NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Controversial study claims humans reached Americas 100,000 years earlier than thought Broken mastodon bones hint that Homo sapiens wasn’t the first hominin to get to the New World. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21886
1min
Ars Technica

First pictures give a taste of Scorpio’s better graphics at 4K, 1080p Enlarge / This scientist in her steampunk laboratory and time machine in the background brings to mind BioShock Infinite 's Elizabeth. It's a shame this is just a tech demo and not a real game. (credit: Windows Central ) While Microsoft's initial reveal of Project Scorpio placed heavy emphasis on 4K gaming, the huge GPU upgrade relative to the Xbox One is going to bring a big visual upgrade for t
0min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can aromatherapy calm competition horses?Although studies suggest that inhaling certain scents may reduce stress in humans, aromatherapy is relatively unexplored in veterinary medicine. But new research presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago raises the question of whether aromatherapy may be beneficial to horses as well.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Possible new tool for first responders: An ice bag to the faceCardiovascular decompensation is a significant risk after blood loss, even once the person is no longer actively bleeding. Applying a bag of ice to a person's forehead could help prevent this life-threatening complication while patients are being transported to the hospital.
0min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA satellites see Tropical Storm Muifa in Northwestern Pacific OceanTropical Storm Muifa continued to move through the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm.
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans in America '115,000 years earlier than thought'High-tech dating of mastodon remains found in southern California has shattered the timeline of human migration to America, pushing the presence of hominins back to 130,000 years ago rather than just 15,000 years, researchers said Wednesday.
1min
The Atlantic

The Language of Apology in Layli Long Soldier’s Whereas Whereas I went one day to the pharmacy to pick up a prescription, and the pharmacy was closed, and I decided a book of poetry was the next best thing to medicine; Whereas the book I selected was Layli Long Soldier ’s collection titled Whereas ; Whereas in January of this year, President Trump signed an order to expedite the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline , and, as The Atlantic’s Robin
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincersPaleontologists have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. Named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, the creature documents for the first time the anatomy of early mandibulates, a sub-group of arthropods with speciali
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes need to be screened for stem cell transplantsAs stem cell lines grow in a lab dish, they often acquire mutations in the TP53 (p53) gene, an important tumor suppressor responsible for controlling cell growth. New research findings suggest that genetic sequencing technologies should be used to screen for mutated cells in stem cell cultures, so that cultures with mutated cells can be excluded from experiments and therapies.
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

13 big businesses urge Trump to stay in Paris dealThirteen big businesses, including oil giant Shell and retailer Walmart, on Wednesday urged US President Donald Trump to keep the United States in the Paris Agreement on climate change.
7min
Gizmodo

Glass, the Sequel Both to Split and Unbreakable, Will Be Out January 2019 Finally, fans are getting their Unbreakable sequel. Image: Touchstone Well, spoilers be damned, now it’s out there. M. Night Shyamalan just announced via Twitter that his next movie is called Glass . It’s a sequel to Split and Unbreakable simultaneously and it’ll be in theaters January 18, 2019. Advertisement Bruce Willis will return as David Dunn. Samuel L. Jackson will return as Mr. Glass. Jame
10min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Working human forebrain circuits assembled in a lab dishPeering into laboratory glassware, researchers have watched stem-cell-derived nerve cells arising in a specific region of the human brain migrate into another brain region. This process recapitulates what's been believed to occur in a developing fetus, but has never previously been viewed in real time.
13min
New on MIT Technology Review

Can DJI’s No-Fly Zone Software Stop ISIS from Weaponizing Drones?Virtual fences could help drone manufacturers stop aircraft being used as home-brew killing machines—but terrorists may have other ideas.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JNeurosci: Highlights from the April 26 issueCheck out these newsworthy studies from the April 26, 2017, issue of JNeurosci. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the studies should contact media@sfn.org.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists propose mechanism to describe solar eruptions of all sizesFrom long jets to massive explosions of solar material and energy, eruptions on the sun come in many shapes and sizes. Scientists now propose that a universal mechanism can explain the whole spectrum of solar eruptions.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millionsScientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth's most densely populated areas.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global warming accounts for tripling of extreme West African Sahel storms, study showsUK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) has led an international team of scientists who reveal global warming is responsible for a tripling in the frequency of extreme West African Sahel storms observed in just the last 35 years.Professor Christopher Taylor, a Meteorologist at CEH, and researchers from partner institutions including Universite? Grenoble Alpes in France, also suggest that cli
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study signals need to screen genes for stem cell transplantsNew research shows that as stem cell lines grow in a lab dish, they often acquire mutations in the TP53 (p53) gene, an important tumor suppressor responsible for controlling cell growth. Findings suggest that genetic sequencing technologies should be used to screen for mutated cells in stem cell cultures, so that cultures with mutated cells can be excluded from experiments and therapies.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Temple researchers uncover vital role for mitochondrial calcium exchange in heart functionScientists have long thought that calcium transport into mitochondria is a key signal linking cardiac workload, or how hard the heart pumps, with energy production. Now, in a major breakthrough, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University show that the exit of calcium from mitochondria serves a critical role in heart function and may represent a powerful therapeutic appro
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCI physicists design 2-D materials that conduct electricity at almost the speed of lightPhysicists at the University of California, Irvine and elsewhere have fabricated new two-dimensional quantum materials with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics. In three separate studies appearing this month in Nature, Science Advances and Nature Materials, researchers explored the physics b
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human forebrain circuits under construction -- in a dishNeuroscientists have created a 3-D window into the human brain's budding executive hub assembling itself during a critical period in prenatal development. What's more, they used it to discover and experimentally correct -- in cultured human forebrain 'spheroids' -- defective cell migration caused by an autism-related disorder. The 'disease-in-a-dish' model replicates rudimentary circuitry that can
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vesselsImmunotherapy with T-cells offers great hope to people suffering from cancer. Some initial successes have already been made in treating blood cancer, but treating solid tumors remains a major challenge. The signaling molecule interferon gamma, which is produced by T-cells, plays a key role in the therapy. It cuts off the blood supply to tumors, as a new study in the journal Nature reveals.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sun's eruptions might all have same triggerLarge and small scale solar eruptions might all be triggered by a single process, according to new research that leads to better understanding of the sun's activity.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paleontologists identify new 508-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincersPaleontologists have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. Named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, the creature documents for the first time the anatomy of early mandibulates, a sub-group of arthropods with speciali
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Berkeley Lab scientists discover new atomically layered, thin magnetBerkeley Lab scientists have found an unexpected magnetic property in a 2-D material. The new atomically thin, flat magnet could have major implications for a wide range of applications, such as nanoscale memory, spintronic devices, and magnetic sensors.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Light can improve perovskite solar cell performancePublishing in Nature, EPFL scientists show how light affects perovskite film formation in solar cells, which is a critical factor in using them for cost-effective and energy-efficient photovoltaics.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking unstable chromosomes helps predict lung cancer's returnScientists have found that unstable chromosomes within lung tumours increases the risk of cancer returning after surgery, and have used this new knowledge to detect relapse long before standard testing. These are the first findings from the Cancer Research UK-funded TRACERx lung cancer study, published today (Wednesday) in the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford scientists assemble working human forebrain circuits in a lab dishPeering into laboratory glassware, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have watched stem-cell-derived nerve cells arising in a specific region of the human brain migrate into another brain region. This process recapitulates what's been believed to occur in a developing fetus, but has never previously been viewed in real time.
22min
WIRED

Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet Stem cell scientists are modern day witches. The post Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet appeared first on WIRED .
25min
WIRED

A 130,000-Year-Old Mastodon Threatens to Upend Human History Ancient tools scattered around a mastodon suggest that the earliest humans showed up in North American more than 100,000 years earlier than we thought. The post A 130,000-Year-Old Mastodon Threatens to Upend Human History appeared first on WIRED .
25min
WIRED

You Want Better Beer? Good. Here’s a Better Barley Genome A new high-resolution sequence of the barley genome could pave the way for better malt. The post You Want Better Beer? Good. Here's a Better Barley Genome appeared first on WIRED .
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Iceball' planet discovered through microlensingScientists have discovered a new planet with the mass of Earth, orbiting its star at the same distance that we orbit our sun. The planet is likely far too cold to be habitable for life as we know it, however, because its star is so faint. But the discovery adds to scientists' understanding of the types of planetary systems that exist beyond our own.
25min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food photos help Instagram users with healthy eatingPeople are turning to Instagram as a place where they can log food intake and track healthy eating behaviors by posting photos of everything they eat -- and being held accountable by followers for sticking to their goals, a new study finds.
27min
Gizmodo

Chris Sacca, Shark Tank's Singing Cowboy, Retires From Tech Investing Photo: Getty Chris Sacca, the amateur Hank Williams Jr. impersonator best known for his early investments in Twitter and Uber, published 1,700 words on Wednesday to say what he could have said in just one tweet: he’s retiring. Advertisement “It’s hard to leave all this behind right when things are going so well. I’m good at what I do,” Sacca assured his loyal fans, “But, as I have increasingly re
28min
Ars Technica

Big Content cheers, as Congress votes on changes to US Copyright Office Enlarge / House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) (L) and ranking member Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) at a hearing in September. Both supported H.R. 1695, a bill which will come up for a vote today. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) The US House of Representatives will vote today on a bill that will make the US Register of Copyrights a presidential appointment, confirmed by
30min
Popular Science

A mastodon carcass could totally rewrite American history—but there's reason to be skeptical Science CSI: Mastodon New research makes a startling claim that, if correct, will rewrite everything we know about how North America was populated. Read on.
32min
NYT > Science

Matter: Humans Lived in North America 130,000 Years Ago, Study ClaimsIf early humans smashed mastodon bones found in California in 1992, scientists will have to rethink how humans came to the Americas.
34min
WIRED

Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet Stem cell scientists are modern day witches. The post Scientists Brew Up the Creepiest Batches of Brain Balls Yet appeared first on WIRED .
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with a normal BMI who carry weight around the middle at greatest risk of deathPeople with a normal BMI who carry their weight around the middle are at the highest risk of death from any cause compared to those who are overweight or obese but carry their weight elsewhere, new research has found.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wind, rain play key role in breeding patterns of migratory tree swallowsWind and precipitation play a crucial role in advancing or delaying the breeding cycles of North American tree swallows, according to the results of a new study.
35min
Science | The Guardian

Could history of humans in North America be rewritten by broken bones? Smashed mastodon bones show humans arrived over 100,000 years earlier than previously thought say researchers, although other experts are sceptical The history of the people of America, a story that dates back to the last ice age, has been upended by the battered bones of a mastodon found under a freeway construction site in California. Archaeological sites in North America have led most research
40min
Science | The Guardian

Pincer-wielding 507m-year-old fossil sheds light on evolution of crabs Mandibulates, a group that includes crustaceans and insects, show huge diversity – Tokummia katalepsis could be the missing link that explains why A fossilised ancient creature boasting huge pincers resembling can-openers, a hinged two-piece shell and more than 50 pairs of legs has been discovered, shedding light on the evolutionary past of a huge and diverse group of animals. Researchers say the
40min
Science | The Guardian

DNA-based test can spot cancer recurrence a year before conventional scans ‘Liquid biopsy’ diagnosed cancer recurrence up to a year before CT scans are able to in major lung cancer trial, and could buy crucial time for doctors A revolutionary blood test has been shown to diagnose the recurrence of cancer up to a year in advance of conventional scans in a major lung cancer trial. The test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy crucial time for doctors by indicating that ca
40min
Ars Technica

Amazon’s Echo Look takes outfit photos and suggests the best styles for you YouTube, Amazon Fashion It was a simpler time, back in early 2015, when Amazon's Echo first came out as a speaker with a voice assistant inside. Now, the evolution of the Echo family and Alexa have brings us a device designed specifically to make you look good. The new $199 Echo Look is the first iteration of Echo that has a camera, and the device uses it to evaluate your outfits, take outfit-of-
40min
Science : NPR

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought Until now, the earliest signs of humans in the Americas dated back about 15,000 years. But new research puts people in California 130,000 years ago. Experts are wondering whether to believe it. (Image credit: Tom Demere/San Diego Natural History Museum)
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists design 2-D materials that conduct electricity at almost the speed of lightPhysicists at the University of California, Irvine and elsewhere have fabricated new two-dimensional quantum materials with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millionsScientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth's most densely populated areas.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincersPaleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. The finding was announced in a study published today in Nature.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sun's eruptions might all have same triggerLarge and small scale solar eruptions might all be triggered by a single process, according to new research that leads to better understanding of the Sun's activity.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover new atomically layered, thin magnetIt may not seem like a material as thin as an atom could hide any surprises, but a research team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) discovered an unexpected magnetic property in a two-dimensional material.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming accounts for tripling of extreme West African Sahel storms, study showsThe UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) has led an international team of scientists who reveal global warming is responsible for a tripling in the frequency of extreme West African Sahel storms observed in just the last 35 years.
43min
Latest Headlines | Science News

First settlers reached Americas 130,000 years ago, study claimsMastodon site suggests first Americans arrived unexpectedly early.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA satellites see Tropical Storm Muifa in Northwestern Pacific OceanTropical Storm Muifa continued to move through the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ingesting soy protein may ease severity of inflammatory bowel diseaseA diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells.
43min
The Atlantic

Steven Mnuchin Thinks Trump Can Fix Taxes Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he wants comprehensive tax reform, and he thinks the Trump administration can get it done. On Wednesday, ahead of the release of the White House’s new tax plan , Mnuchin joined The Hill ’s editor in chief, Bob Cusack, to discuss the soon-to-be-unveiled proposal and his economic priorities for the next four years. At the event held at the Newseum in Washingto
43min
The Atlantic

Feist's Pleasure Reworks the Passage of Time Feist’s stormy and great new single “Century” is the kind of song that doesn’t let you tune out while you listen. The drums wallop in a sharp, jerky pattern that’s like a cop banging on a door. Leslie Feist’s trademark style—melting her words into high, fleeting tones—appears here with unusual urgency. Midway through, the arrangement disappears and builds back up as Pulp’s Jarvis Cocker whispers
43min
The Atlantic

A New Study Says Humans Were in America 130,000 Years Ago In the winter of 1992, a construction crew in San Diego, California started cutting into the rocks that flanked the State 54 Highway, in a bid to widen the road. Those rocks hailed from the Pleistocene period and were rich in Ice Age fossils, so scientists from the San Diego Museum of Natural History accompanied the crew to recover whatever they unearthed . Among bits of horse, camel, dire wolf,
43min
The Atlantic

How to Fight Cancer (When Cancer Fights Back) I n early 2014 , Laura Brealey was visiting her daughters in Singapore when she slipped on a marble floor and cracked her hip. She had it replaced, but in the process, the surgeons noticed that her breathing sounded odd, and told her to speak to a respiratory specialist. At her daughter’s urging, she did so when she returned home to London, England—and was told that she had lung cancer. The docto
43min
The Atlantic

Remembering Jonathan Demme The director Jonathan Demme’s career in film was defined by its versatility. He could be making a weighty drama on social issues, a madcap action comedy, a pulpy crime thriller, or just be filming a rock-and-roll concert or a one-man show. All of his movies crackled with life, pulsed with empathy for their characters, and found new ways to tell familiar stories. Demme died at the age of 73 on Wed
43min
The Atlantic

Watch the British Labour Party Veer Into Disaster in Real Time If you want to understand why the British Labour party under Jeremy Corbyn is careening to disaster, take a look at the clip below. The day before it was filmed, Corbyn had unveiled a proposal to add four new bank holidays to the year, one each for the patron saints of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. Britain, as you may have heard, has recently voted to leave the European Union. That decis
43min
Gizmodo

Controversial Study Makes a Staggering Claim About When the First Humans Settled North America The surface of mastodon bone showing half impact notch on a segment of femur. (Credit: Tom Deméré, San Diego Natural History Museum) In a study that’s already attracting considerable controversy, a research team says it has found evidence of human habitation along the southern coast of California dating back an astounding 130,000 years. That’s ten times older than most estimates, and a complete u
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cassini's first grand finale dive: MilestonesNASA's Cassini spacecraft is set to make its first dive through the narrow gap between Saturn and its rings on April 26, 2017.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cannabis use in adolescence linked to schizophreniaA new study points to cannabis as a trigger for schizophrenia. The research finds that smoking pot or using cannabis in other ways during adolescence may serve as a catalyst for schizophrenia in individuals already susceptible to the disorder.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milkA new antibiotic resistance gene has been found in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A transfer to S. aureus which is likely according to the researchers would jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics to treat human infections caused by mult
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conservation endocrinology sheds light on a changing worldThe endocrine system is the set of glands that release hormones directly to the blood. Through the monitoring of endocrine responses, the field of conservation endocrinology can make contributions to conservation planning and the understanding of species' adaptations.
49min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Ageless' silicon throughout Milky Way may indicate a well-mixed galaxyNew surveys of the element silicon may mean that the Milky Way is more efficient at mixing its contents than previously thought, thereby masking the telltale signs of chemical aging.
49min
Live Science

'Almost Forgotten Disease' Caused Factory Workers' RashesA mysterious outbreak of an itchy rash among workers at an herbal supplement factory turned out to be caused by an "almost forgotten disease," a new study from Poland finds.
53min
New Scientist - News

Melting moons could support liveable atmospheres for aeonsIf a migrating exoplanet dragged a Europa-like moon closer to its host star, the moon’s icy shell could melt into liquid oceans and breathable air
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stringent exhaust gas tests for cars in EuropeAs of October 2017, newly launched car models will have to pass more stringent exhaust gas tests in the EU and in Switzerland. The new test method includes measuring drives in actual traffic. Researchers have already tested currently available cars with the new method – with alarming results.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In a neuro-techno future, human rights laws will need to be revisitedNew human rights laws to prepare for advances in neurotechnology may put the 'freedom of the mind' at risk.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nano-notch sends self-assembling polymers into a spiralTemplate modification could speed up the fabrication of sensing substrates and other novel structures, reports a team of researchers.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dyadic coping can enhance the coach athlete relationshipThe relationship between a coach and an athlete benefits from a two-way support system, according to new research.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to get adults to eat their vegetables? Study explores potential of spices and herbs useResearchers interested in developing interventions to encourage adults to make better food choices are investigating whether using more spices and herbs, like ginger, curry, rosemary, or garlic, for example, can help adults consume more vegetables as part of their diet.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFsTo treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point or another. But we often have to take doses every four to six hours if the pain warrants it. Now scientists are working on a way to package the commonly used drug so it can last longer. Their approach could also be used to deliver other drugs orally that currently can only be taken intravenously.
56min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

March for Science, climate engineering and China's space station The week in science: 21–27 April 2017 Nature 544 398 doi: 10.1038/544398a
57min
NYT > Science

What Is the Antiquities Act and Why Does President Trump Want to Change It?The 1906 law, enacted under Theodore Roosevelt, has been used by presidents to protect vast tracts of public land from development and exploitation.
58min
Gizmodo

Scientists Are Already Planning the Next Mission to Pluto Image: NASA The Pluto-shaped void in our hearts has yet to be filled by Planet 9, copious amounts of Ben & Jerry’s, or anything. Ever since the summer of 2015, when NASA’s New Horizons performed a six-month-long reconnaissance flyby study of Pluto and its moons, fans of the dwarf planet have wondered if or when we’d ever go back. According to New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern, he and
58min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ER health promotion advocates help teens struggling with substance use get treatmentHealth promotion advocates in the pediatric emergency room serve as a vital resource for young people experimenting with substances and linking them with necessary resources and treatment, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH).
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food photos help Instagram users with healthy eatingPeople are turning to Instagram as a place where they can log food intake and track healthy eating behaviors by posting photos of everything they eat -- and being held accountable by followers for sticking to their goals, a new study finds.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More women with atrial fibrillation die after ER discharge than menA new study from the University of Alberta adds to the growing evidence that women with cardiovascular disease may receive different health care from men -- and experience worse outcomes.The study analyzing data from 21,062 Albertans discharged from hospital emergency rooms after presenting primarily for atrial fibrillation/flutter (AFF) showed that 1.3 per cent of women and 0.9 per cent of men di
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Iceball' planet discovered through microlensingScientists have discovered a new planet with the mass of Earth, orbiting its star at the same distance that we orbit our sun. The planet is likely far too cold to be habitable for life as we know it, however, because its star is so faint. But the discovery adds to scientists' understanding of the types of planetary systems that exist beyond our own.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Super-resolution spectral imaging to monitor dynamic processes in real timeA new approach to increase resolution of multichannel spectrometers has now been developed by a team of researchers.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do medical marijuana laws promote illicit cannabis use and disorder?Illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders increased at a greater rate in states that passed medical marijuana laws than in other states, according to latest research. The new study is among the first to analyze the differences in cannabis use and cannabis use disorders before and after states passed medical marijuana laws, as well as differentiate between earlier and more recent periods and
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater roboticsGeckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development could be useful in underwater robotics, sensors and other bionic devices
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Corn with a cover of grass: Finding best combination for biofuel corn, soil protectionThe phrase "a double-edged sword" describes something that is beneficial in some ways but problematic in others. One example is removing maize stover (the husks, stems and leaves of corn plants) from fields. Maize stover is used to make cellulosic ethanol, a renewable biofuel. And renewable biofuels are beneficial to the environment. However, removing the stover can harm the environment because it
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservation endocrinology sheds light on a changing worldAs species rapidly adapt to altered landscapes and a warming climate, scientists and stakeholders need new techniques to monitor ecological responses and plan future conservation efforts. Writing in BioScience, Stephen McCormick of the US Geological Survey and Michael Romero of Tufts University describe the emerging field of conservation endocrinology and its growing role in addressing the effects
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sequencing the station: Investigation aims to identify unknown microbes in spaceBuilding on the ability to sequence DNA in space and previous investigations, Genes in Space-3 is a collaboration to prepare, sequence and identify unknown organisms, entirely from space. When NASA astronaut Kate Rubins sequenced DNA aboard the International Space Station in 2016, it was a game changer. That first-ever sequencing of DNA in space was part of the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation.
1h
Gizmodo

Live Out Your Wolverine Fantasies With a Retractable Set of Popsicle Stick Claws GIF GIF: YouTube There are two great reasons to follow this tutorial which teaches you how to turn 15 wooden popsicle sticks into your own set of wearable Wolverine claws : 1) You get to run around pretending to be Wolverine, popping balloons and being awesome. 2) You have a great reason to eat 15 popsicles. Advertisement You’ll also need to find some elastics, a tube of glue, and be somewhat cap
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dairy 'excellent' source of protein for children, new study deemsResearchers are using pigs as a model to study the best way of evaluating protein quality in foods eaten by children.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists using high tech microscope find clues to an autoimmune diseaseUsing a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jupiter and the theory of relativity gets the blame for celestial bodies changing courseIn the case of solar system bodies passing close to the sun, there are two important effects playing a crucial role in the orbital evolution. One of the effects is from the general relativity and the other effect is from Newtonian theory of gravitation.
1h
Viden

Hvad skal vi sige til børnene: Klimadebatten skal være mere nuanceretKlimaforskeren Jens Olaf Pepke er skeptisk overfor om konsekvenserne af klimaforandringerne er så store, som mange af hans kolleger mener.
1h
The Atlantic

Why Educated Christians Are Sticking With Church The idea is peppered through the writings of scholars, great thinkers, and New Atheist-types: Education is the cure for religion. Freud wrote that civilization “has little to fear from educated people and brain-workers” who have rejected religion. And “if religious instruction were not allowed until the child had attained the age of reason,” maintained Christopher Hitchens, “we would be living in
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual reality's cousin generating lots of buzz as Facebook, Apple, others focus on itLast year, virtual reality generated lots of buzz. This year, the buzz is around a different kind of "reality" technology that could end up being more popular and useful.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tel Aviv University study links cannabis use in adolescence to schizophreniaA new Tel Aviv University study points to cannabis as a trigger for schizophrenia. The research finds that smoking pot or using cannabis in other ways during adolescence may serve as a catalyst for schizophrenia in individuals already susceptible to the disorder.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Corn with a cover of grassCorn raised for biofuel can result in eroded soils, as all materials are removed from the field. However, using a perennial grass groundcover could preserve soil in addition to reducing costs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservation endocrinology sheds light on a changing worldThe endocrine system is the set of glands that release hormones directly to the blood. Through the monitoring of endocrine responses, the field of conservation endocrinology can make contributions to conservation planning and the understanding of species' adaptations.
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Gizmodo

The Rihanna/Lupita Heist Movie Is the Internet's Only Good Movie Idea Aimlessly browsing the internet is sort of like taking a pediegg to your callouses without soaking them first. Stuff definitely happens, but it sure as hell ain’t pleasant. Every once in a while, however, something extraordinary rises above the web’s feculent froth. A good idea is churned out by the internet machine and we all get a glimpse of the potential glory of the human race. Advertisement
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New Scientist - News

Seabed images show the scars icebergs carve into polar sea floorA new atlas shows scars gouged into polar sea floors by glaciers and icebergs in unprecedented detail, which could help our understanding of how they behave
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Link between alcohol consumption, cardiac arrhythmias found in drinkers at the Munich OctoberfestResearchers who studied beer drinkers at the Munich Octoberfest have found that the more alcohol consumed the higher was the likelihood of developing abnormal heart rhythms called cardiac arrhythmias.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Urbanization costs five billion years of evolutionary historyAll over the globe, the urbanization of landscapes is increasing. 60% of the land surface which is expected to be urban by 2030 is currently not built on at all. How this will impact on biological diversity will only be apparent in retrospect. However, for most cities there have been systematic surveys of biological diversity, although only since the second half of the 20th century. Researchers ha
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Gizmodo

This Old FBI File Is a Great Reminder of Just How Screwed Trump's Lying Cronies Are Then-nominee Trump and Michael Flynn as they speak at a rally in Colorado on October 18, 2016 (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images) Martin Friedman, the head of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, died last May at the age of 90 . At the time, I requested Friedman’s FBI file through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, and that 93-page file was delivered to me yesterday. While there’s noth
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Gizmodo

Nebula Wasn't Originally Meant to Survive the First Guardians of the Galaxy Image: Nebula in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (Marvel/Disney) Of all of Marvel’s vaguely defined villains, Nebula was always more of an opportunist than a straight-up believer, which is why her changing sides in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 works. But, according to Karen Gillan, Nebula wasn’t even supposed to be alive to switch sides. Advertisement Digital Spy interviewed Gillan, who revealed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clearing out old cells could extend joint health, stop osteoarthritisSelectively removing old or 'senescent' cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis, researchers report after a preclinical study in mice and human cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of obesity influenced by changes in our genesA child's risk of obesity as they grow up can be influenced by modifications to their DNA prior to birth, a new study has shown. These changes, known as epigenetic modifications, control the activity of our genes without changing the actual DNA sequence. One of the main epigenetic modifications is DNA methylation, which plays a key role in embryonic development and the formation of different cell
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The Atlantic

Why Was the State Department Promoting Mar-a-Lago? Three weeks ago, ShareAmerica , a website run by the State Department’s Bureau of International Information Programs , published a post about Mar-a-Lago , President Donald Trump’s resort in Florida. The article is, at a glance, fairly innocuous, describing some of the Palm Beach estate’s notable features and offering a brief rundown of its history and how it came into Trump’s possession. On Monda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Informed Delivery service lets you peek at your mail before you get itHow would you like to know what's in your mailbox without looking?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Ageless' silicon throughout Milky Way may indicate a well-mixed galaxyAs galaxies age, some of their basic chemical elements can also show signs of aging. This aging process can be seen as certain atoms "put on a little weight," meaning they change into heavier isotopes—atoms with additional neutrons in their nuclei.
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Ars Technica

Palantir settles US charges that it discriminated against Asian engineers (credit: aki51 ) The Silicon Valley security and analytics firm whose algorithms were used in the government's search for Osama bin Laden is agreeing to pay $1.7 million to resolve US Department of Labor charges that the company discriminated against Asians applying for engineering jobs. The deal requires Palantir , which has scored US intelligence and defense contracts worth more than $340 milli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common pesticide damages honey bees' ability to flyBiologists have provided the first evidence that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly. The study, which employed a bee “flight mill,” raises concerns about how pesticides affect honey bee pollination and long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Would You Go This Far To Get A Bite To Eat In The Wild? | Naked and Afraid #NakedAndAfraid | Sundays at 10/9c Extremely hungry with few options, Geoff and Melissa resort to eating a nest of baby birds to sustain their energy. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Foll
1h
New Scientist - News

Amazon rainforest under threat as Brazil tears up protectionsThe political turmoil and fast-tracking of big development projects is putting deforestation gains under threat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The man behind 2016's biggest US tech IPO shares how the deal went downWhile most Silicon Valley tech startups were shying away from the public market last year and analysts were sounding alarm bells over the worrisome lack of IPOs, San Jose-based Nutanix was one of the few companies that took the plunge.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Amazon Activewear Sale, USB Power Receptacles, Anker Headphones, and More Anker’s newest Bluetooth headphones , power receptacles with USB ports , and a huge one-day activewear sale lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundBuds Tag , $28 with code BEST3231 | Use code BEST3232 for white model . Anker’s original SoundBuds are your favorite affordable wireless earbuds , but the new Sound
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exploring personalized pharmacotherapy to treat panic attacksAlthough drug therapy is the accepted first-line treatment for panic disorders (PDs), 17% to 64% of patients do not respond adequately and continue to exhibit one of the most common symptoms of PD, the panic attack (PA). Researchers carefully reviewed scientific data to establish whether a personalized treatment approach could help physicians prescribe the drug that will work most effectively for
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers explore personalized pharmacotherapy to treat panic attacksAlthough drug therapy is the accepted first-line treatment for panic disorders (PDs), 17% to 64% of patients do not respond adequately and continue to exhibit one of the most common symptoms of PD, the panic attack (PA). In a comprehensive new analysis published in Personalized Medicine in Psychiatry, researchers carefully reviewed scientific data to establish whether a personalized treatment appr
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The Scientist RSS

Is Immunotherapy Living up to its Promise?The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to weigh in on the progress that immunotherapy has made.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Youth violence on decline, new study showsContrary to popular perception, a new study finds that youth violence is declining -- and at noteworthy rates. Between 2002 and 2014, researchers found a 29 percent decrease in the relative proportion of young people involved in violence in the United States. The study also reveals a persistent pattern of racial and ethnic disparities in youth violence.
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Gizmodo

Amazon Has a New Echo That Tells You If Your Outfit Sucks GIF Image: Amazon Amazon has a new Echo and this time, it has a camera built-in to tell you how ugly, or hot, your outfit looks. Dubbed the Echo Look , this forthcoming $200 device has a depth-sensing camera that can take full-length photos and videos using just your voice. Advertisement If you’re like me, and your small Brooklyn apartment doesn’t allow for a full-length mirror, the Echo Look can
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Ars Technica

A Fitbit Flex 2 “exploded” on woman’s wrist, leaving second-degree burns [Update] Enlarge / The Flex 2's module is super tiny and slides into this silicone band. (credit: Valentina Palladino) Samsung isn't the only company that has had deal with exploding products . A Wisconsin woman told ABC News that her new Fitbit Flex 2 activity tracker "exploded" on her wrist while she read a book earlier this week. Dina Mitchell was treated at an area emergency care provider the next day
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New on MIT Technology Review

Clean Technology Innovation Is in DeclineThe last two years have been slow for green energy patents, and plans to cut federal R&D could make that a real problem.
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Live Science

Illegal Pot Use Is Rising in States That Have Legalized Medical MarijuanaIn recent years, illegal marijuana use has risen faster in states that have legalized medical marijuana than in states without such laws, a new study finds.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Dog DNA study maps breeds across the worldHere are five findings from a massive study of dog breed genomes.
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Live Science

Lightning and 'Probably Satellites' Seen from Space Station | VideoEuropean Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet captured imagery of Earth while orbiting over California aboard the International Space Station on April 17, 2017.
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Ingeniøren

Nye fiskefarme i de danske farvande splitter også politikerneHverken Enhedslisten eller Dansk Folkeparti føler sig efter en eksperthøring trygge ved at udvide havbrug i Danmark mod at rense vandet med muslingefarme. Venstre går stadig ind for forslaget.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study deems dairy 'excellent' source of protein for childrenResearchers at the University of Illinois are using pigs as a model to study the best way of evaluating protein quality in foods eaten by children, a method that was proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in 2011.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did illicit cannabis use increase more in states with medical marijuana laws?A study using data from three US national surveys indicates that illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders increased at a greater rate in states that passed medical marijuana laws than in other states, according to a new article published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do medical marijuana laws promote illicit cannabis use and disorder?Illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders increased at a greater rate in states that passed medical marijuana laws than in other states, according to latest research. The new study is among the first to analyze the differences in cannabis use and cannabis use disorders before and after states passed medical marijuana laws, as well as differentiate between earlier and more recent periods and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Israel says it uncovered planned mass cyber attacksIsraeli authorities said on Wednesday that they had detected planned cyber attacks against 120 public and private targets in the Jewish state but did not specify the intended victims.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early blood signatures of vaccine immunogenicityWithin seven days of vaccination, a blood test early after vaccination can predict whether vaccines based on living, modified viruses have had the desired effect. This is one of the results of a new study on systems analysis of immune responses induced by a highly promising vaccine against Ebola. This result can inform and accelerate rational development of other new vaccines based on living virus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seabird parents compensate for struggling partnersFor species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key. A new study shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI offers greater range of diagnostic, therapeutic applicationsA new means of noninvasively tracking nanodiamonds with magnetic resonance imaging has been developed by researchers, opening up a host of new applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Old car, new tricks: Adding safety tech to an older carOld cars can learn new tricks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small businesses can feel bigger effects from a PR disasterHalfway through Valentine's Day, florist Ajay Kori realized he was in the midst of a disaster.
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Popular Science

Supercharge your scheduling with these 5 Google Calendar tricks DIY Bonus features of a popular app Google's long-lasting calendar app has been helping people stay organized for years, but you might not know about all of the features and functions it has to offer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do babies coordinate gestures, vocalization?A new study has focused on how babies start speaking, and how 9 to 13-month-old babies tackle the shift from early babbling to the use of combinations of gestures and speech.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital life project uses 3-D to document endangered frogsThe Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick today unveiled an online set of 15 three-dimensional (3D) models of live frogs, including several endangered species, to promote conservation, education and science by showcasing their extraordinary beauty and vulnerability to ecological threats.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The automation of art: A legal conundrumIn 1968, sociologist Jean Baudrillard wrote on automatism that "contained within it is the dream of a dominated world [...] that serves an inert and dreamy humanity."
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Scientific American Content: Global

India's Energy Landscape Is Rapidly ChangingThe country’s coal plants are being shelved at a swift pace -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English

Neuroquest: The forces of Order triumph! Lo! The fields of Neurondolin have been won by those sworn to uphold Order. But it was a battle fought nobly by both sides, so nobly in fact that as the former foes look off to where you and your party are attempting to fully heal the Golden Ganglion, both Order and Chaos must agree: this world is too delicate to be torn apart by such strife in the future! With any luck, Neurondolin will continue
2h
The Atlantic

Russia's Interference in the U.S. Election Was Just the Beginning Mike Conaway, the Republican who replaced Devin Nunes as head of the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. election, has described his mission simply: “I just want to find out what happened,” he’s said. The more urgent question elsewhere in the world, however, isn’t confined to the past. It concerns what is happening —not just in the United States but in E
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The Atlantic

The Bizarre Spectacle of Casting JonBenét The documentary film is often a space for confession, or interrogation—a public forum that’s both intimate and private, where people can spill their life stories into a camera without thinking about who might one day watch the results. In Kitty Green’s new movie Casting JonBen ét, which premieres April 28 on Netflix, a whole ensemble of aspiring actors share their thoughts and memories, some star
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The Atlantic

Hippos Can’t Swim—So How Do They Move Through Water? People are talking about hippos this week, at least in part because the Cincinnati Zoo’s beloved baby hippopotamus, Fiona, is now three months old—a milestone that seemed uncertain when she was born prematurely in January. Fiona’s doing great—so great that she’s “a little bit dangerous to actually cuddle and snuggle” anymore, the zookeeper Jenna Wingate told local reporters . Which reminds me tha
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Ingeniøren

Styrelse får kritik for at sende 900 sider med personfølsomme patientdata med usikker mail En medarbejder i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er ved et uheld kommet til at sende 900 siders personfølsomme patientdata uden 2-faktor-autentifikation. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedsbrist-ved-styrelsen-patientsikkerhed-1075943 Version2
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Gizmodo

A Devastating Holocaust Documentary Proves VR Filmmaking Isn't Just a Gimmick Still: The Last Goodbye It’s really easy to mess up a film project about the Holocaust. The wrong tone, the wrong direction, and it can all go horribly awry. Add cutting-edge technology operated by unskilled hands to a topic as devastating as survivor testimony, and you could have a disaster. Fortunately, the VR film The Last Goodbye , which debuted at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival, gets it r
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Live Science

Nerve Gas Attack: New Treatment Cleared, But More Drugs Are NeededAfter a deadly nerve agent attack in Syria earlier this month, the U.S. government has approved a new type of injector for a drug that treats these lethal chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Whispering' keeps humpback whales safe from killer whalesNewborn humpback whales 'whisper' to their mothers to avoid being overheard by killer whales, researchers have discovered. The recordings were the first obtained from tags directly attached to the whales.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Larger schooling fish found to have stronger attraction forcesIn schooling fish, collective movement emerges as a result of multiple social interactions between individuals. In a new study, larger individuals have been found to display stronger attraction forces to one another than smaller individuals. Short range repulsion forces, on the other hand, are the same regardless of fish size.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The clever cell: Molecular mechanism inhibits the swarming motility of bacterial populationsA biological chemistry working group has decoded a molecular mechanism that inhibits the swarming motility of bacterial populations.
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Gizmodo

Baby Humpback Whales Whisper to Their Moms Because the Ocean Is Terrifying A mother-calf pair in Exmouth Gulf. Credit: Fredrik Christiansen The ocean is dark and full of terrors—including hungry orcas, and horny men looking to bang your mom, if you’re a baby humpback whale. And so, you keep your voice to a whisper to avoid these predatory eavesdroppers. Advertisement That, at least, is the conclusion of a new study led by Danish and Australian researchers, who tracked e
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Builders 'behind UK flooding risk'Government rapped again for failure to tighten flood-prevention rules on new homes
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The Atlantic

'Until the Drug Dealer's Teeth Rattle' Any real discussion of mass incarceration is impossible without addressing racism. Michelle Alexander’s widely acclaimed book The New Jim Crow cast the criminal-justice system as a successor to slavery and segregation, one that’s hamstrung the African American community’s social and economic growth since the civil-rights movement. My colleague Ta-Nehisi Coates has explored at length how racial an
3h
WIRED

You’ll Never Guess Who Does Diversity Right: Uber Opinion: Amid scandal, Uber is getting something right: diversity. The post You'll Never Guess Who Does Diversity Right: Uber appeared first on WIRED .
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Baby humpback whales 'whisper' to mums to avoid predatorsNew recordings show newborn humpback whales and mothers "whisper" to each other, to avoid predators.
3h
Live Science

US Marines Airlifted 1,100 Tortoises to New Desert HomesThe two-week-long relocation effort was four years in the making.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The automation of art: A legal conundrumDeep Neural Networks are systems that are able to simulate human perception by 'memorizing' complex patterns on a mathematical level. One application for this is in the arts, where these systems are used for their creative potential. As DNN's become more popular, there is the danger of an unchecked proliferation of copyright protections, which risks stifling creativity. In order to prevent this, w
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

HIPPO's molecular balancing act helps nerves not short circuitIt may be possible to therapeutically fine tune a constantly shifting balance of molecular signals to ensure the body's peripheral nerves are insulated and functioning normally, researchers have discovered. They suggest this may be a way to treat neuropathies or prevent the development of peripheral nerve sheath tumors.
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Popular Science

How hot peppers and marijuana could help cure gut problems Health Just don't try to fix your colitis with Sriracha Marijuana and hot peppers might cure gut related diseases. Read on.
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Popular Science

This training will help you become a certified project manager Sponsored Post Start a lucrative new career with over 35 hours of training. Start a lucrative new career with over 35 hours of training. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Deadspin ESPN Officially Announces Layoffs, Says Very Little Else | Jezebel Serena Williams Says Her Deadspin ESPN Officially Announces Layoffs, Says Very Little Else | Jezebel Serena Williams Says Her Pregnancy Announcement Was a Social Media Slip | The Root What’s Up With Oprah And Homophobic Preachers? | Fusion Charlotte Cops Think This Video Showing Officers Threatening to Kill an Unarmed Man Is Just Fine |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticles can travel from lungs to blood, possibly explaining risks to heartTiny particles in air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular disease, which can lead to premature death. But how particles inhaled into the lungs can affect blood vessels and the heart has remained a mystery. Now, scientists have found evidence in human and animal studies that inhaled nanoparticles can travel from the lungs into the bloodstream, potentially explaining the link between
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to imbalanced microbiomeAbnormal levels of specific gut bacteria are related to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, or ME/CFS, in patients with and without concurrent irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, scientists have discovered.
3h
Ingeniøren

Det går for langsomt med at forbedre de nye bilers brændstoføkonomiGanske vist steg brændstofeffektiviteten i de nye biler, som europæerne sidste år købte, men stigningen er den laveste i en årrække og alt for lav til at nå miljømålet i 2021, viser ny rapport.
3h
Ingeniøren

Kunstig intelligens: Din personlige drone følger dig gennem tykt og tyndtStifteren af et lille, amerikansk droneselskabet Skydio vil benytte AI-teknologi til at gøre droner mere anvendelige for almindelige mennesker.
3h
Ingeniøren

Alvorlige designfejl afsløret i skadet kæmpedæmningDårligt design, dårlig udførelse og dårligt vedligehold. Kritikken er ubønhørlig i en ny rapport om den enorme dæmning i Oroville i USA, der var tæt på at blive oversvømmet i februar.
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Gizmodo

Twitter's Free Fall Is Slightly Less Brutal Than It Was Before Image: AP Twitter announced its Q1 2017 earnings on Wednesday, and good news, everyone: The company isn’t performing as poorly as it was last quarter ! Advertisement Now, make no mistake. Twitter still made less money than it did a year ago—its revenue declined eight percent year over year. But because of, uh, a lack of investor confidence, it still beat analyst expectations by a wide margin. As
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'First arrival' hypothesis in Darwin's finches gets some caveatsBeing first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new study testing the importance of 'first arrival' in controlling adaptive radiation of species, a hypothesis famously proposed for 'Darwin's Finches,' birds from the Galapagos Islands that were first br
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major health benefits linked to indoor temperature variation, study findsExposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early blood signatures of vaccine immunogenicityWithin seven days of vaccination, a blood test early after vaccination can predict whether vaccines based on living, modified viruses have had the desired effect. This is one of the results of a new study from a large European research collaboration on systems analysis of immune responses induced by a highly promising vaccine against Ebola in which the University of Gothenburg is participating. Th
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists using high tech microscope find clues to an autoimmune diseaseUsing a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future.
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Gizmodo

Add USB Charging Ports To Your Wall Outlets For $15 Each TOPGREENER 15-Amp USB Charger Receptacle , $15 Update : Now up to $20, but you can opt for this model instead for $13 . You’ll just need to supply your own wall plate. These days, you probably charge as many things over USB as you do over standard AC outlets, so it only makes sense to add some semi-permanent USB ports to your home. Today on Amazon, you can get highly-rated duplex receptacles with
3h
Live Science

Did Human Ancestor 'Lucy' Have a Midwife?How might the ancient relative of humanity dubbed "Lucy" and others of her species have given birth? In a manner in-between that of chimpanzees and humans — with a bit of tilting in the birth canal as they were born, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

p53 critical to recovering from acetaminophen overdoseA new study shows that after an acetaminophen overdose, the p53 protein plays a key role in preventing the progression of liver damage and signaling the liver to repair itself. The findings could lead to new treatments for people who overdose on this popular pain reliever and fever reducer.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New progress toward finding best cells for liver therapyIn an important step toward using transplanted cells to treat liver failure, researchers demonstrate successful transplantation of fetal rat liver cells to an injured adult rat liver.
3h
Ars Technica

What Remains of Edith Finch is an effective experiment in storytelling Enlarge / Your first view of the teetering Finch house doesn't really do justice to its cluttered, circuitous insides. The average big-budget video game story is a sprawling power fantasy quest focused on saving the kingdom/world/galaxy, told in fits and starts amid dozens of hours of often repetitive puzzles and challenges. As far as narrative is concerned, video games as a whole usually focus o
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

When to Worry about Lower Back PainLower back pain is the fifth-most common reason that drives people to the doctor's office. Learn the tips on how to prepare for your doctor's visit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teenagers can become disruptive if teachers use psychological pressureA new study discovered that psychological pressure from teachers can contribute to disengagement amongst young teens. Active disengagement behaviors include talking and making noise, with daydreaming in class amongst the more passive disengagement behaviors.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New model could help predict major earthquakesResearchers have characterized several earthquakes that struck South America's west coast over the last 100 years by using seismographic data, tsunami recordings, and models of the rapid plate movements associated with these natural disasters. The team showed that some earthquakes were linked to the same sites of rupture at plate boundaries and others to different sites. Thus, they revealed the pe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extinction risk for many species vastly underestimated, study suggestsA new study indicates that the number of plant and animal species at risk of extinction may be considerably higher than previously thought. A team of researchers, however, believe they've come up with a formula that will help paint a more accurate picture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New studies refocus attention on the genotoxicity of AAV vectors in gene therapyA growing number of preclinical studies in mice suggests that therapeutic gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) can cause insertional mutagenesis and increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the apparent safety of rAAV-mediated gene therapy in human clinical applications, the data emerging from some mouse studies emphasize the need to carefully recons
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The automation of art: A legal conundrumDeep Neural Networks are systems that are able to simulate human perception by 'memorizing' complex patterns on a mathematical level. One application for this is in the arts, where these systems are used for their creative potential. As DNN's become more popular, there is the danger of an unchecked proliferation of copyright protections, which risks stifling creativity. In order to prevent this, w
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

35 scholars, journalists, authors win Carnegie fellowshipsThis year's Andrew Carnegie fellows will delve into a wide range of issues—including immigration, the refugee crisis, American election processes and global violence against women in politics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New test assesses sperm functionNew research validates the usefulness of a test that determines if sperm can capacitate, a process that allows them to fertilize an egg. The first article validates the underlying technology of the test, called the Cap-Score Sperm Function Test, and demonstrates its accuracy, reproducibility, and precision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity amplifies genetic risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseAn international study has revealed a striking genetic-environmental interaction: Obesity significantly amplifies the effects of three gene variants that increase risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by different metabolic pathways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune system, brain structure and memory linkedScientists have demonstrated that both the structure of the brain and several memory functions are linked to immune system genes.
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New Scientist - News

Pollution nanoparticles may enter your blood and cause diseaseA study of airborne nanoparticles – which are nearly impossible to measure in our air - may explain why pollution is linked to heart attacks and strokes
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New Scientist - News

Typhoon Haiyan’s electric spectacular in the eye of the stormSatellites reveal that one of the strongest tropical storms on record had unusual lightning in its core – which could be used to monitor storm intensity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater roboticsGeckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development, reported in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry C, could be useful in un
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'First arrival' hypothesis in Darwin's finches gets some caveatsBeing first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new study testing the importance of "first arrival" in controlling adaptive radiation of species, a hypothesis famously proposed for "Darwin's Finches," birds from the Galapagos Islands that were first br
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFsTo treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point or another. But we often have to take doses every four to six hours if the pain warrants it. Now scientists are working on a way to package the commonly used drug so it can last longer. Their approach, reported in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, could also be used to deliver other drugs orally that cur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Several EPA programs face possible elimination under Trump proposalThe Trump administration's proposed plan for the US Environmental Protection Agency includes completely defunding several programs related to climate change, public health and pollution, according to an internal agency memo that was leaked to the media last month. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, runs through the numbers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New progress toward finding best cells for liver therapyIn an important step toward using transplanted cells to treat liver failure, researchers demonstrate successful transplantation of fetal rat liver cells to an injured adult rat liver.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

p53 critical to recovering from acetaminophen overdoseA new study shows that after an acetaminophen overdose, the p53 protein plays a key role in preventing the progression of liver damage and signaling the liver to repair itself. The findings could lead to new treatments for people who overdose on this popular pain reliever and fever reducer.
4h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Placental ArrayPlacentas from mice with genetically distinct immune systems, stained to highlight differences in three proteins, representing the nucleus (blue), blood vessels (red), and trophoblasts (green)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team decoded molecular mechanism that inhibits swarming motility of bacterial populationsIn nature, bacteria occur mostly in multi-cellular collectives, rather than as individuals. They are capable of coordinating their behaviour, with some species even being able to move together in swarms. The biological chemistry junior research group at the University of Konstanz investigates the ways in which organisms can manipulate and, above all, inhibit this kind of behaviour. Group leader an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detector delivery marks another Euclid milestoneESA's Euclid mission has passed another important milestone with the delivery of the first three state-of-the art detectors for the Near-Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer instrument.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Serious violence in England and Wales drops 10 percentThe Number of people injured in serious violence dropped by 10% in 2016 compared to 2015, according to a national report on serious violence published by Cardiff University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New model could help predict major earthquakesA Nagoya University-led team reveals the mechanisms behind different earthquakes at a plate boundary on the west coast of South America, shedding light on historical seismic events and potentially aiding prediction of the future risk from these natural disasters.
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Science | The Guardian

Satellite Eye on Earth: March 2017 – in pictures Mount Etna, India’s ship graveyard and trees in Africa are among the images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last month The Mackenzie river system is Canada’s largest watershed, and the 10th largest water basin in the world. The river runs 4,200km (2,600 miles) from the Columbia icefield in the Canadian Rockies to the Arctic Ocean. If your vehicle weighs less than 22,000lb, y
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Gizmodo

Flash Flood of Fruit Juice Terrorizes Russian Town Image: YouTube / Lipetsk Live Disasters aren’t funny. But sometimes they’re kinda silly. Advertisement Such is the case in Lebedyan, a town in southern Russia, where a roof collapse at the local Lebedyansky beverage factory, owned by PepsiCo, lead to a flash flood of fruit juice. Two people were injured in the roof collapse (not funny). The town does seem amused by the juice flood, however, which
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Futurity.org

Rare supernova shows up 4 times across the sky Astronomers have captured multiple images of a Type Ia supernova—the brilliant explosion of a star—appearing in four different locations in the sky. So far this is the only Type Ia discovered that has exhibited this effect. The help of an automated supernova-hunting pipeline and a galaxy sitting 2 billion light years away from Earth that’s acting as a “magnifying glass” made the discovery possibl
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Fossil' groundwater's modern secretThe deepest and oldest waters on Earth are not immune from contamination, warn scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFsTo treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point or another. But we often have to take doses every four to six hours if the pain warrants it. Now scientists are working on a way to package the commonly used drug so it can last longer. Their approach, reported in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, could also be used to deliver other drugs orally that cur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater roboticsGeckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development, reported in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry C, could be useful in un
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Larger schooling fish found to have stronger attraction forcesIn schooling fish, collective movement emerges as a result of multiple social interactions between individuals. In a new study led by researchers at Uppsala University, larger individuals have been found to display stronger attraction forces to one another than smaller individuals. Short range repulsion forces, on the other hand, are the same regardless of fish size.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rationale and prospects of targeting bacterial 2-component systemsAntimicrobial resistance is a major societal problem as there are resistant bacteria to any antibiotic available, and they spread across countries and continents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The clever cellA biological chemistry working group at the University of Konstanz has decoded a molecular mechanism that inhibits the swarming motility of bacterial populations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Serious violence in England and Wales drops 10 percent in 2016The number of people injured in serious violence dropped by 10 percent in 2016 compared to 2015, according to a national report on serious violence published by Cardiff University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clearing out old cells could extend joint health, stop osteoarthritisIn a preclinical study in mice and human cells, researchers report that selectively removing old or 'senescent' cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'First arrival' hypothesis in Darwin's finches gets some caveatsBeing first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new study testing the importance of 'first arrival' in controlling adaptive radiation of species, a hypothesis famously proposed for 'Darwin's Finches,' birds from the Galapagos Islands that were first br
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Urbanisation costs 5 billion years of evolutionary historyAll over the globe, the urbanisation of landscapes is increasing. 60% of the land surface which is expected to be urban by 2030 is currently not built on at all. How this will impact on biological diversity will only be apparent in retrospect. However, for most cities there have been systematic surveys of biological diversity, although only since the second half of the 20th century. Researchers at
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Science : NPR

Cassini Spacecraft Starts Weaving Between Saturn And Its Rings "Shields Up!" the Cassini craft's Twitter feed announced Wednesday. If all goes well, new images of the ringed planet will reach Earth early Thursday. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

California’s $3-billion bet on stem cells faces final test Major investment in regenerative medicine enters its last stage — and the money might run out before treatments are ready. Nature 544 401 doi: 10.1038/544401a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teenagers can become disruptive if teachers use psychological pressureA study by researchers at the University of Kent is expected to help teachers identify specific reasons for different types of pupil withdrawal in the classroom.
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Popular Science

Little devices that use huge cloud servers to do your bidding Gadgets The big brains of tech. Right now, in a data center far, far away, gargantuan cloud servers are providing brainpower to devices as minute as fitness trackers. Read on.
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Gizmodo

It's Already Time to Start Speculating About Game of Thrones' Final Season Will Smith could join the long-in-development clone movie Gemini Man . A major Riverdale character will look very different in season two. The Lion King remake might have found its Timon and Pumba. Plus, bad news for Powerless . Behold, Spoilers! Gemini Man Will Smith is in talks to star in Ang Lee’s long-in-development clone thriller. Smith would play the lead role, an aging assassin who finds h
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Ars Technica

Mission Control is a wonderful movie. Go see it now Mission Control Movie We'll make this film review simple and straightforward: Mission Control is a wonderful movie. Go see it . This new movie is both timely and overdue. It is timely in that we're nearing the 50th anniversary of the Apollo program's glory days, and it's overdue in the sense that mission control is finally getting some of the limelight it deserves. A few years ago, a book titled
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WIRED

Breathtaking Photos of a World Without Light Pollution Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic set out to document the last dark skies around North America. The post Breathtaking Photos of a World Without Light Pollution appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Gerrymandering Has a Solution After All. It’s Called Math All that packing and cracking comes up lacking once you apply a little efficiency gapping. The post Gerrymandering Has a Solution After All. It's Called Math appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Larger schooling fish found to have stronger attraction forcesIn schooling fish, collective movement emerges as a result of multiple social interactions between individuals. In a new study led by researchers at Uppsala University, larger individuals have been found to display stronger attraction forces to one another than smaller individuals. Short range repulsion forces, on the other hand, are the same regardless of fish size.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans alter Earth's chemistry from beyond the graveIt's not only in life that humans leave their mark on Nature. In death, our decomposing corpses alter the chemistry of precious soil, scientists warned on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Establishing the boundaries of quantum secure communicationsScientists at the University of York's Centre for Quantum Technology have made an important breakthrough in the theory of quantum secure communications.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dog Family Tree Reveals Hidden History of Canine DiversityGenetic map showing how breeds are related provides a wealth of information about origins -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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cognitive science

Towards new human rights in the age of neuroscience and neurotechnology submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence can accurately predict future heart disease and strokes, study findsComputers that can teach themselves from routine clinical data are potentially better at predicting cardiovascular risk than current standard medical risk models, according to new research at the University of Nottingham.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovering a new mechanism of epigenetic inheritanceGiacomo Cavalli's team at the Institute of Human Genetics (University of Montpellier / CNRS), in collaboration with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), has demonstrated the existence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI) among Drosophila fruit flies. By temporarily modifying the function of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins—which play an essential role in develo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: Six ways the meat on your plate is killing the planetWhen we hear about the horrors of industrial livestock farming – the pollution, the waste, the miserable lives of billions of animals – it is hard not to feel a twinge of guilt and conclude that we should eat less meat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New model could help predict major earthquakesNagoya University-led researchers characterized several earthquakes that struck South America's west coast over the last 100 years by using seismographic data, tsunami recordings, and models of the rapid plate movements associated with these natural disasters. The team showed that some earthquakes were linked to the same sites of rupture at plate boundaries and others to different sites. Thus, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New test assesses sperm functionTwo new publications in the journal Molecular Reproduction and Development validate the usefulness of a test that determines if sperm can capacitate, a process that allows them to fertilize an egg.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanotechnology designed to speed up the hardening of concreteIt has been possible to demonstrate scientifically that tobermorite can be produced at 400 C when above 200 C it had been thought to be impossible. This mineral has been found in concrete buildings dating back to Roman times and could hold the key to their durability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teenagers can become disruptive if teachers use psychological pressureThe study, which was led by Stephen Earl from the University's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, discovered that psychological pressure from teachers can contribute to disengagement amongst teenage pupils under 14. Active disengagement behaviors include talking and making noise, with daydreaming in class amongst the more passive disengagement behaviors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Autism Speaks issues special reportAutism Speaks today issued the first in a series of annual, in-depth reports on special topics in autism. 'Autism and Health: Advances in Understanding and Treating the Health Conditions that Frequently Accompany Autism' gathers into one comprehensive report the most authoritative research and the latest guidelines on treatment and support of children and adults with autism spectrum disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method for early screening of colorectal cancerA highly sensitive method that can detect even the earlier stages of colorectal cancer has been developed by researchers in Japan. Shimadzu Corporation, the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, and the National Cancer Center in Japan have collaborated to develop a new screening method that comprehensively analyzes the metabolites in our blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows youth violence on declineContrary to popular perception, a new study by Boston University professor Christopher Salas- Wright finds that youth violence is declining -- and at noteworthy rates. Between 2002 and 2014, Salas-Wright and his colleagues found a 29 percent decrease in the relative proportion of young people involved in violence in the United States. The study also reveals a persistent pattern of racial and ethni
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Perils of Public OutreachA culture that normalizes hypercritical peers is a problem for scientists who want to reach beyond academe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

An interview with Cory Doctorow on beating death, post-scarcity, and everything Enlarge (credit: Ian Muttoo ) Cory Doctorow's new book Walkaway centers on the rise of a counterculture built on open-source technology that fabricates nearly everything from the "feedstock" provided by the refuse and wreckage of a world ravaged by climate change and economic ruin. In a conversation with Ars, Doctorow discussed that and some of the other underlying themes that influenced Walkaway
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds political contributions can play an important role in a successful IPOA firm's political donations can have a significant effect on initial public offering (IPO) underpricing, leading to immediate and measurable gains on issue day, according to new research from the University of Portsmouth.
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Gizmodo

Life Finds a Way as Jeff Goldblum Returns for Jurassic World 2 Jeff Goldblum is returning to Jurassic Park. Image: Universal Did you watch the first Jurassic World and think, “This needs more Jeff Goldblum?” Well, you’re in luck for the sequel. Life found a way. Advertisement The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed that Goldblum will return to the franchise in 2018's Jurassic World 2 . It’ll be his first time back since 1997's The Lost World . Goldblum will onc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pac-Man meets biotechnologyScientists in the U.S have a designed a computer game that could help with biomedical research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remembrance and the teaching of memoryIn the midst of ANZAC Day commemorations, a timely paper explores the role of digital technologies in how we think about war and peace.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher studies the feeding habits of stomatopod crustaceansBiology Letters talks to Maya deVries, author of a recently published article that describes the feeding habits of stomatopod crustaceans with two kinds of highly specialized feeding appendages; those with elongated spear-like appendages (spearers) or hammer-like appendages (smashers).
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Scientific American Content: Global

Antarctic Penguin Populations in Flux as the Planet WarmsA new report reveals large declines in some populations but increases in others -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s Human Problem, Artificial Wombs, and AI Script Writers—The Download, April 26, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New design tool to enable global roaming smart phonesWireless communications is a technology that is used every day. Across society, there is a move away from using the internet on desktop computers and towards smartphones, tablets and laptops. Engineers at the University of Bristol have developed a novel radio frequency (RF) design tool that will speed up the design of tuneable wireless devices and will enable smartphones to roam internationally.
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The Scientist RSS

Naked Mole Rats Can Survive Long Periods Without OxygenThe resilient rodents switch to fructose metabolism in order to survive for up to 18 minutes in anaerobic conditions.
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Futurity.org

How glowing microRNA could illuminate cancer A tool for tracking microRNA could potentially offer a way to determine how cancer occurs and spreads in the body. In a person’s cells, RNA receives instructions from DNA about how to build proteins, then directs the cell to build those proteins. The RNA that codes protein is called messenger RNA. However, scientists estimate that while upward of 95 percent of DNA transcribes into RNA, most of th
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Gizmodo

Amazon's One-Day Activewear Sale Won't Give Your Wallet Too Much of a Workout Up to 50% Off Active Clothing Spring is ripe with opportunity to get outside, but getting the right gear for the weather is always the hard part. Amazon is right there with you, marking down a ton of activewear apparel , from brands like PUMA, Adidas, Champion, Reebok, and more, so you can get outside, even if it’s just for a nice, brisk walk to the deli for a sandwich. Here are a few styles, inc
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Gizmodo

An Airline Pilot Captured This Beautiful Timelapse Footage of the Milky Way GIF GIF: Vimeo As a passenger on an airplane, it’s not easy to shoot footage from your plane’s tiny window. But when you’re the pilot, with a large window to watch the night sky, you it’s possible to capture some amazing aerial footage of the Milky Way . Advertisement This timelapse footage provides an incredible view of the Milky Way, visible overhead while the Earth races past beneath. It was c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity amplifies genetic risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseAn international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center revealed a striking genetic-environmental interaction: Obesity significantly amplifies the effects of three gene variants that increase risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by different metabolic pathways.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study identifies optimum human hand-throwing techniques(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Harvard and Yale Universities has conducted a study of optimal human throwing techniques and found which work best under which conditions. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Madhusudhan Venkadesan and Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan describe how they combined physics with observed results to learn which techniques work best in which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: We need to break science out of its ivory tower – here's one way to do thisWithout hardware, there is no science. From Hooke's microscope to the Hubble telescope, instruments are modern science's platforms for producing knowledge. But limited access to scientific tools impedes the progress and reach of science by restricting the type of people who can participate in research, favouring those who have access to well-resourced laboratories in industrial or academic institu
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Dagens Medicin

Ansatte i Syddanmark må fortsat bære kors og tørklæderEt forslag om religiøs og ideologisk neutral påklædning for ansatte på hospitalerne i Region Syddanmark blev nedstemt i regionsrådet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing the hanging gardens of MarsNASA is all about solving challenges, and the goal of having a prolonged presence in space, or a colony on Mars or some other world, is full of challenges, including the necessity of growing food. Scientists at Kennedy Advanced Life Support Research are working on the Prototype Lunar/Mars Greenhouse Project to try and meet that challenge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser cooling a polyatomic molecule(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Harvard University has successfully cooled a three-atom molecule down to near absolute zero for the first time. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the team describes how they achieved the feat and suggest that their technique could be modified to allow for cooling molecules with even more atoms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter gets lift from uptick in user numbersTwitter shares shot higher Wednesday after its quarterly update showed improving growth in user numbers, offsetting concerns over a decline in revenue and another net loss for the social network.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Portable Laser Range Finder Enables Real-Time 3-D MappingA new handheld device integrates LIDAR with a motion sensor, camera, processor and seven-inch touch screen to enable color mapping on the fly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sri Lanka overturns ban on adopting elephantsSri Lanka said Wednesday it would allow rich individuals and temples to adopt baby elephants, overturning a ban put in place to protect the animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles can travel from lungs to blood, possibly explaining risks to heartTiny particles in air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular disease, which can lead to premature death. But how particles inhaled into the lungs can affect blood vessels and the heart has remained a mystery. Now, scientists have found evidence in human and animal studies that inhaled nanoparticles can travel from the lungs into the bloodstream, potentially explaining the link between
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticles can travel from lungs to blood, possibly explaining risks to heartTiny particles in air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular disease, which can lead to premature death. But how particles inhaled into the lungs can affect blood vessels and the heart has remained a mystery. Now, scientists have found evidence in human and animal studies that inhaled nanoparticles can travel from the lungs into the bloodstream, potentially explaining the link between
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Backyard skinny-dippers lack effective laws to keep peeping drones at bayRecent advances in technology mean we can no longer rely on fences or barriers around our homes to protect our privacy. This was certainly the case for Darwin resident Karli Hyatt, who on Tuesday explained to the ABC's Law Report how a drone invaded the security and privacy of her suburban backyard.
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Science : NPR

Energy Star Program For Homes And Appliances Is On Trump's Chopping Block Appliance makers and home builders are in Washington, D.C., to celebrate the energy efficiency program. Energy Star is among 50 EPA programs that would be eliminated under the president's budget plan. (Image credit: Paul Sakuma/AP)
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Science-Based Medicine

Faking Peer-ReviewA major cancer journal just retracted 107 papers for faking peer-review, bringing the total for that publisher to 450. How did this happen, and how do we prevent it in the future?
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Gizmodo

How America's Secret Nuke Police Hunted For Dirty Bombs in the 1970s A screenshot from the newly released 1976 short instructional film “A Response to Nuclear Extortion” released to Gizmodo through a Freedom of Information Act request (National Nuclear Security Administration) Bomb threats have been a part of American life since at least the 19th century. But in the 1970s the types of threats shifted dramatically. The people making bomb threats in the US started t
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Scientific American Content: Global

Aspirin May Prevent Cancer from Spreading, New Research ShowsIn addition to relieving headaches and preventing heart attacks, the drug seems to keep malignant cells from spreading -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Elegant Way Online Social Networks 'Heal' After a Death Just as life, for many, now takes place both online and in the physical world, so too does death. Social media has brought back the kind of public grieving often seen in ancient Greece —open performances of sadness that bring people together for communal mourning. And a new study shows that the connections made online after a loss can last for years to come. In the study, published in the journal
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Ars Technica

Killing the Clean Power Plan leaves Trump’s EPA in an awkward place Enlarge / Donald Trump signs H.J. Res. 38, disapproving the rule submitted by the US Department of the Interior known as the Stream Protection Rule. The Department of Interior's Stream Protection Rule, which was signed during the final month of the Obama administration, "addresses the impacts of surface coal mining operations on surface water, groundwater, and the productivity of mining operation
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drones that detect early plant disease could save cropsResearchers are developing drones that could detect plant disease before any visible signs show, allowing farmers to stop infections in their tracks.
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WIRED

The Best Map Yet of What Could Be NASA’s Next Mars Landing Site A new map charts Northeast Syrtis---a promising potential landing site for NASA's next Mars rover---in unprecedented detail. The post The Best Map Yet of What Could Be NASA's Next Mars Landing Site appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Google Wants You to Help Fix the Fake-Fact Problem It Created Search result snippets have made Google an arbiter of facts. Now it wants to outsource the job. The post Google Wants You to Help Fix the Fake-Fact Problem It Created appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix ItTech is a huge growth industry, but it comes at a price. The solution will have to come from people working to move beyond winner-take-all urbanism. The post Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix It appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Trump’s Wall Is Worthless if He Doesn’t Back It Up With Tech If the president wants results as much as a big, beautiful wall, he'll need to shore up the tech behind border security. The post Trump’s Wall Is Worthless if He Doesn’t Back It Up With Tech appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Transcribing Audio Sucks—So Make the Machines Do It Trint is the first product to offer the automated transcription of audio featuring two or more speakers in natural conversation. The post Transcribing Audio Sucks—So Make the Machines Do It appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Police around the world learn to fight global-scale cybercrimeFrom 2009 to 2016, a cybercrime network called Avalanche grew into one of the world's most sophisticated criminal syndicates. It resembled an international conglomerate, staffed by corporate executives, advertising salespeople and customer service representatives.
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Live Science

Distant Dwarf Planet DeeDee Stirs Up the Pluto Planethood DebateRecent observations that a tiny object in our solar system is a likely dwarf planet has some planetary scientists grumbling again about Pluto's demotion to that status.
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Popular Science

Meet the giant diesel engine that powers huge shipping containers Technology A diesel sea beast. This engine is 44 feet tall and 87 feet long. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your headphones aren't spying on you, but your apps areLawyers in the U.S. are claiming that headphone and speaker company Bose, is secretly collecting information about what users listen to when they use its bluetooth wireless headphones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Environmental collapse or sustainable future?Young people have a bleak view of the future. They believe we are more likely heading towards environmental collapse than towards a sustainable world. A new dissertation from Uppsala University shows that although young people in upper secondary school are aware of current environmental issues, they think it is difficult, or impossible, to do anything to avoid environmental collapse.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Conspiracy Theorists May Really Just Be LonelyPeople prone to believing in elaborate cover-ups could just be seeking more meaning in life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

High-Tech Crime Steals the Show in 'Outlaw Tech'Modern-day outlaws are more likely to use a computer than a six-gun to get what they want.
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Live Science

On Tinder, Swipe Right to Save This Endangered RhinoSwipe right to help save the northern white rhinoceros.
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Live Science

'Dragonfly' Drone Could Explore Saturn Moon TitanA relocatable lander could explore the hazy skies of Saturn's intriguing moon Titan, according a new mission proposal.
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Ingeniøren

Sådan afsløres lastbilers snyd med NOx-filtrerende teknologiSnydeudstyr i lastbiler breder sig, fordi det sparer penge. Men nu har politiet udstyr til at finde det.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new sensor increases smartwatch battery life five timesNearly 80% of the battery power in smartwatches is used up by the heart-rate monitor. But a new generation of sensors developed by EPFL startup ActLight consumes five times less energy. They have been tested and calibrated, and are now ready to be mass-produced for use in new models.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New genes are more likely than expected to emerge full-fledged from a genome's non-coding regionsNew genes are more likely to appear on the stage of evolution in full-fledged form rather than gradually take shape through successive stages of "proto genes" that become more and more refined over generations. This is the surprising upshot from research led by Benjamin Wilson and Joanna Masel at the University of Arizona, published as an Advance Online Publication by the scientific journal Nature
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subconscious bias and the battle for justiceThe second-year law school students watched in amazement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infectionScientists have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteria -- to treat a patient near death from a multidrug-resistant bacterium.
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Popular Science

The biggest, baddest motorcycles money can buy Cars The incredible hulks. These are the biggest, most fearsome motorcycles money can buy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Anumeric' people: What happens when a language has no words for numbers?Numbers do not exist in all cultures. There are numberless hunter-gatherers embedded deep in Amazonia, living along branches of the world's largest river tree. Instead of using words for precise quantities, these people rely exclusively on terms analogous to "a few" or "some."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The impact of a guide dog extends far beyond its guiding responsibilitiesPreliminary findings from world-first research reveal the impact of a guide dog extends far beyond its ability to guide its handler.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cutting EPA budget puts babies at risk – and makes little economic sensePresident Donald Trump recently ordered an air strike on Syria, fueled in part by moral outrage at images of babies being injured and killed by airborne toxins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cities are complex systems – let's start looking at them that wayThe way we design our cities needs a serious rethink. After thousands of years of progress in urban development, we plateaued some 60 years ago. Cities are not safer, healthier, more efficient, or more equitable. They are getting worse on these measures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evaluating the performance of computer components designed to run 100 times faster than top supercomputersNIST scientists have developed a novel automated probe system for evaluating the performance of computer components designed to run 100 times faster than today's best supercomputers and consume as little as 1/1000th the energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sea levels could rise by more than three metres, shows new studyGlobal sea levels could rise by more than three metres – over half a metre more than previously thought – this century alone, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Southampton scientist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A simplified fabrication process for high efficiency solar cellsA team of EPFL and CSEM researchers in Neuchâtel presents in Nature Energy a new astonishing method of creating crystalline solar cells with electrical contacts at the rear, suppressing all shadowing at the front. Thanks to the new inexpensive approach, the fabrication process is strongly simplified with efficiencies in the laboratory already surpassing 23 percent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers' world first reveals structure of important drug targetMonash University researchers have used a novel technique to reveal the structure of an important drug target, opening the way for improved treatments of chronic diseases such as osteoporosis, diabetes and obesity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA balloon mission launches, with goal of breaking flight recordNASA on April 24 launched a football-stadium-sized, super-pressure balloon on a mission that aims to set a record for flight duration while carrying a telescope that scientists at the University of Chicago and around the world will use to study cosmic rays.
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Science : NPR

How A Wild Berry Is Helping To Protect China's Giant Pandas And Its Countryside Long before it became a "superfood" in the U.S., schisandra was made into soups and jams and prized as a medicinal plant. Now the berry is at the center of a dramatic new approach to conservation. (Image credit: Courtesy of Josef Brinckmann)
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Long naps lead to less night sleep for toddlersDaytime naps can steal sleep from the night, a small study of toddlers suggests.
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The Atlantic

The Case for Contentious Curricula On August 9, 2014, the police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri. Wilson is white; Brown was black. He was also unarmed. Within a few days, Ferguson was engulfed in riots. In dozens of other American cities, thousands of protesters took to the streets to condemn racism and police brutality. University of Chicago Press Some schools in the Fergu
6h
The Atlantic

Was the Solar System Previously Home to Another Intelligence? When astronomers talk about the search for life elsewhere in our solar system, they usually talk about microbes, simple and resilient forms of life known to exist in the most extreme temperatures and conditions. Space probes have mapped enough of the sun’s planets and moons to show there are no civilizations lurking in this star system, save for the one on Earth. But what if we’re not done lookin
6h
The Atlantic

Today's News: April 26, 2017 —The U.S. military began moving parts of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system to South Korea, a move that’s likely to anger both China and North Korea. —Turkish police have arrested 1,000 people and are looking for another 2,000 in connection with last year’s failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in
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Scientific American Content: Global

Programming as a Way of ThinkingThe power of modern programming languages is that they are expressive, readable, concise, precise, and executable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using lasers to examine space, bugs and bonesA novel way to harness lasers and plasmas may give researchers new ways to explore outer space and to examine bugs, tumors and bones back on planet Earth.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's first spherical drone displayNTT DOCOMO has developed a spherical drone display—an unmanned aerial vehicle that displays LED images on an omnidirectional spherical screen while in flight—which DOCOMO believes to be a world first.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

One Big Legal Obstacle Keeps Trump from Undoing Greenhouse Gas RegulationThe Supreme Court backed a federal rule that CO2 emissions endanger health, and the White House is having trouble working around it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand fish and chips hold human DNA cluesBefore you pop that piece of battered fish in your mouth, be aware it might just hold the key to understanding the origins of a form of DNA memory critical to human development.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parental guidance relinquished to kids regarding digital mediaParents can toss out the owner's manual for that new smartphone or tablet—they can get all the digital assistance they need from their teens.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study settles debate over origins of ants and beesAnts and bees – which by all appearances seem so different – are creepy-crawly cousins, according to new research published in a recent issue of Current Biology.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stabilizing molecule could pave way for lithium-air fuel cellLithium-oxygen fuel cells boast energy density levels comparable to fossil fuels and are thus seen as a promising candidate for future transportation-related energy needs.
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

The next big hit in molecule Hollywood Superfast imaging techniques are giving researchers their best views yet of what happens in the atomic world. Nature 544 408 doi: 10.1038/544408a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No, epigenetics and environmental responsiveness don't undermine Darwinian evolutionThe remarkable adaptability of octopus with new evidence showing they can alter the information copied from their DNA is an example of epigenetics: modification of gene expression by factors "above" the DNA.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The financial cost of opportunity lostWhen we make big financial decisions, such as buying or selling property or even deciding to accept a new job, we are willing to accept a lower price in the short term rather than 'spend' our time to search longer, new Australian research from Macquarie Graduate School of Management (MGSM) has found.
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Science | The Guardian

The ultimate slow TV: a 168-hour show on reindeer migration Using drones, snowmobiles and antler-cams, Norwegian broadcaster NRK is charting the passage of more than 1,000 reindeer as they travel to pastures new. Just as soon as they get a move on High up on a mountain plateau in Lapland there has been a tense silence for some days. A crew from the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) has been stuck with a herd of reindeer who are not intending to mov
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build artificial synapse capable of autonomous learningResearchers from France and the University of Arkansas have created an artificial synapse capable of autonomous learning, a component of artificial intelligence. The discovery opens the door to building large networks that operate in ways similar to the human brain.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UAE's first solar-powered gas station opens in DubaiA government oil company in the United Arab Emirates says it has opened the country's first solar-powered gas station in Dubai.
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Science | The Guardian

New human rights to protect against 'mind hacking' and brain data theft proposed A response to advances in neurotechnology that can read or alter brain activity, new human rights would protect people from theft, abuse and hacking New human rights that would protect people from having their thoughts and other brain information stolen, abused or hacked have been proposed by researchers. The move is a response to the rapid advances being made with technologies that read or alter
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build a single-molecule diodeResearchers of the University of Barcelona have led a project to create a diode out of a 1 nm-sized single molecule with high rectification ratios. Diodes, commonly used in in everyday electronic devices, allow current to flow in one direction while blocking the current in the opposite direction.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify chemical causes of battery 'capacity fade'Like you, me and everyone we know, batteries have a finite lifespan.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA boosting its Argentine link with deep spaceThanks to some high-tech improvements, ESA's radio dish in Argentina will be ready to receive the rising torrent of scientific data beamed back by future missions exploring deep in our Solar System.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding the architectures of inner mitochondrial membrane proteinsMembrane proteins make up approximately a quarter of all gene products and are the targets of over 50 percent of all modern pharmaceutical drugs. The inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteome plays a central role in maintaining mitochondrial physiology and cellular metabolism. Despite their importance, there has been no method to reveal the topology of mitochondrial membrane proteins in live cel
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Security firm: Cyberattacks against Saudi Arabia continueResearchers at U.S. antivirus firm McAfee say the cyberattacks that have hit Saudi Arabia over the past few months are continuing, revealing new details about an unusually disruptive campaign.
7h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor opvarmer vi ikke vandet i undergrunden?En læser vil gerne vide, hvorfor vi satser så meget på vindkraft og olie i stedet for at bruge jordvarme? Det svarer Geus og Sønderborg Fjernvarme på.
7h
Science | The Guardian

Get moving, grandad! Exercise improves brain health in the over 50s | Dean Burnett A recent meta-study suggests that regular exercise improves the functioning of the brain in people aged 50 and over. How does that work, and is it even surprising? A recently-published study has provided strong evidence that regular exercise is very beneficial for the health and functioning of the brain in the over 50s. To many scientists, this is just confirming what we already knew. But for oth
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As Dubai focuses on future, cybersecurity a growing concernA Dubai official says as the city races toward a future of self-driving cars and drones filling up its skies, cybersecurity is becoming a growing concern.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Romania: hundreds of taxis, buses protest UberSome 200 taxis and buses have parked outside the government offices in Romania's capital, Bucharest, demanding that Uber and other online taxi services be outlawed in the country.
7h
The Atlantic

A Trick That Hides Censored Websites Inside Cat Videos A pair of researchers behind a system for avoiding internet censorship wants to deliver banned websites inside of cat videos. Their system uses media from popular, innocuous websites the way a high schooler might use the dust jacket of a textbook to hide the fact that he’s reading a comic book in class. To the overseeing authority—in the classroom, the teacher; on the internet, a government censo
7h
Ingeniøren

Kinesiske sikkerhedsfolk hacker biler med udstyr for 80 kroner Angrebsmetoden har været kendt i årevis, men udstyret har indtil nu været forholdsvis dyrt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kinesiske-sikkerhedsfolk-hacker-biler-med-udstyr-80-kroner-1075916 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren

Nu med landingspladser på tagene: Uber vil have flyvende storby-taxaer i 2020Det kontroversielle transportfirma, har indgået en række partnerskaber, der om få år skal gøre det muligt at transportere kunderne via elektriske VTOL-fly.
7h
Ingeniøren

Tyske dieselbiler sviner seks gange mere, end producenterne sigerHøje NOx-tal fra tests i 'real driving' af helt nye dieselbiler genstarter diskussionen: Hvad skal myndighederne kunne forlange af bilproducenterne?
7h
Dagens Medicin

RLTN-formand forlader midlertidigt OK-forhandlinger Anders Kühnau har søgt om barselsorlov og tager dermed også en pause fra overenskomstforhandlingerne med PLO. Det får ingen betydning for forhandlingerne, siger han.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Syddanmark henter ny koncern­direktør på hovedstads­hospital Kurt Espersen forlader Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital til fordel for en stilling i Region Syddanmark.
8h
Ingeniøren

Britisk forskning udpeger lovende lægemidler mod hjernesygdommeTo typer medicin ser ud til at hindre nerveceller i at slå sig selv ihjel og kan derfor måske stoppe eksempelvis demens.
8h
Ingeniøren

Sådan stiller du de rigtige spørgsmål til jobsamtalen Skal du til jobsamtale? Her er ti tips til, hvordan du stiller spørgsmål, som både giver dig svar på, om virksomheden er det rigtige match for dig - og samtidig skiller dig ud fra mængden. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-stiller-du-de-rigtige-spoergsmaal-jobsamtalen-1423 Jobfinder
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Italian-style coffee reduces the risk of prostate cancerAdd another typical component of the Italian way of life to the list of foods characterizing one of the most healthy populations in the world. This time it's coffee, prepared the Italian way. A research by the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention - I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Italy, in collaboration with the Italian National Institute of Health and the I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIPPO's molecular balancing act helps nerves not short circuitScientists report Nature Communications it may be possible to therapeutically fine tune a constantly shifting balance of molecular signals to ensure the body's peripheral nerves are insulated and functioning normally. In a study published April 26, they suggest this may be a way to treat neuropathies or prevent the development of peripheral nerve sheath tumors. They discovered genetic dysfunction
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link discovered between immune system, brain structure and memoryIn two independent studies, scientists at the University of Basel have demonstrated that both the structure of the brain and several memory functions are linked to immune system genes. The scientific journals Nature Communications and Nature Human Behaviour have published the results of the research.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common pesticide damages honey bee's ability to flyBiologists at UC San Diego have provided the first evidence that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly. The study, which employed a specially constructed bee 'flight mill,' raises concerns about how pesticides affect the honey bees' capacity to pollinate and long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds major health benefits linked to indoor temperature variationExposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI offers greater range of diagnostic and therapeutic applicationsA team of investigators based at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital has devised a means of noninvasively tracking nanodiamonds with magnetic resonance imaging, opening up a host of new applications.
8h
Viden

Brinkmann: Klimaredning kræver ny teknologi og ny adfærdBioteknologi kan hjælpe klimaet og mætte jordens voksende befolkning. Men teknologien har selv været med til at skabe nogle af de problemer, den nu lover at løse, mener psykologiprofessor Svend Brinkmann.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Region vil forlænge forsøg med praksisklinik Lægedækningsaftalens muligheder for at afprøve nye praksisformer får Region Hovedstaden til at søge om at forlænge levetiden for praksisklinikken på Bornholm.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Common pesticide damages honey bee's ability to flyBiologists at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly, raising concerns about how pesticides affect their capacity to pollinate and the long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI offers greater range of diagnostic and therapeutic applicationsNanodiamonds - synthetic industrial diamonds only a few nanometers in size - have recently attracted considerable attention because of the potential they offer for the targeted delivery of vaccines and cancer drugs and for other uses. Thus far, options for imaging nanodiamonds have been limited. Now a team of investigators based at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massach
8h
NYT > Science

As Rising Seas Erode Shorelines, Tasmania Shows What Can Be LostPort Arthur, the famous prison that housed the British Empire’s toughest convicts in the 19th century, is facing an onslaught from the sea.
8h
The Atlantic

How Trump Alienated the Judiciary President Trump’s first 100 days deserve at least one superlative: The Trump administration has managed to alienate the courts to a degree that some administrations take years to achieve. The latest Trump defeat came Monday in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. That case, County of Santa Clara v. Trump , has now produced a nationwide injunction against another Trump
8h
The Atlantic

The Quantified Presidency First, it was crowd size . Then, it was health-care bill size . On Tuesday, the Trump administration continued its habit of conflating quantity with quality by releasing a list detailing President Donald Trump’s “ historic accomplishments ” from his first 100 days in office, a milestone he will officially reach on Saturday. The list boasts of the number of Trump’s Congressional Review Act resolut
8h
The Atlantic

Why Is Trump Risking a Trade War With Canada? Donald Trump is not the first U.S. president to tangle with Canada over lumber. In fact, the first U.S. president to do so was the first U.S. president. George Washington’s administration saw a dispute over ownership of valuable forests on the border between New Brunswick and present-day Maine. So despite Trump’s recent tough talk about the trade relationship with America’s neighbor to the north,
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Science : NPR

Recordings Reveal That Baby Humpback Whales 'Whisper' To Their Mothers Scientists recently tracked eight baby whales using special sound and movement recorders. The sounds the babies made turned out to be far different from the eerie songs of adult male humpbacks. (Image credit: Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology)
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The Atlantic

Drinking Four Cups of Coffee Is Probably Safe “Bring it!” A Los Angeles news anchor said earlier this month , in response to the announcement that “the world’s strongest coffee” is now available in the United States. The product is called Black Insomnia, a playful nod to a potentially debilitating medical condition that can be caused by the product. The anchor’s tone took a dramatic decrescendo as she read from the teleprompter: “The site Ca
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Dagens Medicin

DSAM ændrer i ledelsen Bestyrelsen i DSAM har lagt an til en ny ledelsesstruktur, der – ifølge formand Anders Beich – skal rette op på selskabets svage organisation.
9h
Dagens Medicin

To kræftforskere får hver 11 mio. kr.Novo Nordisk Fonden har uddelt Hallas-Møller Stipendium til to unge forskningsledere, der begge arbejder med grundforskning inden for kræftsygdomme.
9h
Viden

QUIZ: Er du hverdagens klimaekspert?Ved du, hvad man skal undgå, hvis man gerne vil minimere udledningen af CO2 og andre drivhusgasser?
9h
The Atlantic

What Trump Still Doesn't Understand About the Holocaust Given his administration’s bizarre rhetorical struggles when it comes to anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, the bar for Donald Trump’s speech on Tuesday at the Holocaust Memorial Museum was low. All he really had to do was show he understands that anti-Semitism is bad, and that the Holocaust happened mostly to Jews. He did that, and more. At times, his speech was genuinely moving. It was also distu
9h
The Atlantic

How Democrats Learned to Love Trump's Negotiating Style Mock Donald Trump’s legislative ignorance if you will, but for a brief, shining stretch during the past week, he managed to bring about a rare Washington phenomenon: House and Senate Democrats saying nice things about their GOP counterparts. Publicly. With straight faces. That the president accomplished this entirely by accident makes the feat no less remarkable. It has been like a scene straight
9h
The Atlantic

A Tax Plan That Befits the 'King of Debt' “I am the king of debt,” Donald Trump famously boasted during last year’s campaign. On Wednesday, the president is going to set about proving it—but perhaps not in the way he originally meant. All indications are that the tax plan the White House is slated to unveil will include what Trump has described as a “massive” cut in the rate that corporations and many small businesses pay to the governme
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Science | The Guardian

The discovery of alien life may be close. How will religion survive it? | Santhosh MathewEncounters with new worlds and new life will present religions with the ultimate theological conundrum. But they will adapt, as they have done before About two decades ago, it was quite uncertain whether stars other than our own sun even hosted their own planets. However, according to Nasa, the latest count of confirmed exoplanets stands at around 3,500 – and at least six of them are potential Ear
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bugs have stranglehold on Southern California region's urban forestThe trees that shade, cool and feed people in California from Ventura County to the Mexican border are dying so fast that within a few years it's possible that the region will look, feel, sound and smell much less pleasant than it does now.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Surprise El Niño causes devastation but offers lessons for ecologists How Peruvian coastal deserts respond to rains will aid future disaster response. Nature 544 405 doi: 10.1038/544405a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Climate change is making algal blooms worse Rising ocean temperatures drive more intense and longer lasting toxic outbreaks. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21884
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Dog family tree reveals hidden history of canine diversity Genetic map showing how dog breeds are related provides a wealth of information about their origins. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21885
9h
WIRED

This App Guilts You Into Not Buying From Crummy Companies The Aspiration Impact Measurement rates companies based on how they treat people, and the planet. The post This App Guilts You Into Not Buying From Crummy Companies appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump's constant tweeting isn't lifting Twitter's profitYou'd think Twitter would be able to milk its status as President Donald Trump's megaphone. But the company still faces stagnant user growth, has never made a profit and may even report a quarterly revenue decline Wednesday, a first since going public.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mozambique battles illegal logging to save tropical forestsA squad of Mozambican forest rangers made their first arrest just minutes after arriving at a checkpoint near the northern port city of Pemba.
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Science | The Guardian

Dinosaur click-bait: is getting your attention more important than getting it right? | Elsa Panciroli Scientists can’t turn their backs on the engagement of mass-media, but when it comes to inaccurate and sensational headlines, do the ends justify the means? “The public is mostly made of people who just don’t care. The media know they don’t understand the science and they don’t want to learn about it either.” An established scientist bitterly confesses to me his experiences with public outreach,
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Internet firms winding up for a fight on 'net neutrality'Internet companies are readying for a showdown with telecoms and a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TED: Smart machines to recover lost memories, mind your childrenIntelligent machines of the future will help restore memory, mind your children, fetch your coffee and even care for aging parents.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China talking with European Space Agency about moon outpostRepresentatives of China and the European Space Agency are discussing potential collaboration on a human outpost on the moon and other possible joint endeavors, according to a spokesman for the European agency and Chinese media reports.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AT&T sheds more lucrative wireless customers in 1QAT&T Inc. on Tuesday said it lost more of its most lucrative wireless customers during the first three months of the year as the country's biggest mobile carriers try to lure customers from each other with offers of unlimited data plans.
10h
Viden

Fjern 85 procent af CO2-udledningen: Spis svin i stedet for oksekødDu behøver ikke at blive vegetar for at reducere din udledning af drivhusgasser betydeligt.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's rare milu deer return in victory for conservationThe newborn fawn walks unsteadily among the trees that were once part of the Chinese emperor's hunting grounds, where more than a century before its forebears died out in their native China.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators: studyNewborn humpback whales and their mothers whisper to each other to escape potential predators, scientists reported Wednesday, revealing the existence of a previously unknown survival technique.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US should stay in Paris climate accord: energy secretaryThe United States should stay in the Paris climate accord but renegotiate it, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday, alleging that some European countries were not doing enough to curb emissions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China launches its first domestically-made aircraft carrierChina has launched its first aircraft carrier built entirely on its own, in a demonstration of the growing technical sophistication of its defense industries and determination to safeguard its maritime territorial claims and crucial trade routes.
11h
Science | The Guardian

The first Brexit: Submerged landscapes of the North Sea and Channel The British Isles split from Europe several thousand years ago. Now, maritime archaeology is revealing a lost landscape on the seafloor The British Isles separated from the European continent approximately 8,000 years ago. For this Brexit there was no referendum or bus, no Leavers or Remainers, nor was it hard or soft. This was a watery Brexit as rising sea levels filled the Channel and created t
11h
Ingeniøren

Sundhedsøkonom: Intet bevis for påstået milliardbesparelse med Sundhedsplatformen Det nye it-system, Sundhedsplatformen, i Region H skal medføre økonomiske gevinster i form af ændret adfærd hos personale - men der bare ikke empiri for antagelsen, påpeger professor i sundhedsøkonomi. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/professor-forventet-milliardbesparelse-med-sundhedsplatformen-uden-dokumentation-1075788 Version2
11h
Ingeniøren

Seks tegn på, at du mangler relationer på jobbet Det faglige er selvfølgelig vigtigt, men skal du yde maksimalt, skal du også trives sammen med dine kolleger. Her er en liste med advarselssignaler, der viser, om dine relationer er gode nok https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/seks-tegn-paa-at-du-mangler-relationer-paa-jobbet-7638 Jobfinder
11h
NeuWrite West

Our eyes and brain. Relationship status: It’s complicated. “…Crosses over? Like in an X shape? Well that seems ridiculous”, my younger sister scoffed. After 10 minutes of me trying to briefly explain our visual system to her over the phone, she still couldn’t believe that sending signals from our eyes to our brain wasn’t a straight “Point A to Point B” system. While any human with common sense would agree with my sister’s logic, transmitting signals from
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Physics of throwing analysed by scientistsScientists have calculated the optimal strategy for throwing something accurately, even a ball of paper.
12h
WIRED

Handy ‘Stress Map’ Helps Cyclists Avoid the Scariest of Streets Knowing which streets support cycling is a big step towards making safer spaces for those on two wheels. The post Handy 'Stress Map' Helps Cyclists Avoid the Scariest of Streets appeared first on WIRED .
12h
The Scientist RSS

Reactions to the March for ScienceThe Scientist's Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Providers who prescribe PrEP don't see most patients increasing risky sexual behaviorA new study examining medical provider attitudes toward prescribing PrEP to prevent HIV found that those who already prescribe it do not see widespread increases in risky sexual behavior among their patients as a result.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to imbalanced microbiomeScientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered abnormal levels of specific gut bacteria related to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, or ME/CFS, in patients with and without concurrent irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. Findings are published in the journal Microbiome.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seabird parents compensate for struggling partnersFor species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key -- it's as true for birds as it is for us! A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

For 3,000 Startups, Y Combinator’s Class Is in Session OnlineThe accelerator’s new Startup School offers a virtual way into the startup scene even if you’re not based in the Bay Area.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

Berkeley Lab Program Champions Neglected Energy EntrepreneursCyclotron Road is trying to provide a way out of the dead end that is the fate of most energy research.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Eksplosion på kinesisk fabrik giver global mangel på bredspektret antibiotikaDanske hospitalsapoteker kan blive ramt af reducerede og usikre leverancer af Piperacillin/Tazobactam resten af 2017.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seabird parents compensate for struggling partnersFor species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key—it's as true for birds as it is for us! A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack.
13h
Ingeniøren

Molbohistorien om trafiktavler: Slukkede tavler bliver hængendeDe slukkede elektroniske oplysningstavler langs landets motorveje bliver hængende året ud, mens politikerne diskuterer, om tavlerne skal pilles ned eller tændes igen.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators, study finds Scientists reveal unique, intimate form of communication between humpback mothers and calves as well as silent method to initiate suckling Newborn humpback whales and their mothers whisper to each other to escape potential predators, scientists reported Wednesday, revealing the existence of a previously unknown survival technique. “They don’t want any unwanted listeners,” researcher Simone Videse
14h
WIRED

TED Day Two: $1 Million for Tech to Spread Health Care Everywhere With threatened cuts to foreign aid, technology could help homegrown health care workers cover at least some of the gap. The post TED Day Two: $1 Million for Tech to Spread Health Care Everywhere appeared first on WIRED .
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistanceCancer cells deploy an ancient mechanism used by single-celled organisms to elevate their mutation rate in response to stress. This discovery explains one of the best-known hallmarks of cancer -- its high mutation rate, which contributes to the rapid evolution of drug resistance.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overfishing in one of world's most productive fishing regions, new study suggestsScientists used images from satellites and flyovers to count the number of small boats, or pangas, to find that fishing in Gulf of California, which separates Baja California and mainland Mexico, is over capacity. The analysis suggests that future investment in the region's fisheries may not be economically or ecologically viable.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cold weather linked to mortality risks in Texas, research showsCold weather increases the risk of mortality in Texas residents, according to researchers. In the state's 12 major metro areas from 1990 to 2011, researchers found that cold temperatures significantly increased the risk of mortality by up to 5 percent with a 1 degree Celsius decrease in temperature in the winter.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists unravel how protein impacts intellectual disabilityA protein helps balance nerve cell communication, scientists have shown in a new study. This new study could have implications for potential treatments of intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental disorders.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Political left, right similarly motivated to avoid rival viewsPeople on both sides of the political aisle are similarly motivated to dismiss monetary enticements in order to distance themselves from hearing or reading opposing ideals and information, new research reveals.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areasResearchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Afghanistan and Iraq veterans' opioid use similar to that of civiliansOpioid use among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans is roughly comparable to that of the general US population, suggests new research.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Unicorn' shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine, bacterial infectionsA dark slithering creature four feet long that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines has been discovered by researchers. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolerate--and even benefit from--them.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes associated with resilience against brain pathology identifiedResearchers have discovered two genes, known as UNC5C and ENC1, that are associated with aging individuals having better memory and brain function than would be expected, given the amount of pathologies that accumulated in their brains.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor marker for aggressive ovarian cancer identifiedPatients who expressed the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 had more aggressive cancers and were more likely to die early from their disease, according to a large study.
16h
TEDTalks (video)

Why the only future worth building includes everyone | His Holiness Pope FrancisA single individual is enough for hope to exist, and that individual can be you, says His Holiness Pope Francis in this searing TED Talk delivered directly from Vatican City. In a hopeful message to people of all faiths, to those who have power as well as those who don't, the spiritual leader provides illuminating commentary on the world as we currently find it and calls for equality, solidarity a
16h
Live Science

Eureka! The Archimedes PrincipleArchimedes discovered the law of buoyancy while taking a bath and ran through the streets naked to announce his discovery.
16h
Live Science

Testicles: Facts, Function & DiseasesThe testicles are the primary male reproductive organs. They produce gametes, or sperm, and they secrete hormones, primarily testosterone.
16h
Scientific American Content: Global

Selective Breeding Molds Foxes into PetsEvolutionary biologist Lee Dugatkin talks about the six-decade Siberian experiment with foxes that has revealed details about domestication in general. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
Gizmodo

What Will Stop Uber From Being Just Another Failure in the Sky? Image: Uber Flying cars have been a sci-fi prediction since rubber first hit the road with the street automobile, but the fantasy of flying cars has always been just that—a fantasy. For some reason, Uber thinks it can transform this pie-in-the-sky concept into actual vehicles cruising through the air. Advertisement Amidst a slew recent of scandals, including a lawsuit over allegations of stolen i
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Whispering' keeps humpbacks safe from killer whales, study findsNewborn humpback whales 'whisper' to their mothers to avoid being overheard by killer whales, researchers have discovered. The recordings -- the first obtained from tags directly attached to the whales -- are published today in Functional Ecology.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In a neuro-techno future, human rights laws will need to be revisitedNew human rights laws to prepare for advances in neurotechnology that put the 'freedom of the mind' at risk have been proposed today in the open access journal Life Sciences, Society and Policy.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What's coming next? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speechA new study has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. Their research reveals how individual neurons coordinate with neural populations to anticipate events, a process that is impaired in many neurological and psychiatric disorders such as dyslexia, schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New survey hints at exotic origin for the Cold SpotA supervoid is unlikely to explain a 'Cold Spot' in the cosmic microwave background, according to the results of a new survey, leaving room for exotic explanations like a collision between universes.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients with positive fecal screening test, sooner is better for colonoscopyThe risk of colorectal cancer increased significantly when colonoscopy was delayed by more than nine months following a positive fecal screening test, according to a large study.
17h
Ars Technica

Appeals court: Uber engineer can’t get help from the 5th Amendment Enlarge (credit: Getty Images ) Anthony Levandowski, the embattled Uber engineer who has been accused of illegally downloading thousands of documents while he worked at Google, won't be able to stop Uber from handing over documents by pleading the Fifth Amendment. That's the decision (PDF) of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, published today. Levandowski filed an emergency motion w
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Science | The Guardian

LGBTIQ rights: 'Being gay in Stem workplaces can be difficult' Nearly half of LGBTIQ Australians hide their sexual identity at work, with many experiencing homophobic abuse. It’s time to do better In 2015 a US survey found that LGBTIQ scientists felt more accepted in their workplaces than their peers in other professions did. The Queer in Stem survey, published in the Journal of Homosexuality, surveyed 1,400 LGBTIQ workers in science, technology, engineering
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In a neuro-techno future, human rights laws will need to be revisitedNew human rights laws to prepare for advances in neurotechnology that put the 'freedom of the mind' at risk have been proposed today in the open access journal Life Sciences, Society and Policy.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bad feelings can motivate cancer patientsFeeling down is a common side effect of being diagnosed with cancer. Anxiety, guilt, and distress often come hand-in-hand with diagnosis and treatment. But a recent study shows that these seemingly negative emotions can actually be good for patients.
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Hitting a Wall What We’re Following Border Blues: As Congress struggles to strike a deal on a spending bill this week, President Trump is renewing his calls for the government to fund a wall on the Mexican border. But for all his insistence on Twitter , Trump has indicated he’d back down on the demand to avoid a government shutdown—which makes the second time his opponents in Congress have called his bluff . Me
17h
Live Science

Trademark Style: Why No One's Naming Their Baby IvankaThe Trump family isn't setting any baby-name trends.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fighting infections with a silver swordSilver has been used to fight infections since ancient times. Today, researchers are using sophisticated techniques such as the gene-editing platform Crispr-Cas9 to take a closer look at how silver poisons pathogens. The work is yielding new insights on how to create effective antimicrobials and avoid the pitfalls of antimicrobial resistance.
18h
The Atlantic

A Federal Judge Blocked Trump's 'Sanctuary Cities' Executive Order A federal district court in California on Tuesday blocked the Trump administration from enforcing part of a January executive order to defund “sanctuary cities,” ruling that the directive likely exceeded federal law and unfairly targeted those jurisdictions. “Federal funding that bears no meaningful relationship to immigration enforcement cannot be threatened merely because a jurisdiction chooses
18h
The Scientist RSS

Artificial Womb Supports Premature Fetal Lamb DevelopmentThe lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of obesity influenced by changes in our genesA child's risk of obesity as they grow up can be influenced by modifications to their DNA prior to birth, a new University of Southampton study has shown.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link between alcohol consumption and cardiac arrhythmiasResearchers who studied beer drinkers at the Munich Octoberfest have found that the more alcohol consumed the higher was the likelihood of developing abnormal heart rhythms called cardiac arrhythmias. The research, which is published in the European Heart Journal, is important because it is thought that arrhythmias can, in some circumstances, lead to atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart beat th
18h
Live Science

Psychedelic Drugs Really Do Trigger a 'Higher' State of ConsciousnessPeople in the study who used psychedelic drugs showed higher patterns of neural activity.
18h
Ars Technica

Juicero teardown hints at a very expensively built product Enlarge / In this post a venture capital partner pulls apart this machine. (credit: Juicero ) A product designer and venture capital partner took apart a Juicero to see what made the notorious $400 juice presser so expensive. What he found was eight separate machined parts and a slew of custom plastic pieces that likely made the presser more expensive than it needed to be. Juicero came under fire
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Big Think

Is It Possible To Break Free From Your Political Bubble? A new extension suggests that you follow people you don't agree with. Will this help pop your bubble? Read More
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Science | The Guardian

People whose 'brain age' is older than their real age more likely to die early Scientists at Imperial College London used MRI scans and algorithms to produce computer-generated brain age and spot risk of dying young Doctors may be able to warn patients if they are at risk of early death by analysing their brains, British scientists have discovered. Those whose brains appeared older than their true age were more likely to die early and to be in worse physical and mental heal
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Science | The Guardian

'Granny style' is best way to take a basketball free throw, study shows Mathematical analysis reveals that for players with good control, using an unorthodox underarm technique gives better odds of scoring It might invite ridicule, but it gets results. A scientific analysis has concluded that using a “granny style” underarm technique is the optimal way to take a free throw in basketball. Adopting the unorthodox strategy could result in marginal gains for professional
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wind, rain play key role in breeding patterns of migratory tree swallowsWind and precipitation play a crucial role in advancing or delaying the breeding cycles of North American tree swallows, according to the results of a new University of Colorado Boulder-led study.
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Futurity.org

How tests fail to detect ‘hidden hearing loss’ Common hearing tests may not detect subtle kinds of hearing loss, particularly those that make hearing in noisy rooms or loud crowds difficult. This type of “hidden hearing loss” paradoxically presents itself as essentially normal hearing in the clinic, where audiograms—the gold-standard for measuring hearing thresholds—typically take place in a quiet room. The reason some forms of hearing loss m
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistanceThe human body produces about a gallon of mucus per day. By studying and replicating mucus’ natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, scientists hope to find new methods for combatting infections and antibiotic resistance.
19h
Science | The Guardian

Q&A: saturated fat, your health and what the experts say The key points in a debate between cardiology experts over the link between fat, cholesterol and coronary disease What’s the fuss about? A furore has blown up over whether eating saturated fat increases the risk of coronary heart disease after three cardiologists said that “the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong”. They also dismissed the drive for foods
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with aortic aneurysms fare much worse than men, new study findsMortality rates for women undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms are nearly twice those for men, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Popular belief that saturated fats clog up arteries 'plain wrong' say expertsThe widely held belief among doctors and the public that saturated fats clog up the arteries, and so cause coronary heart disease, is just 'plain wrong,' contend experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
19h
Ars Technica

Silicon Valley security robot beat up in parking lot, police say Enlarge / A Knightscope K5 security robot. (credit: Knightscope ) A 300-pound egg-shaped security robot was punched to the ground by an allegedly drunken man outside a Silicon Valley shopping center, Mountain View police said. A 41-year-old Mountain View man has been arrested in connection to the alleged parking-lot altercation with the Knightscope -made droid. The accused robo-assailant, who fac
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is climate change responsible for record-setting extreme weather events?After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour or drought, climate scientists inevitably receive phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role.
19h
Futurity.org

This combo may trigger memory loss in Alzheimer’s Low levels of a brain protein may combine with another long-suspected culprit to trigger the learning and memory losses in Alzheimer’s disease, a study shows. The discovery should open up important new research areas, scientists say—and may one day lead to better therapies for the disease and other forms of cognitive decline. “The key point here is that it’s the combination of amyloid and low NPT
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Annual flu jab may pose greater risk for lung cancer patients under immunotherapyLung cancer patients treated with PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors may be at increased risk of adverse events after receiving the seasonal influenza vaccination, according to the first study measuring this effect.
19h
Gizmodo

AT&T Launches Fake 5G Network in Desperate Attempt to Seem Innovative Image: Gizmodo Have you heard? AT&T is going to “pave the way for the next generation of faster speeds” with something called 5G Evolution. No, it’s not actually a new 5G network, the much hyped successor to 4G that’s supposed to change the way we connect to the internet. It’s just a re-branded 4G offering, and AT&T’s sad attempt at seeming innovative. Advertisement If you already feel confused,
19h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Wall They or Won't They? Today in 5 Lines President Trump insisted that the border wall “will get built,” despite backing down on demands to fund the project in this week’s spending bill. A federal judge in San Francisco blocked a portion of Trump’s January executive order on immigration aimed at cutting federal funding to so-called “sanctuary cities.” The leaders of the House Oversight Committee said Trump’s former Nati
19h
Gizmodo

Adequate Man Which TV Shows Have The Most People Boned To? Adequate Man Which TV Shows Have The Most People Boned To? | Jezebel Bill O’Reilly Didn’t Harass Me, But His Viewers Did | Fusion Judge Blocks Trump’s Executive Order Threatening Sanctuary Cities | The Root What Happened to Your Revolution, Bernie Sanders? |
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Gizmodo

What the Fuck Is Going On With Star Trek: Discovery? Image: CBS Star Trek: Discovery is delayed yet again. A beloved Next Generation actor was reportedly offered an insulting amount of money to appear on the show. It lost a showrunner with a well-deserved fan base of his own. And CBS has made poor marketing decision after poor marketing decision. So, how screwed is this show? Short answer: Very . Advertisement Star Trek : Discovery was initially an
19h
Ars Technica

Lawsuit: Mylan’s epic EpiPen price hike wasn’t about greed—it’s worse Enlarge / Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Bresch testifies on Capitol Hill in a hearing on "Reviewing the Rising Price of EpiPens." (credit: Getty | Alex Wong ) When Mylan dramatically increased the price of its life-saving EpiPen devices, it drew sharp rebuke all around for what seemed like a purely greedy—and heartless—move. But according to a lawsuit filed by French drug maker Sanofi, the move wasn’t j
19h
Ars Technica

10% of Windows 10 machines upgraded to Creators Update; 60% of phones eligible Enlarge / The announcement of the Creators Update in October 2016. Two weeks into its phased rollout, the Creators Update (version 1703) is on about ten percent of Windows 10 machines. That number comes from AdDuplex , which collects statistics from Windows 10 machines running apps built with its advertising SDK. 9.8 percent of Windows 10 machines are on 1703, 82.1 percent are on the Anniversary
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cassini completes final -- and fateful -- Titan flyby: Dive to Saturn nextNASA's Cassini spacecraft has had its last close brush with Saturn's hazy moon Titan and is now beginning its final set of 22 orbits around the ringed planet.
20h
Gizmodo

Air Pollution in Subway Systems May Be Much Worse Than We Realized Image: Dennis Jarvis/Flickr As anyone who has ridden the subway knows, the air down there is unpleasant. New research done in Canada shows that air pollution levels in Toronto’s subway system are ten times greater than those above ground. It’s a troubling realization for subway-goers, but there are ways to keep these underground systems clean. Advertisement A new study led by University of Toront
20h
Popular Science

3 things to do now to check up on your data privacy settings Technology With Unroll.Me in the internet’s crosshairs, here’s are some best practices to manage how you share your information This week, Unroll.Me found itself in an unfriendly spotlight. Read on.
20h
Ars Technica

Five years later, legal Megaupload data is still trapped on dead servers Enlarge / Following the Megaupload bust, the feds took more than 1,000 servers belonging to Carpathia Hosting. The servers, now offline in a climate-controlled facility, held more than 25 petabytes of data. (credit: Getty Images) It's been more than five years since the government accused Megaupload and its founder Kim Dotcom of criminal copyright infringement. While Dotcom himself was arrested i
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights on triggering muscle formationA team of scientists led by Lorenzo Puri, M.D., Ph.D., has identified a previously unrecognized step in stem cell-mediated muscle regeneration. The study, published in Genes and Development, provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that impair muscle stem cells during the age-associated decline in muscle function, and into the connection between accelerated muscle aging and muscular dys
20h
Gizmodo

Leaked Documents Reveal the NSA Spying on Scientists to Find 'Nefarious' Genetic Research Image: Shutterstock A new document made public this week via Edward Snowden’s leak of NSA documents reveals a fascinating aim of signals intelligence program : The agency, it turns out, monitored international scientific developments in hopes of detecting “nefarious” genetic engineering projects more than a decade ago. Advertisement SIGINT is intelligence collected by monitoring electronic and co
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Cassini poised to plunge beneath Saturn's ringsAn unmanned NASA spacecraft, Cassini, is poised to plunge into the gap between Saturn and its rings, a pioneering journey that could offer an unprecedented view of the sixth planet from the Sun.
20h
Popular Science

Rigging up: How to pack for a month drilling oil Science Or for a month stuck anywhere, really. Neil Deemers regularly spends 28 days on an oil rig anchored in 12,000-feet-deep water off the Gulf Coast. These are his essentials.
20h
Big Think

Is Not Fighting Enough a Sign of a Doomed Relationship? Dr. Gottman, a psychologist who studies relationships, has found there's a "magic ratio" for how much successful couples argue. Read More
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Gizmodo

Why It's Time For America To Leave Afghanistan Behind U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis looks out over Kabul as he arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters on April 24, 2017 in in Kabul, Afghanistan. Photo credit Getty Images In Afghanistan, springtime means one thing: the start of another brutal fighting season. And if 2017 is anything like 2016 was, this fighting season could be the one that breaks the fledgling Afghan National Ar
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Primitive human 'lived much more recently'Homo naledi could be from just 200,000 years ago, not three million, a study suggests.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genetic variants associated with extreme old ageThe search for the genetic determinants of extreme longevity has been challenging, with the prevalence of centenarians (people older than 100) just one per 5,000 population in developed nations. But a recently published study that combines four studies of extreme longevity, has identified new rare variants in chromosomes 4 and 7 associated with extreme survival and with reduced risks for cardiovas
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When artificial intelligence evaluates chess championsSince the 1970s, the system designed by the Hungarian, Arpad Elo, has been ranking chess players according to the result of their games. The best players have the highest ranking, and the difference in ELO points between two players predicts the probability of either player winning a given game. If players perform better or worse than predicted, they either gain or lose points accordingly.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes associated with resilience against brain pathology identifiedResearchers have discovered two genes, known as UNC5C and ENC1, that are associated with aging individuals having better memory and brain function than would be expected, given the amount of pathologies that accumulated in their brains. They reported their findings in an article published in the journal PLOS Medicine on April 24.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Unicorn' shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine and bacterial infectionsNortheastern professor Daniel Distel and his colleagues have discovered a dark slithering creature four feet long that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolera
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estimating wealth from outer spaceCities and villages illuminated at night are common in wealthy regions such as Europe. This is different in developing countries: Satellite data shows that many dark spots are visible next to illuminated regions. Two political scientists evaluated satellite data of night light emissions and compared them with wealth estimates collected in large surveys.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemotherapy drug may increase vulnerability to depressionA chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer may increase vulnerability to depression by stopping new brain cells from growing, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mental illness does not affect bariatric surgery weight loss resultsA new study compares bariatric surgery outcomes according to preoperative mental illness. Results indicates that the state of mental illness does not affect weight loss results.
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Science | The Guardian

How the modern weather map was born Francis Galton’s synoptic chart described conditions of the previous day and sidestepped the pitfalls of prediction The first newspaper weather map was published in the Times on 1 April 1875, the work of polymath Francis Galton, an explorer and anthropologist who was also a statistician and meteorologist. The map was not a forecast, but a representation of the conditions of the previous day. This
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Gizmodo

Never Forget When Mark Zuckerberg Tried to Bury the Fake News Scandal Image: AP The New York Times Magazine has an interesting story out today about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, fake news, and Facebook’s role as the world’s most prominent information distributor. It’s all part of Facebook’s ongoing public relations freak out surrounding the prevalence of fake news and hoaxes spread on the platform. The company is trying to fix the problem now , but it sure is funn
21h
The Atlantic

The Restaurants Hurt Most by Minimum-Wage Hikes For restaurant workers, especially kitchen staff who don’t receive tips , a boost in the minimum wage is usually welcome. But restaurant owners don’t always see it that way. They often argue that raising the price floor for labor can cause businesses running tight margins—as many restaurants do—to shutter. A new study from Harvard University in conjunction with Yelp found that while minimum-wage
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who you are influences what you eat more than food shopping environment, study findsMuch attention and effort has focused on providing healthy food outlets in areas considered 'food deserts' in order to improve a neighborhood's diet. But a new study finds that who a person is may matter more than where they shop in predicting their consumption of unhealthy food.
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Gizmodo

Gal Gadot Filmed Her Wonder Woman Reshoots Five Months Pregnant Because She's Wonder Woman Warner Bros. When you see Gal Gadot kicking ass (again) as Wonder Woman later this summer, you should try to remember there’s a pretty good chance that you’re seeing the actress doing her crazy stunts five months pregnant . Advertisement Last November, Gadot showed up on set near London in her Wonder Woman costume prepared to do a number of reshoots necessary for the film, standard movie-making p
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Ars Technica

NSA backdoor detected on >55,000 Windows boxes can now be remotely removed Enlarge (credit: Countercept ) After Microsoft officials dismissed evidence that more than 10,000 Windows machines on the Internet were infected by a highly advanced National Security Agency backdoor , private researchers are stepping in to fill the void. The latest example of this open source self-help came on Tuesday with the release of a tool that can remotely uninstall the DoublePulsar implan
21h
Live Science

“Outlaw Tech” Trailer: Counterfeiters and High-Tech Crime | VideoA new series from the Science Channel introduces the cutting-edge technology and science behind some of the last decade’s most daring and outrageous crimes.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa waits on Cassini radio contact from SaturnThe probe should have completed its first plunge in between the planet's rings and cloudtops.
21h
Science : NPR

The Lowly Wax Worm May Hold The Key To Biodegrading Plastic More than a trillion plastic bags are used annually. They're made of a notoriously resilient kind of plastic called polyethylene – but scientists have found that wax worms are able to break them down. (Image credit: Wayne Boo/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab)
21h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Fossil’ groundwater is not immune to modern-day pollutionAncient groundwater that is thousands of years old is still susceptible to modern pollution, new research suggests.
21h
Big Think

That Time Tesla (Briefly) Became the Most Valuable Car Company in the U.S. Tesla's market cap surpassed that of GM and Ford on April 10, 2017. Read More
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Big Think

Researchers Discover How the Naked Mole Rat Can Survive 18 Minutes Without Oxygen The biological process they go through is similar to how yeast turns sugar into alcohol. Read More
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Ars Technica

Study on AT&T’s fiber deployment: 1Gbps for the rich, 768kbps for the poor (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) AT&T's deployment of fiber-to-the-home in California has been heavily concentrated in higher-income neighborhoods, giving affluent people access to gigabit speeds while others are stuck with Internet service that doesn't even meet state and federal broadband standards, according to a new analysis. "Because there is no regulatory oversight of AT&T’s fiber-to-th
21h
The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: ‘Ode Recited at the Harvard Commemoration, July 21, 1865’ by James Russell Lowell In a eulogy for James Russell Lowell, novelist Henry James wrote: He is one of the happy figures of literature. He had his trammels and his sorrows, but he drank deep of the full, sweet cup, and he will long count as an erect fighting figure on the side of optimism and beauty. He was strong without bitterness and bright without folly. J. A. J. Wilcox and S. W. Rouse / Library of Congress This bri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Environmentalists sue government for Lake Erie's toxic algaeEnvironmental groups in Ohio and Michigan sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday, accusing it of dragging its feet on protecting Lake Erie from harmful algae that have fouled drinking water supplies in recent years.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rosetta online server that includes everyoneOur bodies are made of biomolecules like proteins, nucleic acids, fats and sugars. These biomolecules are folded into specific 3D structures—predetermined by the DNA and RNA sequences that build them—which allows them to do everything they need to do in our bodies.
21h
WIRED

Google’s Finally Offering Rides in Its Self-Driving Minivans And starts a new chapter of its autonomous saga. The post Google's Finally Offering Rides in Its Self-Driving Minivans appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

4 Things Robots Need to Learn Before Working With Humans If humans are at all going to get along with robots, we need to figure out how we're going to interact with them, and in turn they'll need to adapt to us. The post 4 Things Robots Need to Learn Before Working With Humans appeared first on WIRED .
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Big Think

Researchers Enhance Human Memory with Electrical Stimulation Someday an implant may help the neurologically impaired overcome a damaged memory. Read More
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Gizmodo

Why You Should Read the American Gods Novel Before Watching the TV Show Months ago, I waffled over whether to re-read American Gods before the TV show started airing. Did I want to experience the show as its own unique thing or should I go back to the book and reacquaint myself with the plot? The decision to go back to Neil Gaiman’s modern fantasy epic won out and I feel like I made the right choice, one that will change the way I watch the series. Advertisement Base
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Scientific American Content: Global

Post-Science March We Must Stay EngagedOur real work starts now and we have a great deal to do over the coming years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Popular Science

Sonos Playbase Review Gadgets The latest generation soundbar from Sonos is a huge step up from your TV's built-in speakers A big sound stage and an inconspicuous form factor…
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTHealth School of Public Health researchers find cold weather linked to mortality risks in TexasCold weather increases the risk of mortality in Texas residents, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. The findings were recently published in the journal Environmental Pollution.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intense training without proper recovery may compromise bone health in elite rowersBone mineral density, an indicator of bone strength, typically increases with regular exercise, acting as a protective mechanism against bone fractures and osteoporosis. But a new study suggests that the extended, high-intensity training sessions of elite athletes could reverse beneficial bone changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One step closer to an 'exercise pill'Studies show obese people produce elevated levels of a protein called myostatin. A new study shows suppressing myostatin enhanced muscle mass and dramatically improved markers of heart and kidney health in mice, suggesting a promising avenue for new drugs to counter obesity.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bugs for thought: Gut bacteria tell the brain what animals should eat?Could the bacteria that inhabit our gut influence our food choices? A new study shows, for the first time, that this idea may not be as far-fetched as it seems. Neuroscientists have discovered that gut bacteria 'speak' with the brain to control food choices in animals. They identified two species of bacteria that have a radical impact on animal dietary decisions.
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Gizmodo

Make Cold Brew And Then Take It With You With This Discounted Coolgear BRU We sell a lot of cold brew coffee makers (the Takeya being the most popular) but the coolgear BRU is something pretty different. With its 21oz double wall tumbler fitted beneath the carafe, you can take your coffee with your immediately after it’s done brewing. And it’s on sale today for only $31 .
21h
The Atlantic

Don't Cut the Estate Tax—Raise It I am not the first person President Trump or his economic team looks to for advice on tax reform. But if they wanted some, this is the free advice I’d give them: Don’t cut or eliminate the estate tax—raise it. Repealing the estate tax—a tax on assets transferred from a deceased individual to their heirs—has become a staple cause among conservative Republicans. Eleven Republican candidates explici
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A pilot study of deep brain stimulation in treatment-resistant schizophreniaDeep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven its effectiveness in different types of psychiatric disorders, neuropathic pain and neurodegenerative diseases. Schizophrenia remains one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, with 30 percent of the patients' refractory to the treatment. Study authors hypothesized that DBS may be an effective treatment in patients with refractory schizophrenia. This
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin a and a high-fat diet increasing risk for obesity, diabetesVitamin A is an essential nutrient that the human body needs to function properly. But new research suggests that normal levels of vitamin A within a high-fat diet can negatively affect expression of liver genes associated with glucose and fat metabolism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patientsAdding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, according to the results of a pilot clinical trial. These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall response and survival rates resulted from a phase Ib/II clinical study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Geophagy: Eating soil could harm babiesUp to 80% of people in Africa, especially women, regularly eat clayey soil – this habit is known as geophagy. A previous study has already shown that it is a form of craving. Now researchers have shown that this practice can also be detrimental to health: pregnant women who consume particular types of soil display higher levels of lead contamination – as do their babies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clinical trials offer fresh hope for kids with rare brain diseaseAnna Gunby can't run around as smoothly as most 4-year-olds because her wobbly legs are affected by a rare brain disease that also hinders her intellect. She can't identify colors. She can't count objects. Her attention span is short. Patients with Glut1 deficiency usually can't learn beyond an elementary school level and often can't live independently as adults. But now there is hope, say researc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Century-old mystery of Blood Falls solvedA century-old mystery involving a famous red waterfall in Antarctica has now been solved by researchers. New evidence links Blood Falls to a large source of salty water that may have been trapped under Taylor Glacier for more than 1 million years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber sets 'flying car' launch for 2020Uber said Tuesday it wants to launch a system of flying cars to move people around cities, with a goal of putting demonstration projects in place by 2020.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New interface allows more efficient, faster technique to remotely operate robotsA new interface allows users to simply point and click on an item, then choose a grasp, to control a robot remotely.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Post-fracture care: Do we need to educate patients rather than doctors?This multicenter, randomized controlled trial involved 436 women, aged 50-85 years, who had attended hospital for treatment of a fragility fracture of the wrist or upper arm. The intervention group received repeated oral and written information about fragility fractures and osteoporosis management by a case manager, who prompted the patients to visit their primary care physicians to ask for BMD te
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low levels of 'memory protein' linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's diseaseThis discovery may lead to important research and may one day help experts develop new and better therapies for Alzheimer's and other forms of cognitive decline.
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

Why America’s Old Nuclear Plants Could Be Dragging Down Clean Energy DevelopmentMoney spent nursing nukes may be better spent on wind, solar, and research into new technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method addresses reproducibility in computational experimentsScientists have developed a workflow management system that addresses irreproducibility when analyzing large genomics datasets with computers. Nextflow contributes to establishing good scientific practices and provides an important framework for those research projects where the analysis of large datasets are used to take decisions, for example, in precision medicine.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using 3-D weapons of science to fight infectious diseasesResearchers have achieved a significant milestone in the effort to understand pathogens responsible for some of the world’s most deadly infectious diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cognitive skills differ across cultures and generationsAn innovative study of children and parents in both Hong Kong and the United Kingdom reveals cultural differences in important cognitive skills among adolescents but not their parents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better dosing of meds: 'Cyclops' algorithm spots daily rhythms in cellsHumans, like virtually all other complex organisms on Earth, have adapted to their planet's 24-hour cycle of sunlight and darkness. That circadian rhythm is reflected in human behavior, of course, but also in the molecular workings of our cells. Now scientists have developed a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing those molecular rhythms -- a tool that could have many new medical applicat
22h
Live Science

What Is Exploding Head Syndrome? | VideoA startling sleep disorder called 'exploding head syndrome' can wake up people up with a crash and a bang. Here's what's really happening in the brain.
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Gizmodo

This Obscene $3,000 Stroller Will Teach Your Kid To Drive Before They Can Walk If there are two things every stroller lacks, it’s a $3,000 price tag and the ability to make a child look like an unfortunate castoff from Downton Abbey . Luckily for all of us, however, a company called D.Throne has created an obscenely over-the-top electric car for kids that you can justify as an essential baby accessory, if you’re the kind of person who expels money from every orifice. The D.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists unravel how protein impacts intellectual disabilityScientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have shown that a protein helps balance nerve cell communication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google tweak aims to curb fake, misleading search resultsGoogle on Tuesday announced changes to how it delivers and ranks internet searches, the latest effort by the tech giant to weed out "fake news" and offensive content.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood obesity quadruples risk of developing type 2 diabetesChildren with obesity face four times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to children with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range, according to a new study.
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

This Robot Knows When It’s Confused and Asks for HelpMisunderstandings will be an unavoidable part of communication between robots and humans. One robot is learning to cope with them.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Gut Bacteria Tell Their Hosts What to Eat By suppressing or increasing cravings, microbes help the brain decide what foods the body “needs” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The fast and the crashed: Collisions five times more likely for street racersOntarians who have street-raced at least once in the past year are five times more likely than other drivers to have crashed their vehicle at some point during those 12 months. This is the first Canadian survey to look systematically at the demographics and crash rates of adult street racers in Ontario.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No biochar benefit for temperate zone crops, says new reportScientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in the Amazon Basin. Since initial studies published several years ago promoted biochar, farmers around the world have been using it as a soil additive to increase fertility and crop yields. But a new study casts doubt on biochar's efficacy, finding that using it only impro
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical causes of battery 'capacity fade' identifiedOne of the major culprits in capacity fade of high-energy lithium-ion batteries has now been identified by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When Hollywood met neurosurgeryA team of computer engineers and neurosurgeons, with an assist from Hollywood special effects experts, reports successful early tests of a novel, lifelike 3-D simulator designed to teach surgeons to perform a delicate, minimally invasive brain operation.
22h
WIRED

TED Day One: Elite Idealists Push Back Against Politics This year, TED can't keep the outside world out. The post TED Day One: Elite Idealists Push Back Against Politics appeared first on WIRED .
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Managing disease spread through accessible modelingA new computer modeling study is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Genetics of HomosexualityMexico’s third gender sheds light on the biological correlates of sexual orientation. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Gizmodo

This Hacker Is My New Hero Image: Flickr / The Preiser Project The hacker’s name is Janit0r. You’ve probably never heard of him, but perhaps you’ve heard of his work. Janit0r is reportedly the one behind a particularly gnarly but undeniably fascinating form of malware called BrickerBot. BrickerBot, as the name implies, will brick internet of things (IoT) devices that fail a simple security test. This is surely illegal, but
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Science | The Guardian

Plastic-eating bugs? It’s a great story – but there’s a sting in the tail | Philip BallBreeding wax moth caterpillars to devour our waste sounds good. But they would attack bee colonies too, and ultimately put crops at risk Caterpillars that can munch up plastic bags have just been identified , fuelling excited speculation that this could one day eliminate global pollution from plastic waste. The chance discovery, initially made by a scientist and amateur beekeeper whose plastic bag
22h
Live Science

Climate Change Altering the Arctic Faster Than ExpectedEvidence continues to mount that climate change has pushed the Arctic into a new state.
23h
Live Science

Beware of Bogus Cancer Treatments, FDA SaysAmericans should be wary of products claiming to treat or cure cancer, as a number of products are falsely making these claims, the FDA said.
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Live Science

Earth's Mantle Could Suck Up Carbon from the AirEarth's mantle produces rocks that could naturally suck up carbon emissions, providing a strategy for checking climate change if necessary emissions cuts don't occur.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA examines newly formed Tropical Depression 3W in 3-DTropical Depression 03W formed in the Pacific Ocean west of Guam on April 24, 2017, and data from the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite was used to look at the storm in 3-D. Tropical Depression 03W formed on April 24 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT) about 201 nautical miles north-northwest of Yap.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Religious people more likely to oppose reproductive technologiesAs new and more effective human reproductive genetic technologies develop, people of faith are more likely to disapprove of these tools than nonreligious people, a new study found.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thought Antarctica's biodiversity was doing well? Think againAntarctica and the Southern Ocean are not in better environmental shape than the rest of the world.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fighting infections with a silver swordSilver and other metals have been used to fight infections since ancient times. Today, researchers are using sophisticated techniques such as the gene-editing platform Crispr-Cas9 to take a closer look at precisely how silver poisons pathogenic microbes—and when it fails. The work is yielding new insights on how to create effective antimicrobials and avoid the pitfalls of antimicrobial resistance.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single-molecule diode createdResearchers have created a diode out of a 1 nm-sized single molecule with high rectification ratios. Diodes, commonly used in in everyday electronic devices, allow current to flow in one direction while blocking the current in the opposite direction. Today, researchers are approaching the physical limit in downsizing electronic components.
23h
Ars Technica

Windows Updates getting even more complex, a little more controllable Enlarge With Windows 10, Microsoft shook up the long-standing Windows patching model. Instead of producing individual hotfixes for each security flaw and infrequent updates to address non-security issues, Windows 10 has two monthly packages. There's a Security Update—a single update that contains all of a given month's security fixes—and a Cumulative Update that contains all of the security and n
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Managing disease spread through accessible modelingA new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study suggests overfishing in one of world's most productive fishing regionsA new study suggests that more small-scale fishing boats are operating in the Gulf of California than is economically and ecologically sustainable, suggesting that local fishermen are spending more time and money to catch fewer fish.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estrogen alters memory circuit function in women with gene variantFluctuations in estrogen triggered atypical functioning in a key brain memory circuit in women with a common version of a gene. Brain scans revealed altered circuit activity linked to changes in the sex hormone in women with the gene variant while they performed a working memory task. The findings may help to explain individual differences in risk for, onset, severity, and course of mental disorde
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Diet' products can make you fat, study showsHigh-fat foods are often the primary target when fighting obesity, but sugar-laden 'diet' foods could be contributing to unwanted weight gain as well.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

India's outsized coal plans would wipe out Paris climate goalsIndia will not be able to meet its Paris climate agreement commitments in the coming years if it carries through with plans to construct nearly 370 coal-fired power plants, according to researchers.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A more than 100% quantum step toward producing hydrogen fuelEfforts to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels are advancing on various significant fronts. Initiatives include research focused on more efficient production of gaseous hydrogen fuel by using solar energy to break water down into components of hydrogen and oxygen. Scientists have now reported a key breakthrough in the basic science essential for progress toward this goal.
23h
The Atlantic

Sandy Wexler Isn’t Just Another Adam Sandler Film Released earlier this month, Sandy Wexler is Adam Sandler’s third film made exclusively for Netflix as part of his lucrative deal with the streaming company. It is two hours and 11 minutes long—the only longer Netflix film is Cary Fukunaga’s weighty child-soldier drama Beasts of No Nation . Written by and starring Sandler, Sandy Wexler is a sort of funhouse mirror version of A Star is Born , a sh
23h
The Atlantic

How Trump Could Get China's Help on North Korea So far, the Trump administration’s North Korea policy consists of declaring that America’s patience has run out, refusing to negotiate, hinting at preventive war , and hoping that China bails it out. In January, Trump—who is perpetually learning things that most other people know and then congratulating himself for having discovered them— announced that China has “total control over North Korea.”
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extinction risk for many species vastly underestimated, study suggestsA new study indicates that the number of plant and animal species at risk of extinction may be considerably higher than previously thought. A team of researchers, however, believe they've come up with a formula that will help paint a more accurate picture.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Political left, right similarly motivated to avoid rival viewsA new report from social psychologists at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Winnipeg suggests people on both sides of the political aisle are similarly motivated to dismiss monetary enticements in order to distance themselves from hearing or reading opposing ideals and information.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thought Antarctica's biodiversity was doing well? Think againAntarctica and the Southern Ocean are not in better environmental shape than the rest of the world.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA examines newly formed Tropical Depression 3W in 3-DTropical Depression 03W formed in the Pacific Ocean west of Guam on April 24, 2017, and data from the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite was used to look at the storm in 3-D.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistanceCancer cells deploy an ancient mechanism used by single-celled organisms to elevate their mutation rate in response to stress. This discovery explains one of the best-known hallmarks of cancer -- its high mutation rate, which contributes to the rapid evolution of drug resistance.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood obesity linked to quadrupled risk of developing type 2 diabetesChildren with obesity face four times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to children with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range, according to a study published today in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood obesity quadruples risk of developing type 2 diabetesChildren with obesity face four times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to children with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range, according to a study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut bacteria tell the brain what animals should eatNeuroscientists have, for the first time, shown that gut bacteria 'speak' to the brain to control food choices in animals. In a study publishing April 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, researchers identified two species of bacteria that have an impact on animal dietary decisions. The investigation was led by Carlos Ribeiro, and colleagues from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in L
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inaccurate IUCN range maps leave birds endemic to India's western Ghats vulnerableRange maps used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) fall short of protecting birds endemic to the Western Ghats, a mountainous biodiversity hotspot in southern India. When current range maps used by the IUCN were assessed using modeling techniques that incorporate data on species sightings, land cover, and climate - -17 out of 18 were inaccurate and overestimated. So repor
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's coming next? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speechA new study, publishing on April 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech.
23h
WIRED

Uber Really Seriously Promises Flying Cars by 2020 And it's not that crazy a plan. The post Uber Really Seriously Promises Flying Cars by 2020 appeared first on WIRED .
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New survey hints at exotic origin for the Cold SpotA supervoid is unlikely to explain a 'Cold Spot' in the cosmic microwave background, according to the results of a new survey, leaving room for exotic explanations like a collision between universes. The researchers, led by postgraduate student Ruari Mackenzie and Professor Tom Shanks in Durham University's Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal A
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method to ensure reproducibility in computational experimentsResearch reproducibility is crucial to move forward in science. Unfortunately, and according to recent studies and surveys, the number of irreproducible experiments is increasing and research reproducibility is now recognized as one of the major challenges that scientists, institutions, founders and journals must address for science to remain credible and to keep progressing.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Religious people more likely to oppose reproductive technologiesAs new and more effective human reproductive genetic technologies (RGTs) develop, people of faith are more likely to disapprove of these tools than nonreligious people, a new Rice University study found. Evangelical Christians are the most likely of any religious group to stand in opposition, the researchers found.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's coal plant plans conflict with climate commitmentsIndia will not be able to meet its Paris climate agreement commitments in the coming years if it carries through with plans to build nearly 370 coal-fired power plants, a new study finds.
23h
Ars Technica

Police story differs from videos of man dragged from United flight Enlarge Aviation authorities late Monday released police reports about the Kentucky doctor who was violently removed from a United flight earlier this month. The officers involved painted a picture that differs from the viral videos of the incident taken by other passengers. The videos of the April 9 incident, which were posted on social media and broadcast on news sites across the world, have sp
23h
Futurity.org

This tool could let companies make greener choices Researchers have devised a more accurate way to predict and measure the impact products have on the environment. Using a process called life-cycle assessment, companies often test the environmental impact their products may have—as well as the impact of producing the components, such as corn or sugarcane, that go into those products. This kind of assessment, however, often lacks detail about how
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Gizmodo

The Most Spectacular New Comics You Should Stay Inside and Read This Summer There’s nothing like reading a good comic or 16 on a warm summer’s day. I mean, why do all that stuff like going outside when there are so many good new comics series coming out? Beat the heat over the summer with a few of our recommendations for all the new series you should check out in the next few months. May Marvel Secret Empire #1 —Marvel’s next big event really kicks off here, despite two
23h
Live Science

Straight Out of 'Star Wars': This 'Death Star' Laser Actually WorksScientists used a diamond crystal to increase power of multiple laser beams into one super-powered beam.
23h
Gizmodo

Fitbit Explodes on Woman's Wrist, Because Catastrophic Failure Is Always an Option Image: ABC News Are you reading this on a smartphone, tablet, or laptop? Yes? Cool. That glowing misery rectangle has the capacity to explode the same way Milwaukee woman Dina Mitchell’s Fitbit Flex 2 did last week. Any lithium-based rechargeable battery can. It’s just extremely unlikely. Advertisement The shoddy manufacturing practices around “ hoverboards ” and vapes made exploding batteries kn
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study suggests overfishing in one of world's most productive fishing regionsScientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego used images from satellites and flyovers to count the number of small boats, or pangas, to find that fishing in Gulf of California, which separates Baja California and mainland Mexico, is over capacity. The analysis suggests that future investment in the region's fisheries may not be economically or ecologi
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The fast and the crashed: Study shows collisions 5 times more likely for street racersOntarians who have street-raced at least once in the past year are five times more likely than other drivers to have crashed their vehicle at some point during those 12 months. This is the first Canadian survey to look systematically at the demographics and crash rates of adult street racers in Ontario.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Managing disease spread through accessible modelingA new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

India's outsized coal plans would wipe out Paris climate goalsIndia will not be able to meet its Paris climate agreement commitments in the coming years if it carries through with plans to construct nearly 370 coal-fired power plants, according to University of California, Irvine and CoalSwarm researchers.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Diet' products can make you fat, study showsHigh-fat foods are often the primary target when fighting obesity, but sugar-laden 'diet' foods could be contributing to unwanted weight gain as well.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prostate cancer patients would pay $2,000 for more accurate biopsies, Loyola study findsProstate cancer patients are willing to pay up to $2,000 of their own money for a new high-tech biopsy technique that significantly improves accuracy, according to a study published in the journal Urology Practice.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Religious people more likely to oppose reproductive technologiesAs new and more effective human reproductive genetic technologies develop, people of faith are more likely to disapprove of these tools than nonreligious people, a new Rice University study found.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Afghanistan and Iraq veterans' opioid use similar to that of civiliansA new study by RTI International and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, published in Pain, suggests that opioid use among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans is roughly comparable to that of the general US population.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin A + high-fat diet = increased risk for obesity, diabetesVitamin A is an essential nutrient that the human body needs to function properly. But new research presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago suggests that normal levels of vitamin A within a high-fat diet can negatively affect expression of liver genes associated with glucose and fat metabolism.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intense training without proper recovery may compromise bone health in elite rowersBone mineral density, an indicator of bone strength, typically increases with regular exercise, acting as a protective mechanism against bone fractures and osteoporosis. But a new study suggests that the extended, high-intensity training sessions of elite athletes could reverse beneficial bone changes. Researchers from Brock University in Canada will present their findings today at the American Ph
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One step closer to an 'exercise pill'Studies show obese people produce elevated levels of a protein called myostatin. A new study shows suppressing myostatin enhanced muscle mass and dramatically improved markers of heart and kidney health in mice, suggesting a promising avenue for new drugs to counter obesity.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gut bacteria tell the brain what animals should eatNeuroscientists have, for the first time, shown that gut bacteria "speak" to the brain to control food choices in animals. In a study publishing April 25 in the Open Access journal PLOS Biology, researchers identified two species of bacteria that have an impact on animal dietary decisions. The investigation was led by Carlos Ribeiro, and colleagues from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in L
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Science Has Always Been Inseparable From PoliticsScientific research doesn’t take place in a vacuum. it can only happen with society’s blessing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Live Science

Odd New Theory Explains How Early Earth Got Its OxygenOne of the still-unsolved mysteries about Earth's history is how the planet became breathable. Now, scientists say the culprit may have been the giant rock slabs that make up Earth's outer shell.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The evolution of dog breeds now mappedWhen people migrate, Canis familiaris travels with them. Piecing together the details of those migrations has proved difficult because the clues are scattered across the genomes of hundreds of dog breeds. However, in a new report, researchers have used gene sequences from 161 modern breeds to assemble an evolutionary tree of dogs. The map of dog breeds, which is the largest to date, unearths new e
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Waymo Has Invited the Public to Hop into Its Self-Driving CarsFolks living in the Phoenix area can now sign up for free on-demand rides, part of a trial meant to see how regular people integrate the autonomous cars into their everyday lives.
23h
Ars Technica

Amazon might use driverless vehicles to deliver packages in the future Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Leon Neal) Amazon is constantly thinking of new ways it can cut costs and revolutionize the shipping and delivery industry. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal , Amazon formed a team about a year ago of a dozen employees to focus on driverless-vehicle technology and develop the company's plans to use self-driving cars to better its business. Amazon d
23h
Live Science

No Need for Roads: Flying Car Soars Over WaterA new flying car designed to travel over open water could be on sale as soon as this year.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair responseLiving in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study now reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers make tool for understanding cellular processes more usefulResearchers have developed methods to use data from FRAP, an experiment used to study how molecules move inside cells, in ways it's never been used before.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoliIn the quest for less contaminating fertilizing strategies, a study has explored the use of ammonium-based fertilizers, less widely used than the nitrate for fertilizing owing to the reduced growth displayed by the plants. The comparison between these two sources of nitrogen has revealed a higher amount of glucosinolates in the case of ammonium nutrition. This gives the plants greater insecticidal
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Gizmodo

Get Your Khakis (and More) During Amazon's One-Day Dockers Sale Dockers Gold Box Who doesn’t like saving money on their khakis (I bet Jake from Statefarm does)? Amazon is knocking down prices on tons of pants, shoes, accessories, and more from Dockers , today only. You could end up with an entire outfit for half of what you’d normally pay, but these prices are a 24-hour thing, so don’t wait. Here are a few things to check out, but definitely head to Amazon to
23h
Ars Technica

Drugs already in medicine cabinets may fight dementia, early data suggests Enlarge / Oh, there's that cure I was looking for. (credit: Getty | Harold M. Lambert ) Tried, true, and FDA-approved drugs for cancer and depression—already in medicine cabinets—may also be long-sought treatments for devastating brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other forms of dementia, according to a new study in Brain, a Journal of Neurology . The research is still in early
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Political left, right similarly motivated to avoid rival viewsA new report from social psychologists at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Winnipeg suggests people on both sides of the political aisle are similarly motivated to dismiss monetary enticements in order to distance themselves from hearing or reading opposing ideals and information.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method to ensure reproducibility in computational experimentsScientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, have developed a workflow management system that prevents irreproducibility when analyzing large genomics datasets with computers. Nextflow contributes to establishing good scientific practices and provides an important framework for those research projects where the analysis of large datasets are used to take decisions, fo
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-sodium diet might not lower blood pressureA new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn't associated with lower blood pressure. The study adds to growing evidence that current recommendations for limiting sodium intake may be misguided.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Decrease in cardiovascular diseases benefits persons with diabetesThe incidence of cardiovascular diseases in Sweden has decreased sharply since the late 1990s. This research included almost three million adult Swedes. In relative terms, the biggest winners are persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A novel form of iron for fortification of foodsWhey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles. Now researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.
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Ars Technica

Nuclear waste facility receives its first shipment since 2014 accident Enlarge / A truck from Idaho arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant at night. (credit: WIPP) The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, began accepting shipments of transuranic waste (PDF) this month for the first time since February 2014 when an explosion of a drum of plutonium and americium waste halted all deliveries. WIPP is the only facility that accepts waste from t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Intranasal MSC-derived A1-exosomes ease inflammation, and prevent abnormal neurogenesis and memory dysfunction after status epilepticus [Neuroscience]Status epilepticus (SE), a medical emergency that is typically terminated through antiepileptic drug treatment, leads to hippocampus dysfunction typified by neurodegeneration, inflammation, altered neurogenesis, as well as cognitive and memory deficits. Here, we examined the effects of intranasal (IN) administration of extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted from human bone marrow-derived mesenchyma
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dual optical control and mechanistic insights into photoswitchable group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors [Physiology]G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling occurs in complex spatiotemporal patterns that are difficult to probe using standard pharmacological and genetic approaches. A powerful approach for dissecting GPCRs is to use light-controlled pharmacological agents that are tethered covalently and specifically to genetically engineered receptors. However, deficits in our understanding of the...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PIF4-controlled auxin pathway contributes to hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]F1 hybrids in Arabidopsis and crop species are uniform and high yielding. The F2 generation loses much of the yield advantage and the plants have heterogeneous phenotypes. We generated pure breeding hybrid mimic lines by recurrent selection and also selected a pure breeding small phenotype line. The hybrid mimics are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Malate-dependent Fe accumulation is a critical checkpoint in the root developmental response to low phosphate [Plant Biology]Low phosphate (Pi) availability constrains plant development and seed production in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. When Pi is scarce, modifications of root system architecture (RSA) enhance the soil exploration ability of the plant and lead to an increase in Pi uptake. In Arabidopsis, an iron-dependent mechanism reprograms primary root...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Variations in crowding, saccadic precision, and spatial localization reveal the shared topology of spatial vision [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Visual sensitivity varies across the visual field in several characteristic ways. For example, sensitivity declines sharply in peripheral (vs. foveal) vision and is typically worse in the upper (vs. lower) visual field. These variations can affect processes ranging from acuity and crowding (the deleterious effect of clutter on object recognition)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Pishesha et al., Engineered erythrocytes covalently linked to antigenic peptides can protect against autoimmune disease [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Engineered erythrocytes covalently linked to antigenic peptides can protect against autoimmune disease,” by Novalia Pishesha, Angelina M. Bilate, Marsha C. Wibowo, Nai-Jia Huang, Zeyang Li, Rhogerry Dhesycka, Djenet Bousbaine, Hojun Li, Heide C. Patterson, Stephanie K. Dougan, Takeshi Maruyama, Harvey F. Lodish, and Hidde L....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Padilla et al., AgRP to Kiss1 neuron signaling links nutritional state and fertility [Correction]PHYSIOLOGY Correction for “AgRP to Kiss1 neuron signaling links nutritional state and fertility,” by Stephanie L. Padilla, Jian Qiu, Casey C Nestor, Chunguang Zhang, Arik W. Smith, Benjamin B. Whiddon, Oline K. Rønnekleiv, Martin J. Kelly, and Richard D. Palmiter, which appeared in issue 9, February 28, 2017, of Proc...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction to Supporting Information for Falahati and Wieschaus, Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern the nucleolus assembly in vivo [SI Correction]CELL BIOLOGY, APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for “Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern the nucleolus assembly in vivo,” by Hanieh Falahati and Eric Wieschaus, which appeared in issue 6, February 7, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:1335–1340; first published January 23, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1615395114). The authors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Controversy in statistical analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data [Biological Sciences]To test the validity of statistical methods for fMRI data analysis, Eklund et al. (1) used, for the first time, large-scale experimental data rather than simulated data. Using resting-state fMRI measurements to represent a null hypothesis of no task-induced activation, the authors compare familywise error rates for voxel-based and cluster-based...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

fMRI clustering and false-positive rates [Biological Sciences]Recently, Eklund et al. (1) analyzed clustering methods in standard fMRI packages: AFNI (which we maintain), FSL, and SPM. They claim that (i) false-positive rates (FPRs) in traditional approaches are greatly inflated, questioning the validity of “countless published fMRI studies”; (ii) nonparametric methods produce valid, but slightly conservative, FPRs; (iii)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reevaluating “cluster failure” in fMRI using nonparametric control of the false discovery rate [Biological Sciences]In a substantial contribution to the fMRI field, Eklund et al. (1) use nonparametric methods to demonstrate that random field theory (RFT)-based familywise error (FWE) correction for cluster inference does not control errors appropriately, and this discrepancy is more pronounced for lenient cluster-defining thresholds (CDT). Moreover, they point to violations...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Brown and Behrmann, Cox, et al., and Kessler et al.: Data and code sharing is the way forward for fMRI [Biological Sciences]We are glad that our paper (1) has generated intense discussions in the fMRI field (2–4), on how to analyze fMRI data, and how to correct for multiple comparisons. The goal of the paper was not to disparage any specific fMRI software, but to point out that parametric statistical methods...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Achiral symmetry breaking and positive Gaussian modulus lead to scalloped colloidal membranes [Applied Physical Sciences]In the presence of a nonadsorbing polymer, monodisperse rod-like particles assemble into colloidal membranes, which are one-rod-length–thick liquid-like monolayers of aligned rods. Unlike 3D edgeless bilayer vesicles, colloidal monolayer membranes form open structures with an exposed edge, thus presenting an opportunity to study elasticity of fluid sheets. Membranes assembled from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Automated glycan assembly using the Glyconeer 2.1 synthesizer [Chemistry]Reliable and rapid access to defined biopolymers by automated DNA and peptide synthesis has fundamentally altered biological research and medical practice. Similarly, the procurement of defined glycans is key to establishing structure–activity relationships and thereby progress in the glycosciences. Here, we describe the rapid assembly of oligosaccharides using the commercially...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pseudomagnetic fields for sound at the nanoscale [Physics]There is a growing effort in creating chiral transport of sound waves. However, most approaches so far have been confined to the macroscopic scale. Here, we propose an approach suitable to the nanoscale that is based on pseudomagnetic fields. These pseudomagnetic fields for sound waves are the analogue of what...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The cryo-EM structure of YjeQ bound to the 30S subunit suggests a fidelity checkpoint function for this protein in ribosome assembly [Biochemistry]Recent work suggests that bacterial YjeQ (RsgA) participates in the late stages of assembly of the 30S subunit and aids the assembly of the decoding center but also binds the mature 30S subunit with high affinity. To determine the function and mechanisms of YjeQ in the context of the mature...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ubiquitinated proteins promote the association of proteasomes with the deubiquitinating enzyme Usp14 and the ubiquitin ligase Ube3c [Biochemistry]In mammalian cells, the 26S proteasomes vary in composition. In addition to the standard 28 subunits in the 20S core particle and 19 subunits in each 19S regulatory particle, a small fraction (about 10–20% in our preparations) also contains the deubiquitinating enzyme Usp14/Ubp6, which regulates proteasome activity, and the ubiquitin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Altering the allosteric pathway in IGPS suppresses millisecond motions and catalytic activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) is a V-type allosteric enzyme, meaning that its catalytic rate is critically dependent on activation by its allosteric ligand, N′-[(5′-phosphoribulosyl)formimino]-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (PRFAR). The allosteric mechanism of IGPS is reliant on millisecond conformational motions for efficient catalysis. We engineered four mutants of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SHPRH regulates rRNA transcription by recognizing the histone code in an mTOR-dependent manner [Cell Biology]Many DNA repair proteins have additional functions other than their roles in DNA repair. In addition to catalyzing PCNA polyubiquitylation in response to the stalling of DNA replication, SHPRH has the additional function of facilitating rRNA transcription by localizing to the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter in the nucleoli. SHPRH was...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PIK3CA mutant tumors depend on oxoglutarate dehydrogenase [Cell Biology]Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations are found in a significant fraction of human cancers, but therapeutic inhibition of PI3K has only shown limited success in clinical trials. To understand how mutant PIK3CA contributes to cancer cell proliferation, we used genome scale loss-of-function screening in a large number of genomically annotated cancer cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Uplift-driven diversification in the Hengduan Mountains, a temperate biodiversity hotspot [Evolution]A common hypothesis for the rich biodiversity found in mountains is uplift-driven diversification—that orogeny creates conditions favoring rapid in situ speciation of resident lineages. We tested this hypothesis in the context of the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and adjoining mountain ranges, using the phylogenetic and geographic histories of multiple groups of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Parallel adaptive evolution of geographically distant herring populations on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean [Genetics]Atlantic herring is an excellent species for studying the genetic basis of adaptation in geographically distant populations because of its characteristically large population sizes and low genetic drift. In this study we compared whole-genome resequencing data of Atlantic herring populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. An important finding...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hepatitis C virus triggers Golgi fragmentation and autophagy through the immunity-related GTPase M [Immunology and Inflammation]Positive-stranded RNA viruses, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), assemble their viral replication complexes by remodeling host intracellular membranes to a membranous web. The precise composition of these replication complexes and the detailed mechanisms by which they are formed are incompletely understood. Here we show that the human immunity-related GTPase...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flicr, a long noncoding RNA, modulates Foxp3 expression and autoimmunity [Immunology and Inflammation]A combination of transcription factors, enhancers, and epigenetic marks determines the expression of the key transcription factor FoxP3 in regulatory T cells (Tregs). Adding an additional layer of complexity, the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) Flicr (Foxp3 long intergenic noncoding RNA) is a negative regulator that tunes Foxp3 expression, resulting in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Roles of the TRAF6 and Pellino E3 ligases in MyD88 and RANKL signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]It is widely accepted that the essential role of TRAF6 in vivo is to generate the Lys63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub) chains needed to activate the “master” protein kinase TAK1. Here, we report that TRAF6 E3 ligase activity contributes to but is not essential for the IL-1–dependent formation of K63-Ub chains, TAK1...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plasma fibronectin stabilizes Borrelia burgdorferi-endothelial interactions under vascular shear stress by a catch-bond mechanism [Microbiology]Bacterial dissemination via the cardiovascular system is the most common cause of infection mortality. A key step in dissemination is bacterial interaction with endothelia lining blood vessels, which is physically challenging because of the shear stress generated by blood flow. Association of host cells such as leukocytes and platelets with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SAGA complex mediates the transcriptional up-regulation of antiviral RNA silencing [Microbiology]Pathogen recognition and transcriptional activation of defense-related genes are crucial steps in cellular defense responses. RNA silencing (RNAi) functions as an antiviral defense in eukaryotic organisms. Several RNAi-related genes are known to be transcriptionally up-regulated upon virus infection in some host organisms, but little is known about their induction mechanism....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of a cono-RFamide from the venom of Conus textile that targets ASIC3 and enhances muscle pain [Neuroscience]Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated Na+ channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system. ASICs have been implicated in several neuronal disorders, like ischemic stroke, neuronal inflammation, and pathological pain. Several toxins from venomous animals have been identified that target ASICs with high specificity and potency. These toxins are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Context-dependent spatially periodic activity in the human entorhinal cortex [Neuroscience]The spatially periodic activity of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of the rodent, primate, and human provides a coordinate system that, together with the hippocampus, informs an individual of its location relative to the environment and encodes the memory of that location. Among the most defining features of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe mediate the anticataplectic action of orexin neurons by reducing amygdala activity [Neuroscience]Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of orexin (hypocretin)-producing neurons and marked by excessive daytime sleepiness and a sudden weakening of muscle tone, or cataplexy, often triggered by strong emotions. In a mouse model for narcolepsy, we previously demonstrated that serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In situ structural studies of tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) reveal spatial association with proteasomes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) is a eukaryotic protease acting downstream of the 26S proteasome; it removes tripeptides from the degradation products released by the proteasome. Structural studies in vitro have revealed the basic architecture of TPPII, a two-stranded linear polymer that assembles to form a spindle-shaped complex of ∼6 MDa....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Balance of microtubule stiffness and cortical tension determines the size of blood cells with marginal band across species [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The fast bloodstream of animals is associated with large shear stresses. To withstand these conditions, blood cells have evolved a special morphology and a specific internal architecture to maintain their integrity over several weeks. For instance, nonmammalian red blood cells, mammalian erythroblasts, and platelets have a peripheral ring of microtubules,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Entropy redistribution controls allostery in a metalloregulatory protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Allosteric communication between two ligand-binding sites in a protein is a central aspect of biological regulation that remains mechanistically unclear. Here we show that perturbations in equilibrium picosecond–nanosecond motions impact zinc (Zn)-induced allosteric inhibition of DNA binding by the Zn efflux repressor CzrA (chromosomal zinc-regulated repressor). DNA binding leads to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CryoEM structure of a prokaryotic cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) ion channels play crucial physiological roles in phototransduction, olfaction, and cardiac pace making. These channels are characterized by the presence of a carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) that connects to the channel pore via a C-linker domain. Although cyclic nucleotide bind
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Aggregation landscapes of Huntingtin exon 1 protein fragments and the critical repeat length for the onset of Huntington’s disease [Chemistry]Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein. The severity of the disease depends on the polyQ repeat length, arising only in patients with proteins having 36 repeats or more. Previous studies have shown that the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental dispersal reveals characteristic scales of biodiversity in a natural landscape [Ecology]Ecological theory posits that dispersal among habitat patches links local communities and is a key “regional” process that maintains biological diversity. However, manipulations required to experimentally test regional processes are infeasible for most systems, and thus more work is needed to detect the scales at which regional processes manifest and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Salting our freshwater lakes [Environmental Sciences]The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanosensation is evolutionarily tuned to locomotor mechanics [Evolution]The biomechanics of animal limbs has evolved to meet the functional demands for movement associated with different behaviors and environments. Effective movement relies not only on limb mechanics but also on appropriate mechanosensory feedback. By comparing sensory ability and mechanics within a phylogenetic framework, we show that peripheral mechanosensation has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Determining the factors driving selective effects of new nonsynonymous mutations [Evolution]The distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of new mutations plays a fundamental role in evolutionary genetics. However, the extent to which the DFE differs across species has yet to be systematically investigated. Furthermore, the biological mechanisms determining the DFE in natural populations remain unclear. Here, we show that theoretical models...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mutation in sorghum LOW GERMINATION STIMULANT 1 alters strigolactones and causes Striga resistance [Genetics]Striga is a major biotic constraint to sorghum production in semiarid tropical Africa and Asia. Genetic resistance to this parasitic weed is the most economically feasible control measure. Mutant alleles at the LGS1 (LOW GERMINATION STIMULANT 1) locus drastically reduce Striga germination stimulant activity. We provide evidence that the responsible...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Antigenicity-defined conformations of an extremely neutralization-resistant HIV-1 envelope spike [Immunology and Inflammation]The extraordinary genetic diversity of the HIV-1 envelope spike [Env; trimeric (gp160)3, cleaved to (gp120/gp41)3] poses challenges for vaccine development. Envs of different clinical isolates exhibit different sensitivities to antibody-mediated neutralization. Envs of difficult-to-neutralize viruses are thought to be more stable and conformationally homogeneous trimers than those of easy-to-neutr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endotoxin-induced autocrine ATP signaling inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis through enhancing myosin light chain phosphorylation [Immunology and Inflammation]Although the neutrophil recruitment cascade during inflammation has been well described, the molecular players that halt neutrophil chemotaxis remain unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was a potent stop signal for chemotactic neutrophil migration. Treatment with an antagonist of the ATP receptor (P2X1) in primary human neutrophils...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Formation of neurodegenerative aggresome and death-inducing signaling complex in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects [Medical Sciences]Diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy increases the risk in infants of birth defects, such as neural tube defects (NTDs), known as diabetic embryopathy. NTDs are associated with hyperglycemia-induced protein misfolding and Caspase-8–induced programmed cell death. The present study shows that misfolded proteins are ubiquitinylated, suggesting that ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation is impaired....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enhanced respiration prevents drug tolerance and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis [Microbiology]Persistence, manifested as drug tolerance, represents a significant obstacle to global tuberculosis control. The bactericidal drugs isoniazid and rifampicin kill greater than 99% of exponentially growing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cells, but the remaining cells are persisters, cells with decreased metabolic rate, refractory to killing by these drugs, and able to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Convergence of DNA methylation and phosphorothioation epigenetics in bacterial genomes [Microbiology]Explosive growth in the study of microbial epigenetics has revealed a diversity of chemical structures and biological functions of DNA modifications in restriction–modification (R-M) and basic genetic processes. Here, we describe the discovery of shared consensus sequences for two seemingly unrelated DNA modification systems, 6mA methylation and phosphorothioation (PT), in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enterococcus faecalis bacteriocin EntV inhibits hyphal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, and virulence of Candida albicans [Microbiology]Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive bacterium, and Candida albicans, a fungus, occupy overlapping niches as ubiquitous constituents of the gastrointestinal and oral microbiome. Both species also are among the most important and problematic, opportunistic nosocomial pathogens. Surprisingly, these two species antagonize each other’s virulence in both nematode infection and in vitro...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

APC/CCdh1-Rock2 pathway controls dendritic integrity and memory [Neuroscience]Disruption of neuronal morphology contributes to the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that postnatal deletion of Cdh1, a cofactor of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase in neurons [Cdh1 conditional knockout (cKO)], disrupts dendrite arborization and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selective entrainment of gamma subbands by different slow network oscillations [Neuroscience]Theta oscillations (4–12 Hz) are thought to provide a common temporal reference for the exchange of information among distant brain networks. On the other hand, faster gamma-frequency oscillations (30–160 Hz) nested within theta cycles are believed to underlie local information processing. Whether oscillatory coupling between global and local oscillations, as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Orexin-driven GAD65 network of the lateral hypothalamus sets physical activity in mice [Neuroscience]Damage to the lateral hypothalamus (LH) causes profound physical inactivity in mammals. Several molecularly distinct types of LH neurons have been identified, including orexin cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) cells, but their interplay in orchestrating physical activity is not fully understood. Here, using optogenetic circuit analysis and cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Size-selective opening of the blood-brain barrier by targeting endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 [Pharmacology]The vasculature of the central nervous system (CNS) forms a selective barrier termed the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Disruption of the BBB may contribute to various CNS diseases. Conversely, the intact BBB restricts efficient penetration of CNS-targeted drugs. Here, we report the BBB-regulatory role of endothelial sphingosine 1–phosphate (S1P) receptor-1, a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The carbonic anhydrase CAH1 is an essential component of the carbon-concentrating mechanism in Nannochloropsis oceanica [Plant Biology]Aquatic photosynthetic organisms cope with low environmental CO2 concentrations through the action of carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). Known eukaryotic CCMs consist of inorganic carbon transporters and carbonic anhydrases (and other supporting components) that culminate in elevated [CO2] inside a chloroplastic Rubisco-containing structure called a pyrenoid. We set out to determine the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ploidy-dependent changes in the epigenome of symbiotic cells correlate with specific patterns of gene expression [Plant Biology]The formation of symbiotic nodule cells in Medicago truncatula is driven by successive endoreduplication cycles and transcriptional reprogramming in different temporal waves including the activation of more than 600 cysteine-rich NCR genes expressed only in nodules. We show here that the transcriptional waves correlate with growing ploidy levels and have...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Live imaging of root-bacteria interactions in a microfluidics setup [Plant Biology]Plant roots play a dominant role in shaping the rhizosphere, the environment in which interaction with diverse microorganisms occurs. Tracking the dynamics of root–microbe interactions at high spatial resolution is currently limited because of methodological intricacy. Here, we describe a microfluidics-based approach enabling direct imaging of root–bacteria interactions in real...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptation aftereffects reveal that tactile distance is a basic somatosensory feature [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The stage at which processing of tactile distance occurs is still debated. We addressed this issue by implementing an adaptation-aftereffect paradigm with passive touch. We demonstrated the presence of a strong aftereffect, induced by the simultaneous presentation of pairs of tactile stimuli. After adaptation to two different distances, one on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

El Nino and the shifting geography of cholera in Africa [Statistics]The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and other climate patterns can have profound impacts on the occurrence of infectious diseases ranging from dengue to cholera. In Africa, El Niño conditions are associated with increased rainfall in East Africa and decreased rainfall in southern Africa, West Africa, and parts of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Floodplains as an Achilles’ heel of Amazonian forest resilience [Sustainability Science]The massive forests of central Amazonia are often considered relatively resilient against climatic variation, but this view is challenged by the wildfires invoked by recent droughts. The impact of such fires that spread from pervasive sources of ignition may reveal where forests are less likely to persist in a drier...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]El Niño and cholera in Africa Cholera incidence rates between El Niño and non-El Niño years throughout Africa. Cholera outbreaks have long been linked to climatic factors, particularly the El Niño Southern Oscillation, but little evidence supports such a link in Africa. Using datasets comprising more than 17,000 annual observations...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ralph J. Cicerone: His scientific legacy and a long friendship [Retrospectives]The discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole and anthropogenic climate change has thrust the atmospheric sciences into the forefront of scientific disciplines, and such findings routinely appear on the front pages of the media and on the desks of world leaders. Two events can be cited as examples of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Are there many different routes to becoming a global biodiversity hotspot? [Evolution]A major question in evolution and ecology is why biodiversity is so unevenly distributed across the planet. The most obvious and salient diversity pattern is the order-of-magnitude greater species richness in the tropics compared with the temperate zones. Superimposed on this latitudinal diversity gradient is a much more complex and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bringing disorder and dynamics in protein allostery into focus [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The intricacies of protein-mediated signaling continue to be revealed in exquisite detail. It therefore seems fitting to return to the fundamental and almost magical feature of protein molecules that makes it all possible: allostery, or action at a distance. This long-held concept arose and was refined during the explosive expansion...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shining a light on the dark world of plant root-microbe interactions [Plant Biology]Interactions between bacteria and roots are critical to the terrestrial ecosystem. The zone of soil immediately surrounding roots is known as the rhizosphere and the surface of the root the rhizoplane (1, 2). This region is of paramount importance to the growth and productivity of plants because it is the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A close-up look at the spliceosome, at last [Biochemistry]Major developments in cryo-electron microscopy in the past three or four years have led to the solution of a number of spliceosome structures at high resolution, e.g., the fully assembled but not yet active spliceosome (Bact), the spliceosome just after the first step of splicing (C), and the spliceosome activated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enhanced hyperuniformity from random reorganization [Applied Physical Sciences]Diffusion relaxes density fluctuations toward a uniform random state whose variance in regions of volume v=ℓd scales as σρ2≡⟨ρ2(ℓ)⟩−⟨ρ⟩2∼ℓ−d. Systems whose fluctuations decay faster, σρ2∼ℓ−λ with d<λ≤d+1, are called hyperuniform. The larger λ, the more uniform, with systems like crystals achieving the maximum value: λ=d+1. Although finite temperature equilibrium dynamics...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cyclooxygenase-derived proangiogenic metabolites of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids [Biochemistry]Arachidonic acid (ARA) is metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) and cytochrome P450 to produce proangiogenic metabolites. Specifically, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) produced from the P450 pathway are angiogenic, inducing cancer tumor growth. A previous study showed that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) increased EET concentration and mildly promoted tumor growth. However, inhibiting...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis of Tie2 activation and Tie2/Tie1 heterodimerization [Biochemistry]The endothelial cell (EC)-specific receptor tyrosine kinases Tie1 and Tie2 are necessary for the remodeling and maturation of blood and lymphatic vessels. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) growth factor is a Tie2 agonist, whereas Ang2 functions as a context-dependent agonist/antagonist. The orphan receptor Tie1 modulates Tie2 activation, which is induced by association of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dimerization of Tie2 mediated by its membrane-proximal FNIII domains [Biochemistry]Tie1 and Tie2, members of the tyrosine kinase family with immunoglobulin and EGF homology domains, are receptor tyrosine kinases found primarily in endothelial cells with key roles in development and maintenance of the vasculature and in angiogenesis. They are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, and sepsis....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Proteolytic control of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex [Biochemistry]The mitochondrial calcium uniporter is a Ca2+-activated Ca2+ channel complex mediating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, a process crucial for Ca2+ signaling, bioenergetics, and cell death. The uniporter is composed of the pore-forming MCU protein, the gatekeeping MICU1 and MICU2 subunits, and EMRE, a single-pass membrane protein that links MCU and MICU1...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular basis for the interaction between Integrator subunits IntS9 and IntS11 and its functional importance [Biochemistry]The metazoan Integrator complex (INT) has important functions in the 3′-end processing of noncoding RNAs, including the uridine-rich small nuclear RNA (UsnRNA) and enhancer RNA (eRNA), and in the transcription of coding genes by RNA polymerase II. The INT contains at least 14 subunits, but its molecular mechanism of action...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of a DNA glycosylase that unhooks interstrand cross-links [Biochemistry]DNA glycosylases are important editing enzymes that protect genomic stability by excising chemically modified nucleobases that alter normal DNA metabolism. These enzymes have been known only to initiate base excision repair of small adducts by extrusion from the DNA helix. However, recent reports have described both vertebrate and microbial DNA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Oncogene KRAS activates fatty acid synthase, resulting in specific ERK and lipid signatures associated with lung adenocarcinoma [Cell Biology]KRAS gene mutation causes lung adenocarcinoma. KRAS activation has been associated with altered glucose and glutamine metabolism. Here, we show that KRAS activates lipogenesis, and this activation results in distinct proteomic and lipid signatures. By gene expression analysis, KRAS is shown to be associated with a lipogenesis gene signature and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Formation of nucleobases in a Miller-Urey reducing atmosphere [Chemistry]The Miller–Urey experiments pioneered modern research on the molecular origins of life, but their actual relevance in this field was later questioned because the gas mixture used in their research is considered too reducing with respect to the most accepted hypotheses for the conditions on primordial Earth. In particular, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water [Chemistry]The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantifying the driving factors for language shift in a bilingual region [Computer Sciences]Many of the world’s around 6,000 languages are in danger of disappearing as people give up use of a minority language in favor of the majority language in a process called language shift. Language shift can be monitored on a large scale through the use of mathematical models by way...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tectonic controls on the long-term carbon isotope mass balance [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The long-term, steady-state marine carbon isotope record reflects changes to the proportional burial rate of organic carbon relative to total carbon on a global scale. For this reason, times of high δ13C are conventionally interpreted to be oxygenation events caused by excess organic burial. Here we show that the carbon...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Serpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu–Bonin–Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni–Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of surface and subsurface processes in scaling N2O emissions along riverine networks [Environmental Sciences]Riverine environments, such as streams and rivers, have been reported as sources of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere mainly via microbially mediated denitrification. Our limited understanding of the relative roles of the near-surface streambed sediment (hyporheic zone), benthic, and water column zones in controlling N2O...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Universal modal radiation laws for all thermal emitters [Physics]We derive four laws relating the absorptivity and emissivity of thermal emitters. Unlike the original Kirchhoff radiation law derivations, these derivations include diffraction, and so are valid also for small objects, and can also cover nonreciprocal objects. The proofs exploit two recent approaches. First, we express all fields in terms...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spontaneous emergence of catalytic cycles with colloidal spheres [Physics]Colloidal particles endowed with specific time-dependent interactions are a promising route for realizing artificial materials that have the properties of living ones. Previous work has demonstrated how this system can give rise to self-replication. Here, we introduce the process of colloidal catalysis, in which clusters of particles catalyze the creation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: Is video game addiction really an addiction? [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Adding video gaming to the list of recognized behavioral addictions could help millions in need. It could also pathologize a normal behavior and create a new stigma. Science fiction is replete with notions of losing oneself inside a digitally generated alternate reality. But for millions around the world, that dystopic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Eight-minute self-regulation intervention raises educational attainment at scale in individualist but not collectivist cultures [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Academic credentials open up a wealth of opportunities. However, many people drop out of educational programs, such as community college and online courses. Prior research found that a brief self-regulation strategy can improve self-discipline and academic outcomes. Could this strategy support learners at large scale? Mental contrasting with implementation intentions...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Life skills, wealth, health, and wellbeing in later life [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Life skills play a key role in promoting educational and occupational success in early life, but their relevance at older ages is uncertain. Here we measured five life skills—conscientiousness, emotional stability, determination, control, and optimism—in 8,119 men and women aged 52 and older (mean 66.7 y). We show that the...
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.