How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine U.S. taxpayers pay $30 billion a year to fund biomedical research aimed at finding better treatments. But competition for scarce funding and tenure may be prompting some scientists to cut corners.

Hitting Bill O’Reilly Where It Hurts Throughout the day on Wednesday, the list—and presumably, Bill O’Reilly’s headache—kept growing. Twenty-four companies announced they were pulling their advertisements from his wildly popular, if hyper-partisan, O’Reilly Factor , in the wake of sexual-harassment allegations (and related settlements) against its host, revealed this weekend by The New York Times . By mid-afternoon, the count had ri

Trump's Confidence Game There are few parallels between Franklin Roosevelt and Donald Trump, beyond their wealthy upbringings in the Empire State. FDR’s first inaugural address famously proposed that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” while Trump’s was a seminar in fear itself . But early in both men’s presidencies, they offered insistent claims that things are getting better, even when there was little ha

Simplifying How the Courts Seal Criminal Records PHILADELPHIA—Jody, 57, checked her phone and tapped her foot as she sat in the pews of a courtroom on a recent Friday in March, waiting for the arrival of a court official who was running late to her hearing. Jody, who asked that her last name be withheld, was ready for this day to be over. “So I can get on with my life,” she explained. The grandmother of three was convicted of welfare fraud near

Family gathers for private send-off of astronaut John Glenn Family and invited guests are gathering at Arlington National Cemetery to say their final goodbyes to astronaut and Sen. John Glenn.

Trump boosts coal as China takes the lead on climate change For years, cutting carbon emissions to stave off the worst impacts of climate change was routinely near the top of the agenda at talks between the leaders of the United States and China.

Will Trump Triangulate? The marriage between Donald Trump and congressional Republicans has never seemed for better or for worse. During his presidential campaign, Trump routinely belittled House and Senate GOP leaders. In turn, more Republican elected officials formally announced they would not support their party’s nominee than in any presidential race probably since 1912, when Theodore Roosevelt bolted the party to c

The Scientist Who Stumbled Upon a Tick Full of 20-Million-Year-Old Blood Once you’ve acquired a certain reputation among fossil collectors—like when you’re the guy whose research inspired Michael Crichton’s book Jurassic Park —you start getting interesting packages in the mail. And so George Poinar Jr. received in his mail one day a piece of amber. Inside that lump of fossilized resin was a tick, still full of blood some 20 million years old. Poinar, now a retired pro

Arduino’s New CEO, Federico Musto, May Have Fabricated His Academic Record WIRED has learned that the new CEO, who holds a 50 percent stake in the brand, appears to have bolstered his reputation with credentials he didn't earn

Proces Analytisk Teknologi skaber smart produktion Mange produktionsvirksomheder baserer stadig deres produktion på nogle få garvede medarbejdere,...

Aftale afsløret: Cityringen bliver 850 mio. kr dyrere Cityringen bliver 850 mio. kr dyrere, men ikke forsinket. Entreprenør kræver stadig 3,75 mia. kr. men har sagt ja til et loft over, hvor store krav der kan stilles fremover.

MIT-rapport: Når robotterne kommer ind, ryger arbejderne ud Flere robotter fører ikke til bedre jobs og højere løn for industriarbejderne - tværtimod. Det konkluderer en ny rapport fra MIT. Men den amerikanske finansminister tror først, at robotter bliver en trussel om 50-100 år.

How Loneliness Begets Loneliness “I’m clearly a textbook case of the silent majority of middle-aged men who won’t admit they’re starved for friendship, even if all signs point to the contrary,” wrote Billy Baker in his recent exploration of male loneliness in T he Boston Globe . Perhaps one reason the piece made so many internet rounds is just how many people could relate: Last year Surgeon General Vivek Murthy warned that Ameri

Allergilæger efterlyser handling fra regionerne Danske Regioner har ikke rykket sig, siden Sundhedsstyrelsen i februar i år fremlagde en række initiativer til at få allergiområdet på ret kurs. Det bekymrer formand for Dansk Selskab for Allergologi Lone Winther, der er nervøs for, at de gode intentioner løber ud i sandet.

Nordic Food Lab udgiver bog om at spise insekter Hvordan høster man myrer fra en myreture i skoven? Hvordan fungerer handlen med insekter i Thailand?...

Trump's Border Barrier Hits a Wall Pamela Taylor’s home in Brownsville, Texas, sits in between the Rio Grande and the current border fence. Taylor, 88, voted for Donald Trump. But now, she faces the possibility that the man she voted for could take her land through eminent domain. “As far as we’re concerned, the fence is not going to work. This fence is not working,” she said. “When you’re not here and you don’t know the area and

Barack Obama's Seven-Year Presidency Republicans in Congress couldn’t make Barack Obama a one-term president . And they’ve failed to repeal his signature domestic legacy. Yet the GOP is succeeding in a more discreet project: In vote after vote this year, they are steadily erasing the final year of Obama’s presidency. The clearest result of that operation will come on Friday, when the Senate plans to confirm President Trump’s nominee

How smaller snakes strangle bigger snakes and swallow them whole Kingsnakes feed on other snakes, sometimes much bigger than themselves. Now the mystery of their feeding feat is out

Microsoft formally bans emulators on Xbox, Windows 10 download shops Bad news if you think Microsoft would soon change its stance about emulators on its Xbox One system. Microsoft has officially begun encouraging Windows 10 users to download and install the Creators Edition patch , and that has been met with an update to the Windows Store's rules . Among other policy changes is one that went into effect almost immediately: a ban on emulators. An affected developer

EU-Parlamentet: EU bør kun importere bæredygtig palmeolie Europas import af palmeolie til bl.a. biodiesel belaster natur, mennesker og klima i de asiatiske lande og modarbejder FN’s klima- og bæredygtighedsmål, mener parlamentet. I Danmark har fødevareindustrien allerede aftalt grøn certificering.

Dive into the twilight zone off Easter Island reveals new species A diving expedition off Easter Island (or Rapa Nui) in the Pacific pushes the boundaries of both technology and the human body to reveal a world of unique species just waiting to be discovered Continue reading...

For horseshoe bats, wiggling ears and nose makes biosonar more informative Humans, and most other mammals, have just four muscles joining their ears to their head. Bats have more than 20, and they use them to execute a precise series of wiggles, swivels, and twitches.

Direktør i it-firma: Branchen har stærkt brug for it-superhelte I morgen kårer Mediehuset Ingeniøren de største it-talenter i landet. Konkurrencen er med til at bekæmpe it-branchens største udfordringer ved at hylde hverdagens it-helte, mener CEO og stifter i Netcompany. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/direktoer-it-firma-branchen-har-staerkt-brug-it-superhelte-7435 Jobfinder

Australia takes Apple to court over 'refusing service' claims Apple was Thursday taken to court by Australia's consumer watchdog for violating laws by allegedly refusing to look at or repair some iPads and iPhones previously serviced by a third party.

Shanghai river clean-up leaves boat-dwellers in limbo Li Chaoqing fled his poverty-stricken Chinese hometown at age 14 for a new life in Shanghai, where he raised five children in a disused old boat on a polluted river.

Relief as flood peak passes in Australia town Residents bracing for major flooding in an Australian town breathed a sigh of relief Thursday after a swollen river peaked lower than forecast, although hundreds of homes were still inundated.

Chile desert combed for clues to life on Mars Chile's Atacama desert may seem to contain little besides red-grey rocks and sand—but scientists are busy searching here for clues to life in a place it much resembles: Mars.

The monster galaxy that died too quickly An international team of astronomers has, for the first time, spotted a massive, inactive galaxy from a time when the Universe was only 1.65 billion years old.

York's Viking centre to reopen 16 months on from Christmas flood Jorvik centre opens its doors to public on Saturday after £4.3m restoration The builders are sitting gossiping on a fence, the groaning man is back in the latrine and the unfortunate woman who has been pregnant for the last 10 years has been allowed to sit down: after 16 months and £4.3m, the Vikings of the Jorvik centre in York are back. The attraction , a recreation of the houses and streets of

Cykelchip-forslag droppet efter overvågnings-kritik Enhedslistens forslag om digitale stelnumre er nu droppet efter partiet blev klar over, hvilke muligheder RFID-chips i alle landets cykler ville give for overvågning.

Ansatte i kommune kigger i borgernes persondata uden gyldig grund Esbjerg Kommune advarer efter afdækning af kritisabel datasikkerhed i kommunen de ansatte imod at ‘slå op på dine venners og families oplysninger’. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hver-fjerde-kommuneansatte-erkender-jeg-har-kigget-borgernes-persondata-uden-gyldig-grund Version2

Overlæge: Vigtigt at undgå mytedannelse om partikelterapi Selvom Dansk Center for Partikelterapi vil indeholde noget af det nyeste og dyreste udstyr i hele den danske sundhedssektor er det ikke nogen mirakelkur mod kræft, påpeger ledende overlæge. »Vi skal undgå at skabe falske forhåbninger«.

Mange kræftpatienter skal have patient­ansvarlig læge i år De første kræftpatienter får i 2017 en patientansvarlig læge og målet er tilbyde ordningen til 90 pct. inden udgangen af 2020.

Scientists created nanopowders for the synthesis of new aluminum alloys The research team of Siberian Federal University together with the scientists of the Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a method for the synthesis of aluminum alloys, the use of which will allow the creation of new types of products with improved characteristics based on aluminum.

Further reductions in radiotherapy to young children with brain tumors less successful A team of investigators has determined that young children participating in a clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of reduced radiotherapy did worse when there were deviations from the treatment protocol. Results of the study will be available online in advance of publication by Pediatric Blood & Cancer on April 4.

For horseshoe bats, wiggling ears and nose makes biosonar more informative Virginia Tech researchers have discovered that these tiny movements pack more information into ultrasound pulses the bats send and receive, helping them locate objects around them.

Why do some with radical views become terrorists yet others don't? Since most people who hold radical views do not become terrorists, what are the factors that drive some to violent extremism? Is there a connection between mental illness and terrorist involvement? And why do some interrogators resort to torture when the body of evidence shows building rapport with suspects is more effective?

Insurers Scramble to Put a Price on a Cyber Catastrophe
Trying to estimate the maximum cost of a devastating cyber event before one actually happens.

Hundreds of Icebergs Are Disrupting Shipping Lanes In the Atlantic Photo: Getty The U.S. agency in charge of monitoring icebergs has warned shipping companies that an unusual amount of icebergs for this time of year are drifting into North Atlantic shipping lanes, disrupting a complex international system that affects numerous facets of life. Experts aren’t certain that climate change is to blame but, yeah, it’s probably climate change. The U.S. Coast Guard’s In

Direktør i it-firma: Branchen har stærkt brug for it-superhelte I morgen kårer Mediehuset Ingeniøren de største it-talenter i landet. Konkurrencen er med til at bekæmpe it-branchens største udfordringer ved at hylde hverdagens it-helte, mener CEO og stifter i Netcompany. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/direktoer-it-firma-branchen-har-staerkt-brug-it-superhelte-7435 Emner Arbejdsmarked Industri 4.0 Jobfinder

Scientists sniff out way to lure reef-killing crown-of-thorns starfish to their death Researchers trying to protect the Great Barrier Reef fabricate environmentally safe bait by harnessing the pheromones the marine pests use to communicate Marine biologists may have devised a new way to protect the Great Barrier Reef after decoding the pheromones of the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish . Researchers say the discovery can be used to create pheromone lures that attract the mari

The Lego Version of the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Trailer Proves All Movies Should Be Lego-fied The Lego Batman Movie made enough at the box office to ensure that won’t be the last superhero to get the Lego Hollywood treatment. YouTube’s Huxley Berg Studios makes a strong case for the Guardians of the Galaxy to be next, but also for every movie to be turned into two hours of talking plastic bricks . Unlike the Lego movies, which use photo-realistic computer graphics to make it look like the

Jeff Bezos Says He Is Selling $1 Billion a Year in Amazon Stock to Finance Race to Space Standing with a reusable booster and a model of a capsule for carrying humans into space, the billionaire disclosed that he had been financing his rocket company by selling shares in his company.

High fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy 'programs' for health complications Eating a high-fat, high-sugar diet when pregnant 'programs' both mother and child for potential health complications later in life by disrupting metabolic processes within the mother's body, researchers have found. The study is the first to reveal the mechanisms which cause the link between eating an obesity-promoting diet during pregnancy and an increased risk of problems such as type 2 diabetes,

Study: Microbes from Young Fish Extend Older Fish?s Lives Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

The FBI Considers Opening a Cyber University for Hackers Who Don't Want to Do So Many Push-ups Photo: Getty In 2014, FBI Director James Comey half-jokingly remarked that the FBI was having trouble recruiting tech talent for its cyber crime division because the best of the best smoke weed. Three years and numerous hacking scandals later, he’s actually floating some ideas on how to fix that problem. After he said that his attempts to staff a great workforce that could compete with the best c

Bliv efteruddannet på USAs førende universiteter - gratis Der er omkring 250 efteruddannelseskurser på otte af USAs topskoler, som du ganske gratis kan følge online. Og der kommer hele tiden nye til. Gå på opdagelse her. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/bliv-efteruddannet-paa-usas-foerende-universiteter-gratis-7179 Emner Kompetence Uddannelse Jobfinder

Rapid rise of clothes moths threatens historic fabrics Rare furnishings in England's historic houses are under threat from a new species of the insect.

Portal Is Like an HOV Lane For Your Home Wi-Fi The past few years have seen a deluge of Wi-Fi router innovation, but the Portal wifi router includes a key feature that’s basically unheard of in consumer technology. But let’s step back for a second. The problem with Wi-Fi is that everyone has it. Almost all 5GHz Wi-Fi routers connect to your devices over the same narrow set of channels, meaning all of the web traffic in your apartment building

8,000 aspiring Uber and Lyft drivers fail state background check (credit: Adam Fagen ) More than 8,000 Massachusetts residents who want to drive for ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft won't be allowed to, because they didn't pass a new background check system that operates in that state. Most were rejected because they had suspended licenses or hadn't been driving for long enough to qualify, according to a report on the matter in The Boston Globe . But h

An unbalanced microbiome on the face may be key to acne development At the Microbiology Society's Annual Conference, researchers will show that the overall balance of the bacteria on a person's skin, rather than the presence or absence of a particular bacterial strain, appears to be an important factor for acne development and skin health. The research team used over-the-counter pore cleansing strips to obtain skin follicle samples from 72 individuals were able to

New study sheds light on 'lung sparing effect' A new study suggests that in cases of severe malnutrition, the body may prioritize lung development at the expense of other less vital growth.

The Atlantic Daily: Ads and Advisers What We’re Following Bannon Removed: President Trump’s chief strategist is now off the National Security Council, while the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the director of national intelligence have been restored as permanent members. Bannon’s original appointment to the council caused controversy in January, since political advisers don’t normally get a seat at the table, but the White

There Are Nearly 1 Billion Smokers on Earth Nearly 1 billion people around the world light up cigarettes every day, a new study finds.

Researchers develop novel flu test to speed up respiratory treatment Doctors and researchers in Southampton have developed a novel way of using a swab test which can rapidly diagnose flu and other viral infections in patients with severe respiratory conditions -- resulting in shorter courses of antibiotics and less time in hospital.

Nearly 1 billion people still smoke daily Despite strong declines in the rate of tobacco smoking over the past 25 years, one out of every four men still smoke daily, as do one out of every 20 women.In a new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease study (GBD) published today (April 5, 2017) in The Lancet, authors discovered that the prevalence of daily smoking declined on a global scale - decreasing by 28 percent for men and 34 percent

The Lancet: The war on tobacco: Latest estimates show need for 'renewed and sustained' efforts on control policies More than one in 10 deaths worldwide (equivalent to 6.4 million deaths) are caused by smoking and half of these occur in just four countries -- China, India, USA, and Russia, according to the latest estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study published in The Lancet.

After 4 Years, Seattle’s Giant Tunneling Machine Finally Breaks Through After four years underground, Bertha reaches daylight

Smoking causes one in ten deaths globally, major new study reveals Efforts to control tobacco have paid off, says study, but warns tobacco epidemic is far from over, with 6.4m deaths attributed to smoking in 2015 alone One in 10 deaths around the world is caused by smoking, according to a major new study that shows the tobacco epidemic is far from over and that the threat to lives is spreading across the globe. There were nearly one billion smokers in 2015, in s

How Does Feminism Affect Morals? In her new book, Eden Collinsworth investigates morals in a growingly diverse world.

Why Legends of Tomorrow's Second Season Was Such a Triumph Image: The episode where the team has to go make sure George Lucas makes Star Wars. Yes, really. (Bettina Strauss/The CW) If you gave up on Legends of Tomorrow in season one, that would be more than fair. What should have been a fun romp through time and space instead got bogged down in a single plot that didn’t showcase the best of the characters involved. It’s to the credit of everyone involved

Fusion The Long, Lucrative Right-wing Grift Is Blowing Up in the World’s Face | Deadspin Yankees Pro Fusion The Long, Lucrative Right-wing Grift Is Blowing Up in the World’s Face | Deadspin Yankees Prospect Clint Frazier Reportedly Asked If He Could Wear Mickey Mantle’s Number [Update] | Jezebel Here’s How I Think the KUWTK Episode About Kendall’s Pepsi Controversy Will Play Out | The Root Ferguson, Mo., Stays in the Sunken Place: Re-Elects Failed Mayor |

Amazon Will Refund $70 Million Worth of App Purchases Made by Kids Last year, Amazon was found guilty of illegally billing some of its customers. Specifically, the issue was that many parents had been charged for purchases made, without their consent, by their children. This week, the company has agreed to end its efforts to appeal that ruling and give those parents their money back. The amount—more than $70 million—covers in-app purchases made by kids between N

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: McMaster of the House Today in 5 Lines During a joint news conference with King Abdullah of Jordan, President Trump said the recent chemical attack in Syria “ crossed many lines ” and that his attitude toward Syria and President Bashar al-Assad “has changed very much,” but didn’t specify how the U.S. would respond. In an interview with The New York Times , Trump suggested , without citing evidence, that former Nationa

The Blair Witch Project Almost Had a Far More Gruesome Ending The final image of The Blair Witch Project. Image: Artisan The final shot of The Blair Witch Project is haunting. It’s Michael standing in a corner, turned away so he won’t see the terrible thing about to happen to Heather, who is holding the camera. However, in a new interview, the filmmakers explained that was almost changed before release. Speaking to Entertainment Weekly , co-directors Dan My

Weird Worm Snail Found on Florida Shipwreck (Video) A new species of worm snail was discovered on a naval shipwreck that was deliberately scuttled in the Florida Keys. The snail casts Spider-Man-like webs of mucous to catch prey.

A 'Lost' Neptune-Like Planet Has Finally Been Found Image: Michael S. Helfenbein via Yale It’s gotta be hard to be an exoplanet these days, living in the shadow of the everyone’s new favorite system , TRAPPIST-1. But the reality is, there are tons of exoplanets that deserve our love— according to NASA , as of last month, 3,472 exoplanets have been confirmed. Many more are out there, waiting for their chance in the spotlight. We just need to find t

硅谷的女性困境 Read this article in English. 2007

CRISPR studies muddy results of older gene research Scientists face tough decisions when the latest gene-editing findings don’t match up with the results of other techniques. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21763

Amazon will replace some of its battery forklifts with hydrogen fuel cell ones Enlarge / Forklifts outfitted with Plug Power hydrogen fuel cells. (credit: Plug Power ) On Wednesday, hydrogen fuel cell company Plug Power announced that Amazon would be changing its battery-operated forklifts to hydrogen fuel cell-powered ones at 11 of its fulfillment centers. According to Reuters , Amazon secured the right to buy up to 23 percent of the company as well, which would make the o

Veteran NASA spacewoman getting three extra months in orbit (Update) The world's oldest and most experienced spacewoman is getting three extra months in orbit.

NFL passes streaming to Amazon, after Twitter Amazon announced Wednesday it is making a foray into streaming live sports with a deal to add pro US football games to its Prime subscription video service.

UCLA researchers discover a new cause of high plasma triglycerides People with hypertriglyceridemia often are told to change their diet and lose weight. But a high-fat diet isn't necessarily the cause for everyone with the condition.UCLA researchers have discovered a subset of people with hypertriglyceridemia whose bodies produce autoantibodies -- immune-response molecules that attack their own proteins -- causing high levels of triglycerides in the blood.

FDA approves drugs more quickly than peer agency in Europe The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews and approves new medicines in a shorter timeframe than its peer agency in Europe, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), says a Yale researcher. This finding, which comes at a time when the FDA is under renewed pressure to streamline and speed up its approval process, provides data to inform ongoing policy discussions.

The Windows 10 Creators Update is now available for manual upgrading Enlarge / This option is the best way of transitioning out of the Insider Program. (credit: Microsoft) The "official" release of the Windows 10 Creators Update , version 1703, won't come until Patch Tuesday on April 11, but if you want to upgrade now—and don't want to enroll your system in the potentially unstable Windows Insider Program—you can now do so. The Windows 10 Update Assistant will upg

What Happens When North Korea Tests a Missile That Could Reach the U.S.? North Korea, frequently the butt of jokes and memes for being backwards, is preparing to test an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Such a missile, unlike the medium-range variety the country tested off its east coast on Monday, is one that could possibly deliver a warhead to the American mainland. The possibility is no joke, and it is going to be one of several painful discussions that P

A History of Sarin as a Weapon Yesterday, the world watched in horror as a deadly chemical agent—likely sarin gas, one of the most-toxic chemical weapons in existence—was unleashed on unsuspecting civilians, including dozens of children. Doctors and rescue workers posted videos of the attack on Syria’s rebel- and jihadist-controlled town of Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib province. Soon, the images of dead, poisoned children had sprea

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

World's Blackest Material Now Comes in a Spray Can Vantablack is the blackest material known to science.

Girl Develops 'Flesh Eating' Infection After Strep Throat A 6-year-old girl in Ohio recently needed to have her leg amputated after she developed a rare complication from an infection with strep throat bacteria.

Researchers develop Marburg virus treatment effective five days after infection An antibody treatment successfully protected nonhuman primates against the deadly Marburg and Ravn viruses even when given five days after becoming infected, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., and Vanderbilt University.

Chemical sensor on the basis of materials possessing molecular memory created Scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated an electrochemical sensor on the basis of polymers with molecular imprinting, aimed at detection of saccharides and hydroxy acids.

Study examines effects of spaceflight on immune system Getting sick isn't fun for anyone, but it could be especially taxing for crew members aboard the International Space Station. Protecting crew health is important as NASA prepares for long duration, deep-space missions. Functional Immune, a new investigation taking place in the orbiting laboratory, studies previously uninvestigated areas of the body's immune response and if spaceflight alters a cre

The Engineer In The Google Vs. Uber 'Stolen Tech' Case Might Be An Evil Genius Anthony Levandowski is the key player in the unfolding legal fight between his former employer, Google’s self-driving car unit Waymo, and Uber, where he now runs the startup’s self-driving program. To put it lightly, the case has shown the dude has some seriously deep—but, crucially, alleged—conflicts of interest. The latest court documents filed this week by Uber to try and move the case to arbi

Project Hotspot In their study published in Lithosphere this week, James Kessler and colleagues examine the geology of a scientific borehole drilled into the Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA, to investigate the potential for geothermal energy at depth. The site discussed in this paper is on the Mountain Home Air Force Base, where a drillhole in 1984 indicated that geothermal fluids were present at about 1.8 km depth

Project Hotspot In their study published in Lithosphere this week, James Kessler and colleagues examine the geology of a scientific borehole drilled into the Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA, to investigate the potential for geothermal energy at depth. The site discussed in this paper is on the Mountain Home Air Force Base, where a drillhole in 1984 indicated that geothermal fluids were present at about 1.8 km depth

Unusually large swarm of icebergs drifts into shipping lanes More than 400 icebergs have drifted into the North Atlantic shipping lanes over the past week in an unusually large swarm for this early in the season, forcing vessels to slow to a crawl or take detours of hundreds of miles.

Ex-Secretary Of State Advocates Causes Not Key On Modern Republic Agenda James Baker--who served in two Republican White Houses--is writing about causes that don't figure prominently on the modern Republican agenda. He's advocating a global ban on the sale of ivory.

NASA's Cassini Begins Its Final Mission Before Self-Destruction NASA's Cassini's spacecraft will begin the final stages of its 20-year mission to Saturn before diving into the planet and ending its lengthy stretch orbiting the planet.

Where’s the Smartphone Headed and What Comes After? Here’s What’s in the Works. The smartphone is set to become the hub of your life, online and off, until this replaces it.

Creating Zika-Proof Mosquitoes Means Rigging Natural Selection Gene drives, powered by Crispr, promise to wipe out mosquito-borne diseases. But first they'll have to beat nature at her own game: evolution

From Breitbart to Sputnik A former Breitbart News writer is launching a radio show for Russian propaganda network Sputnik . “I’m on the Russian payroll now, when you work at Sputnik you’re being paid by the Russians,” former Breitbart investigative reporter Lee Stranahan told me. “That’s what it is. I don’t have any qualms about it. Nothing about it really affects my position on stuff that I’ve had for years now.” Stranah

Can hack but not shoot? FBI may ease entry for cyber agents Aspiring federal agents who can hack a computer with ease but can't shoot their way out of a paper bag could soon find the FBI to be more welcoming.

Facebook ramps up fight against 'revenge porn' Facebook on Wednesday unleashed a new weapon in the war against "revenge porn" at the leading social network as well as the messaging services Messenger and Instagram.

The 'Ferguson effect' or too many guns? Exploring the rise in violent crime in Chicago One of the most hotly contested debates today involves the recent uptick in violent crime and the extent to which increases in violence may be explained by the "Ferguson effect," whereby the increased scrutiny of police since the 2014 Ferguson unrest has been hypothesized to lead police officers to become more hesitant and less aggressive. Chicago is an epicenter for much of this controversy, and

Study explores risk of deforestation as agriculture expands in Africa Next time you bite into a chocolate bar, think of Africa. The continent produces nearly 70 percent of the world's cocoa, a growing output that requires carving more than 325,000 acres of new farmland from forests every year - a drop in the bucket of overall agricultural expansion there.

BRIEF: Counting the Effect of the Earth's Rotation on Our Favorite Sports BRIEF: Counting the Effect of the Earth's Rotation on Our Favorite Sports The Coriolis effect has a small but measurable effect on the path of balls and athletes during sporting events. Golfballcurve.jpg Image credits: Joe West/Shutterstock Sports Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 15:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) -- Just in time for the opening week of baseball season and golf's Masters Tourn

The Man Who Invented the World Wide Web Tim Berners-Lee, who recently received computing’s highest honor, talks about the past, present, and future of the Web.

The 'Ferguson effect' or too many guns? Exploring the rise in violent crime in Chicago In an article published today in Significance, Arizona State University professors Sherry Towers and Michael D. White examine violence in Chicago and test whether the trends are consistent with the 'Ferguson effect.' They also test a competing claim proposed by Former NYPD Commissioner William Bratton that much of the recent violence in Chicago is tied to the proliferation of guns in that city.

Regular exercise, not BMI, before stroke may predict disability later A new study suggests it's the amount of regular exercise people get, not the amount of body fat they have, that may predict just how well they recover from a stroke. The study is published in the April 5, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Stem cell patch shows early promise in treating heart failure In a Phase I clinical trial, heart failure patients treated with patches made from their muscle cells showed improved exercise capacity and heart function after one year. Stem cell patch-based therapy may be a viable heart failure therapy and should be validated in larger clinical trials, researchers conclude.

Lego figures don't stand a chance against time reversal A crowd of 29 stands still, positioned as lookouts in various directions. A chirp punctuates the silence before being replaced by a distinct buzz. The buzzing grows louder, then abruptly drops back into silence. Twenty-eight Lego figurines shift slightly—they survive. But one unlucky companion lies on his back, toppled by an invisible force.

The bionic leaf seems poised to lead a fertilizer revolution Gadgets A lucky four leaf clover Could a bionic leaf save the world?

YouTube Is Officially in the Live TV Game Now YouTube TV—the cordcutting service Google teased six weeks ago—is now available in five cities. If you live in New York, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay area, Philadelphia, or Chicago, you can sign-up for the $35 a month live TV bundle right now. YouTube TV follows in the footsteps of other so-called “skinny bundles”—bundles that let you watch live TV from a phone, tablet, web browser, or set-

Renewables won’t drive up cost of electricity from fossil fuel plants Enlarge (credit: Thomas Bleckmann / EyeEm) Renewable energy has achieved a major milestone: in many cases, it's the cheapest source of electrons you can put on the grid. But the intermittency that comes with renewable energy also poses challenges for the grid, as it has to be able to respond to sudden changes in supply. That creates an economic challenge as well, as we may need to provide incenti

Poem of the Day: ‘She’ by Richard Wilbur In a 1999 interview with The Atlantic , Richard Wilbur—the two-time Pulitzer Prize–winner and former U.S. Poet Laureate—spoke about perfection, translation, and what interviewer Peter Davison referred to as his “lifetime in poetry.” Asked how he was grateful to poetry, Wilbur responded: I … enjoy being able to do something with the important feelings of my life. I think that to be inarticulate ca

One-Quarter of Colorectal Cancers Linked to Lifestyle Lifestyle factors including smoking and eating red meat may cause one-quarter of colorectal cancer cases, a new study from Australia finds.

Artificial topological matter opens new research directions An international team of researchers have created a new structure that allows the tuning of topological properties in such a way as to turn on or off these unique behaviors. The structure could open up possibilities for new explorations into the properties of topological states of matter.

Graphene May Be the Key to Drinkable Ocean Water Researchers develop a graphene-based membrane that may make large-scale desalinization possible.

Turn Back the Clock With This Incredible Legend of Zelda Desk Toy Nendoroid Legend of Zelda Majora’s Mask 3D Figurine , $29 Nenderoid’s Link figurines are always incredible, but in my opinion, the Majora’s Mask 3D version is the cutest of the bunch . You can put your desktop Link into different poses and situations to match your current mood and work environment, like drinking potions (hungover), wearing masks (imposter syndrome), or swinging his little sword (

Nerve cells actively repress alternative cell fates, researchers find A neural cell maintains its identity by actively suppressing the expression of genes associated with non-neuronal cell types, including skin, heart, lung, cartilage and liver, according to a study.

Sodium citrate spray could temporarily restore sense of smell A substance commonly used to treat bladder issues could temporarily treat people who have lost their sense of smell, according to new research.

Sandpiper detectives pinpoint trouble spots in continent-wide migration Understanding and managing migratory animal populations requires knowing what's going on with them during all stages of their annual cycle -- and how those stages affect each other. A new study tackles this problem for Semipalmated Sandpipers, historically one of the most widespread and numerous shorebird species of the Western Hemisphere, whose populations in some areas have undergone mysterious

SuperAger brains shrink more slowly than peers' brains The brains of SuperAgers (those 80 years old and older whose memories are as sharp as healthy people in their 50s and 60s) shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to 'typical' memory loss and dementia, a new path-breaking study that shows.

How to save animals by reducing roadkill Of the more than 40 roadkill prevention methods available, a new study shows that, overall, fences, with or without crossing structures, reduce roadkill by 54 percent, when considering all species combined.

Android devices can be fatally hacked by malicious Wi-Fi networks Enlarge (credit: IntelFreePress ) A broad array of Android phones is vulnerable to attacks that use booby-trapped Wi-Fi signals to achieve full device takeover, a researcher has demonstrated. The vulnerability resides in a widely used Wi-Fi chipset manufactured by Broadcom and used in both iOS and Android devices. Apple patched the vulnerability with Monday's release of iOS 10.3.1 . "An attacker

Inventor of World Wide Web Snags Computer Science's Top Prize Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, has snagged computer science's most prestigious prize, the A.M. Turing Award.

Twitch And YouTube Streamers Slam Persona 5's Video Policy Yesterday, Atlus warned Persona 5 players that if they show gameplay footage after a certain point in the game, Atlus will go after their channels with copyright claims and strikes. While some streamers aren’t surprised by this policy, they’ve reacted with frustration at what they feel are measures that will negatively impact their channels. Atlus USA posted a note to streamers on their website y

Lego figures don't stand a chance against time reversal Researchers use targeted sound waves to detect cracks in nuclear waste containers -- and to knock over Lego figures in epic fashion.

Study analyzes what 'a' and 'the' tell us about language acquisition A study co-authored by an MIT professor suggests that experience is an important component of early-childhood language usage although it doesn't necessarily account for all of a child's language facility. Moreover, the extent to which a child learns grammar by listening appears to change over time, with a large increase occurring around age 2 and a leveling off taking place in subsequent years.

Pepsi’s Kendall Jenner Ad Was So Awful It Did the Impossible: It United the Internet The online response to the soda company's now-pulled marketing video was surprisingly refreshing

These Ancient Texts Might Help Us Predict the Next Massive Solar Storm Aurora in TX from the 2003 solar storm (Christie Ponder) Spotting the Northern Lights anywhere in the United States (except for Alaska and the Upper Midwest) would probably be one of most notable experiences in an American space fan’s life. Now imagine if it was China or Japan a thousand years ago and you didn’t know what caused these light shows. Odds are, you’d freak out a little bit... and wri

Dealmaster: Today only, save big on unlocked smartphones from Amazon Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with a new list of deals. Today only, Amazon is offering hundreds of dollars off select unlocked smartphones, including handsets from Motorola, LeEco, and Lenovo. We also have great savings on Core i7 and Core i5-powered laptops, Amazon Fire tablets, gaming notebooks, and more. Check out the full list of deals below. Featur

The Predictable Effects of Unpredictable Financial Emergencies Last year, Neal Gabler wrote in The Atlantic about Americans’ financial instability, noting that nearly half of them would have a hard time coming up with $400 to cover a sudden expense. That’s bad news, not least because many unexpected events—from an illness to car or home repairs—can lead to bills that amount to much more than that. A recent report finds that many American families can spend a

A Fight to Restore the Constitution at Customs Checkpoints When a U.S. citizen returns home from abroad, the federal government asserts a hugely intrusive prerogative: the option to search not only their person and luggage, but the entire contents of their mobile phone, tablet, or laptop––sans a warrant, probable cause, or reasonable suspicion––as if the Fourth Amendment is null at the border. Two U.S. Senators, Republican Rand Paul and Democrat Ron Wyde

Squishy robotic manta ray flaps its wings to spy in the ocean A manta-ray-inspired robot is made of soft, transparent materials so that it can go undetected as it swims around monitoring wildlife and wrecks

Cheap stroke drug boosts pancreatic cancer survival in mice A drug used in Asia for decades to treat strokes has been found to soften the armour of pancreatic tumours, making them vulnerable to chemotherapy

Apes can see things from your perspective and help you out Chimps, bonobos and orangutans help humans when they look for objects in the wrong place - showing they can tell when others believe something that's false

This "Spiderman" sea snail shoots webs of mucus Animals With great snot comes great responsibility Imagine having all the powers of a worm-snail.

BRIEF: The Science of an Airy Meringue -- With Chickpeas BRIEF: The Science of an Airy Meringue -- With Chickpeas The vegan substitute works just as well as egg whites. meringue-topteaser.jpg Image credits: Alpha via Flicker Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Culture Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 15:15 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) -- There's nothing quite like the sweet, delicate airiness of a meringue. You can make it yourself by whipping toget

Yes, Your Diet Can Raise (or Lower) Your Risk of Colon Cancer Can we change our diet to change our risk of cancer?

Deep sleep may act as fountain of youth in old age As we grow old, our nights are frequently plagued by bouts of wakefulness, bathroom trips and other nuisances as we lose our ability to generate the deep, restorative slumber we enjoyed in youth. But that does not mean the elderly need less sleep, according to neuroscientists.

First long-term stabile brain implant developed based on an anti-inflammatory coating Complex neurotechnological devices are required to directly select and influence brain waves inside the skull’s interior. Although it has become relatively easy to implement the devices, researchers are still faced with challenges when trying to keep them running properly in living organisms over time. But that could be changing now, thanks to a new method. A research team was able to create a mic

Melting snow contains a toxic cocktail of pollutants With spring finally here and warmer temperatures just around the corner, snow will slowly melt away, releasing us from the clutches of winter. However, that's not the only thing that the melting snow will release. Researchers have found that urban snow accumulates a toxic cocktail from car emissions -- pollutants that are in turn unleashed into the environment as the weather warms up.

Breaking the protein-DNA bond Unbound proteins in a cell break up protein-DNA bonds as they compete for the single-binding site, new research has found.

Study shows health insurance plans too complicated to understand A new survey by experts at the Health Disparities Institute of UConn Health shows that many patients across Connecticut are struggling to understand their complex, jargon-filled private health insurance plans and even to use their plan benefits correctly. Researchers believe Connecticut's low health insurance literacy rates most likely mirror the nation.

The man who lived inside a giant wooden egg Artist Stephen Turner lived on the egg from July 2013 until July 2014.

We sleep less as we age because our brains don’t think we're tired Health Sadly, there’s nothing we can do about it—yet Researchers argue that because of certain brain mechanisms that change as we age, we are unable to get the proper sleep necessary for normal functioning.

Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows A new article describes how heating core of the plasma can create sheared flow that improves stability and performance of fusion devices.

Study explores risk of deforestation as agriculture expands in Africa Multinational companies are increasingly looking to Africa to expand production of in-demand commodity crops such as soy and oil palm. A first-of-its-kind study highlights the real and potential impacts on the continent's valuable tropical forests.

Monoclonal antibody cures marburg infection in monkeys An experimental treatment cured 100 percent of guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with lethal levels of Marburg and Ravn viruses, relatives of the Ebola virus, scientists have found. Although the Marburg and Ravn viruses are less familiar than Ebola virus, both can resemble Ebola in symptoms and outcomes in people, and both lack preventive and therapeutic countermeasures.

Inflammatory bowel disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may be linked, suggests research Patients who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for more than two decades have a higher risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), new research concludes.

Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans, study finds A new way to diagnose cancer without resorting to surgery has now been demonstrated by scientists, raising the possibility of far fewer biopsies.

To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of silicon It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number 14. The most-common form of silicon crystallizes in the same structure as diamond. New work shows that one form of silicon, Si-III, which is synthesized using a hig

Doubly accelerated electrons detected in collisions of galaxy clusters A cosmic phenomenon resulting from the acceleration of a gas cloud by a black hole and its reacceleration by the shock waves from the merging of two galaxy clusters has been described by an international collaboration of astronomers. The study enriches scientists' understanding of the universe on the largest scale.

Ubuntu Unity is dead: Desktop will switch back to GNOME next year Enlarge / Unity 8, an option in the Ubuntu 16.10 desktop, will never become the default. (credit: Canonical ) Six years after making Unity the default user interface on Ubuntu desktops, Canonical is giving up on the project and will switch the default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME next year. Canonical is also ending development of Ubuntu software for phones and tablets, spelling doom for the goal

YouTube TV goes live today in five US cities, gears up to add more networks Enlarge (credit: YouTube) YouTube TV was announced at the end of February, and now the service is officially live. YouTube's live TV-streaming service can be accessed by users in five US locations today: New York, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area, Chicago, and Philadelphia. The service will come to more cities, but YouTube hasn't given a definitive timeline for the nationwide rollout. The

Taser Debuts Orwellian New Name, Offers Free Body Cams for Every Cop in America Still: YouTube On Wednesday, stun gun maker Taser announced that it’s offering free body cameras to every police department in the United States. That’s 700,000 cops across 18,000 departments. Rebranding itself as “Axon” (as in the nerve fibers that connect neurons throughout the human body), the company said in a press release that it’s “going ‘all-in’ to empower police officers” and will offer

From Toxin to Treatment: The Healing Powers of Venom | Video A colorful fish called a fang blenny is the latest addition to a list of animals whose venom could inspire medicines.

How Long Do We Remember Major Plane Crashes? Collective memory of airline crashes lasts about 45 years.

Newly discovered chemical reaction in eye may improve vision A light-sensing pigment found in everything from bacteria to vertebrates can be biochemically manipulated to reset itself, an important therapeutic advantage, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Artificial topological matter opens new research directions An international team of researchers have created a new structure that allows the tuning of topological properties in such a way as to turn on or off these unique behaviors. The structure could open up possibilities for new explorations into the properties of topological states of matter.

Watch Live Today: Exploring Pure Mathematics Through Baking [Video] Mathematician Eugenia Cheng will describe how cooking can offer insight into abstract math --

Dimension 404 Promises Sci-Fi With a Twist Before its release, the new Hulu show Dimension 404 was broadly likened to the speculative anthology series Black Mirror , which, it turns out, is a bit like comparing The Twilight Zone to Are You Afraid of the Dark? Yes, like the Channel 4/Netflix show, Dimension 404 consists of individual stories loosely inspired by technology. But while Black Mirror is steeped in a fingernail-gnawing sense of

Unexpected protein structure findings could lead to new therapies Scientists have determined unexpected characteristics of a key protein linked to blood pressure control and to nerve growth, pain control and heart tissue regeneration. The findings open doors to potential new therapies to control cardiovascular disease and pain. The protein AT2 is one of a group of receptors that interact with the angiotensin II hormone, which regulates blood pressure. Angiotensi

Monoclonal antibody cures marburg infection in monkeys Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have found that an experimental treatment cured 100 percent of guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with lethal levels of Marburg and Ravn viruses, relatives of the Ebola virus. Although the Marburg and Ravn viruses are less familiar than Ebola virus, both can resemble Ebola in symptoms and outcomes in people, and both la

Stanford study explores risk of deforestation as agriculture expands in Africa Multinational companies are increasingly looking to Africa to expand production of in-demand commodity crops such as soy and oil palm. A first-of-its-kind study highlights the real and potential impacts on the continent's valuable tropical forests.

Extreme Storms are Extreme Eroders The storm that swept across the Rockies in September 2013 unleashed huge amounts of sediment downstream, doing the work of a century of erosion. Julia Rosen reports. --

Ideal for kangaroos: Out of the pouch, but still living at home Young kangaroos are more likely to survive in the wild if they spend more time alone with their mothers than among others of their own species. They are also larger and heavier than other young kangaroos of comparable age when they spend more time with their mother, according to new findings .

Judge orders Uber to search servers, work harder to find Waymo’s 14,000 files Enlarge / The US District Court building in San Francisco. (credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images) SAN FRANCISCO—The federal judge overseeing the trade secret litigation between Google's Waymo division and Uber said today that he's likely to slap Uber with an injunction unless the company does more to produce the 14,000 documents allegedly stolen by its self-driving car chief, Anthony Levandowski

Culture Change: War Bands Hooked Up With Neolithic Farm Women Neolithic women brought pottery techniques and agricultural knowledge to the relationship.

Apple gentænker sin udskældte "skraldespand" Firmaet indrømmer, at deres seneste Mac Pro ikke var lige i øjet. Nu vil de lytte til brugerne og bygge en ny generation af Mac til professionelle.

Pepsi's New Ad Is a Total Success Before it’s an ad for shampoo or cat food or cola, every advertisement is first an ad for capitalism. Without a privately-controlled industry jockeying to compete with one another for consumer dollars, there’s no need for advertising. People would wash their hair with Shampoo, and feed their cats with Cat Food, and quench their thirst with Cola. Without competition, there would be no need to adve

Lawyers win again in latest privacy class-action settlement Enlarge Twitter, Yelp, Instagram, Foursquare and a few other apps are agreeing to a $5.3 million settlement to an invasion-of-privacy class action in which the companies' apps were accused of accessing the address books of iOS users without their knowledge or consent. About 30 percent of the deal likely will go to the lawyers who sued—about $1.59 million. The remainder is earmarked for the estima

Trump Meets with HHS, NIH Brass President Donald Trump, HHS Secretary Tom Price, and NIH Director Francis Collins discussed the opioid crisis and retaining young researchers in the biomedical research enterprise, among other things, according to a White House official.

Trump Meets with HHS, NIH Brass President Donald Trump, HHS Secretary Tom Price, and NIH Director Francis Collins today discussed the opioid crisis and retaining young researchers in the biomedical research enterprise, among other things, according to a White House official.

Deep sleep may act as fountain of youth in old age As we grow old, our nights are frequently plagued by bouts of wakefulness, bathroom trips and other nuisances as we lose our ability to generate the deep, restorative slumber we enjoyed in youth. But that does not mean the elderly need less sleep, according to neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley.

Biomarker could lead to personalized therapies for prostate cancer In 2016, more than 181,000 new cases of prostate cancer were reported in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. Multiple factors have resulted in the rise of diagnoses, but a number of high-grade tumors remain underdiagnosed and undertreated. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have explored how a specific gene/protein status may allow clinicians to better identify prostate c

Multivitamins not associated with heart disease risk, regardless of initial dietary intake In a new study, published this week in JAMA Cardiology, investigators examined whether multivitamins might help prevent CVD events among those in the PHS II with less nutritious diets. However, their results suggest that baseline nutritional status has no clear impact on whether a daily multivitamin affects the risk of CVD or overall mortality.

When the doctor recommends against the surgery a breast cancer patient wants A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center examines the complex interaction between patients' desires for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and surgeons' responsibility to minimize harm.

Research into why we remember some aviation disasters and forget others Oxford University researchers have tracked how recent aircraft incidents or accidents trigger past events and how some are consistently more memorable than others.

Innovative sensor can screen toxic drugs, help develop biomaterials, and much more Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found an innovative new use for a simple piece of glass tubing: weighing things. Their glass tube sensor will help speed up chemical toxicity tests, shed light on plant growth, and develop new biomaterials, among many other applications.

Public attitudes to end-of-life care in progressive neurological illness are conflicted Public attitudes in UK and USA reveal support both for life-sustaining interventions and for measures to enable peaceful death in progressive neurological illness such as dementia, according to a survey carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

As kids' weight climbs, power of healthy fat supplements drops Body weight plays a significant role in how much benefit children may get from consuming 'good' fats, new research suggests. The study highlights the need for weight-appropriate dosing of supplements and medicines.

One monoclonal antibody protects against 2 lethal viruses A new study reports that one human monoclonal antibody therapy protected nonhuman primates from the lethal hemorrhagic fevers caused by both Marburg and Ravn viruses.

Wikipedia articles on plane crashes show what we remember -- or forget Disastrous current events trigger collective memory of certain past events, a new study of nearly 1,500 Wikipedia articles on airplane crashes and other incidents reports. The results, which provide a new way of modeling our collective memory, reveal how different topics are connected to each other through memory and association -- thereby forming an interconnected network of topics.

A one-two punch hits pancreatic cancer where it hurts Researchers have uncovered a promising new approach to treating pancreatic cancer, by targeting the tissue around the tumor to make it 'softer' and more responsive to chemotherapy. The new approach doubles survival time in mice and lessens the spread of cancer. The findings are published today in Science Translational Medicine.

WSU researchers find a 'sleep gene' Washington State University researchers have seen how a particular gene is involved in the quality of sleep experienced by three different animals, including humans. The gene and its function opens a new avenue for scientists exploring how sleep works and why animals need it so badly.

Collagen-targeting PET probe may improve diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis A PET imaging probe developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators appears able to diagnose and stage pulmonary fibrosis -- an often life-shortening lung disease -- as well as monitor the response to treatment.

New technique helps researchers determine how stem cells differentiate Stem cell differentiation can now be seen thanks to a combination of machine learning and microfabrication techniques developed by scientists at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan. The results, published in PLOS ONE, followed the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) which are easily obtained from adult bone marrow.

Linguistic and cultural knowledge affect whether languages are identified correctly A popular online game shows how linguistic and cultural knowledge may affect whether players can correctly identify different languages, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hedvig Skirgård from the Australian National University, Australia and colleagues.

Like people, great apes may distinguish between true and false beliefs in others Great apes help a person access an object when that person thinks they knows where it is but is mistaken, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Buttelmann from Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues.

Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer, researchers say Pudgy roundworms storing a particular type of fat live longer than their more svelte counterparts, according to a new study.

Plants have been helping to offset climate change, but now it's up to us Plants are currently removing more carbon dioxide from the air than they did 200 years ago, according to new work. This team's findings affirm estimates used in models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Quickly assessing brain bleeding in head injuries using new device A hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the US Food and Drug Administration that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out whether a person with a head injury likely has brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment. These trial results also show the device predicted the absence of potentially dangerous brain bleeding 52 percent of the time in the p

Fish eyes to help understand human inherited blindness Discovery of a gene in zebrafish that triggers congenital blindness could lead to a suitable cure for similar disease in humans.

Algorithms can exploit human perception in graph design Researchers have recently found an algorithmic approach to automatically improve the design of scatterplots by exploiting models and measures of human perception.

Charting the skies of history Ice cores and ancient sediments can be gleaned for clues to weather and climate in the past. But astronomical phenomena -- such as solar flares or auroras -- at best leave only faint environmental traces lacking in specificity. Now scientists have used historical documents to garner better insight into the patterns of past solar events.

A self-healing, water-repellant coating that's ultra durable A self-healing, water-repellent, spray-on coating is hundreds of times more durable than its counterparts, report researchers in a new article.

How Machine Learning May Help Tackle Depression By detecting trends that humans are unable to spot, researchers hope to treat the disorder more effectively.

Want to Stop Your Internet Provider From Selling Your Browsing Data? It Ain't Easy Image: Shutterstock This week, President Donald Trump signed the widely - criticized bill repealing FCC ISP privacy rules , which would have required internet service providers to get opt-in consent before selling customers’ web browsing history. The rules hadn’t actually gone into effect, but the bill’s passage was a wake-up call for American internet users, who suddenly realized: Wait, what the

Watch What Happens When Thousands of People Battle to Make Pixel Art at the Same Time GIF: YouTube The world was given a slight reprieve from the unbearable antics of April Fools’ Day this year given the festivities fell on a Saturday. But Reddit also did its part to make April 1 a little more bearable with a collaborative art project that saw thousands of users painstakingly creating pixel art , one tile at a time, on a giant million-pixel canvas. GIF: YouTube Reddit Place starte

Computers of the Future May Be Minuscule Molecular Machines The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is banking that the computers of the future won't rely on traditional silicon chip architecture, but will instead harness fundamental properties of molecules.

Japan and Norway set off on annual whale hunt despite opposition The countries continue whaling, Norway for food, and Japan claiming it is for scientific research, an argument now dismissed as unjustified by another report

Earth-sized telescope set to snap first picture of a black hole The Event Horizon Telescope will take images of the black hole at the centre of our galaxy, and could reveal how relativity and quantum mechanics mesh

Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and General Atomics have simulated a mysterious self-organized flow of the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions. The findings show that pumping more heat into the core of the plasma can drive instabilities that create plasma rotation inside the doughnut-shaped tokamak that houses the hot charged

NASA's Aqua satellite spots development of Tropical Storm 14P in South Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in newly formed Tropical Cyclone 14P in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Infrared data showed strongest thunderstorms were on one side of the tropical cyclone as a result of wind shear.

Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows Article describes how heating core of the plasma can create sheared flow that improves stability and performance of fusion devices.

Language heard, but never spoken, by young babies bestows a hidden benefit Adults who as babies heard but never spoke Korean benefited from their latent language knowledge decades later, a new study finds.

Aqua satellite spots development of Tropical Storm 14P in South Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in newly formed Tropical Cyclone 14P in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Infrared data showed strongest thunderstorms were on one side of the tropical cyclone as a result of wind shear.

2017 Honda Accord Hybrid has top travel range in its class Honda's Accord Hybrid has returned for 2017 as a roomy, comfortable mid-size sedan that's the most fuel-efficient gasoline-electric hybrid four-door car in its class.

Innovative sensor can screen toxic drugs, help develop biomaterials, and much more Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found an innovative new use for a simple piece of glass tubing: weighing things. Their glass tube sensor will help speed up chemical toxicity tests, shed light on plant growth, and develop new biomaterials, among many other applications.

Like people, great apes may distinguish between true and false beliefs in others Great apes help a person access an object when that person thinks they knowswhere it is but is mistaken, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in theopen-access journal PLOS ONE by David Buttelmann from Max Planck Institute forEvolutionary Anthropology, Germany, and colleagues.

Linguistic and cultural knowledge affect whether languages are identified correctly A popular online game shows how linguistic and cultural knowledge may affect whether players can correctly identify different languages, according to a study published April 5, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hedvig Skirgård from the Australian National University, Australia and colleagues.

New technique helps researchers determine how stem cells differentiate Stem cell differentiation can now be seen thanks to a combination of machine learning and microfabrication techniques developed by scientists at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan. The results, published in PLOS One, followed the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) which are easily obtained from adult bone marrow.

Research into why we remember some aviation disasters and forget others Oxford University researchers have tracked how recent aircraft incidents or accidents trigger past events and how some are consistently more memorable than others. Using the English version of Wikipedia, they analysed articles about airline crashes that occurred between 2008 and 2016. They then measured how the traffic to articles about airline crashes or incidents before 2008 changed due to more

Apes can distinguish between true and false beliefs in others, study suggests Apes can tell whether a person has an accurate belief about a situation, showing the same level of understanding as human infants, research shows Apes are on a par with human infants in being able to tell when people have an accurate belief about a situation or are actually mistaken, researchers say. While previous work has shown that great apes understand the goals, desires and perceptions of ot

The Biggest Misconceptions About VPNs Art by Jim Cookie/GMG. Have you heard? Internet service providers want to sell your data and a virtual private network (VPN) is the best way to tell them to shove off . There’s a problem though. VPNs are notoriously shady, are more complicated than they look, they’re unregulated, and can be more of a security risk than they’re worth if you don’t set them up correctly. We’ve talked about what a VP

Powers of attraction could decimate deadly starfish Scientists studying the Great Barrier Reef have made a breakthrough discovery that could protect one of the Seven Natural Wonders. Biologists believe they can use the powers of attraction to decimate one of the reef's fiercest enemies.

New function discovered for compound that may help slow aging Researchers have found that a compound called rapamycin has unusual properties that may help address neurologic damage such as Alzheimer's disease, and reduce the cellular senescence associated with aging.

Fruits and vegetables' latest superpower? Lowering blood pressure A new study links increased dietary potassium with lower blood pressure.

What Panera Gets From Its $7.5 Billion Sale After speculation during the first half of the week , Panera Bread Company, a fast casual chain, announced on Wednesday that JAB Holdings Company, a German conglomerate, would purchase it for roughly $7.5 billion. JAB’s reasoning seems staightforward enough: the company has been snapping up coffee chains in the U.S. including Krispy Kreme, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Stumptown Coffee Roasters, Keurig Gr

Signs of Spring The vernal equinox took place two weeks ago, heralding the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, despite continued wintry conditions in a few places. As the sunlight becomes more prevalent, people, plants, and animals are beginning to emerge from their winter modes to step outside, bloom, and otherwise welcome the sunshine. These photos show festivals and glimpses of the new season from

Mini-review: Asus cranks out another excellent $700 Ultrabook Andrew Cunningham If you want the “best” Windows laptop right now, it’s hard to argue with stuff like Dell’s XPS 13 2-in-1 or HP’s Spectre x360 . But a lot of the time, people don’t want the “best” laptop so much as they want the best laptop they can get for a certain amount of money. In the last couple of years, a few of Asus’ midrange Zenbooks have done a nice job striking a balance between pri

State: Thousands fail background checks for Uber, Lyft Massachusetts officials say more than 10 percent of drivers for ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft have failed a required background check.

Here's the First Deal Ever on Anker's Newest Lightning Cable, Complete With a Lifetime Warranty Anker PowerLine II Dura Lightning Cables: 6' , $10 with code PL2ND6FT | 3' , $10 with code PL2ND3FT | 1' , $8 with code PL2ND1FT Anker’s PowerLine and PowerLine+ cables were already our readers’ favorite charging cables , but the new PowerLine II line is even stronger, and comes with a hassle-free lifetime warranty , and Anker’s offering the first discounts we’ve ever seen on them today. We wrote

The Search for the Universe’s Missing Antimatter Remains Annoyingly Nebulous The Big Bang produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter. But our universe is mostly matter. What happened to the antimatter?

YouTube TV Goes Live in Google’s Biggest Swipe at Comcast Yet YouTube TV has arrived, and with it the potential to change how television works

S.Africa's top court opens up domestic trade in rhino horn South Africa's highest court Wednesday rejected a bid by the government to keep a ban on domestic trade in rhino horn, a court document showed.

Low-cost 'solar absorber' promising for future power plants Researchers have shown how to modify commercially available silicon wafers into a structure that efficiently absorbs solar energy and withstands the high temperatures needed for "concentrated solar power" plants that might run up to 24 hours a day.

X-ray study reveals long-sought insights into potential drug target Researchers hope to design a new generation of drugs against an array of deadly diseases. One of the key challenges is understanding a particular class of proteins adorning cell surfaces, which are the targets of the majority of pharmaceutical drugs. Scientists have now examined one promising drug target in luminous detail, using a device known as an X-ray free electron laser, or XFEL.

Into the DNA of a coral reef predator Researchers have sequenced and decoded for the first time the genome of the crown-of-thorns starfish, paving the way for the biocontrol of this invasive predator responsible for the destruction of coral reefs across Indo-Pacific oceans.

YouTube TV has some nifty features - and some big drawbacks YouTube TV, Google's new streaming package of about 40 television channels, is the tech industry's latest bid to get cable-shunning millennials to pay for live TV over the internet. It offers intriguing advantages over rivals, but it remains hobbled by a limited channel selection.

Cover, crimp, cultivate? Organic cover crop methods examined for weed control To grow crops organically, farmers fight weeds with chemical-free weapons. One of the most common is a disk. Farmers rip out weeds and churn them into the soil with these disks. But it takes heavy tractors to do this efficiently, and large tractor tires compress the soil as they roll across the field. The process also depletes soil organic carbon, which plants depend on for nutrients, moisture, an

Going Through Hell With H. D.’s ‘Eurydice’ I’ve been thinking a lot about H. D.’s “Eurydice” in recent months, as politics and life in America have suddenly veered into chaos and darkness—chaos and darkness that seem to have a particular appetite for women, and women’s rights. In Greek myth, Eurydice is a tragic object of love. When a fatal snake bite sends her to hell, her husband Orpheus won’t let her go, so he leverages his musical tal

Autotuned Singing Animals Absolutely Nailed the Duck Tales Theme Song Animals electronically coerced into singing has been one of mankind’s greatest artistic achievements. The internet is now packed full of countless songs performed by countless creatures, but few are as wonderful as these random autotuned animals singing the Duck Tales theme . Insane Cherry’s animal cover is so unbelievably perfect that you’ll wonder why the original animated series didn’t opt for

Video Captures Surprise Squid Attack — on Another Squid A marine expedition exploring life in the deep sea recently captured video of an incredible scene: a squid's sneak attack on a smaller squid.

Hunt for Why We Exist Turns to Weird Atomic Decay

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