Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Increasing honesty in humans with noninvasive brain stimulation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Honesty plays a key role in social and economic interactions and is crucial for societal functioning. However, breaches of honesty are pervasive and cause significant societal and economic problems that can affect entire nations. Despite its importance, remarkably little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms supporting honest behavior. We demonstrate...
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Big Think

An Accidental Discovery Could Solve Earth's Plastic Waste Problem Scientists find a surprising way to biodegrade plastic at an impressively fast rate. Read More
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The Atlantic

Coming to Terms With Loss in Elizabeth Bishop’s ‘One Art’ “One Art” is the only poem I’ve ever lost. My high-school English teacher gave me a wallet-sized copy that I misplaced, along with the wallet, the next year. The wallet I replaced, twice; the poem I did not. Still, a year walking around with it in my pocket was enough to learn the opening lines: The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that the
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The Atlantic

The Masks We Wear We wear masks for many reasons: for fun, for protection, or to make a statement. In turbulent public settings, obscuring one's face can protect an individual from retaliation while evoking fear and uncertainty in others. With the recent rise of virtual reality technologies, masks are used to hide the real world from the wearer, whose face, in turn, is hidden behind the headgear. In many cases, th
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Gizmodo

How Did Unroll.me Get Users to Allow It to Sell Their Inbox Data? Image: Unroll.me/ Facebook For years now, people have been letting Unroll.me read the contents of their email inboxes, to help them unsubscribe from email spam. The service was endorsed by our sister site Lifehacker in 2011 for its effectiveness in finding and cleaning out unwanted subscriptions (and Gizmodo wrote about its iOS app release last year). Advertisement But a New York Times profile of
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Scientific American Content: Global

Brave New Wool? Artificial Womb Sustains Premature Lambs for WeeksThe technology may someday help babies born in their second trimester survive -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

The FDA Just Cracked Down on 14 Companies Selling Fake Cancer Treatments Some of the products the FDA is cracking down on. IMAGE: FDA Asparagus might be good for you, but there is no firm evidence to suggest it can prevent cancer. And yet, the website for wellness company BioStar Organix listed it among multiple products that do just that. “Asparagus should be taken by everyone for heart, cancer prevention,” the website read. It can also treat leukemia, breast cancer,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estrogen alters memory circuit function in women with gene variantFluctuations in estrogen triggered atypical functioning in a key brain memory circuit in women with a common version of a gene. Brain scans revealed altered circuit activity linked to changes in the sex hormone in women with the gene variant while they performed a working memory task. The findings may help to explain individual differences in risk for, onset, severity, and course of mental disorde
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fighting infections with a silver swordSilver has been used to fight infections since ancient times. Today, researchers are using sophisticated techniques such as the gene-editing platform Crispr-Cas9 to take a closer look at how silver poisons pathogens. The work is yielding new insights on how to create effective antimicrobials and avoid the pitfalls of antimicrobial resistance.
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Live Science

Gallery: 5 Times Science Inspired ArtArtists turn to the world of nature and science for inspiration.
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Live Science

Did Edvard Munch See 'The Scream' in Spectacular Rare Clouds?Did rare clouds over Oslo inspire Edvard Munch's most famous painting?
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Live Science

'Artificial Womb' Keeps Extremely Premature Lambs Alive for WeeksThe new machine supported the lambs for up to 28 days, which is the longest amount of time that an artificial womb has kept animals stable.
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The Atlantic

Why Wisdom Teeth Are So Much Trouble Given all the fuss modern humans are told to put into our teeth—brush, floss, drink fluoridated water, go to the dentist to get tartar scraped off twice a year—I’ve wondered how our ancestors made do. What did their teeth look like? Peter S. Ungar’s new book, Evolution’s Bite: A Story of Teeth, Diet, and Human Origins , is a deep dive into how the teeth of our ancestors have changed over time . U
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How a dolphin eats an octopus without dyingAn octopus’s tentacles can kill a dolphin — or a human — when eaten alive. But wily dolphins in Australia have figured out how to do this safely.
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Science : NPR

Flying Cars Are (Still) Coming: Should We Believe The Hype? Airbus and Uber are planning for a future of flying cars and sky taxis. "You literally push a button and you get a flight," an Uber executive says. But will our Tomorrowland ever really arrive? (Image credit: EHang)
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Popular Science

New study asks how your favorite doggos came to be Animals The most extensive evolutionary map of dog breeds ever made Dogs: We love them. Like, a lot. Now scientists have created the most complete map of dog breeds and their evolutionary histories to date. Check it out.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extinction risk for many species vastly underestimated, study suggestsA new study indicates that the number of plant and animal species at risk of extinction may be considerably higher than previously thought. A team of researchers, however, believe they've come up with a formula that will help paint a more accurate picture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TGen-HonorHealth study: High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patientsAdding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, according to the results of a pilot clinical trial conducted by the HonorHealth Research Institute and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall
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Gizmodo

Titans Is the Next Live-Action DC TV Show, But It Won't Be on TV Image: DC Comics. It’s official: There’s another DC TV show on the way to add to your watch ist alongside Arrow , Supergirl , Flash , and like a dozen more at this point, and this time it’s a live-action Teen Titans show, which has long been in development limbo. But there’s a twist—it’s not going to be on TV, and neither is the next season of Young Justice . Advertisement Warner Bro. has just co
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Ars Technica

Verizon bungles launch of $70 gigabit plan, which costs more than $70 Finding out the price for Internet service shouldn't be this difficult. Verizon's rollout yesterday of a $70-per-month gigabit Internet plan was pretty confusing. The Verizon announcement said the gigabit service would be immediately available to more than 8 million homes and did not say that the $70 price would only be available to certain customers. But it turned out that the $70 price was only
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ancestors of Flores "Hobbits" May Have Been Pioneers of First "Human" Migration Out of AfricaNew research on Indonesian fossils reveals clues to an ancient expansion from Africa -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

This Power Rangers Movie Concept Art Shows Creepier Ranger Suits and Much Better-Looking Zords Image: Mauricio Ruiz Design . All images used with permission of the artist. The costume designs and Zords we got in this year’s Power Rangers movie already looked pretty out there compared to the classic looks of the original show. But according to this movie concept art from Mauricio Ruiz, the suits and mech designs could’ve looked even more alien than what we eventually got. Advertisement This
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Science : NPR

Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward Dr. Elizabeth Ford treated mentally ill inmates in New York City for more than a decade. It was almost universal, she says, that they had suffered abuse or significant neglect as children. (Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

The Why of Cooking It’s a shame that the standard way of learning how to cook is by following recipes. To be sure, they are a wonderfully effective way to approximate a dish as it appeared in a test kitchen, at a star chef’s restaurant, or on TV. And they can be an excellent inspiration for even the least ambitious home cooks to liven up a weeknight dinner. But recipes, for all their precision and completeness, are
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The Atlantic

How Flight Attendants Are Set Up to Fail Two weeks ago, a man was violently dragged off a United Airlines flight after being told it was overbooked. And late last week, American Airlines suspended a flight attendant after a fight nearly broke out between a passenger and the crew, over a stroller. What did the two incidents have in common? Both stories went viral after passengers’ videos showcased the rotten conditions of flying in coach
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher costs for complex cancer surgery indicator for worse careHigher costs for complex cancer surgery may be an indicator for worse -- rather than better -- quality of care, according to new research by experts at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Their findings are published in the journal Surgery and provide multiple implications for care delivery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Racial, ethnic disparities in pediatric readmission rates for chronic disease vary by conditionDisparities in pediatric readmission rates for chronic conditions such as asthma, depression, diabetes, migraines, and seizures vary, with the lowest one-year readmissions recorded for depression and the highest one-year readmission rates seen for seizure, according to retrospective analyses of hospitalizations at 48 children's hospitals published April 21, 2017 in The Journal of Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

India's coal plant plans conflict with climate commitmentsIndia will not be able to meet its Paris climate agreement commitments in the coming years if it carries through with plans to build nearly 370 coal-fired power plants, a new study finds.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Arctic Is a Profoundly Different Place NowThe changes in the region are so significant they will have implications across the globe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Faux womb keeps preemie lambs aliveA device can keep premature lambs alive for a month in womblike conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique womb-like device could reduce mortality and disability for extremely premature babiesA unique womb-like environment designed by pediatric researchers could transform care for extremely premature babies, by mimicking the prenatal fluid-filled environment to give the tiniest newborns a precious few weeks to develop their lungs and other organs.
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Gizmodo

Behold the James Webb Telescope in all Its Unfurled Glory Image credit: NASA/Desiree Stover Like a dandelion reaching up to the sky on a warm spring day, the James Webb Telescope peers upwards in this stunning new photo released today by NASA. Still under construction, the powerful space-bound telescope will soon be shipped across the country for the next phase of its development. Advertisement In this photo (above), NASA technicians can be seen lifting
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dolphins' Watertight Sex Involves a Strange TwistFemale marine mammals may block insemination with a curled vagina and slick maneuvers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New survey hints at exotic origin for the Cold SpotA supervoid is unlikely to explain a 'Cold Spot' in the cosmic microwave background, according to the results of a new survey, leaving room for exotic explanations like a collision between universes. The researchers, led by postgraduate student Ruari Mackenzie and Professor Tom Shanks in Durham University's Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infectionScientists and physicians at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, working with colleagues at the US Navy Medical Research Center -- Biological Defense Research Directorate (NMRC-BDRD), Texas A&M University, a San Diego-based biotech and elsewhere, have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-fracture care: Do we need to educate patients rather than doctors?This multicenter, randomized controlled trial involved 436 women, aged 50-85 years, who had attended hospital for treatment of a fragility fracture of the wrist or upper arm. The intervention group received repeated oral and written information about fragility fractures and osteoporosis management by a case manager, who prompted the patients to visit their primary care physicians to ask for BMD te
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Cyclops' algorithm spots daily rhythms in cellsHumans, like virtually all other complex organisms on Earth, have adapted to their planet's 24-hour cycle of sunlight and darkness. That circadian rhythm is reflected in human behavior, of course, but also in the molecular workings of our cells. Now scientists have developed a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing those molecular rhythms -- a tool that could have many new medical applicat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers make tool for understanding cellular processes more usefulBrown University researchers have developed methods to use data from FRAP, an experiment used to study how molecules move inside cells, in ways it's never been used before.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers map the evolution of dog breedsWhen people migrate, Canis familiaris travels with them. Piecing together the details of those migrations has proved difficult because the clues are scattered across the genomes of hundreds of dog breeds. However, in Cell Reports, researchers have used gene sequences from 161 modern breeds to assemble an evolutionary tree of dogs. The map of dog breeds, which is the largest to date, unearths new e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair responseLiving in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enzyme treatment reduces alcohol-induced liver damage in mouse modelsAn intestinal enzyme previously shown to keep bacterial toxins from passing from the gastrointestinal system into the bloodstream may be able to prevent or reduce the liver damage caused by excess alcohol consumption, investigators report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to speed search for cancer cures dramaticallyA new technique will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Triggering artificial photosynthesis to clean airA chemistry professor has just found a way to trigger the process of photosynthesis in a synthetic material, turning greenhouse gases into clean air and producing energy all at the same time. The process has great potential for creating a technology that could significantly reduce greenhouse gases linked to climate change, while also creating a clean way to produce energy.
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Quanta Magazine

The Secret Power of the Cell’s Waste Bin At a conference in Maine during the summer of 2008, the biochemist David Sabatini stood before an audience of his peers, prepared to dazzle them with a preview of unpublished results emerging from his lab at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The presentation did not go over well. His group was studying mTOR, a cellular enzyme he and colleagues had discov
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Viden

Hvad skal vi sige til børnene: Noget er ravruskende galtKlimaprofessor Sebastian Mernild er bekymret for sine børns fremtid. Og godt træt af, at folk ikke tror på forskernes advarsler.
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Viden

Klimaforandringer: Fire kommuner sikrer rådhuset førstI Frederikshavn, Gladsaxe, Middelfart og på Stevns er sikring af rådhuset førsteprioritet.
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Science | The Guardian

Bow wow: scientists create definitive canine family tree Study sheds light on breed evolution and why certain types of dog are prone to the same diseases despite appearing to be very different It sounds like the ultimate shaggy dog story, but scientists say they have created the definitive canine family tree. The study not only sheds light on the evolution of different breeds, but also reveals why certain breeds are prone to the same diseases even thou
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Family tree of dogs reveals secret history of caninesThe largest family tree of dog ever assembled shows how dogs evolved into more than 150 modern breeds.
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Gizmodo

How Three Kids With No Experience Beat Square And Translated Final Fantasy V Into English Final Fantasy V concept art by Yoshitaka Amano One day in the late 1990s, Myria walked into the Irvine High School computer room and spotted a boy playing Final Fantasy V . There were two unusual things about this. The first was that Final Fantasy V had not actually come out in the United States. To play the 1992 Japanese game in English, you’d have to download a ROM, then install the unofficial
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Scientific American Content: Global

Meet "Steve," a Strange New Sky PhenomenonCitizen scientists and space-agency satellites come together to discover a new variety of aurora -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Artificial womb helps premature lamb fetuses grow for 4 weeksA fluid-filled plastic bag can help extremely premature lambs to develop and grow – and will be used to support premature babies in three years’ time
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Futurity.org

Algorithm predicts epileptic seizures in real-time Engineering students have created a system designed to prevent seizures caused by epilepsy, a neurological disorder affecting millions. First, the team needed to develop a seizure-prediction algorithm. The students created a machine-learning algorithm that was “very good” at predicting seizures: It predicted all seizures in their data set at least two minutes before their onset with 3.9 false pos
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The Atlantic

The Problem With WikiTribune Wikipedia has always seemed destined to converge with the news. An encyclopedia that is updated in real time is its own kind of news aggregator, after all. And so it comes as no surprise that Jimmy Wales, the Wikipedia co-founder, is now launching a Wikipedia-like news organization called WikiTribune. Wales explains the project on a new website , where he’s asking for donations so he can hire 10
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The Atlantic

The Slow-Motion Bacteria Buried Deep in the Ocean's Floor When algae die, they drift to the ocean floor, their bodies becoming one with the seabed’s muck. This algal rain falls constantly, and as layers of organic matter build up over the years, they bury the bacteria that grow on the seabed. Subsumed in the mire, many bacteria die. But some, a hardy few, survive. And when geochemists and biologists drill down into the seabed and pull up long, black cor
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Homo naledi’s brain shows humanlike featuresSouth African Homo species had small but humanlike brain, scientists say.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Some Surprising Dog Breeds Have Ancient American HeritageA new study of 161 breeds traces some ancestry back to the Americas of 10,000 years ago.
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Ars Technica

An AI wrote all of David Hasselhoff’s lines in this bizarre short film Behold: It's No Game , written by an AI and starring the great David Hasselhoff. (video link) Last year, director Oscar Sharp and AI researcher Ross Goodwin released the stunningly weird short film Sunspring . It was a sci-fi tale written entirely by an algorithm that eventually named itself Benjamin. Now the two humans have teamed up with Benjamin again to create a follow-up movie, It's No Game
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Few researchers consider hearing loss in healthcare communication: StudyOf the 67 papers reviewed, only 16 (23.9 percent) included any mention of hearing loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New interface allows more efficient, faster technique to remotely operate robotsA new interface designed by Georgia Institute of Technology researchers allows users to simply point and click on an item, then choose a grasp, to control a robot remotely.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make tool for understanding cellular processes more usefulUnderstanding how proteins and other molecules move around inside cells is important for understanding how cells function. Scientists use an experiment called Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching, or FRAP, to investigate this molecular motion, and now Brown University researchers have developed a mathematical modeling technique that makes FRAP much more useful.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers map the evolution of dog breedsWhen people migrate, Canis familiaris travels with them. Piecing together the details of those migrations has proved difficult because the clues are scattered across the genomes of hundreds of dog breeds. However, in a study published April 25 in Cell Reports, researchers have used gene sequences from 161 modern breeds to assemble an evolutionary tree of dogs. The map of dog breeds, which is the l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair responseLiving in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ripple Effects of New Zealand Earthquake Continue to This DayNovember tremor sparked slow, deep movements in Earth’s crust that increase the chances of a similar severe quake within a year -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English

Neuroquest: The Golden Ganglion Marathon As the battle for Order and Chaos seems to be nearing its conclusion, your magically-infused geographical sense tells you that both armies have swept surprisingly close to the farthest roots of the Golden Ganglion itself! Perhaps the side quest was less of a distraction than you might have thought. Excitedly, your party searches the horizon once more, and there! You see it in the distance! Those
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Wild Bill And His Crew Are Having Trouble Getting Used To Their New Boat #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Wild Bill and the crew have to quickly adjust to the differences between the Cape Caution and the Summer Bay – while in the middle of a storm! Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FCA, Google begin offering rides in self-driving carsFiat Chrysler and Google for the first time will offer rides to the public in the self-driving vehicles they are building under an expanding partnership.
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Futurity.org

How to know if climate change caused the weather After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour, or drought, Noah Diffenbaugh and his research group inevitably get phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role. A new framework will help them respond. “The question is being asked by the general public and by people trying to make decisions about how to manage the risks of a changing climate,” says Diffenbaugh, a
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The Atlantic

Breitbart Can’t Convince a Committee to Let It Cover Congress Updated at 3:38 p.m. Breitbart News ’ application for permanent congressional press passes was denied on Tuesday, after a months-long attempt by the right-wing news outlet to obtain credentials. The Standing Committee of Correspondents of the Senate Press Gallery voted to table Breitbart ’s application and also to not extend its temporary passes, which are valid through May 31. The committee has
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Philips Hue, OneBlade Beard Trimmer, Amazon Dockers Sale, and More Amazon’s one-day Dockers sale , Philips’ OneBlade , and a 20% Philips Hue discount for Prime members lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker 21W PowerPort Solar , $48 with code BEST2421 Whether you enjoy camping, are worried about power outages, or just like the idea of being off the grid, Anker’s 21W PowerPort Solar
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

80-year-old 'viable' anthrax strain debunked using advanced genomic sequencingA strain of anthrax-causing bacterium thought to have been viable 80 years after a thwarted World War I espionage attack, was, in reality, a much younger standard laboratory strain, a team of international researchers has found. The team speculates that the mix-up was due to commonplace laboratory contamination.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New atlas provides highest-resolution imagery of the Polar Regions seafloorScientists have created the most comprehensive and high-resolution atlas of the seafloor of both Polar Regions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidance for management of aromatase-inhibitor related bone loss in breast cancerWomen treated with aromatase-inhibitors (AI) for breast cancer experience a two to four-fold increase in bone loss compared to the normal rate of bone loss with menopause -- and as a result they are at heightened risk of fracture. This new Position Statement, jointly published by seven international and European organizations, identifies fracture-related risk factors in these patients and outlines
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-sodium diet might not lower blood pressureA new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn't associated with lower blood pressure. The study adds to growing evidence that current recommendations for limiting sodium intake may be misguided.
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Gizmodo

The Plot of Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite Is More Insane Than We Ever Hoped Marvel vs Capcom Ultimate has a brand new trailer, finally revealing the reason why Marvel’s superheroes and Capcom’s stable of video game characters will do battle once again. This time, it involves Ultron, long-time Mega Man X foe Commander Sigma, a sinister deal, Infinity Stone nonsense, and it’s all just delightfully bonkers. Advertisement The trailer below confirms that the newest entry in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual reality, apps add interactivity to music videosMore musicians are using new technology, including 360-degree cameras, virtual reality musical experiences and vertical videos, to reach the smartphone generation of music fans who are discovering new music on their phones and tablets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wikipedia founder tackles fake news with WikitribuneWikipedia founder Jimmy Wales is launching a project aimed at reshaping the news media—and tackling the scourge of misinformation—using the same collaborative principles as the revolutionary online encyclopedia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google targets 'fake news,' offensive search suggestionsGoogle has sprinkled some new ingredients into its search engine in an effort to prevent bogus information and offensive suggestions from souring its results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK man jailed for running global cyberattack businessA British man has been sentenced to two years in prison for creating and selling a program used in online attacks around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's last male rhino getting help from Tinder dating appThe world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive.
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Live Science

Images of Warming: National Parks in 2050 PostersA series of posters by artist Hannah Rothstein show how U.S. National Park might look by 2050 if climate change isn't mitigated.
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TEDTalks (video)

Science in service to the public good | Siddhartha RoyWe give scientists and engineers great technical training, but we're not as good at teaching ethical decision-making or building character. Take, for example, the environmental crisis that recently unfolded in Flint, Michigan -- and the professionals there who did nothing to fix it. Siddhartha Roy helped prove that Flint's water was contaminated, and he tells a story of science in service to the p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When artificial intelligence evaluates chess championsThe ELO system, which most chess federations use today, ranks players by the results of their games. Although simple and efficient, it overlooks relevant criteria such as the quality of the moves players actually make. To overcome these limitations, Reseachers have now developed a new system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modeling reveals how policy affects adoption of solar energy photovoltaics in CaliforniaResearchers inspired by efforts to promote green energy, are exploring the factors driving commercial customers in Southern California, both large and small, to purchase and install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. They built a model for commercial solar PV adoption to quantify the impact of government incentives and solar PV costs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facebook can function as safety net for the bereavedNeuroscientists have long noted that if certain brain cells are destroyed by, say, a stroke, new circuits may be laid in another location to compensate, essentially rewiring the brain. Researchers have found that social networks respond similarly after the death of a close mutual friend, providing support during the grieving process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoliPlants need nitrogen to grow, and intensive agriculture requires the input of nitrogen compounds. However, classical, nitrate-based fertilization is responsible for considerable environmental problems, such as the contamination of surface and underground water due to nitrate leaching, and the emission of greenhouse gases, owing to the effect of the micro-organisms in the soil that use the nitrate
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Ars Technica

AMD puts two GPUs and 32GB of RAM on its latest Radeon Pro Duo graphics card Enlarge / AMD's new Radeon Pro Duo GPU. (credit: AMD) A little over a year after launching the last Radeon Pro Duo graphics card, AMD is back with an all-new version that has the same name but makes a whole bunch of changes. The new Radeon Pro Duo mashes two separate 14nm Polaris GPUs with 2,304 stream processors, 128 texture units, 32 ROPs, and 16GB of graphics RAM apiece (for a total of 32GB) i
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Gizmodo

How to Watch the Spectacular Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower Image: Rocky Raybell /Flickr Stargazers love a good meteor shower, and while the Perseids or Leonids get the most attention, another exquisite one is just ramping up. The Eta Aquarid meteor shower occurs every spring between April 22nd and May 20th, and this year, it’s expected to peak around dawn on May 6th. Advertisement This underrated shower gets its name from the place its material appears t
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Premature lambs kept alive in 'plastic bag' wombScientists were able to keep premature lambs alive for a month using an artificial "plastic bag" womb.
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Popular Science

A culinary torch for 57 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets It's $19. A culinary torch 57 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
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WIRED

Jeff VanderMeer’s New Novel Makes Dystopia Seem Almost Fun The author's latest book is a family drama—that just happens to feature flying bears and a sentient, maneating plant. The post Jeff VanderMeer's New Novel Makes Dystopia Seem Almost Fun appeared first on WIRED .
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Ingeniøren

Eksperter splittede om havbrug: Kan muslinger holde farvande forureningsfri?Under en høring i Folketinget tirsdag var eksperterne uenige om den miljømæssige risiko, man løber ved at bruge muslinger til at bremse forurening med kvælstof og fosfor fra nye fiskeopdræt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive skills differ across cultures and generationsAn innovative study of children and parents in both Hong Kong and the United Kingdom reveals cultural differences in important cognitive skills among adolescents but not their parents. The results are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel form of iron for fortification of foodsWhey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles: ETH researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A more than 100 percent quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuelEfforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into components of hydrogen and oxygen. In an article published in Nature Energy, lead author Yong Yan, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Environment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bad feelings can motivate cancer patientsFeeling down is a common side effect of being diagnosed with cancer. Anxiety, guilt, and distress often come hand-in-hand with diagnosis and treatment.But a recent study by researchers from Concordia and the University of Toronto shows that these seemingly negative emotions can actually be good for patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoliIn the quest for less contaminating fertilizing strategies, a study by the UPV/EHU has explored the use of ammonium-based fertilizers, less widely used than the nitrate for fertilizing owing to the reduced growth displayed by the plants. The comparison between these two sources of nitrogen has revealed a higher amount of glucosinolates in the case of ammonium nutrition. This gives the plants great
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who you are influences what you eat more than food shopping environment, study findsMuch attention and effort has focused on providing healthy food outlets in areas considered 'food deserts' in order to improve a neighborhood's diet. But a new study finds that who a person is may matter more than where they shop in predicting their consumption of unhealthy food.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women recommendedThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The report appears in the April 25 issue of JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated biomarker following surgery linked to increased risk of deathAmong patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, peak postoperative high-sensitivity troponin T measurements (proteins that are released when the heart muscle has been damaged) during the first three days after surgery were associated with an increased risk of death at 30 days, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delay in colonoscopy following positive screening test associated with increased risk of colorectalAmong patients with a positive fecal immunochemical test result, compared with follow-up colonoscopy at eight to 30 days, follow-up after 10 months was associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer and more advanced-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique womb-like device could reduce mortality and disability for extremely premature babiesA unique womb-like environment designed by pediatric researchers could transform care for extremely premature babies, by mimicking the prenatal fluid-filled environment to give the tiniest newborns a precious few weeks to develop their lungs and other organs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with positive fecal screening test, sooner is better for colonoscopyThe risk of colorectal cancer increased significantly when colonoscopy was delayed by more than nine months following a positive fecal screening test, according to a large Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modeling reveals how policy affects adoption of solar energy photovoltaics in CaliforniaResearchers at the University of California, Riverside, inspired by efforts to promote green energy, are exploring the factors driving commercial customers in Southern California, both large and small, to purchase and install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. As the group reports this week in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, they built a model for commercial solar PV adoption to qua
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New chlamydia drug targets discovered using CRISPR and stem cellsScientists have created an innovative technique for studying how chlamydia interacts with the human immune system. The results identify novel drug targets for the sexually transmitted disease.
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Science | The Guardian

Artificial womb for premature babies successful in animal trials Lambs born at equivalent of 23 weeks human gestation kept alive and developing in advance could transform outlook for very premature babies An artificial womb designed to support critically premature babies has been demonstrated successfully in animals for the first time, in an advance that could transform the lives of the most fragile newborns. Lambs born at the equivalent of 23 weeks in a human
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Gizmodo

Marissa Mayer Set to Receive $186 Million for Failing Because This Is How Corporate America Works Image: Getty Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer continues to stack up piles of cash, despite her veritable failure to rescue the company from a pile of its own rot. After numerous setbacks, including two massive security breaches and dwindling ad revenue , Mayer is set to make about $186 million as a result of the company’s sale to Verizon, new SEC documents show. Advertisement This enormous sum of money—th
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Ars Technica

Ex-Lyft driver sues Uber over “Hell,” its alleged “spyware” Enlarge (credit: Ore Huiying/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A former Lyft driver sued Uber on Monday in a proposed class-action lawsuit over the company's recently revealed "Hell" software , which allowed Uber to spoof fake Lyft drivers through a flaw in Lyft’s own design . In turn, those faux accounts gave Uber confidential location information about the eight nearest Lyft drivers. Not only did th
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Futurity.org

Solar wind ‘bubble’ is more basketball than comet The huge bubble formed by the sun’s magnetic influence may be shaped much more like a basketball than a comet, new measurements show. The solar wind—magnetic solar material that constantly flows out from the sun—fills the inner solar system, reaching far past the orbit of Neptune. The wind creates a bubble, some 23 billion miles across, called the heliosphere. The entire solar system, including t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers lull in Mars' giant impact historyFrom the earliest days of our solar system's history, collisions between astronomical objects have shaped the planets and changed the course of their evolution. Studying the early bombardment history of Mars, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the University of Arizona have discovered a 400-million-year lull in large impacts early in Martian history.
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The Atlantic

Trump's Border-Wall Blink The president blinked. Donald Trump wants his border wall funded, but he apparently wants to keep the government open on his 100th day in office a little bit more. Facing the prospect of a government shutdown in four days, the president reportedly backed off his demand that a must-pass spending bill include a downpayment for the wall he wants to construct along the nation’s southern border. Trump
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The Atlantic

Babies Floating in Fluid-Filled Bags When babies are born at 24 weeks’ gestation, “it is very clear they are not ready to be here,” says Emily Partridge, a research fellow at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Doctors dress the hand-sized beings in miniature diapers and cradle them in plastic incubators, where they are fed through tubes. In many cases, IV lines deliver sedatives to help them cope with the ventilators strapped
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A survival guide for retail startupsNothing gets a new retail venture off the ground and likely to stay there more surely than effective inventory management and well-trained employees. That's the bottom line of new research conducted on almost 16,000 small, first-time retailers in Portugal.
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Popular Science

How to kid-proof any phone or tablet DIY Tips and apps for peace of mind Whether you're giving your children their first devices or loaning out your own phone or tablet, make sure the little ones stay safe (and away from your data).
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Popular Science

In photos: where Navy warships are built Military Steel becomes arsenal. This is where warships come from…
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Live Science

Why Can't You Shake Hands with a Robot?For robots to be most useful when working alongside humans, we'll have to figure out how to make robots that can literally lend us a hand when our own two are not enough.
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Live Science

Make Mars Livable with Asteroids: Researchers Propose Terraforming PlanA new plan for the "terraformation" of Mars has been scripted by a research team – a blueprint for the red planet to terraform a site on Mars in 2036.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GW study finds 33 percent of seafood sold in six DC eateries mislabeledScientists at the George Washington University used a powerful genetic technique to test seafood dinners sold in six District restaurants and found 33 percent had been mislabeled—although in most cases with species that are either closely related or considered acceptable alternatives for menu listing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estimating wealth from outer spaceThey found that it is possible to make inferences about the wealth of a region by measuring the amount of nighttime illumination. While this has been used for large geographic units such as countries, the two researchers can now show that this also works for individual settlements within a given country. Their findings have been published in a special issue on "Forecasting in Peace Research" of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Children with reading and spelling difficulties lag behind their peers despite special educationThe reading skills of children with reading and spelling difficulties (RSD) lag far behind the age level in the first two school years, despite special education received from special education teachers. Furthermore, the spelling skills of children who in addition to RSD had other learning difficulties also lagged behind their peers in the first two school years. The follow-up study was carried ou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modeling reveals how policy affects adoption of solar energy photovoltaics in CaliforniaOne key goal for renewable energy in the United States is to promote the continued adoption of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create a clean energy workforce.
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Popular Science

The evolutionary history of your incredibly awkward feelings Entertainment Excerpt: Awkward Why do we feel awkward? Embarrassed? Guilty? Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The 8 Weirdest Food Recalls in AmericaThe threat of golf balls in hash browns triggers action -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Waymo trials free self-driving taxi service in Phoenix Enlarge / One of the earliest self-driving trial families poses with Waymo's minivan. (credit: Waymo) Waymo—Alphabet's self-driving car division—is launching a "trial" of a self-driving taxi service in the Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area. The Google spinoff's fleet of self-driving cars is descending on Phoenix and offering free rides to anyone in its "early rider program," which is currently
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Gizmodo

This Artificial Womb Could Revolutionize the Way We Treat Premature Babies Image: Karen Abeyaseker / Creative Commons Incubators and ventilators are invaluable when treating extremely premature infants, but they’re a far cry from the cozy confines of a mother’s womb. In an effort to create an environment that more closely approximates the real thing, researchers have now developed an artificial womb that could dramatically reduce mortality and disease in preemies. Adver
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Gizmodo

NASA Is Developing 3D-Printed Chain Mail to Protect Ships and Astronauts Image: NASA Chain mail was an essential tool for medieval warriors hoping to avoid a quick (or slow) death by a sword. But NASA engineers hope a similar material , with a few modern upgrades, could prove to be just as useful for spacecraft and astronauts looking to survive the rigors of outer space. Advertisement The biggest improvement NASA has made in its twenty-first century version of chain m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More patients can avoid hospital admissions after emergency room visits for diverticulitisEmergency room (ER) visits for diverticulitis, an inflammation of an outgrowth or pouching in the colon that can cause severe abdominal pain, have increased 21 percent in recent years. However, these ER visits don't have to land patients in the hospital as frequently as they do, according to new findings published as an 'article in press' on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lull in Mars' giant impact historyFrom the earliest days of our solar system's history, collisions between astronomical objects have shaped the planets and changed the course of their evolution. Studying the early bombardment history of Mars, scientists have discovered a 400-million-year lull in large impacts early in Martian history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel mode of antidepressant action may help patients unresponsive to SSRIsScientists have identified a novel mode of action for a potential antidepressant that also leads to nerve cell growth in the mouse hippocampus. The activator of a serotonin receptor uses a different mechanism to the most commonly used antidepressants, SSRIs. This is a promising finding for the millions of patients who do not respond well to current treatments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers solve the century-old mystery of Blood FallsA research team led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado College has solved a century-old mystery involving a famous red waterfall in Antarctica. New evidence links Blood Falls to a large source of salty water that may have been trapped under Taylor Glacier for more than 1 million years.
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Ingeniøren

Flyvende vandscooter kommer snart til salgAmerikanske Kitty Hawk, som er støttet af Google-grundlæggeren Larry Page, præsenterede i går prototypen på et enpersoners vandfly, som kommer på markedet i løbet af i år. Kitty Hawk Flyeren er dog bare et af mange bud på fremtidens alternative luftbårne transportmidler.
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New Scientist - News

Homo naledi is only 250,000 years old – here’s why that mattersThe latest species of extinct hominin to be discovered that promised to rewrite our history may have died out as modern humans came about
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predicting the movement and impacts of microplastic pollutionMarine circulation and weather conditions greatly affect microplastic aggregation and movement. Microplastics, which are particles measuring less than 5 mm, are of increasing concern. They not only become more relevant as other plastic marine litter breaks down into tiny particles, they also interact with species in a range of marine habitats. A study by Natalie Welden and Amy Lusher published in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist invents way to trigger artificial photosynthesis to clean airA chemistry professor in Florida has just found a way to trigger the process of photosynthesis in a synthetic material, turning greenhouse gases into clean air and producing energy all at the same time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: What do electrolytes actually do?Sports drink commercials love talking about them, but what are electrolytes, why do we need them, and what happens if we don't have enough?
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New on MIT Technology Review

Wikipedia’s Founder Wants to Fix Fake NewsCan a cadre of professional journalists, edited by volunteers and paid via crowdfunding, crack a problem that’s plaguing the Internet?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First molecular genetic evidence of PTSD heritability discoveredThe first molecular genetic evidence that genetic influences play a role in the risk of getting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after trauma has been gained by a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding the correct architectures of IMM proteinsScientists have developed a new technique to understand the correct architectures of IMM proteins, using special chemical tools.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Revolutionary method reveals impact of short circuits on battery safetyHow lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries behave under short-circuit conditions can now be examined using a new approach to help improve reliability and safety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pathway for generating up to 10 terawatts of power from sunlight by 2030The annual potential of solar energy far exceeds the world's energy consumption, but the goal of using the sun to provide a significant fraction of global electricity demand is far from being realized.
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The Atlantic

Should France Have Its Own Version of Islam? With France’s first round of voting complete, far-right candidate Marine Le Pen is among the final two contenders for the presidency, along with centrist Emmanuel Macron. Given how often Le Pen invoked the specter of Islamic fundamentalism throughout her campaign, one might expect French Muslims to be worried about the potential for her to win the May 7 runoff. But Tareq Oubrou, the popular imam
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The Atlantic

How Does Race Affect a Student's Math Education? Kassie Benjamin-Ficken, a teacher in Minneapolis, discovered her love of math in elementary school. One of her earliest memories is begging her mother to come to school so her teachers could share how she excelled in math class. While earning average scores in reading, she was consistently above average for math—which instilled her with a sense of accomplishment. That continued into middle school
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Popular Science

The ultimate fidgeters bundle helps you beat stress with two premium desk toys Sponsored Post The Stress Block and Stress Spinner have become the latest office craze. The Stress Block and Stress Spinner have become the latest office craze. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

College students exposed to toxic flame retardants in dust from dormitory furnishingsA new study shows that students living in college dormitories are exposed to high levels of toxic flame retardants in dust. In the analysis, led by Silent Spring Institute, scientists measured dozens of flame retardants in dorm dust samples, including carcinogens, hormone disruptors, and chemicals that affect brain function. The results also included some of the highest levels ever reported.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Facebook can function as safety net for the bereaved, study findsNeuroscientists have long noted that if certain brain cells are destroyed by, say, a stroke, new circuits may be laid in another location to compensate, essentially rewiring the brain. Northeastern's William Hobbs has found that social networks respond similarly after the death of a close mutual friend, providing support during the grieving process.
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Science : NPR

Changes To Federal Insurance Plans Could Hurt Families Of Chronically Ill Kids Some urge ending funding to the Children's Health Insurance Program, and moving those 8 million kids to marketplace plans. But research shows the out-of-pocket costs to many families would soar. (Image credit: LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Ars Technica

Despite delays, Boeing’s Starliner moving steadily toward the launch pad Boeing Last October, during a White House Frontiers Conference in Pittsburgh, President Obama sat down in a simulator of Boeing's Starliner spacecraft, which will begin transporting astronauts to the International Space Station within a couple of years. The commander-in-chief wanted to try his hand at a task astronauts would eventually have to perform. After taking the controls and cleanly dockin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study correlates climate change and early human activities at the Algerian site of El Kherba 1.7 million years agoMohamed Sahnouni, coordinator of the Prehistoric Technology Program at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), leads a study, published online in the journal L'Anthropologie, using fossil fauna and carbon stable isotope to reconstruct paleoenvironments of the newly discovered site of El Kherba (Algeria) dated to 1.7 million years ago, in relation with hominid behav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insecticide-induced leg loss does not eliminate biting and reproduction in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoesResearchers at LSTM have found that mosquitoes that lose multiple legs after contact with insecticide may still be able to spread malaria and lay eggs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teaming up for cheaper energy from ocean tidesOceanographers at Bangor University's School of Ocean Sciences are launching a major project to study tidal turbulence at the Menai Strait in Wales. Just how can this project help reduce development costs, leading to cheaper energy from the tides?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Eco-treehouse' could be future of home buildingA University of Dundee researcher has worked with architects to produce conceptual designs for a luxury 'eco-treehouse' capable of housing a family, regulating its own temperature and functioning on a self-maintaining, low-energy cycle.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Quantum Biometrics Exploits the Human Eye’s Ability to Detect Single PhotonsIdentifying individuals by the way their eyes detect photons could be a hugely accurate form of biometrics, guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

College students, worms help scientists find new genetic clues to sleepThrough a combination of experiments with college students and laboratory worms, researchers have identified the first specific genes to show molecular alterations associated with short sleep duration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aerobic, resistance exercise combo can boost brain power of over 50sA combination of aerobic and resistance exercises can significantly boost the brain power of the over 50s, finds the most comprehensive review of the available evidence to date.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Venus' hair found growing on the surface of underwater volcano after eruption(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Spain and Italy studying the aftermath of the eruption of the Tagoro underwater volcano in 2011 and 2012 has found that colonies of bacteria living in filaments attached to the volcano surface (named Thiolava veneris which is Lation for Venus' hair) were the first organisms to colonize the volcano after the eruption. In their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nondigital, analog theft is main driver in identity theftAlthough identity theft is frequently associated with mega-data breaches such as the Target breach in 2013, new research from the Center for Identity at The University of Texas at Austin has found that old-fashioned "analog" theft is the major driver in identity-related crimes.
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Ars Technica

Soylent recalls powder after dairy accidentally slips into 1.8 powder Enlarge (credit: Soylent ) Those swigging Soylent are in for another hiccup—but, it seems, no belly aches this time. The high-profile meal-replacement company issued a voluntary recall Monday after finding that a small amount of milk product may have slipped into some batches of its Soylent 1.8 powder, which is supposed to be free of lactose and milk products. Soylent fans with an allergy or seve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SwRI-led team discovers lull in Mars' giant impact historyFrom the earliest days of our solar system's history, collisions between astronomical objects have shaped the planets and changed the course of their evolution. Studying the early bombardment history of Mars, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the University of Arizona have discovered a 400-million-year lull in large impacts early in Martian history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientist invents way to trigger artificial photosynthesis to clean airA chemistry professor in Florida has just found a way to trigger the process of photosynthesis in a synthetic material, turning greenhouse gases into clean air and producing energy all at the same time. The process has great potential for creating a technology that could significantly reduce greenhouse gases linked to climate change, while also creating a clean way to produce energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding the correct architectures of IMM proteinsA new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), developed a new technique to understand the correct architectures of IMM proteins, using special chemical tools.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UVA finds way to speed search for cancer cures dramaticallyA new technique will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

80-year-old 'viable' anthrax strain debunked using advanced genomic sequencingA team of international researchers has found that a strain of anthrax-causing bacterium thought to have been viable 80 years after a thwarted World War I espionage attack, was, in reality, a much younger standard laboratory strain. The team speculates that the mix-up was due to commonplace laboratory contamination.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astrophysicists studied the 'rejuvenating' pulsar in a neighboring galaxyThe Lomonosov Moscow State University scientists published the results of a study of the unique ultra-slow pulsar XB091D. This neutron star is believed to have captured a companion only a million years ago and since then, has been slowly restoring its rapid rotation. The young pulsar is located in one of the oldest globular star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy, where the cluster may once have bee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemotherapy drug may increase vulnerability to depressionA chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer may increase vulnerability to depression by stopping new brain cells from growing, according to a new King's College London study out today in Translational Psychiatry.
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Gizmodo

The Fantastic Philips OneBlade Just Got Its First Discount Since Black Friday Philips Norelco OneBlade , $31 The Philips Norelco OneBlade was the most exciting new shaving product of 2016 , and Amazon’s offering the first discount we’ve seen on it since Black Friday . Most of the people on our team (except Jillian) are converts to this thing, and Shane shared his thoughts about it on Lifehacker Gear : Advertisement Advertisement I’m pretty blown away by the Philips OneBlad
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Ingeniøren

Nyt projekt skal gøre skyens produktionsdata mere pålideligeEt demonstrationsprojekt i regi af RoboCluster skal øge pålideligheden af de produktionsdata, der lagres i skyen. Som det er i dag, er det nemlig ifølge projektlederen så som så med datavaliditeten.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

33 percent of seafood sold in six DC eateries mislabeled, study findsScientists used a powerful genetic technique to test seafood dinners sold in six District restaurants and found 33 percent had been mislabeled. The swaps, they found, were mostly with closely related species, say the investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Autonomy in the workplace has positive effects on well-being and job satisfaction, study findsEmployees with higher levels of autonomy in their work reported positive effects on their overall well-being and higher levels of job satisfaction, new research into workplace culture has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measuring immune response could be key to differentiating malaria from other infectionsAnalyzing a patient's immune response could be key to quickly and accurately diagnosing malaria, according to new research.
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WIRED

Take a Trip Inside Coachella’s Psychedelic 120-Foot VR Dome Having Coachella FOMO? Check out one of its coolest shows right here. The post Take a Trip Inside Coachella's Psychedelic 120-Foot VR Dome appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Lowly Folding Chair, Reimagined With Algorithms The Swish stool is an example of using parametric design to kinetic effect. The post The Lowly Folding Chair, Reimagined With Algorithms appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Iris Scans Come to Nursing Homes. Next Stop, Your Phone A retirement community on Lake Erie has turned to a technology more common in sci-fi thrillers than old folks homes: iris scan recognition. The post Iris Scans Come to Nursing Homes. Next Stop, Your Phone appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radiocarbon dating gets a postmodern makeoverFor decades, radiocarbon dating has been a way for scientists to get a rough picture of when once-living stuff lived. The method has been revolutionary and remains one of the most commonly used dating methods to study the past.
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Ars Technica

Samsung develops emoji-based chat app for people with language disorders YouTube, Samsung Italia. You may know someone who sends messages with more emojis than words, but chances are they don't need those symbols to communicate. For some with language disorders such as aphasia, a disorder that can make it difficult to read, talk, or write, emojis can be an ideal way for those with the disorder to communicate with others around them. Samsung Electronics Italia, the com
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Gizmodo

Apple Delays 'Carpool Karaoke' Show, Should Just Kill It Instead Image: YouTube/Apple Back in February, Apple excitedly told the world that its first original series, the Carpool Karaoke spin-off , would be launching in April. Now, according to Reuters , the premiere has been pushed back until “later this year.” Advertisement Carpool Karaoke: The Series is one of Apple’s first big bets on content—the company is also planning the awful-looking, Shark Tank-style
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Into the submillimeter—the early universe's formationIn order to make sense of our universe, astronomers have to work hard, and they have to push observing technology to the limit. Some of that hard work revolves around what are called sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs.) SMGs are galaxies that can only be observed in the submillimeter range of the electromagnetic spectrum.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Skin stem cells used to generate new brain cellsUsing human skin cells, neurobiologists have created a method to generate one of the principle cell types of the brain called microglia, which play a key role in preserving the function of neural networks and responding to injury and disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mystery of the missing mercury at the Great Salt LakeAround 2010, the deep waters of Utah's Great Salt Lake contained high levels of toxic methylmercury. Mercury measurements in waterfowl surrounding the lake led to a rare human consumption advisory for ducks. But by 2015, 90 percent of the deep mercury was gone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parents' use of emotional feeding increases emotional eating in school-age childrenEmotional eating is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear. Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on. The reverse was also found to be the case, with parents of children who were more easily soothed by food b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantlePetrologists who recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth's surface have found a new clue about a crucial event in the planet's deep past.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predicting people's 'brain age' could help to spot who is at risk of early deathA method for predicting someone's 'brain age' based on MRI scans could help to spot who might be at increased risk of poor health and even dying at a younger age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetics, environment combine to give everyone a unique sense of smellReceptors in the noses of mice exposed to certain smells during life are different to genetically similar mice that lived without those smells, new research shows. The study found it is this combination of genetics and experience that gives each individual a unique sense of smell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For many women, body image and sex life may suffer after episiotomyWomen who have episiotomies after childbirth reported having poorer body image and less satisfying sex lives than women who tear and heal naturally.
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The Atlantic

How Democrats Came to Feel Nostalgic for George W. Bush In February 2010, a series of billboards began popping up around the nation . A grinning, waving George W. Bush appeared beside the phrase, “Miss Me Yet?” The answer was a resounding, Eh, sorta . Bush had bounced back somewhat from his abysmal final approval rating, but while Republicans were feeling rosier about the ex-president, Democrats were not. It turns out that for some Democrats, the ques
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme treatment reduces alcohol-induced liver damage in mouse modelsMassachusetts General Hospital investigators report that an intestinal enzyme previously shown to keep bacterial toxins from passing from the gastrointestinal system into the bloodstream may be able to prevent or reduce the liver damage caused by excess alcohol consumption.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds new genetic variants associated with extreme old ageThe search for the genetic determinants of extreme longevity has been challenging, with the prevalence of centenarians (people older than 100) just one per 5,000 population in developed nations.But a recently published study by Boston University School of Public Health and School of Medicine researchers, which combines four studies of extreme longevity, has identified new rare variants in chromoso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts outline pathway for generating up to 10 terawatts of power from sunlight by 2030The annual potential of solar energy far exceeds the world's energy consumption, but the goal of using the sun to provide a significant fraction of global electricity demand is far from being realized.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What do electrolytes actually do? (video)Sports drink commercials love talking about them, but what are electrolytes and what happens if we don't have enough? Electrolytes are salts that we need in our body. They help control the movement of water in our cells along with vital nerve pulses. Sweating is one way you lose electrolytes. This video reveals the ins and outs of electrolytes and whether you should reach for a sports drink after
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

75 years of geriatrics expertise on display at 2017 AGS Annual Scientific MeetingMore than 2,500 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, social workers, long-term and managed care providers, healthcare administrators, students, and other geriatrics stakeholders will come together for a program built from more than 800 abstract submissions and inclusive of more than 100 events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophysicists study 'rejuvenating' pulsar in a neighboring galaxyLomonosov Moscow State University scientists published the results of a study of unique ultra-slow pulsar XB091D. This neutron star is believed to have captured a companion only a million years ago, and since then, has been slowly restoring its rapid rotation. The young pulsar is located in one of the oldest globular star clusters in the Andromeda galaxy, where the cluster may once have been a dwa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

80-year-old 'viable' anthrax strain debunked using advanced genomic sequencingA team of international researchers has found that a strain of anthrax-causing bacterium thought to have been viable 80 years after a thwarted World War I espionage attack, was, in reality, a much younger standard laboratory strain. The team speculates that the mix-up was due to commonplace laboratory contamination.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Animals Set Survival Record Inside Artificial WombFetal lambs lived for weeks in a fluid-filled bag. Tests to help premature babies could begin in three years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Click-on arm prosthesis controlled by patient's thoughtsLast Friday, the first patient in the Netherlands received his click-on robotic arm. By means of a new technique, this robotic arm is clicked directly onto the bone. A unique characteristic of this prosthesis is that it can be controlled by the patient's own thoughts. Worldwide, there are only a handful of patients with such a prosthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Movie research results: Multitasking overloads the brainPrevious research shows that multitasking, which means performing several tasks at the same time, reduces productivity by as much as 40%. Now a group of researchers specializing in brain imaging has found that changing tasks too frequently interferes with brain activity. This may explain why the end result is worse than when a person focuses on one task at a time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children with reading and spelling difficulties lag behind their peers despite special educationThe reading skills of children with reading and spelling difficulties (RSD) lag far behind the age level in the first two school years, despite special education received from special education teachers. Furthermore, the spelling skills of children who in addition to RSD had other learning difficulties also lagged behind their peers in the first two school years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facial expressions: How brains process emotionThe amygdala has distinct neurons that judge the intensity and ambiguity of facial expressions, new research shows. Identifying the amygdala's role in social cognition suggests insights into the neurological mechanisms behind autism and anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toronto's subways expose passengers to more air pollution than Montreal, Vancouver systemsSubways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions, research finds. Another finding from this study is that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studying a catalyst for blood cancersA new paper describes how TET2 loss can open the door for mutations that drive myeloid, lymphoid, and other cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers manipulate water using only lightA new system could make it possible to control the way water moves over a surface, using only light. This advance may open the door to technologies such as microfluidic diagnostic devices whose channels and valves could be reprogrammed on the fly, or field systems that could separate water from oil at a drilling rig, the researchers say.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Psychiatry Needs NeuroscienceAn influential subset of psychiatrists argue—absurdly—that neuroscience has little clinical relevance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

If you misread someone’s face, blame these neurons Have you ever thought someone was angry at you, but it turned out you were just misreading their facial expression? One specific region of the brain, called the amygdala, is involved in making these (sometimes inaccurate) judgments about ambiguous or intense emotions, according to new research. Identifying the amygdala’s role in social cognition suggests insights into the neurological mechanisms
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Gizmodo

Three Great Wireless Headphones That Are Better Than Beats Wireless headphones are rapidly becoming a necessity in our dongle-tangled gadget universe, but the options are endless. We set out to find a pair of high-quality, wireless on-ear headphones for the discerning listener who wants to cruise the streets in style. Advertisement On-ear headphones (the ones that sit directly, well, on your ears) are sort of an odd genre. Some people love them for their
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Futurity.org

Hormone therapy benefits older women prone to fractures Postmenopausal women at the highest genetic risk for fractures benefit the most from hormone therapy, research shows. The study included nearly 10,000 participants from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a national, long-term study of more than 150,000 women. “We found that women who are genetically at the highest fracture risk can enjoy the greatest protection from fracture when they use hormo
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Viden

Plastikædende larver kan hjælpe i kampen mod affaldVed et tilfælde har man opdaget, at voksmøl kan spise og nedbryde plastik.
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Viden

360-VIDEO: Jesper Theilgaard overrumples af VadehavetKlik rundt i 360 filmen og oplev en stormflod helt tæt på.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warm winds: New insight into what weakens Antarctic ice shelvesNew research describes for the first time the role that warm, dry winds play in influencing the behavior of Antarctic ice shelves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predicting the movement, impacts of microplastic pollutionMicroplastics, which are particles measuring less than 5 mm, are of increasing concern. They not only become more relevant as other plastic marine litter breaks down into tiny particles, they also interact with species in a range of marine habitats. A new study takes a look at how global climate change and the impact of changing ocean circulation affects the distribution of marine microplastic lit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insecticide-induced leg loss does not eliminate biting in mosquitoesResearchers at LSTM have found that mosquitoes that lose multiple legs after contact with insecticide may still be able to spread malaria and lay eggs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revolutionary method reveals impact of short circuits on battery safetyHow lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries behave under short-circuit conditions can now be examined using a new approach developed by a UCL-led team to help improve reliability and safety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emergency care, prescribing, end-of-life care among highlights at #AGS17Potentially inappropriate medications, the future of Advance Care Planning (ACP), and improved emergency care for older adults are among headline presentations anchoring the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting (#AGS17), to be held May 18-20 in San Antonio, Texas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential new treatment for kidney failure in cancer patientsKidney dysfunction is a frequent complication affecting more than 50 percent of all cancer patients, and is directly linked to poor survival. Despite the high occurrence, it is still not clear how presence of a tumor contributes to kidney dysfunction and how this can be prevented. A new study from researchers at Uppsala University shows that kidney dysfunction can be caused by the patient's own im
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

College students, worms help scientists find new genetic clues to sleepThrough a combination of experiments with college students and laboratory worms, researchers have identified the first specific genes to show molecular alterations associated with short sleep duration.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to protect human rights: 40 policy recommendations for the EUFight people smuggling by offering more options for legal migration to the EU. Stop sending migrants back to regions where their human rights are at stake. These are just a few of the recommendations presented by FRAME, a large-scale research project on the EU and human rights that is coordinated by the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estimating wealth from outer spaceCities and villages illuminated at night are common in wealthy regions such as Europe. This is different in developing countries: Satellite data shows that many dark spots are visible next to illuminated regions. Two political scientists from the University of Konstanz, Professor Nils Weidmann and Dr. Sebastian Schutte, evaluated satellite data of night light emissions and compared them with wealt
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Ars Technica

Wikitribune is Jimmy Wales’ attempt to wage war on fake news Enlarge / Wikipedia cofounder Jimmy Wales. (credit: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Getty Images) Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales wants to bring together unpaid volunteers and journalists to create a rival news publication—dubbed Wikitribune—that he hopes will battle "fake news" more effectively than long-established newspapers. Volunteers are encouraged to contribute funds to the project via a crowdfunding ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using coseismic calcite veins to date New Mexico fault line earthquakes back half a million years(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Wisconsin, Berkeley and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology has used U-Th testing of coseismic calcite veins at the Loma Blanc fault in New Mexico to learn the earthquake history of the fault going back almost a half-million years. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stretchable sodium-ion battery electrodes made using sugar cubes(Phys.org)—Scientists have used sugar cubes as a template for synthesizing stretchable battery electrodes, which serve as a key component in newly designed stretchable yet mechanically robust sodium-ion batteries. Although there has recently been a great deal of research on stretchable batteries, usually these devices still contain some rigid components. By using electrodes templated on sugar cube
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests climate change likely to cause significant shift in Grand Canyon vegetationDecreases in river flows and frequency of flooding with future climate warming will likely shift vegetation along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon to species with more drought-tolerant traits, according to papers recently published in Ecology and Evolution and Wetlands. What this means for Colorado River recreationists is that plants with traits that confer drought tolerance —mesquite, tamarisk
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Ingeniøren

Flåde af selvkørende biler skal på britisk motorvej i 2019Med støtte fra regeringen planlægger et britisk konsortium at teste autonome biler, der kommunikerer med hinanden, blandt almindelige trafikanter.
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Ingeniøren

Nu kan du 3D-printe glas ved stuetemperaturTyske forskere har gjort det meget lettere at lave 3D-printede glasobjekter med meget fine detaljer. Komponenterne kan bruges i lynhurtige computere og udstyr til bioteknologisk forskning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How statistical thinking should shape the courtroomThe probabilistic revolution first kicked off in the 1600s, when gamblers realized that estimating the likelihood of an event could give them an edge in games of chance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists model the formation of multivalleys in semiconductor microcavitiesEverything we experience is made of light and matter. And the interaction between the two can bring about fascinating effects. For example, it can result in the formation of special quasiparticles, called polaritons, which are a combination of light and matter. A team at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), modeled the behavior of pol
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WIRED

As Streaming Services Boom, SoundCloud Strives for Relevancy The music platform incubates talent wonderfully, but can't hold onto it. What's next? The post As Streaming Services Boom, SoundCloud Strives for Relevancy appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

How to Stream Live Television Without Paying for Cable Get the best of live, on-demand, and streaming television without paying for cable The post How to Stream Live Television Without Paying for Cable appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What the age of your brain says about youResearchers used neuroimages of the brain to identify biomarkers that show how the structures of a person's brain age. Being able to predict someone's brain age could be a valuable tool to help clinicians make timely medical interventions, believes James Cole of Imperial College London in the UK. He is the lead author of a study in Springer Nature's journal Molecular Psychiatry that identified so-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decrease in cardiovascular diseases benefits persons with diabetesThe incidence of cardiovascular diseases in Sweden has decreased sharply since the late 1990s. These are the findings of a study from Sahlgrenska Academy which included almost three million adult Swedes. In relative terms, the biggest winners are persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children with reading and spelling difficulties lag behind their peers despite special educationThe reading skills of children with reading and spelling difficulties (RSD) lag far behind the age level in the first two school years, despite special education received from special education teachers. Furthermore, the spelling skills of children who in addition to RSD had other learning difficulties also lagged behind their peers in the first two school years. The follow-up study was carried ou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Movie research results: Multitasking overloads the brainPrevious research shows that multitasking, which means performing several tasks at the same time, reduces productivity by as much as 40%. Now a group of researchers specialising in brain imaging has found that changing tasks too frequently interferes with brain activity. This may explain why the end result is worse than when a person focuses on one task at a time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When Hollywood met neurosurgeryA team of computer engineers and neurosurgeons, with an assist from Hollywood special effects experts, reports successful early tests of a novel, lifelike 3-D simulator designed to teach surgeons to perform a delicate, minimally invasive brain operation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A survival guide for retail startupsResearch on retail startups found that spending on employee training along with managing rapid inventory turnover are keys to survival.
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Viden

Snart kan Teslaen også lynlades i VestjyllandTesla fordobler antallet af “superchargers” på verdensplan, og Danmark får fire nye ladestationer.
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The Scientist RSS

Trump to Hold Annual Science FairThe president has announced that he will continue the Obama-era tradition of showcasing school children's science projects at the White House.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: World Penguin DayEmperor penguins are among the largest birds in the world. Approximately 595,000 of them live in Antarctica.
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The Scientist RSS

Texas Education Board Reaches Compromise on Science StandardsThe state's board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to 'intelligent design' arguments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some cows may be predisposed to subacute ruminal acidosisCattle with subacute ruminal acidosis suffer from a number of low-level ailments that affect productivity. A research team led by University of Illinois scientists has documented changes in pH, microbiome, and rumen epithelial cells in SARA-affected cows. Results indicate that some animals may be predisposed to SARA because of an overabundance of certain bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook Stories could end up driving younger users away instead of attracting themIf you use Facebook's mobile app, you may have recently noticed the sudden appearance of circles at the very top of the display. The social media giant has previously tried pushing this "Stories" feature into three of its other products: Messenger, WhatsApp and Instagram. This point wasn't lost on many internet users, who quickly began sharing memes mocking Facebook's addition of Stories to everyt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revolutionary method reveals impact of short circuits on battery safetyHow lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries behave under short-circuit conditions can now be examined using a new approach developed by a UCL-led team to help improve reliability and safety.
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Gizmodo

Luke Skywalker Might Have Something Surprising in His Possession in The Last Jedi The Rampage movie could be even more insane than we imagined. Arrow ’s producers tease casualties for the season finale. An important Riverdale season 2 character has been cast—but there’s a catch. Plus, more teases for Harley Quinn’s arrival on Gotham , and new pictures from the next episode of Doctor Who . Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Making Star Wars reports that Luke Skywalker wears
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using an airplane to measure volatile organic compounds from oil sands surface mining facilities(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Canada has found that using an airplane to carry emissions reading hardware over mining facilities offers a better way to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) being pumped into the atmosphere than methods currently in use. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes wha
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Gizmodo

Scientists Are Exploring a Strange New Way to Create an Exotic Phase of Matter The ALICE Detector, with the LHC pipe encased in concrete (Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum) GENEVA, SWITZERLAND— Hiding in the suburbs behind trees and a meadow with furry brown donkeys is a warehouse with an elevator that only visits negative floors. Hundreds of feet down, hyper complex detectors inside an octagonal tube the color and size of a large barn whistle loudly and peer like cameras at proton
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parkinson's disease will be curable with cortisolDGIST's research team has identified the mechanism of dopaminergic neuronal death inhibition using stress hormone cortisol. The study suggests new direction for studies on degenerative brain disease by changing the perception of stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Model for multivalley polaritonsIBS scientists model the formation of multivalleys in semiconductor microcavities, bringing new ideas to the emerging valleytronics field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For many women, body image and sex life may suffer after episiotomyWomen who have episiotomies after childbirth reported having poorer body image and less satisfying sex lives than women who tear and heal naturally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children conceived after fertility treatments are at increased risk for pediatric cancers'The research concludes that the association between IVF and total pediatric neoplasms and malignancies is significant,' Prof. Sheiner says. 'With increasing numbers of offspring conceived after fertility treatments, it is important to follow up on their health.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mystery of the missing mercury at the Great Salt LakeAround 2010, the deep waters of Utah's Great Salt Lake contained high levels of toxic methylmercury. Mercury measurements in waterfowl surrounding the lake led to a rare human consumption advisory for ducks. But by 2015, 90 percent of the deep mercury was gone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skin stem cells used to generate new brain cellsUsing human skin cells, University of California, Irvine neurobiologists and their colleagues have created a method to generate one of the principle cell types of the brain called microglia, which play a key role in preserving the function of neural networks and responding to injury and disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JAMA study, clinical trials offer fresh hope for kids with rare brain diseaseAnna Gunby can't run around as smoothly as most 4-year-olds because her wobbly legs are affected by a rare brain disease that also hinders her intellect. She can't identify colors. She can't count objects. Her attention span is short.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers solve the century-old mystery of Blood FallsA research team led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado College has solved a century-old mystery involving a famous red waterfall in Antarctica. New evidence links Blood Falls to a large source of salty water that may have been trapped under Taylor Glacier for more than 1 million years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Facial expressions: How brains process emotionNew research from Caltech clarifies the once-mysterious role of the amygdala.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guideline published on uncommon risk of death in epilepsyThere is an uncommon risk of death that people with epilepsy and their loved ones may not know about. The risk is called sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, or SUDEP. Now the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Epilepsy Society have co-developed a new guideline on SUDEP, published in the April 24, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Ne
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Scientific American Content: Global

Detection of Ghostly Particles Could Unmask Illicit Nuclear WeaponsWeapons-grade fuel in a nuclear reactor emits a steady rate of telltale antineutrinos that could be detected by a newly designed portable device -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers detect dozens of new quasars and galaxies(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Yoshiki Matsuoka of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) has detected a treasure trove of new high-redshift quasars (or quasi-stellar objects) and luminous galaxies. The newly found objects could be very important for our understanding of the early universe. The findings were presented Apr. 19 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Futurity.org

Gene could let hearing recover from loud noises A protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure, say researchers. Their findings could one day lead to new tools to prevent hearing loss. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports , reveals that a gene called Forkhead Box O3 (Foxo3) appears to play a role in protecting outer hair cells in the inner ear from damage. The outer hair
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New on MIT Technology Review

Mainstream Metal Printing, Old Nuclear’s Bad News, and Trump’s Mars Madness—The Download, April 25, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Viden

Klimaetiker: Vi behøver ikke bo i jordhuler og spise gamle kikærter for at hjælpe klimaetVi er nødt til at tænke mere klimavenligt i vores hverdag. Og det kan sagtens starte i det små med et kig i køleskabet eller en ændret feriedestination, fortæller bioetiker og forfatter Mickey Gjerris.
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Big Think

10 Chinese Thinkers, and Why You Should Know Them The world's most populated country has had its fair share of great minds. Here, we take a quick look at ten thinkers you might not have thought about. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting the movement and impacts of microplastic pollutionMicroplastics, which are particles measuring less than 5 mm, are of increasing concern. They not only become more relevant as other plastic marine litter breaks down into tiny particles, they also interact with species in a range of marine habitats. A study in Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management takes a look at how global climate change and the impact of changing ocean circulation a
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Ars Technica

Heroes of the Storm: 2,490 matches later, here’s why I can’t stop playing Enlarge Not quite an RPG, not quite an RTS, MOBAs are fierce, fast games that combine swift fingers, strategic thinking, and uproarious bursts of skill. Two teams of five players duke it out to destroy each other's base with the assistance of computer-controlled units that march forward along set paths, or lanes, as the terminology has it. It's a simple concept that allows for a huge amount of de
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Ars Technica

Sega built a real Warhammer 40K Power Fist, then let me smash things with it Enlarge According to Warhammer: 40,000 lore, the Power Fist (also known as the Power Glove) is a late-41st millennium weapon wielded by honoured Space Marine Captains and Chapter Masters. While slow to use, its powerful hydraulics mean the fist can hammer straight through the side of tanks, and end conflicts with a single, powerful blow. And yet, despite the fist's theoretical technological prowe
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Northwest Passage Remains Treacherous, Despite Ice RetreatArctic route may remain treacherous for decades -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Videnskabens Verden

FNs klimapanel blev oprettet i 1988 - IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Men faktisk var der forskere, der for mere end 100 år siden spekulerede på, om den menneskeskabte ophobning af CO2 i atmosfæren kunne føre til en stigning af den globale temperatur, fortæller Kristian Hvidtfeldt Nielsen, der er videnskabshistoriker på Århus Universitet. Medvirkende: Kristian Hvidtfeldt Nielsen,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low levels of 'memory protein' linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's diseaseThis discovery, described online in the April 25 edition of eLife, will lead to important research and may one day help experts develop new and better therapies for Alzheimer's and other forms of cognitive decline.
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Ingeniøren

Den nye digitale produktionsingeniør er biologHvad skal der blive af robotspecialisten og produktionsingeniøren i en stadigt mere digital verden, hvor robotten programmerer sig selv, og softwaren selv kan planlægge produktionen? Nye kompetencer er påkrævet, lyder det fra både Grundfos og et fynsk jernstøberi.
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WIRED

Review: iWalk2.0 A high-tech alternative to crutches and knee walkers. The post Review: iWalk2.0 appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Species spread in spurts—and here's whyWhen plants and animals move into new spaces they often do so by fits and starts, with lots of progress one year and less—or even a loss of ground—the next. Conventional wisdom attributes this pattern to variations in the environment in which they're immersed—changes in terrain or weather or the presence of other species that aid or inhibit them.
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NYT > Science

That Ghostly, Glowing Light Above Canada? It’s Just SteveScientists are investigating a stream of hot, bright gas visible not far from the northern lights. Amateurs saw it first, and they gave it a name from a 2006 animated movie.
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Popular Science

The ideal speaker setup for very loud, very high-quality listening Gadgets Can you hear it now? A rock concert blasts 105 decibels into your ear holes. And, though your neighbors might curse the day you moved in, you can re-create that level of acoustic insanity in…
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The Atlantic

How the Political Press Favors the Rich and Famous Whether one likes or dislikes Chelsea Clinton is beside the point. Imagine paging through an official handbook at The New York Times or NPR or Columbia University’s journalism school and encountering an entry with these guidelines: Prospective political candidates: A subject may sometimes warrant coverage as a possible or likely political candidate before he or she officially declares an intentio
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The Atlantic

Can Scientific Discovery Be Automated? Science is in the midst of a data crisis. Last year, there were more than 1.2 million new papers published in the biomedical sciences alone, bringing the total number of peer-reviewed biomedical papers to over 26 million. However, the average scientist reads only about 250 papers a year. Meanwhile, the quality of the scientific literature has been in decline. Some recent studies found that the ma
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Ars Technica

Ars is teaming up with GOG and we’re giving away The Witcher to everyone Enlarge Here at Ars, we like to celebrate the classics—especially classic video games—and we've long been fans of the folks over at GOG (formerly known as "Good Old Games"). They sell modern games, sure, but the site is a treasure trove of DRM-free hits from days gone by. Want to grab a copy of Tie Fighter that works on modern computers? Boom, ten bucks . Want to replay Wing Commander IV with upg
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to End Malaria in AfricaThe continent's own CDC, formed in 2015, can play a major role -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

American Media Are Getting People at Home Ready for War With North Korea The nuclear submarine USS Michigan, armed with 154 tomahawk missiles, arrives in Busan, South Korea on April 24, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jermaine Ralliford) Remember what it felt like a couple of months ago when you, as an American, didn’t give much thought to North Korea? I’d like you to try and remember that feeling over the next couple of weeks, because
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New Scientist - News

Mars Trojans may be part of a planet that was destroyed long agoNine asteroids that trail the Red Planet contain a material usually only formed in the mantle of rocky planets
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Autonomy in the workplace has positive effects on well-being and job satisfaction, study findsNew research into workplace culture has found that employees with higher levels of autonomy in their work reported positive effects on their overall well-being and higher levels of job satisfaction.
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Popular Science

Apparently the end of the world is going to make us all work out more Environment Climate change might make Americans more active, but don't get too excited New study suggests that a warming United States might finally get off the couch. Read on.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Iceberg 'doodles'Scientists publish a new atlas of the poles, detailing the sometimes strange shapes on the ocean floor.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why does this rhino have 24-hour security?Sudan is a the northern white rhino, and the last chance for the survival of his species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method to grow womb lining and mimic menstrual cycle in the laboratory dishScientists have succeeded in growing three-dimensional cultures of the endometrium, the uterus' inner lining, in a dish. These so-called endometrial organoids promise to shed light onto the processes that occur during the monthly menstrual cycle and open up the possibility of studying diseases of the uterus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fluorescent probes prove the existence of 'lipid raft' cell membrane structuresScientists from Japan, India and the US have observed lipid rafts in live cells for the first time. These rafts are active sections of the cell membrane responsible for signal transduction as well as the entry of toxins into cells.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Losing Key DNA Made Us Modern HumansLoss of some DNA during evolution may have helped create big brains and our male–female relationships -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows brands dedicated to postive social change use social media to primarily promote productsSocial media has greatly changed how all sorts of companies can interact with their audiences and customers. A new study suggests that even brands dedicated to positive social change tend to use social media as a way to promote the brand more so than activism or social causes.
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The Atlantic

Today's News: April 25, 2016 —Arkansas executed two inmates Monday night in the first double execution in the U.S. since 2000. —North Korea staged artillery drills to mark its army’s 85th anniversary amid rising tensions with the U.S. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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Dagens Medicin

Hackere: Lægeklinikkers journalsystem er ‘pivåbent’Firma bag 200 lægehuses it-system lukker nu helt ned for, at patienter kan bestille tid og kommunikere med deres læge gennem systemet. Det sker af sikkerhedshensyn, da hackere påstår, at de har fået adgang til systemet.
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WIRED

This App Lets Iranians Swipe Past Political Propaganda In Iran, apps have become a kind of loophole in the government's censorship policies. The post This App Lets Iranians Swipe Past Political Propaganda appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Meet the Scientist Snapping Selfies With Giant Manta Rays Andrea Marshall, AKA "manta queen," captures the otherworldly beauty of manta rays for science. The post Meet the Scientist Snapping Selfies With Giant Manta Rays appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Silicon Valley Commutes Are Hell. Time for Companies to Fix That They can't go at it alone. But with great power—oh, and money—comes great responsibility. The post Silicon Valley Commutes Are Hell. Time for Companies to Fix That appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we need to start listening to insectsIt's a warm summer afternoon in the Tanzanian village of Lupiro, and Mikkel Brydegaard is crouching in a brick hut, trying to fix a broken laser. Next to him, on a tall tripod, three telescopes point through a window at a tree in the distance. A laptop rests on an upturned box, waiting to receive a signal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GW study finds 33 percent of seafood sold in six DC eateries mislabeledScientists at the George Washington University used a powerful genetic technique to test seafood dinners sold in six District restaurants and found 33 percent had been mislabeled.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'World's oldest fungus' raises evolution questionsFossils found in rock from beneath the sea may be the oldest known fungi by one to two billion years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toronto's subways expose passengers to more air pollution than Montreal, Vancouver systemsA new study co-authored by U of T Engineering professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions—and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iron-age Viking longhouses were burned and buried in funeralsFrom the Bronze Age until the Viking Age, burial mounds could be placed on top of the remains of three-aisled longhouses. The internal posts that served as roof-supporting beams were sometimes removed before the house was set on fire. Once the house had burned to the ground, one or more burial mounds were placed on top of its remains.
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Popular Science

Whose is bigger? How all the Mars-bound rockets stack up Space A power trip to the red planet. As governments and private companies race to send astronauts to Mars, bigger is once again better. Read on.
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The Atlantic

Video Games Are Better Without Stories A longstanding dream: Video games will evolve into interactive stories, like the ones that play out fictionally on the Star Trek Holodeck . In this hypothetical future, players could interact with computerized characters as round as those in novels or films, making choices that would influence an ever-evolving plot. It would be like living in a novel, where the player’s actions would have as much
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The Atlantic

The Privilege of School Choice Last year, a contentious zone change in New York City forced well-off parents to decide whether or not to integrate a high-poverty school. The exact-same scenario had played out a half-century earlier during the city’s brief attempt at school desegregation. On November 23, the morning after his home was drawn into a different school zone, Mark Gonsalves slipped out of his office in Midtown Manhat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI and e-commerce—a perfect storm for retail jobsIf you work in retail sales, it might be time to explore a new career, according to a Missouri S&T researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When artificial intelligence evaluates chess championsThe ELO system, which most chess federations use today, ranks players by the results of their games. Although simple and efficient, it overlooks relevant criteria such as the quality of the moves players actually make. To overcome these limitations, Jean-Marc Alliot of the Institut de recherche en informatique de Toulouse (IRIT - CNRS/INP Toulouse/Université Toulouse Paul Sabatier/Université Toulo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel form of iron for fortification of foodsWhey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles: ETH researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: James Webb Space Telescope mirror seen in full bloomIt's springtime and the deployed primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope looks like a spring flower in full bloom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning dramatically streamlines search for more efficient chemical reactionsEven a simple chemical reaction can be surprisingly complicated. That's especially true for reactions involving catalysts, which speed up the chemistry that makes fuel, fertilizer and other industrial goods. In theory, a catalytic reaction may follow thousands of possible paths, and it can take years to identify which one it actually takes so scientists can tweak it and make it more efficient.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The last remaining male northern white rhino joins TinderThe most eligible bachelor in the world is on Tinder and he's looking for love…
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Oldest evidence of patterned silk loom found in ChinaChinese finds offer earliest look at game-changing weaving machine.
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Science : NPR

Eat, Sleep, Repeat: How Kids' Daily Routines Can Help Prevent Obesity A new study finds that preschool-age children who didn't have a set sleep routine were more likely to be overweight by the time they hit the preteen years. (Image credit: AleksandarNakic/Getty Images)
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Live Science

Farewell (for Now) to April's Giraffe CamThe "giraffe cam" for April and her new calf has come down, but their internet career isn't over just yet.
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Live Science

How Dolphins Do It in Water…with Weird, Complex GenitaliaBeing a scientist can be a strange job. Like on the days when your work involves inserting the artificially inflated penis of a dead dolphin into the recently thawed vagina of another dead dolphin, all inside a CT scanner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research comes through with flying colorsLike a chameleon changing colors to blend into the environment, Lawrence Livermore researchers have created a technique to change the color of assembled nanoparticles with an electrical stimulant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicist improves particle interaction modelingQuantum electrodynamics is a lot like baking a cake, and then trying to take apart the individual ingredients. At least, that is what physicist Dr. Ulrich Jentschura equates to the process of creating an equation that can couple particles' and antiparticles' predicted masses at the same time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clouds' response to pollution clarified with new climate analysisHow the properties of clouds change in response to local pollution - mainly from coal burning and ship engines - has been more accurately determined.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Where Astronomy and Gastronomy MeetTo help people grasp the cosmos through senses other than sight, a scientist and a team of chefs are creating simple, elegant (and edible) metaphors for some of the universe’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

A chat with Ron Howard after watching his Einstein series premiere Enlarge / Ron Howard speaks to Ars Technica at March's South By Southwest festival. (credit: Sam Machkovech) AUSTIN, Texas—Writer, director, and actor Ron Howard is very careful when considering his place in the geek-media universe. Over 20 years ago, his film Apollo 13 kicked off a trajectory of major science-and-heart storytelling, which recently crystallized as an ongoing series-development de
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Dagens Medicin

Danske eksperter i genoplivning i fornemt selskab
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural dye garden promotes a greener fashion supply chainCollege of Human Ecology faculty and student efforts to develop sustainable approaches to textile and fashion design has led to the development of the Cornell Natural Dye Garden after a successful crowdfunding campaign that ended in fall 2016.
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New Scientist - News

Medical marijuana may be a salve for the US opioid epidemicIn US states where medical marijuana has been legalised, people seem to be switching from other prescribed drugs to cannabis as a treatment for pain
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optimizing cyanobacteria for biofuel productionCyanobacteria have attracted significant attention as potential biocatalysts for production of clean energy and green chemicals from sunlight and atmospheric CO2. A recent study investigated effects of altering large cellular complexes called phycobilisomes, which cyanobacteria use to efficiently capture light energy for photosynthesis, to guide development of optimal strategies for biofuel produc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery of the missing mercury at the Great Salt LakeAround 2010, the deep waters of Utah's Great Salt Lake contained high levels of toxic methylmercury. Mercury measurements in waterfowl surrounding the lake led to a rare human consumption advisory for ducks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A better way to pasteurize eggsAn Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania and his colleagues have developed a technology that rapidly pasteurizes eggs and could sharply reduce the number of illnesses caused each year by egg-borne Salmonella bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Titan flyby 22 April 2017In the early hours of Saturday morning, the international Cassini–Huygens mission made its final close flyby of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, coming within 1000 km of the atmosphere-clad world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European tornadoes are an unrecognised threat, say U.K. meteorologistsTornadoes are an underestimated threat across Europe with the UK, Germany, and northern Italy at the greatest risk as tornado season fast approaches.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Quantum simulator' facilitates research into theoretical supermaterialsPhysicists at Utrecht University have created a 'quantum simulator,' a model system to study theoretical prognoses for a whole new class of materials. These 'supermaterials' include graphene, which has a two-dimensional structure and unique characteristics. The experiments conducted in Utrecht not only confirm the theoretical physicists' predictions, but also provided new insights. They have disco
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Live Science

Extinct Toothy Carnivore Named After Egyptian God of the UnderworldScientists have identified a new species of small, toothy mammal that once ruled the food chain in Africa almost 40 million years ago.
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Viden

TÆT PÅ Jesper Theilgaard: Hvordan påvirkes vi af klimaforandringer?Her kan du se, hvad DR's klimaekspert Jesper Theilgaard svarede på brugernes spørgsmål.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nano-notch sends self-assembling polymers into a spiralA simple circular or hexagonal pit written into silicon can be used to generate self-assembling polymer spirals thanks to the addition of a tiny notch in the template, report scientists in the launch issue of Nano Futures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New CERN results show novel phenomena in proton collisionsIn a paper published today in Nature Physics , the ALICE collaboration reports that proton collisions sometimes present similar patterns to those observed in the collisions of heavy nuclei. This behaviour was spotted through observation of so-called strange hadrons in certain proton collisions in which a large number of particles are created. Strange hadrons are well-known particles with names suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows global warming making oceans more toxicClimate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences titled "Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans," demonstrates that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers introduce new battery charging technology that uses light to charge batteriesA team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has developed a single-unit, photo-rechargeable portable power source based on high-efficiency silicon solar cells and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Safe, efficient way to produce hydrogen from aluminum particles and water for in-flight aircraft energyAerospace engineers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed and patented a process that can be used onboard aircraft while in flight to produce hydrogen from water and aluminum particles safely and cheaply. The hydrogen can then be converted into electrical energy for inflight use. The breakthrough could pave the way for non-polluting, more-electric aircraft that replace curr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preliminary results of Breakthrough Listen project released(Phys.org)—The team of researchers working on the Breakthrough Listen project (affiliated with SETI) has released preliminary findings after sifting through several petabytes of data obtained from three telescopes involved in the research project. The findings have been made available on the project's website as the team awaits publication of a paper in the Astrophysical Journal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The initial collision between Indian and Asian continentalThe vast Tibetan Plateau, with high altitude and intense uplift, is like a holy land for Earth science researchers. It has earned a reputation as "the third pole of the world," relative to the Arctic Pole and Antarctic Pole. A recent study reveals processes of the India-Eurasia continental collision, which led to the eventual formation of the Tibetan Plateau.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen: Regioner tager ikke ansvar for efteruddannelse Syv ud af ti speciallæger har ikke en plan for efteruddannelse.
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Ars Technica

Cory Doctorow’s Walkaway: Hardware hackers face the climate apocalypse Enlarge / Let it burn: the cover of Cory Doctorow's Walkaway , a novel of building a new world from the ashes of the old post climate-apocylapse. Science fiction has long served as a platform for the hashing out of big social, political, and economic issues, either metaphorically or literally. Cory Doctorow has never been shy of speaking their names directly, whether examining the implications of
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WIRED

Next List 2017: 20 People Who Are Creating the Future You might not recognize their names—they're too busy working to court the spotlight—but you'll soon hear about them a lot. They represent what's next. The post Next List 2017: 20 People Who Are Creating the Future appeared first on WIRED .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toronto's subways expose passengers to more air pollution than Montreal, Vancouver systemsA new study co-authored by U of T Engineering professor Greg Evans shows that subways increase our personal exposure to certain pollutants, even as they decrease overall emissions -- and that Toronto has the highest levels in Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Published data reveals new mechanism to inhibit oligomers, key driver of Alzheimer'sPeer-reviewed results published in the journal CNS Drugs elucidate a new molecular mechanism of action for tramiprosate, the active agent in Alzheon's Phase 3-ready drug candidate, ALZ-801. Scientists discovered that tramiprosate blocks production of neurotoxic beta amyloid oligomers by 'enveloping' the Aß42 amyloid peptide, and prevents its misfolding and aggregation. This enveloping prevents the
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Ingeniøren

Titusindvis af computere inficeret med lækkede hackerværktøjer Selvom Microsoft patchede sine styresystemer inden offentliggørelsen af NSA’s hackerværktøjer er mange tusinde Windows-computere blevet inficeret. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/titusindvis-computere-verden-allerede-inficeret-med-laekkede-hackervaerktoejer-1075876 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Kvinden, it-giganterne slås om: Du kan sagtens klare dig uden kæmpe-koncerner på CV’et Erfaring hos store virksomheder spiller ikke nødvendigvis en afgørende rolle for dine karrieredrømme. Amerikansk karrierekomet giver tips til, hvordan du klarer dig uden imponerende firmanavne dit CV. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/kvinden-it-giganterne-slaas-du-kan-sagtens-klare-dig-uden-kaempe-koncerner-paa-cvet-7465 Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

Læge og forfatter: Sociale medier gør os helt bevidst til digitale junkier Der er brug for viden om, hvad de massive digitale mængder betyder for vores hjerne og krop, mener speciallægen Imran Rashid. Og ikke mindst hvordan vi beskytter vores helbred i en digital brydningstid. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/laege-fortatter-facebook-twitter-snapchat-goer-os-helt-bevist-digitale-junkier-1075880 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Dansk software hjælper komplicerede 3D-print på vejFra et kontor på ydre Nørrebro udvikler tre specialister software, der kan gøre det nemmere at realisere komplicerede 3D-printede metalemner. Indtil videre har bl.a. satellitproducenten Thales og en dansk plastvirksomhed fået hjælp.
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New Scientist - News

Hungry stomach hormone promotes growth of new brain cellsSome people say that fasting makes them feel mentally sharper. The hunger hormone ghrelin may be why – and it may protect against Parkinson’s disease
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Pharmacoscopy' enables immunomodulatory drug discovery by analyzing immune cell interactionsThe immune system consists of a great variety of cell types fulfilling diverse tasks in monitoring tissue homeostasis to protect against pathogens and to remove damaged cells. To ensure the smooth, controlled function of this highly complex system, immune cells use a wide range of biochemical signaling pathways activated by soluble proteins or direct cell-cell contacts. Those pathways are also tar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create new system of concrete building structuresProfessor Andrey Ponomarev of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University and graduate student Alexander Rassokhin have developed several types of building blocks for construction based on nanostructured high-strength lightweight concrete reinforced with skew-angular composite coarse grids. The development has unique characteristics, enabling the increase of load-carrying capability by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interdisciplinary studies reveal relationship between solar activity and climate changeSolar flux is considered to be the fundamental energy source of Earth's climate system on long time scales. In recent decades, some studies have noted that tiny variations in solar activity could be amplified by the nonlinear process in the climate system. Therefore, factors such as solar activity present intriguing and cutting-edge questions to better understand climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First cable-driven robot that prints large-sized components in 3-DTogether with the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC), Tecnalia has developed the first cable-driven robot that allows large parts and even small buildings to be created in situ. The innovative technology includes the latest advances in the field of robotics, digital manufacturing and 3-D printing.
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Viden

København går på gaden for klima-uretfærdighederI anledning af Trumps 100 første dage som præsident vil klimaforkæmpere i hele verden demonstrere på lørdag. Også i København har tusinder meldt sig klar på Facebook.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Planetariums — not just for kids Planetariums are not just for education, or even astronomy: they could display all sorts of data, if only scientists thought to use them, says Tom Kwasnitschka. Nature 544 395 doi: 10.1038/544395a
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The Atlantic

The Visceral, Woman-Centric Horror of The Handmaid's Tale Call it luck, call it fate, call it the world’s most ridiculous viral marketing campaign, but the first television adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale is debuting on Wednesday to audiences who are hyper-ready for it. The 1985 speculative fiction work by Margaret Atwood has featured on library waitlists and Amazon’s top 20 for months now—partly in anticipation of the new Hulu show, and partly in res
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Dagens Medicin

Læge advarer: »Digitalis­eringen har sneget sig ind i lægernes blinde vinkel« Digitaliseringen har forvandlet mennesket til en dopamin-junkie, der konstant jagter hurtige digitale fix, lyder konklusionen i speciallæge Imran Rashids nye bog. Det bør tvinge lægerne til at tænke i nye forebyggelsesstrategier, hvis ikke de vil tabe patienterne på gulvet, advarer forfatteren.
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Ingeniøren

Droner af krydsfiner skal forsyne amerikanske specialtropperBillige svævedroner, der kan efterlades efter brug, skal fremover gøre det muligt for det amerikanske marinekorps at levere forsyninger bag fjendens linjer.
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Ingeniøren

Italiensk domstol anerkender sammenhæng mellem mobiltelefoni og tumorDom fra Italien genopliver striden om, hvorvidt mobiltelefoni kan forårsage kræft eller ej. Domstol har nemlig anerkendt, at omfattende mobiltelefoni var årsagen til en tumor. Afgørelsen kan føre til mange flere sager.
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Viden

København har massiv klimaplan gemt i skuffen – Læsø kommune har ingenBykommuner prioriterer oftest kloakker og boliger mod oversvømmelser, mens landkommuner beskytter naturen, viser en analyse, foretaget af DR Nyheder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smartphone app lets user 'walk a mile in a refugee's shoes'The United Nations helped launch a smartphone app Tuesday that allows users to "walk a mile in a refugee's shoes" by simulating the daily struggles of a fictional Rohingya Muslim who was forced to flee her home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New atlas provides highest-resolution imagery of the Polar Regions seafloorThe most comprehensive and high-resolution atlas of the seafloor of both Polar Regions is presented this week (Tuesday 25 April) at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly (EGU) in Vienna. Over 250 marine geologists and glaciologists from around the world have spent the last four years collating stunning seafloor and glacial landform images to publish the new Atlas of Submarine Glacial Lan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With new method, engineers can control and separate fluids on a surface using only visible lightA new system developed by engineers at MIT could make it possible to control the way water moves over a surface, using only light. This advance may open the door to technologies such as microfluidic diagnostic devices whose channels and valves could be reprogrammed on the fly, or field systems that could separate water from oil at a drilling rig, the researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warm winds: New insight into what weakens Antarctic ice shelvesNew research describes for the first time the role that warm, dry winds play in influencing the behaviour of Antarctic ice shelves. Presenting this week at a European conference scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) explain how spring and summer winds, known as föhn winds, are prevalent on the Larsen C Ice Shelf, West Antarctica and creating melt pools. The Larsen C Ice Shelf is of partic
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Popular Science

These metal-braided toughlink lightning cables will outlast your phone Sponsored Post Crush-proof plugs and unsnappable cords, now at 50 percent off MSRP. Crush-proof plugs and unsnappable cords, now at 50 percent off MSRP. Read on.
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Ingeniøren

Dyster klimarapport: Afsmeltningen af indlandsisen syvdoblet på 22 årDrivhusgasser fra menneskeskabte aktiviteter har de seneste 50 år fået temperaturen til at stige mere end dobbelt så hurtigt i polarområdet som på resten af kloden. Udviklingen vil få alvorlige konskvenser for resten af kloden, konkluderer Arktisk Råd i ny rapport.
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New Scientist - News

We should stand together on science, all over the worldReasoned debate won’t win over Trump’s supporters to the cause of science but mass protest drawing on a broad groundswell of support might get a hearing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIT engineers manipulate water using only lightA new system developed by engineers at MIT could make it possible to control the way water moves over a surface, using only light. This advance may open the door to technologies such as microfluidic diagnostic devices whose channels and valves could be reprogrammed on the fly, or field systems that could separate water from oil at a drilling rig, the researchers say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying a catalyst for blood cancersResearchers at Sylvester today published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, which describes how TET2 loss can open the door for mutations that drive myeloid, lymphoid, and other cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New chlamydia drug targets discovered using CRISPR and stem cellsScientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators at the University of British Columbia have created an innovative technique for studying how chlamydia interacts with the human immune system. The results, reported today (April 25) in Nature Communications, identify novel drug targets for the sexually transmitted disease.
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The Atlantic

When the Courts Take Police Officers at Their Word On a mild Friday evening in late October 2010, Ricardo Salazar-Limon was in his white Toyota pickup truck, driving west along Houston, Texas’s Southwest Freeway. After a long day painting and hanging sheetrock at NASA’s Johnson Space Center he stopped off at the modest gray rancher he shared with his young family and his friend Rogelio. The two men commiserated over a couple beers before setting
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Ars Technica

Man takes drone out for a sunset flight, drone gets shot down Enlarge / Brad Jones' DJI Inspire 2, before its final flight. (credit: Brad Jones) It was around sunset on Easter Sunday, April 16, when Brad Jones took his DJI Inspire 2 out for a flight in front of his home. Jones hoped, as he does on most nights, to capture some of the forested and hilly scenery in the environs of his hometown, Oliver Springs, Tennessee—about 30 miles west of Knoxville. “I fle
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Dagens Medicin

Ny opfølgnings­model skal holde snor i psykiatri­milliarderRegeringen og satspuljekredsen vil holde bedre snor i, hvad regionerne har brugt og vil bruge psykiatriens saltvandindsprøjtning på 2,2 mia. kr. kroner til.
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Science | The Guardian

US should get to Mars during my presidency, Trump tells astronaut – video Astronaut Peggy Whitson, who broke the US record for the most time in space, has received a congratulatory call from Donald Trump. The US president has urged Nasa to ‘speed up’ its Mars mission despite announcing plans to cut the space agency’s spending by about $200m Trump tells Nasa to ‘speed up’ Mars landing in call to congratulate astronaut Continue reading...
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NYT > Science

Op-Ed Contributors: What Trump’s Budget Means for the Filet-O-FishThe president wants to cut funding for N.O.A.A., a linchpin in keeping American fishing afloat.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Machine learningMany people are unsure about what machine learning is, but the chances are they are using it every day.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warm winds: New insight into what weakens Antarctic ice shelvesNew research describes for the first time the role that warm, dry winds play in influencing the behaviour of Antarctic ice shelves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New atlas provides highest-resolution imagery of the Polar Regions seafloorThe most comprehensive and high-resolution atlas of the seafloor of both Polar Regions is presented this week (Tuesday April 25) at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting people's 'brain age' could help to spot who is at risk of early deathA method for predicting someone's 'brain age' based on MRI scans could help to spot who might be at increased risk of poor health and even dying at a younger age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds first molecular genetic evidence of PTSD heritabilityA large new study from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium provides the first molecular genetic evidence that genetic influences play a role in the risk of getting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after trauma.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Can plastic roads help save the planet?A start-up company is persuading local councils in the UK to turn local plastic waste into roads.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Brexit university ‘brain drain’ warningAcademic staff from EU countries should be urgently guaranteed a right to stay, say MPs.
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Live Science

What Your 'Brain Age' Means For Living LongerYour brain may not be the same age as your body, and an "older" brain may be linked to a person's risk of dying at a younger age, a new study from the United Kingdom finds.
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The Atlantic

Does Trump Want a Government Shutdown? If President Trump wants to shut down the federal government over funding for his southern border wall, Democrats seem happy to oblige him. Four days before a deadline for Congress to pass a spending bill, the big question is just how much Trump wants to have the fight his administration has begun to wage over the centerpiece of his presidential campaign. Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: studyHuman activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study on Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource.
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Viden

Kommunernes kamp mod klimaforandringer: Boligejere og biler kommer i første rækkeKommunale klimatilpasningsplaner tilgodeser især boliger, veje og erhverv, viser DR’s kortlægning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetics and environment combine to give everyone a unique sense of smellResearchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that receptors in the noses of mice exposed to certain smells during life are different to genetically similar mice that lived without those smells. Published today in eLife, the study found it is this combination of genetics and experience that gives each individual a unique sense of smell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantleRice University petrologists who recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth's surface have found a new clue about a crucial event in the planet's deep past.
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Dagens Medicin

Høj dødelighed blandt patienter med åndenød Patienter, der ringer 112 på grund af åndenød, har markant højere dødelighed end patienter, der ringer med andre symptomer, viser undersøgelse baseret på data fra 142.000 patienter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice plant to help fight global warming effects on bioenergy cropsThe unassuming ice plant could become an ingenious weapon in the fight against a warming climate that threatens to limit regions suitable for growing biofuel crops. Biochemist and molecular biologist John Cushman at the University of Nevada, Reno will create a gene atlas for the common ice plant that will help find ways to allow bioenergy feedstocks to better tolerate salinity and drought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetics and environment combine to give everyone a unique sense of smellResearchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that receptors in the noses of mice exposed to certain smells during life are different to genetically similar mice that lived without those smells. Published today in eLife, the study found it is this combination of genetics and experience that gives each individual a unique sense of smell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantleRice University petrologists who recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth's surface have found a new clue about a crucial event in the planet's deep past.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel mode of antidepressant action may help patients unresponsive to SSRIsResearch at Osaka University identified a novel mode of action for a potential antidepressant that also leads to nerve cell growth in the mouse hippocampus. The activator of a serotonin receptor uses a different mechanism to the most commonly used antidepressants, SSRIs. This is a promising finding for the millions of patients who do not respond well to current treatments.
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Science-Based Medicine

Gary Taubes and the Case Against SugarGary Taubes writes that sugar is the cause of obesity and most chronic diseases. He makes a good case for the prosecution, but he doesn't convict.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vermont rescues starving bear cubs after wild food shortageVermont biologists say they've rescued several year-old bear cubs found starving this spring after a shortage of wild food in the state last fall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate dealThe UN's environment chief is confident that the United States will not pull out of the Paris climate deal and expects a decision from Washington next month.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Official: 'Silver lining' in hacker, foreign nation allianceForeign governments that rely on the services of private criminal hackers leave their operations vulnerable to being exposed and disrupted, creating something of a "silver lining" for U.S. law enforcement investigations of cyberattacks, a top Justice Department official said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SK Hynix posts record Q1 profit on mobile chip demandSouth Korean chipmaker SK Hynix on Tuesday said profit in the first three months of the year boomed more than 300 percent to a record high as strong demand for memory chips used in mobile phones boosted prices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More Antarctic protections urged on World Penguin DayThe world needs to do more to protect the Antarctic wilderness and its wildlife, scientists warned Tuesday, as they marked World Penguin Day.
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Big Think

One Man’s Quest to Get Elon Musk to Change His Mind A Silicon Valley investor is spending millions on a publicity campaign aimed specifically at Elon Musk. Read More
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Gizmodo

Not Even The Mars Curiosity Rover Can Escape The Back Seat Driver As the Curiosity rover crawls its way across the Martian surface, it has to deal with a team of over 20 people to decide its every move. That makes riding in the car with an annoying navigator seem like a luxury. Advertisement NASA teaches its engineers how to “drive” the Curiosity rover in the “Mars yard” at its Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. It’s the home of a nearly-identic
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Ingeniøren

It-sikkerhedsfolk: Lige lovligt enkelt at få adgang til mails i det danske forsvar Undren over it-sikkerhed hos Forsvaret efter hackerangreb: »Jeg fatter det simpelthen ikke« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hackerangreb-vaekker-undren-sikkerhedniveau-paa-forsvarets-webmail-evt-noget-med-jeg-fatter Version2
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Gizmodo

Infinite Blooms Give Us a Disorienting Glimpse Into Nature GIF GIF source: SciFri John Edmark, a sculptor, inventor, and Stanford professor, loves spirals. When making his mesmerizing “blooms” Edmark wants people to say “wow, how’s that possible?” In this lovely little clip, he explains how it all works. Advertisement Edmark has some big, profound explanations about why he likes spirals so much—that’s just what happens when you spend all your time workin
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Gizmodo

The First Trailer for Kingsman: The Golden Circle Is More Fun Than a Spy Should Have Taron Edgerton is back in Kingsman: The Golden Circle. Image: Fox Director Matthew Vaughn has made some very good movies, but none of them come close to 2014's Kingsman: The Secret Service for pure fun. So it makes perfect sense that the first sequel he’s ever directed is Kingsman: The Golden Circle . The world of impeccably tailored British secret agents is so much fun, who wouldn’t want more? A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printing and Hollywood special FX bring heightened reality to surgical trainingUsing 3-D printing and Hollywood-style special effects, researchers constructed a neurosurgical training simulation model whose physical and functional qualities closely mimic those of the head and brain structures of an adolescent human patient.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents' use of emotional feeding increases emotional eating in school-age childrenEmotional eating is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear. Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on. The reverse was also found to be the case, with parents of children who were more easily soothed by food b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of transgender preschoolers assesses preferences and identityGender may be the earliest identity and social category to emerge in development, research suggests, and acquiring knowledge about one's gender is considered a critical part of early childhood development. In one of the first examinations of early gender development among transgender preschoolers, a new study has found that these children were just as likely as nontransgender children to have pref
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areasResearchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study.
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Viden

Ny rapport: Arktis smelter langt hurtigere end ventetKlimaet i Arktis forandrer sig drastisk, og afsmeltningen af indlandsisen i Grønland er fordoblet siden 2008.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Rules for Geoengineering the PlanetWe have to at least consider geoengineering. And that’s where the problems start.
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI’s PR ProblemThe spooky-sounding name was probably never a good idea.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Will We Ever Get a Better Male Contraceptive?Many forces have slowed the development of better contraceptives for men.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Big Bet on Small SatellitesInvestors and entrepreneurs are betting that tiny satellites called CubeSats can fuel the growth of new markets for imaging and telecommunications.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Make America Great AgainThe president’s proposed cuts to research funding would cripple American innovation. We should be spending more on R&D, not less.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Taming the WeatherNearly five decades ago it seemed as if we might gain mastery over the weather—but what of the risks?
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New on MIT Technology Review

The 3-D Printer That Could Finally Change ManufacturingDesktop Metal thinks its machines will give designers and manufacturers a practical and affordable way to print metal parts.
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Gizmodo

NFL Players Strike a Deal to Sell Their Biometric Data Image sources: Getty, Whoop Quietly flying under the radar in the fitness wearables market is Whoop , a manufacturer of high-end wrist-worn straps that measure data 100 times per second. In what could turn out to be one of the more bizarre licensing agreements ever, the startup struck a deal with the NFL Players Association today that will make it possible for players to sell their health data. A
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Ingeniøren

Energikommission vil fordoble midler til energiforskningDanmarks energiteknologiske førerposition skal styrkes gennem flere penge og en ny strategi for teknologiudvikling. IDAs formand kalde udspillet uambitiøst.
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Live Science

Photoelectric Effect: Explanation & ApplicationsThe photoelectric effect refers to what happens when electrons are emitted from a material that has absorbed electromagnetic radiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Caudate stimulation enhances human associative learningAssociative learning allows an individual to acquire an association between a sensory cue and an outcome resulting from a specific response. Associative learning plays a vital role in the ability to learn new associations that allow human beings to optimally respond to the world around them. Research in humans and primates supports an important role for the caudate in associative learning. Our obj
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lyme disease researchers seek consensus as number of cases growsScientists have built a large body of knowledge about Lyme disease over the past 40 years, yet controversies remain and the number of cases continues to rise. In the United States, reported cases of Lyme disease, which is transmitted from wild animals to humans by tick bites, have tripled in the past 20 years. A multitude of interacting factors are driving the increase in Lyme disease cases, but t
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Gizmodo

Family Is the Focus of the Latest Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Featurette Drax has lots of issues in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Image: Disney Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 doesn’t open for a few more weeks, but today was the opening of the floodgates. Reviews, news, quotes, you name it, and today you probably read about for the upcoming Marvel movie. Advertisement In all that coverage, I’d imagine one theme sort of rose to the top. The fact that Guardians of the
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Viden

Mand bygger iPhone af reservedeleEn amerikansk mand har samlet en smartphone ud af genbrugsmaterialer købt på kinesiske markeder.
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Live Science

Sexual Orientation: Patients More Open Than Docs ExpectOnly about 10 percent of patients reported they would be offended by or refuse to answer a question from a doctor about their sexual orientation, a new study showed.
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Gizmodo

Alibaba's Jack Ma Issues Dire Warning That AI Could Steal CEOs' Jobs Photo: Getty While Elon Musk is running around cautioning the world about the real danger of Skynet-style warrior robots , Jack Ma would like you to consider another possible problem: CEOs might lose their overpaid gigs and there will be no golden parachute. Well, let’s be honest, there probably will be a golden parachute... somehow. Ma, the chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, spoke at
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Ars Technica

Silicon Valley season 4 starts by teetering on the edge of repetition Enlarge / A white board for a potential blank-slate restart. (credit: HBO ) Stop me if you've heard this one before: on Silicon Valley , the show's main character, Richard Hendriks (Thomas Middleditch), is actually facing some small degree of success. But he panics in the face of it, then runs headlong into an awkward confrontation with his peers at tech start-up Pied Piper, before drastically ch
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Ingeniøren

Koden er knækket: Disse kompetencer gør dig til en inspirerende leder Ledelse handler om at kunne inspirere sit team og sine medarbejdere. Et ledelsesrådgivningsfirma mener at have knækket koden for den inspirerende leder, og særligt én bestemt kompetence er vigtig https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/koden-knaekket-disse-kompetencer-goer-dig-inspirerende-leder-7659 Jobfinder
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New Scientist - News

UK does more to protect marine areas overseas than at homeThe government is failing to designate marine protected areas off its coast as promised, says a parliamentary report
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Ars Technica

Square hires Yik Yak’s engineers, leaving fewer than 10 employees behind Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News ) According to a Monday report in Bloomberg Businessweek , Square has acquired the "five- to ten-person" engineering team of Yik Yak for $3 million. That leaves just a handful of employees at the Atlanta-based social networking startup. In December 2016 , the company already fired 30 of its 50 employees. Since late last year, Yik Yak has largely gone
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Ars Technica

AV provider Webroot melts down as update nukes hundreds of legit files Enlarge (credit: Enesse Bhé ) Update 4/25/2017 7:07 AM California time: Webroot officials issued the following statement: " On April 24, Webroot experienced a technical issue affecting some business and consumer customers. We are in the process of creating a fix, but in the meantime, small business customers can follow instructions posted in the Webroot Community to address the issue." Antivirus
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Gizmodo

What's the Best Cooler? Beach season is here, and we want to know how our readers keep their favorite drinks cold while the sun is hot. Just be sure to check out the rules below, then kick off your sandals and head down to the comments to nominate your pick. Cheers! Advertisement 1) Your nomination should contain the specific name of the product, why you think this item is the best, a link where the item can be purchase
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Live Science

Zapping the Brain at Certain Times Improves MemoryNew findings may one day help researchers develop technologies that could aid people with memory loss.
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WIRED

Uber Didn’t Track Users Who Deleted the App, But It Still Broke the Rules Uber took a known industry practice and managed to turn it into something deeply suspicious. The post Uber Didn't Track Users Who Deleted the App, But It Still Broke the Rules appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

Artificial intelligence survey finds UK public broadly optimistic Support for ‘machine learning’ depended on what it would be used for, with mass unemployment among main fears Apart from fears of mass unemployment, accidents with machinery, restrictions on freedom, increased economic inequality and a devalued human experience, the public are broadly optimistic about the arrival of artificial intelligence, according to one of the first surveys of British opinion
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Presidential Progress What We’re Following The French Election: Far-right candidate Marine Le Pen and her independent centrist counterpart Emmanuel Macron advanced to the second round of the French presidential election yesterday. As neither Macron nor Le Pen is from a major party, the vote looks like a clear rejection of the political establishment ; it also marks the decline of the French Socialist Party , whose can
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding malaria with mathematicsMathematical formulas that model how deadly mosquito-borne diseases spread can help medical researchers accurately predict how real-life outbreaks develop and find countermeasures, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solving a cell membrane mysteryScientists have developed new fluorescent probes that prove the existence of cell membrane structures called ‘lipid rafts’, allowing researchers to study how toxins and viruses invade cells.
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Gizmodo

Tesla Model X Owner Pulled From Car After Falcon Doors Don’t Open In Fire Photo of the wreck posted by Lee Tada on CarTeks’ WeChat Tesla’s commitment to new technology is what put it on the map, but the way this tech rolls out is always contentious. Lithium-ion batteries, Autopilot and now the Model X’s Falcon doors , which are blamed for a harrowing incident in China. In February, Lee Tada and her boyfriend were being driven by her chauffeur in the back of her Model X
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

HEART score to risk stratify patients with chest pain is safe but underutilized in the EDIt is safe for physicians to use the HEART (History, ECG, Age, Risk factors, and initial Troponin) score to make decisions about admission, observation, or discharge in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain. However, hesitance to refrain from admitting and testing patients with low scores could explain its small effect on health care costs seen in this analysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Alarmingly high' risk of death for people with opioid use disorder in general medical careAlmost one-fifth of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) in a large healthcare system died during a four-year follow-up period, reports a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming making oceans more toxicClimate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.
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Big Think

What Obama Said on His First Day Back in Public Life Former President Obama returned to public life today , indicating some topics he'll focus on during his post-presidency. Read More
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Gizmodo

If Zoe Saldana Accidentally Revealed the Title of Avengers 4, It's Absolutely Not a Spoiler Image: Disney/Marvel Kevin Feige just said that the title for the fourth Avengers movie is a spoiler, which is why it hasn’t been announced yet. He also said that Infinity War and the mystery movie are very different films. So why does it seem like Zoe Saldana has revealed the title? Logically, she can’t have. Advertisement BBC News’ Lizo Mizimba has an interview up with Saldana where she says th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measuring immune response could be key to differentiating malaria from other infectionsAnalyzing a patient's immune response could be key to quickly and accurately diagnosing malaria, according to research presented on World Malaria Day at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solving the hepatitis C epidemic among people with substance abuse disordersOne of the most dramatic medical success stories in recent years has been the introduction of new drugs that eradicate hepatitis C virus (HCV). But it's a different story among HCV patients with substance use disorders. This population typically does not have easy access to conventional health care so it is difficult to screen, diagnose and treat these individuals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heavy precipitation speeds carbon exchange in tropicsNew insight into how forests globally will respond to long-term climate change has been gained by recent research. The new work suggests that climate-change driven increases in rainfall in warm, wet forests are likely to cause increased plant growth. Plant-growth declines are still expected in cooler forests with increased precipitation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How fear of death affects human attitudes toward animal lifeWhen reminded of death, humans become more likely to support the killing of animals, no matter how they feel about animal rights, researchers have found. Psychology's terror management theory may explain why. The researchers' findings could also help scientists better understand the psychological motivations behind the murder and genocide of humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Process invented to make sustainable rubber, plasticsSynthetic rubber and plastics -- used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products -- are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those humanmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to a team of scientists that has invented a process to make butadiene from renewable sources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery offers new hope to repair spinal cord injuriesScientists have created a special type of neuron from human stem cells that could potentially repair spinal cord injuries. These cells, called V2a interneurons, transmit signals in the spinal cord to help control movement. When the researchers transplanted the cells into mouse spinal cords, the interneurons sprouted and integrated with existing cells.
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New Scientist - News

NASA and ESA join forces to build life-seeking Europa landerThe space agencies just announced a bold plan to search for aliens on Jupiter’s icy moon through a joint American-European mission
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Live Science

Waddle for Science! Penguins Join Protest MarchThe March for Science was not only for people; penguins marched, too.
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Gizmodo

Deadspin I’m Sick Of This Shit | Jezebel Serena Williams Claps Back At Racist Remark About Her Unbor Deadspin I’m Sick Of This Shit | Jezebel Serena Williams Claps Back At Racist Remark About Her Unborn Child | The Grapevine Black Women Are Upset Over SheaMoisture’s New Whitewashing Marketing Ploy | Fusion Trump’s New State Department Spokesperson Is a Fox News Vet and a Virulent Islamophobe |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-flight, on-demand hydrogen production could mean 'greener' aircraftTechnion researchers have a developed safe and efficient way to produce hydrogen on board a plane in flight. Using aluminum particles and (fresh or waste), the technology could one day help meet in-flight energy needs on commercial aircraft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Implanted scaffold with T cells rapidly shrinks tumorsA biopolymer structure enriched with nutrients shows how immunotherapy could be adapted for solid tumors, according to study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young adults with uncomplicated epilepsy fare as well as their siblingsA 15-year follow-up study of young adults with epilepsy found that those with uncomplicated epilepsy who were seizure-free for five years or more did as well as their siblings without epilepsy in measures of education, employment, family arrangements and driving status. Youth with complicated epilepsy had worse social outcomes and were less likely to drive, even if living without seizures.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Guess Who’s Barack In Town Today in 5 Lines During his first public remarks since leaving the White House, former President Barack Obama avoided weighing in on the new administration and encouraged students to become politically involved. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn are expected to meet with congressional leaders to discuss tax reform on Tuesday. Senate Minority Leader
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Live Science

Watch Amazing Caterpillars Degrade a Plastic Bag | VideoThe wax worm caterpillar (Galleria mellonella) can degrade plastic polyethylene bags.
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WIRED

In Option B, Sheryl Sandberg Takes the Hacker Way Through Grief After her husband died suddenly, Sheryl Sandberg grieved. Then she looked for solutions. The post In Option B , Sheryl Sandberg Takes the Hacker Way Through Grief appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

How to Stop Services Like Unroll.me From Snooping on Your Gmail By now you've probably let lots of services and apps into your Gmail and more. Time for some spring cleaning. The post How to Stop Services Like Unroll.me From Snooping on Your Gmail appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facing nightmare scenarios before discharge lifts confidence of parents of babies in NICUThe key to improving confidence among parents of ill or premature infants may lie in simulated care, found new research. A new study found simulations of daily care and worst-case scenarios helped parents of newborns in NICU build confidence, reduce anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How dogs interact with others plays a role in decision-makingDynamics between familiar dogs may influence their likelihood of learning from each other, new research shows. How dogs interact with others plays a big role in how they respond under conditions that require quick thinking.
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Gizmodo

Trump's About-Face on WikiLeaks Sums Up Why He's So Untrustworthy Image: Getty Donald Trump no longer loves WikiLeaks. In fact, the president so expressively does not love the organization that he endorsed the idea of arresting founder Julian Assange on Friday. Which is weird because Trump literally announced, “ I love WikiLeaks ” at a rally in October. Trump now swears the world misunderstood him. Advertisement The Associated Press published a transcript today
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Ars Technica

Ars is hiring an experienced Web developer Enlarge / Be a Tachikoma like us, it's bliss! Ars Technica is hiring! We are looking for an exceptional Web developer to join our small but fast-paced tech team. The ideal candidate will be a technology generalist and have experience in a number of areas, from dev-ops to front-end. You should be very comfortable self-directing and prioritizing your daily workload. You can work remotely from anywh
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Gizmodo

This Caterpillar Can Eat Plastic Shopping Bags A wax worm chewing a hole through plastic. Plastic debris can be seen attached to the caterpillar. (Image: Federica Bertocchini, Paolo Bombelli, and Chris Howe) In a chance discovery, a research team from Europe has learned that a common insect larva is capable of breaking down the plastic found in shopping bags and other polyethylene-based products. This trash-munching caterpillar could inspire
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Gizmodo

Swapping Keycaps Is The Key To Having A Pretty Keyboard A kit-built sandwich keyboard with purple aluminum top plays the perfect host to GMK’s Skeletor set. Between my keyboard-centric posts here on Kotaku and my Twitter feed , I’ve been posting a lot of pictures of very pretty keyboards lately, which leads to people asking me where they can buy those keyboards. For the most part, you can’t. You have to build them. Advertisement I’m not saying you nee
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut bacteria may turn common nutrient into clot-enhancing compoundGut bacteria can produce a clot-enhancing compound when people eat a nutrient found in a variety of foods including meat, eggs and milk, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic target for growing hardier plants under stressIn a new investigation, researchers have identified two proteins that regulate whether a cell in plant roots forms a hair cell, which increases surface area for absorption, or a non-hair cell. Plants that overexpressed one of these regulators thrived despite being deprived of a key nutrient, phosphorus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research from Sandia shows brain stimulation during training boosts performanceNew research from Sandia published in Neuropsychologia shows that working memory training combined with a kind of noninvasive brain stimulation can lead to cognitive improvement under certain conditions. Improving working memory or cognitive strategies could be very valuable for training people faster and more efficiently.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solving the hepatitis C epidemic among people with substance abuse disordersOne of the most dramatic medical success stories in recent years has been the introduction of new drugs that eradicate hepatitis C virus (HCV). But it's a different story among HCV patients with substance use disorders.As an editorial published online on April 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine notes, this population typically does not have easy access to conventional health care so it is diffi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stimulation during training boosts performanceNew research shows that working memory training combined with a kind of noninvasive brain stimulation can lead to cognitive improvement under certain conditions. Improving working memory or cognitive strategies could be very valuable for training people faster and more efficiently.
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Ars Technica

Fan project makes 2D Breath of the Wild prototype a reality At last month's Game Developer's conference, Nintendo set Zelda fans' imaginations running wild with screenshots from a 2D version of Breath of the Wild that was used to prototype the sprawling open-world game. Now, one fan is working to give you a taste of what it would probably be like to play that prototype. Breath of the NES is still very much a work in progress, but the Game Maker Studio pro
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists and Science Supporters Marched--Now What?Thousands congregated in the nation's capital and other cities in the U.S. and around the world to support scientific research and protest Trump administration–proposed budget cuts. Scientific... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Guardians of the Galaxy's Chris Pratt Has One Wish About DC's Superhero Movies Chris Pratt as Star Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Image: Disney As the star of one of Marvel’s biggest franchises, no one would fault Chris Pratt for crapping all over DC. In fact, from the famously brazen and charismatic star, you might expect it. But when asked about the rival franchise, Pratt was objective but honest. Advertisement “I really like all the Warner Bros. movies,” Pratt s
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Big Think

New Research Suggests Working Out With a Friend, Even Online, Makes You Healthier Research on five million runners shows that working out with a friend pushes you harder and longer. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Killer Cats Bash BiodiversityPeter Marra, director of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, talks with journalist Rene Ebersole about the threat of outdoor cats to wild animals and to human health. Marra is the co-author, with... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

This Very Hungry Caterpillar Eats Plastic BagsA wiggly, ravenous caterpillar — one that doesn't limit its diet to naturally grown objects — can biodegrade plastic bags, a material infamous for the amount of time it takes to decompose, a new study finds.
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Live Science

An Aurora Called 'Steve'? Strange Sky Phenomenon InvestigatedMeet "Steve," a strange, new aurora feature discovered by citizen scientists and verified by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm satellites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The placebo effect can mend a broken heart too, study showsFeeling heartbroken from a recent breakup? Just believing you're doing something to help yourself get over your ex can influence brain regions associated with emotional regulation and lessen the perception of pain. That's the takeaway from a new study that measured the neurological and behavioral impacts the placebo effect had on a group of recently broken-hearted volunteers.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Humans Need Time to Realize They Can Do Bad Things BRIEF: Humans Need Time to Realize They Can Do Bad Things Our first impulse is to reject immoral actions as impossible. SneakyWoman_topNteaser.jpg Pathdoc via Shutterstock Human Monday, April 24, 2017 - 15:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Are humans fundamentally wicked, prone to choose immoral acts by default? Philosophers and theologians have debated this question for centuries.
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Science : NPR

What Fish Is Good For Me And The Planet? New Documentary Explores In order to investigate how eating fish affects our health as well as the oceans, author and fisherman Paul Greenberg spent a year eating fish every day. (Image credit: Courtesy of FRONTLINE)
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The Scientist RSS

Cell Signaling in Cancer: New Targets, New HopeThe Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research and share insights into targeting these pathways with anti-cancer therapeutics.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Massive New Library of 3-D Images Could Help Your Robot Butler Get Around Your HouseUsing three-dimensional images is a better way of mimicking the way animals perceive things.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain's power to adapt offers short-term gains, long-term strainsLike air-traffic controllers scrambling to reconnect flights when a major hub goes down, the brain has a remarkable ability to rewire itself after suffering an injury. However, maintaining these new connections between brain regions can strain the brain's resources, which can lead to serious problems later, including Alzheimer's Disease, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hormone-influenced social strategies shape human social hierarchy, study showsIn a game of chicken, the most aggressive players are fueled by testosterone and are more willing to harm others; and while it may be easy to demonize such hawkish behaviors, psychology researchers say there is sound evolutionary reason for their existence.
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Ars Technica

BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance Enlarge (credit: BoatingWithTR.com ) BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons. Pascal Geenens, the researcher who first documented what he calls the permanent denial-of-service bo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Alarmingly high' risk of death for people with opioid use disorder in general medical careAlmost one-fifth of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) in a large healthcare system died during a four-year follow-up period, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Limiting patient mobility in hospitals may do more harm than goodDespite hospitals' best efforts, there is little proof that policies to inhibit patient mobility actually prevent falls and may actually increase the risk of serious side effects, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physical activity may ward off heart damagePhysical activity can lower the risk of heart damage in middle-aged and older adults and reduce the levels of heart damage in people who are obese, according to research.

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