Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian volcanic eruption may have lived on in Aboriginal storiesNew research shows that a volcano in northeastern Australia last erupted around 7000 years ago – and stories passed down by the Gugu Badhun Aboriginal people suggest they were there to see it happen.
3min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A step toward MarsA highly successful test of a prototype power generator at the University of Dayton Research Institute bodes well for NASA's plans to expand its exploration of Mars with the next rover mission.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New population of endangered cats found in BorneoA new population of an endangered and elusive cat species has been found in Borneo.
2min
Viden

Forsker: Tre nemme tips til at klima-opgradere dit husHusholdningernes energiforbrug udgør ca. 30 procent af landets samlede forbrug. Læs her, hvad du kan gøre for at spare på energien.
3min
Dagens Medicin

Her er aftalen, PLO og Danske Regioner ikke kunne blive enige om125 mio. kr. har skilt PLO og Danske Regioner fra at indgå en milliardstor overenskomst aftale. Her er indholdet i aftalen, som blev forkastet ved forhandlingsbordet.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence mounts for a search further north for missing flight MH370It is now more than three years since Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared, and there is growing evidence that the search authorities have been looking for the aircraft in the wrong place.
8min
Ars Technica

Trump’s first 100 days: The good, the bad, and the ugly for tech and science Enlarge (credit: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg ) The first 100 days of President Donald Trump's administration come to a close Saturday. By any account, this presidential honeymoon of sorts was a mixed bag. The 45th president's biggest achievement was the confirmation to the Supreme Court of Neil Gorsuch . His biggest defeat was the failure to live up to a campaign promise to get Congress to repeal Oba
8min
cognitive science

Conspiracy Theorists May Really Just Be Lonely. People prone to believing in elaborate cover-ups could just be seeking more meaning in life submitted by /u/EustacheDaugerLives [link] [comments]
9min
Science | The Guardian

Manchester cancer hospital fire 'may have destroyed vital research' Cancer Research UK institute likely to have lost millions of pounds of life-saving equipment in blaze, says its director Years of research and millions of pounds of life-saving equipment are feared to have been destroyed in a devastating fire at a cancer hospital in Manchester, its director has said. Prof Richard Marais, the head of the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, said researchers ha
11min
Ingeniøren

Svensk ingeniør får bøde for at kritisere matematikken bag trafiklysStaten Oregon straffer den svenskfødte ingeniør Mats Järlström, fordi han har foreslået en ny algoritme til at styre det røde, gule og grønne lys. Nu stævner han selv staten for sin ret til ytringsfrihed.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineer develops new reflector for radar measurementsCornelius Senn, a measurement engineer in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering (D-BAUG), and his post-doctoral colleague Silvan Leinss have developed a new reflector for radar measurements. The underlying mechanism, however, has many possible applications and could revolutionise furniture construction, for example.
14min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Key Einstein principle survives quantum testParticles in quantum superposition adhere to the equivalence principle in atomic test.
15min
Scientific American Content: Global

The Pentagon's Seek-and-Destroy Mission for Counterfeit ElectronicsDARPA is developing microscopic chips to help crack down on knockoff parts destined for weapons and satellite systems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Compact fibre optic apparatus shines light on breath analysis in real-timeUsing hollow-core optical fibre as a sensitive gas cell, researchers in Japan have devised a relatively simple and affordable sensor for monitoring biomarkers in human breath at low concentrations. Trace amounts of gases exhaled through the nose and mouth offer clues to respiratory conditions such as asthma, as well as other easy-to-administer health screening opportunities.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fast, robust algorithm for computing stellarator coil shapes yields designs that are easier to build and maintainA stellarator is a device in which plasma can be confined at temperatures hotter than the core of the sun, using magnetic fields from carefully shaped electromagnetic coils. Scientists modified the mathematical optimization problem used to compute the coil shapes. They increased the space between coils. Increasing the space smooths the coils' sharp bends, while preserving the speed and reliability
26min
Live Science

Researchers Probe Viability of Amino Acids in Alien EnvironmentsAmino acids act as building blocks for life, and scientists are subjecting them to extreme conditions in order to identify what it takes for them to survive on other planets.
26min
Live Science

Photos: Inside the Bizarre World of the Crested Saguaro CactusThe saguaro cactus is the iconic symbol of the American West.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How plants form their sugar transport routesIn experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers from Heidelberg University were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. According to Prof. Dr Thomas Greb of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), these factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings of the Heidelberg re
32min
WIRED

Review: Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Lenovo's business-centric laptop is back once again, now in its fifth generation. Nice machine, but the trackpad is lousy. The post Review: Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon appeared first on WIRED .
32min
WIRED

Tom Hanks and Jack Dorsey Tumble Into The Circle’s Endless Irony What happens when fiction runs headlong into reality that's way weirder. The post Tom Hanks and Jack Dorsey Tumble Into The Circle's Endless Irony appeared first on WIRED .
32min
WIRED

6 Amazing Storm Chasers You Have to Follow on Instagram Wind! Rain! Hail! Tornados! These Instagrams have it all. The post 6 Amazing Storm Chasers You Have to Follow on Instagram appeared first on WIRED .
32min
WIRED

An Obscure App Flaw Creates Backdoors In Millions of Smartphones Researchers at the University of Michigan expose how an obscure feature of thousands of apps can give hackers remote access into your phone's most sensitive guts. The post An Obscure App Flaw Creates Backdoors In Millions of Smartphones appeared first on WIRED .
32min
WIRED

Hate the News? Wikipedia’s Co-Founder Wants You to Edit It Jimmy Wales believes the crowd can fix what's wrong with the media. But is it really journalism? The post Hate the News? Wikipedia's Co-Founder Wants You to Edit It appeared first on WIRED .
32min
Scientific American Content: Global

Earth-Mass "Iceball" Planet Found 13,000 Light-Years AwayThe chilly, distant world is the smallest yet found via the “microlensing” planet-hunting technique -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
32min
Dagens Medicin

PLO ville bruge 125 mio. kr. til tættere opfølgning Den pose penge, der skilte regionerne og PLO i de nu afbrudte OK-forhandlinger, skulle bruges på blandt andet tættere opfølgning og styrket kronikerindsats ifølge PLO.
34min
Dagens Medicin

Regeringen varsler økonomisk indgreb over for læger Økonomiloftet ser ud til at skulle fortsætte, selv om overenskomstforhandlingerne mellem Praktiserende Lægers Organisation (PLO) og Danske Regioner er brudt sammen.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth Observing–1 satellite is retired, leaving a legacy of spectacular imageryAfter more than 16 years of operation, NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft was decommissioned on March 30. The EO-1 satellite was a component of NASA's New Millennium Program to validate new technologies that could reduce costs and improve capabilities for future space missions. Aboard EO-1 was the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory as an alternative t
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cassava is genetically decaying, putting staple crop at riskFor breeders of cassava, a staple food for hundreds of millions in the tropics, producing improved varieties has been getting harder over time. A team at Cornell used genomic analysis of cassava varieties and wild relatives to make a diagnosis: Mutations have corroded the genome, producing many dysfunctional versions of genes and putting at risk a crop crucial to the survival of one-tenth of the w
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oxford reflects fondly on Cassini as the end draws nearA spacecraft that scientists from the University of Oxford played a key role in building, has come closer to the planet of Saturn than ever before.
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny sat, big ambitionsTraditionally, it has been very difficult to perform live, in-flight testing of newly developed software for satellites. No one wants to take any risk with an existing, valuable satellite, so it there are only limited opportunities to test new procedures, techniques or systems in orbit.
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A fresh approach to experimental design at the SLAC X-ray laserBig leaps in technology require big leaps in design – entirely new approaches that can take full advantage of everything the technology has to offer.
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The role of microorganisms in industrial gold processingSpecial 'nugget-producing' bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, University of Adelaide research has shown.
44min
Gizmodo

Guns Banned at President Trump's NRA Speech President Trump awkwardly pats a US Marine on the back outside the West Wing of the White House on April 27, 2017 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) President Trump will give a speech at the National Rifle Association’s annual gathering in Atlanta later today. The NRA has fought tirelessly to make sure that gun owners can take their guns anywhere. But ironically, conference attendees won’t be ab
47min
Scientific American Content: Global

Science in Turbulent TimesNobody wants to act like just another special interest—but science is for the long term good of the nation, not just the scientists. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals what air travelers will tolerate for non-discriminatory security screeningMounting anti-terrorism security procedures and the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) screening processes have launched numerous debates about the protection of civil liberties and equal treatment of passengers. A new study published in Risk Analysis has successfully quantified how much potential air passengers value equal protection when measured against sacrifices in safety, cost, w
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mineral resource exhaustion is just a myth: studyRecent articles have declared that deposits of raw mineral materials (copper, zinc, etc.) will be exhausted within a few decades. An international team including the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has shown that this is incorrect and that the resources of most mineral commodities are sufficient to meet the growing demand from industrialization and future demographic changes. Future sho
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather extremes and trade policies were main drivers of wheat price peaksPrice peaks of wheat on the world market are mainly caused by production shocks like those induced, for example, by droughts, researchers found. These shocks are exacerbated by low storage levels as well as protective trade policies, the analysis of global data deriving from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows. In contrast to widespread assumptions, neither speculation across stock or commodi
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changes of effective temperature and cold/hot days over ChinaWhether you prefer a cool summer night with a gentle breeze or a crystal clear and still winter day, the human perception of temperature, or thermal comfort, while largely dependent on the temperature itself, involves several other climate variables, such as humidity and wind speed.
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explain the way Weyl particles 'dance' on crystal surfaceResearchers at MIPT have examined the behavior of Weyl particles trapped on the surface of Weyl semimetals. Their study was published in the prestigious Rapid Communications section of Physical Review B.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When the smoke clears... tobacco control in post-conflict settingsIn new research published today by King's College London - Institute of Cancer Policy and the Conflict & Health Research Group in the journal ecancermedicalscience, the difficulties of prioritizing preventable disease and long term health issues in post conflict zones are explored.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Brain Has Its Own "Autofill" Function for SpeechThe neural version of a texting app anticipates what comes next when we hear speech -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Viden

Ejere af gamle huse kender alle tricksne til at spare på energienBeboere i ineffektive huse bruger kun omkring halvt så meget energi, som huset er beregnet til. Beboere i energieffektive huse bruger omvendt lidt mere end beregnet.
1h
Ingeniøren

Total forvirring i Ringkøbing-Skjern: Teleudbud udvikler sig til en farceDårlig dækning får jysk kommune til at fyre TDC og hyre Telenor. Så vil de fyre Telenor og have TDC tilbage - måske. Men problemet er, at kommunens nye mobiler er for gamle.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Augmented reality increases maintenance reliability at a space stationAn international project led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new augmented reality (AR) tool for the ESA. In the future, it is envisaged that astronauts will be able to use this tool to perform maintenance tasks and real-time equipment monitoring in the demanding conditions of space. The first practical tests carried out at ESA's European Astronaut Centre produced excel
1h
The Atlantic

Catastrophe and the Comedy of the Self-Aware Marriage Toward the end of the first episode of Catastrophe ’s third season, Sharon sits down on a couch next to her husband Rob after confessing that she’s betrayed his trust. She asks a question: “What now?” Rob re-etches his magnificent block of a face, and what had been stoic rage at his wife’s betrayal becomes resignation. “I don’t know,” he says. “I guess over time I’ll have to learn to forgive you.
1h
Ingeniøren

Darkweb: Internettets mørke sider er ikke et rigtigt web De mest lyssky dele af internettet bryder med det princip, som var visionen for World Wide Web. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/darkweb-internettets-moerke-sider-ikke-rigtigt-web-1076032 Version2
1h
Ingeniøren

Forsker: Vi kan ikke sprøjte os ud af resistensØkonomisk pressede landmænd tilsidesætter rådene fra egne rådgivere og forskere og planter markerne til med hvede år efter år. Resultatet er sprøjtemidler, der ikke længere virker.
1h
Ars Technica

Oddities start to emerge from deeper analyses of LHC data Enlarge / The magnets of the LHCb detector. (credit: NSF/CERN ) The Large Hadron Collider has generated a staggering amount of data in its years of operation; it's enough data that we'll be analyzing it for years after the collider shuts down. In the meantime, priority has gone to searches for big-ticket items like the Higgs boson ( tick ) and dark matter particles (MIA). But with time, some othe
1h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt job til fyret AUH-direktør Gert Sørensen, der indtil januar var direktør for Aarhus Universitetshospital, er ansat som direktør for nyt, nationalt genomcenter.
2h
Viden

Sig hej til Pepper og Sælen: Her er en række robotter du skal kendeService-robotterne bliver mere udbredte, og nogle kan endda afløse følelser og tale.
2h
Ingeniøren

Farvel til fast hyre giver frihed og fleksibilitet Eksportingeniør Lone Glensvig kvittede sit job og er i dag selvstændig konsulent. Mange flere ingeniører vil samme vej, og ingeniør­arbejdsmarkedet bevæger sig mod flere atypisk ansatte. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/farvel-fast-hyre-giver-frihed-fleksibilitet-7766 Jobfinder
2h
Ingeniøren

Studerende ved MIT 3D-printer raketmotor i plastVIDEO: Dysen og motoren holdt overraskende godt til trykket. Nu vil gruppen af studerende bygge en raket, der kan flyve.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single gene encourages growth of intestinal stem cells, supporting 'niche' cells -- and cancerA gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The finding, reported in the Apr. 28 issue of Nature Communications, adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects f
2h
Viden

Forskere overraskede: Ny El Niño kan være på vejStik mod forventningen er der 50 til 60 procent risiko for, at en ny El Niño vil blive dannet i Stillehavet allerede i år.
2h
The Atlantic

What a New Study on Vouchers Means for Trump's Agenda The nation’s capital is the only city in the country where the federal government gives scholarships to underprivileged children to attend private schools. The goal of the voucher program, of course, is to help ensure low-income youth aren’t tethered to their often under-resourced and under-performing neighborhood schools. But a report released Thursday found largely negative results for students
2h
The Atlantic

Sheryl Sandberg's Advice for Grieving Sheryl Sandberg’s new book is not an easy read. Well, in a sense, it is: The pages fly by. But the book is tough, full of the raw, painful emotions that followed the sudden loss of her husband Dave Goldberg when he was just 47 years old. What followed was, for Sandberg, a process of figuring out what life could look like when it wasn’t at all the life she had planned. The book, Option B: Facing A
2h
Science | The Guardian

Frequent readers make the best lovers, say dating-app users Heavy reading increases empathy – and makes users of dating sites more likely to click on your profile A dating website claims to have discovered what kind of reading preferences make one more attractive to potential partners. According to eHarmony, women who listed The Hunger Games among their favourite books saw the biggest boost to their popularity, while men who read Richard Branson ’s busine
2h
Ingeniøren

Ugens it-job: Virksomheder som Sigma Designs, Bloom og Forsvaret søger flere nye medarbejdere På ugens liste finder jobsøgere an lang række it-jobs. Flertallet af firmaer har flere åbne stillinger, der venter på at blive besat. Tjek om, der er noget for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-virksomheder-sigma-designs-bloom-forsvaret-soeger-flere-nye-medarbejdere-7793 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian police reveal they broke new metadata lawsAustralian police revealed on Friday that an officer broke the country's contentious new metadata laws by illegally accessing a journalist's phone records to identify an anonymous source.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Forhandlinger brudt sammen mellem PLO og Danske Regioner Forhandlingerne om en ny overenskomst for landets praktiserende læger brød sammen torsdag aften. Det betyder, at de praktiserende læger skal fortsætte arbejdet under samme vilkår som nu.
3h
The Atlantic

Voting Rights on Trial on the Bayou Terrebonne Parish is probably what people envision when they think about rural Louisiana. It’s chock-full of the swamps, fan boats, gators, and cypress trees that translate to postcards and movie backdrops. People speak Cajun French in public, and shrimpers and fishermen still make their living across the bayous. But peek through the curtains of Spanish moss, and you might get a look at some of t
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sony returns to black on healthy chip, game, battery salesSony Corp. reported Friday a January-March profit of 27.7 billion yen ($250 million) on the back of healthy sales of image sensors, PlayStation 4 game software and batteries for mobile devices, marking a recovery from its red ink a year ago.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A robot that picks apples? Replacing humans worries someHarvesting Washington state's vast fruit orchards each year requires thousands of farmworkers, and many of them work illegally in the United States.
3h
Ingeniøren

Energistyrelsen nedskriver olie og gasressourcer med 10 procentNy prognose efter Nordsøaftalen nedskriver de danske olie- og gasressourcer med 10 pct. på den lange bane og med 4 pct. på den korte, femårige bane.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In invasive species battle, thinking outside the cage worksA robot zaps and vacuums up venomous lionfish in Bermuda. A helicopter pelts Guam's trees with poison-baited dead mice to fight the voracious brown tree snake. A special boat with giant winglike nets stuns and catches Asian carp in the U.S. Midwest.
3h
Ingeniøren

Ny tysk hackergruppe følger op på succesfuldt DDoS-angreb med subtil afpresning XMR Squad lagde bl.a. eBays pakkesystem ned i to timer og sendte en regning på 2.000 kr. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ny-tysk-hackergruppe-foelger-paa-succesfuldt-ddos-angreb-med-mindre-frugtbar Version2
4h
Science-Based Medicine

Spinal Manipulation and the JAMA Meta-Analysis: An Analysis of Fuel.Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. It is even worse than I thought it would be.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

El Salvador bans metal mining in world firstEl Salvador on Thursday became the first country in the world to ban the mining of metals in what campaigners called a landmark move for environmental protection.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deforestation from a tree's perspective at the TED conferenceA pair of filmmakers at the prestigious TED Conference used virtual reality to allow people to experience the ravages of deforestation—from the perspective of a tree.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

British inventor takes flight in 'Iron Man' suitBritish inventor Richard Browning lifted off from the shore of Vancouver Harbor on Thursday in a personal flight suit that inspired references to comic superhero 'Iron Man.'
5h
Gizmodo

No One Needs to Online Date Their Coworkers in Slack Screengrab via YouTube Online dating is either “fun!” or a nightmare, depending on who you ask. Slack, a messaging platform that lots of tech and media companies use for jokes and feigning productivity, could be described in a similar fashion. What if the two combined? Advertisement Feeld , a dating app for “couples and singles,” is now offering Slack integration, which means you can enact your v
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online videos of killings pose tricky problem for FacebookPosting a smartphone video online has never been so easy—even if the video shows a murder. After two recent cases that shocked the world, this has become a tricky but urgent problem for Facebook to tackle.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber self-driving car exec steps aside during Google lawsuitThe executive running Uber's self-driving car division is stepping aside while the company defends itself against charges that he provided the project with technology stolen from a Google spinoff.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SeaWorld San Diego gets a furry surprise: a baby sea lionSeaWorld San Diego is caring for a sea lion that was unexpectedly born to a sick mother.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Variations in tuition at public universities have grown, masking the cost of attendanceDifferences in undergraduate tuition rates by a student's degree program or year of study have become increasingly prevalent over the past 25 years, finds a study by New York University's Steinhardt School, Arizona State University, and the University of Louisville.
5h
Science | The Guardian

UTI test used by GPs gives wrong results in at least a fifth of cases, study claims A large proportion of patients seeking help for urinary tract infections are being misdiagnosed – and even told their problem is psychological, say researchers A test that is routinely used by doctors to diagnose urinary tract infections wrongly gives a negative result in a fifth of cases, scientists have found. The findings imply that a large proportion of women who seek medical help for UTIs su
6h
Science | The Guardian

Cancer Drugs Fund condemned as expensive and ineffective Treatments approved by David Cameron’s scheme were not worth money, extended life very little and often had adverse side-effects, study finds The Cancer Drugs Fund, set up by the government to pay for expensive medicines that the NHS would not normally finance, failed to benefit patients and may have resulted in some of them suffering unnecessarily from toxic side-effects, experts say. An analysi
6h
Ingeniøren

Det ene spørgsmål, du skal stille dig selv, hvis chefen mikrostyrer dig Hvis din leder ønsker at kende alle detaljer i dit arbejde for at tjekke, korrigere og kvalitetsikre arbejdet, er det på tide at stille dig selv et helt bestemt spørgsmål https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ene-spoergsmaal-du-skal-stille-dig-selv-hvis-chefen-mikrostyrer-dig-7704 Jobfinder
6h
Ingeniøren

Håndholdte rejsekortlæsere skal udskiftes med Android-løsning Rejsekort er på udkig efter en leverandør til en Android-baseret kortlæser-løsning. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/haandholdte-rejsekortlaesere-skal-udskiftes-med-android-loesning-1075966 Version2
6h
Gizmodo

How Scene Transitions Make The Matrix Tight As Heck GIF GIF source: Warner Bros. The Matrix is one of those movies that’s tough to see with a fresh pair of eyes. Not only is it the kind of film that burns itself into your memory but the subsequent sequels were so messy that it’s easy to forget just how tight the storytelling in the first film is. One of the biggest reasons for this is its flawless use of scene transitions. Advertisement YouTuber P
6h
NYT > Science

Dr. Joseph Lifschutz, Who Asserted Confidentiality Right for Therapists, Dies at 92Dr. Lifschutz spent a weekend in jail in 1969 defending his position that a privilege of confidentiality should be extended to psychotherapists.
6h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Endelig taler vi om, hvad vi skal bruge vindmøllestrømmen til
6h
Science | The Guardian

Shifting ground has suited the colonies Merry’s Meadows, Leicestershire Ancient disturbance created ridges and troughs, letting a wide range of plants colonise the meadow grassland There is no better way to mark the land’s springtime rejuvenation than a sunny morning whiled away botanising in a floristically diverse meadow. Merry’s Meadows – there are three fairly large fields – huddle together surrounded by a sea of bright yellow oils
7h
Gizmodo

Nintendo Announces The New 2DS XL Just because the Switch can go places doesn’t mean Nintendo is done announcing mobile hardware. Advertisement Meet the New 2DS XL. It’ll be out in July 28 (the same day as Hey Pikmin and Miitopia ) in the US and will retail for $150. And it looks...really nice. If this is how the 3DS line goes out, then it’s going out in style. It’s basically a New 3DS XL, only without the 3D effects. There’s a C
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Variations in tuition at public universities have grown, masking the cost of attendanceDifferences in undergraduate tuition rates by a student's degree program or year of study have become increasingly prevalent over the past 25 years, finds a study by New York University's Steinhardt School, Arizona State University, and the University of Louisville.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Som et tankskib uden lods i et trafikeret farvandVi er mange læger i Region Sjælland, som frygter den såkaldte ‘implementering’ af SP på vore sygehuse i november.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Fortsat vigtigt at arbejde med utilsigtede hændelserDet kræver dog, at observerede hændelser bliver rapporteret, og at der foreligger en organisation, der samler, analyserer, konkluderer og anvender disse konklusioner til ændringer i organisation og procedurer.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Operationer forebygger amputationer og død Karkirurgerne på Kolding Sygehus udfører flest amputationsforebyggende operationer på landsplan, og ca. hver anden patient har diabetes. Indsatsen nytter: I optageområdet er risikoen for amputation halvt så stor som i resten af Danmark. Udenlandske kirurger valfarter til sygehuset for at lære.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Skraldespandsspecialet
7h
Dagens Medicin

Ledende overlæge siger op i frustration: »Akutmedicin risikerer at blive et skraldespandsspeciale« Sundhedsstyrelsen griber arbejdet med at etablere et akutmedicinsk speciale helt forkert an. Styrelse og ministerium burde selv diktere, hvor det akutmedicinske skab skal stå, i stedet for at basere sig på, hvad gamle specialer vil af med. Det kommer der ikke noget godt ud af, mener tidligere ledende overlæge fra akutafdeling.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Undtagelsestilstand på Nordsjællands akutafdeling Tre overlæger plus den ledende overlæge på akutafdelingen på Nordsjællands Hospital har netop opsagt deres stillinger i utilfredshed over ikke at kunne få behandlingsansvaret for egne patienter. De tre akutlæger får nu job på akutafdelingen i Køge, hvor akutmedicin er i fokus. Den kritiske situation har fået hospitalsledelsen til at indføre en slags ‘undtagelsestilstand’.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Aaberg og Hartling – I bør justere SundhedsplatformenDen nye platform giver alt for lange ventetider, nedsat produktivitet og alt for indviklede arbejdsgange. Lav om på arbejdsgangene — start f.eks. med at give mulighed for at diktere og sende registreringsopgaverne tilbage til sekretærerne.
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Dagens Medicin

Den svære samtaleUddrag fra Benedicte Dahlerups bog ‘Konsekvenser’.
7h
Dagens Medicin

»Jeg får jo dårlig samvittighed over at tilbyde ansættelse til disse tre læger, da jeg ved, at det tørlægger Hillerød« Dan Brun Petersen ved godt, at akutafdelingen på Nordsjællands Hospital bliver hårdt ramt af, at han har ‘stjålet’ tre af dens akutlæger. Men hvad skal han gøre, når akutmedicin ikke er et speciale med en uddannelse at rekruttere fra, spørger han
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Dagens Medicin

Tiltagende styrke og spredning af nye ­sygdomsepidemier Den nyeste udvikling i vort samfund fremmer smittespredningen, og spredningens hast og styrke forstærkes af ny teknologi, herunder professionel fejlbrug af teknologien. Der er behov for en national strategi for indsatsen for funktionelle lidelser.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsvæsenet år 2030
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Dagens Medicin

Danske diabeteslæger overser effektivt behandlingsalternativ En ny metaanalyse konkluderer, at galdesyresekvestranter sænker både kolesterolniveau og langtidsblodsukker hos diabetespatienter. Til trods for behandlingens signifikante effekt er det de færreste danske diabeteslæger, der kender til og bruger den i praksis.
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Dagens Medicin

Læge i tærskeværket
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Gizmodo

Desperate Trump Set to Sign Executive Order Targeting Bans On Offshore Drilling Photo: Getty Donald Trump’s first 100 days are up tomorrow and he needs to accomplish something other than appointing a supreme court justice to a stolen seat. Because he can’t get any legislation passed he’s going to settle for his old fallback: signing an executive order. This time, the order will pave the way for America to “drill baby, drill.” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke gave reporters a pr
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Finding Solace in Defeat by Artificial IntelligenceA documentary about the superhuman Go program created by Google DeepMind shows us what it’s like to be superseded by artificial intelligence.
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The Scientist RSS

Paper Suggesting Major Revision to Human Migration Stirs DebateScientists are criticizing the claim that hominins were in North America more than 100,000 years earlier than the currently accepted estimation.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mineral resources: Exhaustion is just a mythRecent articles have declared that deposits of mineral raw materials will be exhausted within a few decades. An international team, including UNIGE has shown that the resources of most mineral commodities are sufficient to meet the growing demand from industrialization and future demographic changes. Future shortages will arise not from physical exhaustion of different metals but from causes relat
8h
NYT > Science

Gary Steigman, Who Teased Out the Universe’s Dark Secrets, Dies at 76Dr. Steigman helped show that most matter in the universe was not made of atoms, a finding that led to modern conceptions of dark matter and dark energy.
8h
Ingeniøren

Resistent ukrudt tvinger Danmark til at slække på krav til pesticiderOp til en tredjedel af nogle ukrudtsarter er blevet sprøjtet så meget på de danske marker, at de er blevet resistente over for kemikalierne. Det er årsagen til historisk aftale om slækkede miljøkrav.
8h
Gizmodo

Facebook Daddy Mark Zuckerberg Helped Build Some Ford F-150s Today All image credits: Mark Zuckerberg/Facebook Facebook co-founder and gajillionaire Mark Zuckerberg visited the Ford Rouge plant outside of Detroit today and helped build some Ford F-150 s. It was his first (first!) time in Michigan. Zuck is truly a man of the people. Advertisement As part of a personal “Year of Travel Challenge,” Zuckerberg went to Michigan and wanted to meet Ford employees to see
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Female partners can help facilitate early melanoma detection in men over 50, research showsMen over 50 have a higher risk than the general population of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, so they need to keep a sharp eye out for signs of the disease. Many women in this age group, however, would attest that they’re more likely than their male partners to notice suspicious spots on the skin — which means women could help save their male partners’ lives by helping them
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein 'spy' gains new abilitiesA method to rapidly trigger the universal tagging of proteins being produced by a cell has now been discovered by researchers. The tagging can be turned on like a switch, which enables researchers to acquire a snapshot of proteins being produced by a cell at a given time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food insecurity can affect your mental healthFood insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people's health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study determined that FI was associated with poorer mental health and specific psychosocial stressors acr
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Slender face identified as novel marker for left-handednessIndividuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shape
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Team science critical to diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseasesTackling complex biomedical research increasingly requires the development of new approaches to facilitate innovative, creative and impactful discoveries. A group of scientists shows that a team science approach is critical to solving complex biomedical problems and advancing discoveries in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial Intelligence Shows Potential to Fight BlindnessResearchers have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study quantifies kidney failure risk in living kidney donorsResearchers have developed a risk calculator that estimates the risk of kidney failure after donation. Overall risk was low, but black race and male sex were associated with increased risks of developing kidney failure in living kidney donors. Older age was associated with greater kidney failure risk in nonblack donors, but not in in black donors. Higher BMI and a close biological relationship to
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overweight/obese people with diabetes at increased risk of brain abnormalitiesOverweight and obese individuals with early stage type 2 diabetes (T2D) had more severe and progressive abnormalities in brain structure and cognition compared to normal-weight study participants, research indicates.
10h
Gizmodo

Uber's Self-Driving Car Guru Takes a Backseat Amidst Ongoing Lawsuit Over Stolen Tech Photo: Getty Travis Kalanick’s “ brother from another mother ,” Anthony Levandowski, has officially stepped down from leading Uber’s self-driving car division. Levandowski is a key player in a lawsuit filed by his former employer, Google, that claims he stole tech that Uber is incorporating into its cars. This isn’t a minor legal proceeding. It could prove to be fatal for the ride-sharing startup
10h
Live Science

Pituitary Gland: Facts, Function & DiseaseThe pituitary gland is called the master gland of the endocrine system; it controls many other hormone glands in the body.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First global simulation yields new insights into ring systemA team of researchers in Japan modeled the two rings around Chariklo, the smallest body in the Solar System known to have rings. This is the first time an entire ring system has been simulated using realistic sizes for the ring particles. The simulation revealed that the ring particles are much smaller than predicted or that an undiscovered shepherd satellite around Chariklo is stabilizing the rin
10h
Live Science

What Are Chinook Winds?Chinook winds are warm, dry winds that can cause extreme increases in temperatures within a few hours.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First global simulation yields new insights into ring systemA team of researchers in Japan modeled the two rings around Chariklo, the smallest body in the Solar System known to have rings (Figure 1). This is the first time an entire ring system has been simulated using realistic sizes for the ring particles while also taking into account collisions and gravitational interactions between the particles. The team's simulation revealed information about the si
10h
New Scientist - News

Cancer Drug Fund didn’t deliver value ‘to patients or society’A fund that spent more than £1 billion on expensive new cancer drugs in England had little clinical benefit, a study of 29 medicines has concluded
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurons' faulty wiring leads to serotonin imbalance, depression-like behavior in miceA gene has been identified that allows neurons that release serotonin to evenly spread their branches throughout the brain. Without this gene, these branches become entangled, leading to haphazard serotonin distribution, and signs of depression in mice. These observations shed light on how neuronal wiring is critical to overall brain health, while also revealing a promising new research focus for
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cells edited to fight arthritisUsing CRISPR technology, a team of researchers rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually could act as a vaccine for arthritis and other chronic conditions.
11h
Gizmodo

Those Super-Popular Bowflex Dumbbells Just Got Way Cheaper Bowflex SelectTech Adjustable Dumbbells (Pair) , $213 Hundreds of our readers bought these insanely popular adjustable dumbbells a couple weekends ago at $229, which at the time was an all-time low. Well, I have some good news (or bad news, if you already got them); they just dropped to $213 . Deals on these never tend to last long, so go flex your savings muscles before this deal taps out.
12h
Live Science

Photos: The National Monuments Being Targeted by Trump's ReviewPresident Donald Trump signed an executive order requiring the review of presidential designations of any national monument or expansion over 100,000 acres since 1996. Here's a look at those monuments.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pregnancy does not increase expectant mothers' melanoma riskExpectant mothers need not be concerned that they are more prone to develop melanoma, or will have a worse prognosis if they do get this serious skin cancer, than women who are not pregnant, according to a study.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mouse teeth providing new insights into tissue regenerationResearchers hope to one day use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Underdiagnoses of age-related macular degeneration, findings suggestApproximately 14 million Americans have age-related macular degeneration, and a new study suggests it may be underdiagnosed in primary eye care settings.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strong parent connections enhance children's ability to develop healthy response to stressChildren in low-income families have an increased chance of thriving when their caregiver relationships include certain positive characteristics, according to new research. Using data from more than 2,200 low-income families surveyed as part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, researchers found that school-age children who reported high levels of parent involvement and supervision w
12h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: About About-Faces What We’re Following Immigration Woes: President Trump recently walked back his campaign promise to eliminate DACA, the Obama-era program that protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as kids. Yet a small number of DACA recipients have already been arrested, showing that they’re still at risk of deportation . And in the private sector, a new lawsuit against Wells Fargo claims
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

England's Cancer Drugs Fund 'failed to deliver meaningful value to patients and society'Analysis of the drugs that were approved for use by the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in England has shown that the fund was not good value for patients and society and may have resulted in patients suffering unnecessarily from toxic side effects of the drugs. The review by Professor Richard Sullivan and Dr. Ajay Aggarwal is published in Annals of Oncology with an accompanying editorial by Dr. Kapil
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Symptoms of cystitis probably caused by bacterial infection, even when tests are negativeThe majority of women suffering with pain when urinating, or needing to urinate often or urgently probably do have a bacterial infection, even when nothing is detected by standard urine testing.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather extremes and trade policies were main drivers of wheat price peaksPrice peaks of wheat on the world market are mainly caused by production shocks such as induced for example by droughts, researchers found. These shocks get exacerbated by low storage levels as well as protective trade policies, the analysis of global data deriving from the US Department of Agriculture shows. In contrast to widespread assumptions, neither speculation across stock or commodity mark
12h
Big Think

We Are What We Watch? What the TV You Choose Says about Your Morals A new study says some TV viewers are more moral than others. W hat kind of viewer are you? Read More
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forestsThe ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists found in a new study.
12h
Live Science

Rare Treat: 3 Snow Leopards Frolic and Snuggle on CameraNew camera-trap images show adorable snow leopards frolicking and relaxing together.
12h
Gizmodo

I Just Strapped a Windows Computer to My Face for the First Time Image: Carmen Hilbert/ Gizmodo The future of Windows computers could soon be worn on your face. Today, at a special media event in New York City, we got our hands on the first Windows 10 “mixed reality headset” from Acer. The device is only a developer kit for now, but it’s expected to be commercially available by the holiday season this year. Advertisement In practical terms, this is actually a
13h
WIRED

Photo of the Week: How to Transform Your Nuclear Bunker Into Paradise Nuclear bunkers are selling fast in Japan. The post Photo of the Week: How to Transform Your Nuclear Bunker Into Paradise appeared first on WIRED .
13h
Gizmodo

Facebook Shruggingly Admits It's a Tool for Propagandists “Help me” Image: AP Photo/Eric Risberg Back in January, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he was “quite proud of the impact that we were able to have on civic discourse,” doubling down on his stance that the rise of misinformation, spread of outright propaganda, and rapid erosion of trust in the fourth estate were anyone’s problems but his. A whitepaper from the world’s largest social media platf
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shortage of essential diphtheria treatment drugs needs international action, experts warnInternational action is needed to tackle a global shortage of medicine in Western nations which could hinder the ability of doctors to treat diphtheria, experts have warned.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancerPatients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds research published today in Lancet Oncology.
13h
NYT > Science

Mass Die-Off of Whales in Atlantic Is Being InvestigatedOfficials are seeking the reason for an “unusual mortality event” that has left 41 humpback whales dead since early 2016 from North Carolina to Maine.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overweight/obese people with diabetes at increased risk of brain abnormalitiesA new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) reveals that overweight and obese individuals with early stage type 2 diabetes (T2D) had more severe and progressive abnormalities in brain structure and cognition compared to normal-weight study participants.
13h
Ars Technica

Microsoft 3Q17: Cloud, Office, Windows strong, Surface slumps (credit: Julien GONG Min ) In its third quarter of its 2017 financial year, Microsoft posted revenue of $22.1 billion, up 8 percent year-on-year, with an operating income of $5.6 billion, up 6 percent on a year ago, net income of $5.7 billion, up 28 percent, and earnings per share of $0.61, an increase of 30 percent over the same quarter a year ago. As ever, Microsoft also offered alternative fig
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Gizmodo

Donald Glover’s Funk Album Proves that He’s Going to Be a Great Lando Calrissian GIF Star Wars fans everywhere let out a collective whoop when Disney announced Donald Glover would be playing a younger version of Lando Calrissian in the upcoming Han Solo film. His outsize charm and sly wit makes him a seemingly perfect fit for the galaxy’s boldest gambler. But if you want to take your excitement about Glover becoming a space hustler to the next level, you need to listen to his
13h
Ars Technica

Lawsuit: Fox News group hacked, surveilled, and stalked ex-host Andrea Tantaros Andrea Tantaros claims that she was stalked and harassed by multiple Twitter accounts that were coordinated by Fox News executives after she filed a sexual harassment suit. Her new lawsuit also claims that Fox had her computer hacked for spying purposes. (credit: Twitter) Comparing their actions to the plot this season on the Showtime series Homeland , an attorney for former Fox News host Andrea
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon delivers strong profits, shares rallyUS online giant Amazon on Thursday delivered stronger-than-expected financial results for the first quarter, pushing shares higher.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube ad boycott could spell trouble for Alphabet's GoogleYouTube's inability to keep big-brand ads off unsavory videos is threatening to transform a rising star in Google's digital family into a problem child.
13h
The Atlantic

A Lawsuit Claims Wells Fargo Targeted Undocumented Immigrants to Hit Sales Quotas On Wednesday, yet another lawsuit was filed against Wells Fargo, and it contained some troubling allegations. The suit, filed by a Wells Fargo shareholder named William Sarsfield, in the San Francisco Superior Court, alleges that in an attempt to meet sales goals for opening new accounts, the bank’s employees took advantage of undocumented immigrants by specifically targeting them as customers. T
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Gizmodo

Here's What The U.S. Military's Nuclear Apocalypse Training Looks Like Photo credit: United States Department of Defense If a nuclear bomb lands on your head, you will not survive. You just won’t. But if you do survive, the military just held an enormous 6,000-person strong exercise, named Guardian Response, on what to do in the aftermath. And the pictures released by the U.S. Army Forces Command perfectly depict your coming radioactive dystopia. Advertisement This
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Cassini’s ring dive offers first close-up of Saturn’s cloud topsCassini has completed its first dive between Saturn and its rings. Along the way, it snapped stunning pics of the planet’s atmosphere.
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Gizmodo

The Worst Lies From Yesterday's Anti-Net Neutrality Speech GIF Image: Getty/Gizmodo Yesterday, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced his plan to repeal the 2015 Open Internet Order, which prevented internet service providers (ISPs) from blocking or prioritizing certain traffic, and reclassified providers as “common carriers.” Up to that moment, Pai had kept reasonably quiet about how he planned to dismantle net neutrality, saying only that he favored an open i
13h
NeuWrite San Diego

Half AsleepSleep, though one of my greatest joys in life, is frustratingly unproductive. As much as I love to curl up in bed, close my eyes and flip the off-switch on my consciousness, the realization that I spend 24-33% of my day just staring at the backs of my eyelids is exasperating. Imagine the possibilities if […]
14h
Live Science

Your Brain Waves May Show Whether You're Paying Attention in ClassYou really can get on the same wavelength as someone else: In a new study, the brain waves of high school students synced up when they were highly engaged during a biology class.
14h
The Atlantic

Trump Falls From One Presidential Trap Into Another Mucking up an interaction with Congress is a rite of passage for every new president—usually on health care, and especially for those with limited experience in Washington. The twin pitfalls for a new president are the same ones the great Tommy Lasorda described in his approach to baseball: “I believe managing is like holding a dove in your hand. If you hold it too tightly you kill it, but if you
14h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Before and NAFTA Today in 5 Lines President Trump told reporters he “will renegotiate” the North American Free Trade Agreement, after reportedly considering withdrawing from the pact. House Democrats threatened to oppose a short-term extension of government funding if Republicans press forward with a vote on legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. United Airlines reached a settlement with David
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trauma surgeon seeing rise in burns from electronic cigarettesBurn surgeons are seeing a rise in burns from electronic cigarettes. The study points to lithium ion battery failure as the culprit.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nose2Brain: Better therapy for multiple sclerosisMedically active substances are normally distributed via the blood -- either directly by injection into the bloodstream or indirectly, for example through the digestive tract after oral administration. In many diseases, however, it is of decisive importance to transport the active substance as efficiently as possible to the required target site. An example of this is the treatment of multiple scle
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How plants form their sugar transport routesIn experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. These factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings substantially expand our understanding of the metabolic processes in plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How state-of-the-art camera that behaves like the human eye could benefit robots and smart devicesExperts will explore how an artificial vision system inspired by the human eye could be used by robots of the future -- opening up new possibilities for securing footage from deep forests, war zones and even distant planets.
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Gizmodo

UC Berkeley Turned Its Fight Song Into a Dothraki War Cry, Wisely Doesn't Rename Sports Teams 'the Stallions Who Mount the World' Image: HBO. Come to UC Berkeley for the chance to study Game of Thrones ’ beloved fictional languages with the linguist who helped create them, stay for the absurd hilarity that is the university’s fight song, delivered as a Dothraki war cry. No, really. Advertisement The university has released the opening stanza of its traditional fight song, “Sons of California,” in the language of the horse l
14h
Live Science

Trump Targets US National Monuments in New Executive OrderMore than two decades of presidential protections fall under the review.
14h
Ars Technica

Ars Technica Live: Why it’s important to defend hackers, even the not nice ones Ars Live #12, filmed by Chris Schodt and produced by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) On June 13, 2017, Mark Jaffe is set to appear before the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to argue on behalf of his client, journalist Matthew Keys. And at the most recent Ars Live event , Jaffe spoke to David Kravets and me about this case and broader issues around what it's like to defend accused ha
14h
Popular Science

The U.S. Navy is designing safer batteries, because no one wants a fire at sea Technology Samsung isn’t the only organization worried about flammable batteries Our smartphones and other gadgets are powered by lithium-ion batteries, but as companies like Samsung know all too well, those charge-holders can be flammable under the…
14h
NYT > Science

Hunting Mushrooms, and What Makes Some Glow in the DarkScientists may have had more luck tracking down how some fungi glow than you may have hunting bioluminescent mushrooms, a reporter discovered.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study quantifies kidney failure risk in living kidney donorsResearchers have developed a risk calculator that estimates the risk of kidney failure after donation. Overall risk was low, but black race and male sex were associated with increased risks of developing kidney failure in living kidney donors. Older age was associated with greater kidney failure risk in nonblack donors, but not in in black donors. Higher BMI and a close biological relationship to
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospital acquired complications may be especially dangerous for kidney disease patientsPotentially preventable hospital acquired complications were associated with increased risks of dying while hospitalized or within 90 days of discharge, as well as with a greater likelihood of staying longer in the hospital and needing to be readmitted. The magnitude of these associations was larger in patients with chronic kidney disease than in those with normal kidney function.
14h
The Atlantic

Washington Already Knows How to Deal with North Korea President Donald Trump is right: North Korea’s nuclear program is on a dangerous trajectory. But there is no quick fix. Nor is there an imminent threat, and it does not help to create the impression that there is one. A show of force, if carefully calibrated, can be helpful. But rhetorical excess, personal provocations directed at North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, and stunts like calling the Sena
14h
Gizmodo

Drug Cartels Are Using Ford Fusions To Smuggle Curiously Cheap Weed Into Minnesota A string of drug busts in Minnesota involving marijuana being smuggled across the border in brand new Ford Fusions has triggered an ongoing investigation. It is believed that the cartel of former drug lord “El Chapo” is involved. Between February and March of this year, about 1,100 pounds of marijuana was discovered hidden in the trunks of at least 22 new Ford Fusions that were made in Mexico. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft quarterly profit up 28 percent at $4.8 bnMicrosoft on Thursday reported a strong jump in profits in the just-ended quarter but revenue fell short of expectations in the tech giant's first earnings report incorporating social network LinkedIn.
14h
Ars Technica

Inside Formula E’s push for ever-better electric motors with Andretti and TE Connectivity Enlarge (credit: LAT Images / Formula E via Getty Images) Now in its third season, Formula E has yet to shake some of its detractors. Sure, the batteries in each car aren't sufficient to complete an entire race distance, but the series is packed with talent, and the racing is pretty good. It's now also getting a lot of interest from OEMs and electric vehicle startups. Even though the budgets are
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Slender face identified as novel marker for left-handednessIndividuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shape
14h
Gizmodo

Watching Someone Make a Camera Lens From Scratch Explains Why No One Makes Camera Lenses From Scratch GIF GIF: YouTube The next time you complain about spending thousands of dollars on a precision camera lens, stop and think about all the all hard work that went into its design and creation. As camera maker Mats Wernersson reveals, were you to make a lens yourself , you’d be spending days ensuring every last component was flawless. In this fascinating how-to video that’s been edited down to just
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California says oceans could rise higher than thoughtNew climate-change findings mean the Pacific Ocean off California may rise higher, and storms and high tides hit harder, than previously thought, officials said.
14h
Popular Science

15 items for a perfect bedside table Gadgets More like your best side table. Make your bedside table the best side table. Essential items to wake up next to. Read on. sta…
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

5 reasons Amazon is experimenting with physical storesIs the online giant of retail also looking to conquer physical stores?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google parent Alphabet revs up revenue, profit (Update)Google parent Alphabet on Thursday reported strong gains in quarterly results, beating most market forecast despite rising costs for its "moonshot" efforts.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rising carbon dioxide levels, ocean acidity may change crucial marine processClimate change may be putting cyanobacteria that are crucial to the functioning of the ocean at risk as the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increases and the acidity of ocean water changes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Volumetric' imaging method reveals chemical contentA "chemical imaging" system that uses a special type of laser beam to penetrate deep into tissue might lead to technologies that eliminate the need to draw blood for analyses including drug testing and early detection of diseases such as cancer and diabetes.
15h
Live Science

Ancient Sea Monster with 50 Legs Discovered in Canada | VideoA marine creature dating to 508 million years ago, with two claws and 50 legs, is the first known arthropod on record to have mandibles.
15h
New Scientist - News

Mud DNA means we can detect ancient humans even without fossilsWe can now look for ancient human DNA at sites with no bone remains – and perhaps confirm claims such as that humans were present in the Americas 130,000 years ago
15h
Gizmodo

I’m Weirded Out That Jurassic World 2 Is Retroactively Adding Hammond’s Super Secret Partner Image: Universal Pictures Jurassic World 2 appears to be pulling a Dawn from Buffy the Vampire Slayer . James Cromwell has shared details about his character in the upcoming film, and how he’s connected to the original Jurassic Park series. Apparently, he’s the most important person you never knew was there. (Because he wasn’t.) Advertisement In an interview with Larry King , Cromwell revealed he
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Science | The Guardian

Cassini dives between Saturn and its rings First in a sequence of dramatic manoeuvres that will end with the spacecraft burning up in the planet’s atmosphere Nasa’s Cassini spacecraft has plunged between Saturn and its rings. This is the first pass in a sequence of 22 weekly dives that will result in the destruction of the spacecraft on 15 September. The mission has been orbiting Saturn since 2004, studying the planet, its rings and moons
15h
Live Science

Wild Snow Leopards Snuggle On-Camera | VideoCamera traps in China recently captured a trio of snow leopards snuggling and relaxing under a shady tree.
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Science : NPR

Florida Battles With Tricky Removal Of Costly Muck In Indian River Lagoon In Florida, an effort is underway to remove more than million cubic feet of muck sullying the Indian River Lagoon, considered North America's most biologically diverse estuary. It's a mess.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

James Comey’s Twitter Security Problem Is Your Problem, TooInformation security used to be able to lock down data. Now we must beware of how algorithms handle our secrets.
15h
Ars Technica

Throttling of websites and online services might help customers, FCC says (credit: Elliott Brown ) You can now start filing public comments on the Federal Communications Commission plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. The FCC today opened the docket, titled " Restoring Internet Freedom ." Clicking "New Filing" takes you to a form for uploading documents, while an "Express" filing lets you write a brief comment without uploading a document. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai also
15h
Ars Technica

Russian-controlled telecom hijacks financial services’ Internet traffic Enlarge / A map that visualizes network changes being announced by Rostelecom. (credit: BGPmon ) On Wednesday, large chunks of network traffic belonging to MasterCard, Visa, and more than two dozen other financial services companies were briefly routed through a Russian government-controlled telecom under unexplained circumstances that renew lingering questions about the trust and reliability of
15h
WIRED

TED Day Three: The Mind-Scrambling TED Talk I Won’t Stop Sharing Cognitive neuroscientist Anil Seth's talk about human consciousness was my TED moment. The post TED Day Three: The Mind-Scrambling TED Talk I Won't Stop Sharing appeared first on WIRED .
15h
The Atlantic

What Does It Mean to Be a ‘Secular Muslim’? Many are familiar with the concept of “secular Jews,” people who choose to identify as Jewish despite being non-practicing, agnostic, or even atheist, because they see Judaism as a culture or ethnicity and not just as a religion. Almost a quarter of American Jews fall into this category, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey . But is there such a thing as “secular Muslims”? Or is it me
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rising carbon dioxide levels, ocean acidity may change crucial marine processClimate change may be putting cyanobacteria that are crucial to the functioning of the ocean at risk as the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increases and the acidity of ocean water changes.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cassini Survives Closest-Ever Encounter with Saturn, Snaps Stunning ImagesFirst images from an epic dive through Saturn’s rings reveal a giant hurricane and turbulent storm clouds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

How many Americans recognize mental health issues? Many Americans have trouble recognizing the signs of anxiety and substance abuse, a new national survey on mental-health literacy suggests. “Our work is designed to help communities think about how to address behavioral health challenges as they emerge, whether that’s drug abuse, anxiety, or other issues, and the challenges such as suicide that can accompany them,” says Mark Skidmore, a Michigan
15h
Big Think

It’s OK That Others’ Snap Judgements of You Are Probably Wrong Alain De Botton talks about the danger of succumbing to “status anxiety” that leaves you caring too much how others judge your value. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Touch new stamp and presto, total solar eclipse becomes moonThe U.S. Postal Service is going all out for this summer's total solar eclipse, with a first-of-its kind stamp.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build a novel switch to facilitate tagging of proteins in a cellRice University scientists have learned to spy on cells with a divide-and-conquer strategy to label proteins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crime and virtual punishmentWhen it comes to crime and punishment, how judges dish out prison sentences is anything but a game.
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Ars Technica

New analysis relocates the “hobbit” on the human family tree Enlarge / Artist's impression of the hobbit. (credit: Katrina Kenny, SA Museum) The story of how modern humans got to be where we are is constantly changing as new evidence is found. This often forces us to confront the idea that we aren’t as unique as we thought , as we find evidence of behaviors like tool use further and further back in our family tree. New evidence hints that our ancestors may
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Futurity.org

How Instagram could help us stick to our diets People post millions of food photos on Instagram every day. New research suggests this could be a way to track food intake for weight loss or fitness. Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 16 people who consistently record and share what they eat on Instagram about the benefits and challenges of using the social media platform to achieve their eating and fitness goals. The research team
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The Atlantic

Poem of the Day: ‘Song and Story’ by Ellen Bryant Voigt Ellen Bryant Voigt’s “ Song and Story ,” from our May 1992 issue, begins with a poignant scene between a mother and her infant daughter: The girl strapped in the bare mechanical crib does not open her eyes, does not cry out. The glottal tube is taped into her face; bereft of sound, she seems so far away. But a box on the stucco wall, wired to her chest, televises the flutter of her heart— news fr
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WIRED

TED Day Three: The Mind-Scrambling TED Talk I Won’t Stop Sharing Cognitive neuroscientist Anil Seth's talk about human consciousness was my TED moment. The post TED Day Three: The Mind-Scrambling TED Talk I Won't Stop Sharing appeared first on WIRED .
15h
Live Science

Really Micro Machines: Molecular Cars Prep for First-Ever RaceTiny vehicles made from a single molecule will go head-to-head in the first ever NanoCar Race tomorrow.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's pastIce cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age -- but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence, suggests a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food insecurity can affect your mental healthFood insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people's health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine determined that FI was associated with poo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emerging companies aim to treat conditions that medication cannot relieveEmerging companies describe how they are using neuromodulation to address challenges such as autism, paralysis, and persistent, medication-resistant pain, as part of an Innovations Day preconference on May 28 before the International Neuromodulation Society 13th World Congress in Edinburgh, Scotland.
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Ars Technica

Acer debuts see-through trackpad gaming laptop and a slew of affordable notebooks New products at Acer's event. Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK—Acer's big press conference last year brought new Chromebooks for work, a new Aspire laptop, and a tablet for the elderly. This year, the company focused on machines that appeal to every level of gamer as well as those of us who want a laptop that won't break the bank. Acer announced additions to the Swift
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Gizmodo

Alien: Covenant's Rover Might Actually End Up Going to the Moon Image: Audi/20th Century Fox Alien: Covenant has a lot of far-flung futurist tech in it, which will inevitably be smeared in bits of the cast by the time the xenomorphs are done with them. But one piece in the movie is actually a bit of present-day technology: a small Rover provided by Audi that the manufacturer actually plans to send to the moon once its Hollywood career has taken off. Advertise
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Gizmodo

Block Out the World With $39 Noise-Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones Cowin E-7 Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones , $39 with code AU2KA5OO You don’t need to sell a kidney to afford noise-cancelling Bluetooth earbuds; these 4 star-rated Cowin E-7s are just $39 right now , or $31 off with promo code AU2KA5OO. They might not have the brand recognition of Sony or Bose, but these headphones pack in 30 hours of battery life, the ability to use them in wired mode if t
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein 'spy' gains new abilitiesRice University scientists discover a method to rapidly trigger the universal tagging of proteins being produced by a cell. The tagging can be turned on like a switch, which enables researchers to acquire a snapshot of proteins being produced by a cell at a given time.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A little support from their online friends calms test-anxious studentsReading supportive comments, 'likes' and private messages from social media friends prior to taking a test may help college students who have high levels of test-anxiety significantly reduce their nervousness and improve their scores, a new study by University of Illinois computer science researchers suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UA trauma surgeon seeing rise in burns from electronic cigarettesDr. Gary Vercruysse, a UA-Banner burn surgeon, and his colleagues are seeing a rise in burns from electronic cigarettes. Their study appears in the May 2017 issue of the journal Burns and points to lithium ion battery failure as the culprit.
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Science : NPR

California Is On Its Way To Having An Avocado Crop Year-Round Americans ate 2 billion pounds of avocados last year; many came from Mexico. That's because avocados grow year-round in Mexico's climate, but not California's. Researchers are working to change that. (Image credit: Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio)
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The Scientist RSS

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related MutationsA screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.
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The Scientist RSS

Behavior BriefA round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
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TEDTalks (video)

On tennis, love and motherhood | Serena Williams and Gayle KingTwenty-three Grand Slam titles later, tennis superstar Serena Williams sits down with journalist Gayle King to share a warm, mischievous conversation about her life, love, wins and losses -- starting with the story of how she accidentally shared her pregnancy news with the world.
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Gizmodo

People Are Already Opening Accounts to Save for Space Image: Wikimedia Commons In the halcyon days of yore, people put away money with the hopes of retiring somewhere warm, where they could argue about chicken salad with other curmudgeons until they expired. But very soon, the new retirement hotspot might be on Mars. While billionaires like Elon Musk have long touted human settlement of the Red Planet, at least a few ordinary folks are listening—and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treatment improved overall survival in elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancerElderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Staking self-worth on the pursuit of money has negative psychological consequencesAlthough people living in consumer-based cultures such as the US often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ssafer alternative to lithium-ion batteriesResearchers have developed a breakthrough alternative to fire-prone lithium-ion batteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap togetherFor the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws tiny crystals together and visualized how they swivel and align. Called van der Waals forces, the attraction provides insights into how crystals self-assemble, an activity that occurs in a wide range of cases in nature, from rocks to shells to bones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wireless power can drive tiny electronic devices in the GI tractAn ingestible electronic capsule, complete with a capsule-sized antenna capable of receiving a radio signal wirelessly, can safely power a device in the gastrointestinal tract in preclinical models, investigators report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemoresistance in breast cancer is related to varying tumor cell populationsScientists have recreated and characterized the process of acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy in orthotopic animal models of breast cancer, unveiling the possibility of reversing this resistance after a period of rest from the treatment.
16h
Live Science

The Next March Is All About Climate ChangeThousands are expected to turn out for the People's Climate March to advocate for climate action.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the bodyThe collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cystic fibrosis: Interactions between bacteria that infect lungs uncoveredSubstances produced by a harmful bacterium in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients may enhance the growth of other bacteria that, in turn, inhibit the harmful bacterium's biofilm, according to new research.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intergalactic gas and ripples in the cosmic webA team of astronomers has made the first measurements of small-scale ripples in primeval hydrogen gas using rare double quasars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How shifts in excitation-inhibition balance may lead to psychiatric disordersSeven reviews highlight advancements in understanding the balance of excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain, and what might happen when it goes awry.
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The Atlantic

Will Democrats Shut Down the Government Over Obamacare? Republican leaders returned to Washington after a lengthy Easter recess with two discrete goals for the week: Keep the federal government from shutting down , and maybe, if they had the time and the votes, finally pass their bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. Congress being Congress, this presented a test significantly more difficult than, say, walking and chewing gum at the same time. And
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The Atlantic

Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong A lot of factors have contributed to American inequality: slavery, economic policy, technological change, the power of lobbying, globalization, and so on. In their wake, what’s left? That’s the question at the heart of a new book, The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice and Power in a Dual Economy , by Peter Temin, an economist from MIT. Temin argues that, following decades of growing inequality, A
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Gizmodo

Apparently, Jason Segel Is Writing YA Science Fiction Books Now Jason Segel is written a new YA scifi novel. The Muppets won’t be helping. Image: Disney Jason Segel—star of sitcoms, maker of R-rated comedies, and friend to Muppets—has branched out yet again. Segel and his co-writer Kirsten Miller have announced that later this year they’ll be releasing a YA novel called Otherworld , the first in a proposed YA scifi trilogy about an all encompassing futuristic
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Viden

Flere end 2000 bliver hvert år uddannet til at forskeLørdag aften er der Ph.d. Cup på DR2. Men hvordan ser det egentlig ud for ph.d.erne i Danmark?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood test predicts kids at risk for dengue shock syndromeThe most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physical activity helps to counteract weight gain from obesity-causing gene variantPhysical activity can reduce the weight-gaining effects of the genetic variant that carries the greatest risk of obesity, report.
16h
Ars Technica

Senior official: NASA will delay first flight of new SLS rocket until 2019 Enlarge / We now know for sure that NASA's SLS rocket will not take flight in 2017. (credit: NASA) NASA has decided it must delay the maiden flight of its Space Launch System rocket, presently scheduled for November 2018, until at least early 2019. This decision was widely expected due to several problems with the rocket, Orion spacecraft, and ground launch systems. The delay was confirmed in a l
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The Atlantic

Why Fruit Has a Fake Wax Coating Anyone who’s ever been apple-picking knows the difference between food off the branch and food off the shelf: A freshly picked apple is matte with dust. It can be scratched, scarred, and pocked with insect bites. An apple in the store is smooth. It shines. If Eve found the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil “pleasing to the eye,” then the fruit on offer in today’s supermarkets would
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The Atlantic

The Death of 2 U.S. Service Members in Afghanistan Two American service members based in eastern Afghanistan were killed Wednesday night during an operation targeting Islamic State militants, the Pentagon announced Thursday. The two service members, whose names have not yet been released, were killed in Nangarhar, an eastern Afghan province bordering Pakistan where much of the U.S.’s fight against ISIS militants has taken place. Attahullah Khogya
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NRL breakthrough enables safer alternative to lithium-ion batteriesResearchers at NRL have developed a breakthrough alternative to fire-prone lithium-ion batteries.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Staking self-worth on the pursuit of money has negative psychological consequencesAlthough people living in consumer-based cultures such as the US often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper by a University at Buffalo research team suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook steps up fight on state-led propagandaFacebook said Thursday it is stepping up its security to counter efforts by governments and others to spread misinformation or manipulate discussions for political reasons.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tibetan people have multiple adaptations for life at high altitudesThe Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scythian horse breeding unveiled: Lessons for animal domesticationA new study unveils the secrets of horse breeding by Iron Age Scythian nomads. The genomes reconstructed from 14 archaeological horses also provide important insights into the process of animal domestication, supporting changes in the neural crest development pathway as key to the emergence of common domestic traits and revealing major changes in breeding practice during the last 2,300 years.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levelsGlucoracle is a new app for people with type 2 diabetes that uses a personalized algorithm to predict the impact of particular foods on blood sugar levels.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA from extinct humans discovered in cave sedimentsResearchers have developed a new method to retrieve hominin DNA from cave sediments -- even in the absence of skeletal remains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The upside of worryingWorry -- it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper argues there's an upside to worrying.
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Scientific American Content: Global

This Adorable Mammal Inspired a More Agile RobotAn engineer measured the jumping height and jumps per minute of several mammals before finding the ideal model for a robot that can better maneuver through disaster zones -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Mennesker kan være ankommet til Amerika 100.000 år før antagetEn gruppe amerikanske arkæologer har fremlagt beviser, der kan vende op og ned på, hvornår man troede, de første mennesker ankom til Amerika.
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Viden

Fem finalister står klar til at formidle fornem forskningPeter Lund Madsen er vært, når fem ph.d.-studerende konkurrerer i at formidle forskning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Legal marijuana stores lead to increases in property crimeLegal marijuana shops are linked to higher levels of property crime in nearby areas, according to a nearly three-year study in Denver.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A quarter of nursing home residents are colonized with drug-resistant bacteriaThe significant presence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), such as E. coli, among nursing home residents demonstrates the need for heightened infection control prevention and control measures in nursing homes, according to a meta-analysis now published.
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Gizmodo

Summer Movie Preview: 37 Movies to Watch Out For Wonder Woman is one of the movies we are most excited for this summer. Image: Warner Bros. The summer movie season is usually very predictable. We all get super excited about all the big movies coming out. Expectations go through the roof. Then you see the movies, most of them are bad, and that’s it. For some reason, though, 2017 feels like it’s going to be an exception. Advertisement Maybe this
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The Atlantic

What's Going On in Macedonia? Protesters entered the parliament in the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia following the election of an ethnic-Albanian lawmaker as speaker. Reuters described the protesters as nationalists angered by Talat Xhaferi’s election as the country’s first ethnic-Albanian speaker. Video from the scene showed Zoran Zaev, the leader of the Social Democrats (SDSM), and other lawmakers bleeding after a f
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The Atlantic

Iraqi Christians Slowly Return to War-Damaged Qaraqosh In August of 2014, ISIS militants swept through towns near Mosul, Iraq, taking control and forcing thousands to flee. Among the towns was Qaraqosh, which was Iraq's largest Christian city with a population of 50,000. For more than two years, occupying ISIS jihadists tried to erase any evidence of Christianity from Qaraqosh—burning churches, destroying icons and statues, toppling bell towers, and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computational research details the activation mechanism of p38?p38? is a protein involved in chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer, among other pathological conditions. A new study provides a deeper understanding of the structure of this protein, thereby paving the way for the development of more effective inhibitors. These findings are the result of combining fundamental biological data using computational techniques.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Urban Water Atlas for Europe: 360° view on water management in citiesOn 27 April 2017, the European Commission published the Urban Water Atlas for Europe. The publication – the first of its kind – shows how different water management choices, as well as other factors such as waste management, climate change and even our food preferences, affect the long-term sustainability of water use in our cities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The key to long female lives may be heterogeneityIn sparrowhawks diversity in frailty and robustness helps females live longer.
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Ars Technica

Report: Apple wants to let you exchange money with your friends Enlarge / Apple's Craig Federighi talks up Apple Pay on the Web. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Rumors about an Apple-backed peer-to-peer payments system that could compete with services like Square Cash, PayPal's Venmo, and Google Wallet have been floating around for years. Those rumors still haven't amounted to anything yet, but a new report from Recode indicates that Apple is still interested and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Allina Health shares LifeCourse model at the Institute for Clinical Systems ImprovementIn an Allina Health study, the LifeCourse care model improved patient experience and reduced costs for people with serious illnesses. Researchers say the model is ready for replication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment improved overall survival in elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancerElderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new technique makes it possible to extract the DNA from hominids preserved in sedimentsThe sediments forming the layers or strata at archaeological sites can be very rich in bone remains, but until now their possible fossil DNA content had not attracted the attention of paleoanthropologists. Now, a new technique developed by an international team, in which the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has participated, allows the remains of groups of hominids in these sediments to be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap togetherFor the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws tiny crystals together and visualized how they swivel and align. Called van der Waals forces, the attraction provides insights into how crystals self-assemble, an activity that occurs in a wide range of cases in nature, from rocks to shells to bones.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA from extinct humans discovered in cave sedimentsResearchers have developed a new method to retrieve hominin DNA from cave sediments -- even in the absence of skeletal remains.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ripples in the cosmic webA team of astronomers has made the first measurements of small-scale ripples in primeval hydrogen gas using rare double quasars.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover interactions between bacteria that infect the lungs in cystic fibrosisSubstances produced by a harmful bacterium in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients may enhance the growth of other bacteria that, in turn, inhibit the harmful bacterium's biofilm, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ocean acidification could impair the nitrogen-fixing ability of marine bacteriaWhile increased carbon dioxide levels theoretically boost the productivity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the world's oceans, because of its 'fertilizing' effect, a new study reveals how increasingly acidic seawater featuring higher levels of this gas can overwhelm these benefits, hampering the essential service these bacteria provide for marine life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How domestication altered the genome of ancient horsesAnalyses of 14 ancient horse genomes reveal the significant selective pressures domestication put on these animals, and highlight a relatively recent loss in their genetic diversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human DNA uncovered in caves without bonesIn cave sediments lacking skeletal remains, scientists report having found DNA from ancient humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levelsGlucoracle is a new app for people with type 2 diabetes that uses a personalized algorithm to predict the impact of particular foods on blood sugar levels.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurons' faulty wiring leads to serotonin imbalance, depression-like behavior in miceColumbia scientists have identified a gene that allows neurons that release serotonin to evenly spread their branches throughout the brain. Without this gene, these branches become entangled, leading to haphazard serotonin distribution, and signs of depression in mice. These observations shed light on how neuronal wiring is critical to overall brain health, while also revealing a promising new res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scythian horse breeding unveiled: Lessons for animal domesticationA new study led by Professor Ludovic Orlando and published in Science unveils the secrets of horse breeding by Iron Age Scythian nomads. The genomes reconstructed from 14 archaeological horses also provide important insights into the process of animal domestication, supporting changes in the neural crest development pathway as key to the emergence of common domestic traits and revealing major chan
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the bodyThe collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research published in PLOS Computational Biology suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physical activity helps to counteract weight gain from obesity-causing gene variantPhysical activity can reduce the weight-gaining effects of the genetic variant that carries the greatest risk of obesity, report Mariaelisa Graff of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Tuomas Kilpeläinen of University of Copenhagen and colleagues April 27, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tibetan people have multiple adaptations for life at high altitudesThe Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans. Hao Hu and Chad Huff of the University of Texas, Houston, and colleagues report these findings in a new study published April 27, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levelsResearchers have developed a personalized algorithm that predicts the impact of particular foods on an individual's blood sugar levels, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology. The algorithm has been integrated into an app, Glucoracle, which will allow individuals with type 2 diabetes to keep a tighter rein on their glucose levels -- the key to preventing or controlling th
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test predicts kids at risk for dengue shock syndromeThe most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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New Scientist - News

Did Goya get an autoimmune disease before his art went scary?Known as the father of modern art, Goya was struck by a mysterious illness in the 1790s. Now a doctor has diagnosed this as the rare condition Susac’s syndrome
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New Scientist - News

We could detect alien life by finding complex moleculesOne chemist has a new strategy to scan for life on other worlds: bypass organic chemistry in favour of any molecules too complicated to form spontaneously
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Ancient-human genomes plucked from cave dirt For the first time, researchers have identified DNA of human relatives without the need to find their bones, opening new window into the past. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21910
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NYT > Science

Ancient Horse DNA Shows Scythian Warriors Were Adept DomesticatorsModern genetic tools have provided new details of how domestication changes animals as they become entwined with humans.
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NYT > Science

No Bones About It: Scientists Recover Ancient DNA From Cave DirtWith a new technique, German researchers isolated Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA from sediment alone, opening new possibilities in archaeology.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon’s Echo Look Rates Your Outfits and Slurps Up Revealing DataThe company’s latest smart assistant features a camera to help you choose what to wear—and photograph the inside of your house while it’s at it.
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Inside Science

Extraterrestrial Life Might Be Hiding in Plain Sight Extraterrestrial Life Might Be Hiding in Plain Sight Detecting signs of life on planets beyond the solar system turns out to be more complicated than previously thought. Exoplanet_topNteaser.jpg An artist's conception of planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-sized world to be found in the habitable zone of a star that is similar to our sun. Image credits: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle Space Th
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Live Science

Long After Their Bones Were Gone, Neanderthals' DNA Survived in a CaveDNA from Neanderthals and a mysterious branch of humanity called Denisovans has been detected in the ancient mud of caves holding no fossilized remains of those individuals.
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Live Science

Photos: Looking for Extinct Humans in Ancient Cave MudScientists have discovered DNA from extinct human lineages in caves devoid of skeletal remains. Here's a look at the archaeological sites and the sample collection.
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Gizmodo

Key Mutations Show How Tibetans Thrive at High Elevations The Tibetan Plateau. (Image: Wikimedia) At altitudes of 15,000 feet, Tibetans live in environments that would incapacitate most humans. New research has uncovered several genetic mutations that appear to be responsible for these high-altitude superpowers—including a trait inherited from an extinct human species. Advertisement Geneticist Chad Huff of the University of Texas, along with colleagues,
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Popular Science

All mammals poop in 12 seconds and there’s an equation for the ‘duration of diarrheal defecation’ Animals Welcome to Poopular Science Researchers team up to answer the age-old question: how can an elephant and a cat poop in the same amount of time? Find out.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

National mental-health survey finds widespread ignorance, stigmaLess than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. And nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ancient DNA bucks tale of how the horse was tamedDNA from ancient horses reveals early domestication involved plenty of stallions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees vertical wind shear affecting Tropical Storm MuifaVertical wind shear can weaken a tropical cyclone and that's what's happening to the now weaker Tropical Depression Muifa in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA gathered rainfall information about the storm as wind shear continued to weaken it.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the bodyThe collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research published in PLOS Computational Biology suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scythian horse breeding unveiled: Lessons for animal domesticationNomad Scythian herders roamed vast areas spanning the Central Asian steppes during the Iron Age, approximately from the 9th to the 1st century BCE (Before Common Era). These livestock pastoralists, who lived on wagons covered by tents, left their mark in the history of warfare for their exceptional equestrian skills. They were among the first to master mounted riding and to make use of composite b
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap togetherLike two magnets being pulled toward each other, tiny crystals twist, align and slam into each other, but due to an altogether different force. For the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws them together and visualized how they swivel and align.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA from extinct humans discovered in cave sedimentsResearchers have developed a new method to retrieve hominin DNA from cave sediments—even in the absence of skeletal remains.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers made first measurements of small-scale ripples in primeval hydrogen gas using rare double quasarsThe most barren regions known are the far-flung corners of intergalactic space. In these vast expanses between the galaxies there is just one solitary atom per cubic meter—a diffuse haze of hydrogen gas left over from the Big Bang. On the largest scales, this material is arranged in a vast network of filamentary structures known as the "cosmic web," its tangled strands spanning billions of light y
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The Atlantic

Scientists Can Now Pull the DNA of Ancient Humans Out of Cave Dirt Around 45,000 years ago, in a Belgian cave, a Neanderthal died. As its body decayed, its cells split apart, spilling their contents onto the cave floor. Those remnants included the Neanderthal’s DNA, some of which stuck to minerals in the sediment. There, leashed to the very rock, the DNA persisted, long after its owner’s body had disappeared and its bones had been carted off by scavengers. And i
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The Atlantic

Three Objects That Could Start Trade Wars In our glorious new populist era, a trade war is politics by other means. For politicians like Donald Trump, who made his election a referendum on Americans’ sentiments about their global status, trade sanctions offer a convenient way to express a political ideology. But Trump is hardly the only politician using trade to symbolically bludgeon his opponents. Here are three items at the heart of tr
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NeuWrite West

Lighting the Way: Project Prakash Opens Our Eyes to a World of Humanitarian Research In America, we all know Helen Keller. But we don’t know the more than 200,000 blind children in India 1 . We don’t know that blind children in India do not go to school; that many end up begging on the streets (if they are of the “lucky” half that survives past the age of five). We don’t know that many of these blind children have easily curable disorders, like cataracts. But Pawan Sinha, founder
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Science current issue

Syria, slums, and health security
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

An unprecedented march for science
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Science current issue

Meet the science marchers
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Private fusion machines aim to beat massive global effort
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Science current issue

Claim of very early humans in Americas shocks researchers
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Science current issue

In surprise, tooth decay afflicts hunter-gatherers
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Science current issue

DNA from cave soil reveals ancient human occupants
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Science current issue

The vaccine wars
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The science of persuasion
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Vaccine myths
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Vaccines on trial
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The natural capital of city trees
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A crossroad of neuronal diversity to build circuitry
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Linking stem cells to germ cells
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Extracting the contents of living cells
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Science current issue

H. Boyd Woodruff (1917-2017)
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Science current issue

Documenting decline in U.S. economic mobility
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What lies beneath
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A state of denial
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Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong
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Mexico's invasive species plan in context
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Community network for deaf scientists
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Nature's treasure hunt
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Bridges, not walls?
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S&T Policy Forum examines evolving opioid epidemic
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Forum's fight for science
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Aspiring to do better than one's parents
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Pattern formation in the brain
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Getting phosphorus into healthy shape
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Taking a look at fungal bioluminescence
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Imaging an atomic soliton train
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Zinc can compete with lithium
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Ancient genomics of horse domestication
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Sensitive and specific CRISPR diagnostics
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Thinking local about building
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Single-cell diversity in the brain
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Germ cells on demand
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An old cancer drug's degrading new look
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Science current issue

Solar heat helps harvest humidity
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Using quasar pairs to measure smoothness
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When forces depend on orientation
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Plant the right tree
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Interferon-independent antiviral defense
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Science current issue

Liver T cells in obesity-associated diabetes
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Science current issue

An antimalarial to add to the armamentarium
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Science current issue

A privileged status for animate objects
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The making of the human brain
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Planning for a rise
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Menstrual cycle on a chip
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Rise on the rise
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Delaying demise
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Virtues of splitting up water-splitting
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Science current issue

The fading American dream: Trends in absolute income mobility since 1940 We estimated rates of "absolute income mobility"—the fraction of children who earn more than their parents—by combining data from U.S. Census and Current Population Survey cross sections with panel data from de-identified tax records. We found that rates of absolute mobility have fallen from approximately 90% for children born in 1940 to 50% for children born in the 1980s. Increasing Gross Domest
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Science current issue

Pcdh{alpha}c2 is required for axonal tiling and assembly of serotonergic circuitries in mice Serotonergic neurons project their axons pervasively throughout the brain and innervate various target fields in a space-filling manner, leading to tiled arrangements of their axon terminals to allow optimal allocation of serotonin among target neurons. Here we show that conditional deletion of the mouse protocadherin α ( Pcdh α) gene cluster in serotonergic neurons disrupts local axonal tiling a
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Science current issue

Multicluster Pcdh diversity is required for mouse olfactory neural circuit assembly The vertebrate clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) cell surface proteins are encoded by three closely linked gene clusters ( Pcdh α, Pcdh β, and Pcdh ). Here, we show that all three gene clusters functionally cooperate to provide individual mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with the cell surface diversity required for their assembly into distinct glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Although deletion
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Science current issue

Rechargeable nickel-3D zinc batteries: An energy-dense, safer alternative to lithium-ion The next generation of high-performance batteries should include alternative chemistries that are inherently safer to operate than nonaqueous lithium-based batteries. Aqueous zinc-based batteries can answer that challenge because monolithic zinc sponge anodes can be cycled in nickel–zinc alkaline cells hundreds to thousands of times without undergoing passivation or macroscale dendrite formation.
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Science current issue

Measurement of the small-scale structure of the intergalactic medium using close quasar pairs The distribution of diffuse gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM) imprints a series of hydrogen absorption lines on the spectra of distant background quasars known as the Lyman-α forest. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations predict that IGM density fluctuations are suppressed below a characteristic scale where thermal pressure balances gravity. We measured this pressure-smoothing scale by quan
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Science current issue

Formation of matter-wave soliton trains by modulational instability Nonlinear systems can exhibit a rich set of dynamics that are inherently sensitive to their initial conditions. One such example is modulational instability, which is believed to be one of the most prevalent instabilities in nature. By exploiting a shallow zero-crossing of a Feshbach resonance, we characterize modulational instability and its role in the formation of matter-wave soliton trains fr
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Science current issue

A multifunctional catalyst that stereoselectively assembles prodrugs The catalytic stereoselective synthesis of compounds with chiral phosphorus centers remains an unsolved problem. State-of-the-art methods rely on resolution or stoichiometric chiral auxiliaries. Phosphoramidate prodrugs are a critical component of pronucleotide (ProTide) therapies used in the treatment of viral disease and cancer. Here we describe the development of a catalytic stereoselective me
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Science current issue

Water harvesting from air with metal-organic frameworks powered by natural sunlight Atmospheric water is a resource equivalent to ~10% of all fresh water in lakes on Earth. However, an efficient process for capturing and delivering water from air, especially at low humidity levels (down to 20%), has not been developed. We report the design and demonstration of a device based on a porous metal-organic framework {MOF-801, [Zr 6 O 4 (OH) 4 (fumarate) 6 ]} that captures water from t
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Science current issue

Direction-specific van der Waals attraction between rutile TiO2 nanocrystals Mutual lattice orientations dictate the types and magnitudes of forces between crystalline particles. When lattice polarizability is anisotropic, the van der Waals dispersion attraction can, in principle, contribute to this direction dependence. We report measurement of this attraction between rutile nanocrystals, as a function of their mutual orientation and surface hydration extent. At tens of
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Science current issue

Nucleic acid detection with CRISPR-Cas13a/C2c2 Rapid, inexpensive, and sensitive nucleic acid detection may aid point-of-care pathogen detection, genotyping, and disease monitoring. The RNA-guided, RNA-targeting clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) effector Cas13a (previously known as C2c2) exhibits a "collateral effect" of promiscuous ribonuclease activity upon target recognition. We combine the collateral effec
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Science current issue

Ancient genomic changes associated with domestication of the horse The genomic changes underlying both early and late stages of horse domestication remain largely unknown. We examined the genomes of 14 early domestic horses from the Bronze and Iron Ages, dating to between ~4.1 and 2.3 thousand years before present. We find early domestication selection patterns supporting the neural crest hypothesis, which provides a unified developmental origin for common domes
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Science current issue

New Products
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Webinar | Getting the best data from your cells: From tissue culture to final analysis
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Standing up to fear
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Science current issue

Intersection of diverse neuronal genomes and neuropsychiatric disease: The Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network Neuropsychiatric disorders have a complex genetic architecture. Human genetic population-based studies have identified numerous heritable sequence and structural genomic variants associated with susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disease. However, these germline variants do not fully account for disease risk. During brain development, progenitor cells undergo billions of cell divisions to generat
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Science current issue

Anticancer sulfonamides target splicing by inducing RBM39 degradation via recruitment to DCAF15 Indisulam is an aryl sulfonamide drug with selective anticancer activity. Its mechanism of action and the basis for its selectivity have so far been unknown. Here we show that indisulam promotes the recruitment of RBM39 (RNA binding motif protein 39) to the CUL4-DCAF15 E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to RBM39 polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Mutations in RBM39 that prevent its recruit
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Science current issue

RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED1 mediates germline entry in Arabidopsis To produce seeds, flowering plants need to specify somatic cells to undergo meiosis. Here, we reveal a regulatory cascade that controls the entry into meiosis starting with a group of redundantly acting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors of the KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (KRP) class. KRPs function by restricting CDKA;1–dependent inactivation of the Arabidopsis Retinoblastoma homolog RBR1. In rbr1
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Scientific American Content: Global

How International Cooperation in Research Advances Both Science and DiplomacyIt can have multiple benefits even when the partner is also an adversary -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gender differences in depression appear at age 12A new analysis has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mouse teeth providing new insights into tissue regenerationResearchers hope to one day use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees vertical wind shear affecting Tropical Storm MuifaVertical wind shear can weaken a tropical cyclone and that's what's happening to the now weaker Tropical Depression Muifa in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA gathered rainfall information about the storm as wind shear continued to weaken it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnancy does not increase expectant mothers' melanoma riskExpectant mothers need not be concerned that they are more prone to develop melanoma, or will have a worse prognosis if they do get this serious skin cancer, than women who are not pregnant, according to study results published online as an 'article in press' on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's pastIce cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.
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Ars Technica

Uber pleads with judge to move Waymo case into arbitration Enlarge / An Uber driverless Ford Fusion in Pittsburgh in 2016. (credit: Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images) SAN FRANCISCO—Uber's love for arbitration is well-known, and it has sought to move its disputes with drivers into that more private forum. Now the question is, will it be able to steer a case as big as the Waymo litigation in the same way? Waymo, Google's self-driving car division, sued Ub
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New Scientist - News

Does mind-hack tech mean your brain needs its own legal rights?Neurotechnology increasingly offers ways to influence and extract information from our brains. Do minds need new legal protections, wonders Jamais Cascio
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Gizmodo

Treat Yourself (Or Your Mom) With Amazon's Sale on Designer Watches and Jewelry Up to 60% Off Designer Jewelry & Watches Feel like adding a new timepiece to your collection? Or maybe you’re struggling with what to get your mom for Mother’s Day this year. Treat yourself to something nice or be prepared for the holiday from Amazon’s one-day sale on designer watches and jewelry from brands like Emporio Armani, Bulova, Versace, and more. Just maybe don’t tell your mom it was on
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Live Science

How Long Do Elephants Take to Poop? Same Time As YouNew parenthood got our fluid dynamics experts thinking about what ends up in the diaper. They headed to the zoo and the lab to come up with a cohesive physics story for how defecation works.
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Ars Technica

Was Uber’s CEO really the second-best Wii Sports tennis player? Enlarge / "The court is empty because all potential competitors are scared to face me." (credit: Aurich Lawson) Last weekend's New York Times profile of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick had plenty of important revelations about Kalanick and the company he runs, both of which have been facing some tough PR lately . But there was one incidental, almost throwaway line buried in the piece that made me stop i
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The Atlantic

The Quiet, All-Consuming Love in Pablo Neruda's Sonnet XVII I first read Pablo Neruda’s collection of 100 love sonnets when I was 11 or 12, and I remember dog-earing the page of my library-book copy on Sonnet XVII . I hadn’t been in love yet, and didn’t have any real-life feelings with which to frame or understand the poem. Yet something about it tugged at me—tugs at me still, 12 years later, with more than one heartbreak under my belt. The love Neruda de
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Gizmodo

Women Artists Are Bringing the Reality of Climate Change Into Your Living Room This week falls in between two of the largest planned protests for the environmental movement in recent history: last Saturday’s Earth Day March for Science and this coming Saturday’s People’s Climate March . Being a part of the resistance against an administration of climate change deniers can be a frustrating and sometimes soul-crushing experience (especially when you still have to get through
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Popular Science

LG's 4K Signature OLED TV for 20 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets From our 100 greatest innovations of 2016 list This TV is from our 100 greatest innovations list. And now it's $2,000 off. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's pastIce cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poll: Most teens have taken social media breakThe common stereotype has teens glued to their phones 24-7. But nearly 60 percent of teens in the U.S. have actually taken a break from social media—the bulk of them voluntarily, a new survey found .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age—but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees formation of Tropical Storm Frances near DarwinTropical Storm Frances has formed in the Beagle Gulf, east of the Timor Sea near Darwin, Australia, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured a clear image of the storm.
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The Atlantic

People Are Calling In to a New 'Criminal Alien' Hotline With Reports of Extraterrestrials The term “alien” is used in legal contexts to denote those present in the United States who aren’t citizens. But some callers are using a new hotline launched on Wednesday for victims of crimes committed by aliens to report that they’ve been victimized by extraterrestrials. On Wednesday, the Trump administration launched the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement Office. The office, which was or
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Another good year for Chesapeake Bay's underwater grassesAn annual survey shows the abundance of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay increased 8 percent between 2015 and 2016, continuing an upward trend initiated in 2012.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A turbo engine for tracing neuronsPutting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. That same idea is now being applied to neuroscience, with a software wrapper that can be used on existing neuron tracing algorithms to boost their ability to handle not just big, but enormous sets of data. The wrapper is called UltraTracer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood cancer study with 'outstanding' resultsResearch reveals 'transformative outcomes' for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights virusesOur bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. Using rooster testes, scientists shed light on how germ cells -- sperm and egg -- protect themselves from viruses so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation. The findings could help researchers better fight viruses in chickens and in people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What air travelers will tolerate for non-discriminatory security screening, study revealsMounting anti-terrorism security procedures and the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) screening processes have launched numerous debates about the protection of civil liberties and equal treatment of passengers. A new study has successfully quantified how much potential air passengers value equal protection when measured against sacrifices in safety, cost, wait time, and convenience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New evidence finds standardized cigarette packaging may reduce the number of people who smokeStandardized tobacco packaging may lead to a reduction in smoking prevalence and reduces the appeal of tobacco, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strong potential of E-health to increase vaccination coverage in Europe, study concludesTwenty one EU/EEA countries have developed or are in the process of developing systems to digitally record information about vaccination, according to a new report. Fourteen of these countries already have a system in place, whereas innovative systems are being piloted in 7 countries.
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Ars Technica

Punching holes in nomx, the world’s “most secure” communications protocol Enlarge / Artist's impression of a nomx product under the scrutiny of security researchers. (credit: Aurich/ThinkStock/Nomx) This article was originally published on Scott Helme's blog and is reprinted here with his permission. I was recently invited to take part in some research by BBC Click , alongside Professor Alan Woodward , to analyze a device that had quite a lot of people all excited. Wit
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Ars Technica

The Google Assistant SDK will let you run the Assistant on anything Enlarge / Build your own Google Home with the Assistant SDK. Today Google is launching yet another Google Assistant feature: the Google Assistant SDK . This will allow developers to run the Google Assistant on their own hardware prototypes. While the SDK is only launching in "Developer Preview" mode today, this is presumably the beginning of a push for third parties to make their own consumer Goo
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Science : NPR

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior Police departments in about 95 percent of cities nationally have put wearable cameras on officers, or soon plan to. But do these body cameras make neighborhoods safer? Scientists want to find out. (Image credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

If This Is Rey's Outfit in The Last Jedi, She's Looking Pretty Sharp Image: Lucasfilm An Irish advertisement for the upcoming Star Wars: Battlefront II video game seems like it’s giving audiences the first full look at Rey’s new outfit in The Last Jedi ... that is, if you squint pretty hard. Advertisement GameStop Ireland ’s sales page for Battlefront II features a pre-order bonus called The Last Jedi Heroes , where players can get exclusive looks and ability upda
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New Scientist - News

Addicted to love? Craving comes in two forms, and both can hurtThe idea that people can be addicted to love is contentious, but a review of 64 studies found evidence for two different but harmful forms of this condition
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

British government loses court case over air pollution plansBritain's government must publish proposals to tackle air pollution months earlier than it wanted, a top court ruled Thursday, saying the plans cannot be delayed until after June's general election.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age -- but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence. A study from the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) finds that, when exposed to a computer-programming activity, 6-year-old girls expressed greater interest in technology
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees formation of Tropical Storm Frances near DarwinTropical Storm Frances has formed in the Beagle Gulf, east of the Timor Sea near Darwin, Australia, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured a clear image of the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis: Gender differences in depression appear at age 12An analysis just published online has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12.
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Ingeniøren

Vildskab hersker i grænselandet mellem videnskabeligt fup og faktaUgen bød på arrangementer om omvendt fotosyntese og kold fusion, misforståelser omkring negativ masse, ny viden om domesticeringen af hesten og spor af menneskelig aktivitet i Amerika for mere end 130.000 år siden. Men kan vi fæste lid til mennesker og resultater, der vil omskrive den videnskabel...
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The Atlantic

When a College Degree Isn't Enough SEATTLE—Last June, Martin Chibwe, a computer-science major, graduated from Evergreen State College, in Olympia, Washington, a liberal-arts campus with a hipster ethos that shuns letter grades and urges exploration (“We don’t tell you what to take,” its website promises). His computer-science courses covered topics like programming, machine learning, and artificial intelligence; Chibwe even did a
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The Atlantic

Preserving Seeds to Feed the World Of the over 30,000 edible plants in the world, humans use about 120 on a regular basis. The majority of humanity subsists on only 10 of these plants as dietary staples. Due to this lack of variety, 94% of the world’s seed diversity has disappeared in the last century. In a new documentary from Independent Lens , farmers, scientists, lawyers, and indigenous seed keepers are on a mission to defend
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Viden

Dansk klimatopforsker: Skal næste generation betale for vores fejl?Hvad skal vi sige til børnene: Professor i klimafysik Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen er bekymret for, at næste generationer overtager verden i dårligere forfatning end vi modtog den.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Light has new capacity for electronicsIn 'Minority Report,' the protagonist uses gloves that give him the power of virtual manipulation. The light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, but he's touching nothing but air. That technology is still science fiction, but a new study may bring it closer to reality. Researchers report that they have discovered the photodielectric effect, which could lead to las
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New analysis of brain network activity offers unique insight into epileptic seizuresLittle is known about which specific areas of the brain contribute to a patient's epileptic network or the roles these different areas play. As a group of researchers now reports one way to get closer to the complex wiring of the human brain is by merging concepts from a timed-based synchronization theory and space-based network theory to construct functional brain networks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule identified that helps give resident T cells in the skin their anti-cancer punchThe molecule CD103 is key to the long-term residence of T cells in the skin and to their anti-tumor function, reports a collaborative team of researchers. This finding supplements the ground-breaking discovery that T cells residing in the skin are responsible for a potent anti-tumor response against melanoma.
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New Scientist - News

UK loses another court case over failure to tackle air pollutionGovernment must unveil revised plans on 9 May and cannot wait until after the general election as it wanted to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood test may better predict gestational diabetesResearchers have found that a single measurement of GCD59, a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, women who failed the glucose challenge test as well as women with gestational diabetes. It was also associated with the probability of delivering a large-for-gestational-age newborn.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Underwater debris is clouding hopes for sustainable deep-sea miningTreasure troves of raw materials are resting on the ocean floor and their potential abundance is driving the emergence of deep-sea mining, and throwing up concerns about the environmental impact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists study portion of Everglades closed to people for decadesAfter nearly 40 years of being closed off to the public, visitors to Everglades National Park can now explore Joe Bay.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US probes unusual rise in humpback whale deathsInvestigators are probing an unusually high number of humpback whale deaths since 2016 off the US Atlantic Coast, where many appear to have been killed by colliding with boats, officials said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legal marijuana stores lead to increases in property crime: studyLegal marijuana shops are linked to higher levels of property crime in nearby areas, according to a nearly three-year study in Denver.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Legal marijuana stores lead to increases in property crimeLegal marijuana shops are linked to higher levels of property crime in nearby areas, according to a nearly three-year study in Denver.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strong parent connections enhance children's ability to develop healthy response to stressChildren in low-income families have an increased chance of thriving when their caregiver relationships include certain positive characteristics, according to new research. Using data from more than 2,200 low-income families surveyed as part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, researchers found that school-age children who reported high levels of parent involvement and supervision w
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Ars Technica

Next-generation Xeons to come in “Gold” and “Platinum” versions Intel Skylake die shot. (credit: Intel) While Intel's desktop and laptop processors are using the latest generation Kaby Lake core, the multisocket high-end Xeon processors, used in servers and workstations, are still using the much older Broadwell core. The full range is due to be refreshed soon, with a whole range of new chips using a derivative of the Skylake core. There's still not much known
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Popular Science

This ancient predator stalked the seas with can-opener shaped claws Animals What’s for dinner? 508 million years ago, long before some brilliant mind came up with the idea of a sealed metal container for food, a creature was cruising the ocean floor with…
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Gizmodo

What Lethal Injection Drugs Actually Do Illustration by Jim Cooke The drugs used in lethal injections were not designed to kill people, and they are on the market today because of their use in medicine. Pharma companies don’t allow them to be used for executions, but Arkansas got their hands on some anyway. Here’s what the three drugs in the state’s lethal injection cocktail actually do. Advertisement Lethal injections have become rare
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NYT > Science

A Very Hungry Caterpillar Eats Plastic Bags, Researchers SayWax worms are able to break down the bonds in a popular synthetic polymer, which may someday help to reduce pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The upside of worryingWorry -- it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper by Kate Sweeny, psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside, argues there's an upside to worrying.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cells edited to fight arthritisUsing CRISPR technology, a team of researchers led by Farshid Guilak, Ph.D., at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually could act as a vaccine for arthritis and other chronic conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemoresistance in breast cancer is related to varying tumor cell populationsIDIBELL scientists have recreated and characterized the process of acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy in orthotopic animal models of breast cancer, unveiling the possibility of reversing this resistance after a period of rest from the treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why do we like our classes? And each other? Our brain waves tell us, new research showsThe synchronization of brainwaves among students during class reflects how much they like the class and each other, a team of neuroscientists has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When students pay attention in class, their brains are in syncWhen people in a group are engaged with each other and with the world around them, their brainwaves show similar patterns. That's the conclusion of researchers who used portable EEG to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of high school students over the course of a semester as they went about their classroom activities. The findings, reported in Current Biology, highlight the promise
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Ars Technica

BlackBerry’s last internally designed phone comes out at the end of May Ron Amadeo It's the end of another era for BlackBerry. Its last internally designed phone, the BlackBerry KeyOne, will be available for preorder in Canada on May 18 and released in Canada and the US on May 31. Unlike 2015's keyboard-equipped BlackBerry Priv , the KeyOne isn't a slider—its keyboard is always exposed, and as a result, it has a shorter and more squarish display than most modern smar
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When students pay attention in class, their brains are in syncWhen people in a group are engaged with each other and with the world around them, their brainwaves show similar patterns. That's the conclusion of researchers who used portable EEG to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of high school students over the course of a semester as they went about their classroom activities. The findings highlight the promise of investigating the neurosci
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Live Science

After Vacation, Woman Learns Her Rash Is a Worm Under Her SkinA woman's raised itchy rash turned out to be the result of a parasite burrowing beneath her skin, according to a recent case report.
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Live Science

How to 3D Print Glass | VideoScientists are now able to use 3D printers to create glass sculptures. This technique could one day be used to manufacture lenses for smartphone cameras and other glass components.
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The Scientist RSS

Zika Virus Persists in the Nervous System and ElsewhereStudies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus's long-term hiding places in the body.
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Ars Technica

Net neutrality rules took away your Internet freedom, FCC chair claims Enlarge / Net neutrality supporters march past the FCC headquarters before a commission meeting on May 15, 2014. (credit: Getty Images | The Washington Post) Did you feel a sudden loss of Internet freedom in February 2015? That's when the Federal Communications Commission imposed net neutrality rules that prevent Internet service providers from discriminating against websites and other online ser
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cognitive science

The Race To Build The World's First Sex Robot: "The $30bn sex tech industry is about to unveil its biggest blockbuster: a $15,000 robot companion that talks, learns, and never says no" submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

Awkwardness, Why? The author of a new book explains the science behind the cringeworthy feeling—and how to overcome it. submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

The Nuclear Security Administration Lost a Film Titled 'Skull Melting Demonstration' GIF Back in August, I submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for a bunch of films held by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). We looked at one yesterday from 1976 about nuclear extortion , and we’ll explore the others in the coming weeks. But there was one that I requested that the NNSA can’t seem to find. The title? “Skull Melting Demonstration.” Advertisement I c
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Popular Science

How to save your text messages DIY Back up your SMS history Whether you're switching to a new phone or just want a record of your chats, the right tools and apps can help you preserve your SMS messages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Winemakers lose billions of dollars every year due to natural disastersEvery year, worldwide wine industry suffers losses of more than ten billion US dollars from damaged assets, production losses, and lost profits due to extreme weather events and natural disasters. A multidisciplinary team examined the extent to which regions are affected by the risks and how climate change influences wine industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animals actively choose to match their surroundings to avoid predationAnimals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators -- a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal marijuana use linked to low birth weightResearchers found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight. It is the first large-scale study in Canada to show this association between maternal marijuana use and low birth weight infants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wireless power can drive tiny electronic devices in the GI tractInvestigators report that an ingestible electronic capsule, complete with a capsule-sized antenna capable of receiving a radio signal wirelessly, can safely power a device in the gastrointestinal tract in preclinical models.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Zika hides out in body’s hard-to-reach spotsZika virus sticks around in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of monkeys.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ohio zoo euthanizes 29-year-old polar bear that had cancerThe Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio says it has euthanized a 29-year-old male polar bear after veterinarians determined he had liver cancer with limited treatment options.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

The Most Dangerous Thing On A Ship At Sea Is Not Flooding... It's Fire #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c A burned-out clutch on the Saga begins to release acrid smoke into the engine room. Fortunately, the crew manages to catch the issue just in time. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bi
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The Atlantic

Sergey Brin's Secret Zeppelin Being a billionaire means sometimes having a secret side-project big enough to necessitate an actual NASA hangar. That appears to be the case for the Google co-founder Sergey Brin, anyway. Brin is building a huge airship inside of Hangar 2 at the NASA Ames Research Center, according to a report from Bloomberg , but it’s unclear whether the covert project is a business effort, a very impressive ho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mushrooms get defensiveSome mushrooms produce long-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids as their chemical defense against insect larvae. The biosynthesis of these polyenes relies on only one enzyme, as scientists have now discovered. They report the unprecedented multiple double-bond-shifting activity by the enzyme, which is representative of a yet uncharacterized phylogenetic clade of polyketide synthases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antidepressant may enhance drug delivery to the brainPairing the antidepressant amitriptyline with drugs designed to treat central nervous system diseases, enhances drug delivery to the brain by inhibiting the blood-brain barrier in rats, new research shows. The blood-brain barrier serves as a natural, protective boundary, preventing most drugs from entering the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spatial epidemiology used to identify 3 key hepatitis C hotspots in MassachusettsPublic health researchers conducted a spatial epidemiology study to identify hotspot clusters of hepatitis C infections in Massachusetts. The information may help to make the best use of funding for education, prevention, testing, and treatment.
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Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Penalizes Syrian Weapons Scientists after Sarin AttackResearchers blocked from financial dealings in U.S., but sanctions may have little impact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Americans Love Baseball and Brits Love Soccer...er... FootballIt's tradition, which is why imported or newly invented sports rarely find a foothold -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Most groundwater is ancient but contains surprising human fingerprint Enlarge / We're talking mostly water that is way older than this fellow, but also a little water that's slightly younger... (credit: Don Harrison ) Water is typically considered a renewable resource, as the global cycle of evaporation and precipitation constantly redistributes it. But not all sources of fresh drinking water work that way. Some accumulate at modest rates, which can easily be surpa
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WIRED

For Senior Citizens, the Future of VR Lies in the Past A new film project seeks to reconnect the elderly with the joys of everyday life. The post For Senior Citizens, the Future of VR Lies in the Past appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Vignettes Invents a New Game Genre By Enchanting Your Phone The iOS game, and others like it, transforms your phone into a window to a more joyful plane of reality. The post Vignettes Invents a New Game Genre By Enchanting Your Phone appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Dyson Vacuum, Arduino Starter Kit, Durable USB Cables, and More An Arduino starter kit , Bissell’s carpet cleaner , and durable USB cables lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Arduino Starter Kit , $33 with code ANCBWVFV Update : Sold out Lifehacker has posted more Arduino projects than Trump has tweets, and you can build some yourself with this $33 starter kit ,
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