EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can barnacle geese predict the climate?The breeding grounds of Arctic migratory birds such as the barnacle goose are changing rapidly due to accelerated warming in the polar regions. They won't be able to keep up with this climate change unless they can somehow anticipate it. A research team from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) employed computer models to assess the future of the geese and their young. Results are bein
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Ars Technica

Fate of the Furious camcording suspects face trial, year in jail Floyd Lee Buchanan (left), and Troy Montgomery Cornish. The pair was arrested Friday in Maryland while allegedly camcording Fate of the Furious. (credit: Anne Arundel County Police Department) A June 15 trial date has been set for two Maryland men arrested on suspicion of camcording the new action flick Fate of the Furious, a court clerk said Tuesday. The men, Troy Montgomery Cornish, 38, and Flo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alerting stem cells to hurry up and healAccelerated healing isn't just for superheroes. A new study suggests a way that mere mortals can potentially speed their recovery from a wide variety of injuries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How campuses can measure their nitrogen footprintsA new groundbreaking initiative helps researchers to measure and reduce the nitrogen footprint left behind by campus activities like food waste and energy consumption. The publication outlines research aiming to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen and prevent negative impacts on such things as water quality, air pollution, and climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers unlock an immunity 'black box'Mapping the biological machinery of the inflammatory skin disease neutrophilic dermatosis offers multiple targets for treating inflammatory disorders.
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Gizmodo

Apple's Microsoft Office Killer Is Free Again (If You Dare) Image: Gizmodo We’ve been talking a lot lately about the perks and perils of Microsoft Office, especially the program you begrudgingly used to write your college papers: Word. In what appears to be an unrelated move, Apple just made a whole host of productivity apps free. Get excited for Pages! (Borat voice: “Not!”) But seriously, this is not bad news. Apple’s word processor (Pages), spreadsheet
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New on MIT Technology Review

Central Bankers Have Their Eyes on BlockchainA member of the Federal Reserve and a researcher say there are a lot of problems to solve before digital currency will ever disrupt the global financial system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fainting episodes may increase risk of workplace accidents, job lossPeople who experience fainting spells have a higher risk of workplace accidents and job loss, compared to adults who do not have fainting episodes. In a Danish study, one in three employed people with syncope were no longer in the workforce within two years of having a first-time fainting spell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the stationNew research examines the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station -- and is not coming back.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteriophages, natural drugs to combat superbugsViruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment.
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The Atlantic

How Did the Trump Administration Lose an Aircraft Carrier? A certain amount of unpredictability is a virtue in foreign policy. When one’s adversaries—and perhaps one’s allies—don’t know precisely what a country will do, it gives that country a little extra power in the relationship. Like all virtues, it turns into a vice when used in excess. Donald Trump, Fred Kaplan recently argued , offers an extreme test of Richard Nixon’s “madman theory,” the Vietnam
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Big Think

Is Crime Forensics Flawed? Forget everything you think you learned on your favorite crime scene drama. Read More
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Popular Science

Facebook’s new Camera Effects Platform wants to augment your entire reality Technology See the world through Facebook's eyes. Facebook wants to be a part of your reality, whether its virtual or augmented.
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Inside Science

Watching Earth's Water Through the Eyes of Gravity Watching Earth's Water Through the Eyes of Gravity NASA prepares to replace the twin satellites, named GRACE, that have monitored Earth's droughts, glacial retreats and sea level rise for the last 15 years. GRACE_artist_concept.jpg Artist's concept of the GRACE satellites Image credits: NASA Physics Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 14:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Last month, scientists
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Both low and high birth weight linked to fatty liver disease in childrenBoth high and low birth weights show increased risk for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vanderbilt research unlocks molecular key to animal evolution and diseaseThe dawn of the Animal Kingdom began with a collagen scaffold that enabled the organization of cells into tissues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New test identifies patients with diabetes who are at high risk of kidney failureTwo biomarkers -- urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated glomerular filtration rate -- are used to identify those at higher risk of kidney failure. But many say those criteria miss a large proportion of patients who are at high risk of the disease and fail to predict accurately time of onset of ESRD. Joslin Diabetes Center has developed a prognostic tool that accurately predicts t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ex Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer offers facts on governmentFormer Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has created a new organization to analyze government spending and revenue to make it easier to understand.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Blockchain’s Weak Spots Pose a Hidden Danger to UsersAn expert who is studying Bitcoin and blockchain technologies says those looking to commercialize them need to be aware of potentially dangerous technical issues.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook Is Just What Augmented Reality NeedsBy rolling out an AR platform that lets developers create effects for its camera, Facebook may finally make the technology popular.
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WIRED

Here’s Everything Facebook Announced at F8, From VR to Bots Augmented reality, Messenger upgrades, and more. The post Here's Everything Facebook Announced at F8, From VR to Bots appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UNH helps lead the way for campuses to measure their nitrogen footprintsSustainability leadership efforts at the University of New Hampshire have contributed to a groundbreaking initiative to measure and reduce the nitrogen footprint left behind by campus activities like food waste and energy consumption. The new research is highlighted in the April 2017 special issue of Sustainability: The Journal of Record. The publication outlines research being done at UNH, and se
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Gizmodo

Las Vegas Is Installing Drug Needle Vending Machines A Trac-B Exchange clean needle vending machine. Image: Trac-B Needle exchange programs are generally considered a huge success. In New York state, the programs have been credited with virtually eradicating the transmission of AIDS through contaminated needles. Now, in an effort to further crack down on disease transmission via shared needles, Las Vegas has become the first city in the U.S. to ins
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Live Science

What Has 1,800 Teeth and a Suction Cup? A New Clingfish SpeciesA duck-faced fish with 1,800 teeth has been discovered in a museum jar from the 1970s.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: This Is a Giant Shipworm. You May Wish It Had Stayed In Its Tube.It’s actually a clam, it lives on sulfur and researchers have studied a living specimen for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH helps lead the way for campuses to measure their nitrogen footprintsSustainability leadership efforts at the University of New Hampshire have contributed to a groundbreaking initiative to measure and reduce the nitrogen footprint left behind by campus activities like food waste and energy consumption. The new research is highlighted in the April 2017 special issue of Sustainability: The Journal of Record. The publication outlines research being done at UNH, and se
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alerting stem cells to hurry up and healAccelerated healing isn't just for superheroes. A new study in Cell Reports suggests a way that mere mortals can potentially speed their recovery from a wide variety of injuries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabis-based medicine may cut seizures in half for those with tough-to-treat epilepsyTaking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information released today from a large scale controlled clinical study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22-28, 2017. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fainting episodes may increase risk of workplace accidents, job lossPeople who experience fainting spells have a higher risk of workplace accidents and job loss, compared to adults who do not have fainting episodes.In a Danish study, one in three employed people with syncope were no longer in the workforce within two years of having a first-time fainting spell.
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Live Science

Google Earth Virtual Reality Will Take You to Any Address in the WorldA new Google Earth Virtual Reality (VR) feature allows users to enter any address — whether it's grandma's house or a 19th-century castle in Germany — and fly over it in 3D with a VR headset.
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Popular Science

Pushing the limits of assistive technology during the Boston Marathon Technology What an ambitious test tells us about the state of remote guidance for the visually impaired Erich Manser finished his eighth Boston Marathon on Monday, but this race was different: It was his first time completing the course with a system called Aira. Read…
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Gizmodo

This Giant RC Truck Is the Barbie Jeep's $5,000 Off-Roading Cousin As everyone from Texas already knows, bigger is always better, be it a giant steak or a remote control pickup truck that’s six and a half-feet long, making it roughly a third the size of the real thing. At $5,250, the Mammuth Works’ Rewarron doesn’t come cheap, but you can thrash it around a track without ever having to worry about your insurance rates going up. Weighing in at 375 pounds, the Rew
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Florida tests bacteria-infected mosquitoes to kill off bugsThousands of bacteria-infected mosquitoes were released in the wild Tuesday near Key West, testing a new way to kill mosquitoes that carry Zika and other viruses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteriophages, natural drugs to combat superbugsViruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center have determined that phages can effectively reduce bacterial levels and improve the health of mice that are infected with
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Ars Technica

iWork and iLife apps are now free for old and new Mac and iOS users Mac and iOS users with old hardware can now get some of Apple's fundamental software for free. According to a report from MacRumors , the iWork and iLife suite of apps, including iMovie, Numbers, Keynote, Pages, and GarageBand for Mac and iOS, are now listed as free in the App Store. Previously, users with old hardware had to pay for each app. Individual programs cost between $5 and $20 each, whi
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The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: ‘Jersey Rain’ by Robert Pinsky In an online conference with The Atlantic in 1995, the former poet laureate Robert Pinsky meditated on the idea of physical, imagined, and remembered places: Many of our most energetic and vivid “here”s—one might almost say our most physically vivid “here”s—are in the imagination. Even while making love or playing a sport or eating, most of us are also “here” in our imagination, here in a series
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The Atlantic

Why America Cares About Chemical Weapons On April 6, Donald Trump initiated his first war, by launching dozens of cruise missiles against the Syrian regime, following its use of chemical weapons. U.S. officials have offered a variety of motives for the use of force—but many of them aren’t compelling. First of all, there’s the need to defend American credibility when opponents cross a red line. This may help to explain why the United Sta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adjusting solar panel angles a few times a year makes them more efficientWith Earth Day approaching, new research from Binghamton University-State of New York could help US residents save more energy, regardless of location, if they adjust the angles of solar panels four to five times a year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify tactic Dengue virus uses to delay triggering immune responseMount Sinai researchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteriophages, natural drugs to combat superbugsViruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easyUsing pressure instead of chemicals, nanoparticles have been fabricated into nanowire arrays similar to those that underlie touch-screens for phones, computers, TVs, and sensors. The pressure process takes nanoseconds instead of the hours required by industry's current chemical means, say investigators.
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Gizmodo

What Happens Next With North Korea People watch a live television program showing North Korea’s missiles with letters reading “Pukguksong” during a parade in Pyongyang, North Korea, at the Seoul train station in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, April 15, 2017. AP Photo North Korea had the world on edge last week when it paraded new and improved weapons through Pyongyang right as a new nuclear test was expected, leading to talk of a p
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Gizmodo

Bundle and Save On Your Favorite Charging Gear With $20 Off Anker's PowerPack Anker PowerPack , $60 with code KINJA283 Anker’s PowerPack bundles some of your favorite USB battery packs, charging hubs, and power cables into a single, affordable package, and you can save an extra $20 today with promo code KINJA283. $60 gets you a PowerPort 4 wall charger ( currently $26 ), a PowerCore+ 10000 battery pack ( currently $30 ), a PowerLine+ microUSB cable ( currently $10 ), a Pow
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Popular Science

Running might be kind of contagious Health Are you working out today because your friend went jogging yesterday? A new study out this week suggests that the act of running might be contagious among groups and between pairs of friends. Read on.
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NeuWrite West

Have you ever tasted pain? Think about the last time you ate something spicy, whether it be Hot Cheetos, a jalapeño, or sriracha. Did your nose flush? Did you sweat? Cry? And what did it feel like? Like you were breathing fire or like you were getting your tongue pinched? Those are sensations many of us have experienced to some degree when we’ve eaten spicy foods. The question is: why? Just as we know what it feels like to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy-efficient computing: Damping gives a faster switchControlling memory with electric fields enables faster and more energy-efficient computing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The perfect pattern to trap lightSuperimposing two lattices of similar periods creates structures that researchers can design to control and localize light.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taking the sting out of bone repairSpherical biodegradable carriers support scalable and cost-effective stem cell expansion and bone formation for tissue engineering.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supermassive black holes stifle galaxy growthSupermassive black hole winds in a newly discovered class of galaxies are so energetic they suppress future star formation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking down water pollution through DNA of algaeThe degree of pollution of rivers resulting from human activities is assessed using different biotic indices. The latter reflect the ecological status of a river based on the quantity and diversity of organisms selected as bioindicators, due to their ecological preferences and tolerance to pollution. This is the case of diatoms, algae consisting of a single cell surrounded by a silica skeleton, re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study examines effectiveness of steroid medication for sore throatIn patients with a sore throat that didn't require immediate antibiotics, a single capsule of the corticosteroid dexamethasone didn't increase the likelihood of complete symptom resolution after 24 hours, and although more patients taking the steroid reported feeling completely better after 48 hours, a role for steroids to treat sore throats in primary care is uncertain, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adherence to USPSTF recommendations could lead to lower number of individuals recommended for statinFewer people could be recommended for primary prevention statin therapy, including many younger adults with high long-term cardiovascular disease risk, if physicians adhere to the 2016 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for statin therapy compared with the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method can model chemistry in extreme magnetic fields of white dwarfsApproximately 10-20 percent of white dwarfs exhibit strong magnetic fields, which can reach up to 100,000 tesla. However, on Earth, the strongest magnetic fields that can be generated using nondestructive magnets are about 100 tesla. Therefore, studying the chemistry in such extreme conditions is only possible using theory and until now has not provided much insight to the spectra accompanying whi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using nanoparticles to detect deadly virusesA system composed of two different types of nanoparticles can be used to accurately, sensitively and quickly detect viruses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study on impact of climate change on snowpackAn international team of scientists, including one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has found that up to 20 percent loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the Western United States' mountain snowpack in the last three decades is due to human influences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team uses supercomputing to understand processes leading to increased drought resistance in food and fuel cropsPhotosynthesis, the method plants use to convert energy from the sun into food, is a ubiquitous process many people learn about in elementary school. Almost all plants use photosynthesis to gather energy and stay alive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genesOver two billion people worldwide rely on wheat as a staple food, but attempts to sequence its genome have been thwarted by its complexity. Scientists have now developed new methods, creating the most complete picture to date including over 20,000 genes completely absent from earlier assemblies or found only as fragments. The methods and results have been made freely available for other researcher
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emergency departments administering more medications through the noseAdministering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Poor sleep in anxiety, depression may make it harder to see positiveThe dorsal anterior cingulate cortex may have to work harder to modify negative emotional responses in people with poor sleep who have depression or anxiety, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover gene that influences grain yieldA gene that influences grain yield in grasses related to food crops has been discovered by a team of scientists.
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Gizmodo

‘It’s All Over Now But the Screaming’: Inside the Unraveling of LeEco in America Illustration: Angelica Alzona In 2016, rising Chinese tech star LeEco made an aggressive move to conquer the unfamiliar US market with cheap gadgets. But just months after a blingy launch event in October, the company’s American operation is in shambles. From missed payrolls to disappearing employees, former employees of the once-hyped startup tell us how it all went wrong. When LeEco abruptly bl
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Popular Science

How humans have fought over—and weaponized—water Environment A timeline of all the reasons we've gone to battle over the H2O. Whether we're poisoning, drowning, or dehydrating our enemies into submission, we humans have long fought over—and weaponized—water.
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Popular Science

Most scientific studies only use male subjects. Here's why that's a terrible idea. Science It's birdbrained Most scientific studies on animals only use male subjects. Here's why that's a terrible idea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers unlock an immunity 'black box'Mapping the biological machinery of the inflammatory skin disease neutrophilic dermatosis offers multiple targets for treating inflammatory disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study on impact of climate change on snowpack loss in Western USAn international team of scientists, including one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has found that up to 20 percent loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the Western United States' mountain snowpack in the last three decades is due to human influences.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Blockchain’s Weak Spots Pose a Hidden Danger to UsersAn expert who is studying Bitcoin and blockchain technologies says those looking to commercialize them need to be aware of potentially dangerous technical issues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein primes mouse stem cells to quickly repair injury, study findsLike drag car racers revving their engines at the starting line, stem cells respond more quickly to injury when they've been previously primed with one dose of a single protein, according to a study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People's tribunal accuses Monsanto of possible 'ecocide'An informal people's tribunal headed by five professional international judges Tuesday accused US seeds firm Monsanto of harming the environment and possible "ecocide".
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Live Science

The Possibility of Silicon-Based Life GrowsScience fiction has long imagined silicon-based life on alien worlds, such as the rock-eating Horta from Star Trek. Now, scientists have shown that nature can evolve to incorporate silicon into carbon-based molecules, the building blocks of life on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genesScientists have created the most accurate navigation system for the bread wheat genome to date—allowing academics and breeders to analyse its genes more easily than ever before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret passwordIf you are raised by other species, then how do you know who you are? Although heterospecific foster parents rear brood parasitic brown-headed cowbird chicks, juvenile cowbirds readily recognize and affiliate with other cowbirds. That's because they have a secret handshake or password. Specifically, the "password" hypothesis helps explain this paradox of species recognition: Social recognition pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

68-year study shows long-term effects of burning forests at frequent intervalsIn recent decades, scientists and land managers have realized the importance of controlled forest fires for reaching specific forest management objectives. However, questions remain about how often forests should be burned. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prescribed forest fire frequency should be based on land management goalsResearchers have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time. They found that the frequency of prescribed forest fires should be determined based on the long-term goals of land managers.
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WIRED

This Beautiful Speaker Is Made of Concrete. Yes, Concrete Master & Dynamic's new speaker looks as stunning as it sounds. The post This Beautiful Speaker Is Made of Concrete. Yes, Concrete appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Epidemiologists call for more visibility of Arab Americans and their health issuesA group of epidemiologists are advocating for the increased visibility of, and focus on, Arab Americans in discussions about mental and physical health issues in the US, in an article published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.
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Gizmodo

Five Things to Know About Facebook's Huge Augmented Reality Fantasy All images: Facebook Facebook kicked off its annual F8 Developer Conference today in dramatic fashion when CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced an ambitious new augmented reality (AR) platform that will let people overlay digital images onto photos and videos in Facebook. “We’re going to make the camera the first mainstream AR platform,” said Zuckerberg. He explained that the platform itself will open i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Well-kept vacant lots can help reduce crimeMaintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new Michigan State University study that's the most comprehensive to date.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the stationCommercial activity in fossil fuels is increasingly at odds with global actions to reduce the threat of climate change. Burning coal, oil, and natural gas is responsible for two-thirds of humanity's emissions of greenhouse gases, and yet provides more than 20% of GDP in two dozen nation states. By Citicorp's estimate, current commitments to reduce these emissions could mean forgoing $100 trillion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predictive Power—CASL aids startup of TVA's Watts Bar Unit 2Few jobs are more massive than that of building a nuclear power plant, a project that takes years and billions of dollars to complete. But once a new plant is finished, how do engineers know it will operate as designed?
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The Atlantic

What's So Bad About Trump Calling Erdogan? Just after Donald Trump grew disenchanted with Vladimir Putin, the U.S. president appeared to strike up a new fling with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Trump’s friendship with Erdogan has been budding for some time, dating back to at least last summer. But his reaction to a controversial, narrowly passed referendum in Turkey, which granted Erdogan sweeping new powers, nevertheless provok
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The Atlantic

Facebook Chases Snapchat Into Augmented Reality Facebook was a “little slow” to leap into the world of augmented reality, Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged in his keynote address at Facebook’s annual developer conference on Tuesday. But Facebook is now committed to catching up, he said. Zuckerberg remains "confident" that Facebook will be the company to push AR forward, he said. But Zuckerberg’s presentation for how Facebook would do that, to anyon
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The Atlantic

The Silent Crisis of Retail Employment Brick-and-mortar retail is having a meltdown , and economists are starting to see the effects in the job market. Overall retail employment has fallen every month this year. Department stores, including Macy’s and JC Penney, have shed nearly 100,000 jobs since October—more than the total number of coal miners or steel workers currently employed in the U.S. Even America’s richest areas are getting
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Gizmodo

A Trail of Strange Physics Results Offers Tantalizing Hints of New Particles A computer reconstruction of the stuff LHCb detects (Image: CERN) Conceptually, particle physics experiments are surprisingly simple. Smash a shitload of particles together, and look at what comes out. The results will either confirm whatever the business-as-usual theory is, or, if there’s a really crystal clear deviation from that theory, they might prove some new hypothesis about some new parti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method can model chemistry in extreme magnetic fields of white dwarfsMost stars become white dwarfs when they reach the end of their stellar life cycle. Astrophysicists determine what elements are present in these collapsed stars by comparing spectra observed from space against either experimentally re-created spectra measured in laboratories on Earth or theoretical spectra generated using computer models based on quantum-chemical principles. Over time, they have f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers suggest sea scorpions used serrated tail spine to dispatch their preyFour hundred and thirty million years ago, long before the evolution of barracudas or sharks, a different kind of predator stalked the primordial seas. The original sea monsters were eurypterids—better known as sea scorpions.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Autism, ADHD risk not linked to prenatal exposure to antidepressantsTaking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest.
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Gizmodo

Facebook's New VR Experience Looks Like Hell on Earth Facebook At its annual developer conference in San Jose today, Facebook unveiled some of its latest tech projects, assuring investors that it’s catching up to competitors like Snapchat . Mark Zuckerberg himself took the stage to make painful jokes about Fast and Furious and opine on how Facebook wants to dominate what he sees as the next major platform: augmented reality . Being able to have anim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big space rock to streak past Earth on WednesdayAn asteroid stretching 650 metres (2,000 feet) across is on track to whoosh past Earth on Wednesday at a safe—but uncomfortably close—distance, according to astronomers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook pushes to augment reality through smartphonesFacebook on Tuesday launched a mission to make smartphone cameras windows to augmented reality, focusing on what people have in hand instead of waiting for high-tech eyewear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover mitochondrial 'circuit breaker' that protects heart from damageA team of scientists from the National Institutes of Health has discovered biological mechanisms that appear to prevent damage to the heart muscle's 'power grid,' the network of mitochondrial circuits that provide energy to cells. One of those mechanisms, the researchers found, acts much like a circuit breaker, allowing energy to continue moving throughout the heart muscle cells even when individu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor sleep in anxiety, depression may make it harder to see positiveResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex may have to work harder to modify negative emotional responses in people with poor sleep who have depression or anxiety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find strong link between fast-food ads and consumption among pre-schoolersPre-school age children who are exposed to child-targeted fast-food advertising on television are considerably more likely to consume fast-food products, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study in the journal Public Health Nutrition.
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Popular Science

Everything you need to know about geoengineering Environment Scientists may finally put some of the basic principles to the test in 2018—and not everyone is happy about that While federal scientists are avoiding terms like “climate change” in their budget proposals, one word has been resurfacing in the media: geoengineering.
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The Atlantic

When Writing Is Actually About Waiting By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean Two hundred and fifty pages in, Hannah Tinti finally admitted things weren’t working out with her book. It was supposed to be the follow-up to her acclaimed first novel, The Good Thief, and the
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic’s May Issue: Alec Baldwin Gets Under Trump’s Skin Washington, D.C. (April 18, 2017)—"Alec Baldwin has become America's deflator in chief, a weekly pinprick in Trump’s balloon,” writes Chris Jones in The Atlantic 's May issue, online in full today. The cover story, “ Alec Baldwin Gets Under Trump's Skin , ” explores comedy, tragedy, and satire in our era of political chaos. Jones, a longtime magazine writer, obtained rare behind-the-scenes access
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Live Science

Blanket of Spiderwebs Covers Entire FieldThousands of spiders spun a web "blanket" that covered a field in New Zealand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Police break up WhatsApp child porn image sharing networkPolice have arrested 39 suspects in over a dozen countries across Europe and Latin America after busting an online paedophile ring that used the WhatsApp chat service to share images of child sex abuse, officials said Tuesday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study on impact of climate change on snowpack loss in Western U.S.There has been up to 20 percent loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the Western United States' mountain snowpack in the last three decades is due to human influences, an international team of scientists has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabinoids may soothe certain skin diseases, say researchersCannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers.
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The Atlantic

Along the North Korean Border With much of the world’s attention once again focused on North Korea, many international photojournalists are doing their best to cover the reclusive country. However, North Korea still tightly restricts the movements of visiting journalists within its borders, and controls what can be photographed. For photographers looking in from just over the border, there may be more freedom of movement, but
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Ars Technica

Facebook wants you to stare even more at the real world through your phone camera Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg kicked off his company's annual "F8" conference on Tuesday with a stark mission statement: People don't look at Facebook on their phones enough , and he has plans to change that. The plan revolves around adding "augmented reality" (AR) features to Facebook's smartphone apps using our existing cameras. Starting today, basic features will be added to the Facebook ap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method can model chemistry in extreme magnetic fields of white dwarfsApproximately 10-20 percent of white dwarfs exhibit strong magnetic fields, which can reach up to 100,000 tesla. However, on Earth, the strongest magnetic fields that can be generated using nondestructive magnets are about 100 tesla. Therefore, studying the chemistry in such extreme conditions is only possible using theory and until now has not provided much insight to the spectra accompanying whi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New mechanism to fight multi-resistant bacteria revealedIn recent years scientists, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies have been struggling to find new antibiotics or alternative strategies against multi-drug resistant bacteria that represent nowadays a serious health problem. In a breakthrough study now published in PLOS Biology, Isabel Gordo and her team at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC; Portugal) identified a compensatory mechanism in ba
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental drug targets nucleus of allergen-sensitized cellsTranscription factors, the tiny proteins that switch genes on or off in the nucleus of cells, are considered unreachable molecular targets for drugs attempting to treat medical conditions. Overcoming this challenge, researchers discovered a small molecular compound that successfully blocks a transcription factor and its pro-inflammatory and hyper-mucous activity in asthma. In a study published onl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taxes to reduce obesity and diabetes: The sweet spot in Berkeley, Calif.Many countries are considering or already implementing taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in an effort to curb increasing levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The effects of these taxes on purchasing decisions of these products is beginning to emerge and one study, published in PLOS Medicine examines whether such a tax in Berkeley, Calif., is passed on to purchasers in different types of s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google Earth invites you to 'get lost' exploring the planetGoogle Earth is getting a revival, as the 3-D mapping service reorients itself to become more of a tool for adventure and exploration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg vows work to prevent next 'Facebook killer'Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday vowed to work to keep the world's leading social network from being used to propagate grisly acts like the murder of an elderly man on Easter Sunday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual technology can make landscaping easierJust as virtual technology has become a common tool for anyone planning to repaint or redecorate a home, a growing array of apps can make landscaping easier too.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrasensitive detection of protein linked to multiple autoimmune diseasesResearchers have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. The technique will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerous autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and dermatomyositis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequencesThe structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuelsScientists have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Banning transshipment at-sea necessary to curb illegal fishing, researchers concludeBanning transshipment at-sea -- the transfer of fish and supplies from one vessel to another in open waters -- is necessary to diminish illegal fishing, a team of researchers has concluded after an analysis of existing maritime regulations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single high-sensitivity troponin T result could quickly and safely rule out MI in the EDHigh-sensitivity assays for cardiac troponin T can quickly and safely rule out myocardial infarction (MI) in patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) with possible emergency acute coronary syndrome.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Slims River: Climate change causes 'river piracy' in Canada's YukonWhen a team of scientists went to the Yukon to study the Slims River, all they found was a "skinny lake".
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Futurity.org

These parrotfish care about competition, not predators Prey species are usually fearful of predators—and change their behavior accordingly—but not so with the bullethead parrotfish. According to new research, Chlorurus spilurus , known as the bullethead or daisy parrotfish, barely reacts to the presence of predators. Working in the waters off Moorea and the Palmyra Atoll, the researchers observed almost constant competitive interactions between preda
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Ars Technica

Fate of the Furious may be fun, but it made my brain hurt The following article contains some spoilers for Fate of the Furious. Ten of the most expensive cars in the world. (video link) To celebrate the Fate of the Furious —and the ridiculous rides that characterize the franchise—we've put together a video of the world's most expensive hypercars. But while there's a lot for the car-obsessed to like about the new movie, it at times left my brain ready to
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Ars Technica

With $4.65M deal, Arizonans will get their money back from Theranos Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: NBC Today ) Theranos, Inc., the infamous and embattled blood-testing company, has agreed to pay the state of Arizona more than $4.65 million dollars in consumer restitution for blood tests that were allegedly misrepresented and, in some cases, voided. The agreement, announced Tuesday by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich’s office , comes aft
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Science | The Guardian

Hanging on for Lizzy to get her man | Brief lettersHomo sapiens | Pride and Prejudice | Formula for happiness | Messrs Block and Anderson | The Yotam effect Homo sapiens is the world’s most productive trader, whatever that means, in an ecosystem teeming with life, writes Christine McNulty ( Letters , 17 April). Then why is it that the number of wild animals in the world has declined by over 50% since 1970, and that the rate of extinction of specie
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WIRED

Facebook Messenger’s Plot to Be the Only App You Ever Need New features aim to make Messenger the place you talk to your friends and the place you stay to do everything else. The post Facebook Messenger's Plot to Be the Only App You Ever Need appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Facebook Offers a Better Way to Get Back Into Your Locked-Out Apps At Facebook's F8 conference, the company outlined a refreshing alternative to the bad security questions that plague account recovery across the web. The post Facebook Offers a Better Way to Get Back Into Your Locked-Out Apps appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Signs point to reduced drinking by pregnant womenThe signage varies but the message is working. Drinking by pregnant women is down 11 percent in states requiring point-of-sale warning signs, says a health economist.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sea scorpions: The original sea monsterRelated to both modern scorpions and horseshow crabs, sea scorpions had thin, flexible bodies. Some species also had pinching claws and could grow up to three metres in length. New research that the sea scorpions had another weapon at their disposal: a serrated, slashing tail spine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graft-versus-host disease successfully preventedResearchers believe they may have found a way to prevent graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplants while retaining the transplants' positive effects on fighting leukemia and lymphoma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists combine a peptide with a nano cancer drug formulation to improve treatment effectiveness and prevent metastasis in pancreatic cancerScientists have unlocked an important mechanism that allows chemotherapy-carrying nanoparticles—extremely small objects between 1 and 100 nanometers (a billionth of a meter)—to directly access pancreatic cancer tumors, thereby improving the ability to kill cancer cells and hence leading to more effective treatment outcome of the disease. The researchers also confirmed the key role of a peptide (an
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The Atlantic

The Secret PR Push That Shaped the Atomic Bomb's Origin Story In August 1945, a few days after the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the government released an official report on the history of the destructive weapon. “The work on the atomic bomb,” it explained, was undertaken in Los Alamos, where “an extraordinary galaxy of scientific stars gathered on this New Mexican mesa.” Despite its dull prose, the Smyth report, as it came
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The Atlantic

Why Does America Have Fewer Types of IUDs Than Other Countries? My uterus needs more options. In 2013, a gynecologist told me that it was too short to fit any FDA-approved IUD. So I traipsed from Colorado to Canada to get a smaller IUD called the GyneFix. This IUD isn’t shaped like a “T”—as all American IUDs are—but, rather, a rod. Three years later, my now-ex-gynecologist saw the copper rod in an ultrasound. He assumed that, because he couldn’t see them, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predictive powerThe Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors carried out the largest time-dependent simulation of a nuclear reactor ever to support Tennessee Valley Authority and Westinghouse Electric Company during the startup of Watts Bar Unit 2, the first new US nuclear reactor in 20 years. The simulation was carried out primarily on Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility resources.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Signs point to reduced drinking by pregnant womenThe signage varies but the message is working. Drinking by pregnant women is down 11 percent in states requiring point-of-sale warning signs, says a health economist at the University of Oregon.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Tech Meant to Explore Space Answer Vital Questions about Breast Cancer?Scientists at NASA Jet's Propulsion Laboratory are eyeing other mysterious terrains -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Can Bitcoin Be the Foundation of a Fairer Financial System?According to one prominent economist, cryptocurrencies could make financial systems safer and more accessible to all.
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Live Science

Remember 'The Dress'? It Looked Different to Night Owls & Early Birds"The dress" went viral in 2015 because people saw it as different colors. Now, new findings show why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Well-kept vacant lots can help reduce crimeMaintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new study that's the most comprehensive to date.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cytokine controls immune cells that trigger inflammatory bowel disease, study findsA certain cytokine, or small protein that helps cells communicate during immune responses, can control whether immune cells promote or suppress inflammatory bowel disease, a finding that could lead to new treatments, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Science fiction horror wriggles into reality with discovery of giant sulfur-powered shipwormOur world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformational equilibria of light-activated rhodopsin in nanodiscs [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Conformational equilibria of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are intimately involved in intracellular signaling. Here conformational substates of the GPCR rhodopsin are investigated in micelles of dodecyl maltoside (DDM) and in phospholipid nanodiscs by monitoring the spatial positions of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 at the cytoplasmic surface using site-directed spin labeling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Climate change both facilitates and inhibits invasive plant ranges in New England [Ecology]Forecasting ecological responses to climate change, invasion, and their interaction must rely on understanding underlying mechanisms. However, such forecasts require extrapolation into new locations and environments. We linked demography and environment using experimental biogeography to forecast invasive and native species’ potential ranges under present and future climate in New England,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Intracellular metabolite {beta}-glucosylceramide is an endogenous Mincle ligand possessing immunostimulatory activity [Immunology and Inflammation]Sensing and reacting to tissue damage is a fundamental function of immune systems. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) is an activating C-type lectin receptor that senses damaged cells. Notably, Mincle also recognizes glycolipid ligands on pathogens. To elucidate endogenous glycolipids ligands derived from damaged cells, we fractionated supernatants from damaged...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nimodipine fosters remyelination in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis and induces microglia-specific apoptosis [Immunology and Inflammation]Despite continuous interest in multiple sclerosis (MS) research, there is still a lack of neuroprotective strategies, because the main focus has remained on modulating the immune response. Here we performed in-depth analysis of neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and in in vitro studies regarding the effect of the well-established...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic neural architecture for social knowledge retrieval [Neuroscience]Social behavior is often shaped by the rich storehouse of biographical information that we hold for other people. In our daily life, we rapidly and flexibly retrieve a host of biographical details about individuals in our social network, which often guide our decisions as we navigate complex social interactions. Even...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Parietal neurons encode expected gains in instrumental information [Neuroscience]In natural behavior, animals have access to multiple sources of information, but only a few of these sources are relevant for learning and actions. Beyond choosing an appropriate action, making good decisions entails the ability to choose the relevant information, but fundamental questions remain about the brain’s information sampling policies....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trk receptor signaling and sensory neuron fate are perturbed in human neuropathy caused by Gars mutations [Neuroscience]Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D) is a peripheral nerve disorder caused by dominant, toxic, gain-of-function mutations in the widely expressed, housekeeping gene, GARS. The mechanisms underlying selective nerve pathology in CMT2D remain unresolved, as does the cause of the mild-to-moderate sensory involvement that distinguishes CMT2D from the allelic disorder distal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neuroendocrine androgen action is a key extraovarian mediator in the development of polycystic ovary syndrome [Physiology]Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex hormonal disorder characterized by reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities. As the origins of PCOS remain unknown, mechanism-based treatments are not feasible and current management relies on treatment of symptoms. Hyperandrogenism is the most consistent PCOS characteristic; however, it is unclear whether androgen excess,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Parathyroid hormone controls paracellular Ca2+ transport in the thick ascending limb by regulating the tight-junction protein Claudin14 [Physiology]Renal Ca2+ reabsorption is essential for maintaining systemic Ca2+ homeostasis and is tightly regulated through the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) signaling pathway. We investigated the role of PTH1R in the kidney by generating a mouse model with targeted deletion of PTH1R in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding protein AtPH1 controls the localization of the metal transporter NRAMP1 in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]“Too much of a good thing” perfectly describes the dilemma that living organisms face with metals. The tight control of metal homeostasis in cells depends on the trafficking of metal transporters between membranes of different compartments. However, the mechanisms regulating the location of transport proteins are still largely unknown. Developing...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Mylvaganam et al., Dynamics of SIV-specific CXCR5+ CD8 T cells during chronic SIV infection [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Dynamics of SIV-specific CXCR5+ CD8 T cells during chronic SIV infection,” by Geetha H. Mylvaganam, Daniel Rios, Hadia M. Abdelaal, Smita Iyer, Gregory Tharp, Maud Mavinger, Sakeenah Hicks, Ann Chahroudi, Rafi Ahmed, Steven E. Bosinger, Ifor R. Williams, Pamela J. Skinner, Vijayakumar Velu, and Rama...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Zhong et al., B vitamins attenuate the epigenetic effects of ambient fine particles in a pilot human intervention trial [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “B vitamins attenuate the epigenetic effects of ambient fine particles in a pilot human intervention trial,” by Jia Zhong, Oskar Karlsson, Guan Wang, Jun Li, Yichen Guo, Xinyi Lin, Michele Zemplenyi, Marco Sanchez-Guerra, Letizia Trevisi, Bruce Urch, Mary Speck, Liming Liang, Brent A. Coull, Petros Koutrakis,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Quantitative literary criticism 1432 Italian manuscript of the complete works of Seneca. MS Lat 47, Houghton Library, Harvard University. By adapting, quoting, and alluding to previous works, authors create links among literary texts, a phenomenon termed intertextuality, which provides grist for literary criticism. Using machine-learning tools and computational analysis of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An antivascular vaccine to boost self-immunity and strike the tumor [Biological Sciences]Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members and their receptors have long been considered suitable anticancer targets (1) because of their role in angiogenesis. Although their full potential remains to be realized, two monoclonal antibodies have been Food and Drug Administration-approved against human cancer: bevacizumab (humanized anti-VEGFA) and ramucirumab (fully...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Marchio et al.: Antitumor immune regulation by angiostatic therapy [Biological Sciences]We read with great interest the letter by Marchiò et al. (1) on our recently published paper describing the rational design and testing of a vaccine directed against the major angiogenic growth factor VEGF (2). The letter raises the concern that the potential of the vaccine is limited because of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Baseball and jet lag: Correlation does not imply causation [Biological Sciences]My attention was drawn to the recent article by Song at al. entitled “How jet lag impairs Major League Baseball performance” (1), not only by its slightly unusual subject but more importantly because I wondered how one could ever actually prove the effect of jet lag on baseball performance. In...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Joly: Inferring causation from comprehensive analysis of observation [Biological Sciences]In our paper, “How jet lag impairs Major League Baseball performance,” we describe performance reductions in teams as a function of travel across time zones and attribute these effects to jet lag (1). The letter by Joly (2) raises the issue of correlation versus causation, implying that we cannot conclude...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Christopher Monroe [QnAs]Classic computing can take credit for technology ranging from mobile phones to supercomputers. But in recent years, a budding counterpart to these conventional devices has emerged: quantum computers. Whereas classic computing sometimes fails to solve complex calculations, such as factoring hundred-digit numbers, quantum computing holds the potential to easily tackle...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Predicting invasion winners and losers under climate change [Ecology]Invasive plant species are human-introduced, nonnative, and damaging. They can restructure natural habitats, change community composition, disrupt food webs, and degrade ecosystem services. Global climatic changes are often thought to exacerbate invasions (1), but no consensus exists over the generality of this phenomenon (2). As a consequence, anticipating areas of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anterior temporal lobe and the representation of knowledge about people [Neuroscience]Patients with semantic dementia (SD), a neurodegenerative disease affecting the anterior temporal lobes (ATL) (1), present with striking cognitive deficits: they can have difficulties naming objects and familiar people from both pictures and descriptions (2, 3). Furthermore, SD patients make semantic errors (e.g., naming “horse” a picture of a zebra),...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neuronal androgen receptor: Molecular gateway to polycystic ovary syndrome? [Physiology]Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) afflicts ∼15% of women in their reproductive years (1). PCOS women exhibit high circulating levels of testosterone (T), intermittent or absent menstrual cycles, and polycystic ovaries on ultrasound, or at least two of these three diagnostic criteria (2). Hyperandrogenism is at the core of PCOS, its...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neural pathways for cognitive command and control of hand movements [Neuroscience]A piece of fruit—a raisin—swings on a stick in front of a monkey (Fig. 1). He likes raisins; he wants this one. He stretches out his arm, opens his hand with the fingers spread wide apart, and tries to capture it; he misses (bursts B and D). He tries again,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nanoparticle amount, and not size, determines chain alignment and nonlinear hardening in polymer nanocomposites [Applied Physical Sciences]Polymer nanocomposites—materials in which a polymer matrix is blended with nanoparticles (or fillers)—strengthen under sufficiently large strains. Such strain hardening is critical to their function, especially for materials that bear large cyclic loads such as car tires or bearing sealants. Although the reinforcement (i.e., the increase in the linear elasticity)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure-metabolism relationships in human-AOX: Chemical insights from a large database of aza-aromatic and amide compounds [Chemistry]Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a metabolic enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of aldehyde and aza-aromatic compounds and the hydrolysis of amides, moieties frequently shared by the majority of drugs. Despite its key role in human metabolism, to date only fragmentary information about the chemical features responsible for AOX susceptibility are reported...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Delivering strong 1H nuclear hyperpolarization levels and long magnetic lifetimes through signal amplification by reversible exchange [Chemistry]Hyperpolarization turns typically weak NMR and MRI responses into strong signals so that ordinarily impractical measurements become possible. The potential to revolutionize analytical NMR and clinical diagnosis through this approach reflect this area's most compelling outcomes. Methods to optimize the low-cost parahydrogen-based approach signal amplification by reversible exchange with studies...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantitative criticism of literary relationships [Computer Sciences]Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships (“intertextuality”) and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of aryl O-demethylase offers molecular insight into a catalytic tyrosine-dependent mechanism [Biochemistry]Some strains of soil and marine bacteria have evolved intricate metabolic pathways for using environmentally derived aromatics as a carbon source. Many of these metabolic pathways go through intermediates such as vanillate, 3-O-methylgallate, and syringate. Demethylation of these compounds is essential for downstream aryl modification, ring opening, and subsequent assimilation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mass spectrometric identification of intermediates in the O2-driven [4Fe-4S] to [2Fe-2S] cluster conversion in FNR [Biochemistry]The iron-sulfur cluster containing protein Fumarate and Nitrate Reduction (FNR) is the master regulator for the switch between anaerobic and aerobic respiration in Escherichia coli and many other bacteria. The [4Fe-4S] cluster functions as the sensory module, undergoing reaction with O2 that leads to conversion to a [2Fe-2S] form with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis of pH-dependent client binding by ERp44, a key regulator of protein secretion at the ER-Golgi interface [Biochemistry]ERp44 retrieves some endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident enzymes and immature oligomers of secretory proteins from the Golgi. Association of ERp44 with its clients is regulated by pH-dependent mechanisms, but the molecular details are not fully understood. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human ERp44 at neutral and weakly acidic pH....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nit1 is a metabolite repair enzyme that hydrolyzes deaminated glutathione [Biochemistry]The mammalian gene Nit1 (nitrilase-like protein 1) encodes a protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes and is thought to act as a tumor suppressor. Despite being ∼35% sequence identical to ω-amidase (Nit2), the Nit1 protein does not hydrolyze efficiently α-ketoglutaramate (a known physiological substrate of Nit2), and its actual...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of the MeCP2-TBLR1 complex reveals a molecular basis for Rett syndrome and related disorders [Biochemistry]Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurological disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG–binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. The majority of RTT missense mutations disrupt the interaction of the MeCP2 with DNA or the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR)/silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid receptors (SMRT) corepressor complex. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Facilitated dissociation of transcription factors from single DNA binding sites [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The binding of transcription factors (TFs) to DNA controls most aspects of cellular function, making the understanding of their binding kinetics imperative. The standard description of bimolecular interactions posits that TF off rates are independent of TF concentration in solution. However, recent observations have revealed that proteins in solution can...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Membrane fission by protein crowding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Emerging infectious diseases: A proactive approach [Sustainability Science]Infectious diseases are now emerging or reemerging almost every year. This trend will continue because a number of factors, including the increased global population, aging, travel, urbanization, and climate change, favor the emergence, evolution, and spread of new pathogens. The approach used so far for emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) does...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Origins of house mice in ecological niches created by settled hunter-gatherers in the Levant 15,000 y ago [Anthropology]Reductions in hunter-gatherer mobility during the Late Pleistocene influenced settlement ecologies, altered human relations with animal communities, and played a pivotal role in domestication. The influence of variability in human mobility on selection dynamics and ecological interactions in human settlements has not been extensively explored, however. This study of mice...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Early human symbolic behavior in the Late Pleistocene of Wallacea [Anthropology]Wallacea, the zone of oceanic islands separating the continental regions of Southeast Asia and Australia, has yielded sparse evidence for the symbolic culture of early modern humans. Here we report evidence for symbolic activity 30,000–22,000 y ago at Leang Bulu Bettue, a cave and rock-shelter site on the Wallacean island...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ancient individuals from the North American Northwest Coast reveal 10,000 years of regional genetic continuity [Anthropology]Recent genomic studies of both ancient and modern indigenous people of the Americas have shed light on the demographic processes involved during the first peopling. The Pacific Northwest Coast proves an intriguing focus for these studies because of its association with coastal migration models and genetic ancestral patterns that are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dual bioluminescence and near-infrared fluorescence monitoring to evaluate spherical nucleic acid nanoconjugate activity in vivo [Applied Biological Sciences]RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene regulation platforms have shown promise as a novel class of therapeutics for the precision treatment of cancer. Techniques in preclinical evaluation of RNAi-based nanoconjugates have yet to allow for optimization of their gene regulatory activity. We have developed spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) as a blood–brain barrier-/blood–tumor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: 3D printer innovations tackle complexity of metamaterials, living tissue [Applied Physical Sciences]At 3D printing company Carbon’s headquarters in Redwood City, California, a mechanical arm pulls a miniature model of the Eiffel Tower out of a pool of viscous ooze. The figure grows as patterned light beams projected into the chemical bath solidify the crisscrossing beams and struts of the model, one...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selective Purcell enhancement of two closely linked zero-phonon transitions of a silicon carbide color center [Applied Physical Sciences]Point defects in silicon carbide are rapidly becoming a platform of great interest for single-photon generation, quantum sensing, and quantum information science. Photonic crystal cavities (PCCs) can serve as an efficient light–matter interface both to augment the defect emission and to aid in studying the defects’ properties. In this work,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reach and speed of judgment propagation in the laboratory [Applied Physical Sciences]In recent years, a large body of research has demonstrated that judgments and behaviors can propagate from person to person. Phenomena as diverse as political mobilization, health practices, altruism, and emotional states exhibit similar dynamics of social contagion. The precise mechanisms of judgment propagation are not well understood, however, because...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biosynthesis of the pyrrolidine protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin involves novel gene ensemble and cryptic biosynthetic steps [Biochemistry]The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin features a unique benzylpyrrolidine system and exhibits diverse biological and pharmacologic activities. Its biosynthetic origin has remained obscure for more than 60 y, however. Here we report the identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) of anisomycin in Streptomyces hygrospinosus var. beijingensis by a bioactivity-guided...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CMG-Pol epsilon dynamics suggests a mechanism for the establishment of leading-strand synthesis in the eukaryotic replisome [Biochemistry]The replisome unwinds and synthesizes DNA for genome duplication. In eukaryotes, the Cdc45–MCM–GINS (CMG) helicase and the leading-strand polymerase, Pol epsilon, form a stable assembly. The mechanism for coupling DNA unwinding with synthesis is starting to be elucidated, however the architecture and dynamics of the replication fork remain only partially...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unsaturated fatty acyl recognition by Frizzled receptors mediates dimerization upon Wnt ligand binding [Biochemistry]Frizzled (FZD) receptors mediate Wnt signaling in diverse processes ranging from bone growth to stem cell activity. Moreover, high FZD receptor expression at the cell surface contributes to overactive Wnt signaling in subsets of pancreatic, ovarian, gastric, and colorectal tumors. Despite the progress in biochemical understanding of Wnt–FZD receptor interactions,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 triggers a biophysical change in the red blood cell that facilitates invasion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Invasion of the red blood cell (RBC) by the Plasmodium parasite defines the start of malaria disease pathogenesis. To date, experimental investigations into invasion have focused predominantly on the role of parasite adhesins or signaling pathways and the identity of binding receptors on the red cell surface. A potential role...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SMARCE1 is required for the invasive progression of in situ cancers [Cell Biology]Advances in mammography have sparked an exponential increase in the detection of early-stage breast lesions, most commonly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). More than 50% of DCIS lesions are benign and will remain indolent, never progressing to invasive cancers. However, the factors that promote DCIS invasion remain poorly understood. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bidirectional KCNQ1:{beta}-catenin interaction drives colorectal cancer cell differentiation [Cell Biology]The K+ channel KCNQ1 has been proposed as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating KCNQ1:β-catenin bidirectional interactions and their effects on CRC differentiation, proliferation, and invasion. Molecular and pharmacologic approaches were used to determine the influence of KCNQ1 expression on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evidence of low-density and high-density liquid phases and isochore end point for water confined to carbon nanotube [Chemistry]Possible transition between two phases of supercooled liquid water, namely the low- and high-density liquid water, has been only predicted to occur below 230 K from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. However, such a phase transition cannot be detected in the laboratory because of the so-called “no-man’s land” under deeply supercooled...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Low-symmetry sphere packings of simple surfactant micelles induced by ionic sphericity [Chemistry]Supramolecular self-assembly enables access to designer soft materials that typically exhibit high-symmetry packing arrangements, which optimize the interactions between their mesoscopic constituents over multiple length scales. We report the discovery of an ionic small molecule surfactant that undergoes water-induced self-assembly into spherical micelles, which pack into a previously unknown, low
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hydration-reduced lattice thermal conductivity of olivine in Earth’s upper mantle [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Earth’s water cycle enables the incorporation of water (hydration) in mantle minerals that can influence the physical properties of the mantle. Lattice thermal conductivity of mantle minerals is critical for controlling the temperature profile and dynamics of the mantle and subducting slabs. However, the effect of hydration on lattice thermal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Accelerated body size evolution during cold climatic periods in the Cenozoic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]How ecological and morphological diversity accumulates over geological time is much debated. Adaptive radiation theory has been successful in testing the effects of biotic interactions on the rapid divergence of phenotypes within a clade, but this theory ignores abiotic effects. The role of abiotic drivers on the tempo of phenotypic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unraveling the disease consequences and mechanisms of modular structure in animal social networks [Ecology]Disease risk is a potential cost of group living. Although modular organization is thought to reduce this cost in animal societies, empirical evidence toward this hypothesis has been conflicting. We analyzed empirical social networks from 43 animal species to motivate our study of the epidemiological consequences of modular structure in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unveiling the carrier transport mechanism in epitaxial graphene for forming wafer-scale, single-domain graphene [Engineering]Graphene epitaxy on the Si face of a SiC wafer offers monolayer graphene with unique crystal orientation at the wafer-scale. However, due to carrier scattering near vicinal steps and excess bilayer stripes, the size of electrically uniform domains is limited to the width of the terraces extending up to a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic signatures of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans [Genetics]Indigenous Tibetan people have lived on the Tibetan Plateau for millennia. There is a long-standing question about the genetic basis of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. We conduct a genome-wide study of 7.3 million genotyped and imputed SNPs of 3,008 Tibetans and 7,287 non-Tibetan individuals of Eastern Asian ancestry. Using this...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Memory of recent oxygen experience switches pheromone valence in Caenorhabditis elegans [Genetics]Animals adjust their behavioral priorities according to momentary needs and prior experience. We show that Caenorhabditis elegans changes how it processes sensory information according to the oxygen environment it experienced recently. C. elegans acclimated to 7% O2 are aroused by CO2 and repelled by pheromones that attract animals acclimated to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simply put: Vaccination saves lives [Medical Sciences]Few measures in public health can compare with the impact of vaccines. Vaccinations have reduced disease, disability, and death from a variety of infectious diseases. For example, in the United States, children are recommended to be vaccinated against 16 diseases (1). Table 1 highlights the impact in the United States...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Prenatal loss of father during World War One is predictive of a reduced lifespan in adulthood [Medical Sciences]Although early-life stress is known to alter health, its long-term consequences on mortality remain largely unknown. Thanks to unique French legislation established in 1917 for war orphans and children of disabled soldiers, we were able to study the adult mortality of individuals born in 1914–1916 whose fathers were killed during...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

NEIL1 protects against aflatoxin-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in mice [Medical Sciences]Global distribution of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) is dominated by its incidence in developing countries, accounting for >700,000 estimated deaths per year, with dietary exposures to aflatoxin (AFB1) and subsequent DNA adduct formation being a significant driver. Genetic variants that increase individual susceptibility to AFB1-induced HCCs are poorly understood. Herein, it...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of systemic multiexon skipping with peptide-conjugated morpholinos in the heart of a dog model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy [Medical Sciences]Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disorder caused by an absence of the dystrophin protein in bodywide muscles, including the heart. Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of death in DMD. Exon skipping via synthetic phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) represents one of the most promising therapeutic options, yet PMOs...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trio-based exome sequencing arrests de novo mutations in early-onset high myopia [Medical Sciences]The etiology of the highly myopic condition has been unclear for decades. We investigated the genetic contributions to early-onset high myopia (EOHM), which is defined as having a refraction of less than or equal to −6 diopters before the age of 6, when children are less likely to be exposed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of specific posttranslational O-mycoloylations mediating protein targeting to the mycomembrane [Microbiology]The outer membranes (OMs) of members of the Corynebacteriales bacterial order, also called mycomembranes, harbor mycolic acids and unusual outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including those with α-helical structure. The signals that allow precursors of such proteins to be targeted to the mycomembrane remain uncharacterized. We report here the molecular features...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Emergence of a new Neisseria meningitidis clonal complex 11 lineage 11.2 clade as an effective urogenital pathogen [Microbiology]Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) clonal complex 11 (cc11) lineage is a hypervirulent pathogen responsible for outbreaks of invasive meningococcal disease, including among men who have sex with men, and is increasingly associated with urogenital infections. Recently, clusters of Nm urethritis have emerged primarily among heterosexual males in the United States. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recovery sleep after extended wakefulness restores elevated A1 adenosine receptor availability in the human brain [Neuroscience]Adenosine and functional A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) availability are supposed to mediate sleep–wake regulation and cognitive performance. We hypothesized that cerebral A1AR availability after an extended wake period decreases to a well-rested state after recovery sleep. [18F]CPFPX positron emission tomography was used to quantify A1AR availability in 15 healthy male...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resistance to action potential depression of a rat axon terminal in vivo [Neuroscience]The shape of the presynaptic action potential (AP) has a strong impact on neurotransmitter release. Because of the small size of most terminals in the central nervous system, little is known about the regulation of their AP shape during natural firing patterns in vivo. The calyx of Held is a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Posterior parietal cortex contains a command apparatus for hand movements [Neuroscience]Mountcastle and colleagues proposed that the posterior parietal cortex contains a “command apparatus” for the operation of the hand in immediate extrapersonal space [Mountcastle et al. (1975) J Neurophysiol 38(4):871–908]. Here we provide three lines of converging evidence that a lateral region within area 5 has corticospinal neurons that are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anomalous Anderson localization behaviors in disordered pseudospin systems [Physics]We discovered unique Anderson localization behaviors of pseudospin systems in a 1D disordered potential. For a pseudospin-1 system, due to the absence of backscattering under normal incidence and the presence of a conical band structure, the wave localization behaviors are entirely different from those of conventional disordered systems. We show...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The elaborate route for UDP-arabinose delivery into the Golgi of plants [Plant Biology]In plants, L-arabinose (Ara) is a key component of cell wall polymers, glycoproteins, as well as flavonoids, and signaling peptides. Whereas the majority of Ara found in plant glycans occurs as a furanose ring (Araf), the activated precursor has a pyranose ring configuration (UDP-Arap). The biosynthesis of UDP-Arap mainly occurs...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Providing driver’s licenses to unauthorized immigrants in California improves traffic safety [Political Sciences]The integration of immigrants presents a major challenge for policymakers in the United States. In an effort to improve integration, several US states recently have implemented laws that provide driver’s licenses to unauthorized immigrants. These new laws have sparked widespread debate, but we lack evidence on the traffic safety impact...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Titling indigenous communities protects forests in the Peruvian Amazon [Sustainability Science]Developing countries are increasingly decentralizing forest governance by granting indigenous groups and other local communities formal legal title to land. However, the effects of titling on forest cover are unclear. Rigorous analyses of titling campaigns are rare, and related theoretical and empirical research suggests that they could either stem or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human health alters the sustainability of fishing practices in East Africa [Sustainability Science]Understanding feedbacks between human and environmental health is critical for the millions who cope with recurrent illness and rely directly on natural resources for sustenance. Although studies have examined how environmental degradation exacerbates infectious disease, the effects of human health on our use of the environment remains unexplored. Human illness...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Contrasting nitrogen and phosphorus budgets in urban watersheds and implications for managing urban water pollution [Sustainability Science]Managing excess nutrients remains a major obstacle to improving ecosystem service benefits of urban waters. To inform more ecologically based landscape nutrient management, we compared watershed inputs, outputs, and retention for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in seven subwatersheds of the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. Lawn fertilizer and...
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Live Science

Massive Marine 'Worm' Slithers into the Spotlight | VideoAn enormous mollusk the size and shape of a baseball bat hid from scientists for centuries, but it was recently found in the Philippines.
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Futurity.org

Bacteria use this ‘toxin gun’ against our cells Scientists have created a 3D image of a molecular structure that many different bacteria use to pump toxins into humans cells and spread antibiotic-resistance genes to other bacteria. Experts predict that by 2050, antibiotic-resistant bacteria will cause as many deaths as cancer. For the study, published in EMBO Reports , researchers looked specifically at Legionella , the bacteria that causes Le
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technology is great, but are we prepared for the consequences?Dependence on technology is slowly eroding some of our core principles, according to an expert. It's impacting everything from fake news to texting while driving.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Termite gut holds a secret to breaking down plant biomassThe incredibly efficient eating habits of a fungus-cultivating termite are surprising even to those well acquainted with the insect's natural gift for turning wood to dust.
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WIRED

Facebook’s Bizarre VR App Is Exactly Why Zuck Bought Oculus Facebook's new virtual reality app, Spaces, promises to make VR more personal, and more relatable, than it's ever been. The post Facebook's Bizarre VR App Is Exactly Why Zuck Bought Oculus appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the stationTwo seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station -- and is not coming back.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emergency departments administering more medications through the noseAdministering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a paper by Loyola Medicine pharmacists. The intranasal route 'is easy, fast and noninvasive,' emergency department pharmacist Megan A. Rech, Pharm.D., M.S., and colleagues write in the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Fireside Chat: Unlocking the Power of Hybrid, Flexible ITIn order to thrive in today’s demanding business environment, here’s how savvy organizations are using emerging technologies like hybrid IT to achieve agility from the data center to the network edge.
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Gizmodo

Someone Cut a Model Rocket Engine in Half So You Can See What Happens Inside GIF: YouTube Despite only giving you about a second of excitement at launch, model rockets are still a fun way for us (non-billionaires) to live out our dreams of space travel. But have you ever wondered what’s happening inside a model rocket engine while you’re standing a safe distance away from ignition? YouTube’s Warped Perception channel cut an Estes model rocket engine in half (something you
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Gizmodo

Stick Two of OxyLED's Super-Popular Night Lights Around Your House For $15 2-Pack OxyLED T-02 Night Lights , $15 with code KINJAOXY OxyLED’s uber-popular T-02 motion-sensing night lights come in a lot of different varieties now , but today, you can get two of the originals for $15 with promo code KINJAOXY. All you have to do is add two to your cart , and use that code to save $11. If you aren’t familiar, these stick anywhere via an included adhesive magnetic strip, and
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The Atlantic

Stephen Colbert’s Alex Jones Parody Is Hardly a Parody The InfoWars host Alex Jones has been described as a conspiracy theorist , a pro-Trump propagandist , a very rude lunch host , and (by our current president) a broadcaster with an “ amazing ” reputation. But he’s never been called a performance artist—at least until this week, when his lawyer claimed that his many baritone online rants were simply part of a “character” he’s playing, and not to be
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The Atlantic

Warsan Shire’s Lesson ‘For Women Who Are “Difficult” to Love’ Like most poems, “ For Women Who Are ‘Difficult’ to Love ” is best read aloud. There’s audio floating around online of the poet, Warsan Shire, reciting it in a near-whisper , as if she recorded it in a shared space and didn’t want the person in the next room to overhear. It works. It makes it intimate. I revisit the audio every once in awhile, and each time I get the feeling that she’s speaking t
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Popular Science

A look at China's most exciting hypersonic aerospace programs From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The latest scramjets, near-space planes, and super wind tunnels. The 21st International Space Plane and Hypersonic Systems and Technology in Xiamen, China, offers details on key fast technologies. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Cleveland Facebook Killer Dead by Suicide Pennsylvania State Police confirmed Tuesday afternoon that Steve Stephens, the Ohio man who shot and killed 74-year-old Robert Godwin on Sunday and then uploaded a video of the slaying to Facebook, is dead. Stephens had been added to the FBI Most Wanted list and after a nationwide manhunt, PSPD says officers, responding to a tip, found Stephens around 11 AM Tuesday in Erie, Pennsylvania. After a
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Gizmodo

The Handmaid's Tale TV Series Isn't Revelatory, But Unfortunately It Doesn't Need to Be Image: Hulu Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s classic novel The Handmaid’s Tale isn’t a groundbreaking show in terms of storytelling or film technique. Unfortunately, given the state of the world, it doesn’t need to be, and that’s what makes the show so powerful—and so chilling. These days, it seems as if headlines constantly scream about how dystopian science fiction stories (or, to use Atw
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Viden

Nu kan alle boltre sig i NASAs arkiverRumfartsagenturet har givet fri adgang til årtiers billeder, video og lyd fra sin mangeårige historie.
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Ars Technica

Princeton researchers discover why AI become racist and sexist Enlarge / An AI contemplates its own biases in the movie Ex Machina. (credit: UPI) Ever since Microsoft's chatbot Tay started spouting racist commentary after 24 hours of interacting with humans on Twitter, it has been obvious that our AI creations can fall prey to human prejudice. Now a group of researchers has figured out one reason why that happens. Their findings shed light on more than our f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frog slime kills flu virusFrogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. A new research finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Gamers' method creates unique 4-D molecular spectral mapsResearchers have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems. In this context, 'structure' doesn't just mean the 3-D arrangement of atoms that make up a molecule, but rather time-dependent quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom that dictate the optical, chemical and physical properties of the system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Megafaunal extinctions driven by too much moistureStudies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting po
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lasers measure jet disintegrationThe study of jet disintegration in particular focuses on fuel breakup and mixing within the combustion chamber of propulsion devices. A team of researchers applied spectroscopic diagnostics techniques to learn more about the fundamentals of sub- and supercritical jet disintegration.
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Live Science

Bizarre Superfluid with Negative Mass Created in a LabA mysterious superfluid has demonstrated a negative mass, meaning that if it's pushed to the right, it will move to the left.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study finds amoeba 'grazing,' killing bacteria usually protected by filmA professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password identified by researchersIf you are raised by other species, then how do you know who you are? Although heterospecific foster parents rear brood parasitic brown-headed cowbird chicks, juvenile cowbirds readily recognize and affiliate with other cowbirds. That's because they have a secret handshake or password. Specifically, the "password" hypothesis helps explain this paradox of species recognition: Social recognition pro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Milky Way: Hydrogen halo lifts the veil of our galactic homeAstronomers have reported the first detections of diffuse hydrogen wafting about in a vast halo surrounding the Milky Way.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genesOver two billion people worldwide rely on wheat as a staple food, but attempts to sequence its genome have been thwarted by its complexity. Earlham Institute scientists developed new methods, creating the most complete picture to date including over 20,000 genes completely absent from earlier assemblies or found only as fragments. The methods and results have been made freely available for other r
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Ars Technica

Meet PINLogger, the drive-by exploit that steals smartphone PINs Enlarge (credit: Harrison Weber ) Smartphones know an awful lot about us. They know if we're in a car that's speeding, and they know when we're walking, running, or riding in a bus. They know how many calls we make and receive each day and the precise starting and ending time of each one. And of course, they know the personal identification numbers we use to unlock the devices or to log in to sit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measuring the safety, efficacy of a vaccine against Ebola virus diseaseThe 2014--2015 Ebola epidemic affected several countries in West Africa, leading to the death of more than 11,000 people. Although this epidemic of Ebolavirus disease is over, there is no knowing if, when or where another may strike. It is therefore more important than ever to find a reliable vaccine against this deadly disease. Research on vaccines, which was ongoing during the epidemic in West A
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nutrition label readers favor food quality over quantityAlthough nutrition-label users eat roughly the same amount of food as less-discerning diners, the two groups diverge when it comes to the quality of the food they eat, suggests a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antidepressant use in early pregnancy does not increase autism, ADHD risk in kidsA new study suggests that mothers' use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What makes pancreatic cancer so aggressive?Pancreatic cancer starts forming metastases early. The cancer itself, however, is usually only discovered late. This leads to a high patient mortality rate. Researchers have now discovered why pancreatic cancer and other malignant types of tumors can disseminate so rapidly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A potential cure for metastatic prostate cancer? Treatment combination shows early promiseIn the past, all forms of metastatic prostate cancer have been considered incurable. In recent years, the FDA has approved six drugs for men with metastatic disease, all of which can increase survival. Researchers demonstrate for the first time that an aggressive combination of systemic therapy (drug treatment) with local therapy (surgery and radiation) directed at both the primary tumor and metas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economicsA new article shows how collaborations between psychologists and economists lead to better understanding of such decisions than either discipline can on its own.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Origins of an enigmatic genus of Asian butterflies carrying mythological names decodedA group of rare Asian butterflies, which have once inspired an association with Hindu mythological creatures, have been quite a chaos for the experts. In fact, their systematics turned out so confusing that in order to decode their taxonomic placement, scientists had to dig up their roots some 43 million years back.
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Ars Technica

NASA set an ignominious record last week—but don’t blame the space agency Atlantis and the final landing of the Space Shuttle program. (credit: NASA / Wikimedia Commons ) No humans have launched into space from US soil for more than five years, when space shuttle Atlantis made its final voyage. Since that spacecraft landed on July 21, 2011, a total of 2,098 days have passed. Former Space Shuttle Program Manager Wayne Hale noted on Twitter Tuesday that this gap has now
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New on MIT Technology Review

Satellite Swarms Could Eat ThemselvesThe more satellites we launch without retiring old ones, the more there are to collide with one another.
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Popular Science

How to turn used plastic bottles into skylights and street lamps From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Let the sunshine in Alfred Moser had a eureka moment involving an old Coke bottle and a spoonful of bleach. His makeshift lightbulb illuminates homes across the developing world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easyUsing pressure instead of chemicals, nanoparticles have been fabricated into nanowire arrays similar to those that underlie touch-screens for phones, computers, TVs, and sensors. The pressure process takes nanoseconds instead of the hours required by industry's current chemical means.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Well-kept vacant lots can help reduce crimeMaintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new Michigan State University study that's the most comprehensive to date.
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Blog » Languages » English

This one’s for the birds: Early Birds vs Night Owls Are you an early riser? Or do you like sleep all day and party all night? Pick your favorite feathered friend and let the battle begin! Early Birds They say the early bird catches the worm! You like to rise, shine and greet the day. Getting up early means you don’t have to rush in the morning. You can have a pleasant homemade breakfast, go for a run, maybe get some good reading in before your wor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Master detox molecule boosts immune defensesScientists have discovered an unknown molecular mechanism promoting the activation of the human immune system. The team has been studying the glutathione molecule known for its role in cleaning the body from harmful metabolic wastes and revealed that glutathione also stimulates T cells energy metabolism. This discovery offers perspectives to develop new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer
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New Scientist - News

Fleet of CubeSats launches to study the neglected ‘ignorosphere’Today 28 boxy satellites blasted off for the International Space Station, on a mission to study a stubbornly inaccessible region of Earth's atmosphere
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How the March for Science splits researchers Nature asked members of the scientific community whether or not they plan to march on 22 April — and why. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21847
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Ingeniøren

Forsinkelse på Femern-godkendelse begrænses til halvt årDe tyske myndigheder vil som lovet være færdige med at behandle Femernforbindelsens miljøgodkendelse næste sommer, lød det i dag fra den slesvig-holstenske transportminister Reinhard Meyer, da han besøgte København
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

French-election fears unite scientists in defence of liberal democracy Threat of a far-right president galvanizes researchers to put politics first. Nature 544 277 doi: 10.1038/544277a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Republican scientists negotiate the Trump era Conservative academics face a growing tension between their politics and the liberal atmosphere on many US campuses. Nature 544 280 doi: 10.1038/544280a
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Gizmodo

How Do You Keep a 13,600-Year-Old Woman From Looking Like Wilma Flintstone? Who is she (Image: Hayes et al) Recreations of Paleolithic people at the museum usually look like the typical Geico commercial caveman. Famed Otzi the Iceman , for example, has the face of someone who’d be fun to disembowel a moose with, but whose conversation might be just a little gauche. A new facial reconstruction of a Stone Age woman who lived in Thailand roughly 13,600 years presents the pl
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Ars Technica

Energy Dept. chief Perry says coal retirements threaten to destabilize the grid The sulfer-coal-burning John E. Amos Power Plant in West Virginia. (credit: Cathy ) Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Rick Perry ordered a review (PDF) of electricity markets and reliability late last week, saying that "certain policies" have hindered the development and use of baseload energy sources like coal. Although Perry never mentions renewable energy explicitly in his letter, he refere
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cytokine controls immune cells that trigger inflammatory bowel disease, study findsA certain cytokine, or small protein that helps cells communicate during immune responses, can control whether immune cells promote or suppress inflammatory bowel disease, a finding that could lead to new treatments, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sea scorpions: The original sea monsterRelated to both modern scorpions and horseshow crabs, sea scorpions had thin, flexible bodies. Some species also had pinching claws and could grow up to three metres in length. New research by University of Alberta scientists Scott Persons and John Acorn hypothesise that the sea scorpions had another weapon at their disposal: a serrated, slashing tail spine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liver progenitor cells are involved in the development of hepatic tumorsThe malignant transformation of hepatocytes is the origin of most hepatocellular carcinomas, an aggressive type of liver cancer with high mortality rates. But these cells do not act alone. Research conducted by scientists at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) reveals how hepatocytes 'recruit' and 'instruct' liver progenitor cells to contribute to the hepatic lesions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Master detox molecule boosts immune defensesScientists of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) have discovered an unknown molecular mechanism promoting the activation of the human immune system. The team has been studying the glutathione molecule known for its role in cleaning the body from harmful metabolic wastes and revealed that glutathione also stimulates T cells energy metabolism. This discovery offers perspectives to develop new
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein primes mouse stem cells to quickly repair injury, Stanford study findsLike drag car racers revving their engines at the starting line, stem cells respond more quickly to injury when they've been previously primed with one dose of a single protein, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Killing flu viruses with help from a frogFrog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these 'host defense peptides,' courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers rep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frog slime kills flu virusFrogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well.
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Ars Technica

Report: Apple is planning a major iPhone overhaul for the fall Enlarge / The Jet Black iPhone 7, replete with fingerprints. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple is said to be planning not one, not two, but three new iPhones for release this fall, if "people familiar with the matter" speaking to Bloomberg are to be believed. Two of those models will use the same 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch IPS screens that we're already used to, though Bloomberg doesn't say whether th
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Ars Technica

Navy drone software brings us one step closer to robot-filled skies Enlarge (credit: US Navy) Northrop Grumman has announced that new software for the US Navy's MQ-4C Triton long-range patrol drone has passed a key flight test. The Triton is an upgraded maritime patrol version of Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk, and it's now on track for initial deployment by the Navy next year. The new software upgrade is a step toward tackling a problem that had grounded Northro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arctic river ice deposits rapidly disappearingClimate change is causing thick ice deposits that form along Arctic rivers to melt nearly a month earlier than they did 15 years ago, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New world record for solar hydrogen productionScientists have recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New perovskite ink opens window for quality cellsScientists have developed a new perovskite ink with a long processing window that allows the scalable production of perovskite thin films for high-efficiency solar cells.
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Gizmodo

Snapchat's Dumb New 'World Lenses' Feel Like Magic Image: Mike Nunez/Gizmodo Snapchat is about to get way more fucking adorable. The company just launched a major update today introducing its highly anticipated “World Lenses” feature, giving people the ability to drop digital 3D objects into real world scenes. Although the feature is undoubtedly augmented reality (AR), Snapchat curiously does not mention the phrase in its official announcement .
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Gizmodo

Marvel Studios Gave Us a Peek at Every Movie It Has in the Works One elevator bank of Marvel Studios. Image: Germain Lussier The email said “Marvel Studios - Open House Invitation.” What that meant, I didn’t know. But it’s Marvel, so I went, and I’m glad I did, because I got to see concept art, footage, and/or more from every known movie on their schedule, up through Captain Marvel . Yes, Infinity War , too. Before a (still-embargoed) screening of Guardians of
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Viden

Forskere undersøger gådefuld monster-pæleormVidenskaben har ledt efter den mareridstagtige kæmpe pæleorm i århundreder. Nu viser det sig, at den lever ganske fredeligt i havet ud for Filippinerne.
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New on MIT Technology Review

First Results from the Search for Extraterrestrial Laser Activity Around Other StarsIf civilizations on other planets are pointing lasers in our direction, either deliberately or inadvertently, this survey will have spotted them.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Fish 'pool' their experience to solve problemsSome of them may know where to find food but not how to access it while others know how to get at it but not where it is hidden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Killing flu viruses with help from a frogFrog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these "host defense peptides," courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers rep
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Gizmodo

Frog Slime Could Prevent the Next Pandemic The skin mucus of the South Indian frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara contains a compound that kills bacteria and viruses. (Credit: Sanil George & Jessica Shartouny) New research from Emory University School of Medicine shows that a chemical in the mucus of South Indian frogs is capable of killing certain strains of the influenza virus. It’ll take a while for scientists to translate this finding into a
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Quanta Magazine

A Cosmic Burst Repeats, Deepening a Mystery “A minor point of interest regarding the Spitler Burst.” The email subject line popped up on Shami Chatterjee ’s computer screen just after 3 in the afternoon on Nov. 5, 2015. When Chatterjee read the email, he first gasped in shock — and then sprinted out of his Cornell University office and down the corridor to tell a colleague. Twenty-eight minutes later, when he started to draft a reply, his
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The Atlantic

The Visa Uncertainty Holding Back Star Scientists Dr. Sharon George is one year out of her Ph.D. program and working on lifesaving heart research on how chemotherapy affects the organ. George is from India and her visa expires next month—and she’s eagerly awaiting to hear the status of her H1B visa application. H1B visas allow foreign workers in specialty occupations to remain in the country for six years, but the status of the program could be
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dogging It: Turning Wild Foxes into Man's Second-Best FriendEvolutionary biologist and science historian Lee Dugatkin talks about the legendary six-decade Siberian experiment in fox domestication run by Lyudmila Trut, his co-author of a new book and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Trans fat bans link to fewer heart attacks, deaths—and they’re going national Enlarge (credit: Getty | Scott Olson ) Banishing trans fats from foods is linked to reductions in the number of heart attacks and cardiovascular deaths in the years after the bans are implemented, according to data from cities and counties in New York that have made the cut. After three years, the areas banning trans fats from eateries seemed to have an extra 6.2 percent reduction in heart attack
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Ars Technica

FCC helps AT&T and Time Warner avoid lengthy merger review Enlarge / AT&T will own a bunch of new media properties if it is allowed to buy Time Warner. (credit: Aurich Lawson) The Federal Communications Commission has helped clear the path for AT&T to buy Time Warner Inc. without a lengthy public-interest review. The FCC conducts public-interest reviews of mergers when FCC licenses are transferred, but AT&T and Time Warner have been trying to structure t
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WIRED

Steve Ballmer’s USAFacts Uses Smart Design To Make Sense of Government Spending USAFacts organizes 30 years of data from more than 70 local, state, and federal government agencies into an interactive visualization of America's finances. The post Steve Ballmer's USAFacts Uses Smart Design To Make Sense of Government Spending appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prescribed forest fire frequency should be based on land management goalsResearchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time. They found that the frequency of prescribed forest fires should be determined based on the long-term goals of land managers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret passwordScientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers describe ultrasensitive detection of protein linked to multiple autoimmune diseasesResearchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. The technique, which is described in the study 'Detection of interferon- protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease' published April 18 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerou
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Technology Brings Star Wars–Style Desert Moisture Farming a Step CloserScientists have found a way to pull water from the air using only energy from the sun -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Here's How One Little Mistake Can Lead To A Big Upset | Street Outlaws #StreetOutlaws | Mondays at 9/8c on Discovery Are pigs flying? Because the El Camino just destroyed last season's top racer. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twit
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New Scientist - News

Internal migration of millions as seas rise will rattle whole USIt's not just coastal areas that will be affected by rising waters, and the US might be hopelessly underprepared unless planning starts now, says Jeff Goodell
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds amoeba 'grazing,' killing bacteria usually protected by filmBacteria have developed an uncountable number of chemistries, lifestyles, attacks and defenses through 2.5 billion years of evolution. One of the most impressive defenses is biofilm—a community of bacteria enmeshed in a matrix that protects against single-celled predators and antibiotics—chemicals evolved by competitors through the course of evolution, including other bacteria and fungi.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees lingering remnants of Tropical Cyclone 02WThe remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Cyclone 02W continued to linger in the South China Sea when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pinning down fraudulent business listings on Google mapsA partnership between academic computer scientists and Google has allowed the search giant to reduce by 70 percent fraudulent business listings in Google Maps. The researchers worked together to analyze more than 100,000 fraudulent listings to determine how scammers had been able to avoid detection -- albeit for a limited amount of time -- and how they made money.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chaining up diarrhea pathogensResearchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA team explores using LISA Pathfinder as 'comet crumb' detectorScientists hope to take advantage of LISA Pathfinder's record-breaking sensitivity to acceleration to map out the distribution of tiny dust particles shed by asteroids and comets far from Earth.
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Popular Science

The best ways to clean up your Facebook News Feed DIY More of what you want to see, less of what you don't You're going to care about some of the updates in your Facebook News Feed a lot more than others. So here's how to customize the stories that get displayed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds amoeba 'grazing,' killing bacteria usually protected by fiA University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees lingering remnants of Tropical Cyclone 02WThe remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Cyclone 02W continued to linger in the South China Sea when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space debris problem getting worse, say scientistsScientists sounded the alarm Tuesday over the problems posed to space missions from orbital junk—the accumulating debris from mankind's six-decade exploration of the cosmos.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Vacuum Sealer, 24, Beats Headphones, and More Apple’s newest Beats headphones, a FoodSaver starter kit , and the complete 24 box set lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals BeatsX , $120 | Beats Solo3 , $160 | PowerBeats 3 , $130 AirPods aren’t the only headphones with Apple’s impressive—hell, magical—W1 chip for easy pairing and switching between devices; they added i
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Gizmodo

Rule the Playground With a Chainsaw-Powered Tricycle GIF: YouTube As a kid, you probably came up with a lot of terrible ideas your parents wisely stopped you from carrying out; that’s why you’re alive today. But once grownup, you’re free to try anything that pops into your mind, like upgrading a toddler-sized tricycle so that it’s powered by an old chainsaw . YouTube channel ThisDustIn is responsible for this monstrous upgrade, which swaps the peda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA measures rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone MaaruthaTropical Storm Maarutha became the first tropical cyclone of 2017 in the Bay of Bengal when it formed on April 15, 2017. Although the tropical cyclone only lived two days, NASA gathered rainfall rate data on it on the day it developed.
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Ars Technica

What Xbox Scorpio developers can learn from the world of PC games High speed, high-resolution. We've noted a few times recently how the impending launch of Scorpio is making the Xbox ecosystem look more and more like the tiered PC gaming space. A couple of Microsoft's first-party developers made that connection more explicit recently, telling Gamasutra that making games for the Scorpio is very similar to the multiple hardware targets seen in PC game development
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Harnessing heat to power computersHeat is commonly regarded as computing's mortal enemy. Two researchers, however, flipped the question of how to keep computers cool to how to use heat as an alternative energy source.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inflammatory bowel diseases on the rise in very young Canadian childrenCanada has among the highest rates of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, and the number of children under five years old being diagnosed increased by 7.2 percent every year between 1999 to 2010.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than othersHouse finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving problems than their rural counterparts. They are able to solve new problems even when humans are around. The study investigated how increased urbanization and human presence affects the behavior and foraging habits of wildlife, and how birds, in particular, cope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Galaxy S8: More screen and elegance, but a hefty price tagSamsung's new Galaxy S8 phone is stunning. But its $100 price hike is hard to swallow.
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TEDTalks (video)

How radio telescopes show us unseen galaxies | Natasha Hurley-WalkerOur universe is strange, wonderful and vast, says astronomer Natasha Hurley-Walker. A spaceship can't carry you into its depths (yet) -- but a radio telescope can. In this mesmerizing talk, Hurley-Walker shows how she probes the mysteries of the universe using special technology that reveals light spectrums we can't see.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA measures rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone MaaruthaTropical Storm Maarutha became the first tropical cyclone of 2017 in the Bay of Bengal when it formed on April 15, 2017. Although the tropical cyclone only lived two days, NASA gathered rainfall rate data on it on the day it developed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paper: Nutrition label readers favor food quality over quantityAlthough nutrition-label users eat roughly the same amount of food as less-discerning diners, the two groups diverge when it comes to the quality of the food they eat, says a new paper co-written by Brenna Ellison, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at Illinois and an expert in consumer food preferences and behaviors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Antidepressant use in early pregnancy does not increase autism, ADHD risk in kidsA study led by Indiana University reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that mothers' use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Megafaunal extinctions driven by too much moistureStudies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrogen halo lifts the veil of our galactic homeUA astronomers Huanian Zhang and Dennis Zaritsky have reported the first detections of diffuse hydrogen wafting about in a vast halo surrounding the Milky Way.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adherence to USPSTF recommendations could lead to lower number of individuals recommended for statinFewer people could be recommended for primary prevention statin therapy, including many younger adults with high long-term cardiovascular disease risk, if physicians adhere to the 2016 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for statin therapy compared with the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antidepressant use during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of autism, ADHD in childrenTwo studies published by JAMA examine the risk of autism and other adverse birth outcomes among women who use antidepressants during pregnancy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines effectiveness of steroid medication for sore throatIn patients with a sore throat that didn't require immediate antibiotics, a single capsule of the corticosteroid dexamethasone didn't increase the likelihood of complete symptom resolution after 24 hours, and although more patients taking the steroid reported feeling completely better after 48 hours, a role for steroids to treat sore throats in primary care is uncertain, according to a study publi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lasers measure jet disintegrationThe study of jet disintegration in particular focuses on fuel breakup and mixing within the combustion chamber of propulsion devices. A team of researchers at the University of Florida applied spectroscopic diagnostics techniques to learn more about the fundamentals of sub- and supercritical jet disintegration, and reports their new findings this week in the journal Physics of Fluids.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Gamers' method creates unique 4-D molecular spectral mapsResearchers at Northwestern University have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems. In this context, 'structure' doesn't just mean the 3-D arrangement of atoms that make up a molecule, but rather time-dependent quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom that dictate the optical, chemical and physical properties of the system. They discuss their work
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Over 18,000 high school students learned to hack in this year's picoCTF hacking contestThe cybersecurity workforce, which is currently struggling to fill seats with qualified talent, may have some newfound optimism. Over the past two weeks, upwards of 18,000 middle and high school students from across the United States learned and honed computer security skills in this year's picoCTF online hacking contest, hosted by Carnegie Mellon University's CyLab Security and Privacy Institute.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study offers good news for pork producersWhat happens when meat scientists get their hands on nearly 8,000 commercially raised pigs? They spend a year running dozens of tests and crunching numbers to arrive at research-backed management recommendations for pork producers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthetic sugar against autoimmune diseasesResearchers are working on an innovative approach to treat a rare autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, using a kind of molecular sponge made of sugar to remove pathogenic antibodies from the bloodstream. Developed to treat anti-MAG neuropathy, the approach also has potential applications in the treatment of other autoimmune diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tweaking a molecule's structure can send it down a different path to crystallizationSilky chocolate, a better medical drug, or solar panels all require the same thing: just the right crystals making up the material. Now, scientists trying to understand the paths crystals take as they form have been able to influence that path by modifying the starting ingredient.
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WIRED

Samsung Galaxy S8 First Impressions: That Screen, You Guys There's a lot of software inside Samsung's new smartphone. But the real story, for once, is the thing itself. The post Samsung Galaxy S8 First Impressions: That Screen, You Guys appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

9 More Viral Photos That Are Totally Fake We’ve been debunking fake photos at Gizmodo since 2013 , but in the year 2017, the fakes seem to be spreading online faster than ever. Here are just a few of the images we’ve seen swirling around the internet lately. And none of them are what they appear to be at first glance. Fake breaking news alert reading “Bannon accepts diminished role in W.H.” produced by the Daily Show (Twitter) 1) Is this
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Ingeniøren

Forsker: Genredigering kan designe fremtidens perfekte astronauterDrømmen om kolonisering af det ydre rum kan blive virkelighed, hvis menneskekroppen kan klare høje doser af radioaktiv stråling, mener amerikansk forsker, der sågar har en 500-års plan for afkolonisering af Jorden.
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Science : NPR

WATCH: NASA Livestreams 360-Degree View Of Rocket Launch A special 360-degree camera was installed on the launch pad near the base of the Atlas V rocket heading to the International Space Station. (Image credit: United Launch Alliance)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common antibiotic azithromycin not linked to increased risk of abnormal heartbeat, study showsThe commonly used antibiotic azithromycin is not linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia, an often life-threatening rapid, irregular heartbeat, according to a large study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential new treatment strategy for neuroinflammation related to severe type of strokeScientists have discovered a potential new treatment to reduce the effects of intracerebral hemorrhage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do BAT receptors hold the key to treating obesity and diabetes?Scientists have discovered a way to increase the amount of metabolism-boosting brown adipose tissue (BAT) ('good' fat) by employing two receptors on BAT cells as potential therapeutic targets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could yellow fever rise again?Many people might not have heard of the Aedes aegypti mosquito until this past year, when the mosquito, and the disease it can carry – Zika – began to make headlines. But more than 220 years ago, this same breed of mosquito was spreading a different and deadly epidemic in Philadelphia and just like Zika, this epidemic is seeing a modern resurgence, with Brazil at its epicenter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lyme disease imposes large cost on the northeast United StatesResearchers find that perceived risks of contracting Lyme disease on average cause a person in the Northeast to forego eight 73-minute outdoor trips per year -- exacting a total cost roughly $2.8 billion to $5 billion annually in the densely populated region.
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Ars Technica

Apple settles with major patent holder at 1:00am the night before trial A large patent-holding company called Unwired Planet reached a settlement with Apple at 1:00am on Monday, just hours before a jury trial was set to start in San Francisco. A jury had already been selected but was dismissed on Monday morning after the parties' lawyers told US District Judge Vincent Chhabria about their settlement. Unwired Planet is the patent-holding remains of early mobile compan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study offers good news for pork producersWhat happens when meat scientists get their hands on nearly 8,000 commercially raised pigs? They spend a year running dozens of tests and crunching numbers to arrive at research-backed management recommendations for pork producers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lasers measure jet disintegrationThere are many processes, such as propulsion, in which fluid in a supercritical state, where the temperature and pressure put a substance beyond a distinguishable liquid or gas phase, is injected in an environment of supercritical thermodynamic conditions. Under these conditions, mixing and interaction dynamics do not behave as they would in their well-defined liquid or gas phases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Gamers' method creates unique 4-D molecular spectral mapsResearchers at Northwestern University have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems. In this context, "structure" doesn't just mean the 3-D arrangement of atoms that make up a molecule, but rather time-dependent quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom that dictate the optical, chemical and physical properties of the system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogen halo lifts the veil of our galactic homeSometimes it takes a lot of trees to see the forest. In the case of the latest discovery made by astronomers at the University of Arizona, exactly 732,225. Except that in this case, the "forest" is a veil of diffuse hydrogen gas enshrouding the Milky Way, and each "tree" is another galaxy observed with the 2.5-meter telescope of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Megafaunal extinctions driven by too much moistureStudies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting po
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Science | The Guardian

'The truth needs an advocate': why scientists will be marching on Saturday The hands of the Doomsday Clock currently stand at two-and-a-half-minutes to midnight. Professor Ray Pierrehumbert of Oxford University and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists explains why support for science and the global March for Science on 22 April is crucial Continue reading...
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Bubbles may put mysterious fizz in Titan’s polar seaNitrogen bubbles may be the source of the “magic island” on Saturn’s moon Titan.
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The Atlantic

Does the Quran Forbid Electing Christians? In early April, a huge demonstration gripped Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia and one of the most populous Muslim cities in the world. Tens of thousands of white-robed protesters turned out to the center of the city, calling for the impeachment of Basuki “Ahok” Purnama, Jakarta’s first Christian governor in decades. Ahok is a Christian of Chinese descent, which makes him a double minority in maj
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The Atlantic

A Graphic-Novel Memoir That Tangles With the Puzzle of Existence The title of Kristen Radtke’s remarkable graphic memoir Imagine Wanting Only This almost reads as a riddle. On one hand, it seems to ask a somewhat disgruntled question: “Could you imagine wanting just this, and nothing more?” On the other, the phrasing suggests, temptingly: “What if this is all you needed?” What if life, ephemeral and fleeting, could be devoid of ambition, of any desire for more
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The Atlantic

Did Obamacare Increase Voter Turnout? It’s becoming increasingly clear that Medicaid is the center of the health policy universe. Medicaid is the largest single insurer in the United States, covering north of 70 million people with low incomes and disabilities, and is responsible for most of the 20 million additional people covered by Affordable Care Act. The ACA expansion established Medicaid as the bedrock of public insurance and p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Air pollution may directly cause those year-round runny noses, according to a mouse studyAlthough human population studies have linked air pollution to chronic inflammation of nasal and sinus tissues, direct biological and molecular evidence for cause and effect has been scant. Now, researchers report that experiments in mice continually exposed to dirty air have revealed that direct biological effect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eye expressions offer a glimpse into the evolution of emotionNew research reveals why the eyes offer a window into the soul. According to the study, people interpret a person's emotions by analyzing the expression in their eyes -- a process that began as a universal reaction to environmental stimuli and evolved to communicate our deepest emotions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting things done while you wait for WiFiTo help us make the most of idle moments, researchers have developed a series of apps called 'WaitSuite' that test you on vocabulary words during moments of waiting, like when you're waiting for an instant message or for your phone to connect to WiFi.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Coffee–Songbird ConnectionAt least 42 species winter on coffee farms, but only those with plenty of trees—another reason to love shade-grown java -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Earliest Dental Fillings Discovered in 13,000-Year-Old SkeletonLong before the invention of modern dentistry, hunter-gatherers figured out how to scoop out and fill their cavities.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump's Team Is Split over the Paris AgreementIf the president decides to stay in, he might choose to weaken the U.S.’s commitment on emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economicsAdolescents face many challenging decisions. So, do consumers.
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Futurity.org

A quick round of steroids may bring big risks Every year, millions of Americans get short-term prescriptions for steroids, such as prednisone, often for back pain, allergies, or other relatively minor ailments. Though these prescriptions are quite common, doctors should consider the potential health risks associated with short-term steroid use, say researchers. People taking the pills were more likely to break a bone, have a potentially dang
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The Atlantic

The Dark Side of Slack’s New Emoji Statuses Last week, emoji continued their unstoppable invasion into Slack. They began popping up alongside my coworkers’ names in the popular messenger-app’s interface: First, it was just a few early adopters, who were just trying one on for size—I chose a contemplative —but soon, they were everywhere. The proliferation was the result of a new Slack feature that allows people to pick an emoji and type som
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Ingeniøren

Ny aftale skal sikre 5.000 elbiler på de danske vejeRegeringen går sammen med de radikale og Socialdemokratiet om at udskyde afgifter på elbiler og give et ekstra batterifradrag.
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Ingeniøren

Star Treks tricorder eksisterer nu officieltEn læge og ph.d. i ingeniørvidenskab vinder pengestærk, international konkurrence om at fremstille det mest effektive håndholdte apparat, der er i stand til at diagnosticere forskellige lidelser og transmittere data direkte til en læge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For young adults, cigarettes more pleasurable with alcohol than with potYoung adults get more pleasure from smoking cigarettes while they are drinking alcohol than they do while using marijuana, according to a new American study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pigeon study takes on sexism in scienceIn experimental research, scientists tend to assume that male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males. But a new study shows surprisingly big differences in tissue gene expression between male and female rock doves. The work is part of an attempt to make science more gender-inclusive and aware of physiological and other differences between the sexes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Money a barrier to independence for young adults with autismWhen teenagers and young adults with autism enter adulthood and age out of many of the services designed to help them, they often are anxious about how to handle new adult responsibilities such as paying bills and filing taxes. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating financial management into early education to empower young adults with autism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economicsA new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows how collaborations between psychologists and economists lead to better understanding of such decisions than either discipline can on its own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL's new perovskite ink opens window for quality cellsScientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a new perovskite ink with a long processing window that allows the scalable production of perovskite thin films for high-efficiency solar cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuelsScientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Individualizing health care one byte at a timeBased on a network that finds genes likely to be associated with disease or patient phenotype (symptoms), Robert Hoehndorf, Assistant Professor from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, his student Imane Boudellioua and several collaborators have developed an algorithm that can identify variants that modify the normal function of a gene associated with a spec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL establishes world record for solar hydrogen productionScientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.
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Viden

LIVE Se raket blive sendt i kredsløb i 360 graderFølg med live, når NASA for første opsender en raket, man kan følge i 360 graders video.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracing the puzzling origins of clinging jellyfishThe first genetic study of the diversity of clinging jellyfish populations around the globe has discovered some surprising links among distant communities of jellies and also revealed there may be more than one species of the infamous stinger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two in the pack: No changes for Isle Royale wolvesResearchers have released the annual Winter Study detailing updates on the ecology of Isle Royale National Park, which indicates no change in their small population of two.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oral contraceptives reduce general well-being in healthy womenOne of the most common combined oral contraceptive pills has a negative impact on women's quality of life but does not increase depressive symptoms. This is shown by a major randomized, placebo-controlled study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zinc supply affects cardiac healthIn addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle. When oxidative stress occurs, it may be due to a shortage of zinc, which can be determined by examining the heart muscle. A new study shows the relationship between the total amount of zinc in the body and cardiac function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cover crops may be used to mitigate and adapt to climate changeCover crops long have been touted for their ability to reduce erosion, fix atmospheric nitrogen, reduce nitrogen leaching and improve soil health, but they also may play an important role in mitigating the effects of climate change on agriculture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

X-linked intellectual disability: Medical mystery solved in record timeIn record-time detective work, a team of scientists narrowed down the genetic cause of intellectual disability in four male patients to a deletion of a small section of the X chromosome that had not been previously linked to a medical condition.
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Ars Technica

Google Earth gets a new home on the Web, fancy “guided tour” section Earth Day is coming up this weekend, and to celebrate, Google Earth received a major update today to version 9. This version is again designed to run in a Web browser (just Chrome for now), but there's now a standalone home for Google Earth at earth.google.com/web . The Android app has been updated, too (iOS is coming soon). Version 9 puts a big focus on guided tours via the "Voyager" section, wh
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New on MIT Technology Review

Plywood Drones Could Help the Marines Safely Deliver SuppliesA cheap, disposable glider that can carry 700-pound payloads could fly one-way cargo missions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Homing pigeons share our human ability to build knowledge across generationsHoming pigeons may share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others, improving their navigational efficiency over time, a new study has found. The ability to gather, pass on and improve on knowledge over generations is known as cumulative culture. Until now humans and, arguably some other primates, were the only species thought to be capable of it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Narcissism and social networkingSocial networks are an ideal stage for narcissists to showcase themselves. Accordingly, a lot of people with narcissistic traits are drawn to these platforms as a new study conducted by psychologists.
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Gizmodo

What Caused an Entire Yukon River to Vanish Almost Overnight? A river used to run through it. (Image: Dan Shugar/University of Washington Tacoma) Last summer, a team of geologists set out on an expedition to study Slims River in the Yukon, but when they got there, the once majestic river was nowhere to be seen. The scientists attribute the missing river to a retreating glacier, which caused a dramatic shift in the direction of water flow. It’s yet another e
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Gizmodo

The 10th Anniversary iPhone Sounds Like a Samsung Clone Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo According to Mark Gurman at Bloomberg , a traditionally reliable source for iPhone news, Apple’s tenth anniversary iPhone is shaping up to be the company’s most ambitious phone yet. The phone will be a nearly bezel-free slab of glass and stainless steel (or possibly aluminum), the home button will be dead, and a gorgeous OLED display will be the focal point. If you’re ha
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The Atlantic

What Is Janesville, Wisconsin, Without General Motors? Vice President Mike Pence ended his sixth week in the White House last month by following House Speaker Paul Ryan to the small city in southern Wisconsin that is the speaker’s hometown. When Pence arrived mid-morning in Janesville, Wisconsin, he met with a few local farmers and business owners. Before he left mid-afternoon, he got lunch at an Irish pub with photos of Ryan’s ancestors on the wall.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic river ice deposits rapidly disappearingClimate change is causing thick ice deposits that form along Arctic rivers to melt nearly a month earlier than they did 15 years ago, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potential cure for metastatic prostate cancer? Treatment combination shows early promiseIn the past, all forms of metastatic prostate cancer have been considered incurable. In recent years, the FDA has approved six drugs for men with metastatic disease, all of which can increase survival. In a study published in Urology®, researchers demonstrate for the first time that an aggressive combination of systemic therapy (drug treatment) with local therapy (surgery and radiation) directed a
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Ars Technica

Snapchat’s new World Lenses filter reality with 3D objects Enlarge (credit: YouTube, Snapchat) Filters that turn your face into a puppy's face and other silly effects have only been around on Snapchat for about a year. Now Snapchat is expanding those filters by letting users change the world around them. The company launched new World Lenses today, filters that can be applied to the world around you by placing 3D objects you can manipulate in your snaps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

John Glenn honored with launch of space station supply shipJohn Glenn's trailblazing legacy took flight Tuesday as a cargo ship bearing his name rocketed toward the International Space Station.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic river ice deposits rapidly disappearingClimate change is causing thick ice deposits that form along Arctic rivers to melt nearly a month earlier than they did 15 years ago, a new study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber banned in Czech Republic's second biggest cityA court has banned the ride-sharing service Uber from operating in Brno, the second largest city in the Czech Republic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's TCS records fourth quarter profitIndia's biggest IT sourcing firm Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) reported a 4.2 percent increase in quarterly earnings on Tuesday, just missing analysts' estimates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mummies discovered in ancient tomb near Egypt's Luxor (Update)Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed several mummies, colourful wooden sarcophagi and more than 1,000 funerary statues in a 3,500-year-old tomb near the city of Luxor, hailing an "important discovery".
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Futurity.org

Tiny clingfish in a jar is a brand new species A newly discovered species of clingfish has a set of teeth that could put a shark to shame. Scientists discovered and named the new genus and species of clingfish after stumbling upon a specimen preserved in a jar dating back to the 1970s. The fish was unmistakably different from the other 160 known clingfishes, named for the disc on their bellies that offers massive sticking power in wet, slimy
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Gizmodo

Give Your Eyes a Break With Vansky's HDTV Bias Lights, Now In Two Different Lengths Vansky White Bias Light , $11 with code CCT8XE05 | Vansky RGB Bias Light , $13 with code CCT8XE05 | 80" White Light , $13 with code WOA5L6NA | 80" RGB Light , $16 with code WOA5L6NA If you still haven’t tried out a home theater bias light, there’s never been a better time to pick one up. Vansky’s LED bias light strips plug directly into your TV’s USB port for power, and stick to the back of the s
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Ingeniøren

Bakterie kan gøre urandepoter mere sikreForsøg tyder på, at bakterier rent faktisk kan næres af atomaffald og i tilgift kan hjælpe henfaldsprocessen.
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Popular Science

Are ultra-long airplane flights bad for your health? Aviation Flying comes with a few health risks—but the biggest one might not be felt by passengers There are a few health risks linked to flying. What harm could a few extra hours do? Read on.
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Popular Science

The Oco smart security camera is your high-definition guard dog Sponsored Post Protect your most valuable assets, now 20 percent off MSRP. Protect your most valuable assets, now 20 percent off MSRP. Read on.
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Futurity.org

Marriage’s perks extend to LGBT older adults Marriage has been legal for same-sex couples for nearly two years—longer in some states—but the health benefits are already apparent, say researchers. For years, studies have linked marriage with happiness among heterosexual couples. The new study is among the first to explore the potential benefits of marriage among LGBT couples. “In the nearly 50 years since Stonewall, same-sex marriage went fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Banning transshipment at-sea necessary to curb illegal fishing, researchers concludeBanning transshipment at-sea—the transfer of fish and supplies from one vessel to another in open waters—is necessary to diminish illegal fishing, a team of researchers has concluded after an analysis of existing maritime regulations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequencesThe structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant sloth was vegetarian: Diet of fossil megatherium decodedScientists have examined the diet of the extinct Giant Sloth Megatherium. Based on analyses of the collagen in the fossil bones, the researchers concluded in their study that Megatherium subsisted on an exclusively vegetarian diet. Until recently, there had been much speculation about the food habits of these elephant-sized, ground-dwelling animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why don't fish freeze to death in icy water?Microgravity experiments revealed that supercooled water containing antifreeze glycoproteins accelerates and oscillates its ice crystal growth rate, contrary to what was expected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birds sing shorter songs in response to traffic noiseBirds sing differently in response to traffic noise, which potentially affects their ability to attract mates and defend their territory, according to research published in Bioacoustics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Motor neurons adjust to control tasks, new brain research revealsMotor cortical neurons optimally adjust how they encode movements in a task-specific manner, new research reveals. The findings enhance our understanding of how the brain controls movement and have the potential to improve the performance and reliability of brain-machine interfaces, or neural prosthetics, that assist paralyzed patients and amputees.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover birth-and-death life cycle of neurons in the adult mouse gutNew evidence refutes the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we're born with are the same ones we die with. The finding has profound implications for the understanding and treatment of disorders and diseases that affect the digestive system, say the researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Charisma-challenged? You can still be a good bossYou don't need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research. The new study is one of the first to examine how a leader's regulatory focus, or mindset, affects his or her own behavior and, in turn, employees' motivation.
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Futurity.org

Landslide on Ceres looks like Bart Simpson Massive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres, according to a new study. The work adds to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice. Published in Nature Geoscience , the study uses data from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft to identify three different types of landslides, or flow features, on the Texas-sized asteroid. Type I are rel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracing the puzzling origins of clinging jellyfishFor such small and delicate creatures, they can pack mighty painful stings. Known as clinging jellyfish because they attach themselves to seagrasses and seaweeds, Gonionemus is found along coastlines in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and in particular in waters near Vladivostok, Russia. Exactly how these jellyfish, long assumed to be native to the North Pacific, became so widely distributed thro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than othersHouse finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving new problems than their rural counterparts. They are able to solve new problems even when humans are around, says Meghan Cook of Arizona State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study investigated how increased urbanization and human presence af
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Narcissism and social networkingSocial networks are an ideal stage for narcissists to showcase themselves. Accordingly, a lot of people with narcissistic traits are drawn to these platforms as a new study conducted by psychologists from Würzburg and Bamberg shows.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can We Improve National Security Using What We Know about Face Recognition?Most people struggle at the job we ask passport officers to do -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Charisma-challenged? You can still be a good bossYou don't need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research led by Michigan State University business scholars.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Shock VR Users Into 'Feeling' Non-Existent Walls GIF: YouTube Physical therapy often involves the use of a device providing transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation—TENS, for short—that uses electrodes attached to the skin to stimulate the muscles beneath. But virtual reality researchers have found an alternate use for the shocking technology : to let someone in a virtual world feel walls that don’t exist. The human body already uses electri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to predict tumor growth described by research studyA new study describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Assay of nearly 5,000 mutations reveals roots of genetic splicing errorsBiologists have developed a new system that identified and tracked hundreds of genetic variations that alter the way DNA is spliced when cells make proteins, often leading to disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combating antibiotic resistance with 'handshake stewardship'The effectiveness of a unique type of antimicrobial stewardship program has been demonstrated in the fight against antibiotic (antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial) resistance. New research examined the impact a strategy known as 'handshake stewardship' can have on the use of antibiotics in a freestanding children's hospital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two in the pack: No changes for Isle Royale wolvesFor the second year in a row, the Isle Royale wolf population remains a mere two. Researchers from Michigan Tech say that as the wolf population stays stagnant, the moose population will continue to grow at a rapid pace. And this could have a significant impact on the island's famed forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Promising new drug development could help treat cachexiaAccording to the National Cancer Institute, nearly one-third of cancer deaths can be attributed to a wasting syndrome known as cachexia. Cachexia, an indicator of the advanced stages of disease, is a debilitating disorder that causes loss of appetite, lean body mass and can lead to multi-organ failure. Now, researchers have developed a drug that could reverse cachexia. The team currently is seekin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New battery coating could improve smart phones and electric vehiclesHigh performing lithium-ion batteries are a key component of laptops, smart phones, and electric vehicles. Currently, the anodes, or negative charged side of lithium ion batteries, are generally made with graphite or other carbon-based materials. Now a new discovery may help unravel a 40-year mystery and could greatly improve battery performance in electronic devices and electric vehicles
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Powered stretchers could reduce injuries, keep paramedics on the jobMoving from manual to powered stretchers could reduce the number of injuries to paramedics by 78 per cent, a study has found. The study found that paramedics who had access to stretchers with a battery-powered hydraulic system and an assisted ambulance-loading feature experienced significantly fewer musculoskeletal injuries on the job
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What makes pancreatic cancer so aggressive?Pancreatic cancer starts forming metastases early. The cancer itself, however, is usually only discovered late. This leads to a high patient mortality rate. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered why pancreatic cancer and other malignant types of tumors can disseminate so rapidly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequencesThe structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Banning transshipment at-sea necessary to curb illegal fishing, researchers concludeBanning transshipment at-sea -- the transfer of fish and supplies from one vessel to another in open waters -- is necessary to diminish illegal fishing, a team of researchers has concluded after an analysis of existing maritime regulations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zinc supply affects cardiac healthIn addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle. When oxidative stress occurs, it may be due to a shortage of zinc, which can be determined by examining the heart muscle. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows the relationship between the total amount of zinc in the body and cardiac function.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Origins of an enigmatic genus of Asian butterflies carrying mythological names decodedA group of rare Asian butterflies which have once inspired an association with Hindu mythological creatures have been quite a chaos for the experts. In fact, their systematics turned out so confusing that in order to decode their taxonomic placement, scientists had to dig up their roots some 43 million years back.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Face of woman from Tham Lod during Late Pleistocene reconstructed(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has used a relatively new facial approximation technique to reconstruct the face of a woman who lived approximately 13,640 years ago in what is now Thailand. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, the team describes the condition of the remains, where they were found, the methods used to ascertain details about the remains and the techniq
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Necessary Alliance between Conservationists and Rights AdvocatesDegradation of biodiversity is a double injustice that destroys ecosystems and impoverishes indigenous peoples -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Can Grade-Skipping Close the STEM Gender Gap? Jane Charlton never intended to skip high school. “I was planning on just skipping ninth grade,” says the renowned astrophysicist, who spent her summers taking calculus classes at Carnegie Mellon University. “But when the school year was about to start, the teachers went on strike and my math professor said, ‘Why don't you just start here?’” Three years later, Charlton received her bachelor’s deg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakdown of neutrophil protein causes severe autoimmune disease of blood vesselsPatients with a severe autoimmune disease that attacks the blood vessels lack the membrane form of a protein (SEMA4D) found in white blood cells, research reveals. The absence of membrane-bound SEMA4D prevents inflammation from being restrained in these patients, while increased soluble SEMA4D upregulates inflammatory signaling. The findings suggest SEMA4D could not only be used as a marker of dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Charisma-challenged? You can still be a good bossYou don't need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research led by Michigan State University business scholars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chaining up diarrhea pathogensResearchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oral contraceptives reduce general well-being in healthy womenOne of the most common combined oral contraceptive pills has a negative impact on women's quality of life but does not increase depressive symptoms. This is shown by a major randomized, placebo-controlled study conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with the Stockholm School of Economics. The results have been published in the scientific journal Fertility and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than othersHouse finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving problems than their rural counterparts. They are able to solve new problems even when humans are around, says Meghan Cook of Arizona State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study investigated how increased urbanization and human presence affect
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hopkins researchers discover birth-and-death life cycle of neurons in the adult mouse gutJohns Hopkins researchers today published new evidence refuting the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we're born with are the same ones we die with.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New brain research reveals that motor neurons adjust to control tasksNew research from Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh reveals that motor cortical neurons optimally adjust how they encode movements in a task-specific manner. The findings enhance our understanding of how the brain controls movement and have the potential to improve the performance and reliability of brain-machine interfaces, or neural prosthetics,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why don't fish freeze to death in icy water?Microgravity experiments revealed that supercooled water containing antifreeze glycoproteins accelerates and oscillates its ice crystal growth rate, contrary to what was expected.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism behind the electric charges generated by photosynthesisPhotosynthesis requires a mechanism to produce large amounts of chemical energy without losing the oxidative power needed to break down water. A Japanese research team has clarified part of this mechanism, marking another step towards the potential development of artificial photosynthesis.
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Dagens Medicin

Yngre Læger: Region ville ikke vise os Sundhedsplatformens business caseSiden forsommeren 2016 har Yngre Læger bedt Region Hovedstaden om at få lov til at se Sundhedsplatformens business case. Men Region Hovedstaden har ikke villet udleveret den.
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Dagens Medicin

Hjerneskadet psykiater får betinget domRetten i Holstebro har i dag idømt en hjerneskadet, tidligere psykiater 60 dages betinget fængsel for at have efterladt patient i hjælpeløs tilstand.
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Dagens Medicin

#16 Empatien, der forsvandtStår de medicinstuderendes empati til at redde?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better living through pressure—functional nanomaterials made easyUsing pressure instead of chemicals, a Sandia National Laboratories team has fabricated nanoparticles into nanowire-array structures similar to those that underlie the surfaces of touch-screens for sensors, computers, phones and TVs. The pressure-based fabrication process takes nanoseconds. Chemistry-based industrial techniques take hours.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Young gamers are inventing their own controllers to get around their disabilitiesNintendo's latest gaming device is unique. It can operate like a traditional home console, a tablet or a handheld gaming unit complete with miniature joystick. But for gamers with disabilities, the Nintendo Switch may still have many of the same problems as any other console. Yet some of these young gamers are inventing their own ways to get around the challenges of using devices not designed to m
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mega-constellation satellites will need 'rapid disposal'Good management of spacecraft mega-constellations can avoid polluting the orbital environment.
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Ars Technica

AMD launches 500-series graphics cards: RX 580 and RX 570 available now Enlarge AMD has a new range of graphics cards in the form the RX 580, RX 570, RX 560, and RX 550. All, bar the new RX 550, are slightly tweaked versions of the 400-series that debuted with RX 480 in June and feature the company's 14nm Polaris architecture. The RX 580 and RX 570 launch today at an MSRP of £185 and £165 for a 4GB version (8GB will also be available). The 2GB RX 560 launches in earl
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Advisers to Debate Paris Climate AgreementGroup will decide whether to push for U.S. pullout from emission-cutting global pact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Wait, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Has How Many Post-Credit Scenes?! Kathleen Kennedy says we could be close to a new Star Wars Story movie announcement. Dave Filoni says not to expect certain Rogue One locations in Rebels ’ final season. Get an early look at the cast of the Punisher Netflix show. Plus, tons of pictures from Doctor Who , and another familiar face is confirmed for Agents of SHIELD . Spoilers! Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 James Gunn also confirmed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Narcissism and social networkingSocial networks are an ideal stage for narcissists to showcase themselves. Accordingly, a lot of people with narcissistic traits are drawn to these platforms as a new study conducted by psychologists from Würzburg and Bamberg shows.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Origins of an enigmatic genus of Asian butterflies carrying mythological names decodedA group of rare Asian butterflies, which have once inspired an association with Hindu mythological creatures, have been quite a chaos for the experts. In fact, their systematics turned out so confusing that in order to decode their taxonomic placement, scientists had to dig up their roots some 43 million years back. Now, having shed new light on their ancestors, a team of researchers published the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSA professor's study describes new way to predict tumor growthA new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pinning down abuse on Google mapsA partnership between computer scientists at the University of California San Diego and Google has allowed the search giant to reduce by 70 percent fraudulent business listings in Google Maps. The researchers worked together to analyze more than 100,000 fraudulent listings to determine how scammers had been able to avoid detection -- albeit for a limited amount of time -- and how they made money.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

City of Hope researchers successfully prevent graft-versus-host diseaseCity of Hope researchers believe they may have found a way to prevent graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplants while retaining the transplants' positive effects on fighting leukemia and lymphoma. The preclinical study results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden iceMassive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study that adds to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harnessing heat to power computersHeat is commonly regarded as computing's mortal enemy. Two Nebraska researchers, however, flipped the question of how to keep computers cool to how to use heat as an alternative energy source.
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Gizmodo

Can Parents Sue If Their Kid Is Born With the 'Wrong' DNA? An animatronic baby at the London Science Museum. Photo: Getty It’s a nightmare scenario straight out of a primetime drama : a child-seeking couple visits a fertility clinic to try their luck with in-vitro fertilization, only to wind up accidentally impregnated by the wrong sperm. In a fascinating legal case out of Singapore, the country’s Supreme Court ruled that this situation doesn’t just cons
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests income inequality pushes people to take greater risks(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the University of North Carolina and the other with the University of Kentucky, has conducted two kinds of experiments with results suggesting that income inequality in a society can lead those on the bottom to take more risks in hopes of increasing their position. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Keith Payne, J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Massive exoplanet discovered using gravitational microlensing method(Phys.org)—Astronomers have found a new massive alien world using the gravitational microlensing technique. The newly detected exoplanet, designated MOA-2016-BLG-227Lb, is about three times more massive than Jupiter and orbits a distant star approximately 21,000 light years away. The finding was published Apr. 6 in a paper on arXiv.org.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Unnatural ResponsibilitiesSynthetic biology offers unusual rewards and risks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Trump will sign executive order to begin revamp of H-1B visa program Enlarge / President Donald Trump signing an executive order in February. (credit: Photo by Aude Guerrucci-Pool/Getty Images) President Donald Trump will sign an executive order today seeking changes to the H-1B visa program, which allows tens of thousands of foreign tech workers to come and work in the US each year. Trump will go to a manufacturing plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, to sign the order,
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Ars Technica

Firefox kills off Aurora channel to speed up release of new features Enlarge (credit: Francois Grandin/AFP/Getty Images) Firefox is killing off the Aurora release channel, which will improve the speed at which new features can be rolled out—hopefully by as much as six to eight weeks. As of April 18, there are now just three main stages for new Firefox features: Nightly (alpha), Beta (beta), and Release (stable). Here's a handy chart showing the new release cadence
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New Scientist - News

Odds that Tasmanian tigers are still alive are 1 in 1.6 trillionSupposed sightings have kept the dream of finding thylacines alive but mathematical models pour cold water on the claims
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s Violence Problem, Engineering an Astronaut, and Christianity vs. Transhumanism—The Download, April 18, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Gizmodo

Here's What Our Food Might Look Like in a Climate Change-Induced Dystopia Food scientists are already looking to some dramatic-sounding options, from bugs to lab-grown meat to large fish farms, in order to feed a world whose population could approach ten billion humans by 2050. Combined with climate change, the food of the distant future may look very different. Allie Wist, artist and associate art director at Saveur Magazine, collaborated on the photo series Flooded a
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Ingeniøren

Test afslører risiko for gasmangel under Tyra-renoveringEn række stresstests af Energinet.dk's gaslager i Stenlille har ført til, at lagerets beregnede kapacitet øjeblikkeligt reduceres med knap syv procent. Den væsentligt mindre kapacitet udfordrer forsyningssikkerheden under renovering af Tyra-feltet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could space travelers melt as they accelerate through deep space?Forty years ago, Canadian physicist Bill Unruh made a surprising prediction regarding quantum field theory. Known as the Unruh effect, his theory predicted that an accelerating observer would be bathed in blackbody radiation, whereas an inertial observer would be exposed to none. What better way to mark the 40th anniversary of this theory than to consider how it could affect human beings attemptin
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Gizmodo

This Discounted FoodSaver Vacuum Sealer Will Pay For Itself FoodSaver V2244 Vacuum Sealing System , $56 We’ve all had to throw away leftovers or cuts of meat and cheese that spent a little too much time in the fridge or freezer, but vacuum sealing your foods can keep them safe from freezer burn pretty much indefinitely, and dramatically extend their shelf life everywhere else. It sounds like an expensive proposition, but today only, Amazon’s selling the w
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Gizmodo

Watch a Rocket Launch in Glorious 360 Degrees for the First Time Ever Image: United Launch Alliance Watching a rocket launch is the most wholesome and exciting activity besides going on a rollercoaster or eating large quantities of cheese. Today, at around 11:11 am EDT, NASA, in coordination with United Launch Alliance (ULA) and Orbital ATK, will take things to the next level—the agency will be broadcasting the first-ever 360 degree live stream of a rocket launch.
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Videnskabens Verden

Den 8. marts forsøgte fem sydamerikanske kvinder at bestige en næsten 6.000 m. høj vulkan i Ecuador. Fire af dem havde aldrig dyrket bjergbestigning før. I denne udgave af Videnskabens Verden undersøger vi, hvad der sker med kroppen, når man udsætter den for bjergbestigningens strabadser - den tynde luft og den fysiske udmattelse. Og så bliver vi klogere på, hvordan et ustabilt blodsukker stresser
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Live Science

How Global Warming Diverted a RiverIn 2016, the global warming-induced retreat of one of Canada's largest glaciers altered the flow of its meltwater so much that it killed off one river and shunted its waters over to another, an abrupt geological act known as river piracy.
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New Scientist - News

Satellite swarms could increase space junk risk by 50 per centSpace-flight firms hope to democratise global internet access with thousands of new satellites, but that could catastrophically overcrowd low Earth orbit
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The Atlantic

Why Theresa May Called for Elections U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s decision to call for snap general elections on June 8, three years before they were scheduled to be conducted, reflects not only her professed frustration at the “game-playing” in Parliament, but also her increasing confidence of securing a political mandate to see through tough negotiations with the European Union over Brexit. Because May has called for early el
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Science | The Guardian

Food for thought: reconstructing the diet of Napoleon's Grand Army | Jennifer Raff A recent analysis from a 19th century mass grave has revealed the surprisingly complex dietary - and social - diversity among Napoleon’s armed forces Understanding the historic past can be incredibly challenging. Written records are only as accurate as the knowledge of the author, and historical narratives can be influenced by political orientations and specific agendas. Even accurate depictions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Air pollution may directly cause those year-round runny noses, according to a mouse studyAlthough human population studies have linked air pollution to chronic inflammation of nasal and sinus tissues, direct biological and molecular evidence for cause and effect has been scant. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers report that experiments in mice continually exposed to dirty air have revealed that direct biological effect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two in the pack: No changes for Isle Royale wolvesResearchers from Michigan Technological University have released the annual Winter Study detailing updates on the ecology of Isle Royale National Park.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammatory bowel diseases on the rise in very young Canadian childrenCanada has among the highest rates of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, and the number of children under five years old being diagnosed increased by 7.2 percent every year between 1999 to 2010.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why it's so offensive when we call people animalsComparing humans to animals is vexed but irresistible. We are animals, but animals who like to believe we are not merely animals. When we do liken people to other creatures – when sports fans use racial slurs or Donald Trump calls Syrian President Bashar al-Assad an "animal" – fur often flies.
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Futurity.org

This camera captures crazy detail with no long lens A new camera system doesn’t need a long lens to take a detailed micron-resolution image of a faraway object. The prototype reads a spot illuminated by a laser and captures the “speckle” pattern with a camera sensor. Raw data from dozens of camera positions feed into a computer program that interprets it and constructs a high-resolution image. The system known as SAVI—for “Synthetic Apertures for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where the old things are: Australia's most ancient treesThey say that trees live for thousands of years. Like many things that "they" say, there is a germ of truth in the saying (even though it is mostly false).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why can't cats resist thinking inside the box?Twitter's been on fire with people amazed by cats that seem compelled to park themselves in squares of tape marked out on the floor. These felines appear powerless to resist the call of the #CatSquare.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The giant sloth megatherium was a vegetarianTogether with an international team, Senckenberg scientists examined the diet of the extinct Giant Sloth Megatherium. Based on analyses of the collagen in the fossil bones, the researchers concluded in their study, which was recently published in the scientific journal "ScienceDirect," that Megatherium subsisted on an exclusively vegetarian diet. Until recently, there had been much speculation abo
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Ars Technica

The Mass Effect writing contest winner: Seashell research on the seashore Enlarge / No, this wasn't the winning entry—but wouldn't that have been awesome? (Image source unknown) "Send us Mass Effect fanfic," I said last week . "It's for a contest! You could be entered for a chance to win a copy of Andromeda and a nifty remote-controlled Nomad! Come on, it'll be fun!" We asked, and you delivered—and my inbox will never be quite the same. Sorting through the entries was
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Latest Headlines | Science News

There’s still a lot we don’t know about the protonResearchers are puzzling over the proton's radius, spin and whether it decays.
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WIRED

Trump’s $1 Trillion Bill Can’t Fix US Roads—These Ideas Could The future of road funding beckons. The post Trump's $1 Trillion Bill Can't Fix US Roads—These Ideas Could appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Aw Yiss: You Can Now Play Old-School Mac Games in Your Browser The web-based Macintosh emulator offers a beep of nostalgia---no floppy disks required. The post Aw Yiss: You Can Now Play Old-School Mac Games in Your Browser appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

How to Watch Facebook F8 Facebook's big F8 gathering takes place Tuesday and Wednesday, and you can watch the whole thing online. The post How to Watch Facebook F8 appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Meet the Cute, Wobbly Robot That Started the AI Revolution Have you ever relied on your smartphone's maps to get around? Asked Siri to find you the best dim sum? Then you owe Shakey some thanks. The post Meet the Cute, Wobbly Robot That Started the AI Revolution appeared first on WIRED .
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Popular Science

Why basic biology is so important in biomedical research Health Excerpt: Rigor Mortis The search for a treatment for this deadly degenerative disease is rife with studies so poorly designed that they offered nothing more than false hope for people…
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Live Science

Captured: First 'Image' of the Dark Matter That Holds Universe TogetherResearchers have produced what they say is the first composite image of a dark matter filament that connects galaxies across the cosmos.
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Futurity.org

Shark count yields surprising numbers Scientists know that shark populations have declined over the past several decades, but vital baseline information has been missing. A new study is bringing the numbers into focus. Researchers conducted an eight-year study of a healthy shark population on Palmyra, a remote, uninhabited atoll in the central Pacific Ocean. The pristine ecosystem is part of a marine refuge that extends 50 nautical m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why don't fish freeze to death in icy water?In the microgravity experiments at the International Space Station (ISS), scientists revealed that supercooled water containing antifreeze glycoproteins accelerates and oscillates its ice crystal growth rate. This seemingly contradictory result may lead to a better understanding of the mysterious antifreeze effect in living organisms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's back in the satellite business with a new launchThe first Australian-built satellites to be launched in 15 years are set to take off this week from Cape Canaveral in Florida.
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Gizmodo

Blade Runner Pistol Is Being Turned Into...A Water Gun [Image: Movieclips ] Blade Runner ’s blaster already has a number of expensive replicas. This summer, it’s getting a water gun. Japanese gun model maker Ryosuke Takagi previously did his version of Deckard’s PKD Blaster from Blade Runner . [Image: Zospec ] [Image: Zospec ] [Image: Zospec ] As these Zospec photos show, it’s an impressive piece, costing around $600—or more. That replica is the basi
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Science | The Guardian

Rob Newman thinks scientists belittle people. I sympathise: science is unsettling Comedian Rob Newman is angry because he thinks scientists are too ready to devalue people and to belittle human experience. And that made me … curious In an interview in last Sunday’s Observer , comedian Rob Newman passed judgement on the scientific community. “Scientists think we’re all stupid,” he claimed. Worse still, we appear to him to be consumed by the view that “the nastier you can be abo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D image of bacterial machine that injects toxins into cells and spreads antibiotic resistanceExperts predict that by 2050, antibiotic-resistant bacteria will cause as many deaths as cancer. Now, for the first time, Caltech scientists have created a 3-D image of a molecular structure that many different bacteria use to pump toxins into human cells and spread antibiotic-resistance genes to other bacteria. Understanding the architecture of this structure is a first step toward combating its
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Live Science

#CatSquare: Why Fluffy Can't Resist Thinking 'Inside the Box'Twitter recently blew up with posts wondering about the feline fascination with taped squares on the ground. An animal behavior expert explains it's not magic that draws Fluffy to the #CatSquare.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracing the puzzling origins of clinging jellyfishThe first genetic study of the diversity of clinging jellyfish populations around the globe has discovered some surprising links among distant communities of jellies and also revealed there may be more than one species of the infamous stinger. The paper published April 18 in the journal Peer J.
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The Neurocritic

The Big Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience, Explained Are emergent properties really for losers? Why are architectures important? What are “mirror neuron ensembles” anyway? My last post presented an idiosyncratic distillation of the Big Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience symposium, presented by six speakers at the 2017 CNS meeting. Here I’ll briefly explain what I meant in the bullet points. In some cases I didn't quite understand what the speaker mean
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Doom and gloom won't save the world The best way to encourage conservation is to share our success stories, not to write obituaries for the planet, says Nancy Knowlton. Nature 544 271 doi: 10.1038/544271a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian CubeSat prepared for launch by NASAA University of Adelaide-built satellite will be launched early tomorrow morning by NASA from Cape Canaveral in Florida, on the Atlas V rocket bound for the International Space Station.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chaining up diarrhoea pathogensResearchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance.
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Scientific American Content: Global

North Dakota Is a Laboratory for the Future of Alzheimer's in U.S.The state with the second highest death rate has created innovative approaches to assist caregivers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Yellowstone National Park: The Early Years (Photos)Take a glimpse back in time to the early years of Yellowstone National Park.
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NYT > Science

Dinner With a Dung BeetleIn this 360° video, get an up-close look at how a dung beetle in Laikipia, Kenya, prepares a meal.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sunken Pleasure: California Will Need Mountains of Sand to Save Its BeachesUp to two thirds of SoCal’s sandy shores may erode by 2100 without extra human help -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Saga of North Carolina’s Contaminated Water The Trump administration has not been shy about its skepticism of programs designed to protect the environment. Donald Trump has said that environmental regulations are “out of control,” he has proposed slashing the budget and staffing levels at the Environmental Protection Agency, and he has appointed as head of that agency Scott Pruitt, who has spent a career repeatedly backing business over re
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 18, 2017 —U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May calls for fresh elections on June 8. —Arkansas officials bid to carry out the state’s first execution in more than a decade fails. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Technology Behind Bitcoin Is Shaking Up Much More Than MoneyBlockchains are being used to trace blood diamonds, verify health records, and secure supply chains.
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WIRED

Sneaky Exploit Allows Phishing Attacks From Sites That Look Secure When a phishing attack can impersonate a trusted site it's even harder to know that it's happening. The post Sneaky Exploit Allows Phishing Attacks From Sites That Look Secure appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Pain Her skin is perpetually on fire. He can't even feel a bone break. Together they might hold the key to ending America's opioid epidemic. The post How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Pain appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Watch NASA Launch 38 Itty Bitty Satellites to the ISS The ISS is a major launch platform for CubeSats—it has ejected more than 100 small payloads from companies and universities into orbit in the past few years. The post Watch NASA Launch 38 Itty Bitty Satellites to the ISS appeared first on WIRED .
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Science : NPR

Researchers Examine The Psychology Of Protest Movements Social science researchers examine whether extreme protest tactics are an effective way for recruiting popular support. The public may not be relating to protesters like the way protesters aimed for.
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Gizmodo

Olympian Declares That North Korea Is One of the Few Countries That Has Tackled Obesity Double Olympic gold medal winning rower James Cracknell in 2008 (Photo by Cate Gillon/Getty Images) James Cracknell is a British athlete and two-time gold medal Olympian. But now he has his sights set on politics. His pet issue? Tackling obesity. But wait until you hear what he believes are model countries for battling the obesity epidemic. Spit take warning: You may want to slowly put any hot be
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Bacteria-Laden Poop Is Killing American Squash and MelonsA deadly microscopic foe is giving the gourds “heart failures” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interfacial dynamics research may make industry machines safer, more efficientResearchers with the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University are taking complex interactions between drops of water and material surfaces and conducting fundamental research to understand why some droplets adhere to surfaces and why others don't.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers observe heat exchange in an exotic materialIn an article published today in the journal Nature, physicists report the first ever observation of heat conductance in a material containing anyons, quantum quasiparticles that exist in two-dimensional systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

LHCb finds new hints of possible deviations from the Standard ModelThe LHCb experiment finds intriguing anomalies in the way some particles decay. If confirmed, these would be a sign of new physics phenomena not predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. The observed signal is still of limited statistical significance, but strengthens similar indications from earlier studies. Forthcoming data and follow-up analyses will establish whether these hints are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Statistical monitoring technology can detect serious falls and immediately warn healthcare providersFalls by elderly people can cause serious injury or death if sufferers remain on the ground for too long. By combining data from both wearable sensors and video surveillance, a team at KAUST has developed a statistical scheme that detects when senior citizens or others need help after falling1.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden iceMassive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, adding to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice.
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NYT > Science

The Climate Issue: Is It O.K. to Tinker With the Environment to Fight Climate Change?Scientists are investigating whether releasing tons of particulates into the atmosphere might be good for the planet. Not everyone thinks this is a good idea.
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NYT > Science

The Climate Issue: When Rising Seas Transform Risk Into CertaintyAlong parts of the East Coast, the entire system of insuring coastal property is beginning to break down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mountain clouds—from rain makers to snow makersMountains challenge skiers, climbers, and road builders. But when it comes to clouds, they offer an assist. Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Colorado State University found that mountainous, water-ice (a.k.a. mixed-phase) clouds have a dual response when injected with numerous tiny pollution particles. Their study showed that pollution particles near the Sierra Nevada Mou
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Science | The Guardian

Science strikes back: anti-Trump march set to draw thousands to Washington Scientists are ditching their labs for the streets in a mass protest against the Trump administration’s war on facts, but will the effort resonate with skeptics? On Saturday, thousands of scientists are set to abandon the cloistered neutrality of their laboratories to plunge into the the political fray against Donald Trump in what will likely be the largest-ever protest by science advocates. The
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ancient Stone Tools Force Rethinking of Human Origins3.3-million-year-old artifacts from Kenya upend the classic story of when and how humans became innovators -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Regeringen vil betale tyske myndigheder for hurtigere behandling af Femern-ansøgning12.600 tyskere har klaget over Femernforbindelsen. For at fremskynde klagebehandlingen tilbyder den danske regering nu at give de slesvig-holstenske myndigheder penge til at ansætte flere sagsbehandlere.
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Ingeniøren

Machine learning er nu bedre end læger til at forudsige hjerteanfald Hvert år dør mellem 15 og 20 millioner mennesker af hjertestop. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/machine-learning-nu-bedre-end-laeger-at-forudsige-hjerteanfald-1075647 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Amazon: Nødvendigt at bringe computerkraft tættere på kunderne Hos Amazon Web Service er det kunderne, der driver innovationen, og lige nu vil de have edge computing, hvor cloud har sine begrænsninger. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/amazon-paa-kanten-1075648 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Værsgo' - 100 nye stillinger at vælge og vrage imellem Der er gode muligheder for, at drømmejobbet ligger og venter dig lige her. I løbet af påskedagene er indløbet næsten 100 nye stillingsopslag med adresser i både den pulserende storby og det idylliske fiskerleje https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-vaersgo-100-nye-stillinger-at-vaelge-vrage-imellem-7627 Jobfinder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making the bed just right for alkali beesLast summer, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) entomologist Jim Cane spent a week visiting alfalfa fields near the town of Touchet, in Walla Walla County, Washington. He wasn't scouting for insect threats or damage to the legume crop. Instead, he was collecting data on the alkali bee, a solitary, ground-nesting species that alfalfa seed growers count on for peak yields. Alfalfa seed is sold to g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher proposes answer for why cave animals go blindWhy do animals that live in caves become blind? This question has long intrigued scientists and been the subject of hot debate.
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The Atlantic

How Late-Night Comedy Fueled the Rise of Trump A month after the election, Trevor Noah, the host of The Daily Show , published an op‑ed in The New York Times that sought to position himself and his show as instruments of healing in a broken land. It was called “Let’s Not Be Divided, Divided People Are Easier to Rule,” and it zapped around progressives’ inboxes and Facebook feeds like a digital balm of Gilead. It was a reminder that we were no
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The Atlantic

What Was the Most Significant Environmental Catastrophe of All Time? Donald Worster, environmental historian The worst environmental catastrophe in Earth’s history occurred 66 million years ago, when an asteroid struck, killing an estimated 70 percent of all species. Nothing humans have done compares. But the 1930s Dust Bowl was the worst catastrophe in America’s history, and such a phenomenon may become global as the world’s climate changes. John McNeill, history
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The Atlantic

Apps for Refugees In September 2015, the body of Aylan Kurdi, a 3-year-old Syrian migrant, washed up on a Turkish beach. The boy had fallen off a rubber raft provided by a smuggler who had promised the boy’s father a motorboat. As the startling images of the drowned boy spread, they prompted an outpouring of humanitarian aid—including from the tech sector, which wanted to help prevent the next Aylan from drowning.
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The Atlantic

The Conversation How to Build an Autocracy In the March cover story, David Frum wrote that corruption and intimidation by the president is possible “only if many people other than Donald Trump agree to permit it. It can all be stopped, if individual citizens and public officials make the right choices.” I am currently a senior in high school studying comparative politics. The part of this article that struck me t
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The Atlantic

Jet-Age Chic 1 Ezra Stoller / Esto It was the world’s most famous airport terminal 1 , and the most beloved project of the mid-century architect Eero Saarinen 2 . Likened to a bird taking off, the TWA Flight Center at New York’s Kennedy airport comprises four vaulted concrete shells perched lightly on the ground. There are few walls; instead, the exterior is dominated by canted banks of windows. 2 Photoquest
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The Atlantic

Golden State Warrior Xavier Becerra, the new attorney general of California, paused midway through his breakfast to issue a warning to the president of the United States. “Be careful ,” he said in a singsongy voice. “Be careful !” A wicked smile appeared. The previous day, Super Bowl Sunday, Donald J. Trump had told Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly that “California in many ways is out of control” and suggested that one way t
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The Atlantic

A Primal and Eccentric Family Drama “I ’m sure that you will be an artist one day, Mike. I’m convinced of it. Everything you do has such style ,” Auntie Hankie told the nephew she adored “beyond life itself.” Young Michael Frank thrilled to his childless aunt’s attention, her talk, her certainty that he was special, “her spark—her sparkle.” He lived for their frequent outings together in and around Los Angeles, after school as well
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The Atlantic

Mexico’s Revenge When Donald Trump first made sport of thumping Mexico—when he accused America’s neighbor of exporting rapists and “bad hombres,” when he deemed the country such a threat that it should be contained by a wall and so clueless that it could be suckered into paying for its own encasement—its president responded with strange equilibrium. Enrique Peña Nieto treated the humiliation like a meteorological
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The Atlantic

How Online Shopping Makes Suckers of Us All As Christmas approached in 2015, the price of pumpkin-pie spice went wild. It didn’t soar, as an economics textbook might suggest. Nor did it crash. It just started vibrating between two quantum states. Amazon’s price for a one-ounce jar was either $4.49 or $8.99, depending on when you looked. Nearly a year later, as Thanksgiving 2016 approached, the price again began whipsawing between two diffe
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The Atlantic

Puppy Love Neutering your pet isn’t exactly an aesthetic decision. But if for some reason you find Buddy’s postprocedural appearance disconcerting, you have options—like Neuticles, a set of testicular implants that promises to give your pet a more “natural” look. The manufacturer claims to have sold more than 500,000 implants, prompting a question: Just how big is the pet economy? According to the American
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The Atlantic

Big in Australia: Snacktivism To the list of 2016’s surreal happenings, add one more: In Australia, a Styrofoam box filled with meat and french fries became a symbol of liberal values and tolerance. Late in 2015, five friends jokingly created the Halal Snack Pack Appreciation Society, a Facebook group for enthusiasts of a dish combining halal meat, fries, and cheese, layered with what they called a “Holy Trinity” of sauces—ga
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The Atlantic

Alec Baldwin Gets Under Trump’s Skin 点击这里阅读中文版本 | Read this article in Chinese. Alec Baldwin collapses onto his dressing-room couch at Saturday Night Live like a man participating too enthusiastically in a trust fall. He is 58 years old. He has three children under 4. He has been dividing what’s left of his time between filming a movie with Emilio Estevez in Cincinnati and answering the call from NBC whenever it comes, which, becaus
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The Atlantic

Seam The pain can be endured until it can’t. The therapy will work until it won’t. The light will fill the room until it’s out. The kisses halt, or should, when one says “Don’t!” And sleep will come as long as you can wait. The weavers—bird and spider, human being— are born to knot and net, a kind of fate. And every seamless garment has a seam. Where no horizon’s visible, the dawn breaks out like a fl
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The Atlantic

How to Trick People Into Saving Money Late last summer , Dawn Paquin started keeping her money on a prepaid debit card from Walmart instead of in a traditional checking account. The wages from her factory job—she works from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m., inspecting blades on industrial bread-slicing machines—now go directly onto the Visa-branded card, which she can use like a regular debit card, though unlike most debit cards, it is not linked to
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The Atlantic

Turning Pain Into Art Elizabeth Bishop , then 35, and Robert Lowell, almost 30, met in 1947 at a dinner in New York City hosted by Randall Jarrell. They struck up an unusual lifelong friendship fueled by mutual admiration, genuine devotion, and the fact that they rarely saw each other—which meant that in their correspondence they could divulge their best and worst selves, without the friction of actual contact. Each f
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The Atlantic

Poet on the Edge If the number of bullyboys, bootlickers, power nerds, language goons, and slithering propagandists in society remains more or less constant, inflammations and outbreaks notwithstanding, then so—thank God—does the number of poets. And while the former, breathing heavily, go about their work of flattening and coarsening the imagination, the latter are helplessly dedicated to its renewal. They’re mo
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The Atlantic

A Match Made in Heaven Donald Trump has never been known for displays of Christian humility. The first few minutes of his remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast in February were no exception. He thanked the creator of Celebrity Apprentice and, pronouncing Arnold Schwarzenegger a “total disaster,” asked the audience to pray for the show’s ratings. Trump went on to remind everyone that he is a billionaire, “somebody th
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Scientific American Content: Global

Humans and Technology: From Reshaping Stone to Reshaping Our World -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: James Webb Space Telescope lights out inspectionAfter completion of its vibration and acoustic testing in March, the James Webb Space Telescope – JWST – is shown here undergoing a detailed 'lights out' inspection in one of NASA's cleanrooms at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The new game of Russian Roulette for fire-prone ecosystemsIncreasing prolonged periods of severe hot and dry weather during the first summer after wildfires is inhibiting vegetation recovery and causing loss of plant diversity, according to a new international study on climate change.
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Dagens Medicin

Fejl på alarmcentral sletter 93.760 ambulanceopkald »Stram op«, lyder det fra sundhedsministeren til Region Hovedstaden.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Rescued bears settle in to new life in UkraineThe two brown bears were found by Ukrainian charity Four Paws.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Success in recognizing digits and monosyllables with high accurary from brain activity measurementA Japanese research collaborative has developed a technology that can recognize the numbers zero to nine with 90 percent accuracy using electroencephalogram (EEG) readings while the subject utters the numbers. Furthermore, the technology can also recognize 18 types of Japanese monosyllables from EEG signals with 60 percent accuracy, demonstrating the possibility of an EEG-activated typewriter in t
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Ingeniøren

Termisk forgasning taber kampen til biogas og naturgasNy rapport viser, at den termiske forgasningsteknologi ikke er samfundsmæssigt konkurrencedygtig med naturgas og biogas, så længe naturgas fortsat er relativt billig og tilladt.
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Science | The Guardian

A veggie burger that bleeds? Now the ‘clean meat’ revolution is cooking on gas | Brian KatemanPlant-based products meant to resemble animal foods are becoming even more convincing and delicious – and lowering the barriers to a vegan lifestyle Some of the most anticipated and iconic promises of the future have come up empty. There are no flying cars, interstellar teleporters, floating hoverboards, or fully functional, live-in robotic house cleaners. Not only have we not colonised Mars – we
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Gizmodo

Wait, Does Donald Trump Know the Leader of North Korea's Name? President Donald Trump sits at the kids’ craft table during the 139th Easter Egg Roll at the White House on April 17, 2017 (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) The United States stands on the brink of war with North Korea. As Vice President Pence said yesterday, the “era of strategic patience is over.” But it’s becoming increasingly clear that President Trump might not know the name of North
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen plans all-electric car for China next yearVolkswagen, Europe's biggest automaker, plans to launch its first pure-electric car in China next year as Beijing steps up pressure on the industry to reduce reliance on gasoline.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pigeon study takes on sexism in science: Big differences in genes involved in reproductive controlIn experimental research, scientists tend to assume that—unless they are looking specifically at reproduction or sexual behavior—male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males. But a new study by researchers at the University of California, Davis and the University of New Hampshire, published April 18 in Scientific Reports, shows surprisingly big differences in tissue gene expression betw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Homing pigeons share our human ability to build knowledge across generationsHoming pigeons may share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others, improving their navigational efficiency over time, a new Oxford University study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pigeon study takes on sexism in scienceIn experimental research, scientists tend to assume that male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males. But a new study by researchers at UC Davis and the University of New Hampshire, published April 18 in Scientific Reports, shows surprisingly big differences in tissue gene expression between male and female rock doves. The work is part of an attempt to make science more gender-inclusiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CNIC scientists discover how a decades-old drug reduces the size of a heart attackThe beta-blocker metoprolol can limit cardiac damage in patients having a heart attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-fat, high-carb diet a cause of osteoarthritisSaturated fat is a prime suspect in the onset of osteoarthritis after QUT scientists found it changed the composition of cartilage, particularly in the weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Homing pigeons share our human ability to build knowledge across generationsHoming pigeons may share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others, improving their navigational efficiency over time, a new Oxford University study has found.The ability to gather, pass on and improve on knowledge over generations is known as cumulative culture. Until now humans and, arguably some other primates, were the only species thought to be capable of it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acute exposure to Vype vapor has limited impact on gene expression in human lung cellsNew research shows that at equivalent or higher doses of nicotine, acute exposure to e-cigarette vapor has very limited impact on gene expression compared to cigarette smoke. Scientists at British American Tobacco used nicotine as a reference point and exposed MucilAir™, a realistic in vitro 3-D model of a human airway, to e-cigarette vapor and cigarette smoke to assess their comparative effect on
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Ingeniøren

Nu skal også høreapparatet på nettetHvorfor gå hele vejen ned til butikken for at få apparatet indstillet, når det kan gøres via nettet?
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Science : NPR

Nonprofit Working To Block Drug Imports Has Ties To Pharma Lobby An organization campaigning against foreign drug imports has deep connections to the lobbying group PhRMA, which includes Eli Lilly, Pfizer and Bayer, an analysis by Kaiser Health News reveals. (Image credit: Bill Diodato/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

How the Tax-Filing Process Confuses Americans About Tax Policy Most Americans don’t understand how their country’s tax system works. Even smart, educated, politically engaged people often get confused about tax policy, and the problem arises not just from what people learn from politicians or through partisan media coverage. Over the last three years, I’ve been conducting surveys of hundreds of Americans and interviewing dozens of them, trying to capture not
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The Atlantic

Grover Norquist, the Happiest Man in Washington A s Grover Norquist dug into his egg-white frittata, he could barely contain his glee. “If you try and explain American politics by looking at one election, even a presidential election, you miss the forest for the tree,” the founder of Americans for Tax Reform and longtime liberal bogeyman told me over an early-morning breakfast, spearing halves of grape tomato with his fork. “It’s the most inte
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The Atlantic

The Districts Where Democrats Might Find the Next Georgia 6 The suburban Atlanta House district holding a special election Tuesday to replace former Representative Tom Price, now President Trump’s secretary of health and human services, is a most unlikely bellwether. The sixth congressional district in Georgia has been reliably Republican for decades. Since Price was first elected there in 2004, he never carried less than 60 percent of its vote. Mitt Romn
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Science : NPR

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout Native cutthroat trout, an iconic part of the mountain West, thrive in cold streams. But warmer weather has allowed invaders to move in — and it's killing off the cutthroats. (Image credit: Jonny Armstrong/USGS)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds sing shorter songs in response to traffic noiseBirds sing differently in response to traffic noise, which potentially affects their ability to attract mates and defend their territory, according to research published in Bioacoustics. The study found that a species of North American flycatcher sings shorter songs at a lower range of frequencies in response to traffic noise levels. The researchers suggest traffic noise reduction, for example thr
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Dagens Medicin

Yngste kirurg er 61 år Sygehuset i Thisted satser på seniorlæger. Yngstemanden blandt organkirurgerne er 61 år.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New era for nature in ColombiaResearchers are embarking on a major collaboration to characterise Colombia's plant and animal life, from densely rich cloud forests to little-seen museum collections.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan opdateres antivirusprogrammer?En læser undrer sig over, hvordan antivirusprogrammerne bliver holdt opdateret, og hvor på nettet der bliver fisket efter vira. Det svarer Kaspersky på.
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The Atlantic

The Link Between Opioids and Unemployment In 2015, more Americans died from drug overdoses than from car accidents and gun homicides combined. That’s according to a startling interactive story published by The New York Times recently, which also noted that since 1990, drug-overdose deaths have increased by 500 percent. A new study suggests unemployment might be one of the factors behind that dramatic rise. The paper, published by NBER la
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Dagens Medicin

Ny professor forsker i hjerter
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For young adults, cigarettes more pleasurable with alcohol than with potYoung adults get more pleasure from smoking cigarettes while they are drinking alcohol than they do while using marijuana, according to a new UC San Francisco study.
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The Atlantic

A New Exhibit in the Case for the Black Lives Matter Movement The sight of a police officer interacting with a member of the public causes a significant if unknown number of Americans to reach for their cell phones and start recording, just in case. It isn’t that they believe all cops to be abusive or dishonest––just enough to warrant vigilance. “Take your phone out, take your phone out!” a Georgia resident told a companion as they watched Sergeant Michael
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Dagens Medicin

Ældre har ikke gavn af behandling med levothyroxinUdbredt behandling af mildt underaktiv skjoldbruskkirtel hos ældre er uden effekt, viser nyt studie med dansk deltagelse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds sing shorter songs in response to traffic noiseBirds sing differently in response to traffic noise, which potentially affects their ability to attract mates and defend their territory, according to research published in Bioacoustics.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Forskningens døgn vendt på hovedetMød op til en samtale om, hvordan originale idéer opstår og kan forfølges....
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Science-Based Medicine

Vital Stem: Affordable Stem Cell Treatments for Everyone? Anti-Aging Breakthrough?Vital Stem is a dietary supplement mixture that supposedly reverses the changes of normal aging by increasing the body's production of stem cells. We can't know if it works, because it hasn't been tested.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump order would target high skilled worker visa programPresident Donald Trump is planning to sign an executive order that seeks to make changes to a visa program that brings in high-skilled workers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endangered species poached in protected areas: WWFIllegal poaching, logging and fishing of sometimes critically endangered species is taking place in nearly half of the world's most protected natural sites, environmental campaigners WWF warned Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Orbital to launch cargo to space station TuesdayA rocket packed with food and supplies for the astronauts living at the International Space Station is scheduled to blast off Tuesday from a NASA launch pad.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Live, long and black giant shipworm found in PhilippinesScientists find live specimens of the giant shipworm, described as "rare and enigmatic".
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Live Science

Could Eye Drops Help You Recover from Jet Lag Someday?The biological clock is located deep in the brain, but it may be possible to reset it by targeting certain cells in a person's eyes, a new study finds.
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Science | The Guardian

Jürgen Schmidhuber on the robot future​: ‘They will pay as much attention to us as we do to ants' The German computer scientist says artificial intelligence will surpass humans’ in 2050, enabling robots to have fun, fall in love – and colonise the galaxy In a soft-furnished studio space behind a warehouse in west Berlin, a group of international scientists are debating our robot future. An engineer from a major European carmaker is just finishing a cautiously optimistic progress report on sel
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Gizmodo

Steve Ballmer is About to Drop a Massive Data Dump on How Tax Dollars are Spent Photo: Getty It’s always a good time to check in on former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. It seems that since he retired he’s been bored. So, he decided to pour millions of dollars into figuring out how the U.S. government spends his millions (billions?) of dollars in taxes. And he’s releasing all of that data on tax day so the public can know how their money is spent as well. We’ll just quote the
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Science | The Guardian

Broadband expansion could trigger dangerous surge in space junk Increase in orbital traffic from thousands of communications satellites could lead to 50% rise in catastrophic crashes, says study Plans to launch “mega constellations” of thousands of communications satellites to allow for global wireless internet could lead to a rise in collisions and build-up of dangerous space junk in Earth’s orbit, a study warns. Google, SpaceX, Boeing and Samsung are among
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cognitive science

Surgically disconnected temporal pole exhibits resting functional connectivity with remote brain regions submitted by /u/bluebaldric [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren

Privacy eksperiment identificerer dig blandt titusinder af brugere kun ud fra browser Franske sikkerhedsresearchere lancerer hjemmesiderobot for at gøre internetbrugere opmærksomme på deres ikke eksisterende anonymitet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/privacy-eksperiment-kan-identificere-dig-blandt-titusinder-brugere-kun-ud-browser-1075632 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Hackerjæger: Nye kryptovaluta vil give politiet efterforskningsmæssig hovedpine De kriminelle har fået kig på andre kryptovaluta-teknologier end bitcoin, som kan gøre opklaringsarbejdet sværere, mener ekspert. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hackerjaeger-nye-kryptovaluta-vil-give-politiet-efterforskningsmaessig-hovedpine-1075432 Version2
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WIRED

Facebook F8 Liveblog: Get the Latest News as It Happens Join our Facebook F8 liveblog with David Pierce and Brian Barrett. We're going live at 9 am PDT, one hour before Mark Zuckerberg's keynote. The post Facebook F8 Liveblog: Get the Latest News as It Happens appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

The Amazing Star Wars Homages Hidden in Rogue One's Soundtrack Image: Disney/Lucasfilm Composer Michael Giacchino joined Rogue One very late in the game —to the point he allegedly had just four weeks to create his soundtrack for the film. The fact he even managed it was impressive, but as this video shows, Giacchino pulled off a soundtrack filled with intriguing cues and homages to the Star Wars work of John Williams. We’ve featured the musical analysis work
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabinoids may soothe certain skin diseases, say CU Anschutz researchersCannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common antibiotic azithromycin not linked to increased risk of abnormal heartbeatThe commonly used antibiotic azithromycin is not linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia, an often life-threatening rapid, irregular heartbeat, according to a large study published in CMAJ.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Growing Case for GeoengineeringAs climate change accelerates, a handful of scientists are eager to move ahead with experiments testing ways to counteract warming artificially. Their reasoning: we just might get desperate enough to use this technology one day.
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Gizmodo

What Happens When a Person Has an Epiphany? Source: Universal Pictures The entire industry of puzzle gaming is held up on the joy of problem-solving and the endorphin rush that is felt when a player suddenly figures it out. Science knows very little about that brief moment when we all just get it and in a new study, researchers have attempted to gain some insight by watching people have epiphanies. A new study published today in Proceeding
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Ingeniøren

Kæmperegning for at sælge ud af seruminstitut: 133 millioner brugt på it og konsulenterDet indbragte staten godt en kvart milliard kr. at sælge to dele af seruminstituttet, men godt halvdelen blev brugt til it og konsulenter, viser nyt svar.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nano-SPEARs gently measure electrical signals in small animalsMicroscopic probes simplify the process of measuring electrical activity in the cells of small living animals. The technique could revolutionize data-gathering for disease characterization and drug interactions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New era of Western wildfire demands new ways of protecting people, ecosystemsCurrent wildfire policy can't adequately protect people, homes and ecosystems from the longer, hotter fire seasons climate change is causing, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electronics to control plant growthA drug delivery ion pump constructed from organic electronic components also works in plants. Researchers have used such an ion pump to control the root growth of a small flowering plant, the thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study offers hope, sheds light on how vets respond to traumaA new study of military veterans who went through trauma finds that those veterans who have related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also more likely to experience 'post-traumatic growth' -- such as an increased appreciation of life, awareness of new possibilities and enhanced inner strength.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Detergent' molecules may be driving fluctuations in atmospheric methane concentrationsResearchers have found that changes in the amount of hydroxyl in the atmosphere may be responsible for the recent increase in global methane that started in 2007.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Success in recognizing ddigits and monosyllables with high accurary from brain activity measurementA research group led by Emeritus Professor Tsuneo Nitta at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a technology that can recognize the numbers 0 to 9 with 90 percent accuracy using brain waves, or electroencephalogram (EEG), while uttering the numbers. Furthermore, the technology has realized the recognition of 18 types of Japanese monosyllables from EEG signals with 60 percent accuracy,
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Gizmodo

The Crew Sends Their Last Messages to Earth in These Eerie New Alien: Covenant Promos Image: YouTube We’re just over a month away from Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant , a film that’s built its marketing strategy not just on teasers and trailers, but viral clips (like “ Meet Walter ,” an intro to the movie’s android). The latest are a pair of transmissions to Earth from two Covenant crew members. Daniels (Katherine Waterston), speaking to her father (you’re forgiven if you immediate
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Gizmodo

The Competition May Be Catching Up With Netflix Photo: Getty Netflix issued its first quarter user gains report to investors today and the fact that it fell short of user growth estimates caused a brief drop in the streaming giant’s stock price. It blamed the lackluster growth on one thing: no House of Cards- style blockbusters. But in reality, Netflix is probably waking up to the crowded streaming landscape. According to Bloomberg , analysts
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WIRED

Trump’s Executive Order Won’t Give Tech Clarity on H-1B Visas As a candidate, President Trump threatened to kill the tech industry's favorite immigration program. But his new order will just leave companies guessing. The post Trump's Executive Order Won't Give Tech Clarity on H-1B Visas appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells in the retina light the way to treating jet lagResearchers have found a new group of cells in the retina that directly affect the biological clock by sending signals to a region of the brain which regulates our daily (circadian) rhythms. This new understanding of how circadian rhythms are regulated through the eye could open up new therapeutic possibilities for restoring biological clocks in people who have jet lag through travelling or workin
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Futurity.org

Do ‘babies of technology’ need more legal power? There are few, if any, laws protecting children conceived with artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization (IVF), surrogacy, and potentially, bioengineering of embryos. But there should be, says Mary Ann Mason, a professor in the graduate school at University of California, Berkeley and a faculty affiliate of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. In a new book, Babies of Technology: Ass
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Ars Technica

Hello Tatooine! An unpowered device can harvest water vapor in a desert Enlarge (credit: Evelyn Wang/MIT) Luke Skywalker may have been unimpressed with the life of a Tatooine moisture farmer, but a simple device that could economically harvest water from desert air would really be pretty exciting. According to Wookieepedia , the “moisture vaporators” the young Skywalker tended utilized refrigeration coils to chill air to the dew point and collect the water that conde
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WIRED

Let Us Mourn the End of Girls, Great Frenemy of the Internet Lena Dunham's show gave the internet a way to talk about—or at least generalize—an entire generation. What will happen now that the show is over? The post Let Us Mourn the End of Girls , Great Frenemy of the Internet appeared first on WIRED .
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Crime 'threatens nearly half the world's natural heritage sites'Poaching, illegal logging and fishing are threatening some of the world's most iconic natural heritage sites.
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Ingeniøren

Jagten på it-uddannede tager nye former i 2017 Virksomhedernes higen ­efter attraktive kandidater med it-baggrund er intens, og i 2017 vil digitale rekrutteringsmodeller og øget brug af de sociale ­medier være blandt de metoder, der skal vinde kampen om kandidaterne. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/jagten-pa-it-uddannede-tager-nye-former-2017-7420 Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

Antallet af unge ledige stiger trods job i provinsen Flere år i træk har en voksende andel unge ingeniører stået uden for arbejdsmarkedet. Skylden tilfalder både de nyuddannede selv, som kun vil arbejde i de store byer, og virksomheder, der langt overvejende søger erfarne folk. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ida-smaa-virksomheder-nyuddannede-skal-komme-ind-kampen-stigende-andel-unge-ingenioerer Jobfinder
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cognitive science

Consciousness is an Inevitable State of Matter submitted by /u/evanwarfel [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

This Tiny Car Charger Is the Best Selling Item in Kinja Deals History - Get It For $7 Aukey Slim Profile USB Car Charger , $7 with code AUKECAR7 Your favorite USB car charger just happens to be the smallest one you can buy, and you can grab it on Amazon for $7 today with code AUKECAR7. That’s about as cheap as it ever gets, so pick one up if it’s been on your wish list.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancerA new study describes new method to transform immune cells, while inside the body, into leukemia-fighting powerhouses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Time-lapse shows how anticancer and antiviral drugs get into cellsScientists have modeled all of the steps by which nucleosides and their analogs are transported into cells by a specific molecule named the concentrative nucleoside transporter or CNT. The finding provides important structural information that could be used to design smarter, more specific anticancer and antiviral drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imbalances in neural pathways may contribute to repetitive behaviors in autismResearchers have hypothesized that a mutation in the autism risk gene SHANK3 differentially affects synaptic development in two neural pathways that contribute to motor control. Their work suggests that repetitive behaviors in SHANK3-deficient mice are driven by imbalances between the pathways, revealing a potential mechanism and possible targets to treat some behavioral aspects of autism spectrum
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mission control: Salty diet makes you hungry, not thirstyWe've all heard it: eating salty foods makes you thirstier. But what sounds like good nutritional advice turns out to be an old-wives' tale. In a study carried out during a simulated mission to Mars, an international group of scientists has found exactly the opposite to be true. 'Cosmonauts' who ate more salt retained more water, weren't as thirsty, and needed more energy.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Running Out of Patience What We’re Following North Korea: U.S. Vice President Mike Pence began his trip to Asia today by announcing an end to America’s “era of strategic patience” with Pyongyang. Over the weekend, North Korea conducted a much-anticipated missile test ; though the weapon apparently blew up soon after launch, international tensions are still high. President Trump has said he wants to “solve North Korea,”
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Gizmodo

Console Repairmen Explain Why Cockroaches Love PS4s Illustration by Jim Cooke First, there were snakes on a plane. Then, we had sharks in tornadoes. Now, there is a darker and more prevalent combination of pests and unlikely places they exist: cockroaches in your PS4. I heard about the PS4’s roach problem at an independent console repair shop on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. XCubicle is a clean and well-kept business where locals drop off thei
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Gizmodo

The American Gods TV Series Isn't Afraid to Go Full-On Weird, and That's What Makes It Great Shadow Moon and one of Technical Boy’s minions. Image: Starz The biggest hazard a show like American Gods can run into is making it feel like you’re just waiting on the freaky cool stuff to happen. That obstacle never presents itself in the first four episodes of Starz’ new fantasy series, which feels quite unlike anything on television right now. Strangeness is always just an eye-blink away. Pre
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden iceMassive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study adding to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Behind the iron curtain: How methane-making microbes kept the early Earth warmUsing mud pulled from the bottom of a tropical lake, researchers at have gained a new grasp of how ancient microbes made methane in the complex iron chemistry of the early Earth.
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Gizmodo

No, Google Hire Won’t Share Your Search History With Employers Image: hire.withgoogle.com The perfect fake viral news story has two crucial elements: something outrageous that makes you real mad and something you could basically believe. Not like, “Donald Trump Decrees ‘All Dogs Are Boys,’” but like, “Donald Trump Nominates Steven Seagal as Secretary of Defense.” That perfect storm of plausibility and heinousness seems to have been achieved today by a story
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Big Think

A New Study Suggests It’s Going to Be a Bumpy Flight A new study predicts air-travel turbulence may occur over larger areas thanks to climate change. Read More
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Live Science

Mysterious New Crack in Greenland Glacier Revealed in NASA PhotosOne of Greenland's largest glaciers has a new rift in the center of its ice shelf.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New York preps rat birth control test-runThe New York rat race is notorious—the commute and the endemic rodent population. But the city may soon have a new weapon in its arsenal: rat birth control.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: This Week Already Pretty Taxing Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer announced that President Trump’s 2016 tax returns are being audited and will not be released. Vice President Mike Pence issued a warning to North Korea, saying that the “era of strategic patience is over.” The first family hosted its first Easter Egg Roll at the White House. On his first day on the job, Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch he
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Here's What Happens When The Generators Die On Your Crab Boat | Deadliest Catch #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Captain Keith and his chief engineer rush to the engine to find out why the Wizard has lost power just as they were about to throw out the first pot. Start Catching Up With Full Episodes on Hulu: https://www.hulu.com/deadliest-catch Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/
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cognitive science

Neuralle has just started a "Write For Us" section. Knowing that there's a wealth of knowledge amongst this community's followers, if you've ever thought of using your knowledge to your financial advantage, this may be of interest to you.. (we pay for quality content posts btw). submitted by /u/neuralle [link] [comments]
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Live Science

Many Parents Stumble Over Giving Kids Allergy MedicineWhen it comes to giving allergy medicine to kids, many parents are doing things that could potentially cause problems, a new poll finds.
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Big Think

Why Are Ph.D. Students More Vulnerable to Psychiatric Disorders? A recent study suggests Ph.D. students are more likely to develop common psychiatric disorders. Read More
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Gizmodo

Coachella Bandit Nabbed by 'Find My Phone' Feature After Allegedly Stealing 100 Smartphones Images: Indio Police Department Coachella is always full of surprises (like when Radiohead quit earlier this week after audio problems), but this year’s biggest surprise seems to have happened far away from the main stage. On Friday, a New York man was arrested after allegedly stealing more than 100 cell phones from concert attendees in one of the more bizarre crimes ever committed at the music f
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Live Science

Diet, Exercise and 'Giraffe Hugs': Up Close and Personal with April and Her BabyLive Science gets the low-down on April the giraffe and her newborn calf, from Jordan Patch, owner of Animal Adventure Park.
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NYT > Science

Scientists and Activists Look Beyond the March for ScienceOn Saturday scientists and their advocates are expected to fill streets in more than 500 cities. But what they do next is just as important.
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NYT > Science

The March for Science: Why Some Are Going, and Some Will Sit OutIn remarks submitted The Times, some said the president’s posture toward science demanded a response, but others worried about the politicization of science.
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NYT > Science

Take a Number: Ranks of Scientists Aging Faster Than Other WorkersThe percentage of scientists aged 55 and older nearly doubled from 1993 to 2008, amid concerns that young researchers are getting crowded out.
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Ars Technica

Cadillac Super Cruises to the front with the most advanced semi-autonomous car on the market Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK—As regular readers of Cars Technica know, the auto industry is going full-speed ahead when it comes to self-driving cars. A number of OEMs and their technology company partners have promised us SAE "level 4" self-driving vehicles by 2021. But not all of these organizations are taking the same road to get there . Some, like Ford and Vol
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Live Science

More Than Half of American Adults Have Tried PotAbout half of American adults say they've tried pot, and 14 percent use it at least monthly.
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

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