EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ernie intensifyThe storm formerly known as tropical cyclone 15S, now called Tropical Cyclone Ernie continued to strengthen as NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image that showed the storm developed an eye.
9min
New on MIT Technology Review

Sperm Loaded with Drugs Could Target Gynecological CancersFitting sperm cells with a steering mechanism offers a new way to target treatments.
11min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Last-ditch attempt to save world's most endangered porpoise gets go-ahead Funds approved for plan to round up last 30 vaquitas into protective 'sea pens'. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21791
11min
WIRED

The New Smurfs Movie Finally Solves the Smurfette Problem Think it's weird that nearly all Smurfs are dudes? The latest Smurf flick finally addresses that issue head-on. The post The New Smurfs Movie Finally Solves the Smurfette Problem appeared first on WIRED .
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique wave tank helps scientists understand threat of rogue ocean wavesA team of scientists has demonstrated how ocean winds can generate spontaneous rogue waves, the first step to predicting the potentially dangerous phenomena.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A moldable scaffold for boneA bioactive foam that can be used to replace skull bone lost to injury, surgery, or birth defect is currently under development, report scientists.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Puffins that stay close to their partner during migration have more chicksMany long-lived birds, such as swans, albatrosses or indeed, puffins, are known for their long-lived monogamous, 'soulmate' pairings. Now a study has found that puffin pairs that follow similar migration routes breed more successfully the following season.
13min
The Atlantic

Justice Neil Gorsuch The Senate on Friday confirmed Judge Neil Gorsuch to serve on the Supreme Court, restoring a 5-4 conservative majority on the high court after a rancorous debate that resulted in the end of a long-standing Senate tradition. The vote became a formality after Republicans voted along party lines Thursday to change the Senate rules and defeat a Democratic filibuster of Gorsuch’s nomination. Three Dem
13min
The Atlantic

In Syria, Russia Falls Victim to Its Own Success This morning, Moscow woke up to the news that the U.S. had hit an air base in Homs, Syria in retaliation for Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons in Idlib province. This was accompanied by the usual protestations from the Kremlin, which complained that the U.S. had bypassed international law “ under an invented pretext ” and violated Syria’s sovereignty . Maria Zakharova, the spokeswoman for
13min
Live Science

7 Facts About the Deadly Nerve Agent SarinHere is the science behind sarin, a highly poisonous chemical that interferes with signaling within the nervous system.
16min
Popular Science

Hundreds of icebergs are suddenly invading shipping lanes Science Unusual ice activity There are about 481 icebergs parked in the shipping lanes of the North Atlantic right now. Why? Read on.
19min
Ars Technica

Report: Surface Pro 5 gets new CPUs but keeps the proprietary power connector Enlarge / The Surface Pro 4 with its kickstand out. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) The Surface Pro 4 was released about a year-and-a-half ago, and even though new processors are available, it didn't make an appearance along with the Surface Studio and other hardware updates in October of 2016. Longtime Microsoft pundit Paul Thurrott has some news about the Surface Pro 5, an update he says will chang
21min
Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Waste Kings, 25% Off Chocolate, JBL Flip, and More Amazon’s annual chocolate sale , Waste King garbage disposals , and a JBL Bluetooth speaker lead off Friday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals JBL Charge 3 , $64 You recently named the JBL Charge 3 as your favorite water-resistant Bluetooth speaker , but today, its little brother gets some time in the spotlight. While supplies last, yo
24min
Scientific American Content: Global

Court Upholds California's Cap-and-Trade ProgramThe state’s landmark system for curbing carbon emissions can continue through at least 2020 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
25min
cognitive science

How exercise affects the Brain (Increased learning capacity, improved mood, better focus and motivation) [4:24] submitted by /u/Polysomee [link] [comments]
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-car cow avoidanceDriverless cars are hitting the headlines across the globe but for the foreseeable future we will still have drivers. The pressure then is how might some of the safety features of driverless cars be incorporated into conventional vehicles? Researchers from India describe a real-time automatic obstacle detection and alert system for driver assistance.
27min
Live Science

Squid vs. Squid! Surprise Attack Caught on Video | VideoAn Australian marine research vessel captured a life-and-death struggle between two squids on video.
28min
Ars Technica

Do you want to play a game? Ransomware asks for high score instead of money Rensenware's warning screen asks for a high score, rather than the usual pay off, to decrypt your files. At this point, Ars readers have heard countless tales of computer users being forced to pay significant sums to unlock files encrypted with malicious ransomware . So we were a bit surprised when word started to trickle out about a new bit of ransomware that doesn't ask for money. Instead, "Ren
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many older adults will need help with managing their medicines and moneyIn a study of nearly 9500 individuals aged 65 and older who did not need help in managing medications or finances, many needed assistance as time went on.
29min
The Atlantic

Trump’s Disillusioned Supporters President Trump’s decision to launch airstrikes against the Syrian regime in response to a chemical weapons attack has made him abnormally popular with the elites who inhabit the swamp he campaigned against. MSNBC’s Brian Williams hailed video of the strikes as “beautiful,” and CNN’s Fareed Zakaria identified this as the moment when Trump became president. But it has been a bitterly disappointing
35min
Live Science

Next Job for US Air Force: Space Cop?An off-Earth economy cannot truly take off unless moon miners and other pioneering entrepreneurs are able to operate in a safe and stable environment, and it will likely fall to the US Air Force to provide that environment, an Air Force official said.
37min
Live Science

Discovery! Atmosphere Spotted on Nearly Earth-Size Exoplanet in FirstFor the first time, researchers have detected an atmosphere around a planet just a little bit larger than Earth outside the solar system.
44min
Popular Science

A back and neck massager for 67 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets Ease the pain for $80 off. A shiatsu back and neck massager for 67 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
47min
Gizmodo

Even Brian Michael Bendis is Confused By Peter's Best Friend in Spider-Man: Homecoming Image: Disney/Marvel Studios. Peter Parker’s best bud in Homecoming might have the name of a familiar comics character—Ned Leeds—but his role in the film and his appearance are far more in line with another Spider-Man character: Ultimate Spider-Man ’s Ganke. Fans are confused as to why Miles Morales’ best friend is now Peter’s... and turns out, so is Ganke’s own creator, Brian Michael Bendis. Spe
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique wave tank helps scientists understand threat of rogue ocean wavesA team of scientists from Australia, Belgium, Italy and the UK have demonstrated how ocean winds can generate spontaneous rogue waves, the first step to predicting the potentially dangerous phenomena.
50min
TEDTalks (video)

How we can find ourselves in data | Giorgia LupiGiorgia Lupi uses data to tell human stories, adding nuance to numbers. In this charming talk, she shares how we can bring personality back to data, visualizing the mundane details of our daily lives and transforming the abstract and uncountable into something that can be seen, felt and directly reconnected to ourselves.
54min
Live Science

Puffin Couples Stay Close During 'Winter Break'Atlantic puffins migrate solo, but keep to the same route as their mates.
57min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Stone Age hunter-gatherers tackled their cavities with a sharp tool and tarLate Stone Age hunter-gatherers scraped and coated away tooth decay.
1h
Popular Science

Frankenviruses may have gobbled up host cells in order to grow Science It was a dark and stormy petri dish… Scientists are determined to nail down the origins of the frankenvirus family—and that the family seems to be growing. Read on.
1h
Ars Technica

FCC chair wants to replace net neutrality with “voluntary” commitments Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaks during a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on March 8, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai reportedly met with broadband industry lobby groups this week to discuss his plans for eliminating net neutrality rules. Instead of the FCC continuing to enforce net neutrality rules, Pai “wants Internet service
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Osteoporosis drug found safe in long-term trialA new study provides reassuring information about the short-term and long-term safety of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that is used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PET radiotracer design for monitoring targeted immunotherapyIn an article published in the April issue of 'The Journal of Nuclear Medicine,' researchers at Stanford University in California provide a template for assessing new positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers that can accurately identify molecules in cancer cells that prevent the immune system from attacking the cancer.
1h
The Atlantic

What's Next in Syria? U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has a difficult job when he heads to Moscow next week. His Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, has already compared the U.S.’s rationale for strikes in Syria—a sarin gas attack on civilians earlier in the week widely attributed to the Assad regime—to the flawed evidence the U.S. presented to the UN Security Council in 2003 to successfully make the case for th
1h
The Atlantic

Seven Lessons From Trump's Syria Strike When the Electoral College elevated Donald Trump to the presidency, it conferred on him the awesome life-and-death powers that attend the office. It was inevitable that President Trump would use those powers sooner or later. Now he has. For the effects on the region, I refer you to the powerful piece by The Atlantic ’s Andrew Exum. I’m concerned here with the effects on the U.S. political system.
1h
The Atlantic

The March Jobs Report Misses Expectations On Friday, the Labor Department reported that 98,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy in March, while the unemployment rate fell to 4.5 percent. The report missed expectations: Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal were expecting 175,000 jobs to be added. Here are the three most important takeaways. The weather may have played a role in the low numbers. Well before the jobs report lan
1h
The Atlantic

Democratic Leaders Are Backing Trump on Syria After the United States launched missile strikes Thursday evening against the Syrian government in response to what officials said was President Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons, some Democratic lawmakers denounced the attack as “unconstitutional” and “unlawful.” Yet while some Democrats objected to how Trump authorized the strike, many either condoned or did not take issue with the mili
1h
Futurity.org

To treat depression with games, remind users to play Reminders to play depression-fighting video games and “brain-training” apps prompt users to not only play more often, but also spend more time in each session, say researchers. “Through the use of carefully designed persuasive message prompts…mental health video games can be perceived and used as a more viable and less attrition-ridden treatment option,” the researchers write in a paper published
1h
Ingeniøren

Cyklistforbund: Kritik af RFID-chips er skudt over måletDigitale stelnumre skal ikke overvåge cyklisterne, og risikoen for misbrug er stærkt overdrevet, mener Cyklistforbundet, efter at et udskældt beslutningsforslag om cykelchips blev skrottet tirsdag.
1h
Gizmodo

This New Mexican Cave Spider is Ridiculous Image: San Diego Natural History Museum Say hello to Califorctenus cacachilensis , a new species of spider found in a remote mountain region of Baja California Sur. This elusive, softball-sized arachnid prefers the dark and cozy confines of caves, which seems entirely appropriate given its gruesome appearance. Also, we are never going into caves ever again. Spiders are an incredibly diverse and p
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google adds 'fact check' to global search resultsGoogle is adding a fact-checking tag to search results globally, its latest initiative to help curb the spread of misinformation and "fake news," the company said Friday.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satellites map carbon sequestered by forests, with accuracy of up to ten metresA new method of using satellite images to evaluate the forest carbon balance has been developed by scientists. The carbon balance indicates how much carbon is sequestered or released by forests each year. This enables the carbon balance to be displayed on digital maps, with an accuracy of up to ten meters.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic tundraFor the first time, scientists present the isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide produced by Arctic soils. The finding opens new avenues for predicting future trends in atmospheric nitrous oxide as well as in identifying climate change mitigation actions in the Arctic, a region that is particularly sensitive to climate change.
1h
The Atlantic

Addicts Who Can't Get Opioids Are Overdosing on a Diarrhea Drug Opioid painkillers have an inconvenient, lesser-known side effect: terrible constipation. Perhaps then it’s no surprise that people addicted to opioids have considered the inverse. If a drug that gets you high causes constipation, could a drug that causes constipation get you high? Yes, and that drug is another opioid called loperamide, better known by its brand name Imodium as an over-the-counte
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Berlin to expand bike lines, approves self-driving car testOfficials and cycling campaigners in Berlin have agreed to budget about 50 million euros ($53 million) a year to expand bike use with the goal of reducing car traffic in the German capital.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pitt designs new wheelchair powered by compressed airA new waterproof motorized wheelchair that runs entirely on compressed air was unveiled today at Morgan's Wonderland, a 25-acre theme park in San Antonio, Texas. The park was built specifically for individuals with disabilities, and 10 of these chairs will be available to patrons at the venue's new splash park, Morgan's Inspiration Island, when it opens later this spring.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical lowland frogs at greater risk from climate warming than high-elevation species, study showsA new study of Peruvian frogs living at a wide variety of elevations—from the Amazon floodplain to high Andes peaks—lends support to the idea that lowland amphibians are at higher risk from future climate warming.
1h
Futurity.org

Your exes share more than being your ‘type’ What do your exes have in common? A new study finds that the people we date share many similarities—both in terms of appearance and personality. For observable qualities like attractiveness, similarity emerges because attractive people seduce other attractive people. But, researchers say, for qualities that vary greatly depending on where you live (like education or religion) similarity emerges b
1h
Ars Technica

One-third of Americans are willing to eat lab-grown meat regularly Are we on the cusp of the consumer biotech age, when lab-grown meat will be just as common as farmed meat? Recently, a company called Memphis Meats started selling in-vitro meat (IVM) that apparently tastes just like delicious chicken and duck. But if we want the price on an IVM burger to get below $1,000, we need consumers to buy lots of the stuff. That's why two Australian researchers from the
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AGA releases best practice advice on long-term PPI useWhen proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are appropriately prescribed, their benefits are likely to outweigh their risks, according to an American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Clinical Practice Update published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of AGA. Additionally, there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend specific strategies for mitigating PPI adverse effects.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep brain stimulation decreases tics in young adults with severe Tourette syndromeA surgical procedure called deep brain stimulation that sends electrical impulses to a specific area of the brain reduces the 'tics,' or involuntary movements and vocal outbursts, experienced by young adults with severe cases of Tourette syndrome, according to new research from NYU Langone Medical Center.
1h
Gizmodo

SpaceX Wants You to Start Saving for Your (Possibly Deadly) Trip to Mars Image: SpaceX via Flickr Elon Musk wants to take you to Mars, but he also wants your sweet Earthling dollars to do that— hundreds of thousands of them , at least. With SpaceX’s most recent success , in which the company launched a reused rocket into orbital space for the first time ever, Mars enthusiasts and billionaires alike are buzzing to get to the Red Planet. “I hope you’re all thinking abou
1h
Futurity.org

Method could find ingredients for better batteries A mathematical model may help scientists design new kinds of materials for use in high-power batteries. In a study published this week in Applied Physics Letters , researchers describe their new mathematical model for designing materials for storing electricity. The model could be a huge benefit to chemists and materials scientists, who traditionally rely on trial and error to create new material
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

You spy with your little eye, dogs can adopt the perspective of humansHumans are able to interpret the behavior of others by attributing mental states to them (and to themselves). By adopting the perspectives of other persons, they can assume their emotions, needs and intentions and react accordingly. In the animal kingdom, the ability to attribute mental states (Theory of Mind) is a highly contentious issue. Cognitive biologists could demonstrate with a new test pr
1h
The Atlantic

The Terrorist Attack in Stockholm Here’s what we know: —A truck crashed into a crowd of people on central street of Drottninggatan. —Local media are reporting at least two dead and many more injured. —Prime Minister Stefan Lofven confirmed the crash was an act of terrorism. Read On »
1h
Ingeniøren

Her vil de radikale lægge ny københavnertunnelVed at nedgrave H.C. Andersens Boulevard og Åboulevarden i København vil Det Radikale Venstre gøre plads til en fem kilometer lang strækning, som partiet kalder ‘Den Grønne Boulevard’. Den skal rumme parker, boliger og legepladser.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Russia Could Stay with the International Space Station to 2028The orbital outpost is presently slated to be retired as early as 2024 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Gizmodo

Your Favorite Water Resistant Speaker's Little Brother Is Cheaper Than Ever Today JBL Charge 3 , $64 You recently named the JBL Charge 3 as your favorite water-resistant Bluetooth speaker , but today, its little brother gets some time in the spotlight. While supplies last, you can pick up the JBL Flip 3 for an all-time low $64 from Amazon. Compared to the Charge 3, the Flip is smaller, quieter, and merely splashproof, rather than truly water resistant. But reviewers still say
1h
Big Think

Can a Font Help Those With Dyslexia Read with More Ease? Dyslexia makes letters float, rotate, and flip on a page. It turns M's into W's, q's into p's, and so on. Changing the font-face might be able to help keep the letters in place on the page. Read More
1h
Ars Technica

New giant viruses suggest their genomes expanded like an accordion (credit: Schultz, et. al., Science) Viruses tend to have stripped-down genomes, carrying just enough genes to take over a cell and make lots more copies. Ebola, for example, carries a total of just seven genes, allowing new copies to be made with little fuss. There are a few exceptions—viruses like herpes with complex life cycles—but even the biggest of the viruses we knew about had only a few hu
1h
WIRED

A Beautiful Tripod That Doubles as a Selfie Stick Because 2017 MeFoto's Backpacker Air folds up to the size of a flashlight and comes in seven glorious colors. The post A Beautiful Tripod That Doubles as a Selfie Stick Because 2017 appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Popular Science

Old books actually smell like chocolate and coffee Science Sniffing out literary smells What does a really old book smell like? Read on.
2h
Gizmodo

Taser’s Latest Body Cams Push Is Unregulated, Unprecedented, and Disturbing Gif: YouTube On Wednesday, Axon (formerly “Taser”) announced its offer to outfit every cop in the US with a free body camera, with rollout beginning as soon as the end of the month. About 20% of police departments use body cameras. The overwhelmingly majority of all police departments have no policies about how best to use the cameras, what to do with footage, or even when to record. Privacy expe
2h
WIRED

The Subtle Art of Watching North Korea Build Nukes Experts are poring over satellite imagery for signals that the isolated nation is working on a new type of nuclear device. The post The Subtle Art of Watching North Korea Build Nukes appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychosocial programs for children in war-torn Sri Lanka show good resultsDifferent psychosocial rehabilitation programs for children have somewhat different results, due to differences in resources, methodologies and objectives. But a much more significant difference appears when comparing rehabilitated children with children who have not undergone any rehabilitation at all, suggests a new report.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pinpoint creation of chirality by organic catalystsA new catalytic system has been developed that enables highly stereoselective synthesis of amino acid derivatives. A slight structural change in this amino acid-derived organic catalyst leads to pinpoint inversion of stereochemistry. This strategy is expected to become a powerful tool to synthesize various molecules that contain multiple stereocenters in high selectivity and efficiency.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risks of diabetics fasting during Ramadan: Hypoglycemia rates w insulin pump v. injectionsA new study examining the risk of fasting during Ramadan for people with type 1 diabetes compared blood glucose control and the rates of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia between users of insulin pump therapy versus multiple daily insulin injections.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers detect protein that increases effectiveness of vaccinesResearchers have discovered a protein they believe would help make vaccinations more effective and provide protection from other diseases such as cancer.The findings, which appear online in Scientific Reports, allows for greater understanding of how vaccine enhancers work and can best be used.
2h
Ars Technica

Blue Origin has built three new rockets, may begin flying again this summer Enlarge / Jeff Bezos speaking at the unveiling of the Blue Origin New Shepard system during the Space Symposium on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (credit: Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Between November 2015, and October 2016, the reusable New Shepard rocket and spacecraft made five suborbital flights, surviving some pretty harsh scenarios . But during the last six months, Blue Origin, the
2h
The Atlantic

What Your Therapist Doesn’t Know, Cont’d First, I want to say thank you for your thoughtful comments on my article “ What Your Therapist Doesn’t Know ,” on how data can make therapists more effective. I am honored that the article sparked so much thought. Some readers raised questions about the applicability of metrics to therapy, and in particular whether FIT (feedback-informed treatment) can benefit therapy. These questions are valid.
2h
The Atlantic

What Would Keynes Think of Trump's Infrastructure Plan? If President Donald Trump sticks to his campaign promises, politicians will soon be debating the merits of a $1 trillion infrastructure program. Before the election, he trumpeted an initiative that would create “jobs, jobs, jobs” in part by rebuilding the U.S.’s bridges and highways. After the failure of his efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, he will likely be moving on to inf
2h
Ingeniøren

Dong: Drop de store forkromede it-projekter Der skal ske et alvorligt skifte i mindsettet, hvis virksomhederne skal trække sig selv ud af it skandalernes dyre sump. Det mener hovedarkitekt for et nyt projekt i Dong. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dong-drop-de-store-forkromede-it-projekter-1075351 Version2
2h
Ars Technica

Aggressive emissions cutbacks would drop heat waves in half in 20 years Enlarge (credit: Kevin Frayer ) One of the challenges of driving action on climate change is the gap between taking action and seeing any benefits. We'll have to act now to limit greenhouse gas emissions if we want to limit total global warming to less than 2°C and minimize negative effects. Yet most indications are that the benefits of these efforts may not be noticeable for decades, and they wi
2h
Gizmodo

This Mind-Blowing Stellar Explosion Is a Beautiful Mess Image: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), J. Bally/H. Drass et al. When it comes to cool space pictures, supernovae get all the credit. After all, who doesn’t love a good star death? But new images from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile reveal a stunning star birth that gives those supernova snaps a run for their money. It looks just like a firework, and now I have that godforsa
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical lowland frogs at greater risk from climate warming than high-elevation species, study showsA new study of Peruvian frogs living at a wide variety of elevations -- from the Amazon floodplain to high Andes peaks -- lends support to the idea that lowland amphibians are at higher risk from future climate warming.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In-car cow avoidanceDriverless cars are hitting the headlines across the globe but for the foreseeable future we will still have drivers. The pressure then is how might some of the safety features of driverless cars be incorporated into conventional vehicles? Writing in the International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems, researchers from India describe a real-time automatic obstacle detection and alert system fo
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-intensity interval training rapidly improves diabetics' glucose metabolismNew research reveals that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases glucose metabolism in muscles as well as insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. Already after a two-week training period, the glucose uptake in thigh muscles returned to a normal level.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Money can't buy confidence in birth services, research showsCash is not a sufficient incentive for pregnant women in India to take up free institutional delivery services, new research shows.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene Flagship researches create thin film transistors printed with layered materialsGraphene Flagship researchers from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of layered materials. Published today in the leading journal Science the team's findings have the potential to cheaply print a range of electronic devices from solar cells to LEDs with applications from interactive smart food and drug labels to next-generation banknote securit
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthma drug helps patients with skin disorderOmalizumab is shown to be effective in treating inducible urticaria.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Help MIT Solve Global Problems with Open InnovationSolve is bringing together a community of technologists, business leaders, researchers, social entrepreneurs, and policy makers around global challenges. Join us next month at MIT.
2h
The Atlantic

The Obama Doctrine, R.I.P. President Obama’s foreign policy doctrine , like many foreign policy doctrines, was contradictory at times, and it sometimes lacked coherence. Obama himself resisted the desire of others (including yours truly) to corral his various foreign policy and national security impulses into a comprehensive, globe-spanning, capital-D doctrine. But Obama possessed a number of well-developed foreign policy
2h
The Atlantic

Trump's Syria Strike Was Unconstitutional and Unwise Early the morning of August 21, 2013, six densely populated neighborhoods in Syria “were jolted awake by a series of explosions, followed by an oozing blanket of suffocating gas,” the Washington Post reported at the time. “Unknown to Syrian officials, U.S. spy agencies recorded each step in the alleged chemical attack, from the extensive preparations to the launching of rockets to the after-actio
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into proving math's million-dollar problem: the Riemann hypothesis (Update)(Phys.org)—Researchers have discovered that the solutions to a famous mathematical function called the Riemann zeta function correspond to the solutions of another, different kind of function that may make it easier to solve one of the biggest problems in mathematics: the Riemann hypothesis. If the results can be rigorously verified, then it would finally prove the Riemann hypothesis, which is wor
2h
Futurity.org

This common virus may set off celiac disease The common but otherwise harmless reovirus can trigger the immune system response to gluten that may lead to celiac disease, new research shows. The study, published in Science , further implicates viruses in the development of autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease and type 1 diabetes, and raises the possibility that vaccines could one day be used to prevent these diseases. “This study clea
2h
Gizmodo

How to Make the Dopest Videos for Snapchat and Instagram Image: Screenshots Apple just pushed out its newest app , a mobile iMovie for the Snapchat generation—but it’s far from the only lightweight video editor you can get for your phone. Jazz up those clips of your pets and vacations before they hit Instagram and Snapchat with these mobile video editing suites, putting pro tools in your pocket. Quik Image: Screenshots Previously called Replay but acqu
2h
Live Science

Parts of the Arctic Ocean Are Turning into the AtlanticThe Arctic is undergoing an astonishingly rapid transition as climate change overwhelms the region.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

You spy with your little eye -- dogs can adopt the perspective of humansHumans are able to interpret the behaviour of others by attributing mental states to them. In the animal kingdom, the ability to attribute mental states (Theory of Mind) is a highly contentious issue. Cognitive biologists from Vetmeduni Vienna could now prove that dogs are not only able to identify whether a human has an eye on a food source and knows about hidden food. They can also correctly int
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellites map carbon sequestered by forests, with accuracy of up to ten metersLed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the EU North State project has developed a new method of using satellite images to evaluate the forest carbon balance. The carbon balance indicates how much carbon is sequestered or released by forests each year. This enables the carbon balance to be displayed on digital maps, with an accuracy of up to ten meters.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peptide acts as mediator for learningIn order to adapt to changes in the environment, the brain produces new nerve cells even at adult age. These young neurons are crucial for memory formation and learning. Scientists in Heidelberg have now discovered that a small peptide plays the role of a mediator in this process. In response to an external stimulus such as a varied environment, the mediator peptide boosts the proliferation of neu
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover isotopic fingerprint of N2O emissions from Arctic tundraA new study from the University of Eastern Finland presents, for the first time, the isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide produced by Arctic soils. The finding opens new avenues for predicting future trends in atmospheric nitrous oxide as well as in identifying climate change mitigation actions in the Arctic, a region that is particularly sensitive to climate change.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Image release: ALMA captures explosive star birthStar birth can be a violent and explosive event, as dramatically illustrated in new ALMA images.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALMA captures dramatic stellar fireworksStellar explosions are most often associated with supernovae, the spectacular deaths of stars. But new ALMA observations provide insights into explosions at the other end of the stellar life cycle, star birth. Astronomers captured these dramatic images as they explored the firework-like debris from the birth of a group of massive stars, demonstrating that star formation can be a violent and explos
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Puffins that stay close to their partner during migration have more chicksPuffin pairs that follow similar migration routes breed more successfully the following season, a new Oxford University study has found.
2h
Live Science

Deadly Poisons Made World War I 'The Chemists' War' | VideoChemical weapons caused more than 1 million casualties during World War I, the first time these agents were used for mass killing in warfare.
2h
The Atlantic

School-Bus Accidents and Resistance-School Inhabitants: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories The Shaky Bus Data Leaving Atlanta Students at Risk Marlon A. Walker | Atlanta-Journal Constitution The Atlanta Journal-Constitution asked for and analyzed school-bus accident data from the state and metro Atlanta school districts, which raise questions about those safety procedures. There are gaps in the records and evidence that some district officials don’t enforce their own policies. There’s
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Violent end as young stars dramatically collideScientists capture a dramatic collision between two young stars that tore apart their stellar nursery.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Grey squirrels are bad for the British countrysideAccording to some animal rights groups the grey squirrel is a victim of circumstance. They say it has been made a scapegoat for regional red squirrel population extinctions and claim that loss of the reds is caused entirely coincidentally by habitat change. They suggest the true facts are being hidden and scientific research being intentionally misinterpreted.
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Dagens Medicin

Læger: Patientansvarlige læger må ikke blive en ekstra arbejdsopgaveIndførslen af patientsanvarlige læger må ikke blive en ekstra opgave for landets læger, advarer Overlægeforeningen og Yngre Læger.
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Dagens Medicin

Morten Hedegaard har åbnet egen klinikDen tidligere klinikchef på Rigshospitalets fødeafdeling, Morten Hedegaard, har åbnet privatklinik på Østerbro.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Squabbles in star nurseries result in celestial fireworksImages from the ALMA observatory in Chile reveal that early days of stars can be just as fiery as their death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ALMA captures explosive star birthStar birth can be a violent and explosive event, as dramatically illustrated in new ALMA images.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Puffins that stay close to their partner during migration have more chicksPuffin pairs that follow similar migration routes breed more successfully the following season, a new Oxford University study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The truth about spider bites in Australia – they're unlikely to eat your fleshRecent news reports that a man had both his legs amputated after being bitten by a white-tailed spider have again cast this relatively harmless spider in a negative light. Experts have since said amputations may have been wrongly blamed on a spider bite, and authorities now consider a bacterial infection to be responsible for the man's injuries. Despite this, the damage to the largely harmless whi
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Science-Based Medicine

Do Canadian Babies Really Cry the Most?Despite an exaggerated and largely inaccurate interpretation by the media, a recently published study in the Journal of Pediatrics does little to update our understanding of infant crying and colic.
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Science : NPR

Dalia Mogahed: How Does Speaking Up Change Minds? After 9/11, Dalia Mogahed saw an increase in negative perceptions of Muslims in the media, so she made it her job to speak up for her faith and fight prejudice with better understanding. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)
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Science : NPR

Adam Galinksy: What Drives Us To Speak Up? Social psychologist Adam Galinsky studies why it's so daunting to speak up — and what can help. He says the most powerful factor that compels us to take that risk is "moral conviction." (Image credit: Dian Lofton/TEDxNewYork)
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Science : NPR

James Hansen: What Makes A Scientist Take A Stand? When James Hansen spoke up about climate change in the 1980s, he risked the loss of his job and reputation. But, he says, it was worth it — because he could not be silent about something so important. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)
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WIRED

Robots Aren’t Human. You Only Make Them So Photographer Max Aguilera-Hellweg peers into the uncanny valley in a fascinating, and slightly terrifying, book. The post Robots Aren't Human. You Only Make Them So appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Dark Souls 3 Ends the Torture With a Devilish Final Expansion Dark Souls never makes anything easy. Going into the franchise's final death-march, it's easy to ask: why bother? This DLC is a good reminder. The post Dark Souls 3 Ends the Torture With a Devilish Final Expansion appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Review: Weber Genesis II LX Grill This grill's burners go to 11, but that's still not high enough. The post Review: Weber Genesis II LX Grill appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

A Classic Jack Kirby Hero Could Be Coming to Legends of Tomorrow Image: The CW. Banner Art by Jim Cooke. More updates on the long-in-the-works Conan sequel. John Ridley’s top-secret Marvel project is still happening (eventually). Scott Gimple teases the possibility of another fallen character appearing in The Walking Dead ’s future. Plus tons of new looks at Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 , iZombie , and more. Behold, Spoilers! The Legend of Conan On the heels
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Device boosts interaction between light and motionNovel design developed by Brazilian researchers couples light waves and mechanical waves at higher intensity levels. One of its potential applications is in telecommunications as an optical modulator, because the device can sense and excite mechanical vibration, it could be used as an optical switch, turning on or off a laser beam that passes through it far more efficiently than the modulating tec
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sleeping Beauties of ScienceScientific American graphic about slumbering research papers wakes up for an award -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

TS Picks: April 7, 2017Consortium pushes for open citation data; Gates Foundation launches open-access publishing platform; Cell Press lifts the veil on papers under consideration; an online widget circumvents some paywalls
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Live Science

Can the Search for Alien Life Be Spurred by a Lottery?A new paper suggests using a combination lottery and savings bond to ensure funding for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To conserve tropical forests and wildlife, protect the rights of people who rely on themMany of our planet's most beautiful areas are also sites of intense conflicts. In a recent example, traditional herdsmen in February took over the land around Mount Kenya, which is a World Heritage Site and biodiversity hotspot, burning down the tourist lodge and bringing in thousands of cattle to graze.
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New on MIT Technology Review

3-D Printing at the Mall, Bumpier Flights, and Digital Drugs to Cure You—The Download, April 7, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biology professors suggest instincts evolved from learning(Phys.org)—A pair of biology professors, one with the University of Illinois, the other with Macquarie University in Australia has proposed in a Perspective piece in the journal Science that the traits we see as instinctual in animals were likely learned by ancestors. In their paper, Gene Robinson and Andrew Barron suggest that those behaviors learned by ancestors wound up in their DNA somehow, ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The stampede of wind farm complaints that never happenedNational Wind Farm Commissioner, Andrew Dyer, has just released his much anticipated first annual report.
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Science | The Guardian

Architects seek to debunk spy's testimony in neo-Nazi murder trial Forensic Architecture to present findings after rebuilding German cafe crime scene where man of Turkish origin was shot Nearly five years into the trial of a German neo-Nazi gang who went on a killing spree against immigrants, relatives of the victims have become so frustrated with the police’s inability to untangle the case they have turned to a an unlikely profession in search of clues: archite
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eastern Arctic Ocean found to be undergoing 'Atlantification'(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that the eastern part of the Arctic Ocean is undergoing what they describe as "Atlantification"—in which the ocean is becoming more like the Atlantic Ocean. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they tracked ocean temperatures over a 15-year period and the changes they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Northern NSW is no stranger to floods, but this one was differentThe devastating flood damage wreaked by Tropical Cyclone Debbie has left many residents in northern New South Wales facing an enormous cleanup that could take months.
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The Scientist RSS

Week in Review: April 3?7Virus triggers gluten intolerance in mice; UK bank offers clinic-ready hESC lines; researchers debate giant virus origins; cephalopods edit RNA; scientists screen noncoding genome with CRISPR
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The Scientist RSS

FDA OKs Marketing of DTC Genetic Health-Risk Tests23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson’s and celiac.
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Gizmodo

Choose From Three Powerful Waste King Garbage Disposals For All-Time Low Prices Waste King Gold Box Every so often, we see deals on individual Waste King garbage disposal models, and our readers always buy a ton of them. Today though, you’ve got three different choices in Amazon’s Gold Box . The main difference between the models is basically the speed and strength of the motor. You can get 1/3 horsepower for $35 , 1/2 HP for $50 , or 3/4 HP for $71 . Those are all easily al
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Gizmodo

One of Michael Crichton's Final Weird Science Stories Has Landed a Director The cover of Micro. Image: HarperCollins Iconic writer Michael Crichton passed away in 2008 while working on another adventure novel in the mold of his best-known work, Jurassic Park . Another author finished that story based on his notes, and the result was Micro , published in 2011. Last year, Dreamworks purchased the film rights and today, that film now has a director. The director is Joachim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Looking beneath the surface—making cities more livableA new interactive toolbox is helping urban planners, practitioners, environmental organisations and researchers across Europe work together to better understand and use the ground beneath our cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a lab-scale prototype for the treatment of skin tumorsResearchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, in collaboration with Universitat Politécnica de Valencia and CIBER's Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), have designed a laser device specifically designed for optical hyperthermia applications.
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cognitive science

Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’ submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Lab notes: I love a planet with a steamy atmosphere Is there life on the Earth-like planet GJ 1132b? Well, most probably not, but what it does have is a hot and steamy atmosphere, astronomers have discovered . It’s one of the first times an atmosphere has been spotted around a small, rocky world. Back on our own rocky planet, geologists have revealed how catastrophic flooding separated Britain from Europe 125,000 years ago (I particularly loved th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How molecular clocks are refining human evolution's timelineDNA holds the story of our ancestry – how we're related to the familiar faces at family reunions as well as more ancient affairs: how we're related to our closest nonhuman relatives, chimpanzees; how Homo sapiens mated with Neanderthals; and how people migrated out of Africa, adapting to new environments and lifestyles along the way. And our DNA also holds clues about the timing of these key event
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automated automobile cattle avoidanceDriverless cars are hitting the headlines across the globe but for the foreseeable future we will still have drivers. The pressure then is how might some of the safety features of driverless cars be incorporated into conventional vehicles? Writing in the International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems, researchers from India describe a real-time automatic obstacle detection and alert system fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny thrusters demonstrate a capability needed to detect gravitational wavesOn December 3, 2015, the LISA Pathfinder mission blasted into space carrying the most stable spacecraft thruster system ever qualified for use in space. Developed by NASA JPL, the Space Technology 7 (ST-7) Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is designed to control the spacecraft's position to within a millionth of a millimeter. ST-7 DRS consists of clusters of colloid micronewton thrusters and cont
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Ingeniøren

Adidas vil masseproducere 3D-printede sko i 2018Det tyske firma er endnu engang på banen med en 3D-printet sko. Ambitionen er at producere 100.000 par sko næste år.
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NYT > Science

Pet City: Dogs Do Their Duty for ScienceResearchers are collecting the microbial life of New York’s pets and pests as part of a larger project to map tiny organisms throughout the city.
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 7, 2017 —The world is reacting to the U.S. strikes on a Syrian airbase in response to Tuesday’s chemical-weapons attack that’s been blamed on the Assad regime. More here —A Romanian tourist who fell into the Thames river during the terrorist attack in London last month has died. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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The Atlantic

The Handbag's Tale I had started out thinking handbags and purses were the same thing. MORE FROM OUR PARTNERS The Seductive Nostalgia of the Picnic How the Diving Bell Opened the Ocean's Depths The Still-Misunderstood Shape of the Clitoris I was a handbag newbie, an unpaid writer, an impartial observer hired as a ghost memoirist for the CEO of a luxury-handbag resale site. Having grown up in Los Angeles, I had a cu
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New Scientist - News

Thousands of fake companies added to Google Maps every monthFraudulent locksmiths and restaurant referral scammers are masquerading as legit firms on Google Maps, fleecing customers and harming real firms
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Futurity.org

‘Orphan’ receptor makes taking opioids so itchy New research identifies what triggers an immune system response to opioids that leads to itching. The culprit: MRGRPX2, a receptor protein on the surface of mast cells. Opioids are an important tool in pain management, but the side effects—including addiction, respiratory failure, dizziness, and severe itching—can be overwhelming. Scientists have been trying to understand how these side effects h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds unused farmland could be key to aiding the survival of farmland birdsPlanting wild flowers at the edges of arable fields could significantly improve the habitat for farmland birds and contribute to their survival, a study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers invent novel catalyst to convert carbon dioxideResearchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have invented a new catalyst that can efficiently convert carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO). This soon-to-be patented invention enables the sustainable utilisation of CO2, a potent greenhouse gas linked to climate change. If successful on a larger scale, this invention could provide a practical way for converting CO2 to useful chemicals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Asteroid to fly safely past Earth on April 19A relatively large near-Earth asteroid discovered nearly three years ago will fly safely past Earth on April 19 at a distance of about 1.1 million miles (1.8 million kilometers), or about 4.6 times the distance from Earth to the moon. Although there is no possibility for the asteroid to collide with our planet, this will be a very close approach for an asteroid of this size.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists watch a molecule protect itself from radiation damageWhen the molecules that carry the genetic code in our cells are exposed to harm, they have defenses against potential breakage and mutations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellites map carbon sequestered by forests, with accuracy of up to ten metresLed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the EU North State project has developed a new method of using satellite images to evaluate the forest carbon balance. The carbon balance indicates how much carbon is sequestered or released by forests each year. This enables the carbon balance to be displayed on digital maps, with an accuracy of up to ten metres.
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Gizmodo

The Cold War Officially Gets Renewed For a Second Season President Donald Trump leaves the podium after speaking at Mar-a-Lago on Thursday, April 6, 2017 (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) The US military launched a missile attack on a Syrian airbase last night, and the President of the United States announced it by uncharacteristically invoking God three times in his three-minute speech . The baby known as Cold War II was conceived long ago. But last night, Pres
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Scientific American Content: Global

Science and America's GreatnessScience is not “soft power”—it’s as hard as nails, and vital to our homeland security -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum-physical model systemTwo researchers at Heidelberg University have developed a model system that enables a better understanding of the processes in a quantum-physical experiment with ultracold atoms. Using computer-assisted methods, Prof. Dr Sandro Wimberger and David Fischer from the Institute for Theoretical Physics discovered physical laws that point to the universal properties of this system. Their results were pu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Outdated UK divorce law causes needlessly painful and destructive breakups, new research findsOutdated divorce law is causing needlessly painful and destructive breakups and exacerbating conflict between couples, a major new study has found.
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Gizmodo

A New Ghost In The Shell Anime Announced! [Image via まとめNaver ] With the beleaguered Hollywood movie out the door, Production I.G has revealed it’s working on a new Ghost in the Shell anime project. Details are scant, but it will be co-directed by Kenji Kamiyama ( Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex series) and Shinji Aramaki ( Appleseed ). That’s all we know for now! Official teaser images, concept art, and key art have all yet to b
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Live Science

Photos: Major Roman Settlement Discovered in North YorkshireDuring construction to expand a major road in England, a wealthy Roman settlement and a treasure trove of artifacts were uncovered.
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Live Science

Wealthy Roman Settlement Discovered Beneath Britain's Longest RoadConstruction work to upgrade Britain's longest road has revealed a treasure trove of rare artifacts from one of the country's earliest and wealthiest Roman settlements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

You spy with your little eye – dogs can adopt the perspective of humansHumans are able to interpret the behaviour of others by attributing mental states to them (and to themselves). By adopting the perspectives of other persons, they can assume their emotions, needs and intentions and react accordingly. In the animal kingdom, the ability to attribute mental states (Theory of Mind) is a highly contentious issue. Cognitive biologists from the Messerli Research Institut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists uncover isotopic fingerprint of N2O emissions from Arctic tundraA new study from the University of Eastern Finland presents, for the first time, the isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide produced by Arctic soils. The finding opens new avenues for predicting future trends in atmospheric nitrous oxide as well as in identifying climate change mitigation actions in the Arctic, a region that is particularly sensitive to climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pinpoint creation of chirality by organic catalystsResearchers at Nagoya University have reported in Nature Communications on the development of an organic catalyst (organocatalyst) that triggers a highly stereoselective 1,6-addition of azlactones (nucleophile) to a δ-aryl dienyl carbonyl compound (electrophile) to generate amino acid derivatives in high yields. The generated 1,6-adduct contains two carbon stereocenters, and a slight structural ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food for thought? Diet helps explain unique human brainpowerIt's the mystery of all mysteries of science. Why is it that humans are so unusual compared to all other life? The key to solving this riddle lies in explaining the evolution of our large brains and exceptional intelligence.
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Futurity.org

Losing CHIP would put vulnerable kids at risk More than 8 million children could be at risk of losing health coverage if federal funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program does not continue. Children with chronic conditions are most vulnerable, experts say, and families could face substantial cost increases if they need to shift their insurance to a Marketplace plan. CHIP is a main source of government-sponsored health insurance for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exoplanet discovery by an amateur astronomer shows the power of citizen scienceYou don't need to be a professional astronomer to find new worlds orbiting distant stars. Darwin mechanic and amateur astronomer Andrew Grey this week helped to discover a new exoplanet system with at least four orbiting planets.
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Popular Science

Smoking still kills over 6 million people a year Health Put down that butt Smoking is on the decline, but it still kills a lot of people. Find out more.
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The Atlantic

What the World Is Saying About the U.S. Strike in Syria Updated at 8:57 a.m. Russia reacted sharply to the U.S. airstrike in Syria on Friday while U.S. allies and those opposed to Bashar al-Assad lauded the action and said the Syrian president had brought it upon himself with the use this week of chemical weapons. “The fact is that we no longer know what goals Washington pursued when deciding to carry out these strikes, but it is univocal that they ar
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The Atlantic

How to Mourn a Space Robot Cassini, the spacecraft that has been orbiting Saturn for 13 years, is running out of fuel and nearing the end of its mission. Over the next few months, Cassini will dive into the space between Saturn and its rings, moving closer and closer to the planet until it eventually disintegrates in its atmosphere in September. This week, NASA released a short animation showing these final moments, set to
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WIRED

Check Out Tokyo’s Cavernous, Creepy, Totally Sci-Fi Drainage Tunnels It's got silos so large you could fit a space shuttle inside. The post Check Out Tokyo’s Cavernous, Creepy, Totally Sci-Fi Drainage Tunnels appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Thimbleweed Park review: Nostalgic to a fault Enlarge / Some of the game's best moments are when it plays tricks with its mechanics. The only classic LucasArts adventure game I ever played when it was new was Monkey Island 4 , so I suspect Thimbleweed Park wasn't made with me in mind. With legendary LucasArts designers Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick behind it, as well as a Kickstarter campaign that promised a spiritual successor to Maniac Mans
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Scientific American Content: Global

Does Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Influence Personality?Sallie Baxendale, a consultant neuropsychologist at the Institute of Neurology at University College London, explains -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

New computer vision challenge wants to teach robots to see in 3DMachine-learning algorithms are now so good at classifying objects in images that the world’s leading computer vision competition is being made even tougher
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Live Science

The Frankenstein of Giant Viruses Found in Sewage PlantThe new discovery reveals how giant viruses evolved from smaller ones.
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Live Science

Most Americans Believe in Climate Change, Lawmaker Tells SenateMost Americans believe that climate change is real, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse told his colleagues in Congress on Wednesday (April 5).
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Long-Distance MessagingAfter an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.
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Ingeniøren

ING BAGSIDEN: ‘Puppen’ i røret er en tot afbrændt vatEfter sidste uges mysterium om puppen i aræometeret får du her ugens forklaringsforsøg.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Arctic Ocean Is Becoming More Like the Atlantic OceanThe changes are already visible in the region, which has had largely ice-free summers since 2011 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hybrid 'eco-roof' design combines five existing energy-saving technologies into a single systemScientists at the University of Malaya have designed a roof that can help address an environmental conflict: increasing demands for energy to increase living comfort versus a need to scale back fossil fuel use to address climate change. The conflict has driven interest in more efficient renewable energy sources, especially in emerging economies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supermassive black holes stifle galaxy growthAn international team of scientists involved in the SDSS-IV MaNGA (Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) project is studying approximately 10,000 galaxies near Earth. The researchers are trying to build maps that can provide details of individual galaxies in order to understand their life cycles, from birth, growth via star formation and eventually death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social networking sites could be used to monitor and respond to global disease outbreaksThat social networking sites are a pervasive force won't come as a surprise to the billions of users worldwide. But how effective are they when it comes to informing the public health response to disease outbreaks? To answer this question and provide clear, quantitative data on how social media supports disease monitoring and response, a joint study between the Agency for Science, Technology and R
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Ars Technica

Decrypted: The Expanse: Here there be dragons Enlarge / Amos and Alex meet up on Ganymede. (credit: Rafy/Syfy) Season two is rapidly drawing to a close, as is Bobby Draper's career with the MCRN Marines. The Martian Powers-That-Be are furious that she spilled the beans about the man without a vac-suit, and the feeling is mutual since they used her and her fire team as live targets for a sales demo. Errinwright's also in deep trouble. In the
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Science | The Guardian

Meet Erica, the world's most human-like autonomous android – video Erica is 23. She speaks with a synthesised voice and has a lot of freedom – but can’t move her arms yet. Hiroshi Ishiguro is her ‘father’ and the so-called bad boy of Japanese robotics. Together they plan to redefine what it means to be human and reveal that the future is closer than we might think Erica, the ‘most beautiful and intelligent’ android, leads Japan’s robot revolution Continue readin
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WIRED

So, Bad News: Now Militants Are Using Drones as Projectiles Weaponizing drones is one thing. Now, the drone itself is the weapon. The post So, Bad News: Now Militants Are Using Drones as Projectiles appeared first on WIRED .
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Scientific American Content: Global

Diamond in the Rough: Precious Gem Coating May Protect Smartphone ScreensA company claims that coating glass with the world’s hardest gem could keep dropped handsets from cracking -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American national election studies data availableWith public responses on polarizing political issues, such as immigration and trade, the latest data from the American National Election Studies at the University of Michigan is now available.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop next-generation NIF optics to boost energy and limit damageA new anti-reflective coating and a novel chemical process for laser optics, developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, represents an important breakthrough in its effort to boost the energy of the National Ignition Facility's (NIF) 192 giant lasers, and cut the cost of repairing or replacing damaged optics vital to its operation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Survey details impact of 2016 drought on New York farmingA survey of more than 200 New York farmers late last summer – during the worst drought in two generations – found that more than 70 percent of unirrigated, rain-fed field crops and pasture acreage had losses between 30 and 90 percent, according to a new report published by the Cornell Institute for Climate Smart Solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds entrepreneurship training better for women, minoritiesWomen and minorities are more likely to benefit from entrepreneurship training programs when compared to Caucasian men, according to recent research conducted by an Ivey Business School professor.
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The Atlantic

Your Name Is a Dazzling New Work of Anime The greatest kinds of teen movies should feel utterly discombobulating—at once overwrought and humdrum, screamingly funny and deadly serious, with magic bleeding in around the edges. How else to properly capture the constant pulse of hormones, drama, and rhapsodic bouts of idealism that comes with adolescence? Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name , a Japanese anime film arriving in U.S. theaters Friday aft
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cannibal larvae eat eggs, grow fast, avoid predatorsInsects that cannibalize often do so to boost their nutrition, but a new study of Colorado potato beetles suggests another reason for the behavior: to lay low from predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shared home ownership helps people with disability, researchers findNew research by UNSW's Social Policy Research Centre has found that shared home ownership schemes for people with disability bring potential benefits but also expose people to debt risks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Renewable plastic precursor could grow cellulosic biofuel industryA team of chemical and biological engineers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison has found a way to produce from biomass a valuable compound used in plastic production that they estimate could lower the cost of ethanol produced from plant material by more than two dollars per gallon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Third gender defies image of macho MexicoThere is a popular myth told in the city of Juchitán, Mexico, to explain the prevalence and acceptance of indigenous men who consider themselves to be neither male nor female, but a hybrid third gender. It goes something like this:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon and nitrogen cycles interact with vegetation shiftsCarbon cycle feedback: When it comes to understanding the forests' role in both giving off and capturing carbon dioxide, those are three words that contain a lot of science. In a new study, researchers led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory incorporated into an Earth system model the complex role of the ecosystem in amping or damping the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospher
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The Atlantic

What Does the Chargers’ Move to Los Angeles Mean for the Padres? There are more than 19,000 parking spots at Qualcomm Stadium, and on football Sundays, those 122 acres of pavement are drenched in the San Diego sunshine, the smell of carne asada hot off the grill, and the spirit of thousands of football fans waiting for kickoff. “Going to a Chargers game on a Sunday is a full-day commitment, there’s no question about it,” Matthew Schulte, a lifelong San Diego s
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Ingeniøren

ITU-forskere: Digital borgerbetjening kobler handicappede og ikke-vestlige af ITU-forskning afslører et åbenlyst modsætningsforhold mellem politiske ambitioner på digitaliseringsområdet og ditto ambitioner om inklusion af mennesker. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/derfor-kan-digital-borgerbetjening-aldrig-blive-krav-handicappede-vender-ryggen-1075243 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Microsoft løfter sløret for, hvilke data de indsamler gennem Windows 10 Det er nu muligt at læse en total oversigt over, hvilke data Microsoft indsamler. Hvis du kan holde dig vågen længe nok til at nå bunden af listen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/microsoft-loefter-sloeret-hvilke-data-de-indsamler-gennem-windows-10-1075393 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Efter dyrt metroforlig: Den kritiske del af byggeriet står stadig stilleSelvom Metroselskabet efter langstrakte forhandlinger har betalt Cityringens entreprenør CMT 850 millioner kroner, står arbejdet med at færdiggøre stationerne stadig stille. Striden kan ende med, at MT Højgaard ryger ud af byggeriet.
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New Scientist - News

Sock puppet accounts unmasked by the way they write and postUsers who create multiple fake accounts to skew conversation in online comment forums can be exposed by their tell-tale behaviour
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Better data needed' on measures of sustainability in businessOxford research shows increasing numbers of investors want better reporting on the environmental, social and governmental (ESG) factors that affect performance so they can make more informed decisions on where to put their money. These factors are the main way of measuring the sustainability and ethical effect of an investment in a company or business.
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Dagens Medicin

Rigshospitalet sender patienter til Aabenraa for rettidigt svar på mammografi Rigshospitalet kan ikke længere undersøge brystkræftpatienter inden for den gældende tidsfrist, på grund af arbejdspresset fra Sundhedsplatformen. Det betyder, at kvinder skal til Aabenraa for at få svar til tiden.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Galileo's search and rescue service in the spotlightEurope's Galileo satnav network does more than let us find our way – it is also helping to save lives. Today sees a spotlight cast on Galileo's Search and Rescue service, which pinpoints people in distress on land or sea.
6h
WIRED

Tearing Down Science’s Citation Paywall, One Link at a Time A new initiative makes scientific paper citations open to everyone, for free. The post Tearing Down Science's Citation Paywall, One Link at a Time appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows that people who were encouraged to judge each other's morals cooperated better in groupsPeople value their moral reputation to such an extent that they will work to behave well and cooperate with each other rather than risk being judged negatively for their actions, according to new Stanford research.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unearthing the secrets of the AztecsFor more than two decades, leading Mexican archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma directed the excavations of the main Aztec temple, located in the ancient capital of Tenochtitlan, in what is now Mexico City's famous central square.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher examines how a country's natural resources affect its politics and policiesLet's say country X is sitting on an abundance of oil reserves. If its institutions are strong and stable—think Norway—then society will benefit. If, on the other hand, its institutions are precarious—think Nigeria—then this resource will lead to negative outcomes, such as weaker democracy, less economic growth, and more corruption. Right?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pros and cons of implementing natural waterfront defenses for climate change in Mid-AtlanticAlthough coastal property owners and government agencies are increasingly turning to green solutions over grey ones to combat climate change-driven threats such as sea level rise and more frequent coastal storms, the hurdles to their implementation can be significant. A new report by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) and the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) offers guidance f
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exoplanet mission gets ticket to rideA Soyuz rocket operated by Arianespace from Europe's spaceport in Kourou will boost ESA's upcoming exoplanet satellite into space.
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Judith Kyst: Vi samler og formidler vores viden om de gode ældrelivInstitut for Fødevarevidenskab er et af tre institutter på Københavns Universitets...
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Eye tracking kan være en vej til mere appetitlig ældremadInstitut for Fødevarevidenskab (FOOD) ved Københavns Universitet tester i øjeblikket,...
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Hurtigmålinger og matematik bekæmper spild i danske biotek-virksomhederFødevareforskere fra Institut for Fødevarevidenskab ved Københavns Universitet bekæmper...
6h
Ingeniøren

IT-Talent 2017: Mediehuset Ingeniøren præsenterer årets dygtigste it-professionelle I går blev de tre dygtigste it-folk i landet kåret, da Mediehuset Ingeniøren for første gang afholdt konkurrencen IT-Talent. Læs, hvem der vandt for prisen for årets bedste it-udvikler, -konsulent og -projektleder. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/it-talent-2017-mediehuset-ingenioeren-praesenterer-aarets-stoerste-it-talenter-7507 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Professor Inge Tetens: Sådan skaber vi flere gode ældrelivForskningsmæssigt har der i mange år været fokus på børn og unge, der...
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new parameterization of canopy radiative transfer for land surface radiation modelsAmong the physical processes of land surfaces, canopy radiative transfer is especially important. It plays a key role in controlling land-atmosphere flux exchanges by determining surface albedo and transpiration. However, the canopy varies geographically from that of dense tropical forests to the shrublands of arid desert lands, and temporally from the vibrancy of spring to the gloominess of winte
6h
The Atlantic

How Discrimination Nearly Stalled a Dual-Language Program in Boston Geralde Gabeau, a longtime leader in Boston’s Haitian community, used to work at the Boston Medical Center and with medical students at Boston University. Several years ago, there was a shortage of interpreters at the medical center to assist patients speaking Haitian Creole. Gabeau, turning to young adults in her own community, found few people had the necessary skills. Yet her university studen
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving our understanding of di-photonsHigh-energy photon pairs at the Large Hadron Collider are famous for two things. First, as a clean decay channel of the Higgs boson. Second, for triggering some lively discussions in the scientific community in late 2015, when a modest excess above Standard Model predictions was observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. When the much larger 2016 dataset was analysed, however, no excess was obs
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds to help unravel the inner working of nature's most complex societiesIt is one of the most spectacular sights in nature - the magnificent aerial ballet of 'murmurations' taking place as a flock of tens of thousands of birds ebbs and flows across the skyline, moving as one.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Rules of memory 'beautifully' rewrittenEverything you know about memory may be wrong.
7h
The Atlantic

What Are America's Options on North Korea? Ahead of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the United States this week—an occasion North Korea marked by testing yet another ballistic missile—Donald Trump vowed to “solve” the problem of Pyongyang’s rapidly developing nuclear-weapons program with or without China’s help, issuing that most Washington-y of warnings: “All options are on the table.” The hazy declarations are a response to an e
7h
Ingeniøren

Dansk Erhverv: Danmark er nordisk nummer sjok i digitaliseringNår Danmark benchmarker med nordiske broderlande, så halter vi efter i forhold til informations- og kommunikationsteknologi.
7h
Science | The Guardian

What can we learn from naked mole rats and eusocial living? – tech podcast Julie Freeman is an artist who creates forms, animations, and soundscapes from tracking data. She created a multifaceted installation – A Naked Mole Rat Eutopia – at London’s Somerset House, featuring kinetic sculptures, an animation and a visualisation, all using live data from the naked mole rat community What can we do with data gathered from naked mole rats? Could we gain a new lens on nature
7h
Dagens Medicin

WHO vil halvere lægemiddelfejlFejlagtig anvendelse af lægemidler skal på fem år reduceres med 50 pct., mener verdenssundhedsorganisationen WHO.
7h
The Atlantic

When Apps Secretly Team Up to Steal Your Data Imagine two employees at a large bank: an analyst who handles sensitive financial information and a courier who makes deliveries outside the company. As they go about their day, they look like they’re doing what they’re supposed to do. The analyst is analyzing; the delivery person is delivering. But they’re actually up to something nefarious. In the break room, the analyst quietly passes some of
7h
Viden

Verdens første skibs-tunnel: Norge vil sikre sejlads i farligt farvandNorsk tunnel skal skabe bedre sikkerhed for skibsfart.
7h
The Atlantic

In The Freedom Caucus, Trump Meets His Match No doubt Twitter has done some unfortunate things to public discourse, especially in the fetid swamps of U.S. politics. But every now and again, a tweet surfaces that makes ones stop and marvel at its transcendence—its ability to boil a broad, multifaceted issue down to a tasty, bite-sized nugget that would tuck snugly inside a fortune cookie. Last Saturday, House Freedom Caucus member Justin Ama
7h
The Atlantic

The Prison-Health Paradox Mass incarceration overall hurts the health of Americans, leading to worse outcomes for the families and communities of men in prison. The inmates themselves are at a very large risk of self-harm and violence immediately after their release. But a recent review of the impacts of incarceration on health published Thursday in The Lancet hints at a surprising upshot: Getting out of jail can be miser
7h
Science | The Guardian

Self-driving cars will only work when we accept autonomy is a myth The ability of autonomous vehicles to navigate our cities is impressive. But their potential will only be realised when these cars are interdependent The crash of an Uber Volvo in Tempe, Arizona has dragged a regulatory spotlight back onto self-driving cars. The Uber car, in driverless mode, crashed into a Honda that was turning left, ending up on its side. Such incidents bring the hype surroundi
8h
Dagens Medicin

Det er nødvendigt at snakke om depressionDepression kan behandles, men alligevel modtager tre ud af fire personer med alvorlige depressioner ikke den nødvendige behandling.
8h
Ingeniøren

Indisk firma: Uddannede ingeniører er for dårligeHCL Technologies vil håndplukke talentfulde skolelever, oplære dem selv og dermed slippe for bøvlet med dårligt uddannede unge fra universitetet.
8h
Ingeniøren

Ugens it-job: Rigspolitiet jagter sikkerhedsrådgiver og Forsvarsministeriet mangler flere it-folk Der er job for både it-projektledere, udviklere og it-arkitekter. Tjek ugens jobliste efter et job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-rigspolitiet-jagter-sikkerhedsraadgiver-forsvarsministeriet-mangler-flere-it Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Possible venus twin discovered around dim starAstronomers using NASA's Kepler space telescope have found a planet 219 light-years away that seems to be a close relative to Venus. This newly discovered world is only slightly larger than Earth, and orbits a low-temperature star called Kepler-1649 that's one-fifth the diameter of our Sun.
8h
WIRED

The US Strike on Syria Underscores Trump’s Media-Fueled Worldview Trump had no interest in attacking Syria---but the narrative left him no choice. The post The US Strike on Syria Underscores Trump’s Media-Fueled Worldview appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boats left high and dry by drought back on Great Salt LakeDozens of beached sailboats that spent two years on the shore of Utah's drought-stricken Great Salt Lake were hoisted on cranes back into the briny waters Thursday after winter storms raised lake levels.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big women have nearly threefold greater risk of atrial fibrillationBig women have a nearly threefold greater risk of atrial fibrillation than small women, according to research presented today at EuroPrevent 2017. The study included 1.5 million women who were followed-up for more than 30 years.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Court backs California fees for polluters who exceed limitsIn a win for environmentalists, a California appeals court on Thursday upheld a key component of the state's landmark climate change effort that requires companies to buy credits if they exceed pollution limits.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung Electronics expects Q1 profits to jumpEmbattled Samsung Electronics said Friday it expects profits to jump by half in the first quarter, despite a smartphone recall fiasco and the arrest of its de facto head.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Bipartisan coalitions more likely as congress becomes more polarizedCongress passed a surprising number of bills between 1981 and 2008 with bipartisan majorities large enough to withstand a presidential veto despite growing ideological divisions between Democratic and Republican lawmakers. A new Dartmouth - Miami University study demonstrates that legislative leaders used their increased control over procedures, a development that coincided with greater polarizati
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Money to burn: As the wealthy get wealthier, carbon emissions grow in US statesAcross the U.S., state-level carbon emissions are higher in states where income is more highly concentrated among the wealthiest residents, according to a new study by two Boston College researchers.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Mad to Be Normal review – Tennant returns as a very different doctor David Tennant gives a brilliant performance as RD Laing, the radical psychiatrist who rewrote the rules on mental health treatment David Tennant is on pugnacious, mercurial and beady-eyed form in this very interesting and absorbing film. It’s one of his best performances. He plays the psychiatrist RD Laing , who became a 60s counterculture hero for challenging what he saw as the profession’s hear
9h
cognitive science

Does anyone have access to Sage Journals? I badly require access to an article! submitted by /u/properstranger [link] [comments]
10h
cognitive science

False memories: How your memory deceives you submitted by /u/luscid [link] [comments]
10h
Viden

Danmarksrekord i økologi kalder på mere forskningDet økologiske areal er på et år udvidet med 21 procent. Men forskning i økologi er blevet ​nedprioriteret i flere år, mener forskningscenter.
10h
Ingeniøren

Lovforslag vil give politiet ret til at sammenkøre borgerdata uden om Folketinget Et lovforslag til en ny politilov vil blandt andet give justitsministeren ret til at beslutte, hvordan politiet skal håndtere borgernes data. Kritiker kalder det en ‘blankocheck’. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyt-politilov-skal-fjerne-magten-folketinget-putte-soeren-papes-haender-1075248 Version2
10h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Lad os knække læsekoden, før vi indfører adgangskode Uddannelse
10h
Science | The Guardian

Australian mechanic helps discover four-planet solar system Andrew Grey, a 26-year-old from Darwin, took part in the Stargazers Live event broadcast on ABC An Australian mechanic is about to become a published scientific author after he contributed to the discovery of a four-planet solar system during a crowdsourced astronomy event. Andrew Grey, a 26-year-old from Darwin, took part in the Stargazers Live event broadcast over three nights on the ABC this w
11h
The Atlantic

America Should Have Hit Assad Four Years Ago Donald Trump is president; he now bears full responsibility for addressing the tragedy in Syria, and for the consequences of the response he has chosen. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t reflect on America’s response to the Assad regime’s previous chemical weapons attacks—for how we interpret the difficult and debatable choice the Obama administration (in which I served) made not to use military
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Bipartisan coalitions more likely as congress becomes more polarizedCongress passed a surprising number of bills between 1981 and 2008 with bipartisan majorities large enough to withstand a presidential veto despite growing ideological divisions between Democratic and Republican lawmakers. A new Dartmouth -- Miami University study in 'Political Research Quarterly' demonstrates that legislative leaders used their increased control over procedures, a development tha
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Money to burn: As the wealthy get wealthier, carbon emissions grow in US statesA state-by-state analysis by Boston College researchers finds a link between growth in a state's carbon emissions and the growth in income inequality.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new parameterization of canopy radiative transfer for land surface radiation modelsThe canopy varies geographically from that of dense tropical forests to the shrublands of arid desert lands, and temporally from the vibrancy of spring to the gloominess of winter. Uncertainties are abound in the processes of radiative transfer parameterization. Dr Feng Zhang and his collaborators propose a new parameterization for the canopy phase function, which is based on the leaf normal distr
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CD38 gene is identified to be important in postnatal development of the cerebral cortexThe brain consists of neurons and glial cells. Recent research uncovers the importance of glial cells; their developmental abnormality causes various diseases and aberrant cerebral cortex development. Herein, C38 gene knocking-out is shown to cause aberrant development of glial cells, especially, those called astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. CD38 gene is known to be involved in the cerebral cortex
11h
The Atlantic

The Fight Against the Islamic State Just Got Harder So much for predictions: 24 hours after I confidently and publicly predicted the Trump administration was unlikely to strike the Assad regime, they did just that. On balance, I am glad I was wrong: I thought it a mistake not to have struck the Assad regime in 2013, when it first used chemical weapons in a large-scale attack, and I think the benefits of Thursday’s strikes outweigh the costs, even
11h
New on MIT Technology Review

3-D-Printed Sneakers, Tailored to Your FootThrow out your custom insoles. Adidas is selling shoes with soles that will soon include bespoke shock absorbers.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ny retningslinje skal lægge anafylaksi-behandling lige til højrebenet En ny tværfaglig retningslinje skal ruste sundhedspersonale til at behandle patienter med svære anafylaktiske reaktioner hurtigt og korrekt. Med et simpelt og operationelt design skal retningslinjen forebygge de tilfælde af over- eller underbehandling, som finder sted i dag
12h
Dagens Medicin

Et stærkt svar på øget dehumaniseringEt stadig mere effektivt sundhedsvæsen kalder på de humanistiske kompetencer hos de sundhedsprofessionelle, nemlig evnen til at håndhæve kommunikation, empati og etik
12h
Dagens Medicin

Patologer inddrager bio­analytikere i mikroskopi og diagnostik Opgaveflytning. Patologisk Institut på Regionshospital Nordjylland i Hjørring indfører nye rutiner med biopsier fra livmoderhalsen, og det effektiviserer lægernes arbejde. I hele landet tænkes der i nye arbejdsgange, og mulighederne er store, mener patologernes formand
12h
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsøkonom: Sundheds­platformens business case holder ikke Professor i sundhedsøkonomi ved Syddansk Universitet Jes Søgaard kan i Region Hovedstadens business case for det nye it-system Sundhedsplatformen ikke finde nogen form for dokumentation for regionens vurdering af omkostninger eller gevinster
12h
Dagens Medicin

Din sygdom, det ansvar? Den medicinske behandling bliver i TV-programmet 'U-Turn' ophøjet til selve symbolet på den håbløse situation, man havner i, når diabetesdiagnosen er resultatet af den dårlige livsstil. Det er bekymrende.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Hæstorps underfrankerede platform Det er næsten for godt til at være sandt, at dette fejlbefængte og medarbejderplagende projekt dog i det mindste er en fed forretning – og det passer da heller ikke.
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Dagens Medicin

Patologformand: Specifikke opgaver uden åbne spørgsmål kan flyttesAfgørende med supervision, konsultation og tilsyn, siger patologernes landsformand
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ny skræddersyet behandling har potentiale til at helbrede svær astma På Lungemedicinsk Forskningsenhed på Bispebjerg Hospital afprøver en gruppe forskere et eksperimentelt lægemiddel til behandling af svær astma. Midlet er designet til at blokere immunforsvaret så tidligt, at patienterne undgår at få en astmatisk reaktion, hvilket gør det til det første astmamiddel med en potentielt helbredende effekt.
12h
Dagens Medicin

»Jeg ved ganske enkelt noget om dét, der skal besluttes noget om« Psykiatere ind i politik. Samtidig med at han skriver ph.d. om sektorsamarbejde i indsatsen over for psykisk sårbare, har psykiater og standupper Andreas Hoff besluttet sig for at stille op til regionsrådet ved valget i november. Den unge psykiater vil hente stemmer ved at tale for lighed i sundhed
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Dagens Medicin

Vi skaber resultater gennem samarbejde – ikke det modsatte
12h
Dagens Medicin

Professorer: Staten bør låne regioner penge til implementering af SundhedsplatformenRegion Hovedstaden kan ikke låne penge til implementering af Sundhedsplatformen. Den var derfor tvunget til at finansiere investeringen ved besparelser – som f.eks. at lægerne selv skal taste. Det gør det svært for regionen at gøre Sundhedsplatformen til en succes, vurderer eksperter
12h
Dagens Medicin

Er der egentlig ikke god grund til at være stolt?Man skal helt ind på side 18 i den nye analyse af ph.d.-uddannelsen for at finde oplysningen om, at læger med en ph.d. er et større aktiv end læger uden. Det kan kun undre, at man ikke ønskede at annoncere de positive nyheder mere højlydt
12h
New on MIT Technology Review

Can “Digital Therapeutics” Be as Good as Drugs?Entrepreneurs are betting on apps that improve—or just replace—prescription medication.
12h
The Atlantic

What Is Al-Shayrat Military Airfield? The United States launched more than 50 tomahawk missiles Thursday night at al-Shayrat military airfield, a base used by both Syrian and Russian military forces in Syria’s ongoing civil war. The airfield isn’t just a valuable military target: It was from al-Shayrat that the Syrian government launched its chemical-weapons attack Tuesday on Idlib province’s Khan Sheikhun, a rebel-held city. After t
12h
Science | The Guardian

Tomahawk missile: weapon of deadly precision comes back to fore in Syria Cruise missiles launched from eastern Mediterranean against Assad have been favoured by US military for decades owing to long range and pinpoint accuracy A mainstay of US warfare for more than 20 years, the Tomahawk cruise missile had been considered the most likely weapon for any strike by the Trump administration against the Syrian military. And so it eventuated. The US launched its surprise at
12h
Ingeniøren

Selvkørende biler kan afværge hvert tredje trafikdrabHvis bilerne på de danske veje var selvkørende på bare det eksisterende teknologiniveau, ville op til 30 procent færre personer miste livet i trafikken, viser analyse fra Vejdirektoratet.
12h
Gizmodo

With Attack on Syria, Trump Alienates the Alt-Right Image: AP Photo/Seth Wenig, modified by Bryan Menegus One of the few issues uniting the loose coalition of meme obsessed right-wingers, ethno-national, white supremacists, and other fringe political camps we’ve come to know as the alt-right has been the sentiment that our protracted wars in the Middle East were a grave misstep. Many Trump supporters I’ve spoken to went so far as to say they threw
13h
The Atlantic

A Polarized Political Response to Trump's Syria Strike The U.S. military struck an airfield in central Syria on Thursday night in what the Trump administration described as a retaliatory strike for the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons earlier this week. In Washington, congressional reaction was mixed, with some lauding Trump’s swift action, and others questioning the legal and constitutional basis for the strikes. Florida Senator Marco Rub
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When old growth beats old schoolImitating old-growth forests enhances carbon storage in managed forestland far better than conventional forestry techniques, a fifteen-year study in Vermont shows. The new approach holds promise for landowners aiming to profit in carbon markets or contribute to climate change mitigation.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unraveling the mystery of snowflakes, from the Alps to AntarcticaResearchers have gained important insights into the structure of snowflakes using a pioneering new approach and a special multi-angle camera.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thoughtBees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision, outlines a new study.
14h
The Atlantic

The U.S. Strikes in Syria Updated at 10:08 p.m. The U.S. military struck a Syrian airfield near Homs, launching the opening salvo in the Trump administration’s response to this week’s chemical-weapons attack by the Assad regime and marking the first U.S. military operation against an Arab government since President Obama’s intervention in Libya in 2011. Early Friday morning local time, the U.S. launched more than 50 tomah
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attitudes vary across groups regarding meal choice in restaurantsDifferences in opinions between parents and children and executives of restaurant chains represent a challenge in terms of promoting healthy eating habits. In order to better understand those opinions, researchers surveyed parents and children dining at participating restaurants, as well as executives of restaurant chains, to obtain more information on healthy children's meals.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To save honey bees, human behavior must changeIn the search for answers to the complex health problems and colony losses experienced by honey bees in recent years, it may be time for professionals and hobbyists in the beekeeping industry to look in the mirror. In a new research essay, one researcher argues that human activity is a key driver in the spread of pathogens afflicting the European honey bee.
14h
Ingeniøren

Ung dansk ingeniør er vild med Vietnam De udenlandske investeringer i Vietnam vokster hastigt, og vietnamesere får i stigende grad de betydningsfulde stillinger. Her er en frontberetning fra en eventyrlysten dansk inge­niør i et asiatisk vækstland. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ung-dansk-ingenior-vild-med-vietnam-7469 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
WIRED

Trump & Co. Just Picked the Wrong Fight With Twitter On Thursday, Twitter got a chance to flex its free-speech championing muscle. The post Trump & Co. Just Picked the Wrong Fight With Twitter appeared first on WIRED .
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'What do old books smell like?' -- Preserving smells as important cultural heritageA 'Historic Book Odour Wheel' which has been developed to document and archive the aroma associated with old books, is being presented in a study in the open access journal Heritage Science. Researchers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage created the wheel as part of an experiment in which they asked visitors to St. Paul's Cathedral's Dean and Chapter library in London to characterize its sm
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'What do old books smell like?'—Preserving smells as important cultural heritageA 'Historic Book Odour Wheel' which has been developed to document and archive the aroma associated with old books, is being presented in a study in the open access journal Heritage Science. Researchers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage created the wheel as part of an experiment in which they asked visitors to St Paul's Cathedral's Dean and Chapter library in London to characterize its sme
16h
New Scientist - News

Rich black people have worse health than rich white peopleAs the gap widens between rich and poor, the health of many in the US is declining. But for minorities, money isn’t the whole story – racism is bad for health too
16h
Gizmodo

Your Pick For the Best VPN Service Is Private Internet Access Private Internet Access VPNs are a hot topic these days, and our readers made it abundantly clear that Private Internet Access should be your first stop for protecting your private browsing data. This backs up the service’s win in Lifehacker’s 2014 Hive Five , so they’ve been a solid option for a long time. Here’s what you had to say about the service: It’s cheap, has clients for iOS, Android, Ma
16h
cognitive science

Big Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience (6 talks from CNS 2017) submitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Farm of the futureCould edible caterpillars help fight malnutrition and food security problems in West Africa?
16h
NYT > Science

F.D.A. Will Allow 23andMe to Sell Genetic Tests for Disease Risk to ConsumersLifting an earlier moratorium, the agency said the company could report the risks for 10 diseases under certain controls.
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Day of Bombshells What We’re Following A U.S. War in Syria? In a sudden reversal of his previous policy statements, President Trump now says he’s considering military action to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. GOP hawks had urged him to take action in the wake of Tuesday’s chemical attack, and the Pentagon is reportedly working on options—but there are still plenty of legal and practical obstacles ahead of U
17h
Gizmodo

This Stunning Drone Footage of South Africa Looks Like a Real Life Lion King For the past couple of years, mediocre drone videos of dramatic landscapes have littered the internet. Like, we get it, drone pilots. Your camera flies and stuff looks pretty from the sky and the whole conceit is pretty trite at this point. And then I saw these four minutes of magic, filmed in South Africa. The footage of the African savanna and all the beautiful creatures that live there should
17h
Live Science

Typically Harmless Virus May Trigger Celiac DiseaseA usually harmless virus may play a role in triggering celiac disease, a new study in mice suggests.
17h
Ars Technica

Twitter balks at US demand to expose account condemning Trump policy Enlarge (credit: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images) The Trump administration is demanding Twitter expose the anonymous account holder behind the @ALT_uscis handle that has been critical of the US president's immigration policy. The handle has more than 56,000 followers since it debuted in the immediate aftermath of President Donald Trump signing his first immigration executive order. The authorities be
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet: Structural racism, mass incarceration, and health care system fuel growing health inequalities in the USAStructural racism, mass incarceration, and the widening income gap between rich and poor all feed growing health inequalities in the USA, which the health care system -- by its very design and financing -- only helps exacerbate, according to a new five paper Series published in The Lancet.
17h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

23andMe given green light to sell DNA tests for 10 diseases US Food and Drug Administration says firm can provide consumers with information on genetic risks. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21802
17h
Live Science

Climate Change Is Likely to Make Air Travel a Lot BumpierChanges in the atmosphere brought about by global warming could increase levels of light turbulence by 59 percent and severe turbulence by 149 percent.
17h
Live Science

Watch Dolphins 'Tenderize' Their Octopus Prey | VideoScientists observed dolphins shaking and tossing their clingy, eight-armed prey before eating it.
17h
Ars Technica

Xbox Scorpio: Are its 4K chops masking a change of VR heart? Microsoft has finally revealed most of the hardware going into its Project Scorpio console. Digital Foundry was shown the hardware exclusively and has come away broadly impressed. While there are still some questions—what exactly are those processor cores?—we have a pretty solid idea of what will make the machine go and what it'll be capable of . But as of press time, it's missing one of the thin
17h
Live Science

UK and Canadian Infants Cry More Than US NewbornsIt's a fact of life that newborns cry, but a new analysis of nearly 8,700 infants reveals that babies cry and fuss more in certain countries than in others.
18h
Live Science

Still Sharp: Brains of 'SuperAgers' Shrink More SlowlyThe brains of 'SuperAgers' shrink more slowly than those of other older adults.
18h
Ars Technica

YouTube won’t put ads on videos from channels with fewer than 10K views [Updated] Enlarge (credit: YouTube Creator Hub ) YouTube has come up with a new restriction on who can make advertising money off of the online video platform. The company announced in a blog post that starting today it will not serve ads on videos produced by channels with fewer than 10,000 total views. That means any new creators looking to be in the YouTube Partner Program will have to wait until they a
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Gizmodo

A Seemingly Harmless Virus Might Be Triggering Celiac Disease Image: M Dreibelbis /Flickr Celiac disease can be a nightmare, with the slew of gluten-triggered ails it brings. Those includes everything from gastrointestinal symptoms like bloating and diarrhea, to psychological symptoms, anemia, seizures... pretty much everything that can make the body feel bad, combined into one awful mess. At least one in 141 Americans suffer from celiac disease (that’s a f
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Gizmodo

The Concourse Look At This Fucking Asshole | Jezebel How ModCloth Strayed From Its Feminist Beginnin The Concourse Look At This Fucking Asshole | Jezebel How ModCloth Strayed From Its Feminist Beginnings and Ended Up a Walmart Property | Fusion What Is Independent Media? | The Root Rep. Elijah Cummings Dissed the Donald, but Trump Thought It Was a Compliment |
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Captain Sig Is Ready For Crab Season... Are You? | Deadliest Catch #DeadliestCatch | NEW SEASON Tues April 11 at 9/8c Captain Sig Hansen had a rough season last year: his stress levels escalated and he suffered a heart attack on the boat. He's going to stay calm this season -- maybe. Start Catching Up With Full Episodes on Hulu: https://www.hulu.com/deadliest-catch Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subsc
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New on MIT Technology Review

FDA Opens Genetic Floodgates with 23andMe DecisionGene-testing companies will be able to directly tell consumers their risk for certain diseases.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Slow Nunes Day Today in 5 Lines During a news conference in Palm Beach, Florida, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the U.S. is considering an “appropriate response” to Tuesday’s chemical attack in Syria. When asked by reporters if Assad should remain in power, President Trump said “he’s there and I guess he’s running things so something should happen.” Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in Palm Beach for
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The Atlantic

The Trump Administration Takes Aim at a Twitter Critic The U.S. government is trying to compel Twitter to unmask a pseudonymous critic of the Trump administration, the social-media company said in a First Amendment lawsuit filed Thursday. In its complaint, Twitter asked a federal district court in California to block a U.S. Customs and Border Protection administrative summons issued to the company in March. The summons demands that Twitter “produce f
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Genetic Oddity May Give Octopuses and Squids Their SmartsUnlike other organisms, coleoid cephalopods make extensive use of RNA editing, which could slow their evolution but may make their behavior more complex than other invertebrates.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cave Dwellers Battled Bed Bug Bites, TooResearchers have found the earliest evidence of bugs in the Cimex genus co-habitating with humans, in Oregon's Paisley Caves. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
WIRED

Comcast’s New Mobile Service Is a Good Deal, But Maybe Not Good Enough Should you sign up? That depends. The post Comcast’s New Mobile Service Is a Good Deal, But Maybe Not Good Enough appeared first on WIRED .
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Inside Science

Astrophysicists Envision a Universe Without Dark Energy Astrophysicists Envision a Universe Without Dark Energy A team of scientists develop a model that describes the accelerating expansion of the universe without the need for mysterious dark energy. Deepfield.jpg A portion of the Deep Field image from the Hubble Space Telescope, 1996. Image credits: NASA/JPL/STScI Hubble Deep Field Team Space Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 16:30 Ramin Skibba, Contributor
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Live Science

Why Do Movie Villains Have So Many Skin Problems? | VideoDermatologists analyzed the skin features of 10 classic movie heroes, and 10 classic villains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients on HeartMate 3 have fewer blood-related events than those on HeartMate IIA six-month analysis of the MOMENTUM 3 trial found that patients implanted with the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist system had fewer clotting and bleeding events than those implanted with HeartMate II; 69 percent of the patients on Heartmate 3 survived without bleeding or clotting-related events, compared to 55 percent of those on Heartmate II.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Next Generation TimeTree: An expanded history of life on Earth at your fingertipsA golden age of a global family tree of life on Earth is upon us now with the widespread use of next-generation DNA sequencing generating millions of sequence data. A next generation TimeTree web can now help make it easier for people to make sense of much of that data. Imagine the history of life on Earth at your fingertips combined with the power to quickly cull five decades' worth of all the ev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low ammonium levels in urine may indicate serious risks for kidney disease patientsIn patients with chronic kidney disease, low urine ammonium excretion identified individuals at high risk of kidney disease progression or death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube channels must win audiences before winning adsYouTube on Thursday stopped placing ads on channels with fewer than 10,000 views in a move aimed at preventing people from making money off offensive or pirated videos.
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Gizmodo

What Colony Gets Right About Living in an Apocalypse Her chance of survival on Colony is slightly higher than on The Walking Dead. (Image: USA Network) I gave up on The Walking Dead back in season two. While I like bleak slogs toward the extinction of mankind as much as the next girl, it had started to feel like the show had no interest in moving forward, and no interest in building a larger storyline. But imagine if it did? That is Colony . The US
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Ars Technica

Rash of in-the-wild attacks permanently destroys poorly secured IoT devices Enlarge (credit: Guinnog ) Researchers have uncovered a rash of ongoing attacks designed to damage routers and other Internet-connected appliances so badly that they become effectively inoperable. PDoS attack bots (short for "permanent denial-of-service") scan the Internet for Linux-based routers, bridges, or similar Internet-connected devices that require only factory-default passwords to grant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Record amount of renewables capacity added in 2016: UNThe world added a record 138.5 gigawatts of renewable power capacity in 2016 despite a 23 percent drop in investment, reflecting the falling cost of clean energy, the UN announced Thursday.
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Live Science

$71 Million! Pink Diamond Shines in Record-Breaking SaleThe renowned "Pink Star" diamond sold for $71.2 million at auction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next Generation TimeTree: An expanded history of life on Earth at your fingertipsTemple University's scientists Sudhir Kumar and S. Blair Hedges, of the Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine (iGEM) and Center for Biodiversity, have had a longstanding goal to develop easy-to-use tools to make evolution more accessible for everyone—-from leading scientists to students in elementary school.
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Science : NPR

Bison Or Brian? From A Calorie Perspective, Cannibalism Didn't Pay For Paleo Humans Archaeological records show ancient humans sometimes ate each other. A new study suggests that hunting and eating other humans cost too much effort to be a regular thing. So why'd they do it? (Image credit: Publiphoto/Science Source)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter rejects US effort to unmask anti-Trump usersTwitter filed suit Thursday against the US government, asking a court to back its refusal to hand over the identities of users claiming to be dissenting federal employees.
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The Atlantic

The U.S. Is Already Fighting in Syria President Trump’s remarks that he’s “changed his mind” about Syria and its leader, Bashar al-Assad, after this week’s deadly chemical attack, has raised speculation the U.S. might be considering military action in Syria. CNN reported that Trump told some congressional lawmakers he was considering military action. Reuters cited an anonymous senior administration official who said that the military
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The Atlantic

Americans Are Pretty Skeptical That Hard Work Will Pay Off Hard work is often touted as the key American virtue that leads to success and opportunity. And there’s lots evidence to suggest that workers buy into the belief: For example, a recent study found that Americans work 25 percent more hours than Europeans, and that U.S. workers tend to take fewer vacation days and retire later in life. But for many, simply working hard doesn’t actually lead to a be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gold-plated crystals set new standard for natural gas detectorsMaterials scientists and engineers have developed a sensor that is fast, sensitive and efficient enough to detect specific wavelengths of electromagnetic energy while on the move. The technology could actively scan areas for methane or natural gas leaks, monitor the health of vast fields of crops or quickly sort plastics for recycling.
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New on MIT Technology Review

3-D Knitting Brings Tech to Your Sweaters—for a PriceFrom small boutiques to big manufacturers like Adidas, companies are trying on the idea of instantly “printing” customized clothing.
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Ingeniøren

Facebook vil bruge billedgenkendelse til at bekæmpe hævnporno Billeder der allerede er anmeldt som krænkende, vil fremover blive automatisk genkendt, når de uploades igen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/facebook-vil-bruge-billedgenkendelse-at-bekaempe-haevnporno-1075371 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Suspekte VPN-udbydere forsøger at lukrere på privacy-panik Forslaget om at give internetudbydere i USA lov til at videresælge kundernes historik bliver brugt til at markedsføre utroværdige VPN-udbydere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/suspekte-vpn-udbydere-forsoeger-at-lukrere-paa-privacy-panik-1075357 Version2
19h
The Atlantic

What Could Stop Trump From Launching a War in Syria? It took less than a week for the Trump administration to completely reverse its policy on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. On Friday, the White House said that Assad’s continued leadership of the war-torn country was “political reality.” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said, “I think the status and the longer-term status of President Assad will be decided by the Syrian people.” UN Ambassador Ni
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The Atlantic

Kushner and Bannon Battle for the Soul of the Trump White House Updated at 6:46 p.m. ET It’s only been a few months, but it feels like forever ago that Steve Bannon told New York Magazine that he had “bonded” with Jared Kushner, who “really gets this grassroots, populist movement in a huge way.” Now, the two men are at odds in an escalating conflict that might seem like just the latest twist in the constant palace intrigue emanating from the White House. But
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Ars Technica

Dietary fats make worms live almost 50% longer—no human results yet The worms used in this study. You don't have to eat them to get the fats—an avocado will do. (credit: NIH ) Since well before the days of snake oil peddlers and modern Western medicine, people have been on the hunt for the next “fountain of youth,” a formula that will either keep us young or extend our lifespans. And, while there have been a number of promising discoveries, there's no pill that y
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are your muscles genetically prepared to run a marathon?For a few years, running has been fashionable. But there is a great difference between the physical demands of running a few kilometers and doing a marathon. Now researchers have concluded that genetics plays an essential role in success when completing this long distance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting filmExperimental physicists have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields. The particularly interesting aspect of this work is that the research team has succeeded in creating superconducting nanowires that can be woven into an ultra-thin film that is as flexible
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leaf vein structure could hold key to extending battery lifeThe natural structure found within leaves could improve the performance of everything from rechargeable batteries to high-performance gas sensors, according to an international team of scientists. The researchers have designed a porous, such as the veins of a leaf, and could make energy transfers more efficient.
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Gizmodo

Adobe Thinks It Can Make Your Selfies a Lot Less Ugly With This Mystery App A well-photographed headshot can help make or break an actor or model’s career, which is why performers will often spends thousands of dollars to hire a talented photographer. Your selfies, on the other hand, look like they were snapped in the back of a taxi at two in the morning. Luckily, Adobe says it can help you make them look a lot less terrible. Adobe Sensei is the company’s artificial inte
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Gizmodo

This Is The Weirdest Dang Helicopter I Have Ever Seen This has to be, hands down, one of the weirdest flying machines I’ve ever seen. This is almost certainly some sort of alien craft. This is the Kaman K-Max, and it looks like it’s getting into a flappy hand battle above its own head. Built to haul huge external loads, up to 6,000 pounds, it’s got two big rotors mounted up top, and they’re synchronized so as to never hit each other. Hopefully. That
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'BioBlitz' scientists to survey California desert valleyScientists will fan out across a California desert valley this weekend to take an inventory of everything there that flies, hops, runs, swims or grows in the dirt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bezos sells $1 bn in Amazon stock yearly to pay for rocket firmBillionaire entrepreneur Jeff Bezos said he is selling $1 billion in stock of his retail giant Amazon each year to finance his rocket company, Blue Origin, which aims to carry tourists to space by 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook launches digital assistant 'M' in USFacebook on Thursday launched its digital assistant named "M" for US users of its Messenger application, ramping up the social network's efforts in artificial intelligence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthetic biologists engineer inflammation-sensing gut bacteriaSynthetic biologists have engineered gut bacteria capable of sensing colitis in mice. The research points the way to new experiments for studying how gut bacteria and human hosts interact at a molecular level and could eventually lead to orally ingestible bacteria for monitoring gut health and disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A NASA infrared look at the Southern Indian Ocean's 15th tropical cycloneNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 15S in the Southern Indian Ocean and obtained temperature data on the cloud tops, enabling scientists to see where the strongest part of the storm was located.
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The Scientist RSS

First Clinic-Ready Stem Cell RepositoryThe UK Stem Cell Bank offers several lines derived from human embryonic tissue.
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Popular Science

Reebok's new biodegradable sneakers are made from corn Technology The sneaker industry continues its quest to ditch petroleum-based materials Shoemaker Reebok has chosen corn as a building block for its upcoming sneaker, which is part of its Corn + Cotton initiative. Read on.
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Ars Technica

Here’s how an otherwise humdrum virus sparks celiac disease Enlarge / Viruses in the Reoviridae family. (credit: CDC ) Throughout our lives, many viruses sneak into our intestines, silently mount cellular invasions like tiny little Hannibals crossing the microbiological Alps, then just as quietly slip away unnoticed. Usually, those stealthy viral invaders are completely innocuous—decidedly unnoteworthy. But sometimes they inadvertently set off a lifetime
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Gizmodo

Twitter Sues Trump Administration Over Order to Unmask 'Rogue' Agency Account Photo: Getty Twitter just filed a lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security and US Customs and Border Protection over an attempt by those agencies to unmask an anonymous Twitter account, @ALT_uscis , that is frequently critical of United States immigration policy. From Twitter’s lawsuit: Specifically, on March 14, 2017, they issued and delivered to Twitter an administrative summons (the
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The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: 'Boston Hymn' by Ralph Waldo Emerson In “ Emerson ,” composed in 1868 and published posthumously in our December 1904 issue, theologian Henry James Sr. reflected on the distinct impression Ralph Waldo Emerson made upon his readers: No writer so quickens the pulse of generous youth; so makes his brain throb and reel with the vision of the world that is yet to be. … Mr. Emerson was never the least of a pedagogue, addressing your scien
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New Scientist - News

Gluten allergy in coeliac disease may be provoked by virusSome people seem to get coeliac disease after having an infection. Now experiments in mice suggest a common virus might bring on the autoimmune condition
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New Scientist - News

Giant viruses may just be small viruses that stole hosts’ genesGenome sequences found in a waste-water plant seem to question the possibility that giant viruses are a whole new domain of life – but not everyone is convinced
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists expand ability of stem cells to regrow any tissue typeWhen scientists talk about laboratory stem cells being totipotent or pluripotent, they mean that the cells have the potential, like an embryo, to develop into any type of tissue in the body. What totipotent stem cells can do that pluripotent ones can't do, however, is develop into tissues that support the embryo, like the placenta. These are called extra-embryonic tissues, and are vital in develop
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strong early education equals better long-term relationships with parents, research showsScientists say children who are given high-quality education at an early age -- starting at six weeks -- are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ways to reduce stress in shelter dogsResearcher explores behavior in dogs involved in shelter sleepover program to determine suitability for pet owners.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene mutation helps explain night owl behaviorSome people stay up late and have trouble getting up in the morning because their internal clock is genetically programmed to run slowly, according to a new study. A mutation in a gene called CRY1 alters the human circadian clock, which dictates rhythmic behavior such as sleep/wake cycles. Carriers of the gene variant experienced nighttime sleep delays of 2-2.5 hours compared to non-carriers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atmosphere detected around an Earth-like planetAstronomers have detected an atmosphere on another Earth-like planet. This marks the first detection of an atmosphere around an Earth-like planet other than Earth itself, and thus is a significant step on the path towards the detection of life outside our Solar System.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mount Sinai study reveals how learning in the present shapes future learningThe prefrontal cortex shapes memory formation by modulating hippocampal encoding.
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Gizmodo

Save 15% On TP-Link's Uber-Popular Archer C7 Router TP-Link Archer C7 , $76 with code 15TPLC7 While mesh routers have broken through in 2016, the Wirecutter-recommended TP-Link Archer C7 though is one of the best “traditional” routers you can get, and it’ll only cost you $76 today with promo code 15TPLC7. It was down to $70 around Black Friday, but this is one of the best deals we’ve seen since the holidays.
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Ars Technica

Washington state’s new 8 megawatt-hour flow battery is the largest of its kind Snohomish PUD A company called UniEnergy Technologies (UET) has installed a new large flow battery on the grid in Snohomish County in Washington state. The 2MW, 8MWh battery system may seem like a small installation compared to recent projects in Southern California and Hawaii , but it's quite a step for the nascent flow battery industry. In fact, this installation is currently the largest capaci
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New on MIT Technology Review

Robotics, Smart Materials, and their Future Impact for HumansWe are on the cusp of a robotics revolution in which the boundaries between artificial intelligence and biology are blurring.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lactate from human cells may trigger key step in invasion by meningitis-causing bacteriaLactate produced in the upper throat might trigger meningitis-causing bacterial cells to detach from tiny colonies and spread within the body, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ability of stem cells expanded to regrow any tissue typeA new technique, which allows scientists to generate both embryonic and non-embryonic tissues from cultured stem cells, is a step toward growing donor organs and replacement tissues to combat aging and diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial topological matter opens new research directionsAn international team of researchers has created a new structure that allows the tuning of topological properties in such a way as to turn on or off these unique behaviors. The structure could open up possibilities for new explorations into the properties of topological states of matter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient Earth's fingerprints in young volcanic rocksEarth's mantle is made of solid rock that nonetheless circulates slowly over millions of years. Some geologists assume that this slow circulation would have wiped away any geochemical traces of Earth's early history long ago. But a new study of volcanic rocks that recently erupted from volcanoes in Hawaii and Samoa reveals surprising geochemical anomalies -- the 'fingerprints' of conditions that e
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Futurity.org

How scientists explore our genome’s ‘dark matter’ A new method lets researchers quickly screen the non-coding DNA of the human genome for links to diseases that are driven by changes in gene regulation. The technique could revolutionize modern medicine’s understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, neurological disorders, and others, and lead to new treatments. “Identifying single mutations that
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New Scientist - News

Squid and octopus can edit and direct their own brain genesThese animals do not obey the commands of their DNA to the letter, instead interfering with the code and possibly leading to a special kind of evolution
20h
Inside Science

Can't Eat Wheat? Blame this Humble Virus Can't Eat Wheat? Blame this Humble Virus New evidence for how childhood infections could trigger ciliac disease. Bread_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Pexels Human Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 15:00 Rebecca Boyle, Contributor (Inside Science) -- For gluten-intolerant people with celiac disease, viral infections in childhood may be to blame more than the stuff that bread and pasta are made of. Certain
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Gizmodo

The Secret to Free Music Is Internet Radio Image: TuneIn If you want to enter the modern age and listen to all your music online then streaming is the only way to go. While iHeartRadio and Pandora have both become the poor man’s Spotify—demanding costly monthly fees for so so music selection there’s still genuine free music available online. Internet radio gives you an endless amount of free music with just a few clicks of the mouse...pro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pet exposure may reduce allergy and obesityIf you need a reason to become a dog lover, how about their ability to help protect kids from allergies and obesity? A new study showed that babies from families with pets -- 70 per cent of which were dogs -- showed higher levels of two types of microbes associated with lower risks of allergic disease and obesity.
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Ars Technica

Judge accuses Uber and Levandowski of “obfuscation” in Waymo case Enlarge (credit: Waymo) SAN FRANCISCO—A heated discovery process continued to play out today in the lawsuit between Waymo and Uber, when a hearing ended with a federal judge ordering Uber to allow a Waymo-chosen expert and attorney to examine Uber's LiDAR system. US District Judge Alsup also said he's likely to order documents to be handed over, beginning with a privilege log. He even suggested t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major breakthrough in smart printed electronicsResearchers have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time. This breakthrough could unlock the potential for applications such as food packaging that displays a digital countdown to warn you of spoiling, wine labels that alert you when your white wine is at its optimum temperature, or even a window pane that shows the day's forecast.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble takes close-up portrait of JupiterOn April 3, 2017, as Jupiter made its nearest approach to Earth in a year, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope viewed the solar system's largest planet in all of its up-close glory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Expanding waistlines and metabolic syndrome: Researchers warn of new 'silent killer'For decades, American waistlines have been expanding and there is increasing cause for alarm. Researchers now make the case that metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of three of more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, abnormal lipids, and insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes -- is the new 'silent killer,' analogous to hypertension in the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cells react to injury from open-heart surgeryInvestigators have learned how cardiac muscle cells react to a certain type of injury that can be caused by open-heart surgery. The findings point to a new potential way to help these hearts recover more completely. The cells, known as cardiomyocytes, can be damaged by the process of stopping and starting the heart during surgeries that use cardiopulmonary bypass machines to take over the heart's
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coming together, falling apart, and starting over, battery styleScientists have built a new device that shows what happens when electrode, electrolyte, and active materials meet in energy storage technologies.
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Gizmodo

Once Again, Your Favorite Pop Culture Properties Have Been Turned Into Kids' Book Covers Logan and Westworld as Storytime books by Joey Spiotto. Images: Gallery 1988 There’s something heartwarming about seeing your favorite science fiction and fantasy films turned into kids’ books. Morphing brutal, hard-R rated content in happy, funny ways is the trademark of artist Joey Spiotto, who’s about to debut another new series in this vein. This weekend, Spiotto opens Storytime 3 at Gallery
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Atmosphere found around Earth-like planet GJ 1132bAstronomers make the first detection of an atmosphere surrounding a "super-Earth" planet.
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The Atlantic

100 Years Ago, the United States Entered World War I On April 6, 1917, the United States congress voted to formally enter World War I. More than two years of war had been waged in Europe, as the U.S. tried to remain neutral. In early 1917, German submarine attacks on all ships bound for England resumed, adding to the building pressure to join the war against the German Empire and the Central Powers, which led President Woodrow Wilson to ask Congres
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Married couples with common ancestry also share similar genesWhen two married people appear similar, it isn't necessarily a coincidence, but may be related to the tendency to marry someone with the same ancestry; a trend that can have important effects on the genetics of different populations.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant viruses may simply be a 'Frankenstein' of smaller virusesViruses are thought to outnumber the microbes on Earth; both outnumber the stars in the Milky Way. A handful of giant viruses have been discovered in the past two decades, and scientists report a novel group of giant viruses with a more complete set of translation machinery genes than any other virus known to date. They believe that this discovery significantly increases our understanding of viral
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Male jumping spiders court whomever, wheneverMale jumping spiders will try to mate with any female, but that lack of discretion could cost them their lives, suggests new research.
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Live Science

Shake Well Before Enjoying: Dolphins 'Tenderize' Octopus PreyDolphins shake and toss octopus prey to tenderize their meal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A NASA infrared look at the Southern Indian Ocean's 15th tropical cycloneNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 15S in the Southern Indian Ocean and obtained temperature data on the cloud tops, enabling scientists to see where the strongest part of the storm was located.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospitals put your data at risk, study findsLying in a hospital bed, the last thing you should have to worry about is a personal data breach. Yet recent research co-authored by a Michigan State University business scholar found nearly 1,800 occurrences of large data breaches in patient information over a seven-year period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Homing system delivers drugs to specific neuronsBiomedical engineers have developed a way to deliver drugs to specific types of neurons in the brain, providing an unprecedented ability to study neurological diseases while promising a more targeted way to treat them.
21h
Ars Technica

Researchers find China tried infiltrating companies lobbying Trump on trade Enlarge / Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with the prime minister of Finland, Juha Sipila, during an official visit in Helsinki, Finland, on April 5, 2017. President Xi is traveling to the US today. (credit: ESA MOILANEN/AFP/Getty Images) Researchers at Fidelis Security have revealed data suggesting Chinese state-funded actors engaged in acts of industrial espionage against a number of major U
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seemingly innocuous virus can trigger celiac diseaseInfection with reovirus, a common but otherwise harmless virus, can trigger the immune system response to gluten that leads to celiac disease, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists discover timesharing strategy in bacteriaBiologists have discovered that communities of bacteria have been employing a social timesharing strategy for millions of years. The team found that bacteria faced with limited nutrients will enter an elegant timesharing strategy -- a concept used in computer science, vacation homes and social application -- in which communities alternate feeding periods to maximize efficiency in consumption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solving medical 'cold cases' through geneticsResearchers have identified the genetic mutation responsible for one patient's serious health problems, finally solving a medical mystery that has endured for over 30 years. Thanks to this discovery, the researcher developed a therapy that could also help a lot of people who have problems related to the immune system, whether they are genetic or due to a transplant or an illness.
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The Atlantic

Will Republican Hawks Convince Trump to Take a Tougher Line on Syria? In the wake of a deadly chemical attack in Syria, some Republicans in Congress have called on President Trump to stand up more forcefully to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad—with Senator Marco Rubio going so far as to suggest that the administration’s foreign policy has emboldened him. Now, there are indications that Trump may be willing to take a harder line, as the president is reportedly consi
21h
WIRED

Facebook Pushes News Literacy to Combat a Crisis of Trust Facebook joins with the founder of Craigslist to fix a crisis of faith in the news, but questions remain about who should shoulder the blame. The post Facebook Pushes News Literacy to Combat a Crisis of Trust appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hearing, touch mediate sensations via osseointegrated prosthesesPeople with a prosthesis attached directly to their skeleton can hear by means of vibrations in their implant. This sound transmission through bones is an important part of osseoperception -- sensory awareness of the patient's surroundings provided by their prosthesis. This discovery sheds new light on the tactile and auditory perception of humans and can be used to develop improved prostheses.
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Live Science

Cannibal Calories: Early Humans Likely Didn't Eat Each Other for NutritionA new study suggests that it is unlikely ancient hominins cannibalized each other as an easy alternative to going out and hunting.
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Futurity.org

Device could buzz feet to prevent falls A prototype device could help people with impaired sensation in their feet stay upright and avoid falls. Created by a team of bioengineering students at Rice University, the tangle of wires, sensors, circuits, and motors could someday be a simple powered insole that can go into any shoe to provide additional tactile sensation to improve the wearer’s motor skills. That sensory feedback could preve
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Salk scientists expand ability of stem cells to regrow any tissue typeThe new technique, which allows scientists to generate both embryonic and non-embryonic tissues from cultured stem cells, is a step toward growing donor organs and replacement tissues to combat aging and diseases
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Giant virus discovery sparks debate over tree of life The Klosneuviruses contradict the theory that viruses make up a distinct domain of life, but not everyone is convinced. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21798
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The Atlantic

Senator Mitt Romney? Republican leaders and high-powered donors in Utah are waging a quiet but concerted campaign to convince 83-year-old incumbent Senator Orrin Hatch not to seek reelection next year—and now, they may have found a successor. Mitt Romney, the one-time presidential nominee and leading Trump critic, is exploring a run for Hatch’s Senate seat. According to six sources familiar with the situation, Romney
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cognitive decline after surgery tied to brain's own immune cellsAfter undergoing surgery, elderly patients often experience cloudy thinking that can last for weeks or even months. At one time researchers thought this cognitive decline might be caused by anesthesia, but mounting evidence suggests that heightened inflammation in the brain following surgery is the more likely cause.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists link California droughts, floods to distinctive atmospheric wavesThe crippling wintertime droughts that struck California from 2013 to 2015, as well as this year's unusually wet California winter, appear to be associated with the same phenomenon: a distinctive wave pattern that emerges in the upper atmosphere and circles the globe.
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Gizmodo

Mark Hamill Does a Remarkable Han Solo Impression in This Bad Lip Reading of The Force Awakens They’re often hit or miss, but the Bad Lip Reading YouTube channel has finally tackled Star Wars: The Force Awakens , enlisting the voice talents of Mark Hamill to put words in Han Solo’s mouth , because Harrison Ford was probably busy crashing a plane somewhere. It’s not quite as amazing as Bad Lip Reading’s version of The Empire Strikes Back was, but you might end up enjoying The Force Awakens
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Live Science

Jaw-Dropping Art Captures Stark Beauty of Disappearing Polar IceZaria Forman's drawings render the exquisite details of polar ice adrift, celebrating its beauty, eulogizing its death and shouting a call to action before all we're left with are drawings, stories and memories.
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Live Science

Are You a Night Owl? It May Be a Gene MutationYour night owl tendencies could be hard-wired in your genes.
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New Scientist - News

Atmosphere containing water detected around rocky exoplanetAn exoplanet just 1.4 times the size of Earth has an atmosphere containing water and methane, new observations show
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pet exposure may reduce allergy and obesityIf you need a reason to become a dog lover, how about their ability to help protect kids from allergies and obesity? A new University of Alberta study showed that babies from families with pets -- 70 per cent of which were dogs -- showed higher levels of two types of microbes associated with lower risks of allergic disease and obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endocrine Society issues statement to improve detection of curable forms of hypertensionA new Scientific Statement issued by the Endocrine Society advises healthcare providers on ways to spot hormonal causes of high blood pressure that can be cured with surgery or treated effectively with medication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cardiologist warns against dissolvable stents in NEJMIn a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) editorial published last week, Debabrata Mukherjee, M.D., provides expert commentary on bioresorbable stents, an alternative to the traditional stents used in patients with cardiac conditions. In his editorial, Dr. Mukherjee encourages cardiologists to continue using conventional drug-eluting stents, instead of the newer bioresorbable option.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Turning skin cells into blood vessel cells while keeping them youngResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular switch that converts skin cells into cells that make up blood vessels, which could ultimately be used to repair damaged vessels in patients with heart disease or to engineer new vasculature in the lab.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Financial math models may help build a better HIV vaccineUsing computational tools inspired by financial math models developed to predict changes in stock prices, University of Iowa researchers were able to accurately predict how different properties of the HIV surface protein (Env) evolved in the population of Iowa over the course of 30 years. The ability to predict such changes by testing a small number of patients could potentially allow tailoring of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coming to a lab bench near you: Femtosecond X-ray spectroscopyBerkeley Lab researchers have, for the first time, captured the ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a chemical reaction using ultrafast, tabletop X-ray spectroscopy. The researchers used femtosecond pulses of X-ray light to catch the unraveling of a ring molecule that is important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMD-led study finds ancient Earth's fingerprints in young volcanic rocksEarth's mantle is made of solid rock that nonetheless circulates slowly over millions of years. Some geologists assume that this slow circulation would have wiped away any geochemical traces of Earth's early history long ago. But a new study of volcanic rocks that recently erupted from volcanoes in Hawaii and Samoa reveals surprising geochemical anomalies -- the 'fingerprints' of conditions that e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC San Diego biologists discover timesharing strategy in bacteriaBiologists at UC San Diego and Universitat Pompeu Fabra have discovered that communities of bacteria have been employing a social timesharing strategy for millions of years. The team found that bacteria faced with limited nutrients will enter an elegant timesharing strategy -- a concept used in computer science, vacation homes and social application -- in which communities alternate feeding period
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovered: Novel group of giant virusesViruses are thought to outnumber the microbes on Earth; both outnumber the stars in the Milky Way. A handful of giant viruses have been discovered in the past two decades, and in Science, DOE Joint Genome Institute scientists report a novel group of giant viruses with a more complete set of translation machinery genes than any other virus known to date. They believe that this discovery significant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Irish researchers make major breakthrough in smart printed electronicsResearchers in Ireland have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time. This breakthrough could unlock the potential for applications such as food packaging that displays a digital countdown to warn you of spoiling, wine labels that alert you when your white wine is at its optimum temperature, or even a window pane that shows the day's fore
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Married couples with common ancestry also share similar genesWhen two married people appear similar, it isn't necessarily a coincidence, but may be related to the tendency to marry someone with the same ancestry; a trend that can have important effects on the genetics of different populations, report Ronnie Sebro of the University of Pennsylvania, and senior authors Josée Dupuis from the Boston University School of Public Health and Neil Risch from the Univ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Distinct bacterial communities share nutrients for the common goodWhile researchers have not known whether bacteria in separate populations can communicate to coordinate behavior, new research in adjacent biofilm communities shows they can -- in this case, in order to optimize the sharing of limited nutrients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Arctic Ocean is becoming more like the AtlanticThe eastern Arctic Ocean is becoming more like the Atlantic Ocean, a new study combining remote sensing and local data finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A viral explanation for celiac diseaseAn asymptomatic infection may play a role in facilitating celiac disease, a new study in mice reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant viruses may simply be a Frankenstein of mini virusesThe notion that giant viruses represent a potential fourth domain of life is now closer to being disproven, researchers say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit necessary for memory formationMIT study of neural circuits that underlie memory consolidation reveals memories are formed simultaneously in the hippocampus and long-term storage location of brain's cortex, with long-term memories remaining 'silent' for two weeks before maturing, which upends dominant theories of memory consolidation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seemingly innocuous virus can trigger celiac diseaseInfection with reovirus, a common but otherwise harmless virus, can trigger the immune system response to gluten that leads to celiac disease, according to new research from the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ingredients for lasting memoriesScientists at the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics (CNCG) have found evidence that helps explain how long lasting cortical engrams are formed in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lactate from human cells may trigger key step in invasion by meningitis-causing bacteriaLactate produced in the upper throat might trigger meningitis-causing bacterial cells to detach from tiny colonies and spread within the body, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens.
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Popular Science

How an otherwise harmless virus can trigger celiac disease Health Genetics isn't everything The Karelia regions of Finland and Russia are remarkably similar. But if you live on the Finnish side, there are about ten times as many people in your community who…
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Deconstructing behavioral neuropharmacology with cellular specificityBehavior has molecular, cellular, and circuit determinants. However, because many proteins are broadly expressed, their acute manipulation within defined cells has been difficult. Here, we combined the speed and molecular specificity of pharmacology with the cell type specificity of genetic tools. DART (drugs acutely restricted by tethering) is a technique that rapidly localizes drugs to the surfa
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Science: Current Issue

[Review] CRISPR-Cas: Adapting to changeBacteria and archaea are engaged in a constant arms race to defend against the ever-present threats of viruses and invasion by mobile genetic elements. The most flexible weapons in the prokaryotic defense arsenal are the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems. These systems are capable of selective identification and neutralization of foreign DNA and/or RNA. CRISPR-Cas systems rely on stored genetic m
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Causal role for inheritance of H3K27me3 in maintaining the OFF state of a Drosophila HOX geneMany eukaryotic cells can respond to transient environmental or developmental stimuli with heritable changes in gene expression that are associated with nucleosome modifications. However, it remains uncertain whether modified nucleosomes play a causal role in transmitting such epigenetic memories, as opposed to controlling or merely reflecting transcriptional states inherited by other means. Here,
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Science: Current Issue

[Errata] Erratum for the Report “Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs” by A. Andics, A. Gábor, M. Gácsi, T. Faragó, D. Szabó, Á. Miklósi
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Science: Current Issue

[Errata] Erratum for the Report “Mobile MUTE specifies subsidiary cells to build physiologically improved grass stomata” by M. T. Raissig, J. L. Matos, M. X. Anleu Gil, A. Kornfeld, A. Bettadapur, E. Abrash, H. R. Allison, G. Badgley, J. P. Vogel, J. A. Berry, D. C. Bergmann
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Unequivocal determination of complex molecular structures using anisotropic NMR measurementsAssignment of complex molecular structures from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data can be prone to interpretational mistakes. Residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy provide a spatial view of the relative orientations between bonds and chemical shielding tensors, respectively, regardless of separation. Consequently, these data constitute a reliable reporter of global s
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Science: Current Issue

[Editorial] March for scienceIn Frank Capra's seasonal classic It's a Wonderful Life, the main character, George Bailey, wishes he had never been born and is then transported to a version of his world where all traces of his existence have been removed. This world is much different—darker and less enlightened. Distressingly, the United States is now filled with echoes of George Bailey's nightmare. It seems that some people ar
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Science: Current Issue

[In Brief] News at a glanceIn science news around the world, Brazil's science budget drops by nearly half as the federal government declares a spending freeze, a long-delayed weather forecasting bill passes both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, a Louisiana natural history museum's plea to save its collection makes waves on Facebook, Tropical Cyclone Debbie floods northeastern Australia and stirs debate over the
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Norway seeks to stamp out prion diseaseA year after a deadly and highly contagious wildlife disease surfaced in Norway, the country is taking action. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), caused by misfolded proteins called prions, has ravaged deer and elk in North America, costing rural economies millions in lost revenue from hunting. Its presence in Norway's reindeer and moose—the first cases in Europe—threatens a source of food and traditi
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Relics of the first Americans?For years archaeologists have searched for a sign of the earliest Americans—the mysterious newcomers who, it's generally believed, set out from Asia and spread down the Pacific coast by boat more than 14,000 years ago. Last week, at a jammed session of the meeting of the Society for American Archaeologists in Vancouver, researchers proposed that such evidence has been under their noses all along.
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Unusual presidential race rattles French scientistsLike everybody else, French scientists are anxiously watching the upcoming presidential elections unfold. The two candidates most likely to survive the first round on 23 April are both nontraditional politicians who have radically different visions for their country. A win by Marine Le Pen, the leader of the far-right National Front, could hamper international mobility; Le Pen favors a "Frexit," w
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] Cell-like giant viruses foundResearchers used to think that viruses were small and simple, but they've identified giant viruses that are larger than many bacteria and carry more genes. Now, scientists report that they've uncovered genomes of the most cell-like viruses discovered so far. Compared with previous giant viruses, the new viruses have more of the genes necessary for protein synthesis, including a complete set of gen
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Science: Current Issue

[In Depth] China aims to sow a revolution with GM seed takeoverThe planned takeover of Swiss seed giant Syngenta by Chinese state-owned chemical company ChemChina stands to change the outlook for biotech research in China. Although China imports preapproved genetically modified (GM) foods and generously funds GM research, the Chinese government has never approved a staple biotech food crop for cultivation. That may soon change, however. If the Syngenta takeov
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Science: Current Issue

[Feature] Nigeria's invisible crisisIn one of the world's least recognized humanitarian crises, millions of people in northeastern Nigeria who have fled the violence of the terrorist group Boko Haram are sick and near starvation. More than 8 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, 5.1 million are severely malnourished, most of them children. The displaced have crowded into squalid camps and towns too destitute to deal
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Science: Current Issue

[Letter Letters letters Nextgen Voices] Advocacy in briefAuthor: Jennifer Sills
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Epigenetics and the evolution of instinctsAn animal mind is not born as an empty canvas: Bottlenose dolphins know how to swim and honey bees know how to dance without ever having learned these skills. Little is known about how animals acquire the instincts that enable such innate behavior. Instincts are widely held to be ancestral to learned behavior. Some have been elegantly analyzed at the cellular and molecular levels, but general prin
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Passing epigenetic silence to the next generationAlmost every cell in an organism contains the same DNA, but only a subset of genes is expressed in each cell type. DNA is packaged into chromatin, the core component of which is the nucleosome. During development and cell differentiation, histone constituents of nucleosomes are modified by the methylation, acetylation, or phosphorylation of specific amino acids. Different modifications are associa
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] How infection can incite sensitivity to foodImmune tolerance to dietary antigens is key to preventing undesirable responses to innocuous antigens ingested with food. On page 44 of this issue, Bouziat et al. (1) report how viral infection may break oral tolerance to dietary proteins. The findings provide an explanation for the known epidemiological association between viral infections and the onset of food sensitivities, such as celiac disea
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Science: Current Issue

[Perspective] Following photoexcited electrons in reactionsLight provides a flexible energy source that can precisely manipulate material systems on size scales ranging from the molecular to the macroscopic, with both spatial and temporal control. Photoinduced electronic excitation can induce molecular motion by changing the shape of a molecule through isomerization around a central bond (see the figure) or through the opening and closing of a ring. Molec
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Science: Current Issue

[Policy Forum] Global Fund lessons for Sustainable Development GoalsThe Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB), and Malaria (GF) was launched in 2001 in the context of the AIDS pandemic and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Thanks in large part to key design principles (DPs), the GF public-private partnership has played a major role in advancing public health science and in scaling up and strengthening evidence-based public health efforts in developin
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Science: Current Issue

[Book Review] On rigor and replicationIn Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hopes, and Wastes Billions, a sensationalistic title belies a carefully crafted book about data reproducibility and scientific rigor in biomedical research. Although the book breaks no new ground, at a time when the so-called "irreproducibility crisis" has stoked passionate debate among scientists, bewil­dered the public, and eve
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Science: Current Issue

[Book Review] Rise of the thought leaderThe Ideas Industry, by Daniel Drezner, is a book about how modern Amer­ica produces and interacts with the marketplace of ideas. Although ideas are ubiquitous, manifesting in think pieces, TED talks, and all manner of conventional wisdom, we rarely take the time to examine the people and insti­tutions that give rise to them. Because we have paid this important phenome­non little heed, Drezner main
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Probing the interaction of solitonsAuthor: Ian S. Osborne
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Viruses compound dietary pathologyAuthors: Caroline Ash, Kristen L. Mueller
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] The network of memory consolidationAuthor: Peter Stern
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Seeing hot carriers break the limitAuthor: Phil Szuromi
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Processable cross-linked polymersAuthor: Marc S. Lavine
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Patents from papers both basic and appliedAuthor: Brad Wible
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Fighting filoviruses with antibody therapyAuthor: Lindsey Pujanandez
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] The evolution of giant virus genomesAuthor: Laura M. Zahn
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Nanoparticles for drug delivery in lungsAuthor: Philip Yeagle
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Variation in prokaryote adaptive immunityAuthor: Caroline Ash
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] DNA sequence and inherited gene silencingAuthor: Beverly A. Purnell
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Printing nanosheet-network transistorsAuthor: Phil Szuromi
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] A tailored look at behavioral pharmacologyAuthor: Stella M. Hurtley
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Picking structures out of a lineupAuthor: Jake Yeston
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] X-ray vision catches Woodward-HoffmannAuthor: Jake Yeston
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] A mantle story told with metal and gasAuthor: Brent Grocholski
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Hi-C for mosquito genomesAuthor: Laura M. Zahn
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] An astrocyte call to arms after brain injuryAuthor: Leslie K. Ferrarelli
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] From learning to instinctAuthor: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
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Science: Current Issue

[This Week in Science] Regulating the regulatorsAuthor: Anand Balasubramani
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Threats of coastal hypoxiaAuthor: Andrew M. Sugden
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Immune sensor maintains gut microbiomeAuthor: Priscilla N. Kelly
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Where to keep information about others?Author: Peter Stern
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Fine-tuning a quantum witnessAuthor: Ian S. Osborne
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Folate manages cell shape during neurulationAuthor: Pamela J. Hines
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] What goes down comes back upAuthor: Brent Grocholski
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Science: Current Issue

[Editors' Choice] Selecting drugs with peptide networksAuthor: Phil Szuromi
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Reovirus infection triggers inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and development of celiac diseaseViral infections have been proposed to elicit pathological processes leading to the initiation of T helper 1 (TH1) immunity against dietary gluten and celiac disease (CeD). To test this hypothesis and gain insights into mechanisms underlying virus-induced loss of tolerance to dietary antigens, we developed a viral infection model that makes use of two reovirus strains that infect the intestine but
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Science: Current Issue

[Research Article] Real-time spectral interferometry probes the internal dynamics of femtosecond soliton moleculesSolitons, particle-like excitations ubiquitous in many fields of physics, have been shown to exhibit bound states akin to molecules. The formation of such temporal soliton bound states and their internal dynamics have escaped direct experimental observation. By means of an emerging time-stretch technique, we resolve the evolution of femtosecond soliton molecules in the cavity of a few-cycle mode-l
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy of an electrocyclic ring-opening reactionThe ultrafast light-activated electrocyclic ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene is a fundamental prototype of photochemical pericyclic reactions. Generally, these reactions are thought to proceed through an intermediate excited-state minimum (the so-called pericyclic minimum), which leads to isomerization via nonadiabatic relaxation to the ground state of the photoproduct. Here, we used fe
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Long-range hot-carrier transport in hybrid perovskites visualized by ultrafast microscopyThe Shockley-Queisser limit for solar cell efficiency can be overcome if hot carriers can be harvested before they thermalize. Recently, carrier cooling time up to 100 picoseconds was observed in hybrid perovskites, but it is unclear whether these long-lived hot carriers can migrate long distance for efficient collection. We report direct visualization of hot-carrier migration in methylammonium le
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] High-performance vitrimers from commodity thermoplastics through dioxaborolane metathesisWindmills, cars, and dental restoration demand polymer materials and composites that are easy to process, assemble, and recycle while exhibiting outstanding mechanical, thermal, and chemical resistance. Vitrimers, which are polymer networks able to shuffle chemical bonds through exchange reactions, could address these demands if they were prepared from existing plastics and processed with fast pro
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Tungsten-182 heterogeneity in modern ocean island basaltsNew tungsten isotope data for modern ocean island basalts (OIB) from Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland reveal variable 182W/184W, ranging from that of the ambient upper mantle to ratios as much as 18 parts per million lower. The tungsten isotopic data negatively correlate with 3He/4He. These data indicate that each OIB system accesses domains within Earth that formed within the first 60 million years of
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] All-printed thin-film transistors from networks of liquid-exfoliated nanosheetsAll-printed transistors consisting of interconnected networks of various types of two-dimensional nanosheets are an important goal in nanoscience. Using electrolytic gating, we demonstrate all-printed, vertically stacked transistors with graphene source, drain, and gate electrodes, a transition metal dichalcogenide channel, and a boron nitride (BN) separator, all formed from nanosheet networks. Th
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Engrams and circuits crucial for systems consolidation of a memoryEpisodic memories initially require rapid synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus for their formation and are gradually consolidated in neocortical networks for permanent storage. However, the engrams and circuits that support neocortical memory consolidation have thus far been unknown. We found that neocortical prefrontal memory engram cells, which are critical for remote contextual fear memor
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] The applied value of public investments in biomedical researchScientists and policy-makers have long argued that public investments in science have practical applications. Using data on patents linked to U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants over a 27-year period, we provide a large-scale accounting of linkages between public research investments and subsequent patenting. We find that about 10% of NIH grants generate a patent directly but 30% gener
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Giant viruses with an expanded complement of translation system componentsThe discovery of giant viruses blurred the sharp division between viruses and cellular life. Giant virus genomes encode proteins considered as signatures of cellular organisms, particularly translation system components, prompting hypotheses that these viruses derived from a fourth domain of cellular life. Here we report the discovery of a group of giant viruses (Klosneuviruses) in metagenomic dat
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] Propagation of Polycomb-repressed chromatin requires sequence-specific recruitment to DNAEpigenetic inheritance models posit that during Polycomb repression, Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) propagates histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) independently of DNA sequence. We show that insertion of Polycomb response element (PRE) DNA into the Drosophila genome creates extended domains of H3K27me3-modified nucleosomes in the flanking chromatin and causes repression of a linke
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] DNA sequence-dependent epigenetic inheritance of gene silencing and histone H3K9 methylationEpigenetic inheritance mechanisms play fundamental roles in maintaining cellular memory of gene expression states. In fission yeast, histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) is methylated (H3K9me) at heterochromatic domains. These domains can be epigenetically inherited when epe1+, encoding an enzyme that promotes H3K9 demethylation, is deleted. How native epigenetic states are stably maintained in epe1+ cells
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Science: Current Issue

[Report] De novo assembly of the Aedes aegypti genome using Hi-C yields chromosome-length scaffoldsThe Zika outbreak, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, highlights the need to create high-quality assemblies of large genomes in a rapid and cost-effective way. Here we combine Hi-C data with existing draft assemblies to generate chromosome-length scaffolds. We validate this method by assembling a human genome, de novo, from short reads alone (67× coverage). We then combine our method with draft
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Science: Current Issue

[Business Office Feature] Adding depth to cell cultureThe jump from two dimensions to three gives researchers a laboratory model that is just one step removed from working with cells in vivo. Technologies and techniques have recently proliferated—such as matrices, scaffolds, and other geometries—to coax cells to grow in a wide array of 3D structures.Read the Feature (Full-Text HTML)Read the Feature (PDF)Read New Products (PDF) Author: Kendall Powell
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Science: Current Issue

[New Products] New ProductsA weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Science: Current Issue

[Working Life] Getting my feet wetAuthor: Erik S. Wright
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Science | The Guardian

UK's first double hand transplant patient delights in writing letter to thank surgeon Chris King describes getting his life back since surgery last year, as surgeon says he has progressed faster than anticipated The first person in the UK to undergo a double hand transplant has said writing a letter to thank his surgeon has been one the highlights of his first nine months since the operation – that, and being able to applaud his favourite rugby league team. Chris King, 57, describ
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Gizmodo

This Is the Smallest Exoplanet Known to Have an Atmosphere Artist’s conception of GJ 1132b circling its red dwarf star. (Image: Dana Berry) Using a ground-based telescope, an international team of astronomers has detected traces of an atmosphere around an exoplanet located 39 light-years away. This exoplanet is not much larger than our own, making it the most Earth-like planet known to harbor an atmosphere. Detecting atmospheres around distant exoplanets
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Gizmodo

YouTube TV Isn't Perfect, But It's Very Promising Image: Christina Warren/Gizmodo Try as I might, I just can’t cut the cord. For more than five years, I’ve tried to wean myself off cable—for which I pay $140 a month—in favor of a streaming-only solution. I just cannot live on Hulu and Netflix alone. Is YouTube TV my savior? I know that with my absurd cable package I’m spending a lot of extra money on channels I don’t watch, but so far, the strea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany gets criticized by web giants over encryption plansGermany faces criticism from some of the web's biggest names over plans to weaken encrypted communication and fine social media sites for hate speech.
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Ars Technica

Comcast to sell “unlimited” mobile plans that get throttled after 20GB Enlarge (credit: Comcast) Comcast today announced pricing for its forthcoming smartphone data plans and said the Xfinity Mobile service will be available as an add-on for Comcast home Internet customers before the end of June. There will be some good deals, including $12-per-gigabyte pricing for light Internet users, but "unlimited" customers who use more than 20GB a month will end up being throt
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Science : NPR

In Giant Virus Genes, Hints About Their Mysterious Origin They're the Godzillas of the virus world, pushing the limit of what is considered alive. Researchers are trying to figure out where they came from. (And no, they aren't known to make people sick.) (Image credit: Didier Raoult/Science Source)
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Common virus may be celiac disease culpritA common virus may turn the immune system against gluten, leading to the development of celiac disease.
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Gizmodo

What Is Independent Media? Illustration: Jim Cooke/ FMG Not so long ago, Nick Denton used to boast that Gawker Media was the last true beachhead of “independent media” in America. How quickly things change. Does “independent media” even mean anything, any more? Did it ever? Today, we are owned by Univision, a multibillion-dollar international media company controlled by a partnership of private equity firms. There is nothi
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Ars Technica

Uber said to use “sophisticated” software to defraud drivers, passengers (credit: freestocks.org ) Uber has devised a "clever and sophisticated" scheme in which it manipulates navigation data used to determine "upfront" rider fare prices while secretly short-changing the driver, according to a proposed class-action lawsuit against the ride-hailing app. When a rider uses Uber's app to hail a ride, the fare the app immediately shows to the passenger is based on a slower
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Scientific American Content: Global

Curiouser and Curiouser--Octopus's Evolution Is Even Stranger Than ThoughtCephalopods adapt to changing water temperatures by altering their RNA more often than their DNA, according to a new study -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make major breakthrough in smart printed electronicsResearchers in AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time. These 2D materials combine exciting electronic properties with the potential for low-cost production. This breakthrough could unlock the potential for applications s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coming to a lab bench near you: Femtosecond X-ray spectroscopyThe ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a reaction important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes have been captured and, for the first time, directly characterized using ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists discover timesharing strategy in bacteriaTimesharing, researchers have found, isn't only for vacation properties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds ancient Earth's fingerprints in young volcanic rocksEarth's mantle is made of solid rock that nonetheless circulates slowly over millions of years. Some geologists assume that this slow circulation would have wiped away any geochemical traces of Earth's early history long ago. But a new study led by University of Maryland geologists has found new evidence that could date back more than 4.5 billion years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel group of giant viruses discoveredViruses have a ubiquitous presence in the world. Their population is estimated to be 1031, 10 times greater than the nonillion (1030) of microbes on the planet—a figure that surpasses the number of stars in the Milky Way. Giant viruses are characterized by disproportionately large genomes and virions that house the viruses' genetic material. They can encode several genes potentially involved in pr
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The Scientist RSS

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show.
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The Scientist RSS

New Giant Virus Group ReportedA genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced.
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Gizmodo

This New Species of Worm Snail Is Basically a Penis Image: Rüdiger Bieler Today, science news writers got excited about a purportedly new species of “worm snail” found by Field Museum researchers. It’s a slime-shooting, finger-length thing that shows up where no one wants it to. Guys, it’s a sea dick. Scientists went scuba diving at the similarly dick-shaped state Florida’s Keys to visit some shipwrecks that have turned into man-made reefs. There,
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Gizmodo

Bob Ross Processed by a Neural Network Is the Most Soothing Way to Melt Your Brain GIF: Alexander Reben By now we’ve seen everything from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas to Donald Trump to popular memes processed by neural networks like Google’s Deep Dream . They’re like bizarre drug trips, but without the drugs. But it was only recently that Alexander Reben was curious enough to see what a neural network would make of the human equivalent of Ambien: painter Bob Ross. Image proc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crystalline material could replace silicon to double efficiency of solar cellsA new material has been shown to have the capability to double the efficiency of solar cells by researchers at Purdue University and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
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New on MIT Technology Review

SpaceX Has a Reusable Rocket, and Now the Race Is on to Perfect ThemThe company’s approach to recycling spacecraft isn’t necessarily the right one, but an increasingly Silicon Valley-esque space race aims to find it.
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Popular Science

Today's hurricanes kill way fewer Americans, and NOAA’s satellites are the reason why Science More folks than ever live in cyclone-territory, but less are dying Far fewer American's die from destructive hurricanes today, and NOAA's storm-tracking satellites are a major reason why. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Sale Extended: Buy Dash Buttons For $1, Get $5 Back When You Use Them $1 Dash buttons with $5 first-use credits , $1 with code DASHBDAY Amazon’s Dash Button birthday sale was supposed to end yesterday, but it’s still going strong if you haven’t taken advantage yet. Until the deal ends, you can buy up to three Dash buttons of your choice for $1 each with promo code DASHBDAY . And as always, the first time you use them to order an item from Amazon, you’ll automatical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Hubble takes close-up portrait of JupiterOn April 3, 2017, as Jupiter made its nearest approach to Earth in a year, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope viewed the solar system's largest planet in all of its up-close glory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble takes close-up portrait of JupiterDuring April 2017 Jupiter is in opposition: it is at its closest to Earth and the hemisphere facing Earth is fully illuminated by the Sun. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope used this special configuration to capture an image of what is by far the largest planet in the Solar System. This image adds to many others made in the past, and together they allow astronomers to study changes in the atmosp
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Big Think

What Are Testosterone Boosters Actually Boosting? The cognitive boost of taking testosterone supplements has not been substantiated — but let’s face it, most men aren’t seeking a better memory when popping testosterone pills. Read More
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Gizmodo

The FDA Just Greenlit the First Consumer DNA Tests for Disease Risk Image: Getty At times, DNA testing can feel more like horoscopes than science. In many cases, we just don’t know enough about a gene to say what it means for our health. For this reason, the Food and Drug Administration has sought to protect consumers by preventing DNA testing companies from telling them whether or not they’re are at risk for a certain disease. Until now. On Thursday, for the fir
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Live Science

More Than 20% of US Adults Have 'High-Risk' HPVAbout 1 in 5 U.S. adults under age 60 is infected with a "high-risk" strain of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) that increases the risk of cancer.
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The Atlantic

Beauty and Sanctity in Rumi's ‘A Great Wagon’ Poetry, like music, takes me back to the time when I first heard that piece. I first heard the work of the Sufi poet Jalal al-Din Rumi when I was in college. The priest at the Episcopal campus ministry, who became my mentor, would substitute a Rumi poem for a biblical reading or use it in one of his sermons. This poem, “A Great Wagon,” is the one that has stayed with me over the last 12 years. Yo
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Popular Science

How Syria is still using chemical weapons in 2017 Military It surrendered weapons, not weapons scientists Here are some ways a country could rebuild a chemical weapon stockpile…
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New Scientist - News

Mutation in clock gene explains why some night owls stay up latePeople with delayed sleep phase disorder go to sleep several hours later and hate getting up early. A variant of a circadian clock gene could be to blame
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble takes close-up portrait of JupiterDuring April 2017 Jupiter is in opposition: it is at its closest to Earth and the hemisphere facing Earth is fully illuminated by the Sun. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope used this special configuration to capture an image of what is by far the largest planet in the Solar System. This image adds to many others made in the past, and together they allow astronomers to study changes in the atmosp
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ceres' temporary atmosphere linked to solar activityScientists have long thought that Ceres may have a very weak, transient atmosphere, but mysteries lingered about its origin and why it's not always present. Now, researchers suggest that this temporary atmosphere appears to be related to the behavior of the sun, rather than Ceres' proximity to the sun. The study was conducted by scientists from NASA's Dawn mission and others who previously identif
22h
WIRED

Sorry, But if You’re Married, Browsing Tinder Totally Makes You a Snake More specifically, it makes you an invasive species. The post Sorry, But if You're Married, Browsing Tinder Totally Makes You a Snake appeared first on WIRED .
22h
Ingeniøren

Ny forskerstrid om universets mørke energi og kompas-proteiner til forklaring af den magnetiske sansUgens videnskabelige nyhedsstrøm bragte også en forklaring på tibetanernes særlige evne til at overleve på verdens tag og begavede tanker om, hvordan kunstig intelligens – uden bevidsthed – i løbet af få århundreder kan udkonkurrere menneskeheden.
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The Atlantic

A Battle Between Nepotism and Nationalism Stephen Bannon presided over Breitbart as it stoked anti-Muslim prejudice and white racial anxiety; saw Donald Trump as a useful vessel for destroying the Republican Party; and steered Trump’s presidential campaign toward white nationalism. The 63-year-old once suggested that a war between the U.S. and China is inevitable. And he wants right-wing populists to take power in numerous countries. Jar
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Gizmodo

TRAPPIST-1's Fatal Flaw Could Ruin Our Hopes of Finding Life There Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech In February, Earthlings rightfully cheered when NASA announced the discovery of seven Earth-like planets huddled together around an ultracool dwarf star. The system, called TRAPPIST-1 , is especially appealing because it has three planets in the habitable zone, meaning hypothetically, their surfaces could support liquid water and even life. As a result, everyone from seaso
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Gizmodo

Project Scorpio's Beefy Specs Won't Be Enough We finally know the specs for Microsoft’s supercharged Xbox One: the Project Scorpio console. They’re impressive. The GPU has nearly four times as many compute units as the original Xbox One and the memory on the console will be 108GB/s faster than the memory in both the Xbox One S and Scorpio’s primary challenger, the PS4 Pro. On paper this thing reads like lightning. In practice it means jack s
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Viden

Kan unges tarmbakterier give dig et længere liv?Ny forskning viser, at ældre fisk lever længere, når de får tarmfloraen fra yngre fisk.
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Popular Science

Octopuses can basically edit their own genes on the fly Animals Crazy levels of RNA tinkering could explain how cephalopods got so smart DNA translates into RNA, which tells the cell which proteins to produce. But that's not always the case. Read on:…
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Popular Science

This Earth-size virtual telescope could take the first picture of a black hole Space Scientists just switched on the Event Horizon Telescope A supermassive black hole lurks at the center of our galaxy, but we've never seen it. That could soon change. Read on.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Initiative aims to break science's citation paywall Publishers agree to release proprietary data on references in millions of papers. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21800
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The Economist: The world this week

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NYT > Science

Mud Erased a Village in Peru, a Sign of Larger Perils in South AmericaRapid development without planning draws the region’s most vulnerable people to areas that are the most prone to devastating flooding.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attitudes vary across groups regarding meal choice in restaurantsDifferences in opinions between parents and children and executives of restaurant chains represent a challenge in terms of promoting healthy eating habits. In order to better understand those opinions, researchers surveyed parents and children dining at participating restaurants, as well as executives of restaurant chains, to obtain more information on healthy children's meals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for bone scintigraphy in prostate and breast cancerThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for bone scintigraphy (scans to identify bone metastases) in patients with prostate or breast cancer. This is the first in a series of new AUC developed by SNMMI in its role as a qualified provider-led entity under the Medicare Appropriate Use Criteria program for advanced diagnostic imaging.
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Ars Technica

By 2100, we could be recreating a 50 million-year-old climate Enlarge / A coal mine in Australia. Burning this ancient sunlight could bring back ancient climates, too. (credit: Max Phillips (Jeremy Buckingham MLC) ) From the perspective of a living organism, the history of the Earth has included an odd combination of radical change and fortunate stability. Continents have wandered from polar to equatorial homes, mountain ranges have risen and crumbled away,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taser renames itself as it promotes body camerasTaser International was officially re-branded as Axon Thursday as the company broadens its focus from its controversial stun guns to police body cameras.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Famed astronaut John Glenn laid to rest at ArlingtonThe flag-draped casket of John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, was covered in plastic to protect it from a steady rain as it was carried on a horse-drawn caisson to his final resting place at Arlington National Cemetery. Later, his widow, Annie, gave a kiss on the cheek to the Marine who presented her with the folded-up flag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook launches resource to help spot misleading newsFacebook is launching a resource to help you spot false news and misleading information that spreads on its service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keeping the code: How cultural beliefs affect police, court decisionsLL Cool J's 1991 rap lyrics in his song "Mama Said Knock You Out" are about defending yourself and making sure you are not messed with. Florida State University researchers have found that when individuals adopt this outlook—referred to as a "code of the street"—it can increase their probability of arrest or conviction.
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New Scientist - News

Record amounts of renewable energy added to the mix in 2016Renewable energy sources added 138.5 gigawatts to global power capacity, equivalent to the total installed capacity of Canada
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clinical trial shows benefit of yoga for side effects of prostate cancer treatmentMen who attended a structured yoga class twice a week during prostate cancer radiation treatment reported less fatigue and better sexual and urinary function than those who didn't, according to a clinical trial. It is the first randomized trial to look at the effect of twice-weekly yoga on the side-effects and quality of life issues caused by prostate cancer treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kids' hands may be a source of significant nicotine exposureChildren may carry significant levels of nicotine on their hands just by coming into contact with items or surfaces contaminated with tobacco smoke residues, even when no one is actively smoking around them at the time. A new study also reports the presence of significant nicotine on the hands of children was associated with equally significant levels of the harmful tobacco metabolite cotinine in
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WIRED

Oh Great. Climate Change Will Make Flying Worse, Too Buckle up. Things are about to get a whole lot bumpier. The post Oh Great. Climate Change Will Make Flying Worse, Too appeared first on WIRED .
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Quanta Magazine

Is It Friday the 13th Again? In some of our recent Insights puzzles, we’ve tackled questions related to time: How much time does it take for a gene’s rate of evolution to slow to a virtual standstill? How many half-lives does a pound of radioactive material have? What can an LCD display teach us about time’s arrow ? This month, let’s take a look at a different aspect of time — how we keep track of it. A monthly puzzle celebr
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cassini Bids Farewell before Blazing into Saturn [Video]NASA’s plucky, dependable spacecraft will burn up in the atmosphere after 13 years at the planet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Hot and steamy atmosphere detected on Earth-like planet Goal of finding alien life a step closer with discovery, which marks one of the first times an atmosphere has been spotted around a small, rocky world Astronomers have found evidence for a hot and steamy atmosphere around an Earth-like planet that circles a red dwarf star in the southern sky. The discovery marks one of the first times that scientists have spotted an atmosphere around a small, roc
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Ars Technica

Analysis: What Xbox One Scorpio means for the future of the console wars Enlarge / The exploded innards on what will surely be the most powerful game console in existence... until the next one. (credit: Eurogamer / Digital Foundry ) Evaluating a new piece of gaming hardware based solely on the numbers on a spec sheet is always tough. That said, the Scorpio specifications Microsoft put out today through Eurogamer suggest the system should easily outclass the current to
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The Atlantic

Republicans Abandon the Filibuster to Save Neil Gorsuch Updated on April 6 at 1:20 p.m. ET The judicial filibuster in the Senate is now dead. Republicans on Thursday ended decades of Senate tradition by changing the rules to keep Democrats from blocking President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. On a strict party-line vote at the direction of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the Senate invoked what has become known as the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Smart' cephalopods trade off genome evolution for prolific RNA editingOctopus, squid, and cuttlefish are famous for engaging in complex behavior, from unlocking an aquarium tank and escaping to instantaneous skin camouflage to hide from predators. A new study suggests their evolutionary path to neural sophistication includes a novel mechanism: Prolific RNA editing at the expense of evolution in their genomic DNA.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Honeybees Brush Their Eye HairsFlitting among the flowers can be messy, sticky work. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Flight turbulence to get three times more common because of CO2Air travel is likely to get a lot bumpier as carbon dioxide levels rise and affect the jet streams
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Death by insulin -- management of self-harm and suicide in diabetes managementA special issue of Current Diabetes Reviews examining the management of diabetes in special populations: Death by Insulin -- Management of Self-Harm and Suicide in Diabetes Management.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping the code: How cultural beliefs affect police, court decisionsResearchers found that individuals were more likely to be arrested and convicted when they adopted what is referred to as 'code of the street' or lived in areas where this belief system was entrenched in the community.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nuclear architecture emerges at the awakening of the genomeMax Planck scientists unravel when the 3-D organization of the genome in the nucleus arises during development. Their finding, published in Cell, reveals that the genome first takes its proper shape when transcription is first turned on in the zygote. Transcription itself however is not required for this process.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

WSU researchers improve technology to save sperm stem cellsWashington State University researchers have found a promising way to preserve sperm stem cells so boys could undergo cancer treatment without risking their fertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool illuminates cell signaling pathways key to diseaseIn a major advance for fundamental biological research, UC San Francisco scientists have developed a tool capable of illuminating previously inscrutable cellular signaling networks that play a wide variety of roles in human biology and disease. In particular, the technique opens up exciting new avenues for understanding and treating psychiatric disease, the researchers say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In 4 related papers, researchers describe new and improved tools for stem cell researchIn a new paper, a large team of researchers led by senior author Kelly Frazer, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics and director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe a new collection of 222 systematically derived and characterized iPSC lines generated as part of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's NextGen consortium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study helps explain varying outcomes for cancer, Down SyndromeDisorders caused by aneuploidy, a condition in which cells contain an abnormal number of chromosomes, can vary widely in severity from one individual to another. New research from MIT shows that aneuploidy alone can cause this significant variability in traits, in otherwise genetically identical cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Smart' cephalopods trade off genome evolution for prolific RNA editingOctopus, squid, and cuttlefish are famous for engaging in complex behavior, from unlocking an aquarium tank and escaping to instantaneous skin camouflage to hide from predators. A new study suggests their evolutionary path to neural sophistication includes a novel mechanism: Prolific RNA editing at the expense of evolution in their genomic DNA.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies 'night owl' gene variantScientists have discovered a common mutation that might explain why some people have trouble going to sleep at night and getting up early. The gene alteration slows the internal biological clock that regulates our sleeping patterns.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rutgers researchers determine structure of tuberculosis drug targetRutgers University scientists have determined the three-dimensional structure of the target of the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug rifampin. They have also discovered a new class of potential anti-tuberculosis drugs that kill rifampin-resistant and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria. Tuberculosis (TB) bacteria infect a third of the world's population and the disease kills 1.8 million peo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish defy genetics' 'central dogma''RNA editing' is rarely used to recode proteins in most animals, but octopuses and their kin edit RNA base pairs in over half of their transcribed genes. When researchers did experiments to quantify and characterize the extent of this RNA editing across cephalopod species, they found evidence that this genetic strategy has profoundly constrained evolution of the cephalopod genome. The study appear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell drug screen yields potential alternative to statinsIn the April 6, 2017 issue of Cell Stem Cell, scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina report that cardiac glycosides reduce a precursor of LDL cholesterol in a drug screen of statin-resistant hypercholesterolemia. A large meta-analysis of medical records revealed that patients taking glycosides for heart failure had reductions in LDL cholesterol similar to patients taking statins. C
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell consortium tackles complex genetic diseasesMuch of stem cell research over the past decade has focused on Mendelian disorders -- those caused by a single gene, such as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, and Huntington's disease. But as genome-wide association studies continue to reveal, most conditions are more complex, arising from dozens or hundreds of genetic mutations working together to cause disease. To understand how someone can i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a beneficial gut microbe adapted to breast milkBreast milk provides vital nutrients not only to infants, but also to beneficial microbes that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. A study published April 6 in Cell Chemical Biology shows that a bacterial species called Bifidobacterium longum has successfully adapted to the unique niche of the infant gut by producing an enzyme called LnbX, which enables this microbe to grow on a sugar that is abun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene mutation helps explain night owl behaviorSome people stay up late and have trouble getting up in the morning because their internal clock is genetically programmed to run slowly, according to a study published April 6 in Cell. A mutation in a gene called CRY1 alters the human circadian clock, which dictates rhythmic behavior such as sleep/wake cycles. Carriers of the gene variant experienced nighttime sleep delays of 2-2.5 hours compared
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Scientific American Content: Global

Only One of TRAPPIST-1's Rocky Planets May Be Right for LifeA new climate model suggests six of the nearby star's seven worlds are uninhabitable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Our $5 Billion Satellite Spy Agency Can't Hire a Sign Language Interpreter Because of Trump's Hiring Freeze GIF of a fan-made sign language video interpreting Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election (via YouTube ) They’re in charge of keeping an eye on the entire planet with the most advanced imaging technology in the world, and they have an estimated annual budget of at least $5 billion. But right now they have a position for a sign language interpreter that they’re not allowed to fill. Why
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The Atlantic

The New Champions of School Integration Policies that promote school integration by race and class took a significant hit last week when the U.S. Department of Education announced that it was killing a small but important federal program to support local diversity efforts. The initiative, “Opening Doors, Expanding Opportunities,” was slated to provide $12 million to school districts to boost socioeconomic diversity. The brainchild of P
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The Atlantic

What Do Southerners Hear in S-Town? S-Town plays on some familiar themes of storytelling about the South. As Aja Romano has noted at Vox , the show fits firmly into the Southern gothic tradition immortalized in the works of authors like William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor, even though it’s nonfiction. But in an interview with Deep South Magazine , the show’s producer Brian Reed said his instinct was to push beyond stereotypes: R
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The Atlantic

Octopuses Do Something Really Strange to Their Genes Octopuses have three hearts, parrot-like beaks, venomous bites, and eight semi-autonomous arms that can taste the world. They squirt ink, contort through the tiniest of spaces , and melt into the world by changing both color and texture. They are incredibly intelligent, capable of wielding tools, solving problems, and sabotaging equipment . As Sy Montgomery once wrote, “no sci-fi alien is so star
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Futurity.org

Team finds molecule to treat man’s mystery illness Researchers have identified the genetic mutation responsible for one patient’s serious health problems, finally solving a medical mystery that has endured for over 30 years. The discovery has led to a therapy that could help treat people who have problems related to the immune system, whether they are genetic or due to a transplant or an illness. “In the laboratory, we demonstrated that a molecul
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WIRED

Science Reveals Yet Another Reason Octopuses and Squid Are So Weird Squid, octopuses and cuttlefish favor modifying their proteins in a way that slows down normal evolution. The post Science Reveals Yet Another Reason Octopuses and Squid Are So Weird appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Comcast's New Wireless Service Feels Like a Trick Image: Comcast / Gizmodo Just when you thought cell phone plans couldn’t get any more confusing, Comcast just announced its own wireless service: Xfinity Mobile. The service will launch in May or June for Xfinity customers and later this year for everyone else. Unlimited plans start at $65 per month, runs Verizon’s 4G LTE network, and gets even cheaper if you buy cable service through Comcast. (C
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Cephalopods may have traded evolution gains for extra smartsEditing RNA may give cephalopods smarts, but there’s a trade-off.
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Popular Science

How to secure your Google account DIY Make sure no one's getting in but you Keep all of your Google data, from emails to web searches, safe and secure: Follow these steps for maximizing the security protections on your account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear architecture emerges at the awakening of the genomeThe DNA molecules in each one of the cells in a person's body, if laid end to end, would measure approximately two metres in length. Remarkably, however, cells are able to fold and compact their genetic material in the confined space of the nucleus, which spans only a few micrometres. Importantly, the compaction and arrangement of the genome inside the nucleus needs to be achieved in an ordered fa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In four related papers, researchers describe new and improved tools for stem cell researchInduced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from human adult cells and capable of being differentiated to become a variety of cell types, are a powerful tool for studying everything from molecular processes underlying human diseases to elusive genetic variants associated with human phenotypes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish defy genetics' 'central dogma'Octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish often do not follow the genetic instructions in their DNA to the letter. Instead, they use enzymes to pluck out specific adenosine RNA bases (some of As, out of the As, Ts, Gs, and Us of RNA) that codes for proteins and replace them with a different base, called Inosine. This process—called "RNA editing"—is rarely used to recode proteins in most animals, but octopu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a beneficial gut microbe adapted to breast milkBreast milk provides vital nutrients not only to infants, but also to beneficial microbes that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. A study published April 6 in Cell Chemical Biology shows that a bacterial species called Bifidobacterium longum has successfully adapted to the unique niche of the infant gut by producing an enzyme called LnbX, which enables this microbe to grow on a sugar that is abun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool illuminates cell signaling pathways key to diseaseIn a major advance for fundamental biological research, UC San Francisco scientists have developed a tool capable of illuminating previously inscrutable cellular signaling networks that play a wide variety of roles in human biology and disease. In particular, the technique opens up exciting new avenues for understanding and treating psychiatric disease, the researchers say.
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Live Science

Plant Photos: Amazing Botanical Shots by Karl BlossfeldtA new book reveals a striking collection of plant portraits captured in amazing detail by photographer Karl Blossfeldt.
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Ars Technica

Review: Apple’s $329 iPad is for people who have never upgraded their tablet Andrew Cunningham Apple isn’t shy about admitting it: the biggest feature of its newest iPad is the price. At $329, it’s $70 cheaper than the iPad Air 2 used to be, $270 cheaper than the smaller iPad Pro costs now , and $170 cheaper than the initial starting price of the iPad back in 2010. It’s a big shift, especially after a year-and-a-half where larger and more expensive iPads were Apple’s main
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Gizmodo

Controversial Bee-Killing Insecticide Found in US Drinking Water Image: AP A class of insecticides linked to colony collapse disorder in bee colonies has been detected in US drinking water for the very first time. The amounts are admittedly low, but scientists aren’t sure if long term exposure to these chemicals, known as neonicotinoids, are a threat to human health. Researchers from the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Iowa have detected minu
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

🏄 Join In One Of Surfing's Most Sacred Events In Immersive Virtual Reality 🏄 (360 Video) Be a part of one of the most sacred events among big wave surfers. The best surfers in the world gather to celebrate an extraordinary Hawaiian, Eddie Aikau – waterman, inspiration, and caretaker of Waimea Bay. Eddie would go. For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. iPhone: http://apple.co/1Kl14XA Android: http://bit.ly/
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The Scientist RSS

Cephalopod Genomes Contain Thousands of Conserved RNA Editing SitesOctopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process.
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Scientific American Content: Global

States Challenge Trump over Clean Power Plan17 states are objecting to the EPA’s request to delay legal proceedings of the climate rule -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under challenge: Girls' confidence level, not math ability hinders path to science degreesWhen it comes to mathematics, girls rate their abilities markedly lower than boys, even when there is no observable difference between the two, according to Florida State University researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold-plated crystals set new standard for natural gas detectorsMaterials scientists and engineers have developed a sensor that is fast, sensitive and efficient enough to detect specific wavelengths of electromagnetic energy while on the move. The technology could actively scan areas for methane or natural gas leaks, monitor the health of vast fields of crops or quickly sort plastics for recycling.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leaf vein structure could hold key to extending battery lifeThe natural structure found within leaves could improve the performance of everything from rechargeable batteries to high-performance gas sensors, according to an international team of scientists. The researchers have designed a porous, such as the veins of a leaf, and could make energy transfers more efficient. The material could improve the performance of rechargeable batteries, optimizing the c
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The Atlantic

How China’s President Could Bully Trump When the new and relatively inexperienced U.S. president met the leader of the world’s second-most powerful nation in their first summit meeting, public smiles hid the battering that the American took behind closed doors. Sized up as a lightweight by the survivor of a brutal political scene, the U.S. president confided that “he beat the hell out of me.” Worse, the impression of weakness and uncer
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The Atlantic

When Globalization Brings Brain-Invading Worms There is a long, grim history of infectious diseases crisscrossing the globe aboard giant ships. Explorers looking to set up new colonies carried smallpox, measles, and other deadly viruses with them to distant lands. Even the vessels they used to get there contributed to the spread of disease. Infected ballast water from cargo ships traveling to South America, for example, has been blamed for in
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Science | The Guardian

A puke bucket and an ancient drug: is ayahuasca the future of PTSD treatment? I visited Peru to find out more about an intriguing ayahuasca study – and to have my own experience with the psychedelic brew I’m sitting on a blue plastic, wipe-down mattress with my back to a wooden pillar. Within arm’s reach on the floor is a small torch to light my way to the toilet during the night, on the other side an orange plastic bucket to puke into. As the light fades my four companion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting filmExperimental physicists in the research group led by Professor Uwe Hartmann at Saarland University have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields. The particularly interesting aspect of this work is that the research team has succeeded in creating superconducti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feeding fat to fungi: Evidence for lipid transfer in arbuscular mycorrhizaNearly all organisms live in symbiosis with a vast, diverse array of microbes. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is the interaction between plants and a group of fungi called Glomeromycota. Most land plants, including several crop species, are able to interact with these fungi, which have been long known to positively affect plant growth and nutrition. The fungi live in plant roots where they
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear blowing Cyclone 14P apartNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14P gathering data in infrared light and observed that westerly wind shear pushed the strongest storms east of the center. The strong winds were shearing the storm apart.
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Gizmodo

Everything Cut From Rogue One: A Star Wars Story All images: Lucasfilm We know there were a lot of changes made to Rogue One , be that in the script phase, the shooting phase, or the edit phase. That means a pile of stuff ended up not making the final cut. The movie is finally out on DVD and Blu-ray this week, but there were no additional scenes there. So we’ve assembled every bit of information that we could find about what’s missing. The Open
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: RTIC Bottle, ViewSonic Projector, Crayola Supplies, and More RTIC’s 64 ounce growler , $200 off a projector , and Crayola art supplies lead off Thursday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals ViewSonic Lens Shift Projector , $599 If you’ve been itching to build out a true, projector-based home theater, Amazon’s marking down a 1080p ViewSonic by about $200 , today only. At 2200 lumens, it’s not the b
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Ingeniøren

Danmarks højeste bygning skal bores ned i leretEn 128 meter høj bygning er på vej på Aarhus Havn. Men undergrunden er fyldt med plastisk ler, der deformerer let. Derfor er planen, at den tunge bygning skal stå på borede pæle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clinical trial shows benefit of yoga for side effects of prostate cancer treatmentMen who attended a structured yoga class twice a week during prostate cancer radiation treatment reported less fatigue and better sexual and urinary function than those who didn't, according to a clinical trial led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. It is the first randomized trial to look at the effect of twice-weekly yoga on the side-effects and quality of life
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leaf vein structure could hold key to extending battery lifeThe natural structure found within leaves could improve the performance of everything from rechargeable batteries to high-performance gas sensors, according to an international team of scientists. The researchers have designed a porous, such as the veins of a leaf, and could make energy transfers more efficient.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gold-plated crystals set new standard for natural gas detectorsMaterials scientists and engineers have developed a sensor that is fast, sensitive and efficient enough to detect specific wavelengths of electromagnetic energy while on the move. The technology could actively scan areas for methane or natural gas leaks, monitor the health of vast fields of crops or quickly sort plastics for recycling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Under challenge: Girls' confidence level, not math ability hinders path to science degreesA Florida State University research team found that girls rate their math abilities lower than boys, even when there is no observable difference between the two.
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Ars Technica

Nvidia delivers new and improved Titan Xp—3,840 cores, 550GB/s memory bandwidth Enlarge Nvidia has quietly released the Titan Xp, an updated version of 2016's Pascal Titan X which was colloquially and soon confusingly referred to as the Titan XP. The new Titan Xp is available directly from Nvidia for £1,160 or $1,200—the same price that last year's Titan X launched at. Delivery time is listed as "1-3 working days." The new Titan Xp finally features a full-fat Pascal GP102 GP
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Viden

VIDEO Tre måneders Antarktis-ekspedition skal bringe ny viden om verdens klimaEn international gruppe af forskere er netop nu på vej hjemad efter tusindvis af prøver.
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Gizmodo

This Is The Tesla Model 3 Way Before You're Supposed To See It All photos credit: Brian Williams/Spiedbilde/Jalopnik The Tesla Model 3 is supposed to make or break Tesla, and it’s supposed to go into production in just three months . But the weird thing is, no one’s seen a clean shot of a release candidate yet (save for a crappy, brief clip posted last month). Until now. This is a prototype just spotted running around, and if Elon’s right, that means it’s da
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Science | The Guardian

We’ve been labelled ‘anti-sex difference’ for demanding greater scientific rigour | Cordelia Fine and Rebecca Jordan-YoungOur criticism of gender research has been portrayed as dogmatic feminism – thankfully the scientific community has looked beyond the headlines At a time when both science and feminism are under attack, there are welcome signs that neuroscience is showing new openness to critiques of research into sex differences. Mainstream journals increasingly publish studies that reveal how misleading assumptio
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Scientific American Content: Global

Most Americans Oppose Climate Science CutsFifty-nine percent of voters want the U.S. to do more to address global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear blowing Cyclone 14P apartNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14P gathering data in infrared light and observed that westerly wind shear pushed the strongest storms east of the center. The strong winds were shearing the storm apart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting filmExperimental physicists in the research group led by Professor Uwe Hartmann at Saarland University have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields. The particularly interesting aspect of this work is that the research team has succeeded in creating superconducti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospital care standards released for delivering high-quality surgical care to older adultsThe first comprehensive set of hospital-level surgical care standards for older adults has been released and published on the Annals of Surgery website.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feeding fat to fungi: Evidence for lipid transfer in arbuscular mycorrhizaResearchers from the labs of Dr. Maria Harrison at the Boyce Thompson Institute and Dr. Peter Dörmann at the University of Bonn have produced the first experimental evidence to suggest that AM fungi also get lipids from the plant. AM-induced FatM and RAM2 may play specific roles in the biosynthesis of 16:0 βMAG, which cannot be produced by the fungus, providing a clue to understanding the obligate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SWOG publishes key statistics on 18 years of physician-aid-in-dying in OregonResearchers have analyzed and reported on a sweeping data set on the Death with Dignity Act, Oregon's first-in-the-nation law that allows physicians to provide terminally ill patients with a lethal dose of medication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is threshold for lips perceived as artificial, unnatural-appearing?Recognizing the perceptual threshold for when lips appear unnatural is important to avoid an undesirable outcome in lip augmentation.A new study published by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery by Sang W. Kim, M.D., of the Natural Face Clinics, Syracuse, N.Y., and coauthors attempts to provide data on balanced augmentation. The study used incrementally digitally altered photographs of a female model's lip
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report evaluates results of Oregon's Death with Dignity ActOregon's Death with Dignity Act is the longest-running physician-aided dying program in the United States.A new article published by JAMA Oncology from Charles Blanke, M.D., chairman of SWOG, a Portland-based worldwide network of researchers who design and conduct cancer trials, evaluates the usage and effectiveness of the law, which went into effect in 1997.
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Popular Science

Knife-wielding stabbing machine could help solve violent crimes Science It can stab in 60 different ways A machine built to stab fabric could eventually help forensic scientists catch criminals. Read on.
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The Atlantic

The Painful Syrian Education of Barack Obama and Donald Trump In August 2013, there was a gas attack in Ghouta, Syria. The attack, which was attributed to the Syrian government by everyone except President Assad and his Russian allies, killed hundreds of people and outraged the international community. A consensus arose in the West: Something had to be done . Related Story What Could Possibly Motivate a Chemical-Weapons Attack? The urgency was elevated by O
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tibet sediments reveal climate patterns from late Miocene, six million years agoThe Tibetan Plateau in China experiences the strongest monsoon system on Earth, with powerful winds—and accompanying intense rains in the summer months—caused by a complex system of global air circulation patterns and differences in surface temperatures between land and oceans.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Clot-Grabbing Devices Offer Better Stroke OutcomesInsights from patient follow up may fuel changes in care -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Cancer survivors more likely to give birth early Women who underwent cancer treatment during their childbearing years more commonly gave birth prematurely, and to babies whose weights were below normal, research shows. Cancer survivors also had a slightly higher rate of cesarean section deliveries, according to the study in JAMA . “One of the things that’s exciting about this work is we identified thousands of women who went on to have a child
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Gizmodo

These Badass Little Snakes Eat Bigger Snakes An Eastern kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula) consuming a Texas ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus) of 120% its own size. (Image: David Penning, Missouri Southern State University) Professional fighters have weight classes for a reason: no matter how adept the smaller fighter is, a much bigger one will probably have some sort of advantage. But size is rarely an issue in the snake world if a kingsnake
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WIRED

The Aviation Industry Finally Discovers Silicon Valley To move into the future, planemakers and airlines look to California. The post The Aviation Industry Finally Discovers Silicon Valley appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than half of the racial college completion gap explained by pre-college factorsIn an analysis of Texas students, more than 60 percent of the racial gap in college completion rates can be attributed to factors that occur before college - factors that are beyond the control of many colleges and universities, finds a new study led by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To save honey bees, human behavior must changeIn the search for answers to the complex health problems and colony losses experienced by honey bees in recent years, it may be time for professionals and hobbyists in the beekeeping industry to look in the mirror.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When old growth beats old school: New forestry technique imitates old growth to capture more carbon and profitAs the planet warms, carbon markets are getting hot too. Forest landowners have been looking for ways to enter these markets, making money from their commercial timberland not just by selling logs—but also by demonstrating that their land is absorbing climate-warming carbon dioxide from the air. The more carbon an acre of trees holds, the more valuable it will be in these new carbon markets—whethe
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Science : NPR

Ex-Secretary Of State Advocates Causes Not Key In Modern Republican Agenda James Baker, who served in two Republican White Houses, is writing about causes that don't figure prominently in the modern Republican agenda. He's advocating a global ban on the sale of ivory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists link California droughts and floods to distinctive atmospheric wavesThe crippling wintertime droughts that struck California from 2013 to 2015, as well as this year's unusually wet California winter, appear to be associated with the same phenomenon: a distinctive wave pattern that emerges in the upper atmosphere and circles the globe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US educationAs teacher resignation letters increasingly go public—and viral—new research indicates teachers are not leaving solely due to low pay and retirement, but also because of what they see as a broken education system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unraveling the mystery of snowflakes, from the Alps to AntarcticaImagine taking pictures of thousands of snowflakes from three different angles with a specialized instrument installed at an altitude of 2,500 meters. Then imagine using 3,500 of these pictures to manually train an algorithm to recognize six different classes of snowflakes. And, finally, imagine using this algorithm to classify the snowflakes in the millions of remaining pictures into those six cl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists further understanding of a process that causes heat loss in fusion devicesEveryone knows that the game of billiards involves balls careening off the sides of a pool table—but few people may know that the same principle applies to fusion reactions. How charged particles like electrons and atomic nuclei that make up plasma interact with the walls of doughnut-shaped devices known as tokamaks helps determine how efficiently fusion reactions occur. Specifically, in a phenome
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tibet sediments reveal climate patterns from late Miocene, 6 million years agoResearchers at the University of Rochester surveyed sediment samples from the northern Tibetan Plateau's Qaidam Basin and constructed paleoclimate cycle records from the late Miocene epoch of Earth's history, which lasted from approximately 11 to 5.3 million years ago. Reconstructing past climate records can help scientists determine both natural patterns and the ways in which future glacial event
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids' hands may be a source of significant nicotine exposureChildren may carry significant levels of nicotine on their hands just by coming into contact with items or surfaces contaminated with tobacco smoke residues, even when no one is actively smoking around them at the time. A study in Tobacco Control also reports the presence of significant nicotine on the hands of children was associated with equally significant levels of the harmful tobacco metaboli
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NeuWrite San Diego

AN update: disease in a dishWhile the phrase “stem cells” used to spark bitter controversy, scientists can now take a harmless skin biopsy from a human patient and transform those (skin) cells into a bunch of stem cells capable of becoming many different types of cells in the body, including brain cells.
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TEDTalks (video)

How racism makes us sick | David R. WilliamsWhy does race matter so profoundly for health? David R. Williams developed a scale to measure the impact of discrimination on well-being, going beyond traditional measures like income and education to reveal how factors like implicit bias, residential segregation and negative stereotypes create and sustain inequality. In this eye-opening talk, Williams presents evidence for how racism is producing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cable giant Comcast offers cellular plans on Verizon networkThe cable giant Comcast will start selling cellphone plans called Xfinity Mobile in the coming months, using a network it's leasing from Verizon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For early humans, cannibalism more than just a meal (Update)When early humans, including our species, ate their own kind it was more likely for ritual purposes than for a nourishing meal, according to an unusual study released Thursday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US educationAs teacher resignation letters increasingly go public - and viral - new research indicates teachers are not leaving solely due to low pay and retirement, but also because of what they see as a broken education system.
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Your Annual Reminder That Jim Nantz Is A Deeply Strange Breed Of Jackass | The Slot What Di Deadspin Your Annual Reminder That Jim Nantz Is A Deeply Strange Breed Of Jackass | The Slot What Did Sebastian Gorka Do in the British Army? | The Grapevine French Montana Gets Dragged for Calling Black Woman ‘Dusty Rusty Ass Hoe’ With Nappy Hair | Fusion The Undocumented Husband of a Trump Supporter Has Been Deported to Mexico |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bangladesh closes one of world's most polluted placesA historic leatherworking quarter in Bangladesh once labelled among the most polluted places on earth was shut Thursday as police enforced a court ruling to protect a vital waterway.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Mucus-Shooting Worm-Snail That Turned Up in the Florida KeysWhile studying an artificial reef made from a sunken ship, researchers found a mollusk that may never have been seen before. It could threaten coral in the Florida Keys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fatty liver diagnosis improved with magnetic resonanceTaking tissue samples from the liver to diagnose fatty liver can be replaced in most cases by a painless magnetic resonance investigation. This is the conclusion of a new study from Linköping University in Sweden, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology. The authors propose that the current value considered to be a normal amount of fat in the liver should be lowered.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Twitter Lite' aims at emerging marketsTwitter on Thursday unveiled a low-data usage version of the social network, which aims to bring in users in emerging markets and areas with slow or expensive mobile networks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Record new renewable power capacity added worldwide at lower costAs the cost of clean technology continues to fall, the world added record levels of renewable energy capacity in 2016, at an investment level 23 per cent lower than the previous year, according to new research published today by UN Environment, the Frankfurt School—UNEP Collaborating Centre and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF).
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Viden

EU's forsyningsselskaber: Ikke mere ny kul fra 2020Energiselskaber fra næsten alle EU-lande lover at følge Paris-aftalens anbefalinger og at stoppe opførelsen af nye kulkraftværker.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Seeking Pig Organs for Human TransplantsResearchers want to employ CRISPR to solve a huge health care problem -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Xi Jinping May Be Less Powerful Than He Seems Once, on a visit to China in August 2015, I heard an odd theory about one of the most powerful men in the world. Xi Jinping, the president of China, would prefer to travel overseas more, but he dreaded doing so, according to the theory. Why? Because he feared deplaning in Beijing and seeing the other six members of the Politburo Standing Committee, China’s top ruling body, lined up to meet him. “
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The Atlantic

The Trump Administration Appears to Embrace Regime Change in Syria Updated at 3:01 p.m. ET During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump was careful to point out that he thought fighting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and the Islamic State at the same time was “madness and idiocy.” “ I think that our far bigger problem than Assad is ISIS, I’ve always felt that,” he told The New York Times in March 2016. “Assad is, you know, I’m not saying Assad is a good man,
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The Atlantic

Scott Pruitt Can Go to Congress Whenever He Wants Whenever Scott Pruitt, the new administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is pressed on his plans to dismantle the agency’s rules and regulations, he falls back on an easy excuse: The statute made me do it. That’s what happened last weekend, when Pruitt went onto Fox News Sunday . Chris Wallace, the show’s longtime host, asked him how he would achieve the public-health benefits of
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The Atlantic

The Swift Fall of Devin Nunes Representative Devin Nunes will no longer lead the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian interference in last year’s election amid allegations that he broke congressional rules by disclosing classified information. The California Republican announced abruptly on Thursday he would step aside from the inquiry while the House Ethics Committees investigates his actions. “The charg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strong early education equals better long-term relationships with parents, research showsChildren who are given high-quality education at an early age - starting at six weeks old and continuing through their first five years of life - are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults, according to new results from a longitudinal study now entering its fifth decade.
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Popular Science

This graphene filter could make it cheaper to drink seawater Science We'll drink to that A new technique may make desalinating water cheaper and easier. Read on:…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered chemical reaction in eye may improve visionA light-sensing pigment found in everything from bacteria to vertebrates can be biochemically manipulated to reset itself, an important therapeutic advantage, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making spines from sea waterSome sea creatures cover themselves with hard shells and spines, while vertebrates build skeletons out of the same minerals. How do these animals get the calcium they need to build these strong mineral structures? Professors Lia Addadi and Steve Weiner of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Structural Biology Department asked this question about sea urchins, which need to extract quite a few calci
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Gizmodo

Trump's Stooge in Congress Bows Out of Russia Probe (for Now) Photo: Getty Much to the delight of Americans who love honesty and competence, Representative Devin Nunes will no longer lead the congressional investigation into Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election. Donald Trump must be bummed, though. Politico reports that the California Republican will “temporarily step away” from the House Intelligence Committee probe. A trio of Republicans—Michae
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Live Science

World War I Unleashed Chemical Weapons and Changed Modern WarfareThe scope of World War I's chemical weaponry was unlike anything seen on battlefields before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thoughtResearch conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists further understanding of a process that causes heat loss in fusion devicesIn the past year, scientists at PPPL have made important advances in understanding secondary electron emission.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Postpartum hospital admissions for women with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesA new study has shown that women with intellectual and developmental disabilities had nearly twice the risk of a hospital or emergency department visit with the first few weeks after giving birth compared to women without these disabilities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer commandeers immature immune cells to aid its successful spreadMore typically, these immature immune cells might help us fight cancer, but scientists have now shown cancer can commandeer the cells to help it spread.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urine test may be able to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children with Down syndromeA study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators raises the possibility of identifying children with Down syndrome who may also have obstructive sleep apnea without the need for expensive and inconvenient sleep studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists link California droughts and floods to distinctive atmospheric wavesThe crippling wintertime droughts that struck California from 2013 to 2015, as well as this year's unusually wet California winter, appear to be associated with the same phenomenon: a distinctive wave pattern that emerges in the upper atmosphere and circles the globe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Will Trump administration seize opportunity to disrupt ailing health-care system?'President Donald Trump has a unique opportunity tofundamentally disrupt a fragmented, expensive, inequitable, and illogical health-care system by making a 'deal' that puts patients first,' states Stephen K. Klasko, M.D., M.B.A., Editor-in-Chief Healthcare Transformation and President and CEO, Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To save honey bees, human behavior must changeIn the search for answers to the complex health problems and colony losses experienced by honey bees in recent years, it may be time for professionals and hobbyists in the beekeeping industry to look in the mirror. In a research essay to be published this week in the Journal of Economic Entomology, one researcher argues that human activity is a key driver in the spread of pathogens afflicting the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When old growth beats old schoolA fifteen-year study in Vermont shows that imitating old-growth forests enhances carbon storage in managed forestland far better than conventional forestry techniques. The new approach holds promise for landowners aiming to profit in carbon markets or contribute to climate change mitigation.
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The Atlantic

Good Riddance to the Filibuster Where were you on June 10, 1964? What were you doing, what were you thinking, what were you talking about? You may not have been born; you may have been very young. I remember June 10, 1964, clearly. I was 14, a Southern white boy teetering on the edge of adolescence, thinking ahead to high school and girls—and dimly realizing that the world as I knew it was about to change forever. On June 10, 1
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NYT > Science

South African Court Ends Ban on Sale of Rhinoceros HornsThe decision was cheered by commercial rhino breeders but condemned by animal preservation groups, which warned that it could increase poaching.
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Gizmodo

Illuminate Your House With Mpow's Solar-Powered Spotlights, No Wiring Required Mpow Solar Light , $16 with code WVOTXL52 | 2-Pack , $30 with code NFBJ9WYL | 4-Pack , $57 with code M5KVSIOU Without any wiring to futz with, Mpow’s solar-powered, motion-sensing spotlights are the easiest way to illuminate your front porch or lawn, and you can get one for $16 today, or buy more to save more. Just be sure to note the promo codes in each case.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Want to Use Color-Changing Rainbow Poop to Diagnose Your Bowel Problems GIF: Caddy Shack, Still: Caddyshack, Orion Pictures The physical appearance of your bowel movements can already reveal a lot about your body’s digestive health , and color changes can even indicate more severe problems. But scientists at Rice University want to make it even easier to spot medical problems in your colon, by tinting your poop a rainbow of different colors. Brilliant! The team of bi
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Ingeniøren

Europæiske lande lover at kvitte investeringer i kulkraft i 2021Som led i Paris-aftalen meddeler den europæiske fællesorganisation for elselskaber Eurelectric, at næsten alle europæiske lande er enige om at undlade at investere i kulkraft efter 2020. Det kan betyde øget eksport for Danmark.
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WIRED

Facebook’s New Plan May Curb Revenge Porn, But Won’t Kill It The only way to eradicate revenge porn is to catch it before it's posted—this is a good first step, though. The post Facebook’s New Plan May Curb Revenge Porn, But Won't Kill It appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Microsoft Reveals Xbox Scorpio's Impressive Specs Microsoft has promised that their next console, Scorpio, will be “the most powerful console ever,” and today the company delivered on that promise, revealing a set of beefy specs that, in terms of raw power, surpass any video game console on the market today. In a PR reveal with Eurogamer ’s Digital Foundry , Microsoft unveiled that Scorpio will include a custom CPU, 12GB of GDDR5 RAM, and, well,
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Scientific American Content: Global

Who Are You Calling Anti-Science?Those who reject vaccines or the climate consensus often embrace other legitimate areas of research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

For cannibals, here’s the caloric content of humans—it’s just meh Enlarge (credit: Getty | Reinhard Dirscherl ) According to archeological evidence, the real Paleo diet included some human flesh now and then. But as Ars has reported before , deciphering exactly why our ancient relatives dined on their fellow hominins is tricky and up for debate—was it for rituals, other social reasons, or just good eats? A new study counting up the calorie content of a Paleolit
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Japanese scientists call for boycott of military research Academics protest over government's 'dual use' research programme — which received a big funding boost. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21779
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than half of the racial college completion gap explained by pre-college factorsIn an analysis of Texas students, more than 60 percent of the racial gap in college completion rates can be attributed to factors that occur before college -- factors that are beyond the control of many colleges and universities, finds a new study led by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US educationAs teacher resignation letters increasingly go public - and viral - new research indicates teachers are not leaving solely due to low pay and retirement, but also because of what they see as a broken education system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are men with a family history of prostate cancer eligible for active surveillance?Active surveillance -- careful monitoring to determine if or when a cancer warrants treatment -- is an increasingly prevalent choice for prostate cancer, but it's unclear if the strategy is appropriate for men with a family history of prostate cancer. A recent analysis of the medical literature concluded that a family history of prostate cancer does not appear to increase a patient's risk of havin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unraveling the mystery of snowflakes, from the Alps to AntarcticaUsing a special multi-angle camera, EPFL researchers have gained important insights into the structure of snowflakes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are your muscles genetically prepared to run a marathon?For a few years, running has been fashionable. But there is a great difference between the physical demands of running a few kilometers and doing a marathon. Now Spanish researchers have concluded that genetics plays an essential role in success when completing this long distance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synthetic biologists engineer inflammation-sensing gut bacteriaSynthetic biologists at Rice University have engineered gut bacteria capable of sensing colitis in mice. The research points the way to new experiments for studying how gut bacteria and human hosts interact at a molecular level and could eventually lead to orally ingestible bacteria for monitoring gut health and disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Private insurers in New York state see surge in claims related to opioid addictionPrivate insurance claims for emergency room visits, substance use treatment and other services related to opioid addiction surged in New York between 2007 and 2014, well before the latest coverage mandates took effect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atmosphere around super-Earth detectedAstronomers have detected an atmosphere around the super-Earth GJ 1132b. This marks the first detection of an atmosphere around a low-mass super-Earth, in terms of radius and mass the most Earth-like planet around which an atmosphere has yet been detected. Thus, this is a significant step on the path towards the detection of life on an exoplanet. The team, which includes researchers from the Max P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Taking it to the SupermaxWhat better way to test supersonic parachutes than strapping one to a rocket? One experiment is going to do just that on Thursday's Maxus-9 suborbital rocket.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Craters suggest impacting body that may have broken into three before it hit MarsAt first glance this scene may seem nothing out of the ordinary, but the large elongated crater marks the imprint of an impacting body that may have broken into three before it hit Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double standards in animal ethics—why is a lab mouse better protected than a cow?The British public are renowned for their love of animals. Historically, the UK has been a hotbed of heated debate about animal cruelty and the use of animals in research. A number of well-established, UK-based organisations such as NAVS and the RSPCA have been highly effective in shining a light on animal cruelty and have garnered public support for better regulation of animal research. For examp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the first blood cells form during human developmentScientists at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new understanding of how the first blood cells form during human development as they transition from endothelial cells to form blood cells of different types.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prehistoric alpine farming in the Bernese OberlandThe people in Switzerland were on the move in the High Alps and running alpine pastures 7,000 years ago and therefore much earlier than previously assumed. A study by the University of Bern that combines archaeological knowledge with findings from palaeoecology comes to this conclusion. Prehistoric finds from the Schnidejoch Pass played a crucial part in this.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The many reasons why less is more for the people choosing modest livesThe idea of a life lived modestly is gaining traction. Ten years ago, Samantha Weinberg, a mother of two young children, spent a year not shopping. Her aim was to reduce her environmental impact. The next year, Mark Boyle, founder of the online Freeconomy community, embarked on a life without money in order to sever his connection with it. Since then, others have joined this "Not Spending" movemen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why jobs in special economic zones won't solve the problems facing the world's refugeesIn a new book, two Oxford professors, Alexander Betts and Paul Collier, are calling on politicians to harness "the remarkable opportunities of globalisation" to reorient the refugee system away from humanitarian assistance and towards development. Focusing primarily on the arrival of large numbers of Syrian refugees in Europe during the course of 2015, they argue that the refugee system has failed
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New on MIT Technology Review

Lightning-Fast AI Chips, Robo-Manta Rays, and the Cost of Cyber Devastation—The Download, April 6, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keys to attracting scientific talent in the health sciencesSocial capabilities (working conditions and other benefits) can be decisive in the return of scientific talent. This is one of the main conclusions of a study carried out by a team of researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Universidad a Distancia de Madrid. This research was published in the journal PLOS ONE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New DNA research shows true migration route of early farming in Europe 8,000 years agoNew DNA research shows true migration route of early farming in Europe 8,000 years ago, correcting previous theories.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making spines from sea waterHow do creatures like sea urchins take up the calcium they need to build hard structures?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wise plant analysisWeizmann Institute's WeizMass and MatchWeiz help identify plant metabolites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Archaeogenetic findings unlock ancestral origins of SardiniansUniversity of Huddersfield researcher Dr. Maria Pala has taken part in a project that has helped to unlock the genetic secrets of her Mediterranean homeland. One of the findings is that some modern Sardinians could have evolved from people who colonized the island at an even earlier period, the Mesolithic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strong early education equals better long-term relationships with parents, research showsVirginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists say children who are given high-quality education at an early age -- starting at six weeks -- are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tumor necrosis factor found to directly regulate blood pressureInvestigators at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research have discovered a surprising new role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF): namely, that it is a major regulator of small blood vessel function, the key determinant of blood pressure. The study is published online today in Nature Communications.
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Gizmodo

New Zealand Could Use Gene Editing to Kill Off Its Cutest Predator Photo: Flickr / Kentish Plumber The stoat—a small, adorable, weasel-like mammal—is the one of the largest ecological threats in New Zealand. It’s a fierce invader with few predators that dines freely on the country’s endangered birds. The stoat did not come to New Zealand via any unfortunate accident. It was brought there on purpose, introduced in the 19th century to control another pest introduc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When peaceful coexistence suddenly turns into competitionBiologists agree that climate change reduces biological diversity. The specific processes that ultimately cause species to go extinct have, however, been little studied so far. Scientists at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Leipzig University have now discovered that as temperatures rise, the complex relationships between species are changing. Prey species not
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How telepresence robots can help kids stay in schoolAs a child growing up in California, Veronica Newhart was absent from school for weeks at a time due to a congenital heart condition. The loneliness and isolation she felt so many years ago are similar to what children with chronic illnesses feel today, but Newhart says it doesn't have to be that way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlling pest fungi in an environmentally friendly wayThe St. Gallen-based Empa biotech spin-off, MycoSolutions AG, has developed a new fungal product that improves the soil and controls pest fungi in an environmentally friendly way. Wooden poles remain in use much longer, leading to cost savings of millions for operators. A "proof of concept" is now available for the integrated wood preservation method.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Buckle up! Climate change to increase severe aircraft turbulenceTurbulence strong enough to catapult unbuckled passengers and crew around the aircraft cabin could become twice or even three times as common because of climate change, according to a new study from the University of Reading published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles pass through mucus membranes in lungs to deliver pulmonary drugs(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from multiple institutions in the U.S. has developed a new way to treat lung disease—using nanoparticles to transport chemicals through the thick mucus membranes that can coat pulmonary airways. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they used particles small enough to move through holes in the mesh that makes up mucus to d
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Gizmodo

These Cheetah Babies Are Trying to Chirp [Updated] Image: Smithsonian’s National Zoo A lot of the stuff you’ll see online right now is pretty depressing, possibly concerning how the world is falling apart or like how we could randomly go to war at any second. But you know what isn’t depressing? This video of cheetah cubs doing their very best to let out some little roars. The cubs live at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Ro
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The Atlantic

Could 'America First' Lead to War? When Presidents Trump and Xi meet at Mar-a-Lago on Thursday, they will bring a common conviction that the fates of their nations—especially on grand issues like war and peace—rest firmly in their hands. Each has vowed to make his respective country great again (what Xi called “the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation”). And each believes that the vision and determination of a strong leader wi
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Futurity.org

Just one black teacher can boost success of black boys Low-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate from high school and consider college, research shows. Further, having at least one black teacher in the third through fifth grades reduces a black student’s probability of dropping out of school by 29 percent. For very low-income black boys, the results are even greater; t
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Ars Technica

Xbox One Project Scorpio specs: 12GB GDDR5, 6 teraflops, native 4K at 60FPS The tech specs for the Microsoft's upcoming Xbox Project Scorpio are here, courtesy of Digital Foundry , and—on paper on least—Microsoft has hit its six teraflops performance goal for the console and then some. If early performance in Forza and testing by the company is anything to go by, Scorpio will play a good chunk of games at a native 4K resolution and at 60FPS. At the heart of Project Scorp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hearing and touch mediate sensations via osseointegrated prosthesesA new study has found that people with a prosthesis attached directly to their skeleton can hear by means of vibrations in their implant. This sound transmission through bones is an important part of osseoperception -- sensory awareness of the patient's surroundings provided by their prosthesis. This discovery sheds new light on the tactile and auditory perception of humans and can be used to deve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overactive bladder drug linked with increased risk of depressionA recent study found that women with overactive bladder who received antimuscarinics were 38 percent more likely to be diagnosed with depressive disorder within the next three years than those who did not receive antimuscarinics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where does your blood actually come from?Scientists at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new understanding of how the first blood cells form during human development as they transition from endothelial cells to form blood cells of different types.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammation: It takes two to tangoSignal molecules called chemokines often work in tandem to recruit specific sets of immune cells to sites of tissue damage. A systematic analysis of their interactions by researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich pinpoints potential targets for new therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thoughtResearch conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists show how cells react to injury from open-heart surgeryCedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigators have learned how cardiac muscle cells react to a certain type of injury that can be caused by open-heart surgery. The findings point to a new potential way to help these hearts recover more completely. The cells, known as cardiomyocytes, can be damaged by the process of stopping and starting the heart during surgeries that use cardiopulmonary bypass machi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Expanding waistlines and metabolic syndrome: Researchers warn of new 'silent killer'For decades, American waistlines have been expanding and there is increasing cause for alarm. Researchers from FAU's Schmidt College of Medicine make the case that metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of three of more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, abnormal lipids, and insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes -- is the new 'silent killer,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive decline after surgery tied to brain's own immune cellsAfter undergoing surgery, elderly patients often experience cloudy thinking that can last for weeks or even months. At one time researchers thought this cognitive decline might be caused by anesthesia, but mounting evidence suggests that heightened inflammation in the brain following surgery is the more likely cause.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UN-backed report: Record new renewable power capacity added worldwide at lower costAs clean technology costs continue to fall, the world added record levels of renewable energy capacity in 2016, at an investment level 23 percent lower than 2015, new UN-backed research shows.Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2017 finds that wind, solar and other renewables added 138GW to global power capacity in 2016, up 8 percent from 2015. The added capacity roughly equals that of th
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cognitive science

Screening Status Quo Misses Most Children with Autism. Vast majority go undiagnosed until after age 3, new research shows. submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Ny klausul kan gøre op med direkte krav i byggeriet Entreprenører Projektering Rådgivere
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Science-Based Medicine

Ignorance is Strength?Findings from a recent consultation suggest that consumers don't want health claims to be supported by evidence. Do consumers really prefer ignorance over evidence? Or is this the product of a industry campaign to derail new, science-based regulations?
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Gizmodo

A Wild New Rumor About the Identity of Sylvester Stallone's Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Character There’s more rumors about Benicio Del Toro’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi character. Chris Evans discusses his future as Captain America. The Walking Dead might do its own version of the time skip from the comics. Plus, new Doctor Who pictures, and a chance to hail Agents of SHIELD ’s Madame Hydra. Spoilers now! Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Load up your cosmic spacesalt shakers, because an Italian
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WIRED

The Lovely British Scenery Where the Plague and Anthrax Once Rained The landscape looks perfectly ordinary, but it holds a sinister secret. The post The Lovely British Scenery Where the Plague and Anthrax Once Rained appeared first on WIRED .
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BBC News - Science & Environment

UN report: Clean power is up, costs are downUN celebrates fall in renewables costs but warns that investment is slipping.
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Ars Technica

America takes on Japan in terrifying giant mech battle this August The battle to end all bot battles is coming this August. In 2015, a team of American engineers created the MegaBots Mk. II , a 15ft tall, 5,400kg, paintball cannon-armed mech of nightmarish proportions. Which is impressive and all, but the question was: why? The answer came in the form of a fight-to-the-death challenge issued to Japanese company Suidobashi Heavy Industries, which had built its ow
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Ancient Cannibals Didn’t Eat Just for the Calories, Study SuggestsAn archaeologist’s fascination with the nutritional value of humans aims to understand the complexities of early relatives of our species.
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Science | The Guardian

Prehistoric cannibalism not just driven by hunger, study reveals Humans are less nutritious than other forms of meat, findings show, indicating complex social motivations may be behind our ancestors’ cannibalism Cannibalism among prehistoric humans was more likely to have been driven by social reasons than the need for a hearty meal, research suggests. Evidence of cannibalism, in the form of cut marks, tooth marks and tell-tale bone breakage has been found at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Spotting orbital debris from the groundOn 30 March, NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson ventured outside the International Space Station on a seven-hour spacewalk. The duo's work included installing four thermal shields on the US Tranquility module, protecting a docking port.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsplatform kan betyde milliontab for hospitalerneLægerne bruger så meget tid på Sundhedsplatformen, at de ikke kan nå at behandle det antal patienter, der er aftalt med regeringen. Det kan betyde mistede indtægter på til 430 mio. kr. i 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solving medical 'cold cases' through geneticsResearchers have identified the genetic mutation responsible for one patient's serious health problems, finally solving a medical mystery that has endured for over 30 years. Thanks to this discovery, the researcher developed a therapy that could also help a lot of people who have problems related to the immune system, whether they are genetic or due to a transplant or an illness.
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Gizmodo

Ancient Humans Didn't Turn to Cannibalism For the Calories Illustration: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo Humans have been eating other humans since the beginning of time, but the motivations behind this macabre practice are complex and often unclear. Some anthropologists say prehistoric cannibals were just trying to grab a nutritious snack, but new research shows that human flesh—as tasty as it is—doesn’t pack the same caloric punch as wild animals. In other words, ca
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Futurity.org

How AI algorithms could help design new drugs A new kind of AI algorithm—designed to work with a small amount of data—may be able to assist in the early stages of drug development. Artificially intelligent algorithms can learn to identify amazingly subtle information, enabling them to distinguish between people in photos or to screen medical images as well as a doctor. But in most cases their ability to perform such feats relies on training
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Workplace diversity will soon include artificial intelligenceA tsunami of change is already arriving. Artificial intelligence is now capable of doing desk jobs that were previously safe from automation. The social and economic effects remain to be seen, but is AI what we think it is?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows success in workplace wellbeing trainingAn international review of evidence on workplace learning shows workplace training specifically designed to improve wellbeing is effective. Regardless of what kind of training is used, the research reveals the majority of techniques had a positive impact: from mindfulness to problem solving, life skills to happiness.
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Gizmodo

In This Scifi Short, an Astronaut Is Almost Completely Prepared for His Historic Moment In Tom Webb’s Hyper Jump , an astronaut prepares for a historic jump into hyperspace with cool, laser-like precision—until he realizes that the entire world will be tuning in hear his pre-flight speech. Panic, self-doubt, half-remembered movie quotes, and Schwarzenegger imitations soon follow. [ Film Shortage ]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better understanding of nanomaterialsIn the past six years, the National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64) intensively studied the development, use, behaviour and degradation of engineered nanomaterials, including their impact on humans and on the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensing technology identifies trees affected by deadly larch diseaseResearchers from the University of Leicester have used remote sensing technology by Leicestershire-based aerial mapping company Bluesky in order to identify trees affected by a destructive disease.
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The Scientist RSS

CDC Recommends Brain Imaging for Zika-Affected BabiesInfants born to mothers who were infected with the virus during pregnancy—including babies who do not show signs of microcephaly—may experience other birth defects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JNeurosci highlights from the April 5 issueCheck out this newsworthy study from the April 5, 2017, issue of JNeurosci. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the study should contact media@sfn.org.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Great Barrier Reef's safety net is becoming more complex but less effectiveThe Great Barrier Reef is under serious threat, as the coral-bleaching crisis continues to unfold. These problems are caused by global climate change, but our ability to react to them – or prevent more harm – is clouded by a tangled web of bureaucracy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach may accelerate design of high-power batteriesResearch led by a Stanford scientist promises to increase the performance of high-power electrical storage devices, such as car batteries.
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Gizmodo

RTIC's 64 oz. Vacuum-Insulated Bottle Is Down to a New Low Price RTIC 64 oz. Bottle , $17 Sometimes, a normal water bottle just isn’t enough. This vacuum-insulated vessel from RTIC holds 64 ounces of your favorite fluid , be it water, coffee, or beer, and keeps it cold for up to 24 hours, or hot for six. I own RTIC can koozies and a tumbler, and their temperature regulation is nothing short of magical, so the bigger the better, as far as I’m concerned. $17 is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can a four-year-old be sexist?The Victorian government has announced it plans to teach its Respectful Relationship program to preschoolers as a way to target and prevent sexist behaviour among children aged three and four years old.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paywall browser extension lets users read some paywalled papers for free(Phys.org)—A group calling itself Impactstory, a nonprofit team whose mission is to make science more accessible to everyone, has released a free Chrome/Firefox extension called Unpaywall that allows users to access some research papers that lie behind a paywall without having to pay to access the paywall site. The official release date was April 4, but users have been able to download and use it
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Futurity.org

Fixing lousy sleep could keep us healthy longer The unmet sleep needs of the elderly elevate their risk of memory loss and a wide range of mental and physical disorders, say researchers. As we age, bouts of wakefulness, trips to the bathroom, and other nuisances plague our nights as we lose the ability to generate restorative deep sleep we once enjoyed. Does this mean older people need less sleep? Not according to the new article in Neuron . D
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The rapidly populating coastal region from the Gulf to Pakistan faces a huge tsunami riskThat tsunamis can cause death and devastation has become painfully clear over the past two decades. On Boxing Day, 2004, a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Sumatra caused waves several metres high to devastate the Indian Ocean – killing more than 230,000 people in 14 countries. In 2011, another magnitude 9 earthquake, this time off Japan, produced waves up to 20 metres in height, flooding t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Driverless cars might be safer but they'll still keep the courts busyIf driverless cars live up to the safety hype, they could result in a significant reduction in the number of court cases dealing with human-related traffic offences.
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The Atlantic

Our Planet's Eye in the Sky Finally Closes Earth Observing-1 wasn’t supposed to survive as long as it did. Operating on a shoestring budget, the spartan satellite outlasted its warranty 15-fold, and changed the way we do space-based imaging of our planet. The satellite trained its observant lens on the ashes of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It captured the flood that followed in Hurricane Katrina’s wake. It took stock of the devastating tsu
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Fighting FilovirusesResearches develop a human monoclonal antibody against two filoviruses, Marburg and Ravn, which, like Ebola, can cause hemorrhagic fever.
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Viden

Dansk forskning afslører biologiens "mørke stof"Forskere kigger på hvorfor visse planter mangler i vores natur. En forklaring kan være, at de svampe, de samarbejder med, mangler.
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WIRED

Cities Crave Hyperloop Because It’s Shiny—and Talk Is Cheap The scope and intractability of America's infrastructure problem makes the siren song of the hyperloop extra alluring. The post Cities Crave Hyperloop Because It’s Shiny—and Talk Is Cheap appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Total-Takeover iPhone Spyware Lurks on Android, Too A version of the nation-state favorite Pegasus software researchers found on iOS officially hit Android as well. The post Total-Takeover iPhone Spyware Lurks on Android, Too appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

The MASSive Mass Effect: Andromeda writing contest Enlarge / "I'm sure you can think of something to write about," Ryder said, patting Vetra's forearm. The five-year wait for a new Mass Effect title has ended, and Andromeda is here. We've put our thoughts about the game into a preliminary review , and we'll have more to say in a week or two after we're done fully exploring the game and mentally digesting the stories it has to tell. But as part of
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Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansens tale på Danske Regioners Generalforsamling den 6. april 2017Det talte ord gælder
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Dagens Medicin

Statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussens tale på Danske Regioners Generalforsamling den 6. april 2017Det talte ord gælder
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory JournalMy “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.
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Futurity.org

Can a daily cup of tea shield us from dementia? Drinking tea reduces the risk of cognitive impairment by 50 percent—and as much as 86 percent for older adults who have a genetic risk of Alzheimer’s disease—a study of 957 Chinese seniors 55 and older shows. “While the study was conducted on Chinese elderly, the results could apply to other races as well. Our findings have important implications for dementia prevention. Despite high quality drug
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The Atlantic

The Race to Safeguard the Arctic's Natural Heritage The Arctic Ocean may look inhospitable, but it teems with life along its coasts and within the unexpected, ice-free oases brimming with seabirds gorging on plankton and krill. Despite the anchor these places provide for many of the planet’s birds, whales and marine mammals, almost none have a spot on the World Heritage list, a jaw-dropping catalogue of wonders maintained by the United Nations Edu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How computers are searching for drugs of the futureDrug discovery may bring to mind images of white lab coats and pipettes, but when Henry Lin, PhD, recently set out to find a better opioid with fewer side effects, his first step was to fire up the computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skyrmions created with a special spiralLike baristas creating beautiful spirals of creamy foam on the warm surfaces of lattes, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces in magnetically ordered materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Climate of chronic insecurity' created by welfare changesOngoing changes to the welfare system have resulted in "a climate of chronic insecurity," according to University of Liverpool research that followed three groups of claimants over a five year period.
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Dagens Medicin

Statsministeren: Vi vil stadig kræve effektivi­seringer i regionerne Der var atter engang stor forbrødring mellem statsministeren og regionsformanden på regionernes generalforsamling. Men Lars Løkke Rasmussen står fast på sit krav om effektiviseringer i regionerne.
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Dagens Medicin

Hvem står for årets fornyelse i sundhedssektoren?Dagens Medicin efterlyser kandidater til at modtage Den Gyldne Skalpel – sundhedsvæsenets initiativpris. Frist: Tirsdag 20. juni 2017 kl. 12.00
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Gizmodo

Facebook's Head of AI Says Not to Worry Because Society 'Prevents Evil From Having Infinite Power' GIF of a robot that is frustrated with his lack of infinite power in the 1991 documentary Terminator 2: Judgment Day Yesterday, Facebook’s head of artificial intelligence, Yann LeCun, said that humans have nothing to fear regarding artificial intelligence potentially harming humanity. Why’s that? “We have a lot of checks and balances built into society to prevent evil from having infinite power,”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synthetic biologists engineer inflammation-sensing gut bacteriaSynthetic biologists at Rice University have engineered gut bacteria capable of sensing colitis, an inflammation of the colon, in mice. The research points the way to new experiments for studying how gut bacteria and human hosts interact at a molecular level and could eventually lead to orally ingestible bacteria for monitoring gut health and disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bees and environmental stressors—canaries in the coal mineBee populations are declining worldwide, raising concerns of a "pollination crisis." Scientists have identified links to many human-induced environmental stressors, including pesticides, pollutants, parasites, diseases, and malnutrition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Buckle up! Climate change to increase severe aircraft turbulenceTurbulence strong enough to catapult unbuckled passengers and crew around the aircraft cabin could become twice or even three times as common because of climate change, according to a new study from the University of Reading published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences.
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Popular Science

Climate change could make severe turbulence even worse Environment Fasten your seatbelt Climate change will increase the most dangerous type of airplane turbulence. Read on.
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The Atlantic

Father John Misty's Pointlessness Blues Josh Tillman is the kind of musician who talks and talks—in on-stage tirades about the liberal listener’s complicity in Donald Trump’s rise, in LSD-touched interviews about why he left Fleet Foxes to be a solo singer, and on his apocalyptic new Father John Misty album, Pure Comedy , whose lyrics work just fine when read in essay format. It might, then, sound a little harsh to finger the best song
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Ingeniøren

Efter forlig: Metroselskab risikerer stadig krav på to mia. kr.Forliget mellem entreprenøren CMT og Metroselskabet betyder, at CMT får 850 mio. kr. og accepterer, at øvrige krav højst kan løbe op i to mia. kr.
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Live Science

How Christianity Shaped World War IWritings at the time of WWI aimed to construct a religiously diverse and conflicted America into a virtuous, Christian nation. This narrative continued in the cemeteries for the war heroes.
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WIRED

Lightform: The Magical Little Device That Transforms Whole Rooms Into Screens A new computer from Microsoft and Disney alums aims to make projected augmented reality simple to use. The post Lightform: The Magical Little Device That Transforms Whole Rooms Into Screens appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Our 15 Favorite Wireless Headphones, From Bose to Beats Looking to buy some wireless headphones? These ones will make you forget all about the headphone jack. The post Our 15 Favorite Wireless Headphones, From Bose to Beats appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Hidden, Wildly NSFW Scandal of the Hugo Nominations The ballot-box stuffing of the speculative fiction awards continues, as evinced by a self-published erotica author with a curious pen name. The post The Hidden, Wildly NSFW Scandal of the Hugo Nominations appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years ago, contraception options focused on womenWomen have more birth control choices than they did 50 years ago. The same can’t be said for men.
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Science | The Guardian

Secret footage obtained of the wild elephants sold into captivity in Chinese zoos Animal welfare advocates have filmed some of the wild elephants captured in Zimbabwe last year and shipped to China Last year more than 30 young elephants were captured from the wild in Zimbabwe and flown by plane to China. The elephants – some reported to be as young as three – were dispersed to a number of zoos throughout the country, including the Shanghai Exhibition Park, the Beijing Wildlife
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Dagens Medicin

Danske Regioner sætter ny kurs for det samlede sundhedsvæsen Fokus skal flyttes fra hospitalerne til det samlede sundhedsvæsen. Det er hovedpointen i nyt udspil fra Danske Regioner, der vil sikre sammenhæng mellem sundhedsvæsenets tre sektorer.
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Ars Technica

Revenge of the Nerds: The all-new 2018 Audi S4 and S5 Enlarge (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) We usually cover our own travel costs, but in this case, that was not an option; flights and two nights' accommodation on this trip to Palm Springs were paid for by Audi. A little over a year ago, we traveled to California to sample the new Audi A4 . The car's combination of excellent semi-autonomous driving tech and that Virtual Cockpit really appealed to our in
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Live Science

Elaborate Mosaics Unearthed in 'Lost' Roman CityHidden for centuries, richly colored mosaic floors from the lost Roman city of Ucetia have been uncovered in France.
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Live Science

Photos: Lost Roman Mosaics of Southern FranceArchaeologists have undertaken a large-scale excavation in Uzès, a city in southern France. They found mosaic floors dating back to Roman times, when the city was called Ucetia.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dissent with Modification: Soothing Evolution–Religion Tensions in the ClassroomA discussion lasting as little as 10 minutes proved effective at reducing students’ perception that faith conflicts with a foundational biological theory -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 6, 2017 —The U.S. military struck a Syrian airfield near Homs, the opening salvo in the Trump administration’s response to this week’s chemical-weapons attack by the Assad regime. More here —Republicans changed the rules of the Senate on judicial nominations, invoking the so-called “nuclear option” to lower the threshold for such votes from a supermajority of 60 to a simple majority of 51. More here —We’
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Live Science

Killer Chemistry: The Chemical Weapons of World War I (Photos)After World War I showed the horrific effects of chemical weapons, world leaders mobilized to contain these new weapons of mass destruction.
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Live Science

Ancient Jerusalem Comes Alive in New Virtual-Reality AppYou can now see Jerusalem as it looked in ancient history, with a virtual-reality app based on archaeological reconstructions of the city at the height of its splendor under Roman rule in the first century.
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Live Science

In Photos: Experience Ancient Jerusalem's Splendor with Virtual-Reality AppA new app for smartphones and portable virtual-reality headsets, called Lithodomos VR, offers a view of the Western Wall and other historic sites in Jerusalem as they looked at the height of the city's splendor in the first century A.D.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify cause of the 'sea fangle' phenomenonScientists say that the phenomenon of sea fans washing up on the coastline of the South West will continue unless more is done to prevent commercial and domestic plastic pollution from entering into the marine environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experiments validate models predicting failure modes in miniaturized lightweight structuresLawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have adapted theoretical models to predict the failure behavior of miniaturized 3-D lattice structures and have used advanced characterization techniques to demonstrate that these failures exist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black students who have at least one black teacher are more likely to graduateLow-income black students who have at least one black teacher in elementary school are significantly more likely to graduate from high school and consider attending college, according to a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University economist.
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Ingeniøren

Så lukkede tyskerne og svenskerne igen for el-forbindelsen - og gav jyderne gratis strømVestdanmark blev onsdag en elektrisk ø, stort set afskåret fra resten af verden. Blæsevejret gav derfor jyderne gratis strøm, mens elproducenterne ærgrer sig.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The race to fly passengers into spaceAmazon's founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is investing $1bn (£801m) a year to fund his Blue Origin company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experiments test how easy life itself might beOn a lab benchtop, a handful of glass vials taped to a rocker gently sway back and forth. Inside the vials, a mixture of organic chemicals and tiny particles of fool's gold are begging a question seemingly beyond their humble appearance: Where did life come from?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More large, high-intensity forest fires likely in coming yearsWhen it comes to large, high-intensity forest fires, we can expect to see a lot more in the coming years, according to South Dakota State University professor Mark Cochrane, a senior scientist at the Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence.
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The Atlantic

When Baseball Players Were Vaudeville Stars In the days before television and radio, two forces in entertainment dominated much of America’s free time: baseball and vaudeville. But the late 19th and early 20th century pastimes were nowhere near as lucrative and glamorous as their modern-day equivalents: Both athletes and vaudevillians endured long hours, grueling travel, poor accommodations, and often didn’t have much money to show for it
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Ars Technica

Polar updates algorithms to make heart rate sensor better in new M430 running watch Enlarge (credit: Polar) It has been nearly three years since Polar first released the M400 running watch, and now the company is updating it. Polar announced the $229 M430 today, a new version of the previous runner's watch with slight improvements to the device's design and software that may be unnoticeable at first but should make a big difference during workouts. The general design of the M430
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When peaceful coexistence suddenly turns into competitionBiologists agree that climate change reduces biological diversity. The specific processes that ultimately cause species to go extinct have, however, been little studied so far. Scientists at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Leipzig University have now discovered that when temperatures rise, the complex relationships between species are changing. Prey species n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GERDA experiment ready to discover rarest radioactive decayWhy is there more matter than antimatter in the universe? The reason might be hidden in the neutrino nature: one of the preferred theoretical models assumes, that these elementary particles were identical with their own anti-particles. This in turn would lead to an extremely rare nuclear decay process, the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ). The experiment GERDA now has reached a most important
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An injectable guidance system for nerve cellsIn many tissues of the human body, including nerve tissue, the spatial organization of cells plays an important role. Nerve cells and their long protrusions assemble into nerve tracts and transport information throughout the body. When nerve tissue is injured, an accurate spatial orientation of the cells facilitates the healing process. Scientists from the DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive M
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smallest Dutch supercomputerA team of Dutch scientists has built a supercomputer the size of four pizza boxes. The Little Green Machine II has the computing power of 10,000 PCs and will be used by researchers in oceanography, computer science, artificial intelligence, financial modeling and astronomy. The computer is based at Leiden University (the Netherlands) and developed with help from IBM.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

OCTOCAM imager looks toward a new era of astronomical discoveryGemini Observatory announces the development of a major new facility-class broadband optical and near-infrared imager and spectrograph named OCTOCAM.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists show how species diversity can pay dividendsFor decades, conservationists have focused on the possible costs of extinction: the effects on a lost species' predators, prey and environment, or the effects on people who can no longer use the species for food or clothing. In many cases, these costs are seen as ambiguous.
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New Scientist - News

Earbud lets you control your phone with a wink or smileAn earbud kitted out with electrodes can detect facial expressions and use them to control your smartphone, so you don’t even need to take it out of your pocket
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The Atlantic

Colossal Is the Weirdest Monster Movie of the Year Monster movies have always been about their grand, overarching metaphors. Godzilla captured the horrors of the emerging nuclear age. Dozens of films, from Frankenstein to Jurassic Park , are Promethean cautionary tales, warning against scientists who play god. King Kong has been a stand-in for all kinds of unknown enemies (he was most recently turned into an allegory for the Vietnam War ). Nacho
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Ingeniøren

Google finder wifi-sikkerhedshul på både Android og iOS - Apple har løst problemet Wifi-chips i mange udbredte smartphones er fyldt med sårbarheder, som gør det muligt at angribe en telefon, så længe man er indenfor samme wifi-netværk. Apple har dog i denne uge udsendt en opdatering, der løser problemet på firmaets enheder. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/stort-sikkerhedshul-wi-fi-chips-baade-android-ios-enheder-1075340 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Sådan skriver du et CV på én side Hvordan gør man en omfattende karriere overskuelig på et CV? Prøv at begrænse resuméet til én side, lyder rådet fra eksperter hos Novorésumé. Se hvordan, de har sammenfattet Teslas Elon Musks karriere på én enkelt side. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/se-hvordan-du-skriver-cv-paa-side-4522 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

Supercomputere for 4 mia. kr skal give besparelser på hospitalerne Regionerne har foreslået et investeringsprogram til det danske sundhedsvæsen, der afsætter fire mia. kr. over en årrække til supercomputere. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/supercomputere-paa-danske-hospitaler-skal-sikre-bedre-diagnoser-1075342 Version2
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Gizmodo

Australia Sues Apple For Bricking iPhones Repaired by Third Parties Everyone holds up their phones to take photos at London Fashion Week February 2017 (Photo by Jeff Spicer/Getty Images) Apple forbids consumers from taking their iPhones to third parties for repair, and sometimes even bricks phones as punishment. But Australia has said that’s not cool and is suing the tech behemoth. Or, to put it in Australian, “yeah nah mate, garn git fucked.” Australia’s consume
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical sensor on the basis of materials possessing molecular memory createdScientists from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed a polymer-based electrochemical sensor with molecular imprinting aimed at detection of saccharides and hydroxy acids. The enzyme-free sensor allows measurement of glucose and lactic acid concentration. They have presented the results in Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists unravel effect of ENSO and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on the East Asian winter monsoonPast studies have indicated that the Atlantic Ocean acts as a pacemaker for the Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) mean state and variability. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) could modulate the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) by changing the Walker circulation, wave trains, storm track and surface winds. Both the ENSO and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists determine the time of extinction of ancient porcupinesA team of specialists that included scientists from Siberia, the Urals, and the University of Arizona conducted radiocarbon dating of the teeth and bones of ancient porcupines found in the caves of Gorny Altai and the Urals. They established that these thermophilic animals lived in these territories 30,000 to 40,000 years ago and died out with the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Performance of the RegCM4 regional climate model over ChinaThe RegCM series of climate models are widely used throughout the world and in China. Applications include paleo and present-day climate simulation, mechanistic analyses, studies of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols, and climate change projections. The model is currently developed and maintained at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics; the latest version is RegCM4. Recentl
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Ingeniøren

Daimler skrotter næsten hele sin hydrogen-satsningHeller ikke Volvo-chefen tror længere på brændselscellebiler.
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