Ars Technica

Security vendor uses hospital’s network for unauthorized sales demos Enlarge / Orion Hindawi, co-founder and chief technology officer of Tanium Inc. Information security company Tanium is a relatively well-established "next-generation" cybersecurity vendor that was founded 10 years ago—far ahead of the wave of the venture capital-funded newcomers, like Cylance, who have changed the security software space. (Tanium has reached a market valuation of more than $3 bil
5min
Gizmodo

At Least Climate Change Will Bring More Icebergs to Kitesurf Over Like a Badass GIF Climate change threatens to affect everything from the food we eat , to straight-up making the planet inhabitable for humanity. But our self-wrought apocalypse isn’t all bad. As the ice caps keep crumbling , they’re creating lots of icebergs we can use for badass kitesurfing stunts . Advertisement Geza Sholtz headed to Greenland to capture these amazing shots of kitesurfing around giant mount
11min
Popular Science

Non-cheesy gift ideas for new and soon-to-be moms Gadgets Mother's Day is May 14. Must have tech maternity items. Read on.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increased funding for geriatrics education essential, studyWithout a substantial increase in federal funding for geriatrics education and research we risk further decimating a workforce that is essential to training health professionals on the unique healthcare needs of older adults, say researchers reporting on the impact that Geriatrics Academic Career Awards (GACAs) have had on geriatrics academic careers, health professional training, and the care of
17min
New on MIT Technology Review

Blockchain Is Helping to Build a New Kind of Energy GridUsing the technology behind Bitcoin, participants in the Brooklyn Microgrid are buying and selling locally generated renewable energy over a peer-to-peer network.
19min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA engages the next generation with HUNCHNASA is making sure the next generation of high school graduates understand the variety of career paths that can lead to missions exploring space. In fact, hundreds of students are already helping NASA's astronauts live and work aboard the International Space Station - the orbiting research platform making discoveries that benefit Earth while developing the technology that will allow humans to liv
23min
Gizmodo

This Mars-Bound Cheeto Maker Will Help Earthlings First Just a couple of guys playing with their new toy (Image: Purdue Agricultural Communication photo/Tom Campbell) Let’s say we do somehow end up growing grains like corn or wheat on Mars. What fun would that be if we can’t puff them into curls and dust them with cheese? Advertisement Purdue University scientists have been tasked with developing a Mars-worthy extruder, the machine which takes ground
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Defective HIV proviruses reduce effective immune system response, interfere with HIV cureA new study finds defective HIV proviruses, long thought to be harmless, produce viral proteins and distract the immune system from killing intact proviruses needed to reduce the HIV reservoir and cure HIV. The study was published by researchers at the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University in Cell Host & Microbe.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

EPA methane emission policy likely to cost less, miss 2025 targetsStanford research shows plugging methane leaks will cost about a third less than the EPA estimates, further underscoring the cost-effectiveness of emissions mitigation -- but the agency will also likely fall short of its 2025 reduction targets.
38min
Live Science

Hundreds of Meltwater Streams Found Flowing Across AntarcticaMuch of the Antarctic continent is threaded with rivers, pools and streams of melting drainage water, which could mean the continent is more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought.
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cassini heads toward final close encounter with TitanNASA's Cassini spacecraft will make its final close flyby of Saturn's haze-enshrouded moon Titan this weekend. The flyby marks the mission's final opportunity for up-close observations of the lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons that spread across the moon's northern polar region, and the last chance to use its powerful radar to pierce the haze and make detailed images of the surface.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Close call: When asteroids whisk past EarthA peanut-shaped asteroid 1.3 kilometres (3,280 feet) across streaked past Earth on Wednesday, giving astronomers a rare chance to check out a big space rock up close.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook out to read mindsFacebook wants to read your mind.
47min
Gizmodo

Jason Chaffetz Is Maybe Considering Running For President in 2028 Image: Jim Cooke / GMG, photo: Getty Earlier today, House Oversight Committee Chairman and Benghazi enthusiast Jason Chaffetz announced that he would not seek reelection to public office in 2018. While this is surely a blow to fans of incompetent investigations and ineffectual letter writing , the Chaffetz-heads out there need not worry quite yet. Because judging by the web domains his campaign c
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastic pollution builds up in Arctic waters: studyEven though few people live in the Artic, some seas in the region are heavily polluted with plastic because of an Atlantic ocean current which dumps debris there, researchers said Wednesday.
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science is core to saving wildlifeThe following statement was issued today by Wildlife Conservation Society President and CEO Cristian Samper on the importance of science to wildlife conservation:
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better way to manage phosphorus?All living things - from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals - need phosphorus. But extra phosphorus in the wrong place can harm the environment. For example, when too much phosphorus enters a lake or stream, it can lead to excessive weed growth and algal blooms. Low-oxygen dead zones can form.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students may forget relevant information in order to protect their own psychesUCLA-led research has found that students in a college mathematics course experienced a phenomenon similar to repression, the psychological process in which people forget emotional or traumatic events to protect themselves.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broad advance from chemists dramatically simplifies olefin synthesisChemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new method that greatly simplifies, and in many cases enables for the first time, the making of a vast range of organic molecules.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Volunteering might prevent substance abuse for female student-athletesAs substance abuse continues to be a health concern in colleges and universities across the US, a social scientist from the University of Missouri has found that female student-athletes who volunteer in their communities and engage in helping behaviors are less likely to partake in dangerous alcohol and marijuana use.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could fixing the body clock help people regain consciousness?For people with severe brain injuries, researchers have found that the rhythm of daily fluctuations in body temperature is related to their level of consciousness, according to a preliminary study published in the April 19, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

150-year-old drug may provide 'off' time relief for people with advanced Parkinson's diseaseNew research provides evidence that an old drug may provide relief for people with advanced Parkinson's, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017.
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Live Science

This Dingo Has the World's Most Interesting GenomeThis dingo has the world's most interesting genome.
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Live Science

Newfound Alien Planet Is Best Place Yet to Search for LifeA newly discovered exoplanet may jump to the top of the list of places where scientists should go looking for alien life.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

March participants interested in both promoting, defending scienceEncouraging science-based policies and defending science from political attacks are strong motivators for March for Science participants, according to a new University of Delaware Center for Political Communication survey.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Living with a star: NASA and partners survey space weather scienceNASA has long been a leader in understanding the science of space weather, including research into the potential for induced electrical currents to disrupt our power systems. Last year, NASA scientists worked with scientists and engineers from research institutions and industry during a pair of intensive week-long workshops in order to assess the state of science surrounding this type of space wea
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New microscopy method breaks color barrier of optical imagingResearchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward breaking the so-called "color barrier" of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues than is currently attainable. The advancement has the potential for many future applications, including helping
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hazardous chemicals go unregulated in routine oil and gas operationsCalifornia and more than two dozen other states require oil and gas producers to disclose the chemicals they use during hydraulic fracturing activities, enabling scientific and public scrutiny of the environmental and human health hazards these substances may pose. But all existing disclosure regulations cover chemical use only in hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, and, in California, two ot
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geeking out in the golden yearsPhilip Guo caught the coding bug in high school, at a fairly typical age for a Millennial. Less typical is that the UC San Diego cognitive scientist is now eager to share his passion for programming with a different demographic. And it's not one you're thinking of - it's not elementary or middle school-aged kids. Guo wants to get adults age 60 and up.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alphabet's Verily to embark on health-mapping studyAlphabet's life sciences unit Verily on Wednesday announced a study to track people for years, right down to their genetics, in a quest for insights into staying healthy.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new levelThe March for Science may be the first of its kind, science historians say.
1h
Gizmodo

'Beautiful Kids': How the Trump Administration Has Weaponized Photographs of Agony 9-year-old Hassan Dallal. Image via Getty. The video is short: in shaky frames, it captures a Syrian boy lying on the ground surrounded by dust and smoke and detritus shortly after barrel bombs were dropped near his home in Idlib, a northwestern province in Syria. The boy wears a sweater, he is in shock, unaware of what has happened to him. As he tries to stand, his shock turns to the sudden real
1h
The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: ‘Paul Revere’s Ride’ by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow On this day in 1775, patriots in Lexington and Concord fought the first battles of the American Revolution. Which means that the late hours of last night and the very early hours of this morning marked the anniversary of another memorable event in American history, recalled by Atlantic co-founder Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Listen, my children, and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Reve
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women more sensitized than men to metal used in joint replacementWhy are women at higher risk of complications after total hip or knee replacement surgery? An increased rate of hypersensitivity to the metals contained in joint implants might be a contributing factor, suggests a study in the April 19 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
1h
Big Think

Want to See Inside of Your Heart? Virtual Reality is Making That Possible Stanford University is offering medical trainees a real-time virtual tour through heart defects. Read More
1h
Big Think

Prejudice AI? Machine Learning Can Pick up Society’s Biases The program picked up association biases nearly identical to those seen in human subjects. Read More
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Gizmodo

Bowflex's Crazy-Popular Adjustable Dumbbells Are Back On Sale, If You Missed Out on Sunday Bowflex SelectTech Adjustable Dumbbells (Pair) , $236 $236 might seem like a lot to spend on a set of dumbbells , but these Bowflex adjustable models take up way less room than a full rack of weights, and certainly cost less over time than a gym membership. These 4.7 star rated weights were on sale for an all-time low $229 over the weekend, but sold out relatively quickly. So if you missed out, t
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Physicists excited by latest LHC anomaly A series of odd findings have theorists hoping for new particles. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21865
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Futurity.org

Are ‘machine values’ replacing our principles? We need to consider the possible consequences of our 24-7 reliance on digital technology, warns a new book. Our dependence on our phones, tablets, and laptops has dramatically changed how we communicate and interact, and is slowly eroding some of our core principles, says Michael Bugeja, professor and director of the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University. Bugeja
1h
Gizmodo

Holiday Inn Cops to Massive Credit Card Data Breach Image: Getty It seems like every day there’s news of another significant data breach, so here’s today’s: An internal investigation by the InterContinental Hotel Group, which owns Holiday Inn, has revealed that guests at more than a thousand of their hotels had their credit card details stolen. The company identified malware on front desk systems used between September 29 and December 29 in 2016,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In new paper, scientists explain climate change using before/after photographic evidenceA group of scientists offers photographic proof of climate change using images of retreating glaciers.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research paves way for improved colorectal cancer testResearchers have identified specific types of bacteria that seem to be abundant in individuals with colorectal cancer. Using a combination of markers specific for these fecal microbes, scientists anticipate that a noninvasive, sensitive clinical diagnostic test potentially can be developed.
1h
Ars Technica

South Indian frog oozes molecule that inexplicably decimates flu viruses Enlarge / Hydrophylax bahuvistara (credit: Sanil-George-Jessica-Shartouny ) From the slimy backs of a South Indian frog comes a new way to blast influenza viruses. A compound in the frog’s mucus—long known to have germ-killing properties—can latch onto flu virus particles and cause them to burst apart, researchers report in Immunity . The peptide is a potent and precise killer , able to demolish
1h
Ars Technica

Renault imagines the Grand Prix car of 2027 Lionel Koretzky We're three races into the 2017 Formula 1 season, and it's a new era for the sport. The cars are wider, heavier, faster, and more powerful. Lap times are down—although perhaps not by the "five seconds a lap" margin some predicted—and for the first time since we moved back to V6 engines, Mercedes-AMG is no longer winning everything in sight. And with Ross Brawn running the technica
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Review highlights why animals have evolved to favor one side of the brainMost left-handers can rattle off a list of their eminent comrades-in-arms: Oprah Winfrey, Albert Einstein, and Barack Obama, just to name three, but they may want to add on cockatoos, 'southpaw' squirrels, and some house cats. But why do people and animals naturally favor one side over the other, and what does it teach us about the brain's inner workings? Researchers explore these questions in a n
1h
NYT > Science

Asteroid Misses Earth Narrowly, by Cosmic StandardsThe asteroid, 2014 JO25, which is approximately 2,000 feet end-to-end, was about 1.1 million miles away when it passed by on Wednesday morning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The foundations of parentingA team of researchers exploring the genetics underpinning parenting behaviors, found not only that different genes may influence behaviors in males and females, but that the gene for the hormone vasopressin appears to be closely tied to nest-building behavior in parenting mice.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moisture played a role in megafaunal extinctionsA new study published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution reveals that increased moisture levels may have been a primary cause of death for giant herbivores approximately 10,000 years ago.
1h
Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get a Dell 43-inch 4K multi-client monitor for just $854 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with a new list of deals and steals. Today you can get a stunning Dell 43-inch 4K monitor for $854, a steal compared to its market value of $1,199. We also have a deal for $50 off one of Dell's newest XPS tower PCs—the XPS 8920 comes with a Core i5 Kaby Lake processor, 8GB Radeon GPU, and a 256GB SSD. Check out the full lis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Canary in the kelp forest: Sea creature dissolves in today's warming, acidic watersThe one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern California coast, according to a new study.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

This Dryer Blasts Water Out of Fabric with Sound WavesAn ultrasonic dryer can extract moisture from your clothes faster and more efficiently than heat.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living with a star: NASA and partners survey space weather scienceStorms from the sun can affect our power grids, railway systems and underground pipelines. NASA has long been a leader in understanding the science behind this space weather.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

March participants interested in both promoting, defending scienceEncouraging science-based policies and defending science from political attacks are strong motivators for March for Science participants, according to a new University of Delaware Center for Political Communication survey. Fully 93 percent of respondents said 'opposing political attacks on the integrity of science' would be a very important reason for participating in a March for Science event; 97
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists studied the problem of hydrodynamic stability of Keplerian flowResearches from Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University have focused their efforts on one of the major theoretical issues of modern astrophysical fluid dynamics, which is the stability of Keplerian shear flow of liquid or gas.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn team characterizes the underlying cause of a form of macular degenerationUsing an animal model of Best disease in combination with biochemical and optical assays, a team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has pinpointed a number of abnormalities that give rise to the impairments seen in the blinding disease.
2h
The Atlantic

Remembering Barkley L. Hendricks, Master of Black Postmodern Portraiture What’s Going On , one of the best-known portraits by Barkley L. Hendricks, arrived in 1974, three years after the Marvin Gaye album of the same name. At the time, Gaye’s record was well-regarded, but not yet universally recognized as a masterpiece of protest art. Hendricks saw in it something not far off, a moment when black protest music would come into its own as a commercial concern. His strik
2h
The Atlantic

Antarctic Scientists Go Chasing Waterfalls January 29, 1912, was a beautiful day in Antarctica. A group of British explorers, led by a 37-year-old Victor Campbell, were on a cheerful journey across what we now call the Nansen Ice Shelf and Priestley Glacier. It was a kind of summer sojourn around the continent: They would make the first maps of the area, then rendezvous with their ship, Terra Nova, six weeks later. Campbell’s notes are br
2h
Ars Technica

This $400 appliance that squeezes juice out of a bag appears unnecessary Enlarge (credit: Juicero/ PR Newswire) A cold-press juice company called Juicero was one of the top-funded hardware startups in Silicon Valley last year. It promised a $400 countertop juice-pressing appliance that squeezes healthy beverages out of proprietary bags, delivered to a person’s doorstep on a subscription basis for $5 to $8 apiece. But now that the hardware has hit the market, some inve
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Futurity.org

President Trump polls better than his policies While President Donald Trump’s base of support remains behind him, Americans are less supportive of the President’s policy ideas and of Congressional Republicans, a new poll shows. “Republican candidates do not seem to be able to run away from the Trump agenda,” says James Morone, director of the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy at Brown University’s Watson Institute for Internatio
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geeking out in the golden yearsIn the first known study of older adults learning computer programming, a UC San Diego cognitive scientist advocates coding skills for all ages. The paper has been selected for honorable mention at CHI 2017.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers perform largest-ever survey of high-mass binary star systemsAn international group of astronomers led by researchers at the University of São Paulo's Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics & Atmospheric Sciences (IAG-USP) in Brazil, have just identified and characterized 82 new high-mass binaries located in the Tarantula Nebula, also known as 30 Doradus, in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A better way to manage phosphorus?A new project proposes a restructured index to build on phosphorus management efforts in farm fields in New York state and beyond. The new index structure improves upon previous approaches. It focuses on the existing risk of phosphorus runoff from a field based on the location.
2h
Live Science

Police-Related Injuries Send 50,000 People to ER YearlyThe number of hospital emergency room visits for law-enforcement-related injuries was stable between 2006 and 2012.
2h
The Atlantic

One Man's Fight to Bury His Wife With Dignity In Alabama, no state laws exist that prohibit burial on private property; however, some municipalities have their own restrictions. In the small town of Stevenson, James Davis had promised his late wife that he would bury her in the front yard. What began as a way to grant his wife's last wishes turned into a nightmarish legal battle with the city. The short film Let Mama Rest tells Davis's story
2h
The Atlantic

Bill O'Reilly's Exit From Fox News Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET Bill O’Reilly, the pugnacious host of O’Reilly Factor , whose diatribes against political correctness and attacks on those he regarded as “pinheads” enraged his liberal opponents and made Fox News a ratings powerhouse, will not be returning to the network, 21st Century Fox announced Wednesday. The move came amid an exodus by advertisers following allegations O’Reilly, 67,
2h
The Scientist RSS

RNA-Seq Reveals Previously Hidden, Genetic DisorderCausing MutationsAdding RNA sequencing analysis to genomic sequencing helps scientists uncover mutations likely responsible for genetic disorders they might otherwise miss.
2h
Popular Science

How to protect your smartphone privacy DIY Prevent Google and Apple from tracking you Your smartphone can feed location data and other information to Apple or Google while you use it. Here's why—and how to stop it.
2h
Futurity.org

Tiny reflective implant could test eye pressure Researchers have developed an eye implant for glaucoma patients that could one day lead to faster and more effective treatment. If you have ever been to an ophthalmologist, you have probably had your eye pressure checked: with your chin resting on a support to keep your head still, the doctor applies pressure to your eye either via a puff of warm air or by gently pressing a probe against the eye’
2h
Gizmodo

This Browser Extension Will Help You Read Paywalled Science Papers for Free Image: From the Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary/Public Domain Probably the suckiest thing about science is the fact that lots of the time you can’t read the research yourself. If it’s not open access and you’re interested, either you shell out 35 bucks for a pdf, email someone asking for it, or settle with listening to some dummy like me interpret the results peppered with quotes and
2h
Popular Science

Antarctica is leaking from the inside out From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News The Antarctic Ice Sheet is draining huge quantities of water out to sea. Scientists have discovered that Antarctica is melting from the inside out. They examine what this means for sea-level rise.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s Sci-Fi Plan for Typing with Your Mind and Hearing with Your SkinInside the mysterious Building 8, the social network is working on far-out communication technologies.
2h
WIRED

Facebook Just Handed Out Thousands of 360 Cameras. We’ve Got a Review The Giroptic iO 360 camera was just given out to four thousand attendees at Facebook F8. A flood of spherical selfies will soon hit the web. The post Facebook Just Handed Out Thousands of 360 Cameras. We've Got a Review appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Facebook Unveils Two New VR Cameras With ‘Six Degrees of Freedom’ This morning, at its annual developer conference in Northern California, Facebook unveiled two new camera designs that aim to capture 360-degree video with extreme fidelity. The post Facebook Unveils Two New VR Cameras With 'Six Degrees of Freedom' appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Live Science

Super-Earth Discovered! May Be Great Place To Look For Life | VideoConditions may be right for life to exist on an exoplanet, 40 light-years from Earth, named LHS 1140b. Its red dwarf host star "emits less radiation than similar low-mass stars," according to Geneva Observatory's Nicola Astudillo-Defru.
2h
New Scientist - News

Why a neonicotinoid ban isn’t enough to protect the environmentNeurotoxic pesticides hurt more than just bees, and they have spread throughout the environment. A ban is a good thing, but it could create another problem
2h
New Scientist - News

Blood from human babies make brains of elderly mice young againYoung blood can rejuvenate the mind. Now a study has identified a protein in umbilical cord blood that can boost memory and brain function in aged mice
2h
New Scientist - News

The five best exoplanets in the galaxy to check for alien lifeThe announcement of a new habitable, “Earth-like” planet made us wonder – where should we look first?
2h
New Scientist - News

Marchers, raise your banners for the tortoise pace of progressThe March for Science reflects the growing gap between slow, steady, vital scientific gains and quick-fire, opportunist US politics, says Dave Levitan
2h
New Scientist - News

Male robins can guess and satisfy their partner’s food cravingsFemale birds incubating eggs get an itch for specific foods, and their male partners somehow know what they want and deliver it to them
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Broad advance from TSRI chemists dramatically simplifies olefin synthesisChemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new method that greatly simplifies, and in many cases enables for the first time, the making of a vast range of organic molecules.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hazardous chemicals go unregulated in routine oil and gas operationsCalifornia requires oil and gas producers to disclose chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing activities, enabling scientific and public scrutiny of potential environmental and human health hazards. But all existing disclosure regulations cover chemical use only in hydraulic fracturing, and, in California, two other types of well-stimulation treatments. Many of the same chemicals used for hydra
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping tabs on tau to track neurodegenerative disorder progressionA new study reports an antibody therapy in development for the neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies may be eventually used as a marker to screen patients for disease progression, which could help inform much needed new therapeutic strategies for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, frontotemporal dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ocean current dumps plastic in remote Arctic watersThe Arctic Ocean is a dead-end for plastics floating in the North Atlantic, a new study reports. The study confirms that plastics are abundant and widespread in seas east of Greenland and north of Scandinavia, even though human populations -- contributors of plastic waste -- are low there.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibody helps detect protein implicated in Alzheimer's, other diseasesDamaging tangles of the protein tau dot the brains of people with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and boxer's dementia. Now, a team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found a way to measure tau levels in the blood that accurately reflects levels of tau in the brain. The study, in mice and a small group of people, could be the first step towar
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nutrient offers hope to stop deadly march toward cirrhosis, liver cancerA new study suggests that one type of omega 3 fatty acid offers people who are obese or have a poor diet a chance to avoid serious liver damage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered Egyptian carnivore named after Anubis, ancient Egyptian god of underworldAnalysis of Egyptian fossils has identified a new species of extinct carnivorous mammals called hyaenodonts, according to a study published April 19, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Borths from Ohio University, United States of America, and Erik Seiffert from University of Southern California, United States of America.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient reptile tracks in the Pyrenees may include evidence of a new type of footprintA large set of tracks made by archosauromorphs in the Pyrenees mountain range may include a new type of footprint made by reptiles that lived 247 million years ago, according to a study published April 19, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eudald Mujal from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study examines emergency department visits for patients injured by law enforcement in the USFrom 2006 to 2012, there were approximately 51,000 emergency department visits per year for patients injured by law enforcement in the United States, with this number stable over this time period, according to a study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Action required: Invasive fungus is killing European salamandersA new fungal disease brought in from Asia is threatening European salamanders. Once the amphibians become infected, they die within a brief period of time, report biologists. Because saving the infected populations is still not possible, Switzerland has preventively imposed an import ban for salamanders and newts.
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NYT > Science

Trillions of Plastic Bits, Swept Up by Current, Are Littering Arctic WatersA new study found that a major ocean current is carrying plastic from the North Atlantic to the Greenland and Barents seas, and leaving it there.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The Arctic is a final garbage dump for ocean plasticOcean currents dump plastic garbage from the North Atlantic into previously pristine Arctic waters, new research shows.
3h
Popular Science

Cosmic 'hamburger' gives scientists a rare view of a newborn solar system Space It could help us learn more about how stars and planets form A new image of a developing solar system is helping scientists to learn more about how stars and planets form.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene 'copy machine' may produce cheap semiconductor wafersA new technique may vastly reduce the overall cost of wafer technology and enable devices made from more exotic, higher-performing semiconductor materials than conventional silicon. The new method uses graphene -- single-atom-thin sheets of graphite -- as a sort of 'copy machine' to transfer intricate crystalline patterns from an underlying semiconductor wafer to a top layer of identical material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain sets a unique learning rate for everything we do, by self-adjusting to the environmentEach time we get feedback, the brain is hard at work updating its knowledge and behavior in response to changes in the environment; yet, if there's uncertainty or volatility in the environment, the entire process must be adjusted, a new study concludes.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water is streaming across AntarcticaIn the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica's ice during the brief summer.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adherence to high-intensity statin drops-off for many following heart attackA substantial proportion of patients prescribed high-intensity statins following hospitalization for a heart attack did not continue taking this medication with high adherence at two years after discharge, according to a study.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

While Trump Trumpets Coal, Europe Is Phasing It Out Faster Than EverFrom one side of the Atlantic Ocean to the other, approaches to fossil fuel use couldn’t be more different.
3h
Ars Technica

Being hated pays off for Shkreli: Judge shows pity, grants him separate trial Enlarge / Martin Shkreli. (credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Martin Shkreli will have his federal securities fraud trial separated from that of his former counsel and co-defendant Evan Greebel, US District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto wrote in an order filed Wednesday . Shkreli and Greebel were jointly indicted by the FBI in December of 2015 on allegations that they ran an elaborate Ponzi-like scheme to
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered Egyptian carnivore named after Anubis, ancient Egyptian god of underworldAnalysis of Egyptian fossils has identified a new species of extinct carnivorous mammals called hyaenodonts, according to a study published April 19, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Borths from Ohio University, United States of America, and Erik Seiffert from University of Southern California, United States of America.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient reptile tracks in the Pyrenees may include evidence of a new type of footprintA large set of tracks made by archosauromorphs in the Pyrenees mountain range may include a new type of footprint made by reptiles that lived 247 million years ago, according to a study published April 19, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eudald Mujal from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

DNA's secret weapon against knots and tangles A simple process seems to explain how massive genomes stay organized. But no one can agree on what powers it. Nature 544 284 doi: 10.1038/544284a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Young human blood makes old mice smarter Mice treated with a protein from umbilical cord plasma improved their performance on memory tests. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21848
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Live Science

Wooden Figurines 'Weave' at Tiny Looms Placed in Ancient GraveTiny wooden figurines have stood upright "weaving" at appropriately sized looms for more than 2,100 years in a Chinese tomb containing the remains of a middle-age woman, a new study finds.
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Live Science

Photos: Tiny Looms Found in Chinese TombArchaeologists unearthed four tiny looms attended by 15 carved wooden figurines in the grave of a Chinese woman dating to the second century B.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New microscopy method breaks color barrier of optical imagingResearchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward breaking the so-called 'color barrier' of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues than is currently attainable. The advancement has the potential for many future applications, including helping
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IRCM research team discovers how immunotherapy can fight some cancersDr. André Veillette and his team have discovered why immunotherapy would work in some patients and not at all in others. The discovery published in the prestigious journal Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Students may forget relevant information in order to protect their own psychesA new study shows university students who identify as strong in mathematics quickly forgot much of the material from a mathematics course. The explanation: We tend to forget unpleasant experiences and memories that threaten our self-image as a way to preserve our psychological well-being.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Captive meerkats at risk of stressSmall groups of meerkats -- such as those commonly seen in zoos and safari parks -- are at greater risk of chronic stress, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein in human umbilical cord blood rejuvenates old mice's impaired learning, memoryHuman umbilical cord blood can rejuvenate learning and memory in older mice, according to a new study. The findings could lead to new treatments for age-associated declines in mental ability.
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Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on protein modelling: the answer to life, the universe and everything | EditorialWe are only just starting to understand the shape of the molecular key that will unlock life’s secrets When Eliezer Yudkowsky , one of the world’s top artificial intelligence theorists, mused about how superintelligent robots might wipe out humans he speculated that perhaps they would solve one of the science’s holy grails: predicting protein structure from DNA information . In Mr Yudkowsky’s word
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Gizmodo

Report: The Captain Marvel Movie Has Its Directors Image: Sonia Recchia/Getty Images and Marvel Comics Over the past few days, there’s been speculation—thanks to an offhand comment at a recent press tour of Marvel Studio’s offices —that a director for the Captain Marvel movie had been found. Now, a new report indicates this is indeed the case: but it’s not one director, but two: Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck. Advertisement Variety reports that Boden
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Gizmodo

Give Your Feet a Break With Amazon's Under-$35 Skechers Sale Skechers Shoes Under $35 Let your feet breathe a little and escape from the boots you’ve been wearing for the winter. Amazon is having a one-day sale on Skechers , which means you can pick up basically any style of sneaker or casual slip-on that you’d ever need, for both men and women. It’s a really good excuse to take your shoes off, if you ask me. Here are a couple styles to check out, but head
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered exoplanet may be best candidate in search for signs of lifeAn exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star 40 light-years from Earth may be the new holder of the title 'best place to look for signs of life beyond the solar system.' Using ESO's HARPS instrument, and other telescopes, astronomers discovered a 'super-Earth' orbiting in the habitable zone around the star LHS 1140. This world is larger and more massive than the Earth and has likely retained most of its
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amino acids in diet could be key to starving cancerCutting out certain amino acids – the building blocks of proteins – from the diet of mice slows tumor growth and prolongs survival, according to new research.
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Gizmodo

What Would Life On Saturn's Moon Enceladus Look Like? Image: NASA After NASA’s announcement last week, Enceladus is the icy moon on everyone’s mind—not that are are many others (sorry, Europa ). According to the agency, molecular hydrogen has been found in Enceladus’ subterranean ocean , which bolsters the idea that the icy moon could host extraterrestrial microbes . Despite Enceladus’ frigid exterior, this ocean is thought to be extremely warm at t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Closer look at brain circuits reveals important role of geneticsScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in La Jolla have revealed new clues to the wiring of the brain. A team led by Associate Professor Anton Maximov found that neurons in brain regions that store memory can form networks in the absence of synaptic activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New analysis finds Medicare program underestimates heart attack mortality ratesNew analysis of Medicare's Hospital Compare portal shows the statistical methodology used to rate and compare hospitals underestimates mortality rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at small hospitals.
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Viden

Indisk giftfrø dræber influenza-virusSlim fra en indisk frø kan tage livet af H1-typer af influenza. Det kan på sigt hjælpe folk i risikogruppen, siger dansk forsker.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Newfound Super-Earth Boosts Search for Alien LifePlanet LHS 1140b orbits a red dwarf star just 40 light years away, making it a prime target for life-finding telescopes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Motherly Pep Talk in Sarah Kay’s ‘B’ “If I should have a daughter,” writes Sarah Kay, instead of “Mom,” she’s gonna call me “Point B.” Because that way, she knows that no matter what happens, at least she can always find her way to me. We call my mother Pollyanna. No matter how bad the weather, the argument, the traffic, or the grade, she will fervently insist that the glass is still half full. In her eyes every door closed opens a
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Gizmodo

The Easiest Ways to Run Multiple Accounts from One Phone Image: Screenshot If you use Gmail and your office uses Google Apps or you like to maintain multiple Facebook accounts, than operating on a phone can be a nightmare. Multiple logins means constant logging out of apps and then logging back in—a process that only gets more excruciating when you have two-factor authentication (and you should really have two-factor authentication ). Advertisement But
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists have created a fluid with negative mass – but what does it tell us? The fluid, which defies everyday laws of motion, is a rare achievement and provides a platform to study an otherwise hypothetical form of matter Scientists have created a fluid that exhibits the bizarre property of “negative mass” in an experiment that appears to defy the everyday laws of motion. Push an object and Newton’s laws (and common experience) dictate that it will accelerate in the direc
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The Scientist RSS

Human Cord Plasma Protein Boosts Cognitive Function in Older MiceA protein found in human umbilical cord plasma improves synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory in aged mice.
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Inside Science

Zaps from a Laser Could 'Reverse Time' on the Quantum Scale Physics Physicists show how switching positive and negative charges in graphene could make the first quantum time mirror. 04/14/2017 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/zaps-laser-could-reverse-time-quantum-scale
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The foundations of parentingA team of researchers exploring the genetics underpinning parenting behaviors, found not only that different genes may influence behaviors in males and females, but that the gene for the hormone vasopressin appears to be closely tied to nest-building behavior in parenting mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Action required: Invasive fungus is killing European salamandersA new fungal disease brought in from Asia is threatening European salamanders. Once the amphibians become infected, they die within a brief period of time, as biologists of the universities of Zurich and Ghent have shown. Because saving the infected populations is still not possible, Switzerland has preventively imposed an import ban for salamanders and newts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amino acids in diet could be key to starving cancerCutting out certain amino acids - the building blocks of proteins -- from the diet of mice slows tumor growth and prolongs survival, according to new research published in Nature.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered exoplanet may be best candidate in search for signs of lifeAn exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star 40 light-years from Earth may be the new holder of the title 'best place to look for signs of life beyond the solar system.' Using ESO's HARPS instrument, and other telescopes, astronomers discovered a 'super-Earth' orbiting in the habitable zone around the star LHS 1140. This world is larger and more massive than the Earth and has likely retained most of its
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water is streaming across AntarcticaIn the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica's ice during the brief summer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein in human umbilical cord blood rejuvenates old mice's impaired learning, memoryHuman umbilical cord blood can rejuvenate learning and memory in older mice, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene 'copy machine' may produce cheap semiconductor wafersA new technique developed by MIT engineers may vastly reduce the overall cost of wafer technology and enable devices made from more exotic, higher-performing semiconductor materials than conventional silicon. The new method, reported today in Nature, uses graphene -- single-atom-thin sheets of graphite -- as a sort of 'copy machine' to transfer intricate crystalline patterns from an underlying sem
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Futurity.org

Climate predictions and reality are lining up Scientists studying climate change have long debated exactly how much hotter Earth will become given certain amounts of greenhouse gas emissions. Models predicting this “climate sensitivity” number may be closer to the observed reality than some previously thought, according to a new study. Observations in the past decade seemed to suggest a value lower than predicted by models. But the new study
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s Live-Action Camera Systems Let You Take Steps in Virtual PlacesNew VR cameras will be great for live events and virtual tourism. Oh, and probably porn, too.
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The Atlantic

The Many Ways 'Buy American' Can Harm the Economy On Tuesday, at the Snap-on tool company in Kenosha, Wisconsin, President Trump stood before an American flag rendered in wrenches and signed a new executive order based on his campaign and inauguration-speech pledge to “buy American and hire American.” The signing ceremony followed a speech about the importance of American manufacturing in which Trump hit some familiar notes, rehashing his narrow
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The Atlantic

The Georgia Republican Who Succeeded by Keeping Her Distance From Trump Karen Handel, who on Tuesday advanced from a field of 11 GOP hopefuls to a runoff in a Georgia special election for the House, is not exactly the prototype of a Trump-era Republican. She’s a veteran politician who has waged three campaigns—one victorious—for statewide office in the last 11 years, and unlike her main party rivals, rarely invoked the president’s name on the campaign trail. Handel,
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The Atlantic

The Podcast Spreading the Love of Cowboy Culture In the first two decades after the Civil War, more than 10 million cattle were driven north from Texas to railheads in Kansas, where they could be shipped to larger markets in the east. Fighting boredom on the trail, cowboys would often improvise poems and songs. They’d sing on horseback and around the campfire, collectively writing verse, adding a new line or amending an old one, usually in the
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The Atlantic

Astronomers Have Discovered Yet Another Planet Around a Nearby Star For more than three years, the MEarth-South observatory, a cluster of telescopes in Chile, has stared at distant stars in the night sky, waiting for a hint of dimming in their brightness, a sign that something—probably a planet—is passing by. In the fall of 2014, the observatory detected a dip in starlight coming from a red dwarf about 39 light-years away from Earth. Unfortunately, no one noticed
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The Atlantic

Blood From Human Umbilical Cords Can Rejuvenate Old Mouse Brains When a baby is born, the now-useless umbilical cord is usually thrown away. But sometimes, it finds renewed purpose. Parents can decide to donate the blood from the cord to blood banks , which freeze the stem cells within so they can eventually be used to treat people with various cancers and genetic disorders . In the process, plasma—the liquid portion of blood—is usually ignored. But neuroscien
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NYT > Science

Matter: Why Are Some Mice (and People) Monogamous? A Study Points to GenesA groundbreaking study has found that genetic variations in mice are linked to parental care and monogamy, the first time such a link has been found in mammals.
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NYT > Science

A New Exoplanet May Be Most Promising Yet in Search for LifeThe planet, about 40 light years from Earth, is close enough that astronomers hope they will someday be able to probe its atmosphere for signs of water or other evidence of suitability for life.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Broke a Glass? Someday You Might 3-D-Print a New OneResearchers think 3-D printing may make it cheaper and easier to create glass objects, from skyscraper facades to tiny devices used in research.
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WIRED

Toyota’s Still Serious About Hydrogen—It Built a Semi to Prove It Hydrogen has never caught on. But short-distance trucking could make it finally work. The post Toyota’s Still Serious About Hydrogen—It Built a Semi to Prove It appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Bill Nye Says Climate Change Deniers Have a Bad Case of Cognitive Dissonance Also, magnets, how do they work? "Magic!" (JK.) The post Bill Nye Says Climate Change Deniers Have a Bad Case of Cognitive Dissonance appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Here's How Much Tech Companies Gave to the Trump Inauguration Photo: AP On Wednesday, the Presidential Inaugural Committee filed its final report with the Federal Election Commission, revealing the full list of donors who financed Donald Trump’s electoral college victory party. Unsurprisingly, the biggest names in tech all chipped in, including Google, Amazon, Intel, and Microsoft, all of whom spoke out against Trump’s Muslim ban . The filing reveals that j
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Live Science

Secretive X-37B Military Space Plane Marks 700 Days in OrbitThe U.S. Air Force's robotic X-37B space plane has now been circling Earth for 700 days on its latest hush-hush mission.
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Science | The Guardian

Umbilical cord blood could slow brain's ageing, study suggests Scientists hope protein infusion which rejuvenated brains of aged mice could combat mental decline in older people Scientists have reversed memory and learning problems in aged mice with infusions of a protein found in human umbilical cord blood. The striking results have raised hopes for a treatment that staves off mental decline in old age, but researchers stressed that more studies, including
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Can't blame El Nino as global temps spike in March (Update)In what scientists call a clear sign of a warming world, Earth's temperatures in March were the most above normal on record without an El Nino spiking temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Earth's little garbage people?If you're enjoying some tasty food today that has at least one ingredient that was farmed somewhere, you probably owe a little thanks to earthworms.
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Popular Science

Fujifilm’s new instant digital camera is a reminder that film is not dead Gadgets The Fujifilm Instax Square SQ10 is a digital camera that can crank out Polaroid-style prints. Fujifim's new Instax camera mixes digital photography with an old-school film feel.
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Popular Science

What's the deal with this beaver herding a bunch of cows? Animals An animal behaviorist shares his thoughts about the viral video Either those ranchers have turned beaver training into a high art, or there's something else going on here. Read on.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Brain gains seen in elderly mice injected with human umbilical cord plasmaPlasma from human umbilical cord blood refreshes aspects of learning and memory in mice.
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Science : NPR

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. (Image credit: Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

We Just Found Out Antarctica Is Covered in Rivers An enormous waterfall at the Nansen Ice Shelf channels summertime meltwater into the ocean, a process that seemingly protects the shelf from collapse. Image courtesy of Jonathan Kingslake In 1908, Ernest Shackleton’s legendary Nimrod team was making its way toward the South Pole when the men were startled by something unexpected: The sound of liquid water, roaring across the frozen wasteland towa
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Gizmodo

TRAPPIST-1 Has Some Serious New Competition For Best Place to Find Aliens Artist’s rendition of exoplanet LHS 1140b. (Image: ESO/ spaceengine.org ) It seems like every week, there’s a new contender for Coolest Planet Where There Are Definitely Aliens. For those of us who want to believe, this is an emotionally exhausting cycle, as we’re built up and let down time and again. At the risk of fucking with our fragile hearts even more, it’s worth mentioning that a recently
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The arrhythmic beating of a black hole heartAt the center of the Centaurus galaxy cluster, there is a large elliptical galaxy called NGC 4696. Deeper still, there is a supermassive black hole buried within the core of this galaxy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered exoplanet may be best candidate in search for signs of lifeThe newly discovered super-Earth LHS 1140b orbits in the habitable zone around a faint red dwarf star named LHS 1140, in the constellation of Cetus (The Sea Monster). Red dwarfs are much smaller and cooler than the Sun and, although LHS 1140b is ten times closer to its star than the Earth is to the Sun, it only receives about half as much sunlight from its star as the Earth and lies in the middle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump to call commander of International Space StationPresident Donald Trump will speak next week to the commander of the orbiting International Space Station.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study—for the first time—links specific genes with parenting behavior across speciesWhy is it that some species seem to be particularly attentive parents while others leave their young to fend for themselves? For years, scientists have believed one of the major drivers was experience - an animal raised by an attentive parent, the argument went, was likely to be an attentive parent itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Action required: Invasive fungus is killing European salamandersA new fungal disease brought in from Asia is threatening European salamanders. Once the amphibians become infected, they die within a brief period of time, as biologists of the universities of Zurich and Ghent have shown in a Nature paper. Because saving the infected populations is still not possible, Switzerland has preventively imposed an import ban for salamanders and newts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene 'copy machine' may produce cheap semiconductor wafersIn 2016, annual global semiconductor sales reached their highest-ever point, at $339 billion worldwide. In that same year, the semiconductor industry spent about $7.2 billion worldwide on wafers that serve as the substrates for microelectronics components, which can be turned into transistors, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and photonic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water is streaming across Antarctica: New survey finds liquid flow more widespread than thoughtIn the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica's ice during the brief summer. Researchers already knew such features existed, but assumed they were confined mainly to Antarctica's fastest-warming, most northerly reaches. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; th
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Science | The Guardian

New contender in hunt for alien life discovered by astronomers Exoplanet LHS 1140b is believed to be about 40% larger than Earth and lies 39 light years away in the constellation of Cetus, orbiting a red dwarf star A rocky planet that orbits a red dwarf star has been revealed as the latest contender for the best place to hunt for life beyond the solar system. The newfound world was spotted as it crossed the face of its parent star and cast an almost impercep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's little garbage people? (video)If you're enjoying some tasty food today you probably owe a little thanks to earthworms. How is it that these detritivores help make beloved compost? Like when we digest food, it's all chemistry, but earthworms have an extra enzyme that means they can eat materials not found in human diets. Yet all this powerful chemistry means not everyone sees earthworms as the greatest creature to crawl -- find
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees a well-defined center in Ex-Tropical Depression 02W's remnantsNASA's Terra satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression 02W as it continued to linger west of the northern Philippines on April 19.
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Ars Technica

Open the pod bay doors, Watson: IBM introduces “cognitive rooms” (credit: IBM) IBM's Watson Internet of Things (IoT) unit has teamed with audio giant Harman's Professional Solutions group to create an adaptive artificial intelligence service that can act as an "in-room cognitive concierge." In less tech-jargon, that's an AI able to respond to voice commands and questions based specifically on the context of the room its sensor is located in. The technology is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Properly sorted: More intelligence to bulk material plantsSand, gravel, coal, deicing salt or diamonds, grain, sugar, coffee or grapes and waste – a lot of everyday goods are more or less grainy. To classify this bulk material by quality and size, it must be sorted in a sophisticated process. Scientists have developed a system which is able to sort much faster, more cheaply and more accurately than previous techniques.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hazardous asteroid effects ranked from least to most destructiveIf an asteroid struck Earth, which of its effects -- scorching heat, flying debris, towering tsunamis -- would claim the most lives? A new study has the answer: violent winds and shock waves are the most dangerous effects produced by Earth-impacting asteroids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identical twins, not-so-identical stem cellsA new twin study sheds light on what causes reprogrammed stem cells to have different epigenetic patterns. The findings are being used for research and therapeutics, say the researchers.
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The Atlantic

Jason Chaffetz's Abrupt Exit Representative Jason Chaffetz shocked politicos from Utah to Washington Wednesday with a surprise announcement that he would not seek reelection next year. The Utah congressman, who serves as chairman of the House Oversight Committee, is a high-profile figure in the GOP—a media-savvy lawmaker viewed by many party leaders as a rising star. But he has also been a target of fierce grassroots opposit
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The Atlantic

How Marine Le Pen Relies on Dividing French Jews and Muslims Marine Le Pen, the National Front party leader who is among the frontrunners in France’s upcoming presidential elections, made waves this month with her insistence that France was not responsible for the infamous “Vel d’Hiv” roundup of July 1942, in which French police chose to arrest more than 13,000 Jews and deport them to Auschwitz. Many were stunned by the comment. It not only contradicted de
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Popular Science

Salt might actually make you hungry, not thirsty Health Bodies are weird New studies on mice and people suggests salt makes us hungrier – not thirstier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pilot, meteorologist vying to be first German female astronautA fighter pilot and a meteorologist have made the finals in the race to become Germany's first female astronaut.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees a well-defined center in Ex-Tropical Depression 02W's remnantsNASA's Terra satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression 02W as it continued to linger west of the northern Philippines on April 19.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crop-killing armyworm caterpillar reaches Rwanda, KenyaRwanda's government announced on Wednesday it had discovered fall armyworm on its crops, making it the third east African country afflicted by the plant-eating pest also recently spotted in Kenya.
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Gizmodo

Silicon Valley's Hottest Overpriced Juicer Apparently Works Worse Than Your Bare Hands Remember Juicero? It was the darling of glass-eyed Silicon Valley investors just a year ago. But it turns out the the $400 juice-making gadget is very literally useless. You can actually just buy the juice packets and squeeze the goods into your glass with your bare hands , no gadget required. Advertisement If you’re one of the poor souls who paid for this overpriced piece of counter candy, let u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds vs. bees: Study helps explain how flowers evolved to get pollinators to specializeEcologists who study flowering plants have long believed that flowers evolved with particular sets of characteristics—unique combinations of colors, shapes, and orientations, for example—as a means of attracting specific pollinators. But a recent paper in the journal Ecology suggests that flowers that are visited almost exclusively by hummingbirds are actually designed not to lure birds, but to de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report identifies grand challenges to better prepare for volcanic eruptionsDespite broad understanding of volcanoes, our ability to predict the timing, duration, type, size, and consequences of volcanic eruptions is limited, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. To improve eruption forecasting and warnings to save lives, the report identifies research priorities for better monitoring of volcanic eruptions and three grand chal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seven years later: BP oil spill settlement funding new way to manage fish populationsResearchers from the University of South Florida College of Marine Science played a key role in understanding the severity of the BP oil spill. They're now barcoding fish eggs to determine where fish are spawning, helping create protected areas and a baseline should another oil spill occur.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher hones in on plaque-causing protein in ALS and dementiaIn a recent paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry Yuna Ayala, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University, and her research team made advances in understanding how a protein causes damaging plaques to build up in neurodegenerative illnesses like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a form of dementia called frontotemporal lobar deg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In new paper, scientists explain climate change using before/after photographic evidenceA group of scientists offers photographic proof of climate change using images of retreating glaciers in a new paper, "Savor the Cryosphere," appearing in GSA Today, a peer-reviewed publication of the Geological Society of America.
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The Atlantic

Words Which by Their Very Utterance Inflict Injury College students seeking to suppress or punish speech in their communities are the latest iteration of a longer tradition in American life than many of their critics acknowledge. That’s true even narrowing our backward gaze to Supreme Court cases from the last century. During World War II, for instance, the case of Chaplinsky vs. State of New Hampshire considered whether the municipality of Roche
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The Atlantic

The Toll of Wells Fargo's Account Scandal In general, buying a company’s stock is a vote of confidence, something investors do when they think a company is poised for great, money-making things. But when a company executive buys stock, particularly amid a corporate meltdown, it is often an attempt at reassurance or damage control. Wells Fargo’s top executives have recently made such a move. On Monday, following the company’s first-quarte
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Gizmodo

Sony Rivals Canon’s Best Camera with the Badass A9 For a few years now, Sony’s been the most innovative name in the camera game, besting incumbents like Nikon and Canon in several categories with awesome point-and-shoots, like the RX100 line, and the truly game-changing A7 full-frame mirrorless line. Far from just an innovator, there are signs the company’s efforts are finding an audience: A few days ago Sony claimed to have overtaken Nikon as th
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Ars Technica

Verizon CEO: We’d consider merger with almost anyone, including Comcast Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Spencer Platt ) Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam said yesterday that he'd be willing to have merger talks with just about any company, including Comcast. “If [Comcast CEO] Brian [Roberts] came knocking on the door, I’d have a discussion with him about it,” McAdam said in an interview with Bloomberg . “But I’d also tell you there isn’t much that I wouldn’t have a discussio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish cooperate for selfish reasonsWhy do animals help raise offspring that aren't their own? A new study shows that fish cooperate to raise another fish's offspring to reduce their own risk of being eaten by a predator.
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The Atlantic

How Big People Shape Little Kids in Big Little Lies This post contains some spoilers for the first season of Big Little Lies . HBO’s recently wrapped miniseries Big Little Lies is a whodunit featuring attractive people grimly swirling wine and glaring at roiling surf from deck parapets. The adjective “soapy” frequently worms its way into reviews that unfairly boil the show down to its least compelling elements. The Wire it is not, but Big Little L
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D-printable implants may ease damaged kneesA cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may allow surgeons to 3-D print knee menisci or other replacement parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy. The hydrogel-based material is the first to match human cartilage in strength and elasticity while also remaining 3-D-printable and stable inside the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than recess: How playing on the swings helps kids learn to cooperateThe measured, synchronous movement of children on the swings can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, University of Washington researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identical twins; not-so-identical stem cellsA new twin study sheds light on what causes reprogrammed stem cells to have different epigenetic patterns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research paves way for improved colorectal cancer testResearchers at Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions have identified specific types of bacteria that seem to be abundant in individuals with colorectal cancer. Using a combination of markers specific for these fecal microbes, scientists anticipate that a noninvasive, sensitive clinical diagnostic test potentially can be developed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds vs. bees: Study helps explain how flowers evolved to get pollinators to specializeEcologists who study flowering plants have long believed that flowers evolved with particular sets of characteristics to attract specific pollinators. But a recent paper in the journal Ecology suggests that flowers visited almost exclusively by hummingbirds are designed not to lure birds, but to confuse bumblebees and cost them precious time. This extra cost leads most bees to seek nectar rewards
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brain sets a unique learning rate for everything we do, by self-adjusting to the environmentEach time we get feedback, the brain is hard at work updating its knowledge and behavior in response to changes in the environment; yet, if there's uncertainty or volatility in the environment, the entire process must be adjusted. A Dartmouth-led study published in "Neuron" reveals that there's not a single rate of learning for everything we do, as the brain can self-adjust its learning rates usin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell biologists discover crucial 'traffic regulator' in neuronsCell biologists from Utrecht University have discovered the protein that may be the crucial traffic regulator for the transport of vital molecules inside nerve cells. When this traffic regulator is removed, the flow of traffic comes to a halt. 'Traffic jams' are reported to play a key role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The results of their research will
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review highlights why animals have evolved to favor one side of the brainMost left-handers can rattle off a list of their eminent comrades-in-arms: Oprah Winfrey, Albert Einstein, and Barack Obama, just to name three, but they may want to add on cockatoos, 'southpaw' squirrels, and some house cats. But why do people and animals naturally favor one side over the other, and what does it teach us about the brain's inner workings? Researchers explore these questions in a R
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Which production attributes are most important to consumers when buying beef, chicken?Consumers are increasingly interested in how their food is produced and look for claims such as no growth hormones, no GMOs, etc. on food products. In a new study, no growth hormones was prioritized as most important and organic as the least important. For products like poultry, the USDA forbids the use of hormones, meaning consumers may not be well informed about production claims.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Defective HIV proviruses hinder immune system response and cureProteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells, new evidence suggests.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study defines thunderstorm asthma epidemic conditionsResearchers are exploring new ways of predicting thunderstorm asthma outbreaks that may one day provide early warnings for health professionals.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grand challenges to better prepare for volcanic eruptionsDespite broad understanding of volcanoes, our ability to predict the timing, duration, type, size, and consequences of volcanic eruptions is limited, says a new report. To improve eruption forecasting and warnings to save lives, the report identifies research priorities for better monitoring of volcanic eruptions and three grand challenges facing the volcano science community.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Gibraltar-sized' space rock passes EarthA large asteroid the size of the Rock of Gibraltar has passed safely by Earth.
5h
Ars Technica

Microsoft turns two-factor authentication into one-factor by ditching password (credit: Microsoft ) Microsoft Authenticator is a pleasant enough two-factor authentication app. You can use it to generate numeric authentication codes for accounts on Google, Facebook, Twitter, and indeed, any other service that uses a standard one-time password . The login process is straightforward: first you sign in to each site with your username and regular, fixed password, then you use th
5h
WIRED

North Korea’s Failed Missile Launch Eases Experts’ Worst-Case Scenario Fears Rather than showing off North Korea's military might, as intended, the country's most recent failed launch put observers at relative ease. The post North Korea’s Failed Missile Launch Eases Experts' Worst-Case Scenario Fears appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

The Untold Story of the Back-Room Team That Saved Apollo 13 A new documentary explores the history of the Apollo space program, focusing on the mission control engineers who made it possible. The post The Untold Story of the Back-Room Team That Saved Apollo 13 appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

The Brilliant Simplicity of New York’s New Times Square Six years ago Times Square was a congested thoroughfare. Today it celebrates its reopening as a European-style piazza. The post The Brilliant Simplicity of New York's New Times Square appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

Facebook’s Augmented Reality Engine Brings AI Right to Your Phone Facebook can't realize its AR ambitions if AI stays tied to data centers. So it's bringing neural nets right to your phone. The post Facebook's Augmented Reality Engine Brings AI Right to Your Phone appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Live Science

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at LuxorSeveral mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported.
5h
Live Science

Photos: Mummies and Figurines Discovered in Ancient Cemetery at LuxorArchaeologists have uncovered a large funerary complex holding several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines in an ancient cemetery at Luxor, in Egypt.
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Blog » Languages » English

Real-time Complete points are here! Hello Scythes! As you know, our Complete points have been updating at midnight or when a cell is declared complete by HQ. However, now that we are giving out bonus points (yay!) for completion, we have decided to give you real-time updates of your complete points. What does this mean? Anything you complete will be immediately added to your daily Complete points tally, which you can view in your p
5h
The Atlantic

Can a Beautiful Website of Facts Change Anybody’s Mind? It was Tax Day, and Steve Ballmer was excited. No surprise. Excitability is among the attributes most associated with the former Microsoft chief executive. This time, he was not trumpeting the virtues of software developers or screaming after an alley-oop for his Los Angeles Clippers, the basketball team he bought in 2014. Instead, Ballmer’s enthusiasm had a more arcane inspiration. He was on a t
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

It Pays To Have A Commercial Fisherman As Your Partner On Naked and Afraid #NakedAndAfraid | Sundays at 10/9c Commercial fisherman Dan, shows off his fishing skills at an Australian billabong. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Scientists find amazement in what’s most familiarActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the unexpected nature of science.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Readers bugged by wine-spoiling stinkbugsStinkbug hazards, Great Lakes invaders and more reader feedback.
5h
Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Noise Cancelling Headphones, Smart Plugs, Shoes Under $35, and More Wireless noise-cancelling headphones , shoes under $35 , and popular Bodum drinkware lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals BÖHM Bluetooth Noise Cancelling Headphones , $68-$88 We see a ton of deals on affordable Bluetooth earbuds, but if you’ve been waiting for a solid discount on noise-cancelling on-ears before you cut
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Under-studied boreal habitat key for North America's ducksKnowing where migrating birds came from and where they're headed is essential for their conservation and management. A new study tackles this challenge using stable isotope ratios, which reflect where birds were living while growing their feathers, and reveals that the northern reaches of Canada may have underappreciated importance for North America's waterfowl.
5h
Ingeniøren

ESA: Behov for global indsats mod rumskrotKæmpe satellitnetværk øger risikoen for kollisioner med rumskrot. Vi er nødt til at tage problemet alvorligt, viser ny rapport.
5h
Ingeniøren

Nu skal du tale med Facebook-vennerne i VRVirtual reality er fra i dag en del af Facebook, der udvider Messenger-appen med VR-mødesteder.
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Gizmodo

All the Best Movies Coming to and Leaving Netflix In May 2017 Spring is here, but that doesn’t mean any of us want to do anything but binge watch TV. Netflix is bringing a bunch of its original TV shows back this month in the United States alongside tons of other new movies. The Highlights Netflix has been really into itself recently, dumping more and more original stuff into the queue every month. It’s no different in May. There are a couple new movies, in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant therapy in certain breast cancer patients predicts low risk for local metastasesSelect breast cancer patients who achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) after chemotherapy may be able to avoid follow-up breast and lymph node, or axillary, surgery, according to new findings from researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The study, published today in JAMA Surgery, identifies the exceptional responders who are at lowest risk for local metastases and
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SLU researcher hones in on plaque-causing protein in ALS and dementiaSaint Louis University scientist Yuna Ayala, Ph.D., and her research team have made advances in understanding how damaging plaques build up in neurodegenerative illnesses like ALS and dementia.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In new paper, scientists explain climate change using before/after photographic evidenceA group of scientists offers photographic proof of climate change using images of retreating glaciers in a new paper, 'Savor the Cryosphere,' appearing in GSA Today, a peer-reviewed publication of the Geological Society of America. Along with Gregory Baker, adjunct professor of geology at the University of Kansas, co-authors include an Emmy Award-winning documentarian and a prominent environmental
5h
Live Science

Cigarettes, Alcohol & Pot: Why Some Young Smokers Combine DrugsThe findings of the new study could have implications for helping people quit smoking, the researchers said.
5h
Popular Science

Why Bill Nye is set to march on Washington Entertainment Sometimes science should be political The Science Guy is headed to D.C. for the inaugural "March for Science". Find out more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gunshot injuries occur primarily in Miami-Dade's poor, black neighborhoodsGunshot wound injuries in Miami-Dade County are clustered in predominantly poor, black neighborhoods, according to a new study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online preconception health education tool positively impacts patient careA research team has evaluated MyFamilyPlan and found that it enabled a significant increase in the proportion of women who reported discussing their reproductive health with their doctors.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shale gas threat to forests can be eased by consolidating infrastructureFragmentation of ecologically important core forests within the northern Appalachians -- driven by pipeline and access road construction -- is the major threat posed by shale-gas development, according to researchers, who recommend a change in infrastructure-siting policies to head off loss of this critical habitat.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elevated levels of mercury in women of child bearing age in Pacific Island countries, new study revealsWomen of childbearing age living in four Pacific Island countries have elevated levels of mercury in their bodies, a new study reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evidence of a 'higher' state of consciousness?Scientific evidence of a 'higher' state of consciousness has been found in a new study. Using brain imaging technology, researchers measured the tiny magnetic fields produced in the brain and found that, across three psychedelic drugs, one measure of conscious level -- the neural signal diversity -- was reliably higher.
5h
Viden

Nyt 3D-ficeret Google Earth fortæller historierUdforsk Jorden direkte fra browseren - indtil videre dog kun i Chrome.
5h
The Atlantic

How Being a Woman Helped Marine Le Pen When voters in France cast their ballots in the first round of the country’s presidential election on Sunday, Marine Le Pen, the candidate of the far-right National Front (FN), is projected to become the second woman in French history to advance to the second round of a presidential election. That’s probably as far as she’ll go in her quest to become France’s first female head of state—recent pol
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Ars Technica

Facebook’s first VR app surprises, lets us collaborate and be juvenile Ars' Sam Machkovech tests Facebook Spaces in VR, with help from Kyle Orland. Edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) After receiving a robust reveal at 2016's Oculus Connect conference, the first bonafide Facebook VR experience launched for free as part of a surprise announcement on Tuesday morning. Ars Technica's staff didn't get advance notice about the first Facebook Spaces beta going live, so w
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Google’s Massive Health Study Seeks 10,000 Volunteers to Give Up Their Medical SecretsThe project will scrutinize spit, tears, stool, heartbeats, and genomes to search for new predictors of disease.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Venomous fish have evolved many ways to inflict painFish venom shows great diversity and is being studied to treat pain, cancer and other diseases.
5h
Gizmodo

More Evidence That Aliens Aren’t Trying to Communicate With Us The “Sombrero Galaxy.” (Image: Hubble) Some SETI researchers believe the best way to detect aliens is to search the skies for their laser beams . In the largest survey of its kind, astronomers scanned 5,600 stars in search of these optical signals—and they found...absolutely nothing. Nada. Zilch. Here’s what that means to SETI and the ongoing hunt for alien intelligence. Advertisement In a new st
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Gizmodo

The Painstaking Detail Zack Snyder Put Into Superman Snapping Somebody's Neck GIF The thing about Zack Snyder is that he’s always completely into everything he puts on-screen. He has tons of enthusiasm for everything—including making sure that Henry Cavill snapped Michael Shannon’s neck in Man of Steel exactly right. Advertisement In a featurette about Man of Steel which only the truest of fans have probably watched, Henry Cavill twists Michael Shannon’s neck in a rehearsa
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Popular Science

Man-eating lions might like us because we're squishy Animals New research on the teeth of lions who've hunted humans Oh here he comes. He's a man-eater. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

30% reduction in deaths from bowel cancerThe rate of new cases of bowel cancer in Austria has fallen by around 20% in the last ten years, while the associated mortality rate has fallen by nearly 30%. This trend is primarily due to improvements in preventive screening colonoscopy, in which precancerous stages are removed before the disease can take hold.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extraordinary resilience of deadly bacterium explainedResearchers have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses tension-activated membrane channels to stop itself from swelling up and bursting when it is suddenly exposed to water. The study helps explain how this bacterium -- a major cause of hospital-acquired infections -- persists in a variety of different environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Membranes to remove viruses from drinking waterThe 'zwitterionic polymer hydrogel' repels the viruses from approaching and passing through the membrane. It contains both positive and negative charges and improves efficiency by weakening virus accumulation on the modified filter surface. The result was a significantly higher rate of removal of waterborne viruses, including human norovirus and adenovirus.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Outpatient laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible in a public county hospitalIn the first study of its kind, a research team at a large, urban public safety net hospital found that outpatient laparoscopic appendectomy (surgical removal of the appendix) is safe for patients and results in shorter hospital stays and decreased health care costs, according to study results published as an 'article in press' on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of pr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report identifies grand challenges to better prepare for volcanic eruptionsDespite broad understanding of volcanoes, our ability to predict the timing, duration, type, size, and consequences of volcanic eruptions is limited, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. To improve eruption forecasting and warnings to save lives, the report identifies research priorities for better monitoring of volcanic eruptions and three grand chal
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making batteries from waste glass bottlesResearchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have used waste glass bottles and a low-cost chemical process to create nanosilicon anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and provide more power with fewer charges to personal electronics like cell phones
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New evidence: Defective HIV proviruses hinder immune system response and cureResearchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines emergency department visits for patients injured by law enforcement in the USFrom 2006 to 2012, there were approximately 51,000 emergency department visits per year for patients injured by law enforcement in the United States, with this number stable over this time period, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adherence to high-intensity statin drops-off for many following heart attackA substantial proportion of patients prescribed high-intensity statins following hospitalization for a heart attack did not continue taking this medication with high adherence at two years after discharge, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USC team develops new method to create the next fuel-efficient renewable energyThe fossil fuel fight goes on for USC scientists as they develop a new method for creating reversible hydrogen storage based on methanol, with no carbon emissions, in the last major paper co-authored by USC's first Nobel laureate, the late George Olah.
5h
Popular Science

China is building a giant nuclear submarine facility From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal It can build four subs at a time. China's new submarine factory on the Yellow Sea will churn out modern SSNs in the next decade, making PLAN submarines a deadly global force. Read on.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood test offers potential for faster, targeted treatment of non-small-cell lung cancerIdentification of a specific genetic mutation in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) helps clinicians select the best treatment option. Potential NSCLC patients usually undergo invasive tissue biopsy, which may often be unnecessary and delays treatment. A new report describes a new blood test that can accurately and quickly identify genetic mutations associated with NSCLC, allowing cl
5h
Ars Technica

After delays due to rocket problems, next space station crew set to launch Enlarge / An Orthodox priest hands out Easter eggs to the media at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad after blessing the Soyuz rocket on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Kazakhstan. Barring any unexpected technical problems, a Soyuz rocket will launch Thursday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, carrying just two people: first-time NASA astronaut Jack Fischer and veteran Russian cosmonaut Fyo
6h
The Atlantic

Hawaii’s Renewed Jitters About Nukes Memories of the attack have faded, but there are still people in Hawaii who can recall the quiet Sunday morning that descended into chaos more than 75 years ago. You do not forget the deafening buzz of torpedo bombers, once you have heard them overhead, or what it’s like to see the sky polka-dotted red with the markings of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s aircraft. As tensions between the United Stat
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Futurity.org

Did sore teeth make Tsavo lions eat people? It wasn’t desperation that drove the legendary “ man-eating lions of Tsavo ” to terrorize a railroad camp in Kenya more than a century ago, according to a new analysis of their teeth. “Our results suggest that preying on people was not the lions’ last resort, rather, it was simply the easiest solution to a problem that they confronted,” says Larisa DeSantis, assistant professor of earth and envir
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Gizmodo

French Presidential Candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon's 'Hologram' Is Not Actually a Hologram Image: AP French presidential candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon is pulling out all the stops in the final days of the campaign season, beaming a holographic image of his far-left message to six cities across the country. There’s only one problem with Melenchon’s incredible technological feat: It’s not actually a hologram. Advertisement Melenchon used the same technique that brought Tupac back to life
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Science : NPR

An Asteroid Is Swinging By Earth Today For Its Closest Visit In 400 Years Don't worry: Astronomers say asteroid 2014 JO25, which is more than a third of a mile wide, will fly harmlessly past our planet. Still, it should come close enough to be visible with small telescopes. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSSR)
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study ranks which production attributes are most important to consumers when buying beef, chickenFor many consumers, buying a gallon of milk is much more complex than finding the preferred fat content and expiration date. They want to know how the cows were treated, what they were fed, whether they received growth hormones or antibiotics, whether the milk is organic, and so on. A recent University of Illinois study ranks which of these production attributes are most important to buyers for fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study ranks hazardous asteroid effects from least to most destructiveIf an asteroid struck Earth, which of its effects—scorching heat, flying debris, towering tsunamis—would claim the most lives? A new study has the answer: violent winds and shock waves are the most dangerous effects produced by Earth-impacting asteroids.
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Futurity.org

Jello shows how hit to skull wobbles our brain Engineers are taking a closer look at the brain’s “suspension system” and their insights could provide a way to limit or even prevent traumatic brain injury. TBI can be devastating and debilitating. Despite intense interest and years of study, the exact mechanisms linking force and neurological injury remain unclear. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a k
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evolution of cooperation through longer memoryWhen we make a decision about whether or not to cooperate with someone, we usually base our decision on past experiences. However, when analyzing strategies for repeated dilemmas, modeling long-term memory in cooperative strategies quickly becomes computationally intractable. To overcome this challenge, scientists have distilled a set of axioms that every robust cooperative strategy should have. I
6h
Ars Technica

The Xiaomi Mi 6 out-specs the Galaxy S8 for half the price With the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 finally ready for market, it's time for a round of smartphone updates from the usual suspects. The chip debuted in the Galaxy S8 (full review coming soon), and Xiaomi is now featuring the 835 in the Xiaomi Mi 6, the new flagship for the company's home market of China. Unlike the stunning Xiaomi Mi Mix , a slim-bezel "concept" phone from Xiaomi that the company act
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops new method to create the next fuel-efficient renewable energyScientists have long struggled with generating and storing hydrogen, the kind that might one day provide the backbone for renewable energy fuel cells that make our cars move, warm our houses and help produce food, in a way that also won't hasten climate change or otherwise harm the environment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study defines thunderstorm asthma epidemic conditionsResearchers are exploring new ways of predicting thunderstorm asthma outbreaks that may one day provide early warnings for health professionals
6h
TEDTalks (video)

A video game to cope with grief | Amy GreenWhen Amy Green's young son was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor, she made up a bedtime story for his siblings to teach them about cancer. What resulted was a video game, "That Dragon, Cancer," which takes players on a journey they can't win. In this beautiful talk about coping with loss, Green brings joy and play to tragedy. "We made a game that's hard to play," she says, "because the hardest mom
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Change Is Transforming Arctic RiversThe most dramatic shift is the rerouting of a major meltwater river in Canada -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticles remain unpredictableThe way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Degradable electronic components created from corn starchAs consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making artificial blood for transfusionsBlood transfusions can save the lives of patients who have suffered major blood loss, but hospitals don't always have enough or the right type on hand. In search of a solution, researchers have developed a promising substitute using blood's oxygen-carrying component, hemoglobin. This in vitro study found that the modified hemoglobin was an effective oxygen carrier and also scavenged for potentiall
6h
Gizmodo

Deadspin Aaron Hernandez Dead Of Apparent Suicide | Jezebel The Woman Who Accused Drake of Getting H Deadspin Aaron Hernandez Dead Of Apparent Suicide | Jezebel The Woman Who Accused Drake of Getting Her Pregnant Made It Up...Or Did She? | The Root Racist GOP State Sen. Frank Artiles Calls Black Colleagues ‘N—gers’ and Lived | Fusion U.S. pays $1 million to family of late Mexican teen made to chug liquid meth by border agents |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rechargeable 'spin battery' promising for spintronics and quantum computingResearchers have shown how to create a rechargeable "spin battery" made out of materials called topological insulators, a step toward building new spintronic devices and quantum computers.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create robotic cheetahUniversity of Twente researcher Geert Folkertsma has developed a prototype cheetah robot. Folkertsma has dedicated four years of research and development to constructing a scaled-down robotic version of the fastest land animal in the world, with a view to replicating its movements. Relatively speaking, the robot moves using only about fifteen percent more energy than a real cheetah. Folkertsma's d
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Futurity.org

Good news about antidepressants in early pregnancy A new study finds that mothers’ use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications. After controlling for multiple other risk factors, the researchers did not find any increased risk of autism, ADHD, or reduced fetal growth among exposed of
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Fake-drug crackdown, tackling misconduct and Europa’s plumes The week in science: 14–20 April 2017. Nature 544 274 doi: 10.1038/544274a
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Ars Technica

What we want in an “SNES Mini” Enlarge / The actual SNES Mini probably won't be this small or have a cartridge slot. But we can dream... (credit: DannyChoo.com ) Eurogamer's report this morning that Nintendo is working on an "SNES Mini" plug-and-play console in the style of the NES Classic Edition (according to "sources close to the company") isn't too surprising. The original NES Mini was an unexpectedly large success that sh
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cognitive science

Boston's EMPath Program Uses Brain Science to Fight Family Poverty submitted by /u/Aiden_Noeue [link] [comments]
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Records Found in Dusty Basement Undermine Decades of Dietary AdviceRaw data from a 40-year-old study raises new questions about fats -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Ingeniøren

Sol overhaler for første gang vind i ny energikapacitetI 2016 overgik ny kapacitet fra solenergi kapaciteten fra nyopført vindkraft. Ny FN-rapport viser således, at ny sol-kapacitet udgjorde 75 GW mod 54 GW ny vind-kapacitet på verdensplan.
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Gizmodo

Here Are the Songs in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2's 'Awesome Mix' Still: YouTube Marvel has announced the much-anticipated soundtrack for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 , and it looks like James Gunn and the Guardians crew have outdone themselves, with an impressive and eclectic set list that truly earns the name “Awesome Mix.” The second film’s mix includes more rock music, including from the 1970s, and several of the songs aren’t really well known. There’s a
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

U of I study ranks which production attributes are most important to consumers when buying beef, chickenConsumers are increasingly interested in how their food is produced and look for claims such as no growth hormones, no GMOs, etc. on food products. In a U of I study, no growth hormones was prioritized as most important and organic as the least important. For products like poultry, the USDA forbids the use of hormones, meaning consumers may not be well informed about production claims.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study ranks hazardous asteroid effects from least to most destructiveIf an asteroid struck Earth, which of its effects--scorching heat, flying debris, towering tsunamis--would claim the most lives? A new study has the answer: violent winds and shock waves are the most dangerous effects produced by Earth-impacting asteroids.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New AATS consensus statement highlights safety of surgical ablation for atrial fibrillationWhile there is no cure for atrial fibrillation, many successful treatments are available, including surgical ablation. A growing population of patients means an increased demand for care. In an effort to provide practitioners with the most up-to-date information, the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) assembled an expert board to study the available literature and develop evidence-ba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science policy: Considerations for subnational governmentsA new report, Science Policy: Considerations for Subnational Governments, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), affirms the importance of explicit science policies at the subnational level.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gaming helps personalized therapy level upUsing game features in non-game contexts, computers can learn to build personalized mental- and physical-therapy programs that enhance individual motivation, according to Penn State engineers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milestone on way to switching on world's largest superconducting linear acceleratorThe international X-ray laser European XFEL has reached one of its final major milestones on the way to scientific user operation. DESY has successfully commissioned the particle accelerator, which drives the X-ray laser along its full length.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene and gold make a better brain probeScientists have created more flexible neural electrodes that minimize tissue damage and still transmit clear brain signals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Speed-dependent attraction governs what goes on at the heart of midge swarmsEver wondered what makes the collective behavior in insect swarms possible? Scientists have now modeled the effect of an attraction force, which resembles Newton's gravity force, acting towards the center of a midge swarm. Their model reveals that the gravity-like attraction towards the heart of the swarm increases with an individual's flight speed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gaming helps personalized therapy level upUsing game features in non-game contexts, computers can learn to build personalized mental- and physical-therapy programs that enhance individual motivation, according to engineers.
6h
Big Think

In Evolution's Orchestra, Soloists Aren't the Fittest A chorus of new science is showing that evolution has orchestrated life to leave no room for solos. A grander view of life is revealing higher-level, need-centric relational logic patterns (as in David Haskell’s The Songs of Trees). Read More
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Gizmodo

Scientists Are Making Horrible Red-Eye Mutant Wasps Because Why the Hell Not Oh fuck this (image: Akbari lab, UC Riverside) Listen, scientists. I appreciate what you do, and boy I sure do love that evidence-based pursuit of knowledge, but did you have to make mutant wasps? Did you? Advertisement The Nasonia vitripennis wasps’ genomes happen to be one of the most studied of the order of insects that includes wasps, bees and ants, since they’re super easy to breed and play
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Gizmodo

Why Does North Korea Play Blade Runner-Style Music Every Morning? Photo: Getty North Korea is a weird country. Heck, so is the United States of America. But the USA doesn’t play creepy, Blade Runner -like Theremin music in the nation’s capital each morning just after dawn. North Korea does . Advertisement For many news enthusiasts, Pyongyang is a trigger word these days. The US military appears to be flirting with the idea of an invasion, one that would surely
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making artificial blood for transfusionsBlood transfusions can save the lives of patients who have suffered major blood loss, but hospitals don't always have enough or the right type on hand. In search of a solution, researchers have developed a promising substitute using blood's oxygen-carrying component, hemoglobin. The in vitro study, reported in ACS' journal Biomacromolecules, found that the modified hemoglobin was an effective oxyg
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolution of cooperation through longer memoryWhen we make a decision about whether or not to cooperate with someone, we usually base our decision on past experiences—how has this person behaved in the past?—and on future reciprocity—will they return the favor?—and weigh these against the possible benefits of defecting. However, when analyzing strategies for repeated dilemmas, modeling long-term memory in cooperative strategies quickly become
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shale gas threat to forests can be eased by consolidating infrastructureFragmentation of ecologically important core forests within the northern Appalachians—driven by pipeline and access road construction—is the major threat posed by shale-gas development, according to researchers, who recommend a change in infrastructure-siting policies to head off loss of this critical habitat.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Outsmarting the Hungry Brain: An Interview with Stephan GuyenetThe author of The Hungry Brain: Outsmarting the Instincts that Make us Overeat explains how we're betrayed by our very own brains, which lead us to crave and overeat foods that aren't good for... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Degradable electronic components created from corn starchAs consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components. They report their development in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Res
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Universities release results on nitrogen footprintsResearchers have developed a large-scale method for calculating the nitrogen footprint of a university in the pursuit of reducing nitrogen pollution, which is linked to a cascade of negative impacts on the environment and human health, such as biodiversity loss, climate change, and smog. The first completed university-wide nitrogen footprint results are reported in a special issue of Sustainabilit
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Live Science

What Drove Tsavo Lions to Eat People? Century-Old Mystery SolvedSevere mouth pain likely led the Tsavo lions to kill and eat people 119 years ago in Kenya.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telestroke guidelines from American Telemedicine Association in Telemedicine & e-HealthNew guidelines to help clinicians use the latest telemedicine communication technologies to provide remote care for patients with symptoms of acute stroke are published in Telemedicine and e-Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Managers may compromise safety due to earnings expectationsManagers of US companies facing market pressures to meet earnings expectations may risk damaging the health and safety of workers to please investors, according to recent research from the Naveen Jindal School of Management at UT Dallas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moderate-severe hot flashes significantly increase depression riskA new study of more than 2,000 perimenopausal and menopausal women showed that moderate-severe vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes or night sweats) were an independent and significant risk factor for moderate-severe depression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gaming helps personalized therapy level upUsing game features in non-game contexts, computers can learn to build personalized mental- and physical-therapy programs that enhance individual motivation, according to Penn State engineers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Science policy: Considerations for subnational governmentsA new report, Science Policy: Considerations for Subnational Governments, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), affirms the importance of explicit science policies at the subnational level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study on mice demonstrates the action of strawberries against breast cancerA study by European and Latin American researchers has shown that strawberry extract can inhibit the spread of laboratory-grown breast cancer cells, even when they are inoculated in female mice to induce tumors. However, the scientists do point out that these results from animal testing can not be extrapolated to humans.
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Futurity.org

Methane from microbes kept early Earth warm Methane-making microbes may have battled “rust-breathing” microbes for dominance in early Earth’s oceans—and kept those oceans from freezing under an ancient, dimmer sun in the process, new research suggests. For much of its first two billion years, Earth was a very different place: oxygen was scarce, microbial life ruled, and the sun was significantly dimmer than it is today. Yet the rock record
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-fat dairy linked to lower tendency towards depressionPeople who consume low-fat milk and yogurt, rather than whole-fat dairy products, are less likely to have depression, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new mineral from the oldest solar system solids in meteoritesResearchers have identified a new mineral in the oldest solar system solids from primitive meteorites. They've named it "rubinite" after Dr. Alan E. Rubin, a pioneering cosmochemist at University of California, Los Angeles. Rubinite was officially approved in March 2017 by the International Mineralogical Association.
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Gizmodo

Treat Your Ears To Noise-Cancelling BÖHM Bluetooth Headphones Starting at $68, Today Only BÖHM Bluetooth Noise Cancelling Headphones , $68-$88 We see a ton of deals on affordable Bluetooth earbuds, but if you’ve been waiting for a solid discount on noise-cancelling on-ears before you cut the cord, you’re in luck today . Amazon’s marked down a few different BÖHM Bluetooth headphones to $68-$88 today as part of a Gold Box deal. The on-ears are $20 cheaper than the over-ears , but both i
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Considers Whether Churches Should Get Taxpayer Dollars After more than a year of punting, the Supreme Court will finally hear a major church-state case on Wednesday. In 2012, Trinity Lutheran Church in Missouri applied for a state grant to fix up its pre-school playground. Under the program, Missouri would provide rubber from recycled tires to cover play areas like Trinity Lutheran’s, which had a pea gravel surface that was “unforgiving if/when a chi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic control of immune cell proliferationGerminal centers are transient structures in the lymph nodes where antibody-producing B cells proliferate and differentiate at extraordinary rates. Germinal centers can be visually divided into a dark zone and light zone. For the proliferation and differentiation to occur, B cells must cycle between the two zones. Investigators have discovered how specific genes regulate this cycling. The findings
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bears breed across species bordersScientists have sequenced the entire genomes of four bear species, making it now possible to analyze the evolutionary history of all bears at the genome level. It shows that gene flow, or gene exchange, between species by extensive hybridization, is possible between most bear species, not only polar and brown bear. The DNA samples of different bear species came from different European zoos, underl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making oil from algae: Towards more efficient biofuelsThe mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has now been revealed by a research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of biofuels, they say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fertility can hinge on swimming conditions in the uterusA researcher has found that the uterus in female mice contains enzymes that can break down semen, making it less gel-like, more watery, and therefore easier to swim in. This interplay between semen and the female reproductive tract can impact fertility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clues as to why cockroaches are so prolificAsexual reproduction increases when female cockroaches are housed as a group, not alone, enabling them to maintain a colony for at least three years without a male's contribution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big data study of disaster-related language in social media wins 2016 Human Factors prizeThe Human Factors and Ergonomics Society congratulates Andrew Hampton and Valerie Shalin on receiving the 2016 Human Factors Prize for their article, "Sentinels of Breach: Lexical Choice as a Measure of Urgency in Social Media." The prize, which recognizes excellence in human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) research, confers a $10,000 cash award and publication of the winning paper in the Society's flag
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Ars Technica

Porsches to appear in Forza for the next six years in new partnership Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK—For fans of the racing game, Electronic Arts' 17-year-long exclusive contract with Porsche must rank as one of the great injustices of all time. These days, games like Gran Turismo and Forza Motorsport —which sell in the millions—do much to introduce cars to new audiences. Arguably, that has been true for some time now. Don't believe m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Speed-dependent attraction governs what goes on at the heart of midge swarmsEver wondered what makes the collective behaviour in insect swarms possible? Andy Reynolds from Rothamsted Research, UK, and colleagues at Stanford University, California, USA, modelled the effect of the attraction force, which resembles Newton's gravity force, acting towards the centre of a midge swarm to give cohesion to their group movement. In a recent study published in EPJ E, their model rev
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study explains extraordinary resilience of deadly bacteriumResearchers at the University of Maryland have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses tension-activated membrane channels to stop itself from swelling up and bursting when it is suddenly exposed to water. The study, which will be published April 19 in The Journal of General Physiology, helps explain how this bacterium—a major cause of hospital-acquired infections—persi
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene and gold make a better brain probeA team from Korea created more flexible neural electrodes that minimize tissue damage and still transmit clear brain signals.
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Blog » Languages » English

HQ Birthday Mega-Hour! Whoa! This spring, HQ has had three birthdays so far (Amy, Alex, and Will), so we’ve decided to celebrate with a triple-length Happy Hour! Join us 10:30-4:30 PM EDT today for glorious HH bonuses! Cake and points, please.
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WIRED

How Steve Wozniak Got Over His Fear of Robots Turning People Into Pets The Apple Co-founder talks pranks, his forthcoming comic book convention, and why he no longer fears our robot overlords. The post How Steve Wozniak Got Over His Fear of Robots Turning People Into Pets appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Battlefront II Knows Good Star Wars Games—It Already Was One The newest installment in EA's series of multiplayer Star Wars shooters is getting its ideas from the right place: its classic 2005 namesake. The post Battlefront II Knows Good Star Wars Games—It Already Was One appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to protect cells from selfish mitochondrial DNAUsing yeast cells as a model, scientists from the A.N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University investigated the mechanisms which allow cells to protect themselves from invasion of selfish mitochondrial DNA molecules.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Universities release results on nitrogen footprintsResearchers have developed a large-scale method for calculating the nitrogen footprint of a university in the pursuit of reducing nitrogen pollution, which is linked to a cascade of negative impacts on the environment and human health, such as biodiversity loss, climate change, and smog.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Degradable electronic components created from corn starchAs consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components. They report their development in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Res
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shale gas threat to forests can be eased by consolidating infrastructureFragmentation of ecologically important core forests within the northern Appalachians -- driven by pipeline and access road construction -- is the major threat posed by shale-gas development, according to researchers, who recommend a change in infrastructure-siting policies to head off loss of this critical habitat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making artificial blood for transfusionsBlood transfusions can save the lives of patients who have suffered major blood loss, but hospitals don't always have enough or the right type on hand. In search of a solution, researchers have developed a promising substitute using blood's oxygen-carrying component, hemoglobin. The in vitro study, reported in ACS' journal Biomacromolecules, found that the modified hemoglobin was an effective oxyg
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Scientific American Content: Global

Consider That Pale Blue Dot [Video]A rap video for Earth Day -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study on mice demonstrates the action of strawberries against breast cancerStrawberry extract can inhibit the spread of laboratory-grown breast cancer cells, even when they are inoculated in female mice to induce tumors, new research shows. However, the scientists do point out that these results from animal testing can not be extrapolated to humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robotic cheetah createdEngineers have developed a prototype cheetah robot. They have constructed a scaled-down robotic version of the fastest land animal in the world, with a view to replicating its movements. Relatively speaking, the robot moves using only about fifteen percent more energy than a real cheetah.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant protein may protect against type 2 diabetes, meat eaters at greater riskA new study adds to the growing body of evidence indicating that the source of dietary protein may play a role in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that plant protein was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, while persons with a diet rich in meat had a higher risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The tale teeth tell about the legendary man-eating lions of TsavoAnalysis of the microscopic wear on the teeth of the legendary man-eating lions of Tsavo reveals that shortage of normal prey did not drive them to begin killing and eating people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

With beetroot juice before exercise, aging brains look 'younger'Drinking a beetroot juice supplement before working out makes the brain of older adults perform more efficiently, mirroring the operations of a younger brain, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers create red-eyed mutant waspsA new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps has been brought into the world by a team of scientists. The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements.
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The Atlantic

When Passover Is About American Slavery More than 1,000 men and women gathered this past week in coastal Virginia to celebrate Passover and retell the ancient story of how Moses led the Israelites from bondage to freedom. They were observing holiday traditions that Jews all across the world observe—only these celebrants were not Jews. Their memories of slavery and liberation concerned not a distant past in Egypt, but a story set in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The real issue with the barmy design ideas for Trump's border wallTrump promised his supporters a "big and beautiful" wall. Accordingly, the recent design competition required it, among other things, to look good – from the US side. Yet it seems unlikely that the wall will ever be completed. The areas where US border security deemed a physical barrier necessary and viable have already been built. The remaining sections of the border feature formidable natural ba
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twin research reveals which facial features are most controlled by geneticsNew research uses computer image and statistical shape analysis to shed light on which parts of the face are most likely to be inherited. The study examined 3-D face models of nearly 1,000 UK female twins, and found that the shapes of the end of the nose, the area above and below the lips, cheekbones and the inner corner of the eye were highly influenced by genetics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better life outbackDesert lands cover about a quarter of the Earth's land mass and are home to some half a billion people and yet they are commonly portrayed as extreme places with marginalized communities. The people who live there are perceived as living in hardship and isolation and surviving largely due to subsidies from the "mainstream" economy. New research published in the International Journal of Sustainable
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolution of cooperation through longer memoryWhen we make a decision about whether or not to cooperate with someone, we usually base our decision on past experiences. However, when analyzing strategies for repeated dilemmas, modeling long-term memory in cooperative strategies quickly becomes computationally intractable. To overcome this challenge, scientists have distilled a set of axioms that every robust cooperative strategy should have. I
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticles remain unpredictableThe way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic control of immune cell proliferationScientists at IFReC, Osaka University provide new insights on why the tumor suppression gene Foxo1 can actually be the cause of some cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A better life in the outbackPeople who live in desert regions are perceived as living in hardship and isolation and surviving largely due to subsidies from the 'mainstream' economy. New research published in the International Journal of Sustainable Development suggests that for some desert regions, particularly Australia's 'outback,' there is huge potential given appropriate infrastructure and investment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reduction of post-traumatic stress symptoms associated with noninvasive technologyA closed-loop acoustic stimulation brainwave technology significantly reduced symptoms in people suffering from post-traumatic stress in a small pilot study, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Time-lapse cameras provide a unique peek at penguins' winter behaviorNot even the most intrepid researcher wants to spend winter in Antarctica, so how can you learn what penguins are doing during those cold, dark months? Simple: Leave behind some cameras.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish cooperate for selfish reasonsWhy do animals help raise offspring that aren't their own? A new study by an international team of researchers from Sweden, Canada and the UK shows that fish cooperate to raise another fish's offspring to reduce their own risk of being eaten by a predator.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bears breed across species bordersSenckenberg scientists have sequenced the entire genomes of four bear species, making it now possible to analyze the evolutionary history of all bears at the genome level. It shows that gene flow, or gene exchange, between species by extensive hybridization, is possible between most bear species - not only polar and brown bear. The DNA samples of different bear species came from different European
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new method developed for measuring carbon nanotubesWith this method can be measured e.g. the number of single walled carbon nanotubes and their concentration in a carbon nanotube layer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How 'frugal innovation' can fight off inequalityInequality is the defining social, political and economic phenomenon of our time. Just 1% of the world's population now holds over 35% of all private wealth, more than the bottom 95% combined. Bad as this may seem, trends suggest that the situation will only get worse. Addressing it will involve multiple strategies working together, but one which is less well understood is how simple, affordable s
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The Scientist RSS

PubMed-Indexed Abstracts to Include COI StatementsExpressions of concern will also be linked in study summaries.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Giant ShipwormKuphus polythalamia is a worm-like mollusk that can reach up to 155 cm in length, is encased in a hard, tusk-like shell, and lives in sulfur-rich mud.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aalto-2 satellite launched into spaceIn the evening on Tuesday 18 April, Aalto-2, the satellite designed and built by students in Otaniemi was launched on the Atlas V booster rocket towards the International Space Station orbiting the Earth. It will take the cargo spacecraft Cygnus about three days to reach the International Space Station.
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The Atlantic

The Americans Offers a Rare Lesson in Humility This post contains mild spoilers through Season 5 Episode 7 of The Americans . “Who’s she?” Philip asked Elizabeth. They were spying on Ben, the scientist helping to develop a strain of pest-resistant wheat that the couple wanted to claim for Russian uses—and the man with whom Elizabeth, disguised as “Brenda,” had been having a relationship. They had not counted, as they watched him from a phone
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The Atlantic

How Poverty Changes the Brain You saw the pictures in science class—a profile view of the human brain, sectioned by function. The piece at the very front, right behind where a forehead would be if the brain were actually in someone’s head, is the pre-frontal cortex. It handles problem-solving, goal-setting, and task execution. And it works with the limbic system, which is connected and sits closer to the center of the brain.
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Ars Technica

Scammers mine online recruiter for patsies in package reship scheme Enlarge / That sketchy speedy delivery gig you were offered by that company that you applied to work for? It's probably a scam. If you're using a Web-based third-party recruiter site to look for and apply for jobs, you may want to keep a close eye on the e-mails you get in response. As Steve Ragan of CSO reports , scammers are harvesting information from recruiter sites to offer "flexible" jobs t
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Dagens Medicin

Tidligere psykiatri­professor fra Risskov: Hjerne­samling har enestående potentiale »Det er aldeles unikt at have en samling fra så mange mennesker med så mange lidelser,« siger Poul Videbech om unik samling af hjerner, der formentlig står til udsmidning.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Saturday, Science Advocates Prepare for a Long MarchThe Washington, D.C., protest needs to kick off a sustained effort to guide politics with sound research, organizers say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify gene for adapting to changing seasonsUniversity of Toronto researchers have identified a gene that determines whether the body will adapt to changing seasons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How English-style drizzle killed the Ice Age's giantsWet weather at the end of the last ice age appears to have helped drive the ecosystems of large grazing animals, such as mammoths and giant sloths, extinct across vast swathes of Eurasia and the Americas, according to our new research.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Nyt astronomisk center vil afdække det kosmiske daggryCosmic Dawn Centre (DAWN) er et nyt grundforskningscenter på Niels Bohr Institutet ved Københavns...
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cognitive science

What It’s Like to Lose Your Short-Term Memory submitted by /u/amykhar [link] [comments]
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Speed-dependent attraction governs what goes on at the heart of midge swarmsEver wondered what makes the collective behavior in insect swarms possible? Andy Reynolds from Rothamsted Research, UK, and colleagues at Stanford University, California, USA, modelled the effect of an attraction force, which resembles Newton's gravity force, acting towards the centre of a midge swarm. In a recent study published in EPJ E, their model reveals that the gravity-like attraction towar
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online preconception health education tool positively impacts patient careA research team led by Priya Batra, M.D., an assistant clinical professor in residence in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, has evaluated MyFamilyPlan and found that it enabled a significant increase in the proportion of women who reported discussing their reproductive health with their doctors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene and gold make a better brain probeA team from Korea created more flexible neural electrodes that minimize tissue damage and still transmit clear brain signals.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant protein may protect against type 2 diabetes, meat eaters at greater riskA new study from the University of Eastern Finland adds to the growing body of evidence indicating that the source of dietary protein may play a role in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that plant protein was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, while persons with a diet rich in meat had a higher risk. The findings were published in the British Journal of N
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gelatine instead of forearmThe characteristics of human skin are heavily dependent on the hydration of the tissue -- in simple terms, the water content. This also changes its interaction with textiles. Up to now, it has only been possible to determine the interaction between human skin and textiles by means of clinical trials on human subjects. Now, EMPA researchers have developed an artificial gelatine-based skin model tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish cooperate for selfish reasonsWhy do animals help raise offspring that aren't their own? A new study by an international team of researchers from Sweden, Canada and the UK shows that fish cooperate to raise another fish's offspring to reduce their own risk of being eaten by a predator.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive imaging test shown accurate in ruling out kidney cancersThe latest in a series of studies led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine shows that addition of a widely available, noninvasive imaging test called 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT/CT to CT or MRI increases the accuracy of kidney tumor classification. The research team reports that the potential improvement in diagnostic accuracy will spare thousands of patients each year in the United States alone fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study explains extraordinary resilience of deadly bacteriumResearchers at the University of Maryland have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses tension-activated membrane channels to stop itself from swelling up and bursting when it is suddenly exposed to water. The study, which will be published April 19 in The Journal of General Physiology, helps explain how this bacterium -- a major cause of hospital-acquired infections --
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making oil from algae -- towards more efficient biofuelsThe mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has been revealed by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of biofuels. The findings were published on April 4 in Scientific Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers quantify grasslands' carbon storage valueGrasslands that feature diverse plant species have more carbon storage capacity than less-diverse grasslands, largely because the former produce more biomass, the researchers say. They found that increasing the number of plant species from one to 10 had twice the value of increasing from one to two species, from the standpoint of carbon storage capacity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gunshot injuries occur primarily in Miami-Dade's poor, black neighborhoodsGunshot wound injuries in Miami-Dade County are clustered in predominantly poor, black neighborhoods, according to a new study from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Now who will push ahead on validating forensic science disciplines?Science and the law are not natural partners. Science seeks to advance our understanding of the natural world. The law is tasked with ensuring public safety and making sure justice is properly served. Over time, science became another tool available to the legal system to pursue those goals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultraviolet spectroscopic evolution of a tidal disruption event investigated by astronomers(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers led by Jonathan S. Brown of the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, has studied the ultraviolet spectroscopic evolution of a nearby low-luminosity tidal disruption event (TDE) known as iPTF16fnl. The results of this study, published Apr. 7 on arXiv.org., offer new clues on the nature of this TDE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

System detects driver's symptoms of fatigue and prevents traffic accidentsResearchers from the University of Granada (UGR) and the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) have designed a new low-cost system that detects the drivers' symptoms of fatigue and distraction and helps prevent possible traffic accidents.
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Futurity.org

What pigeons show us about sex bias in science New research finds surprisingly big differences in tissue gene expression between male and female pigeons. In experimental research, scientists tend to assume that—unless they are looking specifically at reproduction or sexual behavior—male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males. “There’s a problem of sex and gender inclusion at all levels of science from faculty to the animals we use
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cognitive science

Psychedelic drugs induce 'heightened state of consciousness', brain scans show submitted by /u/HeinieKaboobler [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

The Han Solo Movie Debuts Its First Weird Star Wars Alien Meanwhile, Ewan McGregor is still happy to return for a hypothetical Obi-Wan film. Amazon’s Philip K. Dick anthology finds some cast members. Ryan Murphy wants Jessica Lange back in American Horror Story . Plus a bunch of new clips from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 . Spoilers Now! Han Solo Warwick Davis reveals a new animatronic alien—that kind of looks like a Star Wars Gran crossed with a Dung
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Frog slime protein fights off the fluUrumin, a protein found in Indian frog mucus secretions, has a knack for taking down H1 flu viruses, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo

The Sea Turtle That Ate 915 Coins Did Not Die in Vain Image: AP/Sakchai Lalit It’s not every day that surgeons have to remove 11 pounds of coins from the belly of a patient. It’s even more remarkable when that patient is a sea turtle. That’s exactly what happened in Thailand last month , when a captive green sea turtle named Omsin, which means “Piggy Bank” in Thai, was rushed into emergency surgery. She was drowning because the coins she ate, thrown
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Gizmodo

Nintendo Might Be Preparing a Mini SNES For the Holiday Season Last week, Nintendo dealt a crushing blow to retro gaming fans when it announced that it was discontinuing the uber-popular NES Classic Edition. We’re still not sure what Nintendo was thinking—most companies do not choose to discontinue products that get such great reviews and sell out immediately and consistently across the globe—but the good news is, we might see a mini Super Nintendo at the en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clues as to why cockroaches are so prolificParthenogenesis is a strategy employed by females to reproduce asexually when they find no mating partners available, and is seen in a wide variety of animals, including arthropods, fish, amphibians and reptiles. As opposed to sexual mating which enhances genetic diversity, the asexual strategy is aimed at rapidly generating large numbers of female progeny to expand their habitat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized workouts to prevent heart disease designed by new digital instrumentPersonalized workouts to prevent heart disease can be designed by a new digital instrument, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The EXPERT tool specifies the ideal exercise type, intensity, frequency, and duration needed to prevent a first or repeat cardiovascular event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Singapore scientists provide new insights on how cancers evade the immune systemA team of scientists from Singapore has discovered new ways in which cancers can escape the body's immune system. Focusing on gastric cancer (GC), the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide, the team's findings may also prove applicable to other major cancers with potential implications for how cancers might be better treated with immunotherapy, one of the most promising classes of anti-can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clues as to why cockroaches are so prolificAsexual reproduction increases when female cockroaches are housed as a group, not alone, enabling them to maintain a colony for at least three years without a male's contribution.
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WIRED

This Robot Baby Factory Is the Stuff of Nightmares Babies tossed in boxes. Babies wrapped in plastic. Babies whacked with mallets. Just another day at Realityworks in Wisconsin. The post This Robot Baby Factory Is the Stuff of Nightmares appeared first on WIRED .
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New on MIT Technology Review

Making Finance Fairer, Facebook’s AR Dream, and Why You’re an E-tail Schmuck—The Download, April 19, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Old-Fashioned Computer Manuals and Books Are Still Needed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As live streaming murder becomes the new normal online, can social media be saved?The Facebook Live video of the murder of 74 year old Robert Godwin Sr. by Steve Stephens has been watched at least 1.6 million times.
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Ingeniøren

Tørretumbler ryster tøjet tørt frem for at varme detEt amerikansk forskerhold vil revolutionere verdens tørretumblere. I stedet for at varme tøjet tørt, skal det rystes tørt for at spare tid, energi og penge.
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Futurity.org

System scans cliffs to predict falling rocks A new, automated technology analyzes the potential for rockfalls from cliffs onto roads and areas below. The system could speed and improve risk evaluation, help protect public safety, and ultimately save money and lives. The system, based on the powerful abilities of light detection and ranging, or LIDAR, technology, could expedite and add precision to what’s now a somewhat subjective, time-cons
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Popular Science

How to become a Lego master builder DIY The guy Lego pays to play Want to get payed to play with toys all day? Find out how.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Benzene-based probes highlight two hidden binding sites on an anticancer drug targetIn the quest for new cancer therapies, A*STAR researchers have devised a computational strategy that unearths any previously unknown binding sites or 'pockets' on drug targets.
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Ars Technica

Steve Ballmer’s new gov’t data project assumes that facts change minds Enlarge Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has a lot of money and nothing to prove. Post-Microsoft, his biggest achievement so far has been paying $2 billion to buy the LA Clippers , but on Monday The New York Times dropped an extensive report about his next venture: a project called " USAFacts ," which aggregates publicly available government data to tell you how your city, state, and federal ta
8h
Gizmodo

There's Never Been a Better Day to Buy a Smart Plug TP-Link Smart Plug Mini , $25 | TP-Link Smart Plug , $18. Discount shown at checkout Yesterday, we shared that Belkin’s WeMo Mini Smart Switch was on sale for $30 , but TP-Link has blown that deal out of the water with a pair of discounts. You can choose from the standard TP-Link Smart Plug for $18 , or the functionally identical Mini model for $25 , with the discount shown in cart . Those are bo
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pattern discovery over pattern recognition—new way for computers to seeJim Crutchfield wants to teach a machine to "see" in a new way, discovering patterns that evolve over time instead of recognizing patterns based on a stored template.
8h
Science-Based Medicine

Responding to SBM CriticsA response to a critic of SBM, and setting the record straight on our actual positions regarding evidence and the practice of medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making oil from algae – towards more efficient biofuelsThe mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has been revealed by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of biofuels. The findings were published on April 4 in Scientific Reports.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simultaneously simulating electrical and optical input achieves unprecedented performance in electro-optical interfacesA key interface component between electronic and light-based circuits receives a boost in performance through A*STAR research that combines previously independent simulations of the two systems. This research highlights the scope to improve electro-optical circuits as critical components in modern communications systems.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Islands on Titan may actually be bubble streams(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in France and Mexico has developed computer models that simulate conditions on Saturn's largest moon Titan showing that some of the islands on the planet's surface may be made of bubble streams. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the team describes how they built their model and explain how bubble streams could form
8h
The Atlantic

The Disappearing Act on Saturn’s Largest Moon In the summer of 2014, Jason Hofgartner and his professors at Cornell University were looking at radar images of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, when they noticed something strange. The bright spots they had seen just a year before inside Ligeia Mare, a large lake in the moon’s northern region, were no longer there. The features, imaged by the Cassini spacecraft, had vanished. The astronomers dubbe
8h
Dana Foundation

Brain Day at NYU! After being re-scheduled due to inclement weather, New York University’s Brain Day at NYU Langone Medical Center took place last Thursday, April 13 th as part of BraiNY and the Dana Alliance’s celebration of Brain Awareness Week . The event included a Brain Fair in the breezeway where various booths demonstrated experiments and provided information on the brain. There were also models of brains t
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

International Food Crops Could Vanish as Groundwater DisappearsAbout 11 percent of nonrenewable groundwater is used to irrigate internationally-traded crops -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Vigtigt skridt på vejen mod ny malaria medicinEn international forskningsgruppe under ledelse af Sergey Kapishnikov fra X-ray and Neutron Science på...
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique for investigating the action of molybdate on carbon steelIn the search for corrosion-resistant treatments for carbon steel that are non-toxic, A*STAR researchers have developed a technique for investigating the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor that is safer and environmentally friendly.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our discovery of a minor planet beyond Neptune shows there might not be a 'Planet Nine' after allEver since enthusiasm started growing over the possibility that there could be a ninth major planet orbiting the sun beyond Neptune, astronomers have been busy hunting it. One group is investigating four new moving objects found by members of the public to see if they are potential new solar system discoveries. As exciting as this is, researchers are also making discoveries that question the entir
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Futurity.org

These 8 ‘feel good’ skills may lower HIV in blood Researchers coached people recently diagnosed with HIV to practice skills to help them experience more positive emotions. Afterward, less of the virus showed up in their blood and they used fewer antidepressants, the study shows. “Even in the midst of this stressful experience of testing positive for HIV, coaching people to feel happy, calm, and satisfied—what we call positive affect—appears to i
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mandatory minimum sentences and populist criminal justice policy do not work—here's whyThe Victorian Liberal Party recently announced that, if elected in November 2018, it would introduce mandatory minimum sentences for repeat violent offenders as part of its crackdown on crime.
9h
The Atlantic

The Giant Sea Mammal That Went Extinct in Less Than Three Decades The Pleistocene, the geologic era immediately preceding our own, was an age of giants. North America was home to mastodons and saber-tooth cats; mammoths and wooly rhinos roamed Eurasia; giant lizards and bear-sized wombats strode across the Australian outback. Most of these giants died at the by the end of the last Ice Age, some 14,000 years ago. Whether this wave of extinctions was caused by cl
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Physicists observe 'negative mass'Physicists have created a fluid with "negative mass", which accelerates towards you when pushed.
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Gizmodo

North Korea Nukes San Francisco (With Computer Graphics) You gotta hand it to the North Koreans. They know how to pull off a finale. In a video performance posted to YouTube by state media, you can watch the rousing concert that capped off celebrations in the isolated country this past weekend . And one song ended with a not-so-subtle warning to the US . Did you catch that footage on the huge video screens behind the orchestra? Yes, that’s a computer g
9h
Ars Technica

New hybrid plant combines batteries with gas turbine to cut pollution 60% (credit: https://www.ge.com/ ) This week, General Electric (GE) and Southern California Edison (SCE) announced that they had retrofitted a natural gas peaker plant with a 10 MW, 4.3 MWh battery installation to create the world’s first hybrid electric gas turbine. Peaker plants only run when demand for electricity is high, and they can be used to fill in the gaps between baseload energy and interm
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Popular Science

Birds are changing their songs to shout over traffic noise Animals Will it keep them from finding love? Birds are singing a different tune with traffic noise. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New video shows how blue whales employ strategy before feedingBlue whales didn't become the largest animals ever to live on Earth by being dainty eaters and new video captured by scientists at Oregon State University shows just how they pick and choose their meals.
9h
WIRED

Want to Fix Science’s Replication Crisis? Then Replicate Opinion: Researchers should spend more trying to reproduce other scientists' results. The post Want to Fix Science’s Replication Crisis? Then Replicate appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Shocking Lack of Science Behind Lethal Injections No one knows if lethal injection really is more humane than other execution methods. And they can't really find out. The post The Shocking Lack of Science Behind Lethal Injections appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Launch Worldwide Search for Lost Species [Slide Show]A new initiative sets out to find and save long-missing animals before they really disappear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insights into DNA repairA new paper in the prestigious journal Nature from Brandeis researchers in the laboratory of James Haber provides a detailed description of the processes of DNA repair.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering a novel mechanism in cell divisionNorthwestern Medicine scientists have revealed the role amino-terminal methylation plays in a specific protein in the centromere, a region of the chromosome important in cell division, and how the dysregulation of this protein can affect the development of cancer cells. Methylation of amino acid side chains is well-documented, but the role of amino-terminal methylation is much less well understood
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles remain unpredictableThe way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardised approach would help to advance the research field.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Device meant to feed astronauts on Mars may first make debut in AfricaThe same piece of Purdue University-developed technology that may one day feed astronauts on Mars is being adapted to improve production of instant porridges and other ready-to-use products in several African countries.
9h
Ingeniøren

Elbilaftale: Så meget kan de hurtige spare på en elbilDer er tusindvis af kroner at spare på en el- eller hybridbil - for dem, der kommer først til forhandleren. Den nye aftale skal booste salget af små elbiler og plugin-hybridbiler.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Managers may compromise safety due to earnings expectations, study saysManagers of U.S. companies facing market pressures to meet earnings expectations may risk damaging the health and safety of workers to please investors according to recent research from the Naveen Jindal School of Management at UT Dallas.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly developed insecticide and fungus combination could more effectively control, eliminate termitesA new Purdue University-developed technology concept could provide pest control companies with a more effective way to control termites and prevent associated damage. The technology works by targeting the termite's resistance genes that help the insect fight off a known fungus that can effectively eliminate termites.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are we prepared for the consequences of technologyMost Americans have some form of digital technology, whether it is a smartphone, tablet or laptop, within their reach 24-7.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny probes hold big promise for future NASA missionsSometimes to find the best solution to a big problem, you have to start small.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

To Change Politics, Do More Than March for ScienceTo fight antiresearch policies, scientists must become activists for the long haul -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

When politicians link immigrants to disease, the science just doesn’t add up Entertainment Book Excerpt: Not A Scientist The following is an excerpt from Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science by Dave Levitan.
9h
Ars Technica

Send Wi-Fi companies floor plans, receive the ultimate mesh networking test The old showbiz adage continues to hold true (even in Wi-Fi testing): you can't please everyone. Shortly after our last round of mesh Wi-Fi testing , in which a six-pack of Plume devices surprised the field, e-mails arrived from both the Google Wifi and AmpliFi HD teams. The results weren't representative of their devices, they said, and perhaps I placed the devices badly. Both companies suggeste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Highs and lows of an Englishman's average height over 2000 yearsResearchers have used data on skeletal remains to calculate how the average height of Englishmen rose or fell over 2,000 years of history. They reasoned that height, which is linked with childhood nutrition, is a good alternative measure of wellbeing and can be estimated accurately from the length of a full grown man's femur.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Space fabric' links fashion and engineeringRaul Polit-Casillas grew up around fabrics. His mother is a fashion designer in Spain, and, at a young age, he was intrigued by how materials are used for design.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Happy wife, happy life' meaningful for birds, tooResearch from Victoria University of Wellington has shown for the first time that wild male birds read their partner's behaviour to appropriately cater to her food desires.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Regioner åbner op for gratis udlevering af PCSK9-hæmmereKun ca. 375 patienter ventes at komme i betragtning til vederlagsfrit at få udleveret en PCSK9-hæmmer fra et sygehus.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create "living map" of out-of-the-box water financing ideasLast month, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave the nation's infrastructure a near failing grade and estimated that the country will need to spend $4.59 trillion by 2025 to bring its infrastructure back up to even a B- level. Water infrastructure is in particular need of renewed investment due to the combined pressures of population growth, urbanization and impacts from climate change.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reduction of post-traumatic stress symptoms associated with noninvasive technologyA closed-loop acoustic stimulation brainwave technology significantly reduced symptoms in people suffering from post-traumatic stress in a small pilot study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the April 19 online edition of the journal BMC Psychiatry.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-traumatic stress symptoms reduced after use of HIRREM closed-loop neurotechnologyFor a series of individuals with post-traumatic stress symptoms, use of HIRREM, an algorithm-guided neurotechnology, was associated with significant clinical improvements. Study findings were published April 19 online in BMC Psychiatry, by a team from Brain State Technologies and Wake Forest School of Medicine.
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Science | The Guardian

How we revealed a new family tree for dinosaurs New discoveries lead to new ideas – and sometimes the revival of old ones, such as the relationships between the earliest of the dinosaurs Dinosaur buffs will have noticed some tremors propagating through the ether over the past couple of weeks. These followed from the publication of a new study , by Matthew Baron, David Norman and I, in which we proposed a radical rearrangement of the dinosaur f
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Space debris—a journey to EarthSpace debris - a journey to Earth takes the audience on a journey from the outer solar system back to our home planet. The objects encountered along the way are manmade. Originally designed to explore the universe, these are now a challenge for modern space flight. An estimated number of 700,000 objects larger than 1 cm and 170 million objects larger than 1mm are expected to reside in Earth orbits
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curbing methane emissions likely to cost less than estimated, miss 2025 targetsRegulations recently enacted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reduce methane emissions from oil and natural gas production will cost about a third less than what the agency estimates but may not lead to expected leak reductions, according to publicly available data analyzed by Stanford researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers track down water pollution through DNA of algaeDiatoms are unicellular algae particularly sensitive to changes that affect their aquatic environment. This is why they are used as bioindicators for the biological monitoring of water quality. However, their microscopic identification in river samples requires a lot of time and skill. Biologists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have succeeded in establishing a water quality ind
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Getting Medieval on Bacteria: Ancient Books May Point to New AntibioticsA salve of wine, garlic, leeks and oxgall was found to be kill staph and MRSA -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
The Atlantic

How Office Culture Can Crush Women’s Ambitions Researchers have long been looking for solutions to what could be called the ambition gap . That’s the nagging discrepancy which often shows up in polling, where women express less interest in becoming senior executives than their male counterparts. It’s a frustrating dilemma, and one without simple answers. Encouragingly, companies are starting to investigate the problem and what can be done abo
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The Atlantic

How a Scientist Who Studies Marches Sees the March for Science On April 22, scientists and science enthusiasts will gather in Washington, D.C. and 480 other cities to march for science . Their numbers will likely be large and their signs will undoubtedly be nerdy. Much has been written about the march —whether it’s a good idea or a terrible one, whether it will rally people or distance them, whether it’s goals are acceptably varied or too diffuse , whether i
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How the house mouse tamed itselfWhen people began to settle down, animals followed. Some made successful auditions as our domesticated species. Others — like mice — became our vermin, a new study shows.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover gene that influences grain yieldResearchers at the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Institute for Renewable Fuels at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center have discovered a gene that influences grain yield in grasses related to food crops. Four mutations were identified that could impact candidate crops for producing renewable and sustainable fuels.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique colors biomolecules in tissueAn extra detector on an electron microscope can help determine which molecules are found in which parts of a cell. This is what scientists at the UMCG and Delft University of Technology report in an article published today in the journal Scientific Reports. "This detector enables us to assign a colour to molecules in a cell," says Ben Giepmans, the team leader from Groningen. "Multicolour electron
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New mechanism to fight multi-resistant bacteria revealedIn recent years, scientists, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies have struggled to find new antibiotics or alternative strategies against multi-drug resistant bacteria that represent a serious public health problem. In a breakthrough study now published in PLOS Biology, Isabel Gordo and her team at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC; Portugal) identified a compensatory mechanism in bacteria
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optomechanical crystals to enable chaos-based secure data communicationsResearchers from ICN2's Phononic and Photonic Nanostructures (P2N) Group at the UAB campus have published a study in which the complex dynamics, including chaos, of optical nonlinearities, are controlled by using optomechanical crystals and changing the parameters of the excitation laser. This discovery might allow the codification of information by introducing chaos into the signal.
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Science | The Guardian

The Ascent of Gravity by Marcus Chown review – the fascinating story of a fundamental forceFrom Newton to Einstein to quantum physics – an accessible survey ranges from pioneering ideas to today’s scientific perplexities The Cambridge polymath William Whewell wrote in 1837 that Isaac Newton ’s introduction of a universal law of gravity a century and a half earlier was “indisputably and incomparably the greatest scientific discovery ever made”. The judgment still looks sound. Gravity con
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 19, 2017 —Bill O'Reilly is out at Fox News. More here —Representative Jason Chaffetz, the chair of the House Oversight Committee, says he won’t seek reelection in 2018. More here —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mystery Memory Loss among Illicit-Drug Users Spurs Health ActionDo 13 cases of amnesia among opioid users suggest a more widespread problem? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iran blocks Telegram app voice calls: state mediaIran's judiciary has blocked newly introduced voice calls on Telegram, the most popular messaging app in the country, state media reported on Wednesday.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volvo announces plans to export China-made electric carVolvo Cars, the Chinese-owned Swedish automaker, said Wednesday it plans to make electric cars in China for sale worldwide starting in 2019 amid pressure by Beijing for global auto brands to help develop its fledgling industry in alternatives to gasoline.
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Ingeniøren

Dong Energy må gamble med fremtidens elprisPå to ud af sine tre vindende bud på at bygge tyske havmølleparker kalkulerer Dong med, at elprisen fra 2024 og fremad vil være nok til at kunne forrente byggeriet af havmøllerne.
10h
Live Science

Giant Peanut-Shaped Asteroid to Pass Harmlessly by Earth TodayA huge, shiny, peanut-shaped asteroid will safely swing by Earth tonight (April 19), coming within a distance of 1.1 million miles (1.8 million kilometers) of the planet — about 4.6 times the distance from Earth to the moon.
10h
Live Science

Fountain of Poop? Fish Study Hints at Microbes' Role in AgingOlder fish live longer after eating younger fish's feces.
10h
New Scientist - News

Psychedelic drugs push the brain to a state never seen beforeBrain measurements have revealed that LSD, ketamine and psilocybin cause patterns of brain activity that are far more diverse than normal consciousness
11h
NYT > Science

The Climate Issue: How a Warming Planet Drives Human MigrationClimate displacement is becoming one of the world’s most powerful — and destabilizing — geopolitical forces.
11h
The Atlantic

Why Fast & Furious Needs to Go Small to Survive It’s safe to say the 16-year-old Fast & Furious franchise is an unqualified success. Its eighth entry, The Fate of the Furious , opened to a healthy $98 million at the U.S. box office this weekend and seems poised to be a financial boon like its forebears. The next two sequels are already greenlit and, in general, the Vin Diesel-starring, car-centric series is a crown-jewel property for Universal
11h
The Atlantic

Creativity Makes You Seem More Attractive Dos Equis’s most Interesting Man in the World ran a marathon just because it was on his way, is both left- and right-handed, and is fluent in all the world’s languages, including three that he alone speaks. The character was, until recently, played by a 70-something, little-known actor named Jonathan Goldsmith, whose earlier claim to fame was selling waterless car-wash products. And yet he—or at
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Man-Eating Lions Ate Only Soft Flesh BRIEF: Man-Eating Lions Ate Only Soft Flesh Toothache may have driven famous Tsavo lions to prey on humans. John Patterson with Tsavo lion cropped.jpg John Patterson poses with the carcass of one of the man-eating Tsavo lions after shooting it in 1898. Image credits: Courtesy of The Field Museum Creature Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 05:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When Tsavo's
11h
Dagens Medicin

Tidlig opsporing af diabetes gavner også patienter uden diabetes Læger bør uddannes i at tage effektiv hånd om type 2-diabetes, mener Diabetesforeningen, efter studie viser stor effekt af tidlig opsporing og intensiv behandling, også for patienter uden diabetes.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Rapport: Praktiske udfordringer kan spænde ben for opfølgende hjemmebesøgNy evaluering fra KORA viser, at opfølgende hjemmebesøg hos ældre borgere er meningsfulde for både borgere og medarbejdere. Dog er der udfordringer for både praktiserende læger og kommunale sygeplejersker i forhold til at tage initiativ til besøgene og at planlægge dem.
11h
Viden

Robotforsker til Brinkmann: Teknologien kan gå amok, hvis ikke vi passer påPsykolog Svend Brinkmanns otteårige datter er bange for, at robotter overtager verden. Kendt robotforsker erkender, at der er en risiko.
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Dagens Medicin

Region planlægger at destruere unik samling af 9.479 hjerner Verdens måske største hjernesamling vil næppe blive flyttet med, når Aarhus Universitetshospital forlader det psykiatriske hospital i Risskov.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers create red-eyed mutant waspsResearchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Twin research reveals which facial features are most controlled by geneticsResearch published this week in Scientific Reports uses computer image and statistical shape analysis to shed light on which parts of the face are most likely to be inherited. The study, by researchers at King's College London, examined 3-D face models of nearly 1,000 UK female twins, and found that the shapes of the end of the nose, the area above and below the lips, cheekbones and the inner corn
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First evidence for higher state of consciousness foundScientific evidence of a 'higher' state of consciousness has been found in a study led by the University of Sussex.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The tale teeth tell about the legendary man-eating lions of TsavoAnalysis of the microscopic wear on the teeth of the legendary man-eating lions of Tsavo reveals that shortage of normal prey did not drive them to begin killing and eating people.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What makes a man-eater? Check the teethThe man-eating lions of Tsavo killed dozens in 1898, and scientists are still investigating the lions' bones for clues as to why. A new analysis of the lions' teeth indicates that, contrary to contemporary accounts, the lions weren't crunching bones. Since lions eat bone when there's a shortage of food, they probably weren't hard-up for prey. Instead, they were likely driven to man-eating by denta
11h
Ingeniøren

Betalingsveje giver færre tomme lastbilerFragtmænd gør sig mere umage med at pakke vognene, hvis de skal betale vejafgift, viser nyt studie.
12h
The Atlantic

How Trump's First 100 Days Could End in a Government Shutdown On April 29, President Trump hopes to be commemorating his 100th day in office by touting his successful appointment of a Supreme Court justice and his quick victories in rolling back the Obama-era regulatory regime. But if Congress does not strike the first truly bipartisan deal of his presidency by then, Trump will instead spend his 100th day explaining to the public why the government he’s cha
12h
Science : NPR

FDA Approval Of Hepatitis C Drugs For Kids Is Likely To Speed Treatment Many insurers have required that adults with hepatitis C be very sick before they can get access to expensive drug treatment. But Medicaid has special rules that may get kids and teens access sooner. (Image credit: Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian

Psychedelic drugs induce 'heightened state of consciousness', brain scans show Study records what appears to be the first evidence for mind-opening state experienced by users of LSD, ketamine and psilocybin Brain scans have revealed the first evidence for what appears to be a heightened state of consciousness in people who took psychedelic drugs in the name of science. Healthy volunteers who received LSD, ketamine or psilocybin, a compound found in magic mushrooms, were fou
12h
Gizmodo

Why Did These Lions Eat So Many People? Image: The Field Museum In 1898, a pair of lions feasted on the most fearsome of predators: humans. Some think they could have killed 135 people constructing a railroad bridge over the Tsavo River in Kenya, though research lowered that number down to 35 human lunches between the pair. But what could drive these lions to play a round of The Most Dangerous Game ? Today, man-eating lion expert Bruce
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create red-eyed mutant waspsResearchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The tale teeth tell about the legendary man-eating lions of TsavoAn analysis of the microscopic wear on the teeth of the legendary "man-eating lions of Tsavo" reveals that it wasn't desperation that drove them to terrorize a railroad camp in Kenya more than a century ago.
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Millioner til forskning i kvantenetværkDanmarks Grundforskningsfond er parat til at give 62 mio. kr. til etablering af et nyt forskningscenter...
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Drivers gear up for world’s first nanocar race Chemists will navigate molecular wagons along a tiny golden track. Nature 544 278 doi: 10.1038/544278a
12h
The Atlantic

Why the White House's Secrecy Over Visitor Logs Isn't a Crisis The Trump administration announced on Friday that it would end the last administration’s practice of making White House visitor logs public, returning to the standard of every president prior to Barack Obama. It wasn’t a particularly surprising move. The president has been remarkably consistent in deviating from good-government norms, including his refusal to disclose his tax returns, his disrega
12h
Ingeniøren

Køge Kommune indfører datadrevet udvikling af skolernes undervisning Nationale tests, trivselsmålinger, elevernes arbejde i digitale læremidler. Tilsammen en viden, der skal sikre dataunderstøttet skoleudvikling i ny it-platform. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/koege-kommune-indfoerer-datadrevet-forretning-paa-skoler-1075698 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren

Sydjylland lige nu: 33 ledige job i 15 virksomheder Det kan være de billige grænsehandel, der trækker, når man slår sig ned i det sydlige Jylland. Det kan også være de spændende job. Det sidste kan Jobfinder.dk levere https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/33-ledige-job-15-virksomheder-landsdel-7652 Jobfinder
12h
Ingeniøren

De fleste ingeniører og it-folk vil læse denne artikel Ifølge førende ekspert i overbevisningens kunst burde overskriften her få ingeniører og it-folk til at læse videre. Vi har nemlig en naturlig trang til at gøre som andre. Her er ekspertens seks tricks til at få folk til at gøre, som du gerne vil https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/de-fleste-ingenioerer-it-folk-vil-laese-denne-artikel-7306 Jobfinder
12h
Gizmodo

Julian Assange Tweets About Possibly Running in the UK Election Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks on the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London on February 5, 2016 (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) The Brits are having an election on June 8th, as Prime Minister Theresa May looks to shore up support before things really get messy with Brexit. But an unlikely person has just floated the idea of running for British Parliament. WikiLeaks founder Julian As
12h
Ingeniøren

Ny dansk grundforskning: Find kvanteinternet - og Schrödingers kat i stor udgaveHvorfor producerer mikroorganismer antibiotika? Hvordan kommunikerer celler? Hvordan og hvornår blev de første galakser dannet? Nye forskningscentre træder nye stier.
13h
Viden

Vielsesringen får testosteronniveauet til at falde
13h
The Atlantic

The Case Halting Arkansas' Executions The Supreme Court’s 2016-17 docket has been, by recent standards, relatively sleepy. But one of its cases—an Alabama death-penalty appeal called McWilliams v. Dunn —woke up on Monday. That’s because the issue—whether a capital defendant whose sanity or competence is at issue is entitled to an independent psychiatrist to assist with the defense—is also at stake in the cases of two Arkansas inmates
13h
Dagens Medicin

Tiltagende styrke og spredning af nye sygdomsepidemierDen nyeste udvikling i vort samfund fremmer smittespredningen, og spredningens hast og styrke forstærkes af ny teknologi, herunder professionel fejlbrug af teknologien.
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Nyt grundforskningscenter skal kaste lys over privatsfærens historieDanmarks Grundforskningsfond er klar til at afsætte 235 millioner kroner til fire nye grundforskningscentre...
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

KU får nyt grundforskningscenter i adfærdsbetinget ulighedØkonomi-professor Claus Thustrup Kreiner skal stå i spidsen for nyt grundforskningscenter,...
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Dagens Medicin

Universitet opruster almen medicinsk enhed Aalborg Universitet opruster enheden for almen medicin med ansættelse af to nye professorer. De skal som noget nyt ansættes på Aalborg Universitetshospital samtidig med professorat, fortæller dekan.
13h
Ingeniøren

Sundhedsplatformen presser produktionen på hovedstadens hospitaler Aktiviteten på hovedstadens hospitaler faldt sidste år for tre-cifrede millionbeløb som følge af lavere produktivitet efter Sundhedsplatformen https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsplatformen-presser-produktionen-paa-hovedstadens-hospitaler-1075696 Version2
14h
Science | The Guardian

Why the global March for Science is already a success On 22 April, from Oklahoma to Greenland, scientists and their champions will mobilise, and in many ways, the March for Science is already a success Science teacher Jackie Scott will be in the streets this Saturday in Little Rock, Arkansas. “I march because my middle school students deserve to have a better world,” she wrote . “They deserve to see what real research looks like and sounds like when
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Gizmodo

Facebook Fans Mourn the Death of Patrick the Wombat Internet-famous Patrick the wombat at the Ballarat Wildlife Park in Victoria, Australia (Facebook/Ballarat Wildlife Park) Social media can make celebrities out of the most unlikely people. Or, in some cases, the most unlikely of animals. Such was the case with Patrick the Wombat, who died yesterday at the age of 32. And his fans have taken to Facebook to express their grief . “My wife and I are h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yahoo earnings beat expectations on cusp of Verizon mergerYahoo on Tuesday reported quarterly earnings that topped expectations as the pioneering internet firm remained on track to be bought by Verizon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Croatian rivers face hydroelectric perilSwans glide peacefully over green river waters in the central Croatian area of Karlovac, a tranquil spot popular with fishermen and swimmers that environmentalists fear could be devastated by hydropower projects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key leopard population 'crashing', study warnsThe leopard population in a region of South Africa once thick with the big cats is crashing, and could be wiped out within a few years, scientists warned on Wednesday.
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cognitive science

A forensic psychologist explains why violent criminals post their acts online submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fertility can hinge on swimming conditions in the uterusFor a mammal's sperm to succeed, it must complete the swim of its life to reach and fertilize an egg. That's easier if it swims through water, not goo.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can barnacle geese predict the climate?The breeding grounds of Arctic migratory birds such as the barnacle goose are changing rapidly due to accelerated warming in the polar regions. They won't be able to keep up with this climate change unless they can somehow anticipate it. A research team from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) employed computer models to assess the future of the geese and their young. Results are bein
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research unlocks molecular key to animal evolution and diseaseThe dawn of the Animal Kingdom began with a collagen scaffold that enabled the organization of cells into tissues.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop membranes that remove viruses from drinking waterResearchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) have developed novel ultrafiltration membranes that significantly improve the virus-removal process from treated municipal wastewater used for drinking in water-scarce cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GM announces China version of hybrid VoltGeneral Motors Co. plans to make and sell a gasoline-electric hybrid version of its Chevrolet Volt in China, as Beijing presses global automakers to promote alternatives to gasoline.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Great Dunmow postbox out of action while birds nest insideA postbox gets the stamp of approval from a pair of nesting birds.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Google Earth adds Attenborough world toursThe BBC's Sir David Attenborough will show people "natural treasures" within the new Google Earth.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Is Komodo dragon blood the key to new antibiotics?Scientists find a compound based on a molecule in dragon blood helps heal infected wounds in mice.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Iceberg tourists flock to Newfoundland townA new resident off the coast of a Canadian town has turned it into a cool tourist spot.
15h
Gizmodo

Even Hippies Living In Vans Are Shilling For #Brands On Instagram Now Screencap of @wheresmyofficenow’s Instagram promo for the “Outsiders” TV show. Once, a Volkswagen van represented freedom, the “open road,” a release from the crushing confines of capitalism. The appeal lives on today. Free love! Damn the man! Live on the beach! Feel the ocean breeze blow through your hair! Pose with a bag of Kettle Chips the #brand sent you to hawk on social media! Wait, what?!
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Ingeniøren

Fremtidens jobsamtale kan starte med din videopræsentation: Sådan gør du I et jobmarked, der bliver stadig mere internationalt, kan skridtet mellem en jobansøgning og en jobsamtale være et ønske fra arbejdsgiveren om at se dig i en videopræsentation. Her er nogle gode tips til at få dig til at fremstå professionelt https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fremtidens-jobsamtale-kan-starte-med-din-videopraesentation-saadan-goer-du-7506 Jobfinder
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Science | The Guardian

Why open source pharma is the path to both cheaper and new medicines | Matthew Todd Breaking the cycle in which only highly profitable drugs reach the market is not just the responsibility of government We can all agree that we have some life-saving medicines available to us. We may have benefited directly, or have family members who are benefiting at the moment. Some medicines, however, are too expensive. Some don’t work too well and there are, of course, many terrible diseases
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ILC 2017: Four new EASL clinical practice guidelines on the management of liver diseasesThe European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) today announced that four new Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) will be presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and published in the Journal of Hepatology, EASL's official journal. CPGs define the use of diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive modalities, including non-invasive and invasive proce
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cognitive science

Pigs, parrots and people: the problem of animal personality submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

The Guardians of the Galaxy Game, Based on the Guardians of the Galaxy Comic, Is Getting Its Own Guardians of the Galaxy Comic Image: Marvel Comics So, in a certain way, that’s a comic based on a game inspired by a movie based on a comic that the game based on a movie is also based on, loosely. I think. Hold on, I’m starting to get a headache. Revealed on Marvel’s website today to coincide with the first episode of Telltale Game’s episodic Guardians of the Galaxy series release, the aptly named Guardians of the Galaxy: T
16h
The Atlantic

A Divided Georgia District Braces for a Runoff as Jon Ossoff Falls Short Updated on April 19, 2017 at 7:00 a.m. ET In a blow to liberals hoping that grassroots anger at President Trump will help Democrats win back Congress, Jon Ossoff, a Democratic candidate in a Georgia special election that has drawn national attention, fell just short on Tuesday of winning outright in the race to replace former Republican Representative Tom Price. The race isn’t over yet: It will n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fertility can hinge on swimming conditions in the uterusA Washington State University researcher has found that the uterus in female mice contains enzymes that can break down semen, making it less gel-like, more watery, and therefore easier to swim in. This interplay between semen and the female reproductive tract can impact fertility.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ben-Gurion U. researchers develop membranes that remove viruses from drinking waterThe 'zwitterionic polymer hydrogel' repels the viruses from approaching and passing through the membrane. It contains both positive and negative charges and improves efficiency by weakening virus accumulation on the modified filter surface. The result was a significantly higher rate of removal of waterborne viruses, including human norovirus and adenovirus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

With beetroot juice before exercise, aging brains look 'younger'Drinking a beetroot juice supplement before working out makes the brain of older adults perform more efficiently, mirroring the operations of a younger brain, according to a new study by scientists at Wake Forest University.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood test offers potential for faster, targeted treatment of non-small-cell lung cancerIdentification of a specific genetic mutation in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) helps clinicians select the best treatment option. Potential NSCLC patients usually undergo invasive tissue biopsy, which may often be unnecessary and delays treatment. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new blood test that can accurately and quickly identify genetic mutation
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Time-lapse cameras provide a unique peek at penguins' winter behaviorNot even the most intrepid researcher wants to spend winter in Antarctica, so how can you learn what penguins are doing during those cold, dark months? Simple: Leave behind some cameras.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Under-studied boreal habitat key for North America's ducksKnowing where migrating birds came from and where they're headed is essential for their conservation and management. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tackles this challenge using stable isotope ratios, which reflect where birds were living while growing their feathers, and reveals that the northern reaches of Canada may have underappreciated importance for North America's w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under-studied boreal habitat key for North America's ducksKnowing where migrating birds came from and where they're headed is essential for their conservation and management. For ducks, most of this information comes from long-term bird-banding programs, but this type of research has limits—despite all the birds harvested by hunters, only a small percentage of banded birds are ever recovered. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Time-lapse cameras provide a unique peek at penguins' winter behaviorNot even the most intrepid researcher wants to spend winter in Antarctica, so how can you learn what penguins are doing during those cold, dark months? Simple: Leave behind some cameras. Year-round studies across the full extent of a species' range are especially important in polar areas, where individuals within a single species may adopt a variety of different migration strategies to get by, and
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The Scientist RSS

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine StructuresA double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.
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Image of the Day: Night CrawlerPhyllomedusa bicolor is a nocturnal, tree-dwelling frog that lives in the Amazon rainforest.
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The Scientist RSS

Study: Hydrogen on Enceladus Could Support Microbial LifeThe plumes that erupt through the cracks on the icy exterior of one of Saturn's moons contain molecular hydrogen, researchers report.
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Sweet Trick, HawkmothsThe fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.
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RNAis Future in Drug-Target ScreeningA recent CRISPR study contradicted years of RNA interference research on a well-studied cancer drug target. But is it the last nail in the coffin for RNAi as a screening tool?
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Submit An Innovative ProductWith The Scientist's Top 10 Innovations competition here again, it's time to consider the best new life science tools, technologies, and methodologies.
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Image of the Day: Stop SignalsTranscytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.
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The Scientist RSS

Sociologists to Study the March for ScienceResearchers hope to use the upcoming event as an opportunity to examine the social science of political activism among science supporters.
17h
The Scientist RSS

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, ObscuredBen Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.
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The Scientist RSS

Migratory Eels Use MagnetoreceptionIn laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.
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Week in Review: April 1014CRISPR patent ruling appealed; CRISPR-based nucleic acid test; an experimental gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a cell-based protocol for Parkinson's disease show promise in mice
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Fanged FishPoisonous fang blennies (Meiacanthus) are only around 2 inches long but, with their tiny fangs, they can inject predators with a venom that has potent hypotensive effects.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test DebutsSHERLOCK combines CRISPR-Cas13a with isothermal RNA amplification to detect RNA and DNA with single-base specificity.
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Upgraded Photoswitch for Vision RepairResearchers improve on a technique to use a light-stimulated small molecule to confer longer-term photosensitivity to the retinal cells of blind mice.
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Pioneering HIV Researcher DiesMark Wainberg, a professor of biology and virology at McGill University, has passed away unexpectedly at age 71.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Inner ConflictsTranscriptomic analyses of a patient with severe Ebola virus disease revealed shifts in the expression of antiviral and immune response genes, corresponding to the stages of illness.
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The Scientist RSS

Oklahoma De-funds Science FairStudents launch a fundraising campaign to rescue the event, which was a casualty of budget cuts to the state's education department.
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing MutationsUsing CRISPR-Cpf1 gene editing, researchers have fixed mutations that cause a form of muscular dystrophy in cultured human cardiomyocytes and a mouse model.
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The Scientist RSS

Gut Microbes Contribute to Age-Associated Inflammation in MiceA mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.
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National Academies Issue Advice to Improve Research PracticesA committee says an independent organization designed to foster research integrity would stem misconduct.
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The Scientist RSS

Report: Boost Funds for Basic Science in CanadaAn independent review of Canadian science reveals a need for additional funds to investigator-led, basic research.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sonic SnapperBy rapidly snapping its large claw shut, the newly discovered pistol shrimp, Synalpheus pinkfloydi, can create enough sonic energy to stun-even kill-small fish.
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The Scientist RSS

Charting the Tumor MicroenvironmentUnderstanding the components of the tumor microenvironment and their interplay is essential to better targeting of tumor growth and metastasis in both the laboratory and clinic. Download this poster from PerkinElmer to learn more.
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The Scientist RSS

Forensics Left in Lurch by SessionsUS Attorney General Jeff Sessions is terminating a commission in which independent researchers and federal agencies seek to improve forensic science standards.
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The Scientist RSS

Nine Publishers, Millions of Illegal Paper DownloadsIn a preprint, a PhD student examines freely available SciHub usage data.
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The Scientist RSS

Parasitic Worm Spreads in HawaiiThe roundworm that causes rat lungworm disease has infected at least six people on the island of Maui in the last three months.
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Report Confirms Widespread Great Barrier Reef BleachingAerial survey results reveal severe coral bleaching across much of the massive reef system.
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Image of the Day: Bygone Blood CellsThese fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.
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The Scientist RSS

Scientists Identify More-Precise Neural Correlates of DreamingBy examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.
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Reprogrammed Glia Improve Symptoms in a Mouse Model of ParkinsonsBy converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.
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The Scientist RSS

Behavioral Changes in Mice Given Antibiotics in Early LifeMice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.
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The Scientist RSS

Drugs OKed Faster in U.S. Than in EuropeIn recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved more drugs and in less time than the European Medicines Agency.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Ancient WormUnlike related species, Ovatiovermis cribratus, a lobopodian from the Cambrian period, did not have a hard, protective shell.
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The Scientist RSS

Clock Gene Mutation Leads to Night Owl BehaviorScientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.
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The Scientist RSS

R&D Systems: Custom ServicesSince 1985, R&D Systems has produced gold-standard proteins to meet the strictest development and purification standards. Apply the experience, expertise, and quality of R&D Systems' custom services to accelerate your research.
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The Scientist RSS

Keeping the Blood Supply Zika-FreeBlood donation centers across the U.S. are required to screen samples for signs of the mosquito-borne virus. Some have questioned whether it's always necessary.
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The Scientist RSS

Online Platform Aims to Facilitate Replication StudiesA volunteer-run database called StudySwap, which launched in beta last month, is starting to gain momentum.
17h
The Scientist RSS

TS Picks: April 7, 2017Consortium pushes for open citation data; Gates Foundation launches open-access publishing platform; Cell Press lifts the veil on papers under consideration; an online widget circumvents some paywalls
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Week in Review: April 37Virus triggers gluten intolerance in mice; UK bank offers clinic-ready hESC lines; researchers debate giant virus origins; cephalopods edit RNA; scientists screen noncoding genome with CRISPR
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The Scientist RSS

FDA OKs Marketing of DTC Genetic Health-Risk Tests23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson's and celiac.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Long-Distance MessagingAfter an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.
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The Scientist RSS

ProteinSimple: Sally Sue: Simple WesternThe gel-free, blot-free, hands-free Simple Western is here.
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First Clinic-Ready Stem Cell RepositoryThe UK Stem Cell Bank offers several lines derived from human embryonic tissue.
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The Scientist RSS

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show.
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The Scientist RSS

New Giant Virus Group ReportedA genomic analysis of 'Klosneuviruses' suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced.
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The Scientist RSS

Cephalopod Genomes Contain Thousands of Conserved RNA Editing SitesOctopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process.
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The Scientist RSS

CDC Recommends Brain Imaging for Zika-Affected BabiesInfants born to mothers who were infected with the virus during pregnancy-including babies who do not show signs of microcephaly-may experience other birth defects.
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory JournalMy 'colleagues' and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus 'uromycitisis' case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Fighting FilovirusesResearches develop a human monoclonal antibody against two filoviruses, Marburg and Ravn, which, like Ebola, can cause hemorrhagic fever.
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The Scientist RSS

Study: Microbes from Young Fish Extend Older Fishs LivesRecolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.
17h
Gizmodo

Google's Greatest Time-Sucking Invention Just Got a Lot Better GIF source: Google Earth Google Earth is one of the purest, most beautiful gifts the company has ever given us. Today, the globe-trotting software received a major overhaul that will delight hardcore fans and remind others that it’s still a great way to throw away hours of your life. It’s been two years since the search giant last gave Google Earth a major update and it seems as if the virtual gl
17h
Viden

Teknologi-ekspert: Selvkørende minibusser overtager efter UberUber er kun starten på en gennemgribende digitalisering af taxakørselstjenester, siger ekspert.
17h
Ingeniøren

Minister: Berlins og Londons cirkelzoner vil give ulogiske priser på SjællandStore takstzoner, der omslutter storbyerne i en cirkelform, anvendes i Tyskland, Storbritannien og Frankrig, men kan ikke bruges omkring København, mener transportministeren.
18h
WIRED

AI Isn’t Smart Enough (Yet) to Spot Horrific Facebook Videos But it's getting there. The post AI Isn't Smart Enough (Yet) to Spot Horrific Facebook Videos appeared first on WIRED .
19h
Ars Technica

Vigilante botnet infects IoT devices before blackhats can hijack them Enlarge (credit: Seth Anderson ) Mirai, the botnet that threatened the Internet as we knew it last year with record-setting denial-of-service attacks , is facing an existential threat of its own: A competing botnet known as Hajime has infected at least 10,000 home routers, network-connected cameras, and other so-called Internet of Things devices. Hajime uses a decentralized peer-to-peer network t
19h
NYT > Science

Health Insurers Make Case for Subsidies, but Get Little Assurance From AdministrationInsurers have been closely watching as President Trump and congressional lawmakers debate the future of subsidies that help lower deductibles and co-payments.
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Gizmodo

The 10 Absolute Worst Aliens to Be Abducted By FIre in the Sky image via YouTube screen grab Earth can be shitty. Sometimes, being whisked away by a passing starship sounds like a pretty good idea. However—it completely depends on who’s behind the controls. Hanging with the Arrival heptapods would be pretty chill. Being shanghaied by any of the following kidnap-happy aliens, however, would not. 1) The Predator in Predators Military badass Adr
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New on MIT Technology Review

Baidu Will Release a Free Operating System for Self-Driving CarsChina’s leading search engine hopes to speed development of autonomous driving and draw carmakers to its services.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel semiconductor nanofiber with superb charge conductivity developedA novel technology that embeds highly conductive nanostructure into semi-conductor nanofiber has now been developed by researchers. The novel composite so produced has superb charge conductivity, and can therefore be widely applied, especially in environmental arena.
20h
WIRED

In Facebook’s Future, You Live Through Your Phone At today's Facebook F8 conference, Mark Zuckerberg detailed a mobile-first AR future that may not pan out. The post In Facebook's Future, You Live Through Your Phone appeared first on WIRED .
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New test identifies patients with diabetes who are at high risk of kidney failureTwo biomarkers -- urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated glomerular filtration rate -- are used to identify those at higher risk of kidney failure. But many say those criteria miss a large proportion of patients who are at high risk of the disease and fail to predict accurately time of onset of ESRD. Now a research team has developed a prognostic tool that accurately predicts the
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research unlocks molecular key to animal evolution and diseaseThe dawn of the Animal Kingdom began with a collagen scaffold that enabled the organization of cells into tissues, scientists report in a new article.
20h
Gizmodo

Arizona Makes Theranos Pay Following the Public Embarrassment of Its Governor Photo: Getty Embattled former blood-testing startup Theranos settled one of its many legal battles today. The dangerously incompetent corporation has agreed to give all customers in Arizona who used its product a full refund. The revelations that Theranos’ devices didn’t work as advertised was a major blow to Arizona’s regulation slashing governor who fell for the company’s claims hook, line, and
20h
Ars Technica

Original StarCraft is finally free-as-in-beer after delayed patch Forget the box! It's free now! Finally! (credit: Blizzard Entertainment ) Last month, the game makers at Blizzard announced a remastered, 4K-friendly version of the original StarCraft , set to launch this summer. That announcement also teased a much sooner release of the original StarCraft that would be completely free. After a delay, that free version is finally available to download worldwide.
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Gizmodo

The Newer, Smaller WeMo Switch Is Back Down To Its Smallest Price WeMo Mini Smart Plug , $30 Not only is the new WeMo Mini Smart Plug smaller than the top-selling original so as to only cover one outlet, it’s also cheaper. You’ll almost always see it available for $35, but today on Amazon, it’s knocked down to $30 . Despite its diminutive size, this includes all the same features as the full-sized WeMo Switch, including IFTTT support, Alexa compatibility, and a
21h
Big Think

Are You Lucky? How You Respond Affects Your Fate. Luck doesn't receive enough credit. Read More
21h
Ars Technica

Microsoft continues to experiment with Windows power management Enlarge (credit: kris krüg ) One of the things that Microsoft does with its Insider Preview builds of Windows is run experiments. A couple of experiments that were briefly available during the development of the Creators Update are back, as Microsoft develops new power management capabilities . The new feature is called Power Throttling, although this name is just temporary. Power Throttling was
21h
New Scientist - News

Zika mosquito is spreading worldwide but WHO wants to stop itInspired by efforts that have curbed malaria, the World Health Organization wants to control the Aedes mosquito in every one of the 140 countries it is found
21h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Political Theater What We’re Following Global Votes: President Trump is getting backlash today for calling Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan with congratulations on his recent referendum victory—a notably speedy move that seems to endorse the expansion of the authoritarian leader’s power. In Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim-majority country, Jakarta voters are divided over whether the Quran forbids their
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Captive meerkats at risk of stressSmall groups of meerkats -- such as those commonly seen in zoos and safari parks -- are at greater risk of chronic stress, new research suggests.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canary in the kelp forestThe one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern California coast, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can barnacle geese predict the climate?The breeding grounds of Arctic migratory birds such as the barnacle goose are changing rapidly due to accelerated warming in the polar regions. They won't be able to keep up with this climate change unless they can somehow anticipate it. A research team employed computer models to assess the future of the geese and their young.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Captive meerkats at risk of stressSmall groups of meerkats—such as those commonly seen in zoos and safari parks—are at greater risk of chronic stress, new research suggests.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canary in the kelp forest: Sea creature dissolves in today's warming, acidic watersThe one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern California coast, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
22h
Live Science

Could Brain Stimulation Fight Obesity?Magnetic or electric stimulation of the brain could fight eating problems, a new study finds.
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

How Blockchain Can Bring Financial Services to the PoorA project from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aims to use distributed ledger technology to help the two billion people worldwide who lack bank accounts.
22h
Gizmodo

Jesus Christ Makes Rare Public Appearance Photos: William Turton/Gizmodo Holy fucking shit. Mark Zuckerberg himself, the creator of Facebook and the fifth richest man in the world, just descended down to Earth to walk among us plebeians at the Facebook Developer Conference in San Jose. I was one of the mere mortals lucky enough to witness the power and strength of His Holiness as he gilded around the halls of the San Jose Convention Cent
22h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Global coalition chips away at neglected tropical diseases Partnerships see some success in eliminating illnesses, but challenges, such as access to treatments, remain. Nature 544 281 doi: 10.1038/544281a
22h
Live Science

Skip Your Run Today? Science Says You Can (Partly) Blame Your FriendsYour friends really do influence your exercise habits, a new study suggests.
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Georgia on Trump's Mind Today in 5 Lines President Trump signed the so-called “Buy American, Hire American” executive order. Voting began for the contentious special election in Georgia’s sixth congressional district. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to vacate a stay of execution by the Arkansas Supreme Court, preventing the state from carrying out its first death sentence in 12 years. Vice President Mike Pence met with
23h
Ars Technica

Verizon buying 37 million miles of fiber to boost its wireless network Enlarge Verizon has struck a deal with Corning to purchase up to 37.2 million miles of optical fiber and related hardware over the next three years, with Verizon planning to use that fiber to boost capacity and lower latency in its wireless network. "The agreement calls for Corning to provide and Verizon to purchase up to 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) of optical fiber each year from
23h
Futurity.org

How controlled fires shape forests over time Scientists have examined the effects of burning forests at different intervals over a 68-year period in order to determine how fire alters forest landscapes over time. While researchers and land managers have come to understand the beneficial effects of controlled forest fires over recent decades, questions regarding how frequently to use forest fires remain. Researchers have studied forests subj
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Gizmodo

Small Satellites Could Be Playing a Dangerous Game of Bumper Cars in Space Image: NASA Space is full of all sorts of garbage that can cause problems, including some of the stuff we send up there with good intentions. Take CubeSats . These nanosatellites, which weigh less than three pounds, were first sent into space in December 2006 , and have become increasingly popular in the years since as a cost-effective option for telecommunications companies looking to spread wif
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers identify tactic Dengue virus uses to delay triggering immune responseResearchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response.
23h
The Atlantic

Could Trump's Financial Ties Have Influenced His Phone Call With Erdogan? On Monday night, President Donald Trump took a moment to praise an autocratic ruler—this time, not Russian President Vladimir Putin but Turkish President Recep Erdogan. In the aftermath of Turkey’s constitutional referendum , which significantly broadened the powers of the country’s president, Trump called his Turkish counterpart “to congratulate him on his recent referendum victory,” as well as
23h
WIRED

Anger Isn’t Enough, So the #Resistance Is Weaponizing Data Jon Ossoff's campaign for Congress proves just how powerful the "resistance" has become—and how haphazard. Progressive number-crunchers hope to change that The post Anger Isn’t Enough, So the #Resistance Is Weaponizing Data appeared first on WIRED .
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Whale worldA study that attached cameras with suction cups to the backs of Antarctic whales has revealed never before seen feeding habits and social interactions.
23h
Ars Technica

Two members of ATM skimming ring plead guilty to bank fraud Enlarge (credit: Piotrus ) Joel Abel Garcia, a 35-year-old from the Bronx, New York, became the third member of an alleged ring of automated teller machine "skimmers" to plead guilty today in the US District of New Jersey to the charge of conspiracy to commit bank fraud. Another member of the group—Victor Hanganu, a Romanian citizen living in Bayside, New York—pleaded guilty to the same charge on
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Live Science

Monty Python Star Describes His Illness: What Is Frontotemporal Dementia?Monty Python" star Terry Jones has a little-known form of dementia called frontotemporal dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabis-based medicine may cut seizures in half for those with tough-to-treat epilepsyTaking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information from a large scale controlled clinical study. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not have the psychoactive properties that create a 'high.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experimental drug targets nucleus of allergen-sensitized cellsTranscription factors, the tiny proteins that switch genes on or off in the nucleus of cells, are considered unreachable molecular targets for drugs attempting to treat medical conditions. Overcoming this challenge, researchers discovered a small molecular compound that successfully blocks a transcription factor and its pro-inflammatory and hyper-mucous activity in asthma. In a study, scientists t
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