New Scientist - News
Female dragonflies fake sudden death to avoid male advancesYou could almost say they are drop-dead gorgeous: when certain female dragonflies are pursued by unwanted suitors, they deter them by crashing to the ground
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung, Apple keep top spots in smartphone marketSamsung and Apple maintained their leadership in the smartphone market in early 2017 while Chinese-based Huawei's strong growth cemented its number three position, a market tracker said Thursday.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theme parks: Comcast's under-the-radar growth driverOne of Comcast's fastest-growing businesses hasn't been selling cable or internet subscriptions—or making movies and TV shows, or selling TV ads. It's been theme parks.
2min
Gizmodo
Trump Administration Creates Crime Hotline to Report Aliens, Immediately Gets Trolled Image: NBC Yesterday the Department of Homeland Security launched a new hotline to “assist victims of crimes committed by criminal aliens.” The resulting “fuck you!” from average Americans was swift and hilarious. Advertisement Less than a day into its pitiful existence, the VOICE hotline has been rendered unusable by tipsters claiming to have seen criminal aliens of the extraterrestrial kind. I
5min
cognitive science
What the basic science of addiction says about the legitimacy of video game "addiction" submitted by /u/erusso16 [link] [comments]
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wanting more self-control could hinder our efforts to exert self-control, study findsIronically, wanting to have more self-control could actually be an obstacle to achieving it, suggests new research. It appears that the mere existence of a desire for self-control undermines one's confidence and brings one to disengage from self-control challenges (regardless of one’s actual level of self-control).
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgerySchool bullies and their victims are more likely to want plastic surgery than other teens, according to new research. 11.5% of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4% of bullies and 8.8% of teenagers who both bully and are bullied, compared with less than 1% of those who are unaffected by bullying, the study concludes.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lutein and zeaxanthin isomers demonstrates improved psychological stress levelsLutein and zeaxanthin isomers -- known as the macular carotenoids -- are traditionally associated with eye health, but researchers at the University of Georgia found an interesting connection to their function in brain health, showing that they improved psychological stress levels and reduced serum cortisol. The LAMA II (an acronym for Lutein, Vision and Mental Acuity II) study was the subject of
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quarter of nursing home residents are colonized with drug-resistant bacteriaThe significant presence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), such as E. coli, among nursing home residents demonstrates the need for heightened infection control prevention and control measures in nursing homes, according to a meta-analysis published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infe
11min
Live Science
Closest Saturn Pics Yet Snapped During Daring Cassini Dive | VideoNASA’s Cassini spacecraft’s ’Grand Finale’ has begun with the first of 22 planned dives between the Saturn's innermost rings and the planet itself.
11min
Futurity.org
Does custom political news hurt democracy? Customizing political news online to filter out what doesn’t align with your beliefs may have real-world negative effects on democracy. A new study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior is among the first to experimentally test the political effects of customizability, a popular technology that personalizes a site’s subject matter. It’s an option on many top websites like Facebook
13min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare vaquita porpoise found dead in MexicoAn endangered vaquita porpoise was found dead in the Gulf of Mexico, the country's environmental protection authority said Wednesday, bringing to four the number of dead vaquitas found in 2017.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cassini spacecraft dives between Saturn and its rings, back in contact with EarthNASA's Cassini spacecraft is back in contact with Earth after its successful first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings on April 26, 2017. The spacecraft is in the process of beaming back science and engineering data collected during its passage, via NASA's Deep Space Network Goldstone Complex in California's Mojave Desert. The DSN acquired Cassini's signal at 1
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New eye test detects earliest signs of glaucomaResearchers have developed a simple, inexpensive diagnostic tool DARC (Detection of Apoptosing Retinal Cells). In clinical trials it allowed for the first time visualization of individual nerve cell death in patients with glaucoma. Early detection means doctors can start treatments before sight loss begins. Ongoing trials are investigating the potential of the test for other neurodegenerative cond
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fiber optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinicIn an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Landmark clinical trial to help Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis sufferersA drug combination that could help thousands of children with arthritis has been discovered by a team of researchers. Children and adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) are likely to develop uveitis, a condition that causes inflammation in the middle layer of the eye. The drug combination discovery will help preventing them from serious complications, including blindness.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growthThe cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a few degrees at the same time. Whether this will also be possible in the natural habitat depends on the degree of change in environmental conditions, researchers argue in a publication.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Britons shun ebooks due to 'screen fatigue'British sales of ebooks are waning, trade figures revealed Thursday, suggesting readers were suffering from "screen fatigue".
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survey: Another good year for Chesapeake Bay's underwater grassesAn annual survey led by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows the abundance of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay increased 8% between 2015 and 2016, continuing an upward trend initiated in 2012.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights virusesOur bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. A new study in the journal eLife sheds light on how germ cells - sperm and egg - protect themselves from these attackers so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation.
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
American Physical Society and CERN sign an open access agreement for SCOAP3The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), as the Host Organization of SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics), are pleased to announce that they have entered into an agreement to publish high-energy physics (HEP) articles in three leading journals of the APS - Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and
20min
Ars Technica
New, deadlier trend in the raging opioid epidemic: Elephant tranquillizer Enlarge (credit: Getty | Barcroft Media ) Law enforcement agencies across the country are raising alarms about the increasing trend of finding heroin laced with an extremely lethal elephant tranquilizer called carfentanil, The Washington Post reports . The drug is 10,000 times stronger than morphine and 100 times stronger than fentanyl, just two milligrams of which is lethal—that’s about one toss
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flawed forensic science may be hampering identification of human remainsNew research casts doubt on a method used in forensic science to determine whether skeletal remains are of a person who has given birth.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Looking for the quantum frontierA new theoretical framework has been developed to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' - the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team demonstrates that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers.
24min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Primeval forest risks sparking new EU-Poland clashThe EU warned Poland on Thursday it may take legal action to stop logging in a UNESCO World Heritage forest, risking a new clash with Warsaw's right-wing government.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twitter could have predicted the outcome of the Brexit voteLeave campaigners were not only victorious in the June 2016 Brexit vote but also in the battle of the Twittersphere, a new study reports.
31min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers. The species, formally described as Fukomys hanangensis and Fukomys livingstoni, were found around Mount Hanang and at Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, both in Tanzania.
31min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fecal microbiota transplant is safe and effective for patients with ulcerative colitisA single transplant of microbes contained in the stool of a healthy donor is a safe and effective way to increase diversity of good bacteria in the guts of patients with ulcerative colitis, according to new research. The findings suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) might be an effective treatment for the disease, which causes inflammation and ulcers in the digestive tract.
31min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The anti-malarial efficacy of exciting new clinical candidateA new article describes the discovery, and biological profiling, of an exciting new anti-malarial clinical drug candidate, MMV390048, effective against resistant strains of the malaria parasite, and across the entire parasite lifecycle, with the potential to cure and protect in a single dose.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A turbo engine for tracing neuronsPutting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. That same idea is now being applied to neuroscience, with a software wrapper that can be used on existing neuron tracing algorithms to boost their ability to handle not just big, but enormous sets of data. The wrapper, called UltraTracer, is highlighted this month in Nature Methods.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey: Another good year for Chesapeake Bay's underwater grassesAn annual survey led by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows the abundance of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay increased 8 percent between 2015 and 2016, continuing an upward trend initiated in 2012.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Team science critical to diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseasesTackling complex biomedical research increasingly requires the development of new approaches to facilitate innovative, creative and impactful discoveries. A group of scientists from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) show that a team science approach is critical to solving complex biomedical problems and advancing discoveries in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights virusesOur bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. Using rooster testes, scientists shed light on how germ cells -- sperm and egg -- protect themselves from viruses so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation. The findings could help researchers better fight viruses in chickens and in people.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecule identified that helps give resident T cells in the skin their anti-cancer punchThe molecule CD103 is key to the long-term residence of T cells in the skin and to their anti-tumor function, report a collaborative team of researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and Dartmouth In the April 14, 2017 Science Immunology. This finding supplements the ground-breaking discovery by the Dartmouth researchers that T cells residing in the skin are responsible for a potent
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Findings suggest underdiagnosis of AMD not uncommon in primary eye careApproximately 25 percent of eyes deemed to be normal based on dilated eye examination by a primary eye care ophthalmologist or optometrist had macular characteristics that indicated age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology.
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippine minister bans new open-pit mines worth $8 bnPhilippine socialite-turned-environment minister Regina Lopez caused ire in the mining industry Thursday by announcing a ban on new open-pit mines, a move that threatens over eight billion dollars in investments.
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animals actively choose to match their surroundings to avoid predationAnimals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators—a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color.
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photodielectric discovery brings new optical control to electronicsCharacters in some of the more futuristic science fiction films, like "Minority Report" and "Iron Man," control computer displays with slick and deliberate hand motions. In "Minority Report," the protagonist, played by Tom Cruise, uses gloves that glow at the fingertips and give him the power of virtual manipulation. The light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, b
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computational research details the activation mechanism of p38-alphaThe protein p38α is a member of a family of molecules that transmit outside signals throughout the cell, thus allowing for an appropriate cell response, such as proliferation, differentiation, senescence, or death. Moreover, the participation of p38α in pathological conditions, like chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer, makes it a promising pharmacological target. In this regard, a complete pi
32min
Popular Science
What are national monuments and why is Trump reviewing them? Environment American history, pre-history, and ecology all in one President Trump is calling for a review of the America's national monuments. What does this mean and what is a national monument, anyway?
37min
Popular Science
Take a peek at the country's most beautiful national monuments Environment Here's what a national monument looks like A round up of some of the prettiest images of America's national monuments.
37min
Popular Science
A spacecraft just flew between Saturn and its rings for the first time ever—and there are pictures Space NASA's Cassini is approaching its final days As NASA's Cassini approaches its final days of life, it's getting ever-closer to Saturn's atmosphere. Read on.
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria.
39min
Gizmodo
Arrow Just Can't Let Go of Flashbacks Image: CW Arrow has been saying it was going to phase out the flashbacks for years. After five seasons—matching five years of Ollie was ostensibly “on the island”—it looked like they were finally coming to an end. But it seems the show can’t stop showing us Stephen Amell in a variety of ridiculous wigs that tell us we’re looking at the “past.” Advertisement Last summer, executive producer Marc Gu
42min
Live Science
Scientists Can Now Create Glass Figurines with a 3D PrinterIntricate glass creations such as miniature castles and tiny pretzels can now be fabricated using 3D printing, according to a new study.
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forestsThe ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published today in Global Change Biology. Although most of these cone-bearing evergreen trees are well adapted to fire, the study examines whether two
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New analysis of brain network activity offers unique insight into epileptic seizuresEpilepsy is a complex neurological disorder that afflicts approximately 50 million people worldwide. Although this disease has been known to exist for centuries, the exact mechanism of its cardinal symptom, the epileptic seizure, remains poorly understood. In fact, roughly 25 percent of epileptic seizures can't be controlled by any of the therapies available today.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter could have predicted the outcome of the Brexit voteLeave campaigners were not only victorious in the June 2016 Brexit vote but also in the battle of the twittersphere, a new study in the British Journal of Politics and International Relations reports.
45min
Futurity.org
To test osteoporosis drugs, make bones transparent Ten years ago, the bones currently in your body didn’t exist. Like skin, bone is constantly renewing itself, shedding old tissue, and growing it anew from stem cells in the bone marrow. A new technique renders intact bones transparent, allowing a look at those stem cells within their environment. The method is a breakthrough for testing new drugs to combat diseases like osteoporosis. In healthy b
49min
Live Science
Tropical Storms Create Gamma-Ray Flashes | VideoWhen the conditions are just right, some tropical storms will fire off terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, which are some of the highest-energy light flashes naturally produced on Earth.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The key to long female lives may be heterogeneityFemales often live longer than men—this is true for humans and for many other animal species.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growthThe cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a few degrees at the same time. Whether this will also be possible in the natural habitat depends on the degree of change in environmental conditions, researchers from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel argue in a pu
51min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computational research details the activation mechanism of p38αp38α is a protein involved in chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer, among other pathological conditions.Published in the journal eLife, the study provides a deeper understanding of the structure of this protein, thereby paving the way for the development of more effective inhibitors.These findings are the result of combining fundamental biological data using computational techniques.
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows link between maternal marijuana use and low birth weightResearchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and Brescia University College found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight. It is the first large-scale study in Canada to show this association between maternal marijuana use and low birth weight infants.
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What causes gene transfer to trigger T cell activation and exhaustion?Researchers are beginning to gain a clearer understanding of how the immune system responds, in both a reactive and tolerant way, to gene therapy delivered using what has become the preferred gene delivery vector, adeno-associated viruses (AAV). A new review that takes a comprehensive look at both the AAV-mediated immune reactivation response to gene transfer and the role that regulatory and exhau
53min
Ingeniøren
Se kunsten i den kommende sydhavnsmetroFem stationer på metrolinjen fra Havneholmen til Ny Ellebjerg, der forventes at åbne i 2023, skal udsmykkes af forskellige kunstnere. På baggrund af en indledende idékonkurrence med 10 inviterede kunstnere har Statens Kunstfond udvalgt fem kunstnere til at skabe værkerne. Projektet er finansieret af bevillinger fra Det Obelske Familiefond, Villum Fonden og Statens Kunstfond. Se kunstnernes visuali
54min
Scientific American Content: Global
Rising Sea Levels Will Hit California Harder Than Other PlacesMelting ice sheets will cause higher sea-level rise in the state due to how the Earth rotates and gravitational pull on the waters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
56min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Government bid to delay air pollution plan failsThe UK Government has lost a court bid to delay publication of its air pollution strategy.
1h
New Scientist - News
Robots taught to work alongside humans by giving high fivesBy watching videos of people interacting with one other, Baxter robots learned to respond to social cues in a more human-like way
1h
WIRED
How NASA Visualizes Stunning Worlds Without Really Seeing Them Making space seem real and beautiful isn't just marketing. It's good for science, too. The post How NASA Visualizes Stunning Worlds Without Really Seeing Them appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beyond classical computing without fault-tolerance: Looking for the quantum frontierA team of researchers from Australia and the UK have developed a new theoretical framework to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier'—the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. Importantly, they demonstrate that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do students with debt fare in community college?Community college students who borrow up to $1,999 in student loans during their first two years of community college complete 17% fewer academic credits in that same time period than their peers who take out $2,000 to $3,999 in loans or do not take out any loans at all. This finding and more were published in a new study out today in the ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Scie
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Rhinos should be conserved in Africa, not moved to AustraliaRhinos are one of the most iconic symbols of the African savanna: grey behemoths with armour plating and fearsome horns. And yet it is the horns that are leading to their demise. Poaching is so prolific that zoos cannot even protect them.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher uses math to investigate possibility of time travelAfter some serious number crunching, a UBC researcher has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine.
1h
Futurity.org
Strongly non-linear systems can achieve equilibrium Since 1955, scientists have repeatedly tackled the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou (FPUT) problem, which found that certain nonlinear systems do not disperse their energy, but rather return to their initial excited states. The challenge within the FPUT problem was that the scientists expected the system to achieve a relaxed state, possibly equilibrium, but instead it never relaxed. Numerous papers have
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spatial epidemiology used to identify 3 key hepatitis C hotspots in MassachusettsPublic health researchers from Tufts and colleagues conducted a spatial epidemiology study to identify hotspot clusters of hepatitis C infections in Massachusetts. The information may help to make the best use of funding for education, prevention, testing, and treatment.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Animals actively choose to match their surroundings to avoid predationAnimals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators -- a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New analysis of brain network activity offers unique insight into epileptic seizuresLittle is known about which specific areas of the brain contribute to a patient's epileptic network or the roles these different areas play. As a group of researchers in Germany now reports this week in Chaos, one way to get closer to the complex wiring of the human brain is by merging concepts from a timed-based synchronization theory and space-based network theory to construct functional brain n
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antidepressant may enhance drug delivery to the brainNew research from the National Institutes of Health found that pairing the antidepressant amitriptyline with drugs designed to treat central nervous system diseases, enhances drug delivery to the brain by inhibiting the blood-brain barrier in rats. The blood-brain barrier serves as a natural, protective boundary, preventing most drugs from entering the brain. The research, performed in rats, appea
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Light has new capacity for electronicsIn 'Minority Report,' the protagonist uses gloves that give him the power of virtual manipulation. The light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, but he's touching nothing but air. That technology is still science fiction, but a new study may bring it closer to reality. Researchers report in Applied Physics Letters that they have discovered the photodielectric effe
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feeling the heatHow has thermal comfort changed in recent decades over China against the background of the global warming? Scientists carried out an investigation over the Chinese mainland using the index of effective temperature (ET), which combines the effects of temperature, humidity and wind speed.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Keratin hydrogels show significant potential to regenerate lost muscle tissue & functionThe use of human hair-derived keratin biomaterials to regenerate skeletal muscle has shown promise in new research that documents significant increases in both new muscle tissue formation and muscle function among mouse models of volumetric muscle loss.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers investigate a simple, no-bake recipe to make bricks from Martian soilExplorers planning to settle on Mars might be able to turn the planet's red soil into bricks without needing to use an oven or additional ingredients. Instead, they would just need to apply pressure to compact the soil—the equivalent of a blow from a hammer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This fantastic idea for a circular runway is sadly going nowhereBuilding a new runway is often a tight squeeze. For example, part of the opposition to a new runway in London, which has provoked national debate, comes from the hundreds of families whose homes will be demolished to make way for the airport expansion. But a team of Dutch scientists have now come up with an airport design that would allow large numbers of aircraft to take off in a much smaller spa
1h
Gizmodo
Trump's Plan to Screw Over National Monuments Is Mirrored By This Government Flickr Page Bureau of Land Management Flickr On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order that opened up a review of 25 national monuments , potentially setting the stage for Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to resize or even revoke their protected status. Trump decried former president Obama’s designations as a “federal land grab,” while environmentalists worry the order is a precursor to exp
1h
Gizmodo
Deadspin An Interview With A Man Who Has Willingly Watched Every Round Of Every NFL Draft Since 1999 Deadspin An Interview With A Man Who Has Willingly Watched Every Round Of Every NFL Draft Since 1999 | Jezebel Caitlyn Says She Hasn’t Spoken to Khloe in ‘Like, Two Years,’ Contradicting Recent KUWTK Episodes | Fusion What the Hell is Going On With Donald Trump and NAFTA? | The Grapevine Man Files Suit Against R. Kelly, Charging He Had Affair With His Wife and Gave Her Chlamydia |
1h
The Atlantic
David Bowie’s 1987 Slump Held Its Own Weird Magic In his 1980 song “Ashes to Ashes,” David Bowie sang of how his long-running character, the doomed astronaut Major Tom, was “hitting an all-time low.” Seven years later, Bowie found himself in similar straits. Never Let Me Down , his seventeenth album, was released in April of 1987 to middling sales and critical hostility. It was his first album in 16 years to fail to crack the British Top Five. T
1h
The Atlantic
Awkwardness, Why? It’s when a fist bump unwittingly meets a high-five. It’s when Ben Carson tries, unsuccessfully , to walk onto a stage. It’s trying to introduce an acquaintance to someone else at a party and then realizing you don’t actually remember their name. It’s awkward, and like so many other things, you know it when you see it. We all experience awkwardness, of course, but some people seem chronically sus
1h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
How Artificial Intelligence will change the world: a live event - Science Weekly podcastRecorded in front of a live audience as part of our Brainwaves series, Ian Sample asks a group of experts how AI will change our social landscape - for better or worse
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The toxic air in Britain's cities demands urgent action – not legal delaysThe UK government is facing criticism for delaying publication of its air quality plan. The country's high court had ordered the government to urgently revise its strategy for dealing with air pollution, after breaching legally-binding EU limits of toxic pollutants in towns and cities across the Britain.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Speak up! Why some TV dialogue is so hard to understandWithin 24 hours of the first episode of wartime drama SS-GB being broadcast the BBC received 100 complaints. Viewers took to Twitter to vent their frustrations with the sound. Many highlighted their annoyance that SS-GB was just the latest drama to be plagued with audibility problems. The debate has stretched to the House of Lords, with peers asking whether consultation with broadcasters is needed
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel technique reveals the 3-D structure and composition of powerful, custom-made high-temperature superconductorsSome of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dawn observing Ceres; third reaction wheel malfunctionsNASA's Dawn spacecraft is preparing to observe Ceres on April 29 from an "opposition" position, directly between the dwarf planet's mysterious Occator Crater and the sun. This unique geometry may yield new insights about the bright material in the center of the crater.
1h
Science | The Guardian
How Artificial Intelligence will change the world: a live event - Science Weekly podcast Recorded in front of a live audience as part of our Brainwaves series, Ian Sample asks a group of experts how AI will change our social landscape - for better or worse Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter On Monday 20 April, a crowd gathered in Kings Place to hear a discussion on the future of Artificial Intelli
1h
Popular Science
Keep your online activity hidden from your ISP with lifetime VPN protection Sponsored Post Stay safe and save hundreds on a VPN Unlimited lifetime subscription. Stay safe and save hundreds on a VPN Unlimited lifetime subscription. Read on.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Ice core drilling in North Eastern GreenlandThe first crew of researchers, technicians and students has arrived at the EastGRIP research camp on the Greenland ice cap, flown in by ski-equipped American Hercules planes. During the next 4 months, a number of projects aim to generate a new understanding about ice sheet dynamics and climate history.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-high resolution images of butterfly wing crystals offer clues to how nano-scale structures form(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has taken another step toward understanding the process by which butterfly wing scales develop crystals that result in bright, vivid colors. In their paper published in the open-access site Science Advances, the group describes the methods they used to study the wing scale crystals of the hairstreak butterfly—a black and bright blue native of parts o
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Here’s Why Trump’s Plan to Save the Coal Industry Is DoomedEasing regulatory burdens won’t make a big enough difference to the fortunes of the most polluting of the fossil fuels.
1h
Gizmodo
How to Lock Down Your Privacy on the Amazon Echo and Google Home Image: Gizmodo The smart speakers are coming! Wandering into our living rooms, listening for our voice commands, pulling random bits of trivia from the web, spitting out weather forecasts, and controlling a growing number of home appliances. But they’re always listening and currently there isn’t an easy to way to know when they aren’t (apart from hitting a mute button). So how do you stop TV ads
1h
Ingeniøren
Nasa-rapport: Vi løber snart tør for rumdragterDen amerikanske rumorganisation skal revurdere sine planer for udviklingen af nye dragter til rumvandring, for det går for sløvt, konkluderer generaldirektorat.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
"Mini-Me" Brains Mimic Disease, Raise Hope for Eventual TherapiesThese lab creations may provides hunts about autism or other disorders -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forestsThe ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published today in Global Change Biology.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New eye test detects earliest signs of glaucomaResearchers at University College London (UCL) and the Western Eye Hospital have developed a simple, inexpensive diagnostic tool DARC (Detection of Apoptosing Retinal Cells). In clinical trials it allowed for the first time visualization of individual nerve cell death in patients with glaucoma. Early detection means doctors can start treatments before sight loss begins. Initial clinical trials wil
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
National mental-health survey finds widespread ignorance, stigmaLess than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. And nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can yoga reduce symptoms of menstrual disorders?A systematic review of the published literature on yoga practice and common menstrual disorders found that all of the studies evaluated reported a beneficial effect and reduced symptoms.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How shifts in excitation-inhibition balance may lead to psychiatric disordersIn a special issue of Biological Psychiatry titled 'Cortical Excitation-Inhibition Balance and Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disorders', guest editors Dr. Alan Anticevic and Dr. John Murray, both of Yale University, bring together seven reviews that highlight advancements in understanding the balance of excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain, and what might happen when it goes awry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Winemakers lose billions of dollars every year due to natural disastersEvery year, worldwide wine industry suffers losses of more than ten billion US dollars from damaged assets, production losses, and lost profits due to extreme weather events and natural disasters. A multidisciplinary European-Australian team of researchers led by Dr. James Daniell of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) examines the extent to which regions are affected by the risks and how clim
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study supporting glycated CD59 as a novel alternative for gestational diabetes screeningMellitus, LLC reports publication of results from a prospective, investigator-initiated study conducted at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) demonstrating the potential clinical utility of glycated CD59 (GCD59) as a novel biomarker for the screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood test may better predict gestational diabetesResearchers have found that a single measurement of GCD59, a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, women who failed the glucose challenge test as well as women with gestational diabetes. It was also associated with the probability of delivering a large-for-gestational-age newborn.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fiber optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinicIn an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining.
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Gizmodo
Stunning New Atlas Shows the Polar Seafloor Like We’ve Never Seen It Gulf of Bothnia drumlins. These structures are thought to have formed by ice flow south towards a large glacier in the Baltic Sea during the last glacial period some 20 000 years ago. (Image courtesy British Antarctic Survey) An unprecedented collaboration involving 20 countries, 75 institutions, and over 250 marine geologists has yielded a new atlas that’s providing our best glimpse yet of the s
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Gizmodo
This $33 Arduino Starter Kit Should Satisfy Your Appetite For Tinkering Arduino Starter Kit , $33 with code ANCBWVFV Lifehacker has posted more Arduino projects than Trump has tweets, and you can build some yourself with this $33 starter kit , one of the best prices we’ve ever seen. This beginner-friendly set includes 38 components to get you started,with a heavy focus on RFID, but with plenty of other knickknacks like a temperature sensor, a water sensor, buttons, a
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Popular Science
China’s new aircraft carrier suggests a powerful navy in the works From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal Type 001A is the PLAN's first aircraft carrier built in China. The carrier, the first built in China, was launched to public fanfare in Dalian; once it becomes operational, it'll double Chinese carrier aviation power.
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The Atlantic
United's $10,000 Pledge to Bumped Passengers United Airlines pledged Thursday to reduce overbooking and pay travelers who volunteer to take a later flight up to $10,000 in response to an incident earlier this month in which a passenger was dragged off a flight. “Two weeks ago, we failed to meet that standard and we profoundly apologize … Today, we are taking concrete, meaningful action to make things right and ensure nothing like this ever
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The Atlantic
Cassini Goes Where No Spacecraft Has Gone Before A few minutes before midnight in California, Cassini called home. The spacecraft had been out of contact with Earth for about 41 hours, its large antenna pointed away from its home planet. This happens a few times a week as Cassini collects data around Saturn, fills up its recorders, and then turns back to stream the information across the solar system. But this stretch of silence was different.
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The Atlantic
Where Are all the Preschoolers? The city of Springfield, Massachusetts, has had a serendipitous sequence of events supercharge its preschool-expansion efforts. Federal money came in just as local support for early-childhood education crested, and the closure of an early-childhood center created an opening for the school district to buy an existing facility. The federal money, offered to Springfield and four other Massachusetts
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The Scientist RSS
Another New Timeline for Homo nalediThe ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago-much more recently than previously estimated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual humans help aspiring doctors learn empathyDelivering bad news in a caring way -- and coping with a patient's reaction -- is a key skill for doctors. Intuitive technology is helping medical students learn the best approaches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly prescribed sleeping pills increase risk of hip fractureOlder people newly prescribed sleeping pills like benzodiazepines and 'Z-drugs' have over double the odds of a hip fracture in the first two weeks compared with non-users, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wanting more self-control could hinder our efforts to exert self-control, study findsA new study shows that, ironically, wanting to have more self-control could actually be an obstacle to achieving it. It appears that the mere existence of a desire for self-control undermines one's confidence and brings one to disengage from self-control challenges (regardless of one's actual level of self-control).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgery11.5% of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4% of bullies and 8.8% of teenagers who both bully and are bullied -- compared with less than 1% of those who are unaffected by bullying.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mushrooms get defensiveSome mushrooms produce long-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids as their chemical defense against insect larvae. The biosynthesis of these polyenes relies on only one enzyme, as German scientists have now discovered. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, they report the unprecedented multiple double-bond-shifting activity by the enzyme, which is representative of a yet uncharacterized phylogenetic clad
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find key mechanism to control antibody productionThe study may hold implications in future clinical applications concerning more efficient vaccine development or treatment of autoimmune diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists at MIPT explain the way Weyl particles 'dance' on crystal surfaceIn a theoretical study supervised by MIPT's Prof. Vladimir Volkov, Zhanna Devizorova, a Ph.D. student at MIPT solved the system of Weyl's equations for two valleys "by hand" taking into account the derived boundary conditions, thus analytically finding the shape of Fermi arcs. In effect, they offered a quantitative as well as qualitative description of experimental data and proved that Fermi arc f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows mothers are less wealthy than women without childrenThe direct and indirect costs of having children can be high and, in many societies, women most often shoulder these costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Special status fails to protect forests from illegal tree lossProtected forests in developing nations are losing large numbers of trees and creating significant carbon emissions, despite their special status.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report outlines how climate change will affect gardenersThe 'perfect' English garden could become a thing of the past thanks to climate change, scientists at the University of Reading have warned as a new report is published.
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Futurity.org
Brain science needs your help, so play this game Gamers can now significantly speed up the reconstructing of brain cells’ intricate architecture—a fundamental task in 21st century brain science. Mozak enables citizen scientists to produce complete, 3D reconstructions of neurons from different regions of the brain in animals and people. Figuring out the different shapes of nerve cells is a fundamental first step in analyzing how they assemble in
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Gizmodo
Why the Scariest Response to Climate Change Is Finally Being Taken Seriously Image: Wikipedia We’re not doing such a great job solving the whole climate change problem, which is why some experts think it’s time to study more radical tactics. The notion of geoengineering—hacking the climate to cool the planet—is controversial, awe-inspiring, and to many, terrifying. And yet, despite their own grave concerns with the idea, a group of researchers believes the time has come t
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The Atlantic
What an NYU Administrator Got Wrong About Campus Speech Earlier this week, Ulrich Baer, a vice provost at New York University, published an op-ed in The New York Times defending student-activist efforts to shut down speakers at institutions of higher education like Auburn, UC Berkeley, and Middlebury. He urged readers inclined to defend liberal norms on matters of speech to adopt “a more sophisticated understanding” and argued that “the parameters of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery in northern lakes may be key to understanding early life on EarthMany Canadian lakes can provide new insights into ancient oceans, a team of researchers has discovered, and these findings could advance research about greenhouse gas emissions, harmful algal blooms, and early life forms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Youth binge drinking, cardiovascular disease possibly linkedA new study is underway to determine whether binge drinking is related to cardiovascular disease in young adults who are not predisposed to the condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Where scientist meets machine: A fresh approach to experimental design at SLAC X-ray laserBig leaps in technology require big leaps in design ­-- entirely new approaches that can take full advantage of everything the technology has to offer. That's the thinking behind a new initiative at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fiber optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinicIn an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining. The new multimodal imaging probe uses an ultrafast laser to create nonlinear optical effects in tissue that can reveal cancer and other diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The next Pluto mission—an orbiter and lander?For decades, we could only imagine what the view of Pluto's surface might be. Now, we have the real thing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flawed forensic science may be hampering identification of human remainsResearch from The Australian National University (ANU) has cast doubt on a method used in forensic science to determine whether skeletal remains are of a person who has given birth.
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Futurity.org
Starting sleeping pills can double risk of hip fracture Older people newly prescribed sleeping pills like benzodiazepines and “Z-drugs” have over twice the odds of a hip fracture in the first two weeks compared with non-users, a new study suggests. “While ‘Z-drugs’ are fast becoming the doctor’s hypnotic prescription of choice, there is no evidence that they are a safer alternative to benzodiazepines in relation to hip fracture risk,” says Ben Carter
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New Scientist - News
Electric shocks could help you perfect your running techniqueFootStriker uses electrical muscle stimulation to improve your running style – and early tests suggest that it might have a big impact
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a Pinterest engineer is helping others find inspiration through visual searchSearching for ideas on how to arrange photos in her college dorm room, Cindy Zhang turned to Pinterest for some inspiration as a freshman.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wireless power could enable ingestible electronicsResearchers at MIT, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory have devised a way to wirelessly power small electronic devices that can linger in the digestive tract indefinitely after being swallowed. Such devices could be used to sense conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, or carry small reservoirs of drugs to be delivered over an extended period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overcoming cancer treatment resistanceA collaborative team of researchers has proven the theory that, while resistance to targeted treatment in cancer is truly a moving target, there are opportunities to overcome the resistance that develops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers investigate a simple, no-bake recipe to make bricks from Martian soilExplorers planning to settle on Mars might be able to turn the planet's soil into bricks without needing to use an oven or additional ingredients. Instead, they would need to apply pressure to compact the soil--the equivalent of a blow from a hammer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using math to investigate possibility of time travelAfter some serious number crunching, a researcher says that he has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine: a Traversable Acausal Retrograde Domain in Space-time (TARDIS). He describes it as a bubble of space-time geometry which carries its contents backward and forwards through space and time as it tours a large circular path. The bubble moves through space-time at speeds grea
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Ars Technica
China launches second (and first homegrown) aircraft carrier Enlarge / China's first domestically-developed aircraft carrier at its launching ceremony at Dalian Port on April 26, 2017. (credit: Getty Images/ VCG) On August 26, the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) launched its first domestically constructed aircraft carrier from a shipyard in Dailan. The as-yet-unnamed carrier still requires much more additional work before it joins PLAN's fleet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Outstanding' results announced from new blood cancer studyResearch led by University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust reveals 'transformative outcomes' for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The key to long female lives may be heterogeneityIn sparrowhawks diversity in frailty and robustness helps females live longer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
E-cigarettes do not promote cancer growth in lab testsA new study found no evidence that a commercially available e-cigarette vapor promotes the development of cancer in laboratory cells. In contrast, smoke from a reference cigarette was positive for cancer-promoting activity at very low concentrations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twitter could have predicted the outcome of the Brexit voteLeave campaigners were not only victorious in the June 2016 Brexit vote but also in the battle of the twittersphere, a new study in the British Journal of Politics and International Relations reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growthThe cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a few degrees at the same time. Whether this will also be possible in the natural habitat depends on the degree of change in environmental conditions, researchers from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel argue in a pu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal nanoparticles induced visible-light photocatalysis: Mechanisms, applications, ways of promoting catalytic activity and outlookPhotocatalysis induced by light absorption of metal nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged as a promising strategy for exploiting efficient visible-light-responsive composites for solar-energy conversion. Lequan Liu et al. from the TU-NIMS International Collaboration Laboratory, Tianjin University, reviewed the mechanisms proposed, its application and possible strategies in promoting catalytic activity o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark clinical trial to help Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis sufferersA clinical trial funded by Arthritis Research UK and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) led by professors from the Universities of Liverpool (UK) and Bristol (UK) has discovered a drug combination that could help thousands of children with arthritis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Looking for the quantum frontierResearchers have developed a new theoretical framework to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' - the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team, whose work was highlighted in the first edition of Quantum journal this week, demonstrate that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermedi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A close look into the barley genomeAn international consortium, with the participation of the Helmholtz Zentrum München, Plant Genome and Systems Biology Department (PGSB), has published methodologically significant data on the barley genome. Their findings are contributing to the development of resistant varieties. The publication appeared in Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism of the influence of the Tibetan-Iranian Plateaus on the circulation and climate in summerThe Iranian-Tibetan Plateaus have both dynamic and thermal influences on Asian climate and global circulation. Scientists have been puzzled the mechanism of the influence. Now researchers in Beijing have identified the interactions and feedbacks among the heating over the two plateaus and circulation as well as the associated impacts of such interactions on Asian summer monsoon.
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Science | The Guardian
Cassini: the 17th-century astronomer who shrank France and inspired a spacecraft | Rebekah Higgitt The Cassini spacecraft and its dramatic dive towards Saturn have been in the news this week, but the human Cassini is no less memorable As a historian of science, when I scroll through my Twitter timeline and see mentions of Cassini, my thoughts tend to go not to the spacecraft that is, at the time of writing, somewhere between Saturn’s rings and the planet itself. Rather, they turn to Cassini I
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Gizmodo
Here's United's New Plan to Avoid Beating Up Passengers and Dragging Them Off Planes Image: Fox 13 On Thursday, United Airlines released a list of “substantial changes” to its policies after gruesome video of an elderly man being brutally dragged from a United Airlines plane went viral. The changes are largely pointless PR (“additional training” and a new “customer solutions team”), but a few seem in direct response to the incident earlier in April. Advertisement First, United Ai
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Ars Technica
The secret lives of Google raters Enlarge (credit: The IT Crowd / BBC) Something disturbing has been happening to Google's advertising algorithms. These are the programs responsible for placing ads in appropriate contexts; serving up travel-related ads to people searching for hotels or music-related ads to people watching the latest Beyoncé video. But in the UK, government ads for the Royal Navy, the Home Office, and Transport fo
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Quanta Magazine
A Cosmic-Ray Hunter Takes to the Sky On April 25, at 10:50 a.m. local time, a white helium balloon ascended from Wanaka, New Zealand, and lifted Angela Olinto ’s hopes into the stratosphere. The football stadium-size NASA balloon, now floating 20 miles above the Earth, carries a one-ton detector that Olinto helped design and see off the ground. Every moonless night for the next few months, it will peer out at the dark curve of the E
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cassini spacecraft dives between Saturn and its ringsNASA's Cassini spacecraft is back in contact with Earth after its successful first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings on April 26, 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preventing, treating sport-related concussions: New consensusAn international consensus on recognizing and treating concussion in sport has been revealed by researchers. This consensus statement updates the assessment tools in light of the new evidence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diagnosed autism linked to maternal grandmother's smoking in pregnancyScientists have looked at all 14,500 participants in Children of the 90s and found that if a girl's maternal grandmother smoked during pregnancy, the girl is 67 percent more likely to display certain traits linked to autism, such as poor social communication skills and repetitive behaviors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise and vitamin D better together for heart healthResearchers report that an analysis of survey responses and health records of more than 10,000 American adults for nearly 20 years suggests a 'synergistic' link between exercise and good vitamin D levels in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Control of molecular motion by metal-plated 3-D printed plastic piecesScientists have combined 3-D-printing with electroplating to easily produce high-quality metal electrodes that can be used as a molecular beam-splitter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mother's family history could pose risk for preterm birthThe results of the study show that the medical history of a pregnant woman's mother and aunts should also be taken into account when considering the risk of pregnancy complications such as premature birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy drinks linked to more heart, blood pressure changes than caffeinated drinks aloneTwo hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart's electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink. Both caffeine and energy drinks raised systolic blood pressure initially but blood pressure normalized faster after caffeine.
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The Atlantic
The (Sometimes Unintentional) Subtext of Digital Conversations The meanings we glean in conversation are often, maybe mostly, not found in the words spoken, but in how they’re said, and in the spaces between them. Tone of voice, and cadences created by shifts in speed, volume, and pitch, let listeners know whether “Nice job,” is complimentary or sarcastic, or whether “Wow” shows that you’re impressed or underwhelmed. The literal meaning of words is their mes
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WIRED
A Clever Plan to Secure the Internet of Things Could Still Have Big Drawbacks Relying on companies to secure IoT at the device level hasn't worked. Cloudflare has a different approach. The post A Clever Plan to Secure the Internet of Things Could Still Have Big Drawbacks appeared first on WIRED .
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Ingeniøren
Branchen efter fald i energieksport: Fortsat førerposition kræver drastiske investeringerSelvom energieksporten sidste år faldt med 1 mia. kroner, er Danmark fortsat førende på verdensplan. Men succesen kan kun vare ved, hvis virksomheder og det offentlige investerer mere i fremtiden, mener energibranchen.
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Ingeniøren
10 teknologiske tendenser, du bør kende: #1. Autonome lastbilerNogle teknologier er allerede i færd med ændre alt fra vores økonomi til opfattelsen af, hvad det vil sige at være menneske. Andre er lige på nippet til at udfolde deres potentiale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ocean warming to cancel increased carbon dioxide-driven productivityResearchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.
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Science : NPR
Cassini Craft Beams Closest Images Ever Taken Of Saturn The spacecraft is "showing us new wonders and demonstrating where our curiosity can take us if we dare," NASA's planetary science director says. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mental Qigong can be just as rewarding as its physical cousinNew research in Frontiers in Psychology demonstrated through an extensive series of EEG measurements and statistical tests that mental practice of the dynamic Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi has the same effect on EEG brain activity as physical training of Qigong.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flawed forensic science may be hampering identification of human remainsResearch from The Australian National University (ANU) has cast doubt on a method used in forensic science to determine whether skeletal remains are of a person who has given birth.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise and vitamin D better together for heart healthJohns Hopkins researchers report that an analysis of survey responses and health records of more than 10,000 American adults for nearly 20 years suggests a 'synergistic' link between exercise and good vitamin D levels in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers investigate a simple, no-bake recipe to make bricks from Martian soilExplorers planning to settle on Mars might be able to turn the planet's soil into bricks without needing to use an oven or additional ingredients. Instead, they would need to apply pressure to compact the soil--the equivalent of a blow from a hammer. These are findings of a study published in Nature Scientific Reports on April 27, 2017. The study was authored by a team of engineers at the Universi
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diagnosed autism linked to maternal grandmother's smoking in pregnancyScientists from the University of Bristol have looked at all 14,500 participants in Children of the 90s and found that if a girl's maternal grandmother smoked during pregnancy, the girl is 67 percent more likely to display certain traits linked to autism, such as poor social communication skills and repetitive behaviors.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ECDC report shows strong potential of E-health to increase vaccination coverage in EuropeTwenty one EU/EEA countries have developed or are in the process of developing systems to digitally record information about vaccination, according to a new 'ECDC survey report on immunization information systems implementation and system characteristics'. Fourteen of these countries already have a system in place, whereas innovative systems are being piloted in 7 countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New consensus published on preventing and treating sport-related concussionsResearchers at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Kinesiology have played an integral role in shaping an international consensus on recognizing and treating concussion in sport. The document, International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport, was published on April 26 in two special editions of the prestigious British Journal of Sports Medicine. This consensus statement builds on the pr
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Gizmodo
Saturn Looks Haunted in Cassini's First Grand Finale Photos Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Good morning, Cassini! Today, at about 3:00am EDT , NASA’s Deep Space Network Goldstone Complex in California’s acquired the orbiter’s signal for the first time since it began its series of Grand Finale dives. The photos it took from the space between Saturn and its rings, which have just been released, are nothing short of breathtaking. It’s classi
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Gizmodo
How Is it Possible to Screw Up a Sonos Clone This Badly All images: Michael Nuñez/Gizmodo I have this vision of waking up in the morning, and pressing a button that plays music everywhere in my house. Sonos was the original pioneer that built a speaker system to get this multiroom job done, and it remains the best option for a number of reasons: The $200 starting price point is reasonable, the system sounds phenomenal, and most importantly, it’s relia
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The Scientist RSS
Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of DogsBy analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Colorful CrystalsThecla opisena butterfly wings get their unique luster from the crystalline structures in their scales (bottom right).
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Dagens Medicin
Landsret stadfæster dom mod psykiater for seksuelle overgrebVestre Landsret stadfæster dom mod psykiater, der er dømt for seksuelt overgreb på en patient, mens hun var i ambulant behandling på det psykiatriske hospital i Risskov.
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Science | The Guardian
The perfect memory: does it even exist? | Dean Burnett Despite sensational news reports and pop-culture portrayals, the notion that any human has, or even could have, a 100% reliable memory is far from certain Every now and then, you see news reports of people with incredible memories , able to recall every single thing from their life at a moment’s notice. Initially, it may sound like an incredibly useful ability. No more searching for your car keys
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Gizmodo
Our First Look at a Major Superman Villain's Arrival on Supergirl One fan favorite will return for the next Mad Max movie. Jude Law talks about his approach to Fantastic Beasts 2 . The Scream TV show is getting a complete reboot. Plus, Jessica Henwick teases Colleen Wing’s journey in The Defenders , and Killer Frost gets an appropriately cool new costume in The Flash . Spoilers now! Mad Max 5 & 6 Speaking with The Independent , George Miller revealed he’s still
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Ars Technica
Nintendo plans to ship 10 million Switch consoles in the next year Enlarge For months now, Nintendo has said it planned to ship 2 million Switch systems to players worldwide in the system's first month of availability. In an earnings report released Thursday, the company announced it had beaten that estimate by nearly 40 percent, shipping 2.74 million systems in March for what it calls "a promising start." The numbers are no great surprise, at this point. The Sw
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Popular Science
Bricks made from fake Martian soil are surprisingly strong Space But can they build our future outpost on the red planet? Maybe we can just smoosh Mars' dirt into bricks to build our castles in the sky. Read on.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How a mushroom gets its glowFor the first time, biologists have pinpointed the compound that lights up in fungal bioluminescence.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC instructor uses math to investigate possibility of time travelAfter some serious number crunching, a UBC researcher has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mother's family history could pose risk for preterm birth -- Ben-Gurion U. studyThe results of the study show that the medical history of a pregnant woman's mother and aunts should also be taken into account when considering the risk of pregnancy complications such as premature birth.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fecal microbiota transplant is safe and effective for patients with ulcerative colitisA single transplant of microbes contained in the stool of a healthy donor is a safe and effective way to increase diversity of good bacteria in the guts of patients with ulcerative colitis, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. The findings suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) might be an effective treatment for the disease, which causes inf
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Scientific American Content: Global
Secret Lives of Animals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
Faktatjek: Holder klima-påstandene på de sociale medier?Er der overhovedet klimaforandringer og er de i så fald ikke helt naturlige? Vi er gået klima-kritikernes argumenter efter i sømmene.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Robot Builders, Alexa’s New Eyes, and Medical AI Secrets—The Download, April 27, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Ars Technica
Cassini flies where no spacecraft has gone before—within 3,000km of Saturn NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute After the Cassini spacecraft plunged between Saturn and its inner-most rings on Wednesday, mission scientists waited anxiously Wednesday night for a message from the robotic probe that it had survived. Finally, at 2:56am ET on Thursday, Cassini made contact via NASA's Deep Space Network Goldstone Complex in California's Mojave Desert and sent back some pre
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Gizmodo
Hope For the Best, Prepare For the Worst With This Fully Stocked First Aid Kit, On Sale Today Only 326 Piece First Aid Kit , $26 I’m not saying civil society is going to break down in the relatively near future, necessitating survival preparedness. But I’m not not saying it. This 326 piece first aid kit is OSHA and ANSI certified for 100 people, so it should (hopefully) last you and your family for quite some time, no matter the situation. Inside , you’ll find bandages, alcohol wipes, medicine
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Dagens Medicin
Bent Hansen: Folketinget på vildspor i psykiatrien Bent Hansen (S), formand for Danske Regioner, svarer igen på den kritik, regionerne har fået for at sløse med pengene i psykiatrien.
3h
WIRED
Want Electric Airplanes? Sorry, But You Gotta Start Small and Boring After the grandeur of Solar Impulse 2's round-the-world flight, André Borschberg is ready to start small. The post Want Electric Airplanes? Sorry, But You Gotta Start Small and Boring appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Who’ll Be the First to Meld With the Machines? Diabetics Five years ago, the feds would never let a computer deliver a drug that could kill you. Then they approved the artificial pancreas. The post Who'll Be the First to Meld With the Machines? Diabetics appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Let’s Do the Shocking Physics of Why Power Lines Sag When a cable is supported by the two ends, it will hang down a bit depending on the tension in the cable. How can you model this cable sag with a computer? The post Let’s Do the Shocking Physics of Why Power Lines Sag appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The Breast Pump Finally Joins the 21st Century The device millions of women rely on is stuck decades behind the times. Now tech entrepreneurs are hacking this essential tool of motherhood. The post The Breast Pump Finally Joins the 21st Century appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
When the Hell Will We Find Planet Nine? Artist’s concept of Planet 9. (Image: Caltech/R. Hurt) The hunt for Planet 9 —a hypothetical, Neptune-sized object beyond Pluto—has stirred the scientific community since last year year, when a pair of Caltech astronomers argued in favor of the idea . Those intrepid scientists—Mike Brown, best known as the guy who killed Pluto, and Konstantin Batygin—are currently spearheading a search for this e
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Futurity.org
Fear of death makes killing animals seem okay Reminders of death make people more likely to support killing animals, regardless of their existing attitudes about animal rights, according to new research. The research provides new insight into the psychology behind humans’ willingness to kill animals for a variety of reasons, and could also potentially help scientists better understand the psychological motivations behind the murder and genoc
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
This Advance Brings Us a Lot Closer to a "Hydrogen Economy"Engineers already knew how to make hydrogen gas using solar power, but a new approach makes the process more durable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find means by which mushrooms glow(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Russia, Brazil and Japan has uncovered the means by which two kinds of mushrooms glow in the dark. In their paper published on the open-access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of Neonothopanus gardneri and Neonothopanus nambi—mushrooms that grow and glow in Brazil and Vietnam respectively.
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Gizmodo
The Secret Service Can't Keep Up With the Threats Made Against Trump on Twitter President Donald Trump speaks at the US Capitol on April 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) Barack Obama may have been the first president with a Twitter account, but Donald Trump will definitely be remembered by history as the first social media president. President Trump tweets morning, day, and night—eliciting plenty of love from his supporters and torren
3h
Futurity.org
Some ads make us think products ‘sound big’ Lower pitches in voices or music in advertisements lead consumers to infer a larger product size, according to a new study. Sound is a fundamental element of nearly all marketing communications, from commercials to spokespeople and sales associates, but Michael Lowe, assistant professor of marketing at Georgia Tech’s Scheller College of Business and Kelly Haws, associate professor of marketing at
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsministeriets pressechef skal være spindoktor for Løhde Innovationsminister Sophie Løhde (V) henter sin tidligere pressechef fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet ind som spindoktor.
3h
Popular Science
Why big animals can't take a little rain From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Giant sloths and saber-toothed tigers, oh my As persistent moisture increased at the end of the last Ice Age, many big animals across Eurasia and the Americas became extinct. Read on.
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Ingeniøren
Let adgang til satellitdata skal skabe grundlag for nye virksomhederI et nyt projekt vil danske forskere bringe orden og systematik i de enorme mængder af globale data om havstrømme, bølger og vind. Flere virksomheder står på spring til at udnytte disse til nye forretningsmuligheder.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Laughing Matters--and Helps to Explain How Babies BondAn infant’s laughter can reveal not only how babies think but also the serious reasons for this expression of joy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
WIRED
Facebook’s Race to Link Your Brain to a Computer Might Be Unwinnable Facebook wants to beat the competition to the next big computing platform, including machine-brain interfaces. Never mind they might not work. The post Facebook's Race to Link Your Brain to a Computer Might Be Unwinnable appeared first on WIRED .
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NIST invents fundamental component for 'spintronic' computingNIST has been granted a patent for technology that may hasten the advent of a long-awaited new generation of high-performance, low-energy computers.
4h
Live Science
Can Bill Nye Really 'Save the World'?Popular programming that focuses on science tends to not actually be all that popular. A study of the much-publicized "Cosmos" reboot showed it didn't reach the people who its creators would want to reach.
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Science | The Guardian
Lib Dems shouldn't count on Remain votes - the data looks bleak Conventional wisdom suggests the Tories could bleed Remain votes to the Lib Dems. Our detailed data analysis suggests this idea could be very wrong indeed This post was written in collaboration with Martin Baxter of Electoral Calculus . The Thames Valley constituency I live in voted for Remain in the EU Referendum, which is a little bit awkward because our MP is Theresa May. Surrounded by miles o
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WIRED
Handmaid’s Tale Is Somehow All the More Terrifying as a Hulu Show The series is based on the 1985 novel, but it feels perfectly suited to 2017. The post Handmaid’s Tale Is Somehow All the More Terrifying as a Hulu Show appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED
Facebook’s Race to Link Your Brain to a Computer Might Be Unwinnable Facebook wants to beat the competition to the next big computing platform, including machine-brain interfaces. Never mind they might not work. The post Facebook's Race to Link Your Brain to a Computer Might Be Unwinnable appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED
A Simple, Smart, and Elegant—Yes, Elegant—Glucose Monitor One Drop's glucose meter is an uncommonly attractive alternative to the typical blood monitoring setup. The post A Simple, Smart, and Elegant—Yes, Elegant—Glucose Monitor appeared first on WIRED .
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Dagens Medicin
Kæmperegning efter hospitalsflytning kan betyde fyringer Aarhus Universitetshospital kommer til at mangle op mod 220 mio. kr. om året på grund af ekstraudgifter i forbindelse med hospitalsflytningen.
4h
The Atlantic
Today's News: April 27, 2017 —President Trump has backed away from terminating NAFTA, hours after a senior White House official said Trump would announced the U.S. would withdraw from the free-trade pact with Canada and Mexico. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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Popular Science
Your sense of smell is actually pretty amazing Entertainment Flavor: The science of our most neglected sense How does smell contribute to the way food tastes? Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
"Dragonfly'" Drone Could Fly across Saturn's Moon TitanThe quadcopter-style lander could explore some of the moon’s most promising sites for habitability and life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Hidden World of Canyons and Ridges Revealed on Polar SeafloorScientists have gathered images of the ancient canyons, craters, hills and permafrost fields that are hidden under Earth's icy seas.
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Live Science
Photos: Gorgeous Landscapes Hidden Beneath Polar SeasScientists have compiled an updated atlas of undersea landscapes carved by glaciers and icebergs. Photos reveal these formations, hidden in Earth's polar regions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientific papers that use old and new knowledge get the most attentionAn examination of millions of scientific papers and patents reveals works that land in the top 5 percent of the most cited research draw upon a mix of old and new knowledge—significant in a day and age when the number of new publications is increasing dramatically, says a researcher at the University of Michigan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tick protein helps antibiotics combat MRSA super bugA protein derived from ticks enhances the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, according to a Yale-led study. The strategy of using the protein in combination with existing treatments can help address the growing challenge of antibiotic-resistant MRSA and other staph infections, the researchers said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Super-resolution spectral imaging to monitor dynamic processes in real timeSpectroscopy is the study of the interaction between light and matter, offering numerous important applications in fields ranging from materials science to astronomy. A common goal of spectroscopy is improved spectroscopic resolution to provide more detailed information about dynamic processes. Multichannel spectrometers are widely used in spectroscopy because they are compact, strong, and capture
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
El Nino and the end of the global warming hiatusA new climate model developed by Yale scientists puts the "global warming hiatus" into a broader historical context and offers a new method for predicting global mean temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Age discrimination in the workplace happening to people as young as 45, study saysAlmost a third of Australians perceived some form of age-related discrimination while employed or looking for work in the last 12 months—starting as early as 45 years of age, our study finds.
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Popular Science
A placebo really can mend a broken heart Health The power of belief compels you Emotional pain can almost literally break your heart. Why shouldn’t belief mend it? Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking particles at the energy frontierA new age of exploration dawned at the start of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider, as protons began colliding at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The ATLAS experiment now frequently observes highly collimated bundles of particles (known as jets) with energies of up to multiple TeV, as well as tau-leptons and b-hadrons that pass through the innermost detector layers before decayi
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The Atlantic
Is My Neti Pot Going to Kill Me? Allergy season is upon us once more, and for many allergy sufferers, that means it’s time to pull two crucial items to the front of the medicine cabinet: 24-hour non-drowsy loratadine, and a neti pot—a teapot-like device used to flush the nasal passages with saline in order to clear allergens and soothe sinus pressure. (It can be seen in action in this very popular gif .) The constant mockery of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyber attacks 10 years on—from disruption to disinformationToday is the tenth anniversary of the world's first major coordinated "cyber attack" on a nation's internet infrastructure. This little-known event set the scene for the onrush of cyber espionage, fake news and information wars we know today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why boys and girls are different when it comes reading and arithmeticGirls from low and middle socio-economic backgrounds are better at reading than boys, while boys from high-socio-economic backgrounds are better at mathematics than girls,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recently discovered solar system could seed life between adjacent exoplanetsAfter NASA announced in February the discovery of a solar system with seven planets—three of which were deemed potentially habitable—UChicago postdoctoral scholar Sebastiaan Krijt began wondering: If a life form existed on one of these planets, could space debris carry it to another?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive green crab found near Sequim, WashingtonA new population of invasive European green crab has been found at Dungeness Spit, near Sequim, Washington, rekindling concern over the potential for damage to local marine life and shorelines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From pedicures to the Peregrine rocket, paraffin wax proves its worthYour candles, crayons, and pedicures have something in common with a revolutionary aerospace engineering project from NASA and Stanford University. The paraffin wax used in familiar, everyday products and pampering is also what fuels the Peregrine hybrid rocket motor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Cygnus spacecraft approaches ISS in the sunsetOn Saturday April 22, 2017, Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency photographed Orbital ATK's Cygnus spacecraft as it approached the International Space Station.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA study challenges long-held tsunami formation theoryA new NASA study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Google's help, psychologist tackles 'black troublemaker' school stereotypeAs a boy in Memphis, Tennessee, Jason Okonofua tagged along behind his two protective older brothers, even when they got into schoolyard brawls. By 10th grade he had attended a half-dozen schools, getting suspended four times and expelled once.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's largest moveable steel structure shelters sarcophagus at ChernobylToday marks the 31st anniversary of the catastrophic explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant's Unit 4 reactor. The blast discharged 400 times the radioactivity released by the Hiroshima bomb and drove nearly 200,000 people from their homes near the plant in Ukraine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physics of poo—why it takes you and an elephant the same amount of timeThe ancient Chinese practiced copromancy, the diagnosis of health based on the shape, size and texture of feces. So did the Egyptians, the Greeks and nearly every ancient culture. Even today, your doctor may ask when you last had a bowel movement and to describe it in exquisite detail.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is It True Facts Don't Lie?With climate deniers and political pundits trying to poke holes in what we know to be true, it's important to understand that science, too, is based on questioning facts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Jordskælv annullerer kystsikring: Havbunden løftet flere meterKraftigt jordskælv har fået 120 km kystlinje til at hæve sig op til flere meter i New Zealand. Det er et usædvanligt fænomen, siger dansk seismolog.
4h
Live Science
'Whispering' Whales: Humpback Calves Speak Softly to MomA newborn humpback whale learns early in life to use its "indoor voice" to avoid attracting the attention of nearby killer whales.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black bears on the move in upstate New YorkThe black bear population in southern New York has grown and expanded their range since the early 1990s, which has led to increased encounters with humans. But details about bear populations in the state have remained understudied.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing Fiji hot springs for refrigerationTwo remote off-grid villages on the tiny Fijian island of Vanua Levu in the South Pacific are looking forward to their first reliable source of refrigeration thanks to, rather ironically, their local hot spring.
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Viden
Kan et CO2-mærke gøre dig mere klimabevidst?Dansk forsker foreslår at mærke madvarer efter deres klimavenlighed. Forbrugerorganisationer og Dansk Industri er skeptiske.
4h
New Scientist - News
How to usher in an AI future with gain rather than painThe consent of the people will be needed if the machine learning revolution is to succeed, says Paul Marks
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New Scientist - News
First look at images from Cassini’s dive between Saturn’s ringsThese are the first images of the planet taken as the Cassini spacecraft made the first of its 22 planned dives between its rings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One single enzyme induces the chemical defense of a mushroom against larvaeSome mushrooms produce long-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids as their chemical defense against insect larvae. The biosynthesis of these polyenes relies on only one enzyme, as German scientists have now discovered. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, they report the unprecedented multiple double-bond-shifting activity by the enzyme, which is representative of a yet uncharacterized phylogenetic clad
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodiversity ravaged by dredging at renowned Scottish dive siteThe tragic and sudden loss of an important marine site in Scotland highlights the need for better protection of the country's inshore waters.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Facebook Launches "Moon Shot" Effort to Decode Speech Direct from the BrainCan the social media giant’s bold claims live up to the hype? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Gizmodo
This Viral Photo of Bill Nye Talking About Gender is Completely Fake Have you seen this screenshot from an old episode of Bill Nye the Science Guy ? It shows Nye with the caption, “Gender is determined by your chromosomes.” Alt-right social media users have been posting it because Nye recently said that gender is on a spectrum. But the old image is completely fake . Screenshot of a tweet showing a doctored image of Bill Nye saying that “Gender is determined by you
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WIRED
Meet the Brilliant Young Hackers Who’ll Soon Shape the World They are young but not selfish. Brilliant but not dorky. Engaged but not political. The current class of college-age hackers will shape our future. The post Meet the Brilliant Young Hackers Who’ll Soon Shape the World appeared first on WIRED .
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Ingeniøren
McKinsey-rapport: Robotten udkonkurrerer ikke ingeniørerI fremtiden bliver 40 procent af alle arbejdsopgaver automatiseret, men ikke blandt højtuddannede – og slet ikke blandt de ingeniører, der skal gennemføre omstillingen, hedder det i ny rapport fra McKinsey.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do students with debt fare in community college?Community college students who borrow up to $1,999 in student loans during their first two years of community college complete 17 percent fewer academic credits in that same time period than their peers who take out $2,000 to $3,999 in loans or do not take out any loans at all. This finding and more were published in a new study out today in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Soci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual humans help aspiring doctors learn empathyHow a revolutionary technology -- which assesses a student's body language, facial expressions and communication strategies -- is helping train more empathetic doctors.
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The Atlantic
Are We Having Too Much Fun? Earlier this month, thousands of protesters gathered at Washington’s National Mall to advocate for an assortment of causes: action against global climate change, federal funding for scientific research, an empirical approach to the world and its mysteries. The protesters at the March for Science , as scientists are wont to do, followed what has become one of the formulas for such an event, holdin
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The scales of the ocellated lizard are surprisingly coordinatedThe mazelike patterns of the ocellated lizard’s skin follow a set of rules from computer science.
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New on MIT Technology Review
100 Days in, Few Clues about Trump’s Tech AgendaWe’re even more confused about President Trump’s stances on pressing technology policy issues today than we were on inauguration day.
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Ingeniøren
Sådan styrker du din status i teamet på din arbejdsplads Vi kan alle komme i 'bad standing', hvis vi dummer os eller er klodsede eller uheldige. men vi kan også styrke vores troværdighed og position på arbejdspladsen. Her er syv gode råd, til hvordan du genvinder din status https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-styrker-du-din-status-teamet-7664 Jobfinder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jupiter and the theory of relativity blamed for course changes of celestial bodiesIn the case of solar system bodies passing close to the sun, there are two important effects playing a crucial role in the orbital evolution. One of the effects is from the general relativity and the other effect is from Newtonian theory of gravitation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milkResearchers of the University of Bern have identified a new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows. This gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A transfer to S. aureus which is likely according to the researchers would jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find alarming NOx-emissions from diesel carsBy now, it's no secret: the certification requirements for cars in the EU and in Switzerland have precious little to do with the cars' actual exhaust emissions on the roads. The "real" exhaust emissions are, therefore, determined in separate studies, including at Empa. Air pollution control experts from the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) draw upon this kind of data if they want to estim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method for producing PET radiotracers in higher radiochemical yieldsANSTO researchers have led the development of a new method for producing PET radiotracers. The discovery utilises the transition metal rhenium to promote fluorine-18 radiolabelling under aqueous, low temperature conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanotechnology designed to speed up the hardening of concreteResearchers at Tecnalia and the ICMCB-CNRS have recently published the article "Ultra-Fast Supercritical Hydrothermal Synthesis of Tobermorite under Thermodynamically Metastable Conditions" in the prestigious scientific journal Angewandte Chemie.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oysters hold secrets to Chesapeake Bay's pastPeople began to negatively impact the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay earlier than previously thought, a new study finds.
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Dagens Medicin
Nye data bekræfter værdien af MR-scanning til tidlig opsporing af nerveskader Avanceret MR-teknologi gør det muligt at diagnosticere neuropati tidligt hos patienter med diabetes. Teknologien kan yderligere måle, hvor alvorlige nerveskaderne er, hvilket åbner for helt nye forebyggelsesperspektiver, vurderer forskerne bag.
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Science | The Guardian
Rise of the sex robots – video Advances in computer science and engineering have lifted animatronic lovers from the realms of science fiction to reality; the first models are due to go on sale by the end of the year. Jenny Kleeman meets the men who are making the sex robots, the customers who want to buy them – and the critics who say they are dangerous Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren
Bjarne Corydon: Kunstig intelligens får enorm betydning for det danske samfund 40 procent af danskernes arbejdstimer kan erstattes af automatisering, viser en ny analyse fra McKinsey & Company. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/bjarne-corydon-kunstig-intelligens-faar-enorm-betydning-de-danske-samfund-1075981 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Tyskland stritter imod EU’s NOx-testNyt forslag til EU-kontrol af dieselbilers NOx-emission afvises af Tyskland. Den danske regering bakker op om Europa-Kommissionens forslag.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery in northern lakes may be key to understanding early life on EarthA team of researchers has discovered that many Canadian lakes can provide new insights into ancient oceans, and their findings could advance research about greenhouse gas emissions, harmful algal blooms, and early life forms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cleveland Clinic discovers opportunities to overcome cancer treatment resistanceA collaborative Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and Moffitt Cancer Center team of researchers has proven the theory that, while resistance to targeted treatment in cancer is truly a moving target, there are opportunities to overcome the resistance that develops.
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cognitive science
Artificial Intelligence: Reinforcement Learning in Python submitted by /u/topitguy [link] [comments]
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cognitive science
Reality Check - The Theory of Multiple Intelligences submitted by /u/RealCheckity [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR
The North Korean Electromagnetic Pulse Threat, Or Lack Thereof Can a nuclear weapon in space fired by North Korea knock off much of the world's electricity? Jeffrey Lewis, of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, says not really.
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Science : NPR
Instead Of Showing Off Wealth, Some Show Off Busy Schedules Instead of buying expensive things, people now use busyness to show their high status. New research finds that many celebrities use social media to boast about their lack of time, not their wealth.
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Science : NPR
Welcome To The Poison Garden: Medicine's Medieval Roots One corner of the garden of Alnwick Castle in northern England grows a hundred plants behind lock and key. Many of the toxic species there were used by medieval doctors — nasty plants adapted to heal. (Image credit: Joanne Silberner for NPR)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery in northern lakes may be key to understanding early life on EarthA team of researchers has discovered that many Canadian lakes can provide new insights into ancient oceans, and their findings could advance research about greenhouse gas emissions, harmful algal blooms, and early life forms.
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Ingeniøren
Wales politi vil scanne 170.000 ansigter til Champions League finalen Politiet vil bruge ansigtsgenkendelsesmetoder, når Champions League finalen afholdes i Cardiff, Wales i begyndelsen af juni. Billederne skal samkøres med database over hooligans og terrorister. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/wales-politi-vil-scanne-170000-ansigter-champions-league-finalen-1075973 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nokia narrows its Q1 loss as sales stagnate; CEO optimisticSuffering from what the CEO described as "a typically seasonally weak quarter," Finland-based networks provider Nokia has reported a first-quarter net loss of €473 million ($515 million)— a slight improvement from the 623 million-euro loss recorded a year ago.
6h
The Atlantic
Can the Democratic Party Reconcile Two Divergent Economic Visions? The distinctive pattern of public reaction to President Trump as he approaches the end of his first 100 days in office is sharpening the choices facing Democrats over the party’s road to recovery. Though Trump’s agenda has unified Democrats in near-term opposition, clear fault lines have quickly emerged about the party’s long-term strategy to regain power. On one side are those—largely affiliated
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Science : NPR
Cassini Spacecraft Re-Establishes Contact After 'Dive' Between Saturn And Its Rings The Cassini probe has orbited Saturn for 13 years. This is the first time it entered the gap between the planet and its rings. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)
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The Atlantic
Trump's Attack on Syria Has Already Been Forgotten In October 1962, my middle school principal announced an emergency plan: in case of attack, those of us who lived within a mile would walk home. That is still the longest walk I never took; half a century later, I dream about it sometimes. It is like a faded, scratchy clip from a black-and-white episode of The Twilight Zone : empty streets; sirens echoing off walls. Then a flash of light. The New
7h
The Atlantic
Trump's Demand for Border Barrier Funding Hits a Wall Talk about an impressive political about-face. In the fight over whether the government funding bill currently under negotiation would include $1.5 billion for his Great Wall, Donald Trump went from intransigent chest-thumper to panicked back-pedaler in, what, six days? Starting last Wednesday, President Trump had budget chief Mick Mulvaney running all over town warning that the president would n
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The Atlantic
Is There Any Room in the 'Big Tent' for Pro-Life Democrats? Democrats have become newly divided over reproductive rights as they attempt to decide who they will welcome, and who they will exclude, amid soul searching over how the party should rebuild after its 2016 loss. Democratic leaders have tried to walk a fine line by emphasizing that the party stands for protecting women’s access to abortion, while signaling that there is still room for Democrats wh
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The Atlantic
Trump’s Quiet Reversal on Deporting Young Undocumented Immigrants President Trump has backed away from his campaign pledges to “immediately terminate” an Obama-era program shielding undocumented immigrants from deportation. But that doesn’t mean that they aren’t risk of being deported. More than 750,000 undocumented immigrants have received temporary protection from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program created by former President
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Dagens Medicin
Ny ledende overlæge til Akutafdelingen på Regionshospitalet Randers
8h
Blog » Languages » English
Neuroquest: Marathon Results! These are glad tidings for all of Eywir! The Golden Ganglion has been fully healed, and it took you only 18 hours 45 minutes to complete that herculean task! Light has filled the sky again, and at last you can journey home to the land of the Neuro-Gnomes. But do join us in chat on 4/28 at 4 PM EDT for the epic Neuroquest’s closing ceremony. There you will receive your bonuses, some promotions, an
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NYT > Science
Op-Ed Contributor: Sowing Climate Doubt Among SchoolteachersA group known for attacking climate science has set its sights on America’s public schools.
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Ingeniøren
Kunstig intelligens kan afsløre tuberkuloseComputer identificerer tuberkulose på røntgenbilleder med en succesrate på 96 procent, viser forskningsforsøg. Teknologien kan vise sig særlig brugbar i ulande.
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Science | The Guardian
Standardised cigarette packaging is on its way, will it reduce smoking? A new systematic review of existing studies suggests it will reduce smoking, but long-term impacts of standardised cigarette packaging are still unknown Standardised packaging for cigarettes was first introduced in the UK in May last year. Tobacco companies were forced to stop producing branded packs, but were still allowed to sell off existing stock. From 21 May 2017, that must stop too. Fancy,
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BBC News - Science & Environment
British Veterinary Association slams designer cat breedingScottish Fold cats have increased in popularity through social media.
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Viden
Tusindvis af metan-bobler er klar til at eksplodere under tøende permafrostOg de store mængder metangas kommer til at forstærke klimaforandringerne, siger dansk forsker.
9h
Ingeniøren
Fire ting, du skal fjerne fra dit CV - nu! Dit CV skal plejes, så det skinner. Ikke kun skal det holdes opdateret. Forældede udtryk skal fjernes, og du kan lige så godt starte med de her fire ting https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fire-ting-du-skal-fjerne-dit-cv-nu-7619 Jobfinder
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ocean warming to cancel increased CO2-driven productivityUniversity of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious drop in prized bait worms threatens a way of lifeDan Harrington makes his living unearthing marine worms by hacking away at mudflats with a tool that resembles the business end of an old steel rake.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean warming to cancel increased CO2-driven productivityUniversity of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.
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Science-Based Medicine
FDA issues warning letter to “holistic” practitioner offering thermography for breast cancer detectionThermography for breast cancer detection is one of more than 65 products the FDA just announced it is going after for fraudulently claiming to prevent, diagnose, treat or cure cancer.
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Dagens Medicin
Immunterapi kan accelerere tumorvækst Dansk ekspert tvivler på sammenhængen mellem immunterapi og accelereret tumorvækst hos nogle patienter, som to mindre studier ellers antyder.
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Ingeniøren
Skibe må finde rundt om Grønland uden søkortEn enkelt mand blev tilbage i Geodatastyrelsen, da den skulle flyttes. Derfor må søfolk finde vej gennem trafikeret farvand med meget upræcise papirkort.
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Ingeniøren
Privacy-aktivist: It-giganter behandler mennesker som råt materiale Designer og aktivist Aral Balkan vil udvikle privacy-produkter, som ikke kun er for feinschmeckere men for alle. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/privacy-aktivist-it-giganter-behandler-mennesker-raat-materiale-1075967 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US may stay in Paris climate accord, with caveatsSigns are mounting that US President Donald Trump's administration may stay in the landmark Paris climate change accord of 2015, under pressure from big business and public support for the agreement.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon's Alexa upgraded as 'style assistant'Amazon's digital assistant Alexa is being transformed into a fashionista in a new device that was unveiled Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vinegar offers hope in Barrier Reef starfish battleCoral-munching crown-of-thorns starfish can be safely killed by common household vinegar, scientists revealed Thursday in a discovery that offers hope for Australia's struggling Great Barrier Reef.
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Gizmodo
Holy Crap, David Fincher Is Directing the World War Z Sequel Brad Pitt is coming back for more zombie destruction. Image: Paramount Though the first World War Z was a hit, it’s not necessarily a movie I was excited to see a sequel for. But that all changes with two words: David Fincher. Advertisement After months of dancing around, Variety is reporting that Fincher just closed a deal to direct the zombie sequel starting early next year. Brad Pitt will once
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Control of molecular motion by metal-plated 3-D printed plastic piecesMany measurement techniques, such as spectroscopy, benefit from the ability to split a single beam of light into two in order to measure changes in one of them. The crucial device that separates the beam is the beam-splitter. These have been mostly limited to light beams, where one uses simply a partially reflective glass.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Control of molecular motion by metal-plated 3-D printed plastic piecesEPFL scientists have combined 3-D-printing with electroplating to easily produce high-quality metal electrodes that can be used as a molecular beam-splitter.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unification could be good for North Korea, RAND report assertsA new RAND report identifies the likely concerns of North Korean elites about their possible fates under various unification scenarios and recommends actions that the Republic of Korea (ROK), also known as South Korea, could take now to help North Korean elites feel more positive about, or at least less resistant to, unification.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
Deep Learning Is a Black Box, but Health Care Won’t MindNew algorithms are able to diagnose disease as accurately as expert physicians.
11h
Gizmodo
Microsoft Warns Users Not to Install Its Latest Windows Update, For Now Image source: Microsoft With its Creators Update for Windows 10, Microsoft promised that users would have the option to postpone future updates for a limited period of time and many rejoiced. But now that the update has started rolling out, it’s become apparent that there are still some stability issues and performing a manual installation isn’t recommended right now. In a blog post , Microsoft’s
12h
Gizmodo
What Is the Difference Between a Man Doctor and a Woman Doctor? All images via Landau.com. They both look freaking hot in a nerd way, but you only respect one of them. Advertisement When we think about sexism in STEM, we usually think of girls being taught that they are bad at math, boys “looking like” doctors and girls “looking like” sexy nurses, and tenured lab heads who grope because its part of the job description. But what would you say if I told you tha
13h
cognitive science
Dunning Kruger explained like CGP Grey submitted by /u/ImplodingWalrus [link] [comments]
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Epson EcoTank can print for years before you need to refill the inkI've gone through almost every brand of inkjet printer over the last 15 years.
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Gizmodo
Proposed Human Rights Would Protect Your Mind From the Likes of Facebook Photo: Getty “It sounds impossible but it’s closer than you may realize,” Facebook’s Regina Dugan recently told audience members at the F8 developer conference. Dugan was referring to the social network’s plans to read users’ thoughts . Just in time to inject some practical considerations into that terrifying scenario, researchers have proposed four new human rights to protect our minds from thos
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-fructose diet during and after pregnancy can cause a fatty liver in offspringA diet high in fructose-containing sugars eaten during pregnancy or while breastfeeding can cause offspring to have a fatty liver, increasing their chances of developing obesity or type 2 diabetes. This is according to a new rat study published in The Journal of Physiology.
14h
Live Science
Ovaries: Facts, Function & DiseaseOvaries are the primary female reproductive organs. They secrete hormones and release eggs for fertilization.
15h
Live Science
Unified Field Theory: Tying It All TogetherThe unified field theory is an attempt to tie all the fundamental forces of nature together in a single theory.
15h
NYT > Science
Leonard Reiffel, Who Studied Potential of a Lunar Nuclear Bomb, Dies at 89Dr. Reiffel revealed that the Air Force had been interested in staging a surprise explosion on or near the moon, and that its goal was propaganda.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Actress Kiruna Stamell debates gene editing with ethicist Dr. Christopher GyngellTwo papers published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, debate gene editing and the health of future generations. Stage and screen actress Kiruna Stamell, who has a rare form of dwarfism, proposes that gene editing does not represent an improvement in healthcare; while Dr. Christopher Gyngell, a research fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, argues that provi
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resistance exercises recover motor and memory impairment caused by flavor enhancerA study in rats, published in Experimental Physiology, showed that resistance exercise recovers memory and motor impairment caused by the flavor enhancer monosodium glutamate.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Food security: the gene banks future-proofing Australian agriculture | The future of farming At the start of our Future of farming series on sustainable agribusiness we show how two gene banks, living libraries of all the seeds and grains in Australia, are designed to safeguard the species • The invisible farmers: the young women injecting new ideas into agriculture • Water-smart farming: how hydroponics and drip irrigation are feeding Australia In February 2018 the Svalbard Global Seed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
System can 3-D print an entire buildingResearchers have developed a system that can 3-D print the basic structure of an entire building.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video captures bubble-blowing battery in actionResearchers have created a unique video that shows oxygen bubbles inflating and later deflating inside a tiny lithium-air battery. The knowledge gained from the video could help make lithium-air batteries that are more compact, stable and can hold onto a charge longer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes that help trout find their way homeIn the spring when water temperatures start to rise, rainbow trout that have spent several years at sea traveling hundreds of miles from home manage, without maps or GPS, to find their way back to the rivers and streams where they were born for spawning. Researchers have identified genes that enable the fish to perform this extraordinary homing feat with help from Earth's magnetic field.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seattle startup wants you to make up your mind (and its software will help)Charles Davis has barely stepped outside of his small San Francisco lab space in the last month. His mind is so full of bits of code and musings on human behavior that the bright lights in the Seattle coffee shop he sat in recently seemed to almost shock him.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Animal testing essential to medical progress but protocols could be improvedThe use of animals in biomedical research has long been the focus of campaigns by animal rights activists. Two leading scientists give their expert view of the importance of animal testing to medical progress and present ways it could be further improved to yield more useful clinical results.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to better comply with dietary guidelines, and save money? Cook dinner at homeThe best culinary paths to better health are not always paved with cash, new research shows, and cooking at home can provide the best bang-for-the-buck nutritionally as well as financially.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wasps and wine: Paper wasps contribute to sour rot disease, a scourge of wine industryNew research shows that the invasive European paper wasp, Polistes dominulus, plays a role in facilitating sour rot disease in the absence of other insects.
16h
Gizmodo
Make Iced Coffee, Sans Ice, With HyperChiller Qu’est-ce que c’est? As I’ve said many times, iced coffee is a brilliant way to sell people ice for the price of coffee (which is mostly water to begin with). Cold brew on the other hand is a different process that results in less acidity, among other benefits. The HyperChiller might not make cold brew, but it’s dead simple and works with the brewing gear you already own to rapidly chill your cof
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Futurity.org
These words suggest bias when news describes shooters Media coverage of public shootings may create and perpetuate a number of racial and mental health stereotypes, new research on news stories about shootings suggests. For example, past research shows that 54 percent of participants who read a story about a mass shooting believe all people with mental illnesses are dangerous, compared to only 40 percent of participants who did not read the mass sho
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could Parkinson's disease start in the gut?Parkinson's disease may start in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, according to a study. The vagus nerve extends from the brainstem to the abdomen and controls unconscious body processes like heart rate and food digestion.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stabilizing molecule could pave way for lithium-air fuel cellLithium-oxygen fuel cells boast energy density levels comparable to fossil fuels and are thus seen as a promising candidate for future transportation-related energy needs. Several roadblocks stand in the way of realizing that vision. An engineering lab has focused on one of those roadblocks -- the loss of battery power, also known as capacity fade.
16h
Big Think
How ’13 Reasons Why’ Essentially Promotes Teen Suicide Netflix’s new teen suicide drama has parents and many mental-health experts terrified. Read More
16h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Taxing Times What We’re Following Trump’s Tax Plan: The president released an outline of his proposed reforms to the U.S. tax code, which include reducing the number of individual tax brackets and cutting the corporate tax rate from 35 to 15 percent. Though Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is optimistic about what the plan will accomplish, the changes are likely to exacerbate the national debt —and with most
16h
The Atlantic
How Easily Could Trump Withdraw the U.S. From NAFTA? President Trump is reportedly mulling an executive order to withdraw the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement, a major trade deal with Canada and Mexico that reshaped broad sections of the U.S. economy after going into effect in 1994. But it might not be as easy to get out of NAFTA as Trump may think. The president’s aversion toward multilateral trade agreements placed him i
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers shine light on deadly landslideLate in the morning of March 22, 2014, a huge chunk of land cut loose and roared down a hillside in the Stillaguamish River Valley just east of Oso, Washington, about 60 miles northeast of Seattle. In a matter of minutes, 43 people lost their lives as a wall of mud, sand, clay, water. A new report details the factors leading to the disaster, the hazards that accompany landslides and steps that can
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Readmission penalties don't correlate to heart attack outcomesA program that penalizes hospitals for high early readmission rates of heart attack patients may be unfairly penalizing hospitals that serve a large proportion of African-Americans and those with more severe illness, a study suggests.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A chicken-egg question: Where do baby genes come from?New genes are more likely to emerge full-fledged from a genome's 'junk' DNA than many scientists would have expected, according to new research by evolutionary biologists.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence finds standardized cigarette packaging may reduce number of people who smokeA Cochrane Review published today finds standardized tobacco packaging may lead to a reduction in smoking prevalence and reduces the appeal of tobacco.
16h
Live Science
Italian Island's Mutation Fights Malaria, But Raises Risk of Other DiseasesThe people of Sardinia are famous for their longevity, but also have some of the world's highest rates of multiple sclerosis and lupus.
16h
The Atlantic
Trump Backs Away From Terminating NAFTA A proposed draft executive order that would pull the United States out of the North American Free Trade Agreement set off the latest round in a now-familiar series in Trump’s White House: The friction of Donald Trump’s nationalist campaign promises against the reality of governance, and the tension between moderating forces within the White House and more aggressive ideological purists. The draft
16h
Ars Technica
A vigilante is putting a huge amount of work into infecting IoT devices Enlarge (credit: Gammew ) Last week, Ars introduced readers to Hajime, the vigilante botnet that infects IoT devices before blackhats can hijack them . A technical analysis published Wednesday reveals for the first time just how much technical acumen went into designing and building the renegade network, which just may be the Internet's most advanced IoT botnet. As previously reported, Hajime use
16h
Science | The Guardian
Plain cigarette packaging could drive 300,000 Britons to quit smoking Review by research organisation Cochrane suggests impact of UK’s ban on branded packs could echo results seen in Australia Plain cigarette cartons featuring large, graphic health warnings could persuade 300,000 people in the UK to quit smoking if the measure has the effect it had in Australia, scientists say. Standardised cigarette packaging will be compulsory in the UK from 20 May. A new review
16h
Big Think
The World's Most Hated Vegetable Oil Might Be About to Come Good A new genetic test could improve the palm oil industry and reduce deforestation. Read More
16h
Scientific American Content: Global
Gut Microbes Help Keep Starved Flies FecundMicrobes living in the guts of fruit flies appear to influence the flies' food choice—and promote egg production, even under a nutrient-poor diet. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts make the case for ending routine blood testsThe practice of ordering routine blood tests ('routine bloods') for patients attending hospital regardless of clinical need is wasteful and potentially damaging, argue experts in The BMJ this week.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Government's counterterrorism strategy is having little impact in the NHSNHS organizations are obliged by law to report people it fears at risk of becoming terrorists under the Prevent strategy -- part of the UK government's counterterrorism plan aimed at stopping people becoming terrorists.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Cheap, widely available drug could stop thousands of mothers bleeding to death Tranexamic acid could save the lives of a third of women who die in childbirth from excessive bleeding, which kills 100,000 a year A cheap and widely available drug could save the lives of thousands of women who die in childbirth from excessive bleeding, one of the main killers of women worldwide. The drug, tranexamic acid, is available over the counter in the UK to women suffering from heavy per
17h
NYT > Science
Anthem Threatens to Leave Health Exchanges if Subsidies Are HaltedThe insurer’s earnings beat expectations, but it warned it could withdraw from some marketplaces or raise rates if the government does not continue co-payment subsidies for low-income people.
17h
Gizmodo
Of Course Ivanka Trump Tweeted About Juicero Image: Twitter I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I love Juicero. I love this dumb, insanely over-engineered , $400 juice squeezing machine that works marginally better than using your own hands. And it turns out I may share that passion with the nation’s First Daughter, Ivanka Trump. Advertisement As pointed out by several Twitter users, in March 2016, Ivanka tweeted about her love for t
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Gizmodo
Deadspin A Running List Of ESPN Layoffs | The Muse Isn’t It Relevant That the Star of The Handmaid’s Deadspin A Running List Of ESPN Layoffs | The Muse Isn’t It Relevant That the Star of The Handmaid’s Tale Belongs to a Secretive, Allegedly Oppressive Religion? | Fusion ICE Just Unveiled Its Chilling New Anti-Immigrant Hotline | The Root Ohio Teen Couple Commits Suicide Within Days of Each Other |
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Big Think
EU Deletes UK from Official Map – Two Years Before Brexit Britain hasn't brexited yet, but the EU has already scrapped it from its map Read More
17h
WIRED
Why the FCC’s Plans to Gut Net Neutrality Just Might Fail The chair of the FCC today said he would work to strip his own agency of the authority to enforce net neutrality. But the fight is far from over. The post Why the FCC’s Plans to Gut Net Neutrality Just Might Fail appeared first on WIRED .
17h
Science : NPR
Overlooked Drug Could Save Thousands Of Moms After Childbirth An inexpensive drug could dramatically reduce the number of deaths of mothers from bleeding after childbirth in low- and middle-income countries around the world. (Image credit: Thomas Fredberg/Getty Images/Science Photo Library)
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
First Americans claim sparks controversyA study that claims humans reached the Americas 130,000 years ago, much earlier than previously suggested, has run into controversy.
17h
Gizmodo
DJI Mysteriously Turned Vast Swaths of Iraq and Syria Into Drone No-Fly Zones Image: Getty DJI, the world’s largest consumer drone manufacturer, has a problem. ISIS, the terrorist organization, has been turning off-the-shelf drones into flying bombs and making headlines in the process. So what’s DJI doing about this? The company very quietly created no-fly zones over large parts of Iraq and Syria. Advertisement Some are suggesting that the no-fly zones amount to DJI fighti
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast wants to switch out old boxes for new onesComcast wants your old cable box, demanding that you swap it out for a new one.
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Live Science
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Linked with Differences in Gut BacteriaPeople with chronic fatigue syndrome may have imbalances in their gut bacteria, a new study suggests.
17h
Ars Technica
Early Nintendo programmer worked without a keyboard Kirby's Dream Land This was apparently the entirety of the development hardware Masahiro Sakurai used to start programming Kirby's Dream Land . (credit: Source Gaming / Famitsu ) Any programmer of a certain age likely has a horror story about some rinky-dink coding and workflow environment that forced them to hack together a working app under extreme hardware and software constraints. Still, we'r
17h
Big Think
Columbia Professor: The War on Drugs Is a War on Race Personifying certain drugs as evil while calling opioid users “victims” points a glaring spotlight on drug policies that aren't really about public health. Read More
17h
Ars Technica
Experts: Headline-grabbing editorial on saturated fats “bizarre,” “misleading” Enlarge (credit: Getty | Bloomberg ) Controversial UK cardiologist Aseem Malhotra has once again published an editorial disputing decades of research linking diets high in saturated fats with heart disease—much to the annoyance of health experts and researchers. Aseem Malhotra being interviewed on SkyNews. (credit: SkyNews ) Malhotra, who maintains a high profile on media sites and television, ha
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Gizmodo
Please Help Me Understand This Horrifying and Confusing Cars Theory All images: Disney/Pixar I’m so sorry, but I’m a Cars truther now. Advertisement It’s been fairly well -documented at this point that I and James Whitbrook have a few questions about the world of Cars . Okay, we have a lot of questions. We’re basically Daleks yelling “EXPLAIN” with every new movie. But the one we really, really want to know is: where do the cars come from? Cars ’ creative directo
18h
The Scientist RSS
Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on BoneCLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.
18h
The Atlantic
A Comprehensive Guide to Donald Trump’s Tax Proposal There are two compelling narratives around President Donald Trump’s first 100 days. The first is his transformation from heterodox populist to orthodox Republican. Although he ran as a mold-breaking renegade, his economic policies come straight out of the conservative mold, from cutting business regulations to backing off threats to label China a currency manipulator and supporting plans to reduc
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Single Pager Today in 5 Lines The White House is preparing an executive order formally withdrawing the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement, according to media reports . President Trump revealed a one-page plan to overhaul the tax code that would reduce rates for businesses and individuals. All 100 U.S. senators visited the White House for a classified briefing on North Korea’s nuclear c
18h
Ars Technica
NASA inspector says agency wasted $80 million on an inferior spacesuit Enlarge / NASA's current plans for its next generation of spacesuits. (credit: NASA Inspector General) When NASA began developing a rocket and spacecraft to return humans to the Moon a decade ago as part of the Constellation Program, the space agency started to think about the kinds of spacesuits astronauts would need in deep space and on the lunar surface. After this consideration, NASA awarded
18h
Popular Science
Amazon Echo Look uses a camera and AI to judge your outfit, sell you stuff Gadgets 'Alexa, how do I look today?' Today, Amazon has doubled down on its push to guide the style of everyday users with its home-assistant-come-fashion guru, the $200 Echo Look, which can currently only…
18h
Ars Technica
Project Cars 2 is on the way, with much-improved tire physics It's going to be a busy year for racing games. At some point, we expect Gran Turismo Sport to finally arrive, Forza Motorsport 7 is on its way, and then there's Project Cars 2 . The first Project Cars , which arrived a couple of years ago, was an uncompromising sim racer of the kind hitherto unknown on consoles. It was also fiendishly difficult, something fans seized upon as proof of just how goo
18h
WIRED
Oh Great, Now Alexa Will Judge Your Outfits, Too Et tu, Alexa? The post Oh Great, Now Alexa Will Judge Your Outfits, Too appeared first on WIRED .
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
System can 3-D print an entire buildingMIT researchers have developed a system that can 3-D print the basic structure of an entire building.
18h
The Atlantic
Preserving Biodiversity to Feed the World In the last century, 94% of the world’s seed varieties have disappeared. Family farmsteads have given way to mechanized agribusinesses to sow genetically identical crops on a massive scale. In an era of climate uncertainty and immense corporate power, farmers, scientists, lawyers, and indigenous seed keepers are on a mission to defend the future of food. Botanical explorer Joseph Simcox has been
18h
Ars Technica
Comcast and other ISPs celebrate imminent death of net neutrality rules Enlarge (credit: Comcast) The nation's biggest home Internet and mobile broadband providers say they're big fans of net neutrality—but they're also really glad that the Federal Communications Commission is preparing to dismantle its net neutrality rules. "We continue to strongly support a free and open Internet and the preservation of modern, strong, and legally enforceable net neutrality protect
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Gizmodo
A New Approach to 3D Printing Removes the Limitations of Gravity GIF GIF: Vimeo The potential for 3D printing to revolutionize manufacturing is astounding— if the technology can overcome a few limitations. Researchers at MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab have come up with a novel way to both speed up the 3D printing process , and free it from the restrictions imposed by gravity. Advertisement 3D printing involves slowly building up an object using thousands of thin laye
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tsunami formation: Study challenges long-held theoryA new study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor.
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The Atlantic
Nevada Fights the Latest Attempt to Give It the Nation’s Nuclear Waste On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee’s environment subcommittee took up a draft bill to revive the long-delayed and long controversial plan to store the nation’s nuclear waste under Yucca Mountain in Nevada. Several of the subcommittee’s members—Democrats and Republicans alike—represent districts where nuclear waste is sitting with nowhere to go. Chairman
18h
Science : NPR
Swipe Right To Help Save The Northern White Rhino From Extinction To fund in vitro fertilization research, Ol Pejeta Conservancy CEO Richard Vigne says researchers teamed up with the dating app Tinder to feature "Sudan" as the "Most Eligible Bachelor in the World."
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Gizmodo
Watch Elizabeth Shaw Return in a Short Film Linking Prometheus and Alien: Covenant Noomi Rapace is back in this Alien: Covenant prologue. Image: Fox What happened after Prometheus ? How does that lead into Alien: Covenant ? We won’t know for sure until the new film opens on May 19 but a new short film gives us a pretty good idea. Advertisement For Alien Day, Fox just dropped this official Alien: Covenant prologue short called The Crossing, which stars both Prometheus survivors
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher says customized content on political websites hurts democracyHaving it your way on political websites and seeing only the content that aligns with your beliefs is not good for democracy, according to Ivan Dylko, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo's Department of Communication and an expert in the political effects of communication technology.
18h
Futurity.org
Could soy protein ease irritable bowel diseases? Eating a diet that includes foods containing soy protein may work to alleviate some symptoms of inflammatory bowl diseases, a new study with mice suggests. The findings are significant because inflammatory bowel diseases—including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease—are characterized by either continuous or periodic inflammation of the colon and represent a significant risk factor for colon ca
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Science : NPR
Drug Saves Women In Child Birth Embargoed until Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET. See notes.
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Science : NPR
"It's Not Your Father's LAPD"—And That's A Good Thing "I remember looking out the window the next day and thinking, 'That's weird. It doesn't snow here.' But it wasn't snow. It was ashes. There were that many fires. Throughout the city." (Image credit: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
We Will Hit Peak Oil By 2030 But It's Not What You Think Photo credit: Getty Images Economists and geologists and everyone and their oilman has been telling us that one day, we will hit Peak Oil. One day, we will keep looking for oil, but we won’t find anymore. One day, the demand would greatly outpace the supply. But now one of the biggest oil companies in the world is saying that’s backwards. Advertisement In fact, they’re saying will hit “peak oil”
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Popular Science
The very best notebooks for getting yourself organized Gadgets Journals to write home about. Devices can do some amazing things. Still, for us tactile folk, there's something about crossing off tasks written on paper. Read on.
19h
The Atlantic
The Trump Administration Won't Sabotage Obamacare—Yet The Trump administration won’t try to wreck the Affordable Care Act on its own quite yet, telling Democrats it plans to continue making payments to health insurers considered crucial for the law’s stability. Reince Priebus, the White House chief of staff, informed Democratic leaders of the administration’s plans by phone on Wednesday in an effort to resolve one of the final obstacles in negotiati
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher says customized content on political websites hurts democracyHaving it your way on political websites and seeing only the content that aligns with your beliefs is not good for democracy, according to Ivan Dylko, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo's Department of Communication and an expert in the political effects of communication technology.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rideshare rivals Gett, Juno join forcesUS-based ridesharing startups Gett and Juno announced Wednesday they were joining forces, helping them step up a challenge to larger rivals Uber and Lyft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Move over, Superman! New method sees through concrete to detect early-stage corrosionA noninvasive 'spectral fingerprint' technique using terahertz waves has been developed that reveals the corrosion of concrete-encased steel before it can cause any significant degradation of the structure it supports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing is believing: Diamond quantum sensor reveals current flows in next-gen materialsIn a world-first, researchers have imaged electrons moving in graphene using a quantum probe found only in diamonds. The technique could be used to understand electron behavior and allow researchers to improve the reliability and performance of existing and emerging technologies. These images could reveal the microscopic behavior of currents in quantum computing devices, graphene and other 2-D mat
19h
Big Think
Engaging in These 8 Mindfulness Practices Daily Decreased HIV Patients’ Viral Loads See if these practices can improve your life. Read More
19h
Live Science
Humpback Calves Are Close Talkers | VideoYoung humpback whales communicate quietly with their mothers, likely to avoid attracting the attention of hungry predators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Barley genome sequencedLooking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Headless dinosaur reunited with its skull, one century laterResearchers have matched the headless skeleton to a Corythosaurus skull from the university's Paleontology Museum that had been collected in 1920 by George Sternberg to the headless dinosaur.
19h
cognitive science
BrainExer 2.0 - brain training exercises submitted by /u/brainexer [link] [comments]
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Animal testing essential to medical progress but protocols could be improvedThe use of animals in biomedical research has long been the focus of campaigns by animal rights activists. Two leading scientists writing in the European Journal of Internal Medicine give their expert view of the importance of animal testing to medical progress and present ways it could be further improved to yield more useful clinical results.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could Parkinson's disease start in the gut?Parkinson's disease may start in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, according to a study published in the April 26, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The vagus nerve extends from the brainstem to the abdomen and controls unconscious body processes like heart rate and food digestion.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy drinks linked to more heart, blood pressure changes than caffeinated drinks aloneTwo hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart's electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink. Both caffeine and energy drinks raised systolic blood pressure initially but blood pressure normalized faster after caffeine.
19h
WIRED
Jonathan Demme’s Stop Making Sense Is Still the Concert Film All Others Try to Be The Talking Heads concert doc is still one of the greatest music films ever made. The post Jonathan Demme's Stop Making Sense Is Still the Concert Film All Others Try to Be appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changes that lightning inspires in rock quantifiedNew research has identified the minimum temperature of a bolt of lightning as it strikes rock. The study discovered that, based on the crystalline material in the sample, the minimum temperature at which the fulgurite formed was roughly 1,700 degrees Celsius.
19h
Live Science
508-Million-Year-Old Sea Monster Had 50 Legs and Giant ClawsA 508-million-year-old critter — one that looks like a weird lobster with 50 legs, two claws and a tent-like shell — is the oldest known arthropod with mandibles on record, a new study finds.
19h
Live Science
Photos: Ancient Marine Critter Had 50 Legs, 2 Large ClawsResearchers have identified the first arthropod with mandibles on record.
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Gizmodo
This Sick Video Drone Is the Future of Inescapable Advertising GIF GIF: NTT Docomo Advertisers have found ways to bombard us with promotions no matter what we’re doing: watching TV, checking social media, and even when streaming music. But the future of advertising could be even more invasive when the next public event you attend is full of flying video drones projecting inescapable video everywhere you look. GIF GIF: NTT Docomo NTT Docomo , one of Japan’s l
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Gizmodo
What Up With All the Tornadoes So Far This Year? Image: NOAA As of mid April, at least 570 tornadoes have been reported in the United States this year. That’s nearly a hundred more than the typical tally for mid-spring. So what’s going on there, America? Advertisement As the NOAA notes in an agency release , the 2017 tornado season across the United States is off to an incredibly active start, at least compared to the last 25 years . So far, mu
19h
The Atlantic
Poem of the Day: ‘King of the River’ by Stanley Kunitz The late Stanley Kunitz began his second tenure as U. S. poet laureate in 2000 at the age of 95. He remains the oldest person ever appointed to the role. Five years before the appointment, our poetry editor, David Barber, praised Kunitz for continuing to produce remarkable work over the course of decades: Stanley Kunitz … not only has continued to write poems of a startling richness at an advance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When Nature vents her wrath on grapesMaking wine is a tough job in most places, what with frost, hail, drought and bushfires to contend with.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wasps and wine: Paper wasps contribute to sour rot disease, a scourge of wine industryCome harvest season, wine makers have grown accustomed to looking for the telltale signs of a common but devastating threat: black mold and spores combined with a distinct acidic smell. These symptoms are associated with grape sour rot disease, an incurable condition involving the decomposition of damaged berries that ultimately degrades wine quality, resulting in millions of dollars in losses ann
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Headless dinosaur reunited with its skull, one century laterAfter being headless for almost a century, a dinosaur skeleton that had become a tourist attraction in Dinosaur Provincial Park was finally reconnected to its head.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers quantify the changes that lightning inspires in rockBenjamin Franklin, founder of the University of Pennsylvania, is believed to have experimented with lightning's powerful properties using a kite and key, likely coming close to electrocuting himself in the process.
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Live Science
Mail Dog: Robotic Dog 'Spot' Could Deliver Your Next PackageMeet Spot, the robotic dog trained to deliver packages.
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Gizmodo
The Greatest Hot Wheels Track Ever Built Ends With an Explosive Finale GIF Mark Rober , who we last saw engineering a dart board that guaranteed a bullseye with every throw , has just built what every car-loving kid always dreamed of: an epic Hot Wheels track that has tiny vehicles racing between floors, through swimming pools, and jumping over giant explosions. Advertisement Ecto-1, Back to the Future’s time-traveling DeLorean, Knight Rider’s KITT, and even Scooby
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Gizmodo
Board Game Sale Redux! Score Great Low Prices On Three Popular Titles. Zombicide , $52 | Agricola , $37 | Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries , $29 If you didn’t get everything you wanted in Monday’s massive board game sale, a few titles are still marked down to low or near-low prices. Zombicide is the most popular of the bunch, but you can never go wrong with a Ticket to Ride game or Agricola .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A chicken-egg question: Where do baby genes come from?New genes are more likely to emerge full-fledged from a genome's 'junk' DNA than many scientists would have expected, according to new research by UA evolutionary biologists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wasps and wine: Paper wasps contribute to sour rot disease, a scourge of wine industryNew research led by Tufts University shows that the invasive European paper wasp, Polistes dominulus, plays a role in facilitating sour rot disease in the absence of other insects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Readmission penalties don't correlate to heart attack outcomesA program that penalizes hospitals for high early readmission rates of heart attack patients may be unfairly penalizing hospitals that serve a large proportion of African-Americans and those with more severe illness, a study by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers shine light on deadly landslideLate in the morning of March 22, 2014, a huge chunk of land cut loose and roared down a hillside in the Stillaguamish River Valley just east of Oso, Washington, about 60 miles northeast of Seattle. In a matter of minutes, 43 people lost their lives as a wall of mud, sand, clay, water and trees cascaded down the hillside into the Steelhead Haven neighborhood, a relatively new housing tract.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saturn spacecraft toting CU Boulder instrument starts swan songToting a $12 million instrument built by the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA's Cassini spacecraft made the first of 22 dives between the rings of Saturn and the gaseous planet today, the beginning of the end for one of NASA's most successful missions ever.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify genes that help trout find their way homeIn the spring when water temperatures start to rise, rainbow trout that have spent several years at sea traveling hundreds of miles from home manage, without maps or GPS, to find their way back to the rivers and streams where they were born for spawning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Media portrayal of public shooters can perpetuate stereotypesAs the pervasiveness of media reports on public shootings increase, the way in which media cover these violent stories can have broad social implications, including the creation and perpetuation of racial and mental health stereotypes. For example, research shows that 54 percent of participants who read a story about a mass shooting believe all people with mental illnesses are dangerous, compared
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Barley genome sequencedLooking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch. The research, 10 years in the making, was just published in the journal Nature.
19h
Live Science
'Hobbits' May Have Led Early Humans Out of AfricaNew research on Indonesian fossils reveals clues to an ancient expansion out of Africa led by human ancestors nicknamed "hobbits."
20h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
BioRxiv preprint server gets cash boost from Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Money will be used to develop open-source platform and help put articles in web-friendly formats. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21894
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the futureOn the rust-colored north flank of one of Earth's largest volcanoes, a backpack-sized instrument monitors our atmosphere and, at the same time, helps set the stage for possible human exploration of other worlds.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For these startups, Silicon Valley's diversity problem brings big businessIt's one of the tech industry's biggest embarrassments. But for a handful of startups, Silicon Valley's lack of diversity is also a money-making machine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want to better comply with dietary guidelines, and save money? Cook dinner at homeThe best culinary paths to better health are not always paved with cash, new research shows, and cooking at home can provide the best bang-for-the-buck nutritionally as well as financially.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers shine light on deadly landslideLate in the morning of March 22, 2014, a huge chunk of land cut loose and roared down a hillside in the Stillaguamish River Valley just east of Oso, Washington, about 60 miles northeast of Seattle. In a matter of minutes, 43 people lost their lives as a wall of mud, sand, clay, water and trees cascaded down the hillside into the Steelhead Haven neighborhood, a relatively new housing tract.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers quantify the changes that lightning inspires in rockNew research by University of Pennsylvania scientists identified the minimum temperature of a bolt of lightning as it strikes rock.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Headless dinosaur reunited with its skull, one century laterResearchers at the University of Alberta have matched the headless skeleton to a Corythosaurus skull from the university's Paleontology Museum that had been collected in 1920 by George Sternberg to the headless dinosaur.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitionsImaginary numbers are a solution to a very real problem in a study published today in Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Move over, Superman! NIST method sees through concrete to detect early-stage corrosionWhen you suffer a fall, an on-the-field collision or some other traumatic blow, the first thing the doctor will do is take an X-ray, CT scan or MRI to determine if anything has been damaged internally. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are using the same principle, but in a more powerful form, to detect corrosion, the primary danger threatening the health of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Israel uncovers ancient Roman history at Mediterranean portIsraeli archaeologists working on a major Roman-era port city on Wednesday unveiled new discoveries including an altar dedicated to Augustus Caesar and a centuries-old mother-of-pearl tablet inscribed with a menorah.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FCC chief lays out attack on 'net neutrality' rulesInternet companies are readying for a showdown with a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.
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Ars Technica
Garmin Vivosmart 3 review: Shots fired at Fitbit, but some don’t hit Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) The thinner-and-lighter trend isn't just dominating smartphones and laptops—fitness tech companies are constantly trying to make "the next big thing" as thin and light as they possibly can. Fitbit recently slimmed down its $150 Alta HR fitness tracker, and now Garmin is countering with its new $139 Vivosmart 3 wristband. The newest device in the ac
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Quanta Magazine
Solution: ‘Friday the 13th’ Our Insights questions this month were based on the vagaries of the modern calendar and that eternal question about any specified date: “What day of the week is that?” Our first two questions concerned the frequency of Friday the 13th’s, which some consider an unlucky day. Question 1: The year 2017 began with a Friday the 13th in January, and another one is due in October. What’s the maximum and
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Live Science
Pope Urges Solidarity and Compassion in 1st-Ever Papal TED TalkThe pope surprised an audience in Vancouver, British Columbia, with a prerecorded talk for the TED conference with the theme "The Future You."
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Gizmodo
FCC Chair Ajit Pai Announces Bullshit Plan to Destroy Net Neutrality Pai at today’s speech. Getty. The agonizing wait is finally over. Today, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced his plan to dismantle net neutrality. During a speech in Washington, DC at the conservative nonprofit Freedomworks, Pai outlined his plan to roll back the 2015 Open Internet Order. The order established the principles of the open internet in law, reclassifying internet service providers (ISPs)
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Popular Science
Scientists are puzzling out how butterflies assemble their brightly colored scales Animals Shine bright like a butterfly Butterfly assembly is a surprisingly enigmatic process. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify genes that help trout find their way homeIn the spring when water temperatures start to rise, rainbow trout that have spent several years at sea traveling hundreds of miles from home manage, without maps or GPS, to find their way back to the rivers and streams where they were born for spawning. Researchers have identified genes that enable the fish to perform this extraordinary homing feat with help from Earth's magnetic field.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Move over, Superman! NIST method sees through concrete to detect early-stage corrosionResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a noninvasive 'spectral fingerprint' technique using terahertz waves that reveals the corrosion of concrete-encased steel before it can cause any significant degradation of the structure it supports.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the futureOn the rust-colored north flank of one of Earth's largest volcanoes, a backpack-sized instrument monitors our atmosphere and, at the same time, helps set the stage for possible human exploration of other worlds.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stabilizing molecule could pave way for lithium-air fuel cellLithium-oxygen fuel cells boast energy density levels comparable to fossil fuels and are thus seen as a promising candidate for future transportation-related energy needs. Several roadblocks stand in the way of realizing that vision. A Cornell University engineering lab has focused on one of those roadblocks -- the loss of battery power, also known as capacity fade.
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Gizmodo
All the Science Fiction and Fantasy TV to Watch (or Avoid) This Summer Images: Midnight, Texas (NBC), Twin Peaks (Showtime), Preacher (AMC), Orphan Black (BBC America). The Defenders (Netflix/Marvel), Game of Thrones (HBO) When summer comes, it brings with it lazy days in the sun and kids free of school. It also brings a slew of TV shows, perfect for watching when it’s too hot to leave the air conditioning (which is most of the time). Here’s the io9 guide to everyth
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Live Science
Humans May Have Occupied North America 100,000 Years Earlier Than ThoughtEarly humans may have lived on the North American continent 130,000 years ago, more than 100,000 years earlier than scientists previously believed, according to a new study.
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Futurity.org
See-through fish are a boon to breast cancer research A mutant, see-through variety of zebrafish may be the key to understanding how to treat breast cancer in humans, new research with the fish shows. Derek Walsh, who oversees the zebrafish facility at the Boston University Medical Campus, says there are 15,000 to 20,000 fish swimming in the tanks there. Each adult fish is about an inch long, silver with black stripes, just like the kind you’d see a
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New Scientist - News
Chimps pass on sponge drinking trick like a family traditionAfter a few chimpanzees started using moss to soak up water from a pond, the behaviour has spread. The pattern might tell us about how early human culture spread
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a $10 credit when you sign up for a free trial of Amazon Music Enlarge (credit: Amazon) Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , the Dealmaster is back with a bunch of new deals to share. Amazon has a great deal ending soon: sign up for a 30-day free trial of Amazon Music and you get a $10 Amazon promo credit. We also have a number of deals on Seagate hard drives, Dell and Asus laptops, and more. Check out the full list of deals below.
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Gizmodo
Isn't It Relevant That the Star of The Handmaid's Tale Belongs to a Secretive, Allegedly Oppressive Religion? Screenshot via Hulu/The Handmaid’s Tale The Handmaid’s Tale is one of the finest dystopian novels ever written, and it is, inescapably and fundamentally, about women’s oppression under an ultra-conservative regime. The much-anticipated Hulu series based on the book doesn’t shy away from the original subject matter; it couldn’t, really, and remain the Handmaid’s Tale. Which is why it’s so curious
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Dana Foundation
From the Archives: Imaging Depression This month, Helen Mayberg and her colleagues published a study suggesting that patterns of brain connectivity may predict which people with depression would respond best to talk therapy and which would do better with a drug. This video clip from Fox5 Atlanta describes the study, and shows what it could mean to people who need help for their depression. Our first work with Mayberg, now a member of
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Ars Technica
Picture this: Senate staffers’ ID cards have photo of smart chip, no security Enlarge / Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon has pointed out a particular problem with Senate IT security: Senate staffers' ID cards are essentially fake smartcards, useless for two-factor authentication. (credit: Getty Images/Justin Sullivan) When Congress held hearings following the breach of the systems of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in 2015, one of the issues that caused great consternatio
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The Atlantic
Unrest in Kashmir Surges Once More Anti-government protests have escalated again in Indian-administered Kashmir, following violent clashes earlier this month. On April 9, an election was held for a parliamentary seat, but voter turnout was only 7 percent. Demonstrators who had gathered around polling places clashed with riot police, and were met with a violent response, leaving at least eight dead. Since then, a new cycle of prote
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The Atlantic
The Newest New York Times Columnist Has Flip-Flopped on Climate Change The newest columnist at The New York Times is Bret Stephens, a 43-year-old Never Trumper and the former editor-in-chief of the The Jerusalem Post. The Times picked him up from The Wall Street Journal, where he helped edit the opinion section. Five years ago, Stephens won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. Stephens mostly writes about foreign policy, but for more than a decade, he has also weighed
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Blog » Languages » English
Update on Accuracy Calculation Hi folks, Recently a few of you had questions about how accuracy was being calculated in your profile. As most of you know, your accuracy bar shows how you did on your last 60 cubes. However, a few of you were concerned recently, because it seemed like your accuracies were, well, inaccurate according to these metrics. We’re here to clear things up for you so you can sleep soundly knowing that you
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saturn spacecraft toting CU Boulder instrument starts swan songToting a $12 million instrument built by the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA's Cassini spacecraft made the first of 22 dives between the rings of Saturn and the gaseous planet today, the beginning of the end for one of NASA's most successful missions ever.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Barley genome sequencedLooking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch. The research, 10 years in the making, was just published in the journal Nature.
20h
Ars Technica
Climate change is turning dehydration into a deadly disease Enlarge (credit: Brett Gundlock) A mysterious kidney disease is striking down labourers across the world and climate change is making it worse. For Mosaic , Jane Palmer meets the doctors who are trying to understand it and stop it. The story is republished here under a Creative Commons license. By 10am in the sugarcane fields outside the town of Tierra Blanca in El Salvador, the mercury is alread
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Illuminating the secret of glow-in-the-dark mushroomsScientists now understand what makes bioluminescent mushrooms glow, which may pave the way to new possibilities for harnessing fungal bioluminescence in analytical and imaging technologies. Bioluminescence is a highly conserved phenomenon that exists in a wide range of organisms; there are roughly 80 different known species of bioluminescent fungi alone scattered across the globe.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smartphone-controlled cells help keep diabetes in checkCells engineered to produce insulin under the command of a smartphone helped keep blood sugar levels within normal limits in diabetic mice, a new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple treatment for severe bleeding could save lives of mothers around the worldAn inexpensive and widely available drug could save the lives of one in three mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a major study. The global trial of 20,000 women found that death due to bleeding was reduced by 31 percent if the treatment was given within three hours.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible new tool for first responders: An ice bag to the faceCardiovascular decompensation is a significant risk after blood loss, even once the person is no longer actively bleeding. Applying a bag of ice to a person's forehead could help prevent this life-threatening complication while patients are being transported to the hospital.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can aromatherapy calm competition horses?Although studies suggest that inhaling certain scents may reduce stress in humans, aromatherapy is relatively unexplored in veterinary medicine. But new research raises the question of whether aromatherapy may be beneficial to horses as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mastodon discovery shakes up understanding of early humans in the New WorldAn Ice Age site in San Diego, Calif., preserves 130,000-year-old bones and teeth of a mastodon that show evidence of modification by early humans. Analysis of these finds dramatically revises the timeline for when humans first reached North America, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Concise consent forms are effectively understood by clinical trial participantsShortening consent documents makes no significant difference to how well potential research participants understand a clinical study, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early evidence of Middle Stone Age projectiles found in South Africa's Sibudu CaveInnovations in stone knapping technology during the South African Middle Stone Age enabled the creation of early projectile weapons, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitionsTwo physicists have offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bare bones: Making bones transparentA new bone clearing technique is a breakthrough for testing osteoporosis drugs. The technique has promising applications for understanding how bones interact with the rest of the body.
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The Atlantic
The Latest Obamacare Repeal Plan Exacerbates the Political Problems of the First “Figure out a way to change the state that you live in.” That was the controversial advice White House budget director Mick Mulvaney offered to those worried about a proposal that would allow states to repeal required essential health benefits in health-insurance plans. That provision didn’t quite make it into the last round of the Republicans’ effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, and Mulvaney
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The Atlantic
A Chilling Threat of Political Violence in Portland On the day after Donald Trump was inaugurated, perhaps 3 million Americans took to the streets in peaceful protest to register their opposition. When news of his travel ban broke, I stood at LAX watching Angelenos sing the Star Spangled Banner and Amazing Grace. Across the nation, peaceful protest against President Trump continues. But a violent fringe has been using Trump’s rise as a justificati
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The Atlantic
The Border Battles of Atlanta On the Saturday before Election Day last November, Jason Lary, a former insurance executive, crouched on a rough patch of grass at the center of a busy intersection 20 miles outside of Atlanta in DeKalb County. Lary was holding a hammer, and he tapped carefully on the thin wire base of a campaign sign. “My hand is like Fred Flintstone’s right now because I banged my hand in the night,” he said, n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video captures bubble-blowing battery in actionPNNL researchers have created a unique video that shows oxygen bubbles inflating and later deflating inside a tiny lithium-air battery. The knowledge gained from the video could help make lithium-air batteries that are more compact, stable and can hold onto a charge longer.
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Futurity.org
Whey hybrid adds iron to food but not weird flavors Researchers have come up with a new way to fortify food and drinks with iron: a hybrid material made of edible whey protein nanofibrils and iron nanoparticles. Iron deficiency affects around 1.2 billion people worldwide, causing fatigue, anemia, headaches, and diminished work performance. Boosting iron levels through diet or supplements is difficult since it needs to be in a form that the body ca
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA's Cassini Mission Conducts Daring Dive through Saturn's RingsThe maneuver marks the final phase of Cassini’s mission, and promises the closest-ever investigation of Saturn -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
DARPA Wants to Hack Your Brain to Make You Learn Faster Image: Warner Brothers If the brain is just a bunch of wires and circuits, it stands to reason that those components can simply be re-wired in order to create a better, smarter us. At least, that’s the theory behind a new project from the military’s secretive DARPA research branch announced on Wednesday, which aims to enhance human cognitive ability by activating what’s known as “synaptic plastic
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Gizmodo
The Would-Be Auto Worker Caught Up In A Detroit Prison Snitch Scandal The night 18-year-old Bernard Howard was hauled into Detroit police headquarters he was unequivocal: he knew nothing. Police had heard a man nicknamed Snoop —something Howard’s friend on the east side called him—might’ve been involved in a triple homicide, but Howard was clear: he didn’t know a thing. So he was released. Three days later, when officers brought him downtown again, they’d changed t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Limited gene flow between two Bengal tiger populations in the western Himalayan foothillsThe flow of genes between Bengal tigers in two reserves of the Terai Arc Landscape in western Himalayan foothills is too low, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Media portrayal of public shooters can perpetuate stereotypesMedia portrayals of public shooters vary based on the race of the shooter, regardless of the circumstances of the shooting, new research confirms.
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Popular Science
Smartphone-controlled cells release insulin on demand in diabetic mice Health Diabetes: There’s literally an app for that A push of a button causes the cells implanted in this mouse's back to start making insulin. Read on.
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Ars Technica
Ajit Pai announces plan to eliminate Title II net neutrality rules Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaks during the National Association of Broadcasters conference in Las Vegas on April 25, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Ethan Miller ) The Federal Communications Commission will vote next month to start the process of reversing the commission's 2015 net neutrality order, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced in a speech today. Earlier today, Pai shared with his fellow
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Gizmodo
What Kind of Dog Is This? GIF Have you seen this dog? If you’ve been on Reddit lately, where this video by Japanese good boy enthusiast Hirofumi Kawano has been making the rounds , there’s a good chance you have. Advertisement What a sweetie! Unfortunately for anyone hoping to adopt one of their own, Kawano failed to include the pup’s breed in his video. According to Nerdist science editor Kyle Hill , however, this writhi
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Scientific American Content: Global
Broken Bones Hint at Earlier Human Arrival in the AmericasMastodon bones and shattered stones suggest humans were migrating to the Americas some 100,000 years earlier than currently thought. Nature Video explores this controversial find. This video was... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy Experiments with small clusters of networked brain cells are helping scientists see how real brains develop normally, and what goes awry when cells have trouble making connections. (Image credit: Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University)
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NYT > Science
Renée Fleming and Joshua Bell to Unite for ScienceThe musicians will perform in “Time, Creativity and the Cosmos,” a multimedia spectacle, to open the World Science Festival’s 10th anniversary.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bare bones: Making bones transparentA new bone clearing technique is a breakthrough for testing osteoporosis drugs.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly prescribed sleeping pills increase risk of hip fractureOlder people newly prescribed sleeping pills like benzodiazepines and 'Z-drugs' have over double the odds of a hip fracture in the first two weeks compared with non-users, according to a new study by researchers at Cardiff University and King's College London.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple treatment for severe bleeding could save lives of mothers around the worldAn inexpensive and widely available drug could save the lives of one in three mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a major study published in The Lancet and coordinated by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The global trial of 20,000 women found that death due to bleeding was reduced by 31 percent if the treatment was given within three hours.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dual coil defibrillators still more common than single coil modelsThe number of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) that use two coils to shock the heart has decreased in the last five years but are still more common than single coil models, according to a study published in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology. There is emerging evidence that dual coil ICDs are not associated with lower mortality or lower rates of failed ICD shocks than single coil model
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphone-controlled cells help keep diabetes in checkCells engineered to produce insulin under the command of a smartphone helped keep blood sugar levels within normal limits in diabetic mice, a new study reports.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illuminating the secret of glow-in-the-dark mushroomsScientists now understand what makes bioluminescent mushrooms glow, which may pave the way to new possibilities for harnessing fungal bioluminescence in analytical and imaging technologies. Bioluminescence is a highly conserved phenomenon that exists in a wide range of organisms; there are roughly 80 different known species of bioluminescent fungi alone scattered across the globe.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing is believing: Diamond quantum sensor reveals current flows in next-gen materialsIn a world-first, researchers have imaged electrons moving in graphene using a quantum probe found only in diamonds. The technique could be used to understand electron behavior and allow researchers to improve the reliability and performance of existing and emerging technologies. These images could reveal the microscopic behavior of currents in quantum computing devices, graphene and other 2-D mat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New publication highlights the anti-malarial efficacy of exciting new clinical candidateA new paper published today in the prestigious journal Science Translational Medicine describes the discovery, and biological profiling, of an exciting new anti-malarial clinical drug candidate, MMV390048, effective against resistant strains of the malaria parasite, and across the entire parasite lifecycle, with the potential to cure and protect in a single dose. The research was conducted by the
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concise consent forms are effectively understood by clinical trial participantsShortening consent documents makes no significant difference to how well potential research participants understand a clinical study, according to a study published April 26, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Christine Grady from the NIH Clinical Center, US, and colleagues.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early evidence of Middle Stone Age projectiles found in South Africa's Sibudu CaveInnovations in stone knapping technology during the South African Middle Stone Age enabled the creation of early projectile weapons, according to a study published April 26, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Veerle Rots from University of Liège, Belgium, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Limited gene flow between 2 Bengal tiger populations in the western Himalayan foothillsThe flow of genes between Bengal tigers in two reserves of the Terai Arc Landscape in western Himalayan foothills is too low, according to a study published April 26, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Surendra Prakash Goyal from Wildlife Institute of India, India, and colleagues.
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Futurity.org
Tick protein joins fight against MRSA A protein derived from ticks enhances the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, a new study shows. Using the protein in combination with existing treatments might help address the growing challenge of MRSA and other staph infections, researchers say. Resistance to antibiotic treatment is a widespread problem in medicine—and MRSA can cause
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Popular Science
We now have the power to make bones nearly invisible Health Providing a new window into skeletal diseases A new technique that makes bones transparent could shed light on human skeletal diseases. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient Bones Spark Fresh Debate over First Humans in the AmericasA study of remains found in southern California puts an unknown human species in the New World more than 100,000 years earlier than expected—but critics aren’t buying it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Crunch time for bitcoin as it faces last chance to go mainstreamBitcoin is at a crossroads. One route will make it as easy to use as a debit card, the other ends in obscurity. Can its users agree on its future?
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New Scientist - News
We still haven’t heard from aliens – here’s why we might neverThe most ambitious SETI project yet found nothing in its first data release, and a new approach suggests we might never make contact even if alien life is common
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New Scientist - News
Infrared telescope spots mystery flare-ups in distant galaxiesA new category of infrared sightings, nicknamed SPRITEs, could be showing us previously unseen phases in the lives and deaths of stars
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New Scientist - News
First Americans may have been Neanderthals 130,000 years agoIf the finding from butchered mastodon bones stands up to scrutiny, it could change everything we thought we knew about the earliest humans in the Americas
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New Scientist - News
Wild bears do the twist to communicate through smelly footprintsBrown bears in the mountains of Europe twist their feet into the ground to leave behind a host of scent information for other bears to sniff at
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New Scientist - News
All mammals big or small take about 12 seconds to defecateA study of defecation finds that all mammals take around the same amount of time to relieve themselves. If it’s taking much longer, you may need to see a doctor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light can improve perovskite solar cell performanceScientists show how light affects perovskite film formation in solar cells, which is a critical factor in using them for cost-effective and energy-efficient photovoltaics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking unstable chromosomes helps predict lung cancer's returnScientists have found that unstable chromosomes within lung tumors increases the risk of cancer returning after surgery, and have used this new knowledge to detect relapse long before standard testing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vital role for mitochondrial calcium exchange in heart functionScientists have long thought that calcium transport into mitochondria is a key signal linking cardiac workload, or how hard the heart pumps, with energy production. Now, in a major breakthrough, researchers show that the exit of calcium from mitochondria serves a critical role in heart function and may represent a powerful therapeutic approach to limit heart disease.
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Live Science
In Photos: 130,000-Year-Old Evidence of Humans in CaliforniaScientists have found what they are saying could be the oldest evidence of human activity in North America — the marked bones of a mastodon dating back some 130,000 years.
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Live Science
Humans Mastered Advanced Weapon-Making Technique 77,000 Years AgoThe discovery of 25 dangerously pointy stone weapons in a South African cave shows that humans mastered a complex weapon-creating technique during the Stone Age, some 77,000 years ago, according to a new study.
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Ars Technica
Incredible discovery places humans in California 130,000 years ago Nature In 1992, a group of archaeologists found something extraordinary buried below a sound berm next to the San Diego freeway in Southern California. They had been called in during a freeway renovation to do some excavation because the fossil-laced earth of the California coast often yields scientific treasures. After digging about three meters below the construction area, Center for American P
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New atomically layered, thin magnet discoveredAn unexpected magnetic property in a 2-D material has been found by scientists. The new atomically thin, flat magnet could have major implications for a wide range of applications, such as nanoscale memory, spintronic devices, and magnetic sensors, they say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vesselsImmunotherapy with T-cells offers great hope to people suffering from cancer. Some initial successes have already been made in treating blood cancer, but treating solid tumors remains a major challenge. The signaling molecule interferon gamma, which is produced by T-cells, plays a key role in the therapy. It cuts off the blood supply to tumors, as a new study reveals.
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Dagens Medicin
Når observationer kommer på tværs af evidensI vores komplet videnskabsforførte verden skal alting dokumenteres, før det er bevist og kan tages ad notam.
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The Atlantic
Moderates Can Now Sink or Save the Republican Health-Care Bill Updated on April 25 at 3:02 p.m. ET The fate of the resurrected American Health Care Act in the House might now rest with Republican moderates. Forgive them for not celebrating their newfound clout. Conservative leaders of the House Freedom Caucus have struck a deal with the White House and one leading GOP moderate to back the party’s stalled replacement for the Affordable Care Act in exchange fo
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The Atlantic
There Is a Peaceful Way Out of the North Korea Crisis The drama that is playing out now over North Korea’s nuclear and missile program—accentuated Tuesday by that regime’s large-scale artillery drill—represents one of the most dangerous challenges for U.S. national security since the end of the Cold War. It is a crisis that has been building for a long time, as North Korea has broken through the nuclear barrier and possesses fissile material suffici
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The Atlantic
The Fictional Country You Build When Your Home No Longer Exists During World War II, a generation of great German writers including Thomas Mann, Hannah Arendt, Hermann Hesse, and Bertolt Brecht became exiles, fleeing abroad to escape the Nazis. So many left, in fact, that “Exilliteratur” became its own genre, shaped by intellectuals writing about a rapidly mutating Germany from afar. But after the war, these writers still had homelands they could return to. F
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Popular Science
This 'artificial womb' is like science fiction—but uteruses aren't out of a job yet Health How close are we to artificial gestation? A bag-like device kept lamb fetuses alive longer than anything else has before. What does that mean for human pregnancy? Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early evidence of Middle Stone Age projectiles found in South Africa's Sibudu CaveInnovations in stone knapping technology during the South African Middle Stone Age enabled the creation of early projectile weapons, according to a study published April 26, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Veerle Rots from University of Liège, Belgium, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World-first images of electric currents in graphene releasedResearchers at the University of Melbourne are the first in the world to image how electrons move in two-dimensional graphene, a boost to the development of next-generation electronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Limited gene flow between two Bengal tiger populations in the western Himalayan foothillsThe flow of genes between Bengal tigers in two reserves of the Terai Arc Landscape in western Himalayan foothills is too low, according to a study published April 26, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Surendra Prakash Goyal from Wildlife Institute of India, India, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
2-D materials can conduct electricity at almost the speed of lightNew two-dimensional quantum materials have been created with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics. The researchers explored the physics behind the 2-D states of novel materials and determined they could push computers to new heights of speed and power.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Smartphone-Controlled Cells Could Pump Insulin for DiabeticsResearchers used optogenetics and a mobile app to stimulate cells that were designed to produce insulin in diabetic mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitionsTwo physicists at Argonne offered a way to mathematically describe a particular physics phenomenon called a phase transition in a system out of equilibrium. Such phenomena are central in physics, and understanding how they occur has been a long-held and vexing goal; their behavior and related effects are key to unlocking possibilities for new electronics and other next-generation technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Media portrayal of public shooters can perpetuate stereotypesResearchers from the University of Missouri School of Journalism have found that media portrayals of public shooters vary based on the race of the shooter, regardless of the circumstances of the shooting.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Order Could Remove Protections for National MonumentsThe directive is part of a broader push to open up more federal lands to drilling, mining and other development -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spacesuits over budget, tight on timeline: auditThe United States is in a hurry to send people to Mars by the 2030s, but a key question remains for these deep space explorers: what will they wear?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic firstNASA's Cassini spacecraft ventured Wednesday into the never-before-explored region between Saturn and its rings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK government complains after Twitter cuts data accessThe British government has complained to Twitter over a block on access to data from the social network, which it was reportedly using to track potential terror attacks, officials said Wednesday.
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New Scientist - News
Moth’s disguise is so good, spiders love it instead of eating itMoth master of disguise fools its own predator with spider-like wing pattern, jerky movements and posturing behaviour
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Futurity.org
Intervention for kids with FASD helps parents most When children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) receive a multi-component intervention, both the children and their parents see the benefits, a new pilot study suggests. Children who received the intervention showed lower levels of anxiety and modest, but significant, gains in their ability to control emotions better. The biggest change, however, came in the parents’ understanding of t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can aromatherapy calm competition horses?Although studies suggest that inhaling certain scents may reduce stress in humans, aromatherapy is relatively unexplored in veterinary medicine. But new research presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2017 in Chicago raises the question of whether aromatherapy may be beneficial to horses as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Food photos help Instagram users with healthy eatingInstagram users post millions of food photos—whether to show off a sophisticated palate, make friends drool over chicken and waffles or artfully arrange colorful macarons.
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The Scientist RSS
Developing Brains in DishesTwo studies report methods to mimic human fetal brain development using neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells that form 3-D, brain-like structures.
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Gizmodo
These Are the Three Best Coolers Well this is awkward. The overwhelming favorite in this week’s cooler Co-Op was RTIC’s hard cooler, which is no longer in production due to to a lawsuit by YETI. You can still find them here and there , and it’s possible confirmed that RTIC will make tweaks and rerelease it in some form later this year. But in the meantime, let’s have a vote on your other three favorites. Polar Bear H2O Cooler Po
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global warming accounts for tripling of extreme West African Sahel stormsGlobal warming is responsible for a tripling in the frequency of extreme West African Sahel storms observed in just the last 35 years, an international team of experts has reported.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millionsScientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth's most densely populated areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists propose mechanism to describe solar eruptions of all sizesFrom long jets to massive explosions of solar material and energy, eruptions on the sun come in many shapes and sizes. Scientists now propose that a universal mechanism can explain the whole spectrum of solar eruptions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ingesting soy protein may ease severity of inflammatory bowel diseaseA diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells.
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