has become increasingl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria parasites soften our cells' defenses in order to invadeMalaria parasites cause red blood cells to become bendier, helping the parasites to enter and cause infection, says a new study.
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Gizmodo

Why Did Kellyanne Conway Consult For America's Top Science Organization? Image: AP You might not associate our fleshy president’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway with science, seeing as she popularized the term “ alternative facts. ” But her consulting firm received thousands of dollars from the world’s largest organization of scientists, reports STAT . The White House dumped a series of financial disclosures on Friday, including Conway’s. Her consulting fees includ
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Casio Watches, Unlocked Smartphones, Wake-Up Light, and More Philips’ entry-level Wake-Up Light , Casio watches , and unlocked phones lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Amazon Unlocked Phone Sale If your phone’s on its last legs, or if it’s perfectly fine, and you just want something new (more likely), Amazon’s running a limited time promotion on a number of unlocked Android pho
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Scientific American Content: Global

Citizen Scientists Spot Candidates for Planet NineA crowdsourced science project to find the hypothetical new world has turned up four curious candidates -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PVResearchers from the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential photovoltaic (PV) solar systems equipped with energy storage-and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists engineer sugarcane to produce biodiesel, more sugar for ethanolA multi-institutional team led by the University of Illinois have proven sugarcane can be genetically engineered to produce oil in its leaves and stems for biodiesel production. Surprisingly, the modified sugarcane plants also produced more sugar, which could be used for ethanol production.
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Science | The Guardian

Don Thomas obituary My father, Don Thomas, who has died aged 88, was inspired to take up an academic life as a biologist, by his childhood love of the rivers, mountains and wildlife of Ceredigion in Wales. Son of Dewi Jones, a farmer and poet, and his wife, Kate, Don was born at Llangeitho, a village near the market town of Tregaron, and attended Tregaron grammar school. He was always very grateful for the way that
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TEDTalks (video)

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie BoumanAt the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close -- even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size o
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NYT > Science

When Britain Split From Europe, in a Big WayGeologists have assembled a picture of the catastrophic destruction, hundreds of thousands of years ago, of a land bridge connecting England and the Continent.
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The Atlantic

How Should Art Address Human Rights? Last month marked six years since the start of the Syrian war, which has forced millions of people to flee their homes in one of the largest humanitarian crises in modern history. Perhaps the artist who has most visibly used his work to draw attention to the conflict is Ai Weiwei, whose political activism has earned him a reputation as China’s foremost creative dissident. Ai has made works focuse
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Futurity.org

Is human embryo research the key to treating infertility? Human embryo research remains controversial in many places around the world, including in the United States. Public funding, and sometimes the research itself, is often prohibited, according to experts who are calling for accelerated research. “This state of affairs hampers the acquisition of new insights into the intricate process of early human development,” write Eli Adashi and Rajiv McCoy in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technique makes more efficient, independent hologramsRecently, a team of researchers encoded multiple holographic images in a metasurface that can be unlocked separately with differently polarized light.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

There's a cost to 'bee-ing' too smart, U of G professor findsA U of G researcher has discovered that smart bumblebees die sooner and don't collect as much food over their life spans as their less intelligent co-workers. Prof. Nigel Raine suggests that the energy demands of intelligence eat up limited resources, leaving smart bees with less energy for foraging than their slower-learning counterparts. This is the first evidence of a learning-associated cost i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living downwind of coal-fired power plant could increase risk of low birth weightDrawing on evidence from a Pennsylvania power plant located upwind of New Jersey, a group of researchers led by Muzhe Yang of Lehigh University studied live singleton births that occurred from 1990 to 2006 in the area downwind of the plant. Infants born to mothers living as far as 20 to 30 miles downwind from the power plant were 6.5 percent more likely to be born with a low birth weight and 17.12
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving silver nanowires for FTCEs with flash light interactionsA Korean research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at KAIST and Dr. Hong-Jin Park from BSP Inc., has developed high-performance Ag NWs with strong adhesion on plastic using flash light-material interactions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA analyzes storms that caused deadly Colombia mudslidesNASA's IMERG data were used to estimate the amount of rain that fell near Mocoa, Colombia, during the seven-day period from March 26 to April 2, 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SuperAger brains shrink more slowly than peers' brainsA new path-breaking Northwestern Medicine study that shows that brains of SuperAgers (those 80 years old and older whose memories are as sharp as healthy people in their 50s and 60s) shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to 'typical' memory loss and dementia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Future CO2 and climate warming potentially unprecedented in 420 million yearsNew research led by the University of Southampton suggests that, over the next 100 to 200 years, carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere will head towards values not seen since the Triassic period, 200 million years ago. Furthermore, by the 23rd century, the climate could reach a warmth not seen in 420 million years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brexit 1.0: Scientists find evidence of Britain's original separation from EuropeResearchers have found evidence of how ancient Britain separated from Europe, which happened in two stages, they report today in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-dose penicillin in early life induces long-term behavioral changesIn this paper, the researchers report that low-dose penicillin taken late in pregnancy and in early life of miceoffspring, changes behaviour and the balance of microbes in the gut. While these studies have been performed in mice, they point to popular increasing concerns about the long-term effects of antibiotics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The inner lives of moleculesResearchers from Canada, the UK and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules. They describe their work in this week's The Journal of Chemical Physics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study compares brain atrophy between typical elderly and 'superagers'Cognitively average elderly adults demonstrated greater annual whole-brain cortical volume loss over 18 months compared with SuperAgers, adults 80 years and older with memory ability at least as good as that of average middle-age adults, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Administration of steroid to extremely preterm infants not associated with adverse effects on neurodThe administration of low-dose hydrocortisone to extremely preterm infants was not associated with any adverse effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years of age, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising waysViscous fingering occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface. Such instabilities are encountered in a wide variety of fields. Understanding different aspects of this phenomenon, and the variables that can control things like instabilities and velocity distribution dynamics, can potentially offer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Streamlining mass production of printable electronicsWhile memory devices are becoming progressively more flexible, their ease of fabrication and integration in low performance applications have been generally been treated as being of secondary importance. But now, thanks to the work of researchers at Munich University of Applied Sciences and INRS-EMT, this is about to change. In this week's Applied Physics Letters, they presents a proof of concept,
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WIRED

You Could Soon Print Out Simple Electronics With Your Deskjet Imagine using your $50 deskjet printer to print out digital memory instead of thank-you cards. The post You Could Soon Print Out Simple Electronics With Your Deskjet appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish study shows important genome interactions in animal cellsIn a new study, researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science examined how the interaction of two genomes in animal cells—the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes—interact to affect adaptation of the Atlantic killifish to different temperatures. They showed that although these genomes are separate physical entities, the mitochondrial genome affects th
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Gizmodo

This Guy Invented the World Wide Web and All He Got Was a Lousy Million-Dollar Prize Image: Getty Haha, just kidding. Well, not about the prize part. Sir Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, just won the ACM Turing Award and the $1 million purse that comes with it. The sum seems menial for such a world-changing contribution, but seriously, Sir Tim will be fine. The Turing Award is also known as the “Nobel Prize for Computing” and, accordingly, it’s a huge honor. Is it
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Scientific American Content: Global

EPA Proposal Cuts Hundreds of Climate Change EmployeesThe budget blueprint also attempts to shift responsibility for many federal environmental laws to states -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Yooka-Laylee review: Better than a ’90s platformer Enlarge Is the 3D platformer dead? Someone should probably tell Nintendo. Can't have any more critically acclaimed Mario games doing the rounds. Hell, let Sony know too. Who knows how many more series-best Ratchet & Clank games it has in the works? That's the thing about nostalgia: Everything seems better in the past, even when it wasn't. It isn't a good idea to put '90s TV demagogue Chris Evans
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Gizmodo

Netflix's Defenders Assemble on August 18 (UPDATED) Finlay Mackay for EW A new viral teaser for Marvel and Netflix’s big crossover has just confirmed that we’ve got another four months until Matt Murdock, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Danny Rand start teaming up: because The Defenders is coming August 18. A new video teaser that hit Netflix’s Youtube—and then vanished pretty sharpishly—this morning features Luke, Jessica, Danny, and Matt recuperat
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Ingeniøren

Den originale Brexit var en totrinsprocesStore vandfald henover en kridthøjderyg for ca. en halv million år siden var med til at gøre Storbritannien til en ønation, mener forskere fra Imperial College i London og deres europæiske kolleger.
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cognitive science

Book on the relationship between math and language, from a historical/cognitive perspective submitted by /u/HeNe632 [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Geologists reveal how violent 'Brexit 1.0' separated Britain from Europe Once attached to the European mainland, a new study shows how catastrophic flooding led to Britain becoming an island about 125,000 years ago Brexit might be causing political chaos but whatever Theresa May has up her sleeve it is unlikely to be as catastrophic as the first separation of Britain from the continent. A new study has revealed how giant waterfalls and, later, a megaflood severed our
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Ars Technica

Android 7.1.2 leaves beta, arrives on Pixel and Nexus devices After a lengthy beta period that began in January, Google released Android Nougat 7.1.2 on Monday. Images and OTAs are up on Google's factory image page , and a rollout has started to creep across the Google device landscape. Google is releasing the update for the Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel C, Nexus 6P, 5X, and Nexus Player. As we reported during the beta release, 7.1.2 marks the end of the line for
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WIRED

How Hackers Hijacked a Bank’s Entire Online Operation Researchers at Kaspersky say a Brazilian bank's entire online footprint was commandeered in a five-hour heist. The post How Hackers Hijacked a Bank’s Entire Online Operation appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brexit 1.0: Scientists find evidence of Britain's original separation from EuropeResearchers have found evidence of how ancient Britain separated from Europe, which happened in two stages, they report today in Nature Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The inner lives of molecules: New method takes 3-D images of molecules in actionQuantum mechanics rules. It dictates how particles and forces interact, and thus how atoms and molecules work—for example, what happens when a molecule goes from a higher-energy state to a lower-energy one. But beyond the simplest molecules, the details become very complex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising waysThose who have mixed oil and vinegar may have unknowingly observed a strange fluid phenomenon called fingering instability. A type of this phenomenon, called viscous fingering (VF), occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Future CO2 and climate warming potentially unprecedented in 420 million yearsNew research led by the University of Southampton suggests that, over the next 100 to 200 years, carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere will head towards values not seen since the Triassic period, 200 million years ago. Furthermore, by the 23rd century, the climate could reach a warmth not seen in 420 million years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Streamlining mass production of printable electronicsMemory devices—as a subset of electronic functions that includes logic, sensors and displays—have undergone an exponential increase in integration and performance known as Moore's Law. In parallel, our daily lives increasingly involve an assortment of relatively low-performance electronic functions implemented in computer chips on credit cards, in-home appliances, and even smart tags on consumer p
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Gizmodo

The Original Brexit Was Probably Far More Catastrophic Image: Imperial College London/Chase Stone Britain’s geographical isolation is one of the cornerstones of its identity which, combined with nationalist fervor, probably played at least some role in the country’s recent decision to depart from the European Union. But when the Isles first split from the rest of Europe hundreds of thousands years ago, things were considerably more violent. British r
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Futurity.org

Watch melanoma cells form tumors in real time It’s clear why melanoma cells are so dangerous when you watch them in action. Researchers recently did just that, documenting in real time (and in 3D) how melanoma cells form tumors. The cells waste no time finding their cancerous cousins, slashing their way through a lab-prepared gel to quickly join other melanoma cells and form tumors. For a new study, published in PLOS ONE , the scientists use
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birth weight is risk factor for fatty liver disease in childrenResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with a cohort of clinical collaborators from across the United States, have demonstrated the impact of low and high birth weights in developing Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), a chronic disease that often leads to a need for organ transplantation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Has music streaming killed the instrumental intro?Remember those drawn-out, dramatic intros into the pop power ballads of the 80s? They're all but gone in today's chart toppers, according to new research, and listeners' short attention spans may be to blame.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research could help speed up the 3-D printing processA team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3-D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A self-healing, water-repellant coating that's ultra durableA self-healing, water-repellent, spray-on coating developed at the University of Michigan is hundreds of times more durable than its counterparts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two new mechanisms for herbicide resistance found in Palmer amaranthPalmer amaranth is a nightmare of a weed, causing yield losses up to 80 percent in severely infested soybean fields. It scoffs at farmers' attempts at control, having evolved resistance to six classes of herbicides since its discovery in the United States 100 years ago. And now, scientists have discovered it has two new tricks up its sleeve.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cancer Researchers Worry about Potential Downsides of ImmunotherapyThe treatments may hasten growth of tumors in some patients -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Apple is completely redesigning the Mac Pro… again Enlarge / The 2013 Mac Pro, doomed to never be updated again. (credit: Apple) Wonders never cease. Apple, normally secretive to a fault and allergic to talking about future products before it considers them ready, summoned a small group of journalists from outlets including TechCrunch and Mashable to its headquarters earlier this month to tell them that the Mac Pro will once again be completely r
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The Atlantic

Can Presidents Take Credit for the Stock Market? The stock market boomed after Donald Trump’s election, and he was quick to say he was responsible. But what’s really behind the so-called “Trump Bump”, and how much can presidents affect what happens on Wall Street? Trump’s administration is packed with Wall Street elites, explains Atlantic editor Bourree Lam in this video. This could account for the market uptick. “[It] made investors optimistic
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WIRED

American Spies Now Have Their Very Own Smartphone App Chris Rasmussen is on a mission, which makes sense, since he's a spy. But this mission isn't spooky. It's geeky. The post American Spies Now Have Their Very Own Smartphone App appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Your Guide to the Crazy, Intertwined YouTube Starscape From book deals to endorsements to rabid fandoms, the masters of the You-niverse are unlocking the power of nuclear synergy. The post Your Guide to the Crazy, Intertwined YouTube Starscape appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less fear: How LSD affects the brainScientists at the University of Basel have shown that LSD reduces activity in the region of the brain related to the handling of negative emotions like fear. The results, published in the scientific journal Translational Psychiatry, could affect the treatment of mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paper: Experienced auditors better at fraud detection after a simple cueA simple cue can trigger a marked increase in fraud detection among veteran auditors, says a new study co-written by business professors Jessen L. Hobson and Mark Peecher.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Robot Will Haul Up to 1,500 Kilos Around a Warehouse for Nine Hours without StoppingNext up on the list of jobs being automated: forklift driver.
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New on MIT Technology Review

U.S. Government Moves Forward with Tests of Novel Zika VaccineFlexible vaccines made from DNA could be used to counter emerging threats.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Price awareness can be a buzzkillMost people who buy a new car, electronic device or music album online want to enjoy the purchase as long as possible, but researchers have discovered something that decreases our satisfaction more quickly.
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Futurity.org

Grab that slice! How our hand knows to move Scientists have long believed that the brain signals that tell you to pick up a slice of pizza or text a message originated from motor areas in the frontal lobe of brain. Those areas control voluntary movement. But new research suggests that may not always be the case. “This has implications for how we understand hand movement and may help us develop better treatments for patients…who have had a
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Ingeniøren

Politikere vil tvinge Danmark til at teste nye bilers forureningTo afstemninger i EU-Parlamentet baner vejen for, at lande som Danmark, der i dag slet ikke tester nye biler, kan blive tvunget til et omfattende testprogram for at komme svindel med udslip af giftige gasser til livs.
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Ingeniøren

Facebook er kampplads for vindmølleprojekter. Tilhængere skal til at tjekke indVindmølletilhængere er nødt til at deltage i debatten på sociale medier, hvis modstanden mod landmølleprojekter ikke skal eksplodere. Det siger forsker i teknologiske konflikter i interview med Altinget.
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Gizmodo

RIP Cassini: A Look Back At the Doomed Probe's Most Stunning Saturn Pictures Photo of Saturn by Cassini, taken on December 18, 2012. (Image: NASA) Alas, all good things must come to an end. Today, NASA will announce the details regarding its Cassini spacecraft’s Grand Finale —a resplendent ending to its 20-year-long adventure in space, which will begin later this month. From late April to September 15th, Cassini will perform 22 dramatic dives between Saturn and its rings.
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Live Science

Fossilized Tick Reveals Perfectly Preserved Red Blood CellsA look at an ancient tick preserved in amber midfeed has revealed the only known existence of an ancient red blood cell, along with the tiny parasites that infected the creature.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When female mates multiply, males evolve to be choosyFemale choice for good quality males is familiar to everyone, whereas much less is known about the evolution of male mate choice. Researchers have studied the evolution of male and female mating strategies and mate choice for female fecundity and male fertilization ability in a system where both sexes can mate with multiple partners, and where there is variation in individual quality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop method for DNA programmed material synthesisFor the first time, engineers of Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in producing complex crystal lattices, so-called clathrates, from nanoparticles using DNA strands. The programmed synthesis of clathrates represents a template for the precision modelling of novel nanomaterials. These findings have recently been published in the acclaimed journal Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The genetic basis for timing of reproduction in the Atlantic herring revealedAnimals need to breed at the time of year when their progeny have the best chance of survival. In a study published today in PNAS, scientists in Sweden and Canada have studied the genetic basis of reproduction in 25 populations of herring from both sides of the North Atlantic. They revealed a number of genes associated with the timing of reproduction, and the genetic variants associated with sprin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global growth of ecological and environmental citizen science is fueled by new technologyScientists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and the Natural History Museum, London have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fuelled by advances in new technology.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Label the limits of forensic science This week marks a chance to curb the misuse of crime-scene evidence in US courts and spare innocent people from going to jail, says Robin Mejia. Nature 544 7 doi: 10.1038/544007a
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Popular Science

Why this wily little badger buried a whole cow Animals You never know when you might want leftovers Oh the agony of being full, and still having more delicious food on your plate. Read on:…
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Gizmodo

Here's How To Use A Roundabout And Not Panic Photo: Getty Driving in a circle to improve traffic flow may seem a weird, European concept for the uninitiated, so Michigan police are encouraging motorists to get on board and understand how to tackle them. Several police agencies in Michigan—including the Washtenaw County Sheriff’s Office, Michigan State Police and the Ann Arbor Police Department—launched a “roundabout enforcement project” tod
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In the future, we will control our mobiles using gesturesBeing able to interact with mobile phones and other smart devices using gestures with our hands and fingers in three dimensions would make the digital world more like the real one. A new project will help develop this next-generation interface.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn researchers investigate how songbirds teach themselves songsScientists typically think of songbirds' vocal development in terms of how one circuit in the brain learns a song. But researchers at UPenn investigated how zebra finches learn songs from a different perspective. They studied how one part of its brain, which they dubbed the 'tutor,' teaches another part of its brain, the 'student.' They found that in order to teach effectively, the tutor must adap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majority of incontinence treatments deliver poor resultsSurgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence -- curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success. These are the findings of a comprehensive systematic overview of cure rates for the treatment of incontinence around the world during the last ten years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Industry experts discuss advantages & risks of shifting data analytics to the cloudThought leaders in both cloud computing and big data examine the factors driving increasing numbers of companies to move their enterprises to the cloud, explore the synergy between the cloud and notebooks, and debate whether the cloud is able to provide the level of information security needed by enterprises in an insightful Expert Panel Discussion published in Big Data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Individuals of victimized groups require group sincerity before giving forgivenessIn a series of studies social psychologists examined group forgiveness and found that individuals are astute perceivers of political process. For an apology to be sincere, the process must show that the offenders are in agreement about the apology and that the person(s) saying sorry for the group represents the whole group.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neptune's journey during early planet formation was 'smooth and calm'A Queen's University Belfast expert has made a major discovery on the formation of icy bodies within the Kuiper Belt, unlocking unique evidence that Neptune's movement during early planet formation was a 'smooth and calm' journey.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D deficiency may indicate cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese childrenIn overweight and obese children and adolescents, vitamin D deficiency is associated with early markers of cardiovascular disease, a new study reports. The research results will be presented Sunday, April 2, at ENDO 2017, the annual scientific meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Participation in a weight management program reduces job absenteeismIndividuals with obesity who enrolled in a structured weight loss program report fewer hours missed from work after six months in the program, according to a study being presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inhaled corticosteroids may raise women's risk of the metabolic syndromeUse of inhaled corticosteroids in women is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, researchers have found. Results from a large Dutch study will be presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MERS-like coronavirus identified in Ugandan batA team of researchers in the United States and Uganda has identified a novel coronavirus in a bat from Uganda that is similar to the one causing Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in people, giving further credence to the theory that such viruses originate in bats. The work was described this week in mBio®, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MERS-like coronavirus identified in Ugandan batA team of researchers in the United States and Uganda has identified a novel coronavirus in a bat from Uganda that is similar to the one causing Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in people, giving further credence to the theory that such viruses originate in bats.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover biological evidence of 'atypical' chronic fatigue syndromeScientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are the first to report immune signatures differentiating two subgroups of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): 'classical' and 'atypical.' This complex, debilitating disease is characterized by symptoms ranging from extreme fatigue after exertion to difficulty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oldest remains of insects from bed bug genus found in OregonA cave in Oregon that is the site of some the oldest preserved evidence of human activity in North America was also once home to not-too-distant cousins of the common bed bug. In research to be published next week in the Journal of Medical Entomology, archaeologists describe remains found in caves near Paisley, Ore., that represent the oldest specimens of insects from the genus Cimex ever found, r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Michelangelo's Medici Chapel may contain hidden symbols of female anatomyMichelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.
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Gizmodo

This Discounted Wake-Up Light Makes Mornings Somewhat Less Terrible Philips HF3500 Wake-Up Light , $50 If you still haven’t upgraded your morning routine up a life-changing wake-up light, Philips’ entry level model just got a huge price drop . The Philips HF3500 is currently marked down to $50 , almost $20 less than usual, and the best price we’ve seen in months. While there are higher end models with color-shifting light and multiple wake-up sounds, this model s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Persistently high pesticide levels found in small streamsSmall watercourses are contaminated with large numbers of herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. A study shows that the legal requirements specified for water quality are not met in any of the five Swiss streams investigated; thresholds for acute toxicity to aquatic organisms were also exceeded.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Choosing the right substrate for the right functionScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a unique molecular mechanism responsible for the substrate preference of ubiquitin-specific proteases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon techThe composition of vast swathes of granite found underneath much of the South West peninsula of Britain could offer a vital clue to where deposits of metals crucial for the production of many low carbon technologies can be found.
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The Atlantic

How Russians Got Used to Terrorism The last time a Russian subway was bombed, it was almost exactly seven years ago in Moscow. That time, in March 2010, it was two young Dagestani women who blew themselves up on two spots on the red line, one of them just under Lubyanka, the headquarters of the FSB. Some 40 people died and dozens were injured, and, because it was the first time in years that Moscow had been attacked, observers pre
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The Atlantic

Sage, Ink: Averting Senate Meltdown
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Screening the dark genome for diseaseResearchers have developed a method to swiftly screen non-coding DNA for links to diseases with complicated genetic components. The technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, schizophrenia and many others, and lead to new treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New species of tree living crab found in Western GhatsAn article reveals a new genus and new species of tree crab in Kerala, southern India. Known scientifically as the 'Kani maranjandu,' it is substantially different from other congeners. Its distinguishing characters include: the structure of its hard upper shell, as well as its male abdominal structure and reproductive parts, and of course, its diagnostic elongated walking legs, which no other gen
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New measurement technique lowers estimated vitamin D recommended daily allowanceAfter re-measurement of vitamin D by improved technology, the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D intake drops from 800 to 400 International Units (IU) per day, new research reports.
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NYT > Science

Cost of Carbon: What Financial Markets Can Teach Us About Managing Climate RisksHow we calculate the social cost of carbon can protect us against disruptive climate change.
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Gizmodo

Most of Us Don't Need a Fitness Tracker Image: Fitbit Fitness trackers aren’t what they used to be. The fad gadget you strap to your wrist has seen a precipitous fall in the last year. Pebble closed its doors after releasing a solid fitness tracker , and Fitbit has struggled (though we liked its new Fitbit Alta HR ). There’s also the fact that fitness trackers, while great for athletes, seem to not actually help most of us lose weight
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A 'stranglehold' on the data that could help explain political extremismThe advent of social media has led to a vast increase in the amount of social information that we see about others' political behaviour and this has important implications for democracy, argues Professor Helen Margetts in Nature Human Behaviour.
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Live Science

Did Bedbugs Bite Early Humans? Pest's Oldest Relatives Found in OregonThe remains of the oldest relatives of bedbugs were discovered in an Oregon cave, suggesting humans may have been in contact with the pests some 11,000 years ago.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Bone-inspired steel cracks less under pressureSteel that’s structured like bone resists cracks better that the traditional form of the heavy-duty building material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do you eat your chocolate bunny? Vast majority prefer to start with the earsNew research carried out online has found that 59 percent of 28,113 respondents preferred to eat chocolate rabbits starting with the ears, 33 percent indicated that they had no starting point preference, and 4 percent indicated that they started with the tail or feet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finger prosthesis provides clues to brain healthIn a collaboration between Swedish and Italian researchers, the aim was to analyze how the brain interprets information from a virtual experience of touch, created by a finger prosthesis with artificial sensation. The result was -- completely unexpectedly -- a new method for measuring brain health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Touch-sensitive, elastic fibers offer new interface for electronicsResearchers have created elastic, touch-sensitive fibers that can interface with electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are looks more important than personality when choosing a man?When mothers and daughters have to choose potential partners, they do not look much further than skin deep. Mothers will choose a man who is only reasonably attractive for their daughters. Daughters on the other hand prefer an attractive man, no matter how respectful, friendly, or intelligent he may be. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psychological Science, led by M
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children at risk of diabetes should be screened by HbA1C, oral glucose tolerance testsDoctors should add an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to their hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) when they screen high-risk children for prediabetes and diabetes, new research from South Korea suggests. The study results will be presented Tuesday, April 4, at ENDO 2017, the annual scientific meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orlando, Fla.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disrupted stress hormone signals in bone cells protect from diet-induced obesityA high-calorie diet, even without a high amount of fat, causes bone loss, and both high-calorie and high-fat diets induce excessive fat gain and insulin resistance, a new study conducted in mice finds. Study results, to be presented Tuesday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla., found that some of these negative effects happened because of an increase in the ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating polycystic ovary syndrome early may help prevent later drop in fertilityIn adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), bringing the amount of abdominal visceral fat and liver fat down to normal restores ovulation, normalizes the symptoms of androgen excess, and may help prevent future subfertility, new research from Spain suggests. The results of the study will be presented Tuesday, April 4, at ENDO 2017, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Orl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urine metabolites may help predict which obese teens will develop diabetesResearchers have discovered a unique metabolic 'signature' in the urine of diabetic, obese black teenagers that they say may become a way to predict the development of type 2 diabetes in people at risk. They will present their results Tuesday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MERS-like coronavirus identified in Ugandan bat—New virus not likely to spread to humansA team of researchers in the United States and Uganda has identified a novel coronavirus in a bat from Uganda that is similar to the one causing Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in people, giving further credence to the theory that such viruses originate in bats.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oldest remains of insects from bed bug genus found in OregonA cave in southern Oregon that is the site of some the oldest preserved evidence of human activity in North America was also once home to not-too-distant cousins of the common bed bug.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neptune's journey during early planet formation was 'smooth and calm'Dr Wes Fraser from Queen's led an international research project 'Colours of the Outer Solar Systems Origins Survey' Col-OSSOS, which uses data collected from the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North Telescope and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) both on Maunakea in Hawaii. By simultaneously using two world class telescopes, Dr Fraser's team was able to produce unique research with a global impa
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Gizmodo

An Overhauled MacPro Is Finally Coming Next Year, No Matter What Anybody Thinks Four years after the launch of the trashcan shaped MacPro, Apple has finally, slyly, announced a new MacPro. The news comes via John Gruber of Daring Fireball : Apple is currently hard at work on a “completely rethought” Mac Pro, with a modular design that can accommodate high-end CPUs and big honking hot-running GPUs, and which should make it easier for Apple to update with new components on a r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New invention uses bacteria to purify waterA new system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water will be tested next week in West Vancouver prior to being installed in remote communities in Canada and beyond.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paintings, sunspots and frost fairs: Rethinking the Little Ice AgeThe whole concept of the 'Little Ice Age' is 'misleading,' as the changes were small-scale, seasonal and insignificant compared with present-day global warming, a group of solar and climate scientists argue.
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Dagens Medicin

Reform skal nedbryde siloer i offentlig sektorVLAK-regeringen med Innovationsminister Sophie Løhde (V) i spidsen fremlagde i dag en ny “sammenhængsreform”, der skal skabe en bedre og mere fleksibel offentlig sektor og et sundhedsvæsen, der giver plads til at sætte patienten og fagligheden først.
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WIRED

RIP, Twitter Egg. It Was Good Knowing You, However Anonymously With the social-media platform killing off its infamous avatar, we pay our respects to the departed. The post RIP, Twitter Egg. It Was Good Knowing You, However Anonymously appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Review: BioLite BaseLantern XL Glampers, this is the lighting system you've been waiting for. The post Review: BioLite BaseLantern XL appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

The Silence of Rex Tillerson Updated on April 4 at 4:35 p.m. ET One would not expect the secretary of defense routinely to inspect the sentries and walk point on patrols, but, in effect, that is what the secretary of state has to do. He is the chief executive of a department numbering in the tens of thousands, and a budget in the tens of billions; but he is also the country’s chief diplomat, charged with conducting negotiati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Materials may lead to self-healing smartphonesTaking a cue from the Marvel Universe, researchers report that they have developed a self-healing polymeric material with an eye toward electronics and soft robotics that can repair themselves. The material is stretchable and transparent, conducts ions to generate current and could one day help your broken smartphone go back together again.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bio-sensing contact lens could someday measure blood glucose, other bodily functionsTransparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and a host of other telltale signs of disease without invasive tests. Scientists say the bio-sensing lenses also could potentially be used to track drug use or serve an early detection system for cancer and other serious medical conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Steppe migrant thugs pacified by Stone Age farming womenWhen present day European genetics was formed during the beginning of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago it was a result of migrating Yamnaya pastoralists from the Caspian steppe encountering Stone Age farmers in northern and eastern Europe. A grand synthesis article argues that young Yamnaya warriors belonging to raiding parties married local Stone Age women, settling and adopting a more agrarian lif
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common antibiotic may help to prevent or treat PTSDThe common antibiotic doxycycline can disrupt the formation of negative associations in the brain, according to new research. The study was a pre-registered, placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized controlled trial in 76 healthy volunteers.
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Gizmodo

Parkour in a T-rex Costume Is the Jurassic Park Sequel We Really Deserved You’d think that putting dinosaurs in any movie would be blockbuster gold, but while Jurassic Park was a massive hit, its sequels aren’t remembered as fondly. Instead of rehashing the same ideas from the original, the sequels should have just put a talented parkour runner in a crappy T-rex costume. We could watch Jurassic Parkour for hours. To make this short film, Devin Graham actually visited s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new blue gene: NKPD1 variant increases depression riskA study of people from an isolated village in the Netherlands reveals a link between rare variants in the gene NKPD1 and depressive symptoms. The findings are published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry. The study, led by co-first authors Najaf Amin, Ph.D., of Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands and Nadezhda Belonogova of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Novosibirsk,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PharmaMar presents new data on the treatment of MM and OC at the AACR CongressPharmaMar has presented new data on the mechanism of action of plitidepsin and lurbinectedin during the Annual Congress of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), which is being held in Washington, D.C., on April 1-5.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The genetic basis for timing of reproduction in the Atlantic herring revealedAnimals need to breed at the time of year when their progeny have the best chance of survival. In a study published today in PNAS, scientists in Sweden and Canada have studied the genetic basis of reproduction in 25 populations of herring from both sides of the North Atlantic. They revealed a number of genes associated with the timing of reproduction, and the genetic variants associated with sprin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electronic control to ensure photovoltaic systems always work at maximum powerThe Advanced Control Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Systems Engineering and Automation has developed a control system designed to ensure that photovoltaic generators always work at their maximum power point by adapting them in terms of the level of irradiance received from the sun and the load connected to the system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using drugs to weaken traumatic memoriesA potential new approach to treat posttraumatic stress disorder: After taking the antibiotic doxycycline, study participants remembered an unpleasant event considerably less, as experiments conducted by a team of researchers from the University Psychiatric Hospital and the University of Zurich reveal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA double helix structures crystalsFor the first time, engineers of Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in producing complex crystal lattices, so-called clathrates, from nanoparticles using DNA strands. The programmed synthesis of clathrates represents a template for the precision modelling of novel nanomaterials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do you eat your chocolate bunny? Vast majority prefer to start with the earsNew research carried out online has found that 59% of 28,113 respondents preferred to eat chocolate rabbits starting with the ears, 33% indicated that they had no starting point preference, and 4% indicated that they started with the tail or feet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The value of second opinions demonstrated in studyMany patients seek a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, researchers report that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis -- changing their care plan and potentially their lives. Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Typologies: Women drinkers are more diverse than men drinkersPeople drink alcohol for a number of reasons. This study focused on understanding why people drink and the consequences of their drinking. First, researchers identified “clusters” of drinkers in New Zealand, based on how much alcohol they drank, their beverage of choice, and a preference for public or private drinking locations. Second, it investigated the relations among drinker types and harms e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weight history over time shows higher risk of death for overweight, obese peoplePeople who are obese or overweight at some point in their adult lives have an elevated risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Compass protein attracts heap of criticism Debate grows over a molecule implicated in animal navigation. Nature 544 16 doi: 10.1038/544016a
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Gizmodo

New Hints at Kylo Ren's Appearance in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Arnold Schwarzenegger hints he’s not done with the Terminator franchise yet. Sigourney Weaver talks Avatar 2 . Marc Guggenheim teases mortal danger in Legends of Tomorrow , and why Oliver and Felicity broke up in Arrow . Plus, a new look at Agents of SHIELD ’s return, and more details on Bruce Timm’s next DC movie. Spoilers! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Making Star Wars has a new report about some ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vacuum channel transistor combines best of semiconductors and vacuum tubes(Phys.org)—Although vacuum tubes were the basic components of early electronic devices, by the 1970s they were almost entirely replaced by semiconductor transistors. But in the past few years, researchers have been developing "nanoscale vacuum channel transistors" (NVCTs) that combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern semiconductors into a single device.
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Videnskabens Verden

Vi elsker vores kæledyr, vi elsker dem faktisk så meget, at de bliver syge af det. Vi overfodrer dem, men motionerer dem ikke nok. Og vi går efter et særligt udseende, der kan være en fysiologisk udfordring for dyrene. Udvalget af hunderacer er enormt. Fra de store ludende, irske ulvehunde til de helt små, fyrige chihuahuaer og den kække, franske bulldog. Men hvorfor køber folk hunderacer, der har
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Futurity.org

Why we shouldn’t harm the desert’s ‘skin’ Scientists have discovered that the desert’s biocrust plays a previously unknown role in regulating the arid climate. This “living skin of the desert” goes by different names. You may have seen signs in parks and protected areas advising you not to step on “cryptobiotic soil,” or read about “biocrusts.” Each refers to the same thing: a community of mosses, lichens, and sometimes cyanobacteria in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laboratory study shows that paternal nutrition affects offsprings' mental fitnessThe father's lifestyle affects the cognitive skills of his offspring -- at least in mice. DZNE scientists have now shown that if male rodents are fed a diet rich in folic acid, methionine and vitamin B12, their progeny do not perform well in memory tests. This suggests that the intake of high concentrations of such methyl donors could also have side effects in humans, e.g. if they consume excessiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Michelangelo's Medici Chapel may contain hidden symbols of female anatomyMichelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skeletons developed as chemistry of oceans changed, study showsSkeletons and shells first came into being 550 million years ago as the chemical make-up of seawater changed, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global growth of ecological and environmental citizen science is fueled by new technologyScientists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and the Natural History Museum, London have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fueled by advances in new technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop a new way to study key biological processesA team of scientists at The University of East Anglia (UEA) has developed a novel way to obtain previously inaccessible insight into the functions of a group of essential proteins. They have have developed a new method to study these delicate iron-sulfur clusters based on mass spectrometry -- an advanced technique that can identify proteins by measuring their mass with great accuracy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits childrenDelaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Platelets instead of quantum dotsA team of researchers led by ETH Zurich professor David Norris has developed a model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation. Using pyrite, they also managed to confirm their theory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A step forward to making crops drought tolerantQUT researchers are part of an international consortium of researchers whose work hopes to future-proof crops against the impacts of global climate change. The researchers have sequenced the genome of the 'resurrection plant' Xerophyta viscosa, revealing a genetic 'footprint' of the plant's ability to tolerate severe drought for long periods of time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight into leading viral cause of congenital birth defectsA study led by Cardiff University has revealed why CMV -- a virus responsible for 1,000 birth defects a year in the UK -- is so adept at evading the immune system. The new findings could help in the development of treatments for this and other currently untreatable viruses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even 'healthy' weight gain raises pregnancy diabetes riskMothers who gain weight in the years leading up to pregnancy have an increased risk of gestational diabetes. Women gaining more than 2.5 percent of their body weight each year tripled their risk of gestational diabetes compared to women who maintained a stable weight. This risk doubled for women with a small weight gain (1.5 to 2.5 percent). Even women with small weight gains within the healthy BM
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Current Graphene Science tours its journey of high-performance energy storage devicesGraphene has made its fathomable pathway over wide range of user-friendly energy storage devices. The present study was aimed to comprehend its unseen potentials of energy conservation and providing broader prospective for future research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psychiatric disorders do not increase risk of Alzheimer's diseasePsychiatric disorders do not increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. However, the prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses increased before the Alzheimer's diagnosis, which might be due to prodromal symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. The results were published in European Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proton beam power boosted with pulsed lasers, promising better proton therapiesA Japan-based research team led by Osaka University demonstrated multiple sharp, ultra-short laser pulses that promise new types of proton-beam systems potentially useful in areas such as cancer treatment. By combining the pulses to effectively create longer pulses, high-energy charged particles can be produced at laser intensities 100 times less than predicted by previous theoretical models. Thes
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Dagens Medicin

Vangsted: Flere læger vil komme i søgelyset Skærpede tilsynsregler betyder, at Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed hurtigere kan gribe ind, hvis der er fare for patientsikkerheden. Det betyder, at flere læger vil komme i styrelsens søgelys, siger Anne-Marie Vangsted, direktør i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
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Viden

Ny professor i computerspil: Spil er ikke bare spilMed to millioner euro i forskningsstøtte går Danmarks første spilprofessor, Espen Aarseth, på jagt efter en samlende analysemodel til digitale spil.
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Viden

Milliardinvestering på vej: Bioethanolfabrik kan skabe 1000 grønne jobPlanerne om en bioethanolfabrik i Vestjylland var skrinlagt, men nu er ny milliardinvestor på banen. 1000 vestjyske arbejdspladser er i spil.
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Ars Technica

Russia: Maybe reusing rockets isn’t a crazy capitalist idea after all Enlarge / Maybe reusing rockets isn't a crazy American capitalist idea after all? (credit: SpaceX) As recently as last year, Russian rocket scientists were dubious about the potential of reusable rockets, such as those being developed by SpaceX and Blue Origin. Among the doubters was the Central Research Institute of Machine Building, which develops basic rocket strategy for Roscosmos, the Russia
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The Scientist RSS

Mutations Linked to Secondary CancersChildhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.
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The Scientist RSS

DNA-Based Zika Vaccine Reaches Phase 2An NIAID-sponsored clinical trial advances beyond safety testing.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sharp ShootersSingle-celled dinoflagellates (Polykrikos) use harpoon-like organelles to hunt and capture prey.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Mechanisms of ResistanceCancers appear to be able to evolve resistance to many of the therapies doctors have tried.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Targeting Cancer AntigensNeoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and DiseaseThe body's rhythms could affect numerous ailments as well as how people respond to treatments.
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Ingeniøren

Iværksætterkontor bruger indopererede chips som adgangskortImplanterede chips baseret på Near Field Communications-teknologi hitter i Sverige og især hos kontorfællesskabet Epicenter
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Gizmodo

Trump's War on Climate Science Is a War on the Poor and People of Color Illustration: Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo As the White House was preparing to implement deep cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency earlier this month, Mustafa Ali, head of the Office on Environmental Justice, resigned . A week later, his motivation for departing became clear, when President Trump released a hardline budget draft that called for slashing EPA funding by 31 percent, and eliminatin
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Scientific American Content: Global

Politicians Shouldn't Troll through Scientists' E-mailsThey are useless in evaluating whether research results are correct -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depressionFor years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found no evidence that the gene alters the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Choosing the right substrate for the right functionScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a unique molecular mechanism responsible for the substrate preference of ubiquitin-specific proteases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon techThe composition of vast swathes of granite found underneath much of the South West peninsula of Britain could offer a vital clue to where deposits of metals crucial for the production of many low carbon technologies can be found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Price awareness can be a buzzkillOur enjoyment of an experience or product decreases more quickly when we are aware of the price.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish study shows important genome interactions in animal cellsIn a new study, researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science examined how the interaction of two genomes in animal cells -- the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes -- interact to affect adaptation of the Atlantic killifish to different temperatures. They showed that although these genomes are separate physical entities, the mitochondrial genome affe
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Ars Technica

Lighter weight, lower drag, and more power—the Jaguar F-Type SVR Jim Resnick When Jaguar launched the F-Type a few years ago, it awoke something long-dormant in the British carmaker. Jaguar used to make legitimate sports cars which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans five times in the 1950s. But focus groups and corporate mismanagement diluted away that spirit by the end of the century, a lackluster product line being the leftovers. The F-Type was a proper 21 st centu
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WIRED

An Aircraft Design That’ll Make You Love the Middle Seat. No Joke Wider, deeper, softer, more entertaining. And no more fighting over the armrest. The post An Aircraft Design That’ll Make You Love the Middle Seat. No Joke appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

Why Trump Will Find It Hard to Pivot From Bigotry to Bipartisanship Since President Donald Trump has taken so many positions that align more closely with the typical elected Democrat than the typical elected Republican—skepticism of free trade, support for massive federal infrastructure spending, comfort with a single-payer healthcare system—why can’t the president, who promised to practice “the art of the deal,” advance his agenda by garnering some Democratic vo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inventor of World Wide Web wins computing's 'Nobel Prize'Most people who search on Google, share on Facebook and shop on Amazon have never heard of Sir Tim Berners-Lee. But they might not be doing any of those things had he not invented the World Wide Web.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Retired MRI scanner gets new life studying the starsA team of researchers has successfully taken a magnet from a decommissioned MRI scanner used by a Brisbane, Australia, hospital for scanning patients, and recycled it for use in an experiment at CERN's ISOLDE facility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energyResearchers from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) have developed a novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources. This method can help to assess the future exploitable technical potential of wind and solar PV energy, as well as their capacity to replace exiting generation assets. Furthermore, it can forecast fossil fuel savings and facilitate reductions in greenhouse g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Renewable energy needed to drive uptake of electric vehiclesPlugging into renewable energy sources outweighs the cost and short driving ranges for consumers intending to buy electric vehicles, according to a new study. Queensland University of Technology Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr. Kenan Degirmenci, from QUT Business School, said environmental performance -- or being green -- was more important than price or range confidence for electric vehicle consu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism of aging recovery for progeria patients revealedDGIST's research teams reveal the mechanism to recover the function of aging cells in HGPS patients using ROCK inhibitor. Propose a new research direction for studies on the improvement of aging and aging diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Doctor' robot could help solve sports-concussion dilemma in rural AmericaFrom bustling cities to tiny farming communities, the bright lights of the local stadium are common beacons to the Friday night ritual of high school football.
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Gizmodo

Amazon's Discounting a Bunch of Popular Unlocked Smartphones For Two Days Only Amazon Unlocked Phone Sale If your phone’s on its last legs, or if it’s perfectly fine, and you just want something new (more likely), Amazon’s running a limited time promotion on a number of unlocked Android phones . The highlights here are the Sony Xperia XA line , LeEco’s Le Pro 3 , and the Asus Zenfone Zoom , all of which are $60-$70 less than usual - and they were already pretty affordable t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An eye in the sky to tackle the flyScientists at the University of Aberdeen are putting an eye in the sky as they investigate a potential new method to prevent catastrophic damage to soft fruit crops in the UK.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Steppe migrant thugs pacified by Stone Age farming womenWhen present day European genetics was formed during the beginning of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago it was a result of migrating Yamnaya pastoralists from the Caspian steppe encountering Stone Age farmers in northern and eastern Europe. A grand synthesis article published in the journal Antiquity argues that young Yamnaya warriors belonging to raiding parties married local Stone Age women, settli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wrapping sponges in graphene nanoribbons allows for Joule heating to help clean up oil spills(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Science and Technology of China has found a way to make sponges used to clean up oil spills in the ocean work better when soaking up heavy crude oil. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the team describes how they wrapped polymeric sponges in graphene nanoribbons and then applied an electric current to cause the spo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a new way to study key biological processesA team of scientists at The University of East Anglia (UEA) has developed a novel way to obtain previously inaccessible insight into the functions of a group of essential proteins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skeletons evolved as ocean chemistry changedSkeletons and shells first came into being 550 million years ago as the chemical make-up of seawater changed, a study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some of the ways Tibetans have evolved to stand living at such high altitudes revealed(Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from the University of Queensland in Australia and Wenzhou Medical University in China has identified some of the genes common to people living in Tibet that are different than people living in other areas. In their paper published in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the genetic differences they found and how some of are
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Ars Technica

Formula 1: A technical deep dive into building the world’s fastest cars Enlarge (credit: Christoffer Rudquist) For over 60 years, Formula 1 teams have developed, tested, and built the fastest and most technologically impressive cars the world has ever seen. An almost unending list of superlatives can be ladled onto F1 cars: they can accelerate from 0 to 190mph in about 10 seconds, fling around a corner at such speeds that the driver experiences g-force close to that
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Dagens Medicin

KU vil uddanne flere eksperter i immunologiSiden efteråret 2016 har Københavns Universitet som den første institution i landet udbudt en masteruddannelse i immunologi og inflammation. De nye kandidater skal imødekomme den stigende efterspørgsel på immunologisk ekspertise på hospitaler og i industrien.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Over 10,000 Canadian women per year can stop taking blood thinners for unexplained clotsA Canadian-led research group has developed and validated a rule that could let half of women with unexplained vein blood clots stop taking blood thinners for life. These findings were published in The BMJ.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quickly assessing brain bleeding in head injuries using new deviceIn a clinical trial conducted among adults in 11 hospitals, researchers have shown that a hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the US Food and Drug Administration that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out whether a person with a head injury likely has brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment. The trial results also show the device predict
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WIRED

The Ins and Outs of Silicon Valley’s New Sexual Revolution Polyamory has made a raging comeback in a surprising community—the STEM-first millennials of the tech industry. The post The Ins and Outs of Silicon Valley's New Sexual Revolution appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Visit the Nuclear Bunkers That House a Million People in Beijing It's a bargain apartment—as long as you're not picky about fresh air. The post Visit the Nuclear Bunkers That House a Million People in Beijing appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

HP Elitebook x360 review: A work laptop you’ll like using at home Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Whether you like it or not, you probably spend more time on your work computer than your personal machine. If those devices happen to be one and the same, then you probably want something thin, light, and attractive, not one of the bulky business laptops of yore. HP's newest release, the Elitebook x360, may be geared toward working professionals, b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

African forests threatened by global demand for commodity cropsInternational demand for commodity crops like cocoa is putting increasing pressure on tropical forests in sub-Saharan Africa, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds support for new forms of liquid waterPutting water in a (really) tight spot and cranking up the pressure could reveal new sides of its already mercurial personality, says a new international study co-authored by chemists at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New efficiency record for low-cost solar cellResearchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have achieved a new record efficiency for low-cost semi-transparent perovskite solar cells in a breakthrough that could bring down the cost of generating solar electricity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People who want to prevent immigration to the UK are less happy than those who welcome itPeople who want to stop further immigration to the UK are less happy than those who welcome it, and politicians are part of the reason for this, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rise of 'foodie culture' has left the working class behindThe rise of a new foodie culture of world cuisine in England has left the working-class and non-Londoners behind, new research by The University of Manchester has found.
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The Atlantic

Trees Have Their Own Songs Just as birders can identify birds by their melodious calls, David George Haskell can distinguish trees by their sounds. The task is especially easy when it rains, as it so often does in the Ecuadorian rainforest. Depending on the shapes and sizes of their leaves, the different plants react to falling drops by producing “a splatter of metallic sparks” or “a low, clean, woody thump” or “a speed-ty
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nitrogen, phosphorus from fertilizers and pet waste polluting urban waterNew research from the University of Minnesota points to lawn fertilizers and pet waste as the dominant sources of nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants in seven sub-watersheds of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota.
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Science | The Guardian

Why haven’t sheep evolved into being less nervous of humans? The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Since sheep have been farmed for thousands of years, why have no breeds evolved into being less nervous of humans? Paul Dodd, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire Continue reading...
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New Scientist - News

Google uses neural networks to translate without transcribingA new way of translating speech without first transcribing it could outperform conventional machine translation, particularly for rare languages
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the worldOne of the biggest modern myths about agriculture is that organic farming is inherently sustainable. It can be, but it isn't necessarily. After all, soil erosion from chemical-free tilled fields undermined the Roman Empire and other ancient societies around the world. Other agricultural myths hinder recognizing the potential to restore degraded soils to feed the world using fewer agrochemicals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How World War I ushered in the century of oilOn July 7, 1919, a group of U.S. military members dedicated Zero Milestone – the point from which all road distances in the country would be measured – just south of the White House lawn in Washington, D.C. The next morning, they helped to define the future of the nation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why do schools want all students to look the same?Why are schools so obsessed with all children looking the same? Since the later part of the 20th century, schools in Australia have opted for strict uniform policies, where students will wear an identical set of clothes. Often that extends to the style of hair that's allowed; what backpack, shoes, and even, in some instances, what underwear to wear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists publish study on glacial carbon cycleTwo Montana State University researchers have played a major role in discovering how microbial communities in melting glaciers contribute to the Earth's carbon cycle, a finding that has global implications as the bulk of Earth's glaciers shrink in response to a warming climate.
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Live Science

Neil deGrasse Tyson: I'll Fly to Mars with SpaceX, After Elon Musk Sends His MomNeil deGrasse Tyson is willing to fly to Mars with SpaceX, as long as company founder and CEO Elon Musk meets a few key conditions.
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Popular Science

We need more 'body farms' to figure out how corpses rot Science Research on pig carcasses and a new body farm in Florida might offer some clues Slowly, researchers are piecing together how water can skew decomposition or batter a body. Read on:…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals how ulcer-inducing bacteria survive in the stomachScientists at The University of Western Australia, in collaboration with researchers at Imperial College London and Perth-based biotech Ondek Pty Ltd, have revealed new insights into the structure of an important biomolecule in Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach ulcers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can better advice keep you safer online?Many Americans are worried about their online privacy and security. And rightly so: Nearly half of Americans have encountered at least one serious problem with online safety.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits childrenDelaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows.
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The Atlantic

Will Trump Ever Be Blamed? When President Trump’s plan to repeal Obamacare fizzled, his supporters seemed to blame anyone but him. Soon after the House of Representatives pulled its health-care bill late last month, NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asked two Trump voters, “who do you blame for what just happened?” “I mean, the president sold himself as a deal-maker ... We have a Republican president, a Republican Congress. Yet th
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Live Science

Blowhole 'Breathalyzer' Shows Salmonella in Killer WhalesScientists gave killer whales a breathalyzer to test the animals' health, and found that the orcas are carrying some human pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Steppe migrant thugs pacified by Stone Age farming womenWhen present day European genetics was formed during the beginning of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago it was a result of migrating Yamnaya pastoralists from the Caspian steppe encountering Stone Age farmers in northern and eastern Europe. A grand synthesis article published in the journal Antiquity argues that young Yamnaya warriors belonging to raiding parties married local Stone Age women, settli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Persistently high pesticide levels found in small streamsSmall watercourses are contaminated with large numbers of herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. A study commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment and published today shows that the legal requirements specified for water quality are not met in any of the five Swiss streams investigated. Indeed, thresholds for acute toxicity to aquatic organisms were also exceeded. Bioassays indicate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Male choosiness emerges when females have multiple partnersAcademy researchers Mikael Puurtinen and Lutz Fromhage at the Department of Biological and Environmental Science of the University of Jyväskylä and the Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions have found out that male choosiness is more likely than previously recognized. The results have been recently published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proton beam power boosted with pulsed lasers, promising better proton therapiesA Japan-based research team led by Osaka University demonstrated multiple sharp, ultra-short laser pulses that promise new types of proton-beam systems potentially useful in areas such as cancer treatment. By combining the pulses to effectively create longer pulses, high-energy charged particles can be produced at laser intensities 100 times less than predicted by previous theoretical models. Thes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research exposes an evolutionary arms race – virus vs. hostMonash University scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Platelets instead of quantum dotsA team of researchers led by ETH Zurich professor David Norris has developed a model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation. Using pyrite, they also managed to confirm their theory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Renewable energy needed to drive uptake of electric vehiclesPlugging into renewable energy sources outweighs the cost and short driving ranges for consumers intending to buy electric vehicles, according to a new study.
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WIRED

Tim Berners-Lee, Inventor of the Web, Plots a Radical Overhaul of His Creation The creator of the web just received the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for computing. But his work is far from over. The post Tim Berners-Lee, Inventor of the Web, Plots a Radical Overhaul of His Creation appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

Wanted: space volunteers willing to lie in bed for two months – for €16,000 Sleep is final frontier for French scientists studying microgravity as they seek 24 men willing to eat and perform all bodily functions in bed for 60 days Wanted: young, fit and healthy men willing to lie on their backs and do absolutely nothing for two months. Wage: €16,000. Researchers at France’s space medical institute are advertising for what could be, quite literally, a dream job. They are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA robotic refueling mission departs stationThe International Space Station serves as an orbiting test and demonstration laboratory for scientific experiments to be performed inside and outside the space station. The experiments are inherently transient with typical life cycles of about one to five years. Once their test objectives are accomplished, they are removed to make way for new experiments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Infectious disease transmission in fish, mammals, other animals has implications for humansScientists once thought that being part of a community would protect animal populations from infectious disease outbreaks, but now they've learned otherwise, according to a study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vehicle safety recalls: Why drivers don't heed themA new national survey from the University of Michigan explores why many consumers don't heed vehicle safety recalls and what steps might boost compliance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study targets LigM for its role in breaking down aromatic pollutantsA protein used by common soil bacteria is providing new clues in the effort to convert aryl compounds, a common waste product from industrial and agricultural practices, into something of value.
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Live Science

Ancient Concession Stands and Shops Found at Roman Gladiator ArenaArchaeologists in Austria say they have detected the remains of the bakeries, fast-food stands and shops that would have served spectators at the ancient Roman city of Carnuntum.
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Live Science

Photos: A Roman Entertainment District Brought Back to LifeArchaeologists detected ancient shops and food stalls that would have served spectators outside of a big arena in Austria. And they have digitally recreated this Roman amphitheater called Carnuntum.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests divide in how millennials value newsMillennials with at least one college-educated parent are more inclined than other young adults to seek out news sources, Northwestern University research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here comes the sun in first-time imagesThe first images from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) instrument aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-16 satellite capture a large coronal hole on the sun.
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 4, 2017 —Opposition activists say the Syrian government used a chemical agent in Idlib, killing as many as 100 people. More here —Susan Rice, the former national-security adviser, dismissed as “absolutely false” allegations she used intelligence information for political purposes. More here —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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Ingeniøren

Amazon bygger tre datacentre i Stockholm - ingen i Danmark Amazons nordiske sky bliver centreret omkring den svenske hovedstad. Afstandene er ikke store nok til, at selskabet har tænkt sig at lægge separate datacentre i Danmark. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/amazon-bygger-tre-datacentre-stockholm-ingen-danmark-1075242 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Svensk test: Opgradering af snydesoftware gør nogle VW-biler bovlammeNogle af Volkswagens snyde-dieselbiler, som er blevet opdateret for ikke at udlede for meget NOx, trækker dårligere ved lave omdrejninger, viseren test udført af et svensk teknikmagasin. VW kan ikke genkende resultaterne.
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Ingeniøren

Nyhed på Jobfinder: Drømmejobbet er kun få klik væk med ny funktion Jobfinder præsenterer ny funktion, der gør det let at vise interesse for jobopslag på en uforpligtigende og hurtig måde. Se kort video om funktionen. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/nyhed-paa-jobfinder-droemmejobbet-kan-vaere-faa-kliks-vaek-med-helt-ny-uforpligtigende Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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New on MIT Technology Review

Web’s Inventor Tim Berners-Lee Wins the Nobel Prize of ComputingBerners-Lee says Web access is a human right—and the technology he created needs a rethink.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How stress controls hemoglobin levels in bloodScientists have revealed an entirely new mechanism through which hemoglobin gene expression is regulated by stress. 'We have long known, in relation to other biological processes, that stress and the ability to mount a stress response are essential to our survival. Now we see that it applies even to the tiny molecules that carry oxygen in our blood,' said Professor Raymond Kaempfer at the Hebrew U
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumer reviews reveal positive experience in renting formal dressesAs an alternative to spending hundreds of dollars on a prom dress for one night, more and more online retailers are offering formal dress rentals as an attractive and often more affordable option.
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Gizmodo

Idiots Try to Ship Venomous Snakes and Spiders to Australia, as If They Need More Snakes that have been euthanized after being shipped from Northern Europe and arriving in Australia in mid-March (Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources) When a suspicious looking box labeled “two pair shoes” arrived in Australia from Northern Europe recently, the Australian Border Force sent it through an x-ray. They didn’t find shoes, of course. Instead, the box contained a te
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Live Science

What Does the Solar System Sound Like? Podcast Explores Science of NoiseThe "Twenty Thousand Hertz" podcast, named after the highest frequency that humans can hear, is a nod to all the audio phenomena we encounter on daily basis.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Be a Better Organizer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Living a Lie: We Deceive Ourselves to Better Deceive OthersNew research provides the first evidence for a theory first put forward in the 1970s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On social media, female entrepreneurs act demurely to thriveThe more things change, the more they stay the same for female internet entrepreneurs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What's smaller than a python but just as bad for South Florida? Invasive fishOut in the Big Cypress swamp, across the street from the country's smallest post office in a wilderness the size of Rhode Island, a canal is teeming with something unexpected: aquarium fish usually found in a pet shop.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sociologists urge use of big data to study human interactionThe internet dominates our world and each one of us is leaving a larger digital footprint as more time passes. Those footprints are ripe for studying, experts say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Collaborative research may lead to improvements in the production of carbon fibresInfrared (IR) imaging technology at the Australian Synchrotron, developed specifically for carbon fibre analysis, has contributed to a better understanding of chemical changes that affect structure in the production of high-performance carbon fibres using a precursor material.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA Kennedy partners to help develop self-driving carsSince its inception, NASA has been known as an agency that opens doors to the future. While focusing on exploration beyond our home planet, agency experts also are working to improve life right here on Earth. NASA at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida recently joined a partnership created to help perfect self-driving cars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Frequent flaring on TRAPPIST-1—unsuited for habitability?Data from the K2 mission reveals strong stellar magnetism in the TRAPPIST-1 system that hosts three potentially habitable planets, suggesting that those planets could be a less friendly place for life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists increased the proportion of medicinal substances in plantsTomsk State University biologists have developed a technology for obtaining cell cultures with a high content of a number of biologically active substances (BAS). It is important for pharmaceuticals, and will also help to conserve endangered species of medicinal plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rising incomes make people less likely to attend religious servicesNew research by the University of Manchester has found that people are less likely to attend religious services regularly if their income rises.
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