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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolutionary biologists identify non-genetic source of species variabilityAn unspoken frustration for evolutionary biologists over the past 100 years, says Craig Albertson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is that genetics can only account for a small percentage of variation in the physical traits of organisms. Now he reports experimental results on how another factor, a "bizarre behavior" that is part of early cichlid fish larvae's developmental environment,
11h
Feed: All Latest
Hyperloop One Successfully Tests Its Pod For the First TimeElon Musk's vision of high-speed transportation gets closer than ever to reality.
2h
Ingeniøren
Apples mobile betalingsløsning kommer til Danmark Apple bliver det første af de store teknologifirmaer, der er klar med en løsning, der skal konkurrere med Nets og bankerne om at blive danskernes foretrukne betalingsmetode. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/apple-pay-kommer-danmark-aar-1078754 Version2
6h

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Futurity.org
‘Tree-of-heaven’ is an invasive triple threat Researchers have found that the tree of heaven—the nickname for Ailanthus trees—is an invasive triple threat, producing seeds early in its lifespan, making millions of viable seeds during its long life, and continuing to produce seeds for decades, or even more than a century. In a new study, the researchers found that an Ailanthus tree that lives around 40 years can produce approximately 10 milli
3min
Gizmodo
The Root Cop Shares Racist Facebook Post, Will Resign After Public Outcry | The Slot Trump Reportedl The Root Cop Shares Racist Facebook Post, Will Resign After Public Outcry | The Slot Trump Reportedly Trash-talked White House to Golf Buddies, Calling it ‘a Real Dump’ | Deadspin Under Armour Is Still Struggling | Splinter Newly Released Documents Show How Monsanto Will Do Anything to Prove Roundup Isn’t Toxic |
8min
Ingeniøren
Sejl på satellitter skal eliminere rumskrotSatellitter udstyret med små sejl kan være en både billig og effektiv måde at undgå, at udtjent materiel flyver rundt i kredsløb som ubrugeligt skrot. Britiske forskere tester netop nu sejlene.
9min
Live Science
These Stunning 3D Images Reveal How a Massive Greenland Glacier Has ChangedNASA scientists are keeping sharp eyes on Greenland's glaciers.
10min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin ATMs invade Philly, taking cryptocurrency to the massesThere's no shortage of bitcoin in Philadelphia.
11min
Ars Technica
As the Moon landing anniversary nears, Buzz Aldrin wants to shake NASA up Enlarge / President Donald Trump gives the pen to Buzz Aldrin after signing an Executive Order to reestablish the National Space Council in June. (credit: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) As the lunar module pilot for Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin remains the most well-known figure in the aerospace industry today and a consistent advocate for human exploration of Mars. He has long pushed for the conc
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pennsylvania snowshoe hares differ from those in YukonSnowshoe hares in Pennsylvania -- at the southern end of the species' range -- show adaptations in fur color and characteristics, behavior and metabolism, to enable them to survive in less wintry conditions than their far northern relatives, according to a team of researchers.
13min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar eclipse apps help people prepare for celestial extravaganzaThe upcoming solar eclipse in August bids to be more than a rare celestial event - it could meld the increasingly pervasive world of smartphone apps with a total eclipse visible from sea to shining sea.
17min
Gizmodo
It's Back! Get 100 Velcro Cable Ties For $6 With Prime Shipping 100 Velcro Cable Ties , $6 Velcro cable ties can transform the rat king of cables behind your desk or home theater into something more manageable , and you can get 100 of them today on Amazon for just $6 . These are frequently listed as an add-on item, but at least for now, they’re eligible for standalone Prime shipping.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hypertensive women may benefit most from drugs that directly block the action of the hormone aldosteWhen women are hypertensive their physicians should consider measuring their level of aldosterone, a hormone that at high levels damages the cardiovascular system, scientists say.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loss of 350 miles of Great Plains streams causing changes in aquatic food webA decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing fish assembles according to research published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An end to cavities for people with sensitive teeth?An ice cold drink is refreshing in the summer, but for people with sensitive teeth, it can cause a painful jolt in the mouth. This condition can be treated, but many current approaches don't last long. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a new material with an extract from green tea that could fix this problem -- and help prevent cavities in
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar glasses generate solar powerOrganic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight -- and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. In the Energy Technology journal, researchers from KIT now present sunglasses with colored, semitransparent solar cells applied onto lenses that supply a micropr
20min
Science | The Guardian
A peek behind the cosmic curtain: Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw answer your questions - podcast Science Weekly hosts the authors of Universal: a guide to the cosmos for a special live recording answering questions about the big bang, the multiverse and more Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Last week, we recorded a very special edition of the Science Weekly podcast. For the first time ever, we went out
26min
The Guardian's Science Weekly
A peek behind the cosmic curtain: Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw answer your questions - podcastScience Weekly hosts the authors of Universal: a guide to the cosmos for a special live recording answering questions about the big bang, the multiverse and more
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU warns Poland to obey logging ban in ancient forestThe EU warned Poland Wednesday to obey a ban on logging in Europe's last primeval woodland, saying it would add any breach to a broader Brussels case against Warsaw over democratic standards.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet pricing 101: Why costs are all over the mapThere are 95 million American households with fixed - as in, not wireless - internet access, but few of us really understand why we pay what we pay, especially when we hear about a neighbor or relative with a cheaper rate and faster speed.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The nitty-gritty behind how onions make you cryAdding onions to a recipe can make a meal taste rich and savory, but cutting up the onion can be brutal. Onions release a compound called lachrymatory factor (LF), which makes the eyes sting and water. Scientists know that a certain enzyme causes this irritating compound to form but precisely how it helps LF form in the onion remained an open question. Now, one group reports in ACS Chemical Biolog
29min
Ars Technica
Why the Bitcoin network just split in half and why it matters Enlarge (credit: Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images) On Tuesday, a faction of the Bitcoin community launched an audacious experiment: a new version of Bitcoin called Bitcoin Cash that's incompatible with the standard version. As a result, the Bitcoin network split into two mutually incompatible networks that will operate side-by-side. The confusing result is that if you owned one bitcoin before the sp
30min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Exomoon candidate, fake peer review and a telescope problem The week in science: 28 July–3 August 2017. Nature 548 10 doi: 10.1038/548010a
31min
Science | The Guardian
Australia's shortage of climate scientists puts country at serious risk, report find Climate science workforce needs to grow by 77 positions over the next four years, according to report prompted by CSIRO redundancies Australia has a critical shortage of climate scientists, leaving it at serious risk of not delivering essential climate and weather services to groups like farmers, coastal communities and international organisations, a report has found. The report into the nation’s
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania's coastal watersDescending beneath the waves, the cloudy first few meters quickly give way to clear waters and an astonishing sight—dozens, perhaps hundreds, of tightly packed ancient vases lie on the seabed, testament to some long-forgotten trader's unfortunate voyage more than 1,600 years ago.
35min
The Atlantic
Japan's School System Is More Equitable—and Less Costly KAWAMATA, Japan—In many countries, the United States included, students’ economic backgrounds often determine the quality of the education they receive. Richer students tend to go to schools funded by high property taxes , with top-notch facilities and staff that help them succeed. In districts where poorer students live, students often get shoddy facilities, out-of-date textbooks, and fewer guid
36min
Feed: All Latest
The US Scientists Stepping Up to Run for OfficeMore than a dozen Democratic candidates with scientific backgrounds are running for Congress.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What flowers looked like 100 million years agoFlowering plants with at least 300,000 species are by far the most diverse group of plants on Earth. They include almost all the species used by people for food, medicine, and many other purposes. However, flowering plants arose only about 140 million years ago, quite late in the evolution of plants, toward the end of the age of the dinosaurs, but since then have diversified spectacularly. No one
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's not just what you eat, it's what's eating youRestricting how much you eat without starving has been shown to robustly extend lifespan in more than 20 species of animals including primates. How this works is still unclear. A new study shows that it's not just what or how much you eat that matters. Smelling food in addition to consuming calories could influence the aging process. And, what's 'eating' you or more specifically your cells may pro
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food fight: Children's temperaments help predict dinnertime strugglesMost toddlers go through bouts of picky eating, but infants with more inhibited personalities are more likely to turn up their nose at new foods, according to researchers.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Baby fish exercising, a surprising source of adaptive variation in fish jawsA frustration of evolutionary biologists is that genetics can account for only a small percent of variation in physical traits. Now researchers have found new results on how another factor, a behavior in early cichlid fish larvae's developmental environment, influences later variation in their craniofacial bones.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do dads fit in? Engaging fathers in family-centered early intervention services for childrenEarly intervention services for children with disabilities or developmental delays are focused on being family centered and are ideally conducted in the home setting. Even so, fathers — custodial or noncustodial — are often left out of the process.
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgeryResearchers from Harvard University have developed a hybrid rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes with integrated sensing, flexibility, and multiple degrees of freedom. This arm -- built using a manufacturing paradigm based on pop-up fabrication and soft lithography -- lies flat on an endoscope until it arrives at the desired spot, then pops up to assist in surgical procedures.
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The nitty-gritty behind how onions make you cryAdding onions to a recipe can make a meal taste rich and savory, but cutting up the onion can be brutal. Onions release a compound called lachrymatory factor (LF), which makes the eyes sting and water. Scientists know that a certain enzyme causes this irritating compound to form but precisely how it helps LF form in the onion remained an open question. Now, one group reports in ACS Chemical Biolog
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Species richness -- a false friend?Assessing the state of an ecosystem solely on the basis of short-term changes in the number of different species it contains can lead to false conclusions. This is the conclusion reached by an international team, published online in the Journal of Applied Ecology.
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clarifiying complex chemical processes with quantum computersScience and the IT industry have high hopes for quantum computing, but descriptions of possible applications tend to be vague. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now come up with a concrete example that demonstrates what quantum computers will actually be able to achieve in the future.
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach on research and design for CQD catalysts in World Scientific NANOA new study that provides a new approach for the rational design of carbon quantum dots (CQD) modified catalysts with potential applications in energy and environmental areas has published in World Scientific's NANO journal. The study discusses the introduction of CQDs into Bi2WO6 photocatalyst and the demonstration of its good photocatalytic performance in pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolu
41min
Futurity.org
Hospital heart attacks 2x as deadly for cancer patients Patients who have advanced cancer and suffer cardiac arrest while in the hospital have a survival rate of less than 10 percent, half that of patients who have a heart attack but do not have cancer, a new study suggests. “We’re hopeful that our study in some way will help doctors and cancer patients make more informed decisions about the end of life…” The data help to clear up some myths in medici
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China welcomes world's first panda born to wild and captive parentsChina has welcomed the world's first giant panda cub born to a mixed pair of captive and wild parents, the official Xinhua news agency said.
47min
New Scientist - News
On the trail of dragons with blood that can save people’s livesThe gigantic Komodo dragons of Indonesia have been known to kill people – but their blood is rich with peptides that may destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria
50min
New Scientist - News
North Korea isn’t bluffing, the nuclear threat to the US is realKim Jong-un’s unusual celebrations following a missile test this year herald the nation’s confidence in its ability to threaten US cities, says Jeffrey Lewis
50min
Futurity.org
Baby’s response to new toys predicts picky eating Most toddlers go through bouts of picky eating, but infants with more inhibited personalities are more likely to refuse new foods, say researchers. In a study, researchers observed how infants responded to new foods and new toys throughout their first 18 months. The study found that infants who were wary of new toys also tended to be less accepting of new foods, suggesting early food attitudes st
51min
Popular Science
Every sunset ends with a green flash. Why is it so hard to see? Head Trip Don't blink. Every sunset on Earth ends with a brief but characteristic green flash. It's the result of the varying wavelengths of visible light. Understanding how it forms might…
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collections at the California Academy of Sciences aid researchers in revising a mammal branch on tree of lifeOne small mammal is experiencing a triumphant return to its long-ago spot on the tree of life. Scientists have elevated a subspecies of giant sengi, or elephant-shrew, to full species status. Aided by genetic information gathered from the California Academy of Sciences' vast mammal collection, Academy researchers collaborated with colleagues from the University of Alaska Museum (UAM), the Sokoine
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at riskSome of the methods used to predict at risk species are trend-based - an indicator of what happens gradually over time - while others are trait based, which uses signs of climate change in the current environment.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakawaySince an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. Their observations show the Larsen-C story might not be over yet.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly fungus affecting hibernating bats could spread during summerThe cold-loving fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans, or Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of North American bats during hibernation, could also spread in summer months. Bats and humans visiting contaminated caves and mines can inadvertently contribute to the spread of the fungus, according to a recently published study.
55min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Singapore scientists uncover the role of spindle matrix proteins in NSC reactivationSingapore scientists led by Duke-NUS Medical School's Neuroscience and Behavioural Disorders Programme have uncovered that spindle matrix proteins can play an intrinsic role in regulating neural stem cell (NSC) reactivation and proliferation.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From a memory too strong to a memory too weakThere is increasing evidence that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increases the risk of developing dementia later in life. Researchers at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany, now shed light on the molecular mechanism that links the two disorders. The research is published today in The EMBO Journal.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at riskScientists at the University of York have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Academy collections aid researchers in revising a mammal branch on tree of lifeOne small mammal is experiencing a triumphant return to its long-ago spot on the tree of life. Scientists have elevated a subspecies of giant sengi, or elephant-shrew, to full species status aided by genetic information gathered from the California Academy of Sciences' vast mammalogy collection.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A protein involved in Alzheimer's disease may also be implicated in cognitive abilitiesRare mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) have previously been shown to be strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: A new therapeutic opportunity?Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.
56min
Gizmodo
How to Clean Out Your Gmail Account and Start Again From Scratch Image: Gizmodo When Gmail showed up in 2004 with its overwhelmingly generous 1GB of free space for everyone, we never thought we’d have to delete an email again—but even though that free space is now 15 times what it once was, email is more burdensome than ever. It’s not really the available space that’s the problem in Gmail; it’s the sheer number of unread, unnecessary, and unsolicited emails cl
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon, in sign of growth, holds job fair for US warehousesAmazon is holding a giant job fair Wednesday and plans to make thousands of job offers on the spot at nearly a dozen U.S. warehouses.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cutting-edge Adaptive Optics Facility sees first lightThe Unit Telescope 4 (Yepun) of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has now been transformed into a fully adaptive telescope. After more than a decade of planning, construction and testing, the new Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) has seen first light with the instrument MUSE, capturing amazingly sharp views of planetary nebulae and galaxies. The coupling of the AOF and MUSE forms one of the most advan
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Running out of gas: Gas loss puts breaks on stellar baby boomUnderstanding the history of star formation in the Universe is a central theme in modern astronomy. Various observations have shown that the star formation activity has varied through the 13.8 billion-year history of the Universe. The stellar birthrate peaked around 10 billion years ago, and has declined steadily since then. However, the cause of the declining stellar birthrate is still not well u
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microscopic body snatchers infest our oceansNew research from Swansea University academics has found that our oceans are full of microscopic 'bodysnatchers' that have a significant impact on the ocean's food-web.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Samsung’s Quest to Mitigate the Battery ChallengeHow Samsung has expanded its fault resolution capabilities and is now positioned to revolutionize the manner in which the global smartphone industry mitigates future issues.
1h
Gizmodo
That Photo of Einstein Sticking His Tongue Out Just Sold For a Bunch of Money The image of Albert Einstein sticking his tongue out adorns the racks at Spencer’s gift stores across America. But now, one lucky patron of the arts finally owns one of the first prints of the physicist having a grand ol’ time—at an auction on July 27th, the image sold for $125,000 . The buyer’s identity has not been revealed. According to the Nate D. Sanders auction house in Los Angeles, which m
1h
The Scientist RSS
Study: Eating Less Helps Worms LearnFood restriction decreases a metabolite that impedes associative learning in worms.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change could put rare bat species at greater riskAn endangered bat species with a UK population of less than 1,000 could be further threatened by the effects of global warming, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New eruption at Indonesia volcano spreads ash for milesMount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra blasted volcanic ash as high as 4.2 kilometers (2.6 miles) on Wednesday, one of its biggest eruptions in the past several months of high activity.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Nanobot's giant leapThis highly mobile, jumping Nanobot was designed by a team of space engineers challenged to develop a Moon mission that was not only technically viable but could also make a profit.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Defunct satellites: Reliably determine and predict attitude motionUncontrollable flying objects in the Earth‘s orbit are an enormous risk for active satellites and for spacecraft in general. Since April 2012, the European environmental satellite ENVISAT has also been adrift in orbit. Now, experts have developed pioneering methods to precisely determine the attitude rotation of malfunctioning satellites and, thus, to support de-orbiting missions in the future.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Running out of gas: Gas loss puts breaks on stellar baby boomUnderstanding the history of star formation in the Universe is a central theme in modern astronomy. Various observations have shown that the star formation activity has varied through the 13.8 billion-year history of the Universe. The stellar birthrate peaked around 10 billion years ago, and has declined steadily since then. However, the cause of the declining stellar birthrate is still not well u
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease: A new therapeutic opportunity?Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Metabolic and genetic factors involved in increasing the probability of developing dementia have already been identified. Some vascular risk factors, as hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes or smoking can cause a derangement in
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Riding the wave: Controlling high frequency sound wavesResearchers have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissionsIf CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big data points humanity to new minerals, new depositsResearchers have found a way to predict minerals missing from those known to science, where to find them, and where to look for new deposits of valuable minerals such as gold and copper.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New avenue for precision cancer treatment discoveredOne of the goals of personalized medicine is to be able to determine which treatment would work best by sequencing a patient's genome. New research could help make that approach a reality, suggests a new article.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lifelike 3-D cinematic imaging promises numerous medical usesNewly developed 'cinematic rendering' technology can produce photorealistic 3-D images from traditional CT and MRI data, with potential applications in medical education, communication with patients and physicians, and early disease detection, according to an article.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
River areas overrun by invasive plantsRivers are high-speed corridors for the spread of invasive exotic plants. Increasingly, these plants are pushing out native species and making floods more likely. A study conducted by Deltares, Utrecht University, Radboud University and the German Institute for Flood Plain Ecology has shown that exotic varieties like the Japanese knotweed and the Himalayan balsam grow faster and form denser vegeta
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microscopic body snatchers infest our oceansSwansea University research has found that predatory microbes which enslave prey to acquire photosynthetic capability are abundant in our oceans.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What flowers looked like 100 million years agoFlowering plants with are by far the most diverse group of plants on Earth. Flowering plants arose only about 140 million years ago, but since then have diversified spectacularly. No one knows exactly how this happened, the origin and early evolution of them remains one of the biggest enigmas in biology. A new study in Nature Communications reconstructs the evolution of flowers and sheds new light
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery timesA team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3-D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3-D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gamblers more likely to have suffered childhood traumas, research showsMen with problem and pathological gambling addictions are more likely to have suffered childhood traumas including physical abuse or witnessing violence in the home, according to new research.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's not just what you eat, it's what's eating youRestricting how much you eat without starving has been shown to robustly extend lifespan in more than 20 species of animals including primates. How this works is still unclear. A new study shows that it's not just what or how much you eat that matters. Smelling food in addition to consuming calories could influence the aging process. And, what's 'eating' you or more specifically your cells may pro
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weighing the benefits of incidental habitat protectionUniversity of Washington researchers compared land that had come under incidental protection through regulations, to land acquired for conservation during the same 25-year span (1990-2015), in Washington State. Lawler's talk, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, is part of a session on Conservation Planning, Policy, and Theory at the Ecological Society of America's 2017 Annual Meeting.
1h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Kan man spare brændstof ved at lægge sig bag andre biler?Flere læsere vil gerne vide, om der er brændstof at spare, hvis man lægger sig i slipstrømmen på forankørende biler eller lastbiler. Det svarer Vejdirektoratet på.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Bluesound Pulse 2 and Pulse Flex Review: Great Audio, But Tough to Set UpWe test two wireless speakers from Bluesound that offer lossless audio over Wi-Fi.
1h
Feed: All Latest
NASA Unleashes Two Vintage Warplanes to Chase the EclipseNASA airplanes chasing the solar eclipse will help discover why the solar atmosphere is hotter than the surface.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Encoding smart antibioticsA method for designing antibiotics based on random binary encoding, developed by a team led by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), could open up new opportunities in drug discovery.
1h
Gizmodo
Who Could Jessica Chastain Be Playing in X-Men: Dark Phoenix? Dave Bautista lets slip that he’s working on another superhero movie franchise. John Boyega discusses Carrie Fisher’s legacy in Star Wars: The Last Jedi . Get a teeny new glimpse of IT ’s Pennywise in action. Plus tons of new Defenders pictures and the debut of Pickle Rick on Rick and Morty . To me, my spoilers! X-Men: Dark Phoenix Jessica Chastain revealed on Instagram she’s currently en route t
1h
Futurity.org
Political attack ads have more power against women Negative political advertising may hurt the campaigns of female candidates—and especially Democrats—more than those of men, a new study suggests. The findings particularly apply when the advertisements accuse candidates for office who are women of not adhering to feminine stereotypes. “Women who run for public office have to, in many ways, be all things to all people…” The study counters the noti
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chandra observations provide insights about young stellar cluster NGC 3293(Phys.org)—Observations conducted with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have uncovered a young stellar cluster designated NGC 3293. The data provided by the spacecraft reveal insights about its stellar population. The findings were presented July 27 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars Curiosity rover approaches 5 years of explorationBefore taking the helm at WPI in 2014, President Laurie Leshin, a geochemist and space scientist, had a passion for space and a lifelong fascination with Mars. Her professional career set her on a path to NASA where she shaped future human spaceflight programs and activities as the deputy associate administrator for NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. She also held roles as the directo
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For under-Earth exploration, engineers deepen understanding of rock stressMeasuring unobservable forces of nature is not an easy feat, but it can make the difference between life and death in the context of an earthquake, or the collapse of a coal mine or tunnel.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Guided pluralism' – an encompassing approach to ecosystem servicesThe function of ecosystem services is to to label the benefits that humans derive from natural ecosystems and biodiversity in order to include their value into decision-making. The area is attracting much research, but a variety of definitions and underlying paradigmatic assumptions can pose a barrier to effective interdisciplinary research.
1h
The Atlantic
Should We Get Rid of Political Parties? Mickey Edwards was a Republican congressman for 16 years, but now he argues for shaking up the system. "It's a dumb way to try to run a government," he says, reflecting on the current gridlock and polarization between Democrats and Republicans during this interview at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival. For more, see Edwards’s 2011 Atlantic story, “How to Turn Republicans and Democrats Into Americans.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping electricity access for a sixth of the world's peopleMost Americans can charge their cell phones, raid the fridge or boot up their laptops at any time without a second thought.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA-supported search programs that detect and track near-Earth objectsA few NASA-funded astronomer teams are always on the hunt for potentially hazardous near-Earth objects, asteroids and comets whose orbits periodically bring them within 30 million miles of Earth's orbit. At NASA, the Planetary Defense Coordination Office supports the search programs, while also planning and coordinating any response to possible asteroid impacts.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protect your eyes from long-term damage while viewing the eclipseWatching the captivating sight of the moon's passing between the sun and Earth, where the moon fully or partially covers the sun, could cause serious and potentially long-term harm to the eye if not viewed properly. Eye specialists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham offer tips on eye safety during the eclipse to avoid post-exposure symptoms like pain, red eyes, light sensitivity, tearing
1h
Gizmodo
A DIY Pharmaceutical Revolution Is Coming—If It Doesn’t Kill Us First As Mixael Laufer tells it, the vision came to him in El Salvador. Laufer was visiting Central America as a human rights envoy, touring a tiny, rural mountain town with the Marin County Peace and Justice Coalition . When he arrived at the town’s medical clinic, it had just run out of birth control. “I thought to myself, ‘This is a country where there are there are methamphetamine and ecstasy labs
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Running out of gas: Gas loss puts breaks on stellar baby boomAstronomers observed a galaxy cluster 9.4 billion light-years away using the ALMA radio telescope array and found evidence that hot gas strips away the cold gas in the member galaxies. Since cold gas is the material for forming new stars, removing the cold gas inhibits star formation. This result is key to understanding the declining birthrate of stars throughout the history of the Universe and th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Code Blue' equals lower survival for cancer patientsPatients with advanced cancer who suffer cardiac arrest in the hospital have a survival rate of less than 10 percent -- half the rate of other patients without cancer, according to a nationwide study led by the University of Rochester Medical Center.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
How We Save Face--Researchers Crack the Brain's Facial-Recognition CodeA Caltech team has deciphered the way we identify faces, re-creating what the brain sees from its electrical activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is your drinking water safe? Here's how you can find outAmerica's drinking water infrastructure is aging and in serious need of modernization. Pipes are overdue for replacement, and water and wastewater treatment systems need upgrades to deal with new classes of pollutants. Changing a drinking water standard or adding a new substance to the list of contaminants regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency is time-consuming. Some water systems are h
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Ars Technica
IBM and Sony cram up to 330 terabytes into tiny tape cartridge Enlarge / IBM's Mark Lantz holding one square inch of the new super-dense magnetic tape. Sony can squeeze more than a kilometre of tape inside a cartridge, for a max capacity of 330 terabytes. (credit: IBM Research) IBM and Sony have developed a new magnetic tape system capable of storing 201 gigabits of data per square inch, for a max theoretical capacity of 330 terabytes in a single palm-sized
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Ingeniøren
Trump-rådgiver: Google og Facebook skal reguleres som forsyningsselsskaber Tech-giganters produkter er en så integreret del af borgeres liv, at de kan sidestilles med strøm og vand, mener central Trump-strateg. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/trump-raadgiver-google-facebook-skal-reguleres-forsyningsselsskaber-1078760 Version2
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Caterpillars turned into 'exploding zombies' by bugLancashire wildlife expert says infected insects go on "death march" like a "zombie horror film".
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular link between post-traumatic stress disorder and Alzheimer’s diseaseThere is increasing evidence that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increases the risk of developing dementia later in life. Researchers now shed light on the molecular mechanism that links the two disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What the first flower looked like more than 100 million years agoA new study reconstructs the evolution of flowers over the past 140 million years and sheds new light on what the earliest flowers might have looked like.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Automated painting of individual piecesReductions of 20 percent in paint use, 15 percent in energy consumption and 5 percent in production time – the SelfPaint automated painting system offers significant advantages compared to manual painting operations, which have previously been the preferred option. SelfPaint’s biggest advantage could well be that it is also suitable for painting individual pieces, known in industry as batch size 1
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity linked to better outcomes following heart procedures: ConfirmedResearch has confirmed a link between elevated body mass index (BMI) and patients having better survival outcomes following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intuitive, extraverted and spontaneous women are the best choice for leading creative peopleAccording to a new study, creative people want a transformational leader, especially one who uses motivation and intellectual stimulation. Other dimensions of transformational leadership include taking individuals’ needs into account, visioning and modelling.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vorinostat renders dormant HIV infection vulnerable to clearanceAn assay that can measure antigen production and clearance caused by a latency-reversing agent has now been developed for the first time by HIV researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2-D materials clean up their actTwo-dimensional materials such as graphene may only be one or two atoms thick but they are poised to power flexible electronics, revolutionise composites and even clean our water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trigger for weapons of bacterial warfare uncoveredResearchers have been able to switch on and study the mechanism some bacteria use to inject toxins into their rivals.
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Futurity.org
Magnetic nanoparticles can bust biofilms Researchers have found a way to use magnetic nanoparticle clusters to punch through biofilms to reach bacteria that can foul water treatment systems. The nanoclusters then deliver bacteriophages—viruses that infect and propagate in bacteria—to destroy the bacteria, usually resistant to chemical disinfection. Without the pull of a magnetic host, these “phages” disperse in solution, largely fail to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A big hurdle do-good companies faceHave you ever wondered who collects the clothes you stuff into that donation drop box in your neighborhood? Chances are, you assumed it was a nonprofit, but that box actually may instead belong to a for-profit social venture. If you don't know what that means, you're not alone.
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Futurity.org
HIV tests in primary care can save UK money Offering HIV testing to people when they go to a new primary care is cost-effective and will save lives, according to a study of 86,000 people at 40 GP locations in the UK. Researchers at the University of Warwick are calling on health care commissioners to offer screening to all 74 high HIV prevalence local authorities in England. High prevalence areas are those with more than two HIV infections
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The Atlantic
How Motherhood Became an Election Issue in New Zealand A television host’s question on motherhood to the new leader of New Zealand’s opposition Labour Party has prompted a row over gender roles in the country that was the first to give women the right to vote. Jacinda Ardern was elected head of Labour on Tuesday, and at 37 she is the youngest person, and second woman (Helen Clark, the first, was also a prime minister), to lead the party. The headline
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Science : NPR
Why We Are Naively Optimistic About Climate Change Unfortunately, we are failing in the goal to make our children's world better than our own — and those who deny it won't have to see the consequences of their choices, says blogger Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: S. Guisard/ESO)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The true failure of foreign language instructionA recent report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences calls for more attention to language teaching in the U.S. The report notes that U.S. students have much less access to foreign language instruction than students in other economically developed countries, and that Americans are thus much less likely to be bi- or multilingual.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australians want more children than they have, so are we in the midst of a demographic crisis?Australians want more children than they actually have, according to newly released data collected as part of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safely releasing genetically modified genes into the wildSo, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito. Now what? How many mosquitoes would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most effective distribution pattern? How could you stop a premature release of the engineered mosquitoes? Applied mathematicians and physicists used mathematical modeling to guide the design and distribution of genetically modified gene
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New theory of polymer length provides improved estimates of DNA, RNA sizeResearchers have developed various formulas for calculating distance between the ends of a curved polymer. However, these formulas have typically failed to consider the stretchiness of the molecule. In a new study, scientists have derived a formula to determine the end-to-end distance of a semiflexible polymer, including DNA or RNA, while taking into account how much the polymer stretches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Elective freezing of IVF embryos linked to higher pregnancy rates in some casesA delay in transferring embryos to the mother improves the success of in vitro fertilization in certain cases, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Detecting radio waves with entangled atomsResearchers have harnessed the weirdness of quantum entanglement to detect ultra-faint radio signals, explains a new report.
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Gizmodo
This $25 Paper Notebook Works With Your Favorite Web Services, and Can Be Erased In the Microwave If you thought you knew everything there was to know about paper notebooks, you haven’t seen the Rocketbook Wave . The Wave looks and feels just like any 80 page paper notebook, but it has two interesting features that set it apart. First, a series of seven symbols printed at the bottom of every page can be paired in a smartphone app to your favorite web services. Cross out the horseshoe and scan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intuitive, extraverted and spontaneous women are the best choice for leading creative peopleAccording to a new study from the University of Vaasa, Finland, creative people want a transformational leader, especially one who uses motivation and intellectual stimulation. Other dimensions of transformational leadership include taking individuals' needs into account, visioning and modelling.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Goodbye, Vaquita: How Corruption and Poverty Doom Endangered SpeciesWhat the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science-Based Medicine
0.05 or 0.005? P-value Wars ContinueOver the years Major League Baseball has tweaked the dimensions of the field, specifically the distance and height of the pitcher’s mound and the area of the strike zone. They did this in order to adjust the balance between pitchers and hitters, mostly to shift the balance toward hitters to make games more exciting for the fans. Scientists are debating similar tweaks […]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulations suggests Venus may once have had an ocean(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Université Paris-Saclay has found evidence suggesting that the planet Venus may once have had an ocean. In their paper published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, the group describes entering a multitude of data into a computer simulation and running it using different parameters, showing the likelihood that Venus once had a thick cloud cover and a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to toxins in e-cig vapor varies depending on scenarioE-cigarettes are often perceived to be less harmful than their traditional counterparts, but they could still expose the people who 'vape' and those around them to harmful compounds. Researchers now report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that heavy use and secondhand emissions could lead to inhaled levels of toxins that exceed set exposure limits. But under typical use, secondha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lighting the way: Sensors show drug uptakeWhen designing and characterizing new drugs, a key aspect is making sure the drug actually goes where it is intended to. But current tests for drug uptake monitor the process under unrealistic conditions and do not provide information on the amounts of drugs that cross into a cell. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that fluorescent detector proteins can overcome these challenges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detection of fermentation processes in electricity-generating bacteriaA research team consisting of Akihiro Okamoto (Senior Researcher, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, NIMS), Yoshihide Tokunou (Ph.D. student, Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo; also a recipient of the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists (DC1)) and Professor Kazuhito Hashimoto (NIMS President, formerly affili
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lack of internet affordability may worsen Australia's digital divide, says reportWe often think of the internet as a levelling, democratising technology – one that extends access to knowledge, education, cultural resources and markets.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Capitalize on African biodiversity Under-exploited plants offer untold medical and economic promise that should be pursued, urges Ameenah Gurib-Fakim. Nature 548 7 doi: 10.1038/548007a
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The Atlantic
Why Do Women Bully Each Other at Work? The bitches, as Shannon saw it, came in three varieties. She categorized them on her personal blog, in a post titled “Beware the Female BigLaw Partner.” First was the “aggressive bitch”—a certain kind of high-ranking woman at the firm where she worked who didn’t think twice about “verbally assaulting anyone.” When one such partner’s name appeared on caller ID, Shannon told me, “we would just frea
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Ars Technica
The Lucid Air could be Tesla’s most credible rival—as long as it gets funding Lucid Motors Of the electric vehicle startups that are attempting to match Tesla's formula for success, Lucid Motors remains the one to most quietly impress us. Compared to the elegant-but-conventional Tesla Model S and the Homer-like Faraday Future FF91, Lucid's Air is a refreshing take on what a car designer can do starting with a clean sheet of paper and no internal combustion engine powertrai
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Scientific American Content: Global
Robots with Their Heads in the CloudsRather than each carrying its own “brain,” they could share a single, remote one -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Disease Proofing MythHealthy diet and lifestyle choices can reduce your risk of disease, but not to zero. Let's take a more realistic approach to risk reduction -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Solar Eclipse Charted for the Next 1,000 YearsOpportunities abound to watch the sun disappear if you live long and travel -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lighting the way: Sensors show drug uptakeWhen designing and characterizing new drugs, a key aspect is making sure the drug actually goes where it is intended to. But current tests for drug uptake monitor the process under unrealistic conditions and do not provide information on the amounts of drugs that cross into a cell. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that fluorescent detector proteins can overcome these challenges.
2h
Ingeniøren
Danske raketbyggere i dobbeltbooking: Hvem skal skyde først?Raketmadsen og Copenhagen Suborbitals vil begge opsende raketter samme dag, samme sted. Nu taler parterne sammen for første gang i lang tid. Uklart, hvad myndighederne vil gøre.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vet med experts help solve a grizzly dental problemKnute, a grizzly bear at the B.C. Wildlife Park in Kamloops, was not a happy bear. Pain from a damaged and infected canine tooth was keeping him up at night.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deciphering potent DNA toxin's secretsOne of the most potent toxins known acts by welding the two strands of the famous double helix together in a unique fashion which foils the standard repair mechanisms cells use to protect their DNA.
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Gizmodo
Maybe Don't Tell President Trump Any of Your Secrets President Donald Trump with Resting Shart Face™ in the East Room of the White House (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) President Donald Trump hates leaks. Well, he hates leaks about himself. The president is 100 percent fine with giving secrets to Russian officials in the Oval Office or telling the world about “off the record” conversations he has with CEOs. And it’s a great lesson for anyone th
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Futurity.org
There’s hope for snowshoe hares despite climate Snowshoe hares in Pennsylvania—at the southern end of the species’ range—show adaptations in fur color and characteristics, behavior, and metabolism that allow them to survive in less wintry conditions than their far northern relatives can handle. These evolved, organic survival strategies suggest snowshoe hares possess at least a limited ability to adjust to a warming climate, researchers say. U
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team finds reason behind defects in 3-D printingHigh-speed images of a common laser-based metal 3-D printing process, coupled with newly updated computer models, have revealed the mechanisms behind material redistribution, a phenomenon that leads to defects in printed metal parts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers reported.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NYC-based research finds interaction with kids is keyCornell researchers are working with Head Start Centers and day schools in New York City on early-intervention work to promote development of spatial skills and language acquisition in preschoolers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking concrete steps toward lower carbon dioxide emissionsThe hardest thing about concrete just might be the problem of how to make the ubiquitous building material in an environmentally friendly manner. Recent laboratory results at Princeton University indicate that the challenge of making greener concrete may eventually be cracked.
3h
Ars Technica
How America’s two greatest rocket companies battled from the beginning Enlarge / One of the pivotal moments in the rocket wars came in 2014, when the CEO of United Launch Alliance, Mike Gass, squared off against SpaceX's Elon Musk before a Senate committee. (credit: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images) It began as so many tiffs have in 2017—on Twitter. SpaceX had just completed a near-perfect first half of the year. Ten launches. Two re-flights. Zero accidents.
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The Atlantic
How Do Political Parties Oppose Their Own Presidents? The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increasing productivity by one day each monthCorporate wellness programs have been shown to save companies money by reducing absenteeism and health insurance costs. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, UCLA, and Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., have now quantified an additional benefit to companies' bottom line, showing that a wellness program they studied resulted in higher productivity for all participating emp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dingoes reshape the landscapeA comparison of conditions in the outback on either side of Australia's dingo fence has revealed that extermination of predators affects not only the abundance of other animals and plants, but also reduces the quality of the soil. The UNSW study indicates greater control of kangaroo numbers is needed across a third of the Australian continent where dingoes are rare, to reduce damage on ecosystems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vega lofts two satellites on second launch this yearThis morning, Arianespace launched a Vega rocket carrying two Earth observation satellites for Italy, France and Israel encased in Vega's lighter protective fairing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Human genome editing—we should all have a sayShoukhrat Mitalipov, a reproductive biologist at Oregon Health and Science University, is nothing if not a pioneer. In 2007, his team published proof-of-principle research in primates showing it was possible to derive stem cells from cloned primate embryos. In 2013, his team was the first to create human embryonic stem cells by cloning. Now, in 2017, his team is reported to have safely and effecti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers dress virtual avatars with digitally captured clothingResearchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) have developed technology to digitally capture clothing on moving people, turn it into a 3-D digital form, and dress virtual avatars with it. This new technology makes virtual clothing try-on practical.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food fight: Children's temperaments help predict dinnertime strugglesMost toddlers go through bouts of picky eating, but infants with more inhibited personalities are more likely to turn up their nose at new foods, according to researchers.
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Live Science
Fake Solar Eclipse Glasses Are Flooding the Market: How to Stay SafeCounterfeit eclipse glasses are currently flooding the marketplace, according to the nonprofit American Astronomical Society (AAS). Here's how to know that your equipment is safe.
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Live Science
A Trans Soldier in the Ancient Roman Army?An ancient Roman fable imagines a cinaedus, well-known for his brazen effeminacy, fighting heroically. This story raises concerns over gender identity in the military like those seen in current times.
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Live Science
Weird Worm-Lizard Creature Looks Like a Serpentine CentaurA two-legged creature that looks like a hybrid between a worm and a lizard recently made a rare appearance in Baja California.
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Live Science
Seismic Zone Off Alaska Could Trigger Massive Earthquake and TsunamiA so-called seismic zone off the coast of Alaska could trigger deadly tsunamis like the one that caused the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in 2011, a new study finds.
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Live Science
Not a Pretty Picture: Modigliani Exhibit Closes Amid Claims of ForgeriesA Modigliani exhibit in Genoa, Italy was recently rocked by scandal, as 21 of the artworks were suspected of being forgeries.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Creating a High-Speed Internet Lane for Emergency SituationsNet neutrality arguments aside, researchers pursue a faster and more reliable way to send and receive large amounts of data through the internet in times of crisis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Ny top 15-liste: Saxo Bank og Forsvaret overrasker med kæmpe behov for friske folk På månedens liste over de mest kandidatsøgende virksomheder er der nye navne at finde. Find ud af, om dit drømmefirma søger netop dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ny-liste-mest-soegende-virksomheder-saxo-bank-forsvaret-overrasker-9319 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Feed: All Latest
Companion Robots Are Here. Just Don't Fall in Love With ThemIf we don’t learn how to manage relationships with robots that look and act more like humans, we're in for heartbreak.
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Feed: All Latest
Self-Driving Cars Scare Insurance Companies Worried About 'Autonomous Ambiguity'The Association of British Insurers argues that drivers don’t understand the limitations of these semi-autonomous systems.
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Feed: All Latest
Artificial Intelligence at Salesforce: An Inside LookLet others build Skynet. With “Einstein,” the sales software giant will change the world one spreadsheet column at at time.
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Feed: All Latest
What Is Ray Kurzweil Up to at Google? Writing Your EmailsRay Kurzweil popularized the singularity and is now at Google trying to make machines better with language
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Feed: All Latest
Cosplay Won't Solve the Meme Gap Dooming the #ResistanceBy seeing memes as a core metric of a movement’s success, progressives are tripping over their own message.
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Feed: All Latest
What Biotech CEOs (and Their Funders) Learned From the Theranos DebacleBiotech investors are still stunned by the rise and fall of the one-drop blood testing startup. But they're hellbent on making sure they don’t all get burned again.
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Feed: All Latest
A Super-Expensive iPhone Would Be Good News For Us AllThis year's kickass $1,200 phone looks just like next year's kickass $650 phone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird echolocation inspires new engineeringAll animals use a combination of senses to survive. But where the majority typically rely on one or two especially sensitive sensory systems, the oilbird excels by apparently having keen senses all-around.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting radio waves with entangled atomsIn a study published in Physics Review Letters and highlighted by APS Physics, ICFO researchers demonstrate a new technique for the coherent detection of radio frequency magnetic fields using an atomic magnetometer. They used highly sensitive, nondestructive measurements to entangle the atoms while maintaining their collective coherence, and a new technique to allow the coherent buildup of signal
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The Atlantic
The Real Legacy of Crazy Horse It’s not our fault,” Jacob Rosales said. I had asked the recent high-school graduate what he wants people to know about life on the reservation in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. “There’s a liquor store right across from the border,” he continued after a pause, pointing off into the distance. “Right over there.” The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is a striking 3,469-square-mile expanse of sprawling gras
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Gizmodo
US Air Force Launches ICBM in Test From California During Heightened Tensions with North Korea An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launched this morning at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/Released) The US Air Force successfully launched an unarmed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California this morning at 2:10am local time, 5:10am Eastern. The missile test, conducte
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Modern-day Alice trades looking glass for wormhole to explore quantum wonderlandA new paper shows how the possibility of wormholes linking quantum-entangled black holes could be tested in the laboratory.
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Feed: All Latest
The Star Wars Video That Baffled YouTube's Copyright CopsThe Auralnauts removed the iconic John Williams score from the end of the original Star Wars. But the company that owned the missing music still wanted money.
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Feed: All Latest
How Apple Is Putting Voices in Users’ Heads—LiterallyBy enabling the streaming of calls and music straight to cochlear implants, Apple is empowering those with hearing loss—and maybe, one day, everybody.
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Feed: All Latest
Tacking Age Discrimination in Silicon ValleyCompanies can thrive without shunning employees of a certain age. Karen Wickre offers tech firms some advice for tackling age discrimination.
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New Scientist - News
IVF babies tend to be lighter than others but end up heavierThe first IVF baby was born 39 years ago, but we are only now learning about the long-term effects of the technique, which may raise a person’s obesity risk
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Scientific American Content: Global
Was Agatha Christie's Mysterious Amnesia Real or Revenge on Her Cheating Spouse?Ninety years ago, she stayed in a hotel for 11 days under an assumed name, supposedly because she had suffered from a loss of memory. How plausible is her story? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest
Requiem for the iPod ShuffleThe iPod is officially over. Here's why Steve Jobs told me he particularly loved the iPod shuffle—and why we're going to miss it.
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Ingeniøren
Forspilder Elon Musk sit talent?Den sydafrikanske ingeniør bør trække sig fra Tesla og dedikere sine unikke evner og engagement til langt mere krævende projekter, mener ledende ingeniører og pensionerede chefer fra bilindustrien.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the electrodes of lithium-air batteries become passivatedLithium-air batteries produce power from air, and are often called lithium-oxygen batteries. They are much lighter than lithium-ion batteries due to higher energy density. Lithium-air batteries have applications including increasing the driving range of electric cars on a single charge. However, despite their advantages, industrial production of lithium-air batteries is inhibited by fundamental pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spin dynamics of graphene explained through supercomputingIn a previous study, researchers found evidence to suggest that spin-orbit coupling (SOC) was greater in graphene/transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures than in regular graphene. In principle, this phenomenon is a necessary prerequisite for the spin Hall effect (SHE), yet subsequent tests to measure the system's SHE gave inconclusive results. In a paper published this July in NanoLetters
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cheap and simple detection of neurotoxic chemicalsChemical contamination from pesticides is a serious problem. Detection methods can be complicated, difficult to implement and expensive. However, researchers in Japan have discovered a method to reduce the cost and simplify the process for detecting a neurotoxin found in several pesticides called Nereistoxin. It is hoped that the method will bring about improved detection techniques.
4h
The Atlantic
'Nice to See You Out in Southampton' A certain kind of American imagines that Washington, D.C., politicians have the coziest of relationships with Wall Street power brokers and mainstream media elites—that they tend to put the interests of one another before the public interest in part because they enjoy attending posh parties together in exclusive coastal enclaves, perhaps chatting about children with fancy names and passports stam
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk to Europe's most dangerous pathogens revealedThe impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU geoscientists find explanation for puzzling pockets of rock deep in Earth's mantleThe boundary between Earth's core and mantle is home to isolated pockets of rock which scientists have been unable to explain up until now.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Riding the wave: Pioneering research tames nanoquakesResearchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones.
5h
The Atlantic
Your Smartphone Reduces Your Brainpower, Even If It's Just Sitting There I sit down at the table, move my napkin to my lap, and put my phone on the table face-down. I am at a restaurant, I am relaxed, and I am about to start lying to myself. I’m not going to check my phone, I tell myself. (My companion’s phone has appeared face-down on the table, too.) I’m just going to have this right here in case something comes up. Of course, something will not come up. But over th
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The Atlantic
Trump Has Quietly Accomplished More Than It Appears Imagine, if you will, that there is a shadow government . The actual government, the administration of Donald Trump, is coming off the worst week of his presidency , although there haven’t been any smooth weeks. Trump’s top legislative priority, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, seems dead for the moment. (Tax reform? Forget it.) His administration has set a new standard for chaos
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Ingeniøren
Saturns største måne har byggestenene til alternativt livIntens kulde, høj koncentration af nitrogen i atmosfæren og methanoceaner gør det umuligt for jordiske celler at leve på Titan. Til gengæld har planeten selv kemikalier, der kan bruges til at danne de første byggeklodser for at skabe liv.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Riding the wave: Pioneering research tames nanoquakesResearchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geoscientists find explanation for puzzling pockets of rock deep in Earth's mantleA team led by geoscientists from Arizona State University and Michigan State University has used computer modeling to explain how pockets of mushy rock accumulate at the boundary between Earth's core and mantle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Risk to Europe's most dangerous pathogens revealedThe impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.
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The Atlantic
If Everyone Ate Beans Instead of Beef Ecoanxiety is an emerging condition. Named in 2011, the American Psychological Association recently described it as the dread and helplessness that come with “watching the slow and seemingly irrevocable impacts of climate change unfold, and worrying about the future for oneself, children, and later generations.” It’s not a formal diagnosis. Anxiety is traditionally defined by an outsized stress r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German auto bosses, politicians mull diesel emissionsGerman auto bosses, ministers and state governors are considering how to reduce diesel emissions as drivers face the threat of possible bans on driving older diesel cars in some cities.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaysia seizes rare animal parts worth almost $1 mnMalaysia has seized elephant tusks and pangolin scales from Africa worth almost a million dollars, an official said Wednesday, highlighting the country's role as a hub for smuggling rare animal parts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung heir takes stand to deny corruption chargesThe heir to the world's top smartphone maker Samsung took the stand Wednesday in his corruption trial, to be questioned by prosecutors about the scandal that brought down South Korea's last president.
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Ingeniøren
Fremtidens fødevare? Finner producerer protein af tynd luft og grøn energiLuft tilsat mikrober kan danne proteiner, der kan tilsættes både fødevarer og foder og på den måde modvirke hungersnød, mener finske forskere.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Jordan stakes its future on science The country wants to use a focus on research to solve its problems and build diplomatic ties in the Middle East. Nature 548 14 doi: 10.1038/548014a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Iranian scientist to go on trial for espionage Academics call for release of Ahmadreza Djalali, a disaster-medicine researcher who has been held in a Tehran prison for more than a year. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22384
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Science | The Guardian
Lessons for Brexit negotiations from 60 years of Britain and Euratom The miscalculation politicians have always made in negotiating European treaties is that we’ll be welcomed with open arms. Time for a history lesson Until recently, few of us were familiar with the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) , the international organisation that governs many aspects of nuclear energy activity in member states. Brexit, and the rapidly retracted “leak” that Britain
7h
Science | The Guardian
Jump for joy: researchers make huge leap in understanding frog evolution A new analysis using an unprecedented dataset reveals that major changes in frog diversity are linked to mass extinctions Although Kermit the Frog has always struggled with body image , in evolutionary terms, the frog body plan is a rather successful one. With a short, stout body, protruding eyes and strong, flexible limbs with webbed feet, the world can be your swamp. The frog body plan has rema
7h
Science | The Guardian
Why do my nipples hurt? You asked Google – here’s the answer | the panelEvery day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries Continue reading...
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite launched to monitor climate change and vegetationTwo satellites including one dedicated to monitoring the effects of climate change on vegetation were successfully launched into orbit late Tuesday, launch company Arianespace said.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global warming reduces protein in key crops: studyRising carbon dioxide levels from global warming will drastically reduce the amount of protein in staple crops like rice and wheat, leaving vulnerable populations at risk of growth stunting and early death, experts warned on Wednesday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakawayThe largest remaining ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula lost 10% of its area when an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pneumonia or sepsis in adults associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseasePneumonia or sepsis in adults that results in hospital admission is associated with a six-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the first year, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. Cardiovascular risk was more than doubled in years two and three after the infection and persisted for at least five years.
8h
Ingeniøren
Lavprisrobot løber med førstepræmien i Amazons robotkonkurrenceI et felt domineret af friarmsrobotter demonstrerede en australsk traversrobot i Amazon Robotics Challenge, at den kan være en mulig løsning på en af robotindustriens største udfordringer: at plukke vilkårlige emner, der ligger hulter til bulter i en kasse.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Are entrepreneurs born or made? Entrepreneurs are perceived to be creative, impulsive and risk-takers. But do you need a certain personality to succeed? Starting a business and becoming an entrepreneur is a dream that millions of people share. But what type of person do you have to be? Moreover, if you’re an investor, are some people better risks than others? Related: How to be resilient: 'self-awareness is fundamental' Continu
8h
Ingeniøren
DSB's abnorme app-udbud afgjort - efter syv måneder og fem millioner konsulent-kroner Tre selskaber har sikret sig adgang til rammeaftale på 187 millioner kroner. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dsb-enorme-app-udbud-afgjort-efter-syv-maaneders-forsinkelse-fem-millioner-kroner Version2
8h
Science | The Guardian
What happened next to the giant Larsen C iceberg? Scientists have revealed exactly how the trillion-tonne A68 iceberg broke free of the Antarctic ice shelf last month – and say it has spawned smaller icebergs The fate of the giant iceberg that broke free from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf last month has been revealed. Twice the size of Luxembourg, the trillion-tonne iceberg known as A68 was found to have broken off the ice shelf on 12 July aft
9h
Science | The Guardian
Jodrell Bank's heritage celebrated with listed status for telescope and buildings Celebrating 60 years of the Lovell Telescope, Historic England has listed other parts of Jodrell Bank to honour the landmark research conducted at the site It is 60 years since the first great Jodrell Bank telescope was trained on the skies to peer into the secrets of the universe. To flag up the international importance of this landmark in science history, a modest collection of nondescript indu
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Update on the Larsen-C iceberg breakawaySince an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month, scientists have continued to track its progress using satellites. Their observations show the Larsen-C story might not be over yet.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An app for the perfect selfieComputer scientists at the University of Waterloo have developed a smartphone app that helps people learn the art of taking great selfies.Inside the app is an algorithm that directs the user where to position the camera allowing them to take the best shot possible.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of a fatty heart linked to race, type of weight gain in middle-aged womenA woman's race and where on her body she packs on pounds at midlife could give her doctor valuable clues to her likelihood of having greater volumes of heart fat, a potential risk factor for heart disease, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissionsIf CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Obama Alums Pour $1.5 Million Into Progressive Tech StartupsInvestments aim at tools to bolster Democrats in coming elections.
10h
Gizmodo
Booster, an App For Rich People Who Don't Want to Pump Their Own Goddamn Gas, Raises $20 Million Photo: AP Yet another success for our burgeoning class of Silicon Valley overlords and their relentless quest to delegate all menial tasks in life to some sort of app: Booster, a company which dispatches gas trucks to the parking lots of “private communities” so their inhabitants never need to refill their own gas tanks, is now a thing. Booster recently raised $20 million in a Series B funding ro
10h
Science | The Guardian
'Southern' English language course for foreign teachers – archive, 1922 2 August 1922: Foreign pupils will learn to say a good, straightforward “nice” and an honest “time,” and will not attempt the popular “naice” and “taime” If Chaucer could come back to earth and attend the vacation course in English phonetics for foreign teachers of English which commenced at University College to-day he would probably understand less of the explanations than say, the visitors fro
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Biological Teleporter Could Speed Outbreak Response, Seed Life Through GalaxyStarting with just a digital file, scientists manufactured the common flu virus.
10h
Ingeniøren
Tre ting, du skal give slip på for at få succes Succes er vigtig del af livet, men for at nå så langt er det afgørende at give slip på personlige barrierer. Jobfinder leverer tre tendenser, der kan bremse dig i at blive succesfuld. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/tre-ting-du-skal-give-slip-paa-at-faa-succes-9290 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
Ingeniøren
Dyster klimaprognose: 1 procent chance for at holde global opvarmning på 1,5 graderAmerikanske forskere advarer om, at temperaturen risikerer at stige op til 4,9 grader celsius inden år 2100. Et tysk klimastudie er noget mere optimistisk, men forskerne er enige om, at vinduet er ved at lukke.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wisconsin company holds 'chip party' to microchip workersA brief sting is all employees of a Wisconsin technology company said they felt Tuesday when they received a microchip implant in their hand that will allow them to open doors, log onto computers or buy breakroom snacks by simply waving their hand.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diesel at cross-roads as Germany's car bosses, politicians meetBosses of Germany's powerful car industry and top politicians meet Wednesday on the fate of diesel engines, as the sector faces an existential threat after a colossal pollution cheating scandal and new allegations of collusion.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's next big leap might be into augmented realityApple's iPhone may be ready for its next big act—as a springboard into "augmented reality," a technology that projects life-like images into real-world settings viewed through a screen.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple beats profit estimates, boosting sharesApple on Tuesday reported stronger-than-expected results for the past quarter, with higher revenues and profits, delivering a boost to its share price.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Celebrity Twitter accounts display 'bot-like' behavior'Celebrity' Twitter accounts - those with more than 10 million followers - display more bot-like behaviour than users with fewer followers, according to new research.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research reveals ecosystem cascades affecting salmonInterpreting relationships between species and their environments is crucial to inform ecosystem-based management (EBM), a priority for NOAA Fisheries. EBM recognizes the diverse interactions within an ecosystem—including human impacts—so NOAA Fisheries can consider resource tradeoffs that help protect and sustain productive ecosystems and the services they provide.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line danceAfter Dan Levitis and his wife lost two pregnancies, before having their three children, he was drawn to investigate why pregnancy loss is so common, and whether other living beings face the same struggle his family did.
11h
Gizmodo
Federal Researchers Are Worried Scott Pruitt's EPA is Preparing to Destroy an Upcoming Climate Report Photo: AP The researchers behind an upcoming 600-page federal report on the state of climate change science are very, very concerned Scott Pruitt, the new Environmental Protection Agency chief who made his national name attacking the EPA, is posed to destroy it. According to Nature , the scientific report is a precursor to the legally mandated fourth National Climate Assessment in 2018. It is all
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain 'switch' tells body to burn fat after a mealScientists have found a mechanism by which the brain coordinates feeding with energy expenditure, solving a puzzle that has previously eluded researchers and offering a potential novel target for the treatment of obesity.
12h
Ars Technica
Baltimore police commissioner orders cops not to stage body cam footage Enlarge (credit: Baltimore Police Department ) Baltimore Police Department Commissioner Kevin Davis ordered street officers not to "recreate" body cam footage in a Tuesday memo that follows a turbulent two weeks for the agency in which at least two body cam tapes have come to light showing officers staging crime scenes. "In the event your body worn camera is not activated during the recovery of e
12h
Science | The Guardian
France: archaeologists uncover 'little Pompeii' south of Lyon Site unearthed on land awaiting construction of housing complex is labelled an ‘exceptional find’ by culture ministry A “little Pompeii” is how French archaeologists are describing an entire ancient Roman neighbourhood uncovered on the outskirts of the southeastern city of Vienne, featuring remarkably preserved remains of luxury homes and public buildings. “We’re unbelievably lucky. This is undou
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Whole genome sequencing identifies cause of zoonotic epidemicFor the first time, researchers have used whole genome sequencing to identify the cause of a zoonotic infection that sparked a national epidemic. Researchers describe their use of whole genome sequencing to determine the cause of a respiratory disease that ripped through a population of native horses in Iceland several years ago.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to treat nerve damage caused by insecticides and chemical weaponsNew research has uncovered a potential new therapy for the currently untreatable delayed neuropathy caused by acute exposure to insecticides or chemical weapons that attack the nervous system. The study identifies a new biological mechanism responsible for the neuropathy, as well as the drugs to treat it.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Celebrity Twitter accounts display 'bot-like' behavior'Celebrity' Twitter accounts -- those with more than 10 million followers -- display more bot-like behavior than users with fewer followers, according to new research.
12h
Gizmodo
Star Wars: Episode IX's New Writer Is Harry Potter and the Cursed Child's Jack Thorne Jack Thorne accepts the 2017 Olivier Award for Best New Play for ‘Harry Potter And The Cursed Child.’ Image: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images British writer Jack Thorne has been hired to retool the script for Star Wars: Episode IX , working from a draft penned by the film’s director, Colin Trevorrow, and his writing partner Derek Connolly. Rian Johnson (The Last Jedi) wrote the initial treatment. Since w
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
US space pioneers' hair-raising test flights"We didn’t understand all of the physics that were going to occur during these tests."
12h
Big Think
Eat Your Kale and Spinach. Lutein May Keep You Sharp. Kale contains lutein, a nutrient that may protect the brain against the cognitive effects of aging, according to a new University of Illinois study. Read More
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Mediterranean Diet Works--For Upper CrustItalians who stuck closely to the heart-healthy diet had fewer heart attacks and strokes—but only if they were well-off and/or college educated. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Tim Cook Says Apple Had to Comply With Chinese Censors, and They'd Do It in the US Too Photo: AP Last week, consumer tech giant Apple removed all major VPN apps from the Chinese branch of its Apps Store, seemingly putting yet another barrier in place for millions of Chinese citizens who might desire to defy their government’s pervasive internet censorship system. On Tuesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook explained why Apple chose to comply with the wishes of Chinese censors. It’s pretty simpl
14h
The Atlantic
A Scout Is Trustworthy—but Is the President? In President Trump’s remarkable speech to the Boy Scout’s quadrennial Jamboree, he began to recite the Scout Law, making it through just the first two principles in the list: “As the Scout Law says: ‘A Scout is trustworthy, loyal.’” Remarkably, he seems to have gotten both virtues backward in the process. Last week, I observed that he was offering an inverted definition of loyalty : When Trump pa
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Speed hump cuts 'daft', safety groups sayThe risk of accidents from speeding outweighs the air pollution risk, ministers told.
14h
Feed: All Latest
Full Audio of Jared Kushner's Congressional Intern AddressFrom Trump rallies to Syria strikes, here's what Jared Kushner said to a crowd of congressional interns.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Characteristics of metabolically unhealthy lean peopleCompared to people who are of normal weight and metabolically healthy, subjects who are of normal weight but metabolically unhealthy have a three-fold higher risk of mortality and/or cardiovascular events. Scientists have now addressed characteristics determining metabolic health in lean, overweight and obese people, showed that a reduced accumulation of fat in the lower body puts lean people at r
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enzyme that protects cells from toxic fat identifiedA new study sheds light on how a key fat-producing enzyme helps protect cells from a toxic form of fat.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magic helps unmask how the brain worksScientists have used the 'mirror box' illusion -- an old magic trick - in a number of neuroscience studies. Researchers are using a new version of the illusion to study how the brain processes multiple sensory inputs to perceive our bodies and the world around us.
14h
Gizmodo
Orbitkey Is the Cure For the Common Key Ring My hope is that keys will someday be a relic of the past, but until that day comes, Orbitkey does a great job of keeping them organized and quiet in your pocket. Orbitkey consists of a strap of rubber , canvas , or leather wrapped around your keys, which are held in place with a sturdy metal screw system. When you need access to a key, you can pop it out Swiss Army Knife-style, but otherwise they
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid prescribing and practices in Ohio emergency departmentsResearchers report that the majority of Ohio's emergency department (ED) administrators and physicians are in support of the most recent state guidelines for prescribing opioids, but challenges still exist in implementation.
15h
Gizmodo
Taika Waititi Approached Thor: Ragnarok As a Standalone Movie, Not a Sequel Image: Kevin Winter/Getty At the recent San Diego Comic-Con, we caught up with Taika Waititi, the dapper director of Thor: Ragnarok , to ask him a few questions about the highly-anticipated Marvel sequel—though he soon admitted that one of the first things he did was toss aside the idea that he was making a sequel at all. It makes sense, really— Ragnarok is the third movie in the Thor series, and
15h
Big Think
Digital Natives Do Not Exist, Claims New Paper A paper argues that the younger generation is no better at technology and multitasking than older people. Read More
15h
Big Think
Will We Ever Be Able to Map the Human Personality? There are four main traits of temperament and two subsets of each. Which are you? Read More
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Celebrity Twitter accounts display 'bot-like' behavior'Celebrity' Twitter accounts -- those with more than 10 million followers -- display more bot-like behavior than users with fewer followers, according to new research.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Antibiotic stewardship teams' must be planned and paid for to halt dangerous infectionsThere is an urgent need to plan and fund teams of specialist health workers to promote appropriate use of antibiotics, according to an expert commentary in Clinical Microbiology and Infection.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line danceIn new research published this week (Aug. 1, 2017) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Levitis and his collaborators report that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring. And not just for humans. Creatures from geckos to garlic and cactuses to cockroaches pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby fish exercising, a surprising source of adaptive variation in fish jawsA frustration of evolutionary biologists, says Craig Albertson at UMass Amherst, is that genetics can account for only a small percent of variation in physical traits. He reports new results on how another factor, a behavior in early cichlid fish larvae's developmental environment, influences later variation in their craniofacial bones.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Not just starsThe shortlisted images in this year's Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year have now been selected.
15h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: On the Wray In What We’re Following Comey’s Replacement: The Senate confirmed Christopher Wray as director of the FBI in a 92-5 vote. Replacing James Comey, Wray will oversee the bureau’s involvement in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russian election interference. President Trump was accused of obstruction of justice for firing Comey, and he continues to be criticized for meddling with the in
15h
Ars Technica
Windows adding eye control to boost accessibility Microsoft's Eye Control promo We've written about eye-tracking hardware from Tobii a couple of times over the years. The company builds PC peripherals that can follow the gaze of your eyes and determine where on screen you're looking. Until now, much of Tobii's end-user products have tended to focus on gamers. They've used the eye tracking to either track how a game is being played (for example,
15h
NYT > Science
A Freezing Swim to Call Attention to Warming WatersLewis Pugh, a British endurance swimmer, swam 22 minutes in the freezing Arctic Ocean to call attention to climate change’s effect on the world’s oceans.
16h
NYT > Science
Blistering Heat Wave Threatens Seattle, Where Only a Third Have Air-ConditioningHeat will engulf the Pacific Northwest this week, sending temperatures as high as 104 in Seattle and 107 in Portland, Ore.
16h
NYT > Science
Homeland Security to Bypass Environmental Laws in Border Wall WorkThe department said it would invoke waivers to environmental laws when it begins construction of border wall prototypes near San Diego.
16h
Ars Technica
After three years, iPad sales are up again for Apple Enlarge / The 10.5-inch iPad Pro. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple released its third-quarter financials today, reporting higher than expected numbers almost all-around. The company's total revenue reached $45.4 billion, up seven percent year over year. Apple shares increased five percent to hit above $157 after hours—the company's record intraday high was $156.56. While iPhone sales have increa
16h
Big Think
Bill to Legalize Marijuana at the Federal Level Introduced at US Senate New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has introduced the Marijuana Justice Act, a federal bill that would nationally legalize marijuana. Read More
16h
The Atlantic
Lindsey Graham Reveals the Dark Calculus of Striking North Korea On a sunny morning show on Tuesday, Lindsey Graham made an exceedingly dark calculation. North Korea’s second test of an intercontinental ballistic missile meant that Kim Jong Un is nearly capable of placing a nuclear warhead on a long-range missile and hitting the United States with it, the Republican senator noted on the Today show. And America can’t allow such a “madman” to get to that point,
16h
Gizmodo
Adequate Man Which Athlete Would You Gift A Championship? Adequate Man Which Athlete Would You Gift A Championship? | The Slot Cory Booker Just Introduced a Bill to Make Marijuana Legal Across the Nation | The Grapevine Amazon Is Also Making a Civil War Alt-History Series, but It’s for Us, by Us | Splinter ICE Is Just Arresting Everyone Now |
16h
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No, Facebook’s Chatbots Will Not Take Over the WorldBots programmed to swap balls, hats and books fell into a hype vortex.
16h
The Atlantic
The Senate Overwhelmingly Confirms Christopher Wray as FBI Director President Trump’s sudden ouster of FBI Director James Comey in May set off a legal and political conflagration that eventually led to the appointment of a special counsel. The confirmation process for Christopher Wray, Trump’s chosen replacement for Comey, could not have been less controversial by comparison. The Senate voted to confirm Wray, a former federal prosecutor, in a 92-5 vote on Tuesday
16h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Will This Prospector's Last-Ditch Effort Result In Enough Gold To Make His Trip Worthwhile? Devil's Canyon | Tuesdays at 10/9c The end of digging season in the Canyon is quickly approaching. John needs to find enough gold to make it worth a return trip - or his whole journey will be for nothing. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/devils-canyon More: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/devils-canyon/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscover
16h
Popular Science
Belkin WeMo Mini Smart Plug Review: Automate your dumb appliances Gadgets This is one of the simplest ways to get your non-connected gadgets into your smart home setup. This smart switch plugs into a standard outlet and teaches your old appliances some new smart home tricks.
16h
Science | The Guardian
'Switch' in brain of obese people stays on all the time, researchers say Study focuses on mechanism that controls ability to coordinate feeding with burning energy and fasting with storing it Obese people aren’t able to regulate the way body fat is stored or burned because a “switch” in their brain stays on all the time, a new study by Australian researchers has shown. Specialised fat cells called adipocytes are switched back and forth from brown cells, which are ener
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Gizmodo
This 10-Hour Video of Planet Earth Cityscapes Is Strangely Hypnotic GIF In what is now the sixth installment of a stunning and weirdly addictive series, the BBC has released 10 full hours of video shot during the filming of the Planet Earth II “Cities” episode. The beauty of this video, aside from the sheer volume of it all, is that it’s delivered without any commentary and the action (if you can call it that) is kept to a bare minimum. We’ve got nothing against
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Feed: All Latest
Men Will Lose the Most Jobs to Robots, and That's OKAutomation is so much more than an economic issue. It's an identity, and—critically—a gender problem.
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cognitive science
More colorful Vegetables and Fruits can Protect you from Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Neal Barnard submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Health benefits of the Mediterranean diet are confirmed, but just for the upper classThe Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease but only if you are rich or highly educated. This is the surprising finding by researchers who performed a study on over 18,000 subjects.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Curiouser and CuriouserAstrophysicist and author Mario Livio ventures deep into the human mind in his new book WHY? What Makes Us Curious. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Will Trump Get His Wray? Today in 5 Lines White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said President Trump “weighed in” on his son Donald Trump Jr.’s statement about his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer, after it was reported that Trump “personally dictated” the statement. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell confirmed that Senate Republicans intend to pass tax reform through reconciliation. The head of the Drug Enfo
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Gizmodo
Nintendo's Solution To Switch Battery Issues: Let It Drain, Then Recharge It Six Times The Switch’s battery indicator has been faulty for some since launch. Some users’ battery will appear to drop to 1% rapidly, even though the battery itself works just fine . With the Switch’s most recent update Nintendo has offered a fix, but it’s a little tedious. The Switch’s battery indicator bug looks really scary, but it’s more annoying than anything else. The fix is equally annoying. In the
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer patients turning up in emergency departments with delirium likely to die earlierAccording to a new study published in The Oncologist, patients with advanced cancer who are diagnosed with delirium when turning up in emergency departments are more likely to be admitted to hospital and more likely to die earlier than patients without delirium.
17h
Ars Technica
Pot removed from controlled substance list under proposed legislation Enlarge (credit: Anne Frye ) A Democratic senator from New Jersey proposed legislation (PDF) Tuesday that would remove marijuana from the federal list of controlled substances. The proposal, if adopted, would also financially punish states that fail to decriminalize marijuana if they have racial disparities in their arrest and incarceration rates connected to marijuana. Booker (credit: Facebook )
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New on MIT Technology Review
Wait, Bitcoin Just Did What?The digital currency has split into two. What that means will depend on what the miners do.
17h
Ars Technica
Governor angrily tweets about local TV station flying drone over his house Enlarge / Matt Bevin is the governor of Kentucky. (credit: Gage Skidmore ) Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has publicly accused a local television executive of "personally" flying a drone over his stately private home in a Louisville suburb on Tuesday morning. Gov. Bevin made this accusation after seemingly accusing other local media of "flying directly over and around my home, filming my children."
17h
New Scientist - News
Eating a lower calorie diet improves learning ability in wormsCalorie-restricted diets have already been linked to longer lifespans in flies, mice and monkeys. Now a study has found that eating less can boost learning
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic fatigue syndrome: Biomarkers linked to severity identifiedInvestigators used high-throughput analysis to link inflammation to chronic fatigue syndrome, a difficult-to-diagnose disease with no known cure.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effects of cognitive behavior therapy on parents of children with autismResearchers have discovered that parents who participate in cognitive therapy with their children with autism also experience improvements in their own depression, emotion regulation.
17h
Ars Technica
Microsoft offers new ways to buy Surfaces, cheapo VR headsets, and more Enlarge / Surface Laptop (credit: Justin Wolfson) With a bunch of financing and availability changes today, some Windows hardware is now easier to buy, and some Windows hardware is now better. Way back in October last year, Microsoft announced that a range of cheap virtual reality headsets would be released for Windows PCs . These headsets would have two standout features. First, they would start
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC study examines opioid prescribing and practices in Ohio emergency departmentsA survey led by a team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center reports that the majority of Ohio's emergency department (ED) administrators and physicians are in support of the most recent state guidelines for prescribing opioids, but challenges still exist in implementation.
17h
The Atlantic
Tillerson Acknowledges 'Differences' With Trump on Iran Deal U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson acknowledged Tuesday he and President Trump “have differences” on the nuclear deal with Iran, but said the Islamic republic was violating the spirit of the agreement with its activities, adding the U.S. was working with its allies to ensure Iran’s compliance with the deal. Tillerson, at a news conference at the State Department, described his relationship wit
17h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Australian students report high rates of sexual harassment and assaults One in five say they were harassed on a university campus, according to first national study. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22397
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate scientists create Caribbean drought atlasAtmospheric scientists have developed the first-of-its-kind, high-resolution Caribbean drought atlas, with data going back to 1950. Concurrently, the researchers confirmed the region’s 2013-16 drought was the most severe in 66 years due to consistently higher temperatures – a hint that climate change is to blame.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ecosystem cascades affecting salmonNew research reveals that shifts in ocean conditions in the Gulf of the Farallones leads to changes in bird predation, affecting the number of California salmon that return as adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noise helps cells make decisionsRandom differences between cells early in development could be the key to making different cells in the body, according to new research. Different cell types -- brain, blood, skin, gut etc. -- all have unique and vital roles, yet they all start out the same. Cells become different as a result of a long sequence of biochemical choices made before we're born. For us to be healthy, these choices need
18h
Ars Technica
USAF to buy unclaimed Russian 747s for Air Force One replacement Enlarge / The current Air Force One fleet has been in service for 26 years. Now the Air Force is looking to replace them with 747-8s that a Russian airline didn't finish paying for. (credit: US Air Force ) Before his inauguration, President Donald Trump raged about how the US Air Force's program to replace its two aging VC-25A aircraft—the heavily modified 747-200 aircraft known as Air Force One
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnetized viruses attack harmful bacteriaAntibacterial phages combined with magnetic nanoparticle clusters effectively kill infectious bacteria found in water treatment systems. A weak magnetic field draws the clusters into biofilms that protect the bacteria and break them up so the phages can reach them.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA continues to study pulsars, 50 years after their chance discoveryThese rotating 'lighthouse' neutron stars begin their lives as stars between about seven and 20 times the mass of our sun. Some are found to spin hundreds of times per second, faster than the blades of a household blender, and they possess enormously strong magnetic fields.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New imaging tracer allows early assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm riskResearchers have developed a way in which medical imaging with SPECT/CT could potentially be used to assess a patient's rupture risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Delaying surgical treatment can be life-threatening, and this new type of imaging could allow physicians to diagnose disease and better plan its management.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effectsScientists have discovered that chemical weathering, a process in which carbon dioxide breaks down rocks and then gets trapped in sediment, can happen at a much faster rate than scientists previously assumed and could potentially counteract some of the current and future climate change caused by humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
History of gum disease increases cancer risk in older womenPostmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a new study of more than 65,000 women.
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Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: July 2017 This was an interesting month on Eyewire! Having launched our Mystic class and begun devoting some attention to zebrafish cells, we still completed 41 of our good old mouse retina cells. Also, we might have set a new record for longest marathon, at 45.5 hours; if you felt discouraged about speed, don’t be! It was actually very interesting to see how much time a player-controlled cell of that size
18h
Gizmodo
Glittery iPhone Cases Recalled After Dozens Burned by Mystery Liquid Image: US Consumer Product Safety Commission / Gizmodo All that glitters is recalled. MixBin Electronics just recalled thousands of iPhone cases that contained liquid and glitter because they were burning users. A US Consumer Product Safety Commission report noted that there have been 24 reports around the world, including 19 in the U.S., of skin irritation or chemical burns. Advertisement “One c
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Ars Technica
Electric vehicle hopeful has been reneging on factories it hasn’t yet built [Updated] Enlarge / Faraday’s FF91 design is somewhat derivative, echoing the Jaguar F-Pace and evoking a latter-day Saab SUV, had the company not died before designing its own proper one. (credit: Jim Resnick ) In early 2016, electric vehicle company Faraday Future celebrated a deal with the state of Nevada—in exchange for building a $1 billion factory that would eventually employ up to 4,500 people, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New NOAA Fisheries research reveals ecosystem cascades affecting salmonNew research reveals that shifts in ocean conditions in the Gulf of the Farallones leads to changes in bird predation, affecting the number of California salmon that return as adults.
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Gizmodo
High-Tech Jewelry Looks Like Mechanical Insects Creepy Crawling All Over Your Boobs Picture this: You encounter a stylish woman, note her chunky, futuristic jewelry, look away, and look back, and notice that what you thought was a necklace is actually three beetle-like machines creeping around her décolletage. Obviously, you need some of this Blade Runner shit in your life immediately. The Verge reports that last year, researchers at MIT and Stanford debuted little wearable robo
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Gizmodo
Build Your Own Home Theater Audio System With These Massive JBL Discounts JBL Gold Box Sound bars are all the rage right now, but if you want to build a home theater system piecemeal, like in the olden days, Amazon’s running a great deal today on JBL Arena audio gear . Today only, you can get a JBL Arena S10 subwoofer for $140, and/or a pair of bookshelf speakers for $100 . I know Amazon MSRP prices are frequently misleading, but in this case, you can take them to the
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Ars Technica
How a hacked Amazon Echo could secretly capture your most intimate moments Enlarge (credit: Mark Barnes ) It's a fact of modern life that many of us forget—the phones, computers, and other connected devices we depend on can often be used against us as secret listening devices. On Tuesday, attention turned to the Amazon Echo, with a demonstration that showed how hackers can convert some models into devices that can surreptitiously record our most intimate moments. To be
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team uses phage-enhanced nanoparticles to kill bacteria that foul water treatment systemsMagnetic nanoparticle clusters have the power to punch through biofilms to reach bacteria that can foul water treatment systems, according to scientists at Rice University and the University of Science and Technology of China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA continues to study pulsars, 50 years after their chance discoveryA little bit of "scruff" in scientific data 50 years ago led to the discovery of pulsars—rapidly spinning dense stellar corpses that appear to pulse at Earth.
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Feed: All Latest
A Hack Can Turn an Amazon Echo Into a WiretapAn Echo in every hotel room? Maybe think twice about that plan.
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Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: Muzzle Phone Before It Eats You AliveBan all smartphone notifications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aug. 2017: Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National LaboratoryCooking up biofuel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big data points humanity to new minerals, new deposits (Update)Applying big data analysis to mineralogy offers a way to predict minerals missing from those known to science, where to find them, and where to find new deposits of valuable minerals such as gold and copper, according to a groundbreaking study.
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Gizmodo
Thanks to a Bankrupt Russian Airline, Trump May Get the Air Force One Deal He Wanted Photo: Getty Donald Trump loves a good deal. And the United States Air Force just found one for the president, sitting in a Mojave Desert boneyard: two brand new Boeing 747-8's, the very same planes that the military plans to convert into the next Air Force One aircraft. These two have an interesting origin story, too. The two 747-8’s were originally ordered by Transaero, a Russian airline that w
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Inside Science
How Math Can Help Geologists Discover New Minerals How Math Can Help Geologists Discover New Minerals Geological data holds hidden patterns that can reveal new minerals and undiscovered Earth events. Abellaite_topimage.jpg Abellaite, a mineral that Hazen's team predicted in a paper published last year, was recently discovered in a mine in northeastern Spain. Image credits: J. Soldevilla Earth Tuesday, August 1, 2017 - 15:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Wri
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Virgo detector joins LIGO in the search for gravitational wavesThe Virgo detector near Pisa, Italy, has begun searching for subtle ripples in the fabric of spacetime.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aye group discovers avenue for precision cancer treatmentOne of the goals of personalized medicine is to be able to determine which treatment would work best by sequencing a patient's genome. New research from the lab of Yimon Aye, assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology, could help make that approach a reality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA continues to study pulsars, 50 years after their chance discoveryThese rotating 'lighthouse' neutron stars begin their lives as stars between about seven and 20 times the mass of our sun. Some are found to spin hundreds of times per second, faster than the blades of a household blender, and they possess enormously strong magnetic fields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big data points humanity to new minerals, new depositsResearchers have found a way to predict minerals missing from those known to science, where to find them, and where to look for new deposits of valuable minerals such as gold and copper. In American Mineralogist, Deep Carbon Observatory researchers at the Carnegie Institution for Science report the first application to mineralogy of network theory, best known for analyzing e.g. the spread of disea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Technique enables printable and rewritable color imagesA chemical process that allows color images to be printed on specially coated paper and then erased so that different images can be printed on the same paper has been developed.
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Big Think
Earth Could Be the Only Place with Liquid Water After All Just because a distant body has ice doesn’t mean it’ll ever have liquid water. Read More
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Ars Technica
Review: Why I can’t stop killing a cute, puzzle-solving dog named Fidel Enlarge / That says “Ars Approved” for a reason. (credit: Ludomancy ) I was already in love with the new video game Fidel: Dungeon Rescue before I realized I had missed one of its most important buttons. What greater compliment can you pay a video game? Fidel is so good that I was hooked even when I didn't entirely understand it. One month into my time with the game, I'm still not an expert. Fide
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Gizmodo
The Real Geology Behind the Doom of Valyria and How It Literally Tore Game of Thrones' World Apart Image: HBO There are certain mysterious phenomena in the world of Game of Thrones— like the reappearance of dragons, White Walkers, and the Children of the Forest—that the people of Westeros can neither quite explain nor agree upon if they’re real. Others, though, like the Doom of Valyria, are widely accepted as historical fact. Every man, woman, and child within Game of Thrones ’ larger world kn
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The Scientist RSS
Scientists Destroy Entire Chromosome with CRISPRMultiple DNA breaks at either the centromere or the long arm of the mouse Y chromosome cause it to fragment and disappear.
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The Scientist RSS
Do Preprints Require More Rigorous Screening?Two manuscripts published without methods point to the importance of community policing on preprint archives.
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Live Science
Eclipse Overload: What If the Sun Were Blocked for Years?Total solar eclipses don't last very long — and that's a good thing.
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The Atlantic
A World Without Suicide Steve Mallen thinks the signs first started to show when his son stopped playing the piano. Edward, then 18, was a gifted musician and had long since passed his Grade 8 exams, a series of advanced piano tests. Playing had been a passion for most of his life. But as adulthood beckoned, the boy had never been busier. He had won a place to study geography at the University of Cambridge and was revie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetized viruses attack harmful bacteriaAntibacterial phages combined with magnetic nanoparticle clusters effectively kill infectious bacteria found in water treatment systems. A weak magnetic field draws the clusters into biofilms that protect the bacteria and break them up so the phages can reach them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New imaging tracer allows early assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm riskYale University researchers have developed a way in which medical imaging with SPECT/CT could potentially be used to assess a patient's rupture risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Delaying surgical treatment can be life-threatening, and this new type of imaging could allow physicians to diagnose disease and better plan its management. The study is presented in the featured article of the August is
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Futurity.org
Test sooner to catch this ‘head rush’ disorder Testing for a form of low blood pressure that causes dizziness or fainting should occur within a minute after a person stands up from a lying position, not after three minutes as now recommended, a study suggests. “Our findings suggest that a blood pressure assessment within the first minute is a better way to assess health risks due to orthostatic hypotension and that waiting three minutes might
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Futurity.org
Method erases color printing and reuses the paper Researchers have created a chemical process that allows them to print color images on specially coated paper, erase those images, and then print new images on the same paper. The technique makes use of structural colors, which have different properties than the ink dyes used for standard printing. “This could be really useful when you want to reconfigure, recolor, and reshape messages on signs or
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Gizmodo
Personal Info of 650,000 Voters Discovered on Poll Machine Sold on Ebay When 650 thousand Tennesseans voted in the Memphis area, they probably didn’t expect their personal information would eventually be picked apart at a hacker conference at Caesars Palace Las Vegas. The strength of the US voting system, according to former FBI director James Comey, is that it’s “clunky”—every state and often every district can choose its own setup and whether to use paper or electr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external featuresAs many as a half of all short-nosed dogs such as pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs experience breathing difficulties related to their facial structure. However, research suggests that there is no way to accurately predict from visible features whether an apparently healthy pug or French bulldog will go on to develop breathing difficulties.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifelike 3-D cinematic imaging promises numerous medical usesNewly developed 'cinematic rendering' technology can produce photorealistic 3-D images from traditional CT and MRI data, with potential applications in medical education, communication with patients and physicians, and early disease detection, according to an article published in the August 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magic helps unmask how the brain worksScientists have used the 'mirror box' illusion -- an old magic trick - in a number of neuroscience studies. Researchers at the University of Delaware are using a new version of the illusion to study how the brain processes multiple sensory inputs to perceive our bodies and the world around us.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Aug. 2017New method turns used cooking oil into biofuel with carbon derived from recycled tires; novel technique protects innermost fusion reactor wall from energy created when hydrogen isotopes reach sun-like temps; new catalyst production process doubles output of high-value renewable BTX used in plastics and tires; crystalline thin film vanadium dioxide makes outstanding electrode for lithium-ion batter
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dietary restriction can improve learning in wormsDietary restriction -- the reduction of a specific nutrient or total dietary intake without triggering malnutrition -- increases longevity and improves learning, but are these processes regulated separately? A new study indicates that the answer is 'yes.'
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Gizmodo
Woman Gets Plastic Surgery to Escape $3.7 Million Debt—and the Story Only Gets Worse From There Photo: Getty China has a debt problem. More specifically, Chinese citizens are suddenly drowning in debt after the country opened the door to personal lending in 2014. Now people are borrowing money so recklessly that at least one woman literally rearranged her face in order to avoid paying back her $3.7 million debt. It almost worked, too. Police recently arrested a 59-year-old woman named Zhu N
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spanish court backs extradition of Russian programmer to USSpain's National Court has recommended the extradition to the United States of a Russian computer programmer accused by U.S. prosecutors of developing malicious software that stole information from financial institutions and caused losses of $855,000.
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Gizmodo
Congress Wants to Force ‘Smart’ Device Makers to Secure Their Shit Photo: AP The swarm of internet-connected security cameras, kitchen appliances, wearables, and other gadgets that make up the Internet of Things are notoriously insecure. Two US senators want to fix that—at least for tech acquired by the federal government—and are introducing bipartisan legislation intended to force manufacturers to include basic security features in their products. The bill, cal
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The Atlantic
The Bachelorette and the Empty Redemptions of Reality TV This post reveals minor plot points for The Bachelorette Season 13. Here is one of the tweets that Lee Garrett, a recent contestant on The Bachelorette , posted to the internet before he was cast as a potential husband for Rachel Lindsay, the first black Bachelorette in the show’s long history : “What’s the difference between the NAACP and the KKK? One has a sense of shame to cover their racist-a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's 2017 resource 'budget' spent by August 2: reportHumanity will have used up its allowance of planetary resources such as water, soil, and clean air for all of 2017 by Wednesday, a report said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gold replica of US space module pinched from Ohio museumA gold replica of a lunar landing module gifted to US astronaut Neil Armstrong by French jewlers has been pilfered from an Ohio museum, with security footage offering little help to police.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panda at French zoo expecting... twins!French zoo officials were doubly delighted on Tuesday on learning that their pregnant panda is expecting not one but two cubs at the weekend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deadly fungus affecting hibernating bats could spread during summerThe cold-loving fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans, or Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome , a disease that has killed millions of North American bats during hibernation, could also spread in summer months. Bats and humans visiting contaminated caves and mines can inadvertently contribute to the spread of the fungus, according to a recently published study by the U.S. Geological Survey .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique enables printable and rewritable color imagesA chemical process that allows color images to be printed on specially coated paper and then erased so that different images can be printed on the same paper has been developed by researchers at Rice, Yonsei and Korea universities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA catches formation of Tropical Depression 13WThe thirteenth tropical cyclone of the northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season has formed and NASA's Terra satellite obtained a visible-light image of the storm revealing that it's already battling wind shear.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tracks Tropical Depression Emily across Florida into AtlanticJust after Tropical Storm Emily made landfall in west central Florida, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. As Emily was weakening and tracking east across the Sunshine State, NASA used data from NOAA's GOES-East satellite to create an animation that showed Emily's progression toward the Atlantic Ocean.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA catches formation of Tropical Depression 13WThe thirteenth tropical cyclone of the northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season has formed and NASA's Terra satellite obtained a visible-light image of the storm revealing that it's already battling wind shear.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Technique enables printable and rewritable color imagesA chemical process that allows color images to be printed on specially coated paper and then erased so that different images can be printed on the same paper has been developed by researchers at Rice, Yonsei and Korea universities.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deadly fungus affecting hibernating bats could spread during summerThe cold-loving fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans, or Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of North American bats during hibernation, could also spread in summer months. Bats and humans visiting contaminated caves and mines can inadvertently contribute to the spread of the fungus, according to a recently published study by the US Geological Survey.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external featuresAs many as a half of all short-nosed dogs such as pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs experience breathing difficulties related to their facial structure. However, research published today by the University of Cambridge suggests that there is no way to accurately predict from visible features whether an apparently healthy pug or French bulldog will go on to develop breathing difficulties.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary restriction can improve learning in wormsDietary restriction -- the reduction of a specific nutrient or total dietary intake without triggering malnutrition -- increases longevity and improves learning, but are these processes regulated separately? A new study publishing on Aug. 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Mihir Vohra, Kaveh Ashrafi and colleagues at the University of California at San Francisco, indicates that the answe
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight gain between pregnancies linked to increased risk of gestational diabetesThe risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases with increased weight gain between pregnancies, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Linn Sorbye of the University of Bergen, Norway, and colleagues.
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Popular Science
Seven gorgeous national parks where you can watch the August eclipse Science Chase the sun somewhere fun. If you've yet to make your 2017 eclipse plans, consider venturing to one of the splendid national parks on the path of totality.
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Science | The Guardian
Ejaculation statistics are hard to pull off | LettersSuzanne Moore states that the average man ‘produces 14 gallons of ejaculate in a lifetime’. That can’t be right, argues Andrew Barnard In her article ( Making babies is beginning to look as difficult for men as it always has for women , 27 July), Suzanne Moore states that the average man “produces 14 gallons of ejaculate in a lifetime”. One doesn’t have to be Einstein to work out that 14 gallons o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Size matters, and so do temperature and habitat, to scavengers and the carcasses they eatSize matters in the carrion world, and so do habitat and temperature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SwRI's small satellite mission moves forwardNASA has selected Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to further develop the concept for a small satellite mission to image the Sun's outer corona. SwRI's "Polarimeter to Unify the Corona and Heliosphere" (PUNCH) program was selected for a mission concept study through NASA's Heliophysics Small Explorers Program (SMEX).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effectsThere could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
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Gizmodo
20 Cool Command Line Tricks for Windows and macOS Image: Gizmodo The command line (or Terminal for you Mac fans) is a throwback to a simpler age of computing, before mouse pointers and application windows and desktop wallpaper . Back when it was just you and a window full of text. Operating systems have long since evolved beyond the humble command line interface, but there’s still no better tool for quickly disseminating complex information in y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studying an elusive South African primateAt a remote South African field site, CU Boulder Professor Michelle Sauther and CU alumnus Frank Cuozzo are leading research on two of the world's least studied non-human primates: the iconic, big-eyed African bushbabies, also known as galagos.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pennsylvania snowshoe hares differ from those in YukonSnowshoe hares in Pennsylvania—at the southern end of the species' range—show adaptations in fur color and characteristics, behavior and metabolism, to enable them to survive in less wintry conditions than their far northern relatives, according to a team of researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore how to effectively release and control engineered speciesSo, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito, now what? How many mosquitos would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most effective distribution pattern? How could you stop a premature release of the engineered mosquitos?
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fears Rise for U.S. Climate Report as Trump Officials Take ReinsOfficials at the EPA are consulting global-warming sceptics as they weigh up a technical review -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vorinostat renders dormant HIV infection vulnerable to clearanceFor the first time researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed an assay that can measure antigen production and clearance caused by a latency-reversing agent.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dietary restriction can improve learning in wormsDietary restriction - the reduction of a specific nutrient or total dietary intake without triggering malnutrition—increases longevity and improves learning, but are these processes regulated separately? A new study publishing on August 1 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Mihir Vohra, Kaveh Ashrafi and colleagues at the University of California at San Francisco, indicates that the answer
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external featuresAs many as a half of all short-nosed dogs such as pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs experience breathing difficulties related to their facial structure. However, research published today by the University of Cambridge suggests that there is no way to accurately predict from visible features whether an apparently healthy pug or French bulldog will go on to develop breathing difficulties.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees tiny Tropical Depression Irwin winding downInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression Irwin found a very small area of cold clouds and no strong storms. Irwin appeared as a swirl of clouds as it continued to wind down.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Typhoon Noru gives NASA's Terra satellite the eyeNASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Noru in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a close look at the eye of the storm.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What's Making This NOLA Street Racer Break Down And Cry? | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c Kye and Scott take safety into consideration as they ask one of the fastest cars to pull out. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follo
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
University says prominent Japanese cell biologist committed misconduct University of Tokyo investigated anonymous allegations of manipulated images in papers by Yoshinori Watanabe. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22394
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Quantum Physics Is About to Revolutionize BiochemistryChemists have largely ignored quantum mechanics. But it now turns out that this strange physics has a huge effect on biochemical reactions.
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Popular Science
What's really going on with sea level rise Environment Even the best data can be presented in misleading ways. There's a rumor going around that NASA's data somehow shows that sea level rise isn't happening. Here's a look at how easy it is to mislead by cherry picking data.
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Gizmodo
Save 30% On Your Choice Of Six Different Soylent Flavors, And Skip the Mediocre Meals Soylent , clip coupon for 30% off Grabbing breakfast or lunch with coworkers can be a great way to break up the day, but more often than not you’ll just wallow in your own indecision before ordering a bad $17 sandwich. Break the cycle with Soylent , a nutritionally complete meal replacement shake that now comes in six flavors ( Coffiest is good!). Clip the coupon to save 30% off the 12-pack of yo
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Quanta Magazine
Shrinking Bat DNA and Elastic Genomes Take an onion. Slice it very thin. Thinner than paper thin: single-cell thin. Then dip a slice in a succession of chemical baths cooked up to stain DNA. The dyed strands should appear in radiant magenta — ­the fingerprints of life’s instructions as vivid as rose petals on a marital bed. Now you can count how much DNA there is in each cell. It’s simply a matter of volume and density. A computer ca
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Statistical reanalysis of natural products reveals increasing chemical diversity [Physical Sciences]In their retrospective analysis of natural product (NP) discovery since the 1940s, Pye et al. (1) observe a gradual decline in the proportion of NPs discovered each year with low similarity to previously known compounds [defined by maximum Tanimoto coefficient (Tc) < 0.4]. Additionally, the authors report that the median...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Skinnider and Magarvey: Rates of novel natural product discovery remain high [Physical Sciences]It is encouraging that our recent article examining trends in discovery rates and structural diversity for natural products (NP) (1) is generating discussion in this fascinating area (2). However, we wish to correct several misconceptions presented in the comments from Skinnider and Magarvey (3). Skinnider and Magarvey’s (3) letter incorrectly...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Overfishing causes frequent fish population collapses but rare extinctions [Biological Sciences]Burgess et al.’s report in PNAS, “Range contraction enables harvesting to extinction” (1), provides a highly valuable perspective on the consequences of species range contractions that maintain local densities of declining populations. The authors suggest that this density-dependent contraction maintains local harvesting yields and economic incentives that enable depleted natural...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Le Pape et al.: Management is key to preventing marine extinctions [Biological Sciences]Our report (1) examines factors that maintain the profitability of harvesting a population as it declines. Without management, this can incentivize harvesting to extinction (2). Le Pape et al. (3) note that humans have not yet caused many marine extinctions, and argue that harvesting fish populations to complete extinction should...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evaluating optimal therapy robustness by virtual expansion of a sample population, with a case study in cancer immunotherapy [Applied Mathematics]Cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease, exhibiting spatial and temporal variations that pose challenges for designing robust therapies. Here, we propose the VEPART (Virtual Expansion of Populations for Analyzing Robustness of Therapies) technique as a platform that integrates experimental data, mathematical modeling, and statistical analyses for identifying robust optimal treatment...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Local destabilization, rigid body, and fuzzy docking facilitate the phosphorylation of the transcription factor Ets-1 by the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK2 [Biochemistry]Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase substrates are believed to require consensus docking motifs (D-site, F-site) to engage and facilitate efficient site-specific phosphorylation at specific serine/threonine-proline sequences by their cognate kinases. In contrast to other MAP kinase substrates, the transcription factor Ets-1 has no canonical docking motifs, yet it is efficiently phosphorylated..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of a vesicular ATP release inhibitor for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain [Biochemistry]Despite the high incidence of neuropathic and inflammatory pain worldwide, effective drugs with few side effects are currently unavailable for the treatment of chronic pain. Recently, researchers have proposed that inhibitors of purinergic chemical transmission, which plays a key role in the pathological pain response, may allow for targeted treatment...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of directional pulling on mechanical protein degradation by ATP-dependent proteolytic machines [Biochemistry]AAA+ proteases and remodeling machines couple hydrolysis of ATP to mechanical unfolding and translocation of proteins following recognition of sequence tags called degrons. Here, we use single-molecule optical trapping to determine the mechanochemistry of two AAA+ proteases, Escherichia coli ClpXP and ClpAP, as they unfold and translocate substrates containing multiple...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Symmetry-related proton transfer pathways in respiratory complex I [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Complex I functions as the initial electron acceptor in aerobic respiratory chains of most organisms. This gigantic redox-driven enzyme employs the energy from quinone reduction to pump protons across its complete approximately 200-Å membrane domain, thermodynamically driving synthesis of ATP. Despite recently resolved structures from several species, the molecular mechanism...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sequential eviction of crowded nucleoprotein complexes by the exonuclease RecBCD molecular motor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In physiological settings, all nucleic acids motor proteins must travel along substrates that are crowded with other proteins. However, the physical basis for how motor proteins behave in these highly crowded environments remains unknown. Here, we use real-time single-molecule imaging to determine how the ATP-dependent translocase RecBCD travels along DNA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intrinsically disordered chromatin protein NUPR1 binds to the C-terminal region of Polycomb RING1B [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, and they are often associated with diseases in humans. The protein NUPR1 is a multifunctional IDP involved in chromatin remodeling and in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer; however, the details of such functions are unknown. Polycomb proteins are involved in...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Decoupling of size and shape fluctuations in heteropolymeric sequences reconciles discrepancies in SAXS vs. FRET measurements [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Unfolded states of proteins and native states of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) populate heterogeneous conformational ensembles in solution. The average sizes of these heterogeneous systems, quantified by the radius of gyration (RG), can be measured by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Another parameter, the mean dye-to-dye distance (RE) for proteins with...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conserved gene regulatory module specifies lateral neural borders across bilaterians [Developmental Biology]The lateral neural plate border (NPB), the neural part of the vertebrate neural border, is composed of central nervous system (CNS) progenitors and peripheral nervous system (PNS) progenitors. In invertebrates, PNS progenitors are also juxtaposed to the lateral boundary of the CNS. Whether there are conserved molecular mechanisms determining vertebrate...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insights into the red algae and eukaryotic evolution from the genome of Porphyra umbilicalis (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta) [Evolution]Porphyra umbilicalis (laver) belongs to an ancient group of red algae (Bangiophyceae), is harvested for human food, and thrives in the harsh conditions of the upper intertidal zone. Here we present the 87.7-Mbp haploid Porphyra genome (65.8% G + C content, 13,125 gene loci) and elucidate traits that inform our...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Autophagy-related protein Vps34 controls the homeostasis and function of antigen cross-presenting CD8{alpha}+ dendritic cells [Immunology and Inflammation]The class III PI3K Vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) plays a role in both canonical and noncanonical autophagy, key processes that control the presentation of antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) to naive T lymphocytes. We generated DC-specific Vps34-deficient mice to assess the contribution of Vps34 to DC functions. We found...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visualizing context-dependent calcium signaling in encephalitogenic T cells in vivo by two-photon microscopy [Immunology and Inflammation]In experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), autoimmune T cells are activated in the periphery before they home to the CNS. On their way, the T cells pass through a series of different cellular milieus where they receive signals that instruct them to invade their target tissues. These signals involve interaction with...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inhibition of complement C5 protects against organ failure and reduces mortality in a baboon model of Escherichia coli sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]Bacterial sepsis triggers robust activation of the complement system with subsequent generation of anaphylatoxins (C3a, C5a) and the terminal complement complex (TCC) that together contribute to organ failure and death. Here we tested the effect of RA101295, a 2-kDa macrocyclic peptide inhibitor of C5 cleavage, using in vitro whole-blood assays...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A distinct subpopulation of CD25- T-follicular regulatory cells localizes in the germinal centers [Immunology and Inflammation]T-follicular helper (Tfh) cells differentiate through a multistep process, culminating in germinal center (GC) localized GC-Tfh cells that provide support to GC-B cells. T-follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells have critical roles in the control of Tfh cells and GC formation. Although Tfh-cell differentiation is inhibited by IL-2, regulatory T (Treg) cell...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intracellular zinc activates KCNQ channels by reducing their dependence on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [Neuroscience]M-type (Kv7, KCNQ) potassium channels are proteins that control the excitability of neurons and muscle cells. Many physiological and pathological mechanisms of excitation operate via the suppression of M channel activity or expression. Conversely, pharmacological augmentation of M channel activity is a recognized strategy for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inhibition of the integrated stress response reverses cognitive deficits after traumatic brain injury [Neuroscience]Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of long-term neurological disability, yet the mechanisms underlying the chronic cognitive deficits associated with TBI remain unknown. Consequently, there are no effective treatments for patients suffering from the long-lasting symptoms of TBI. Here, we show that TBI persistently activates the integrated stress...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prostaglandin dehydrogenase is a target for successful induction of cervical ripening [Physiology]The cervix represents a formidable structural barrier for successful induction of labor. Approximately 10% of pregnancies undergo induction of cervical ripening and labor with prostaglandin (PG) E2 or PGE analogs, often requiring many hours of hospitalization and monitoring. On the other hand, preterm cervical ripening in the second trimester predicts...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Functional selectivity for face processing in the temporal voice area of early deaf individuals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Brain systems supporting face and voice processing both contribute to the extraction of important information for social interaction (e.g., person identity). How does the brain reorganize when one of these channels is absent? Here, we explore this question by combining behavioral and multimodal neuroimaging measures (magneto-encephalography and functional imaging) in...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Diverse continuum of CD4+ T-cell states is determined by hierarchical additive integration of cytokine signals [Systems Biology]During cell differentiation, progenitor cells integrate signals from their environment that guide their development into specialized phenotypes. The ways by which cells respond to complex signal combinations remain difficult to analyze and model. To gain additional insight into signal integration, we systematically mapped the response of CD4+ T cells to...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cellular trade-offs and optimal resource allocation during cyanobacterial diurnal growth [Systems Biology]Cyanobacteria are an integral part of Earth’s biogeochemical cycles and a promising resource for the synthesis of renewable bioproducts from atmospheric CO2. Growth and metabolism of cyanobacteria are inherently tied to the diurnal rhythm of light availability. As yet, however, insight into the stoichiometric and energetic constraints of cyanobacterial diurnal...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamic responses of the adrenal steroidogenic regulatory network [Systems Biology]The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis is a dynamic system regulating glucocorticoid hormone synthesis in the adrenal glands. Many key factors within the adrenal steroidogenic pathway have been identified and studied, but little is known about how these factors function collectively as a dynamic network of interacting components. To investigate this, we developed...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antibody-based assay discriminates Zika virus infection from other flaviviruses [Microbiology]Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that emerged recently as a global health threat, causing a pandemic in the Americas. ZIKV infection mostly causes mild disease, but is linked to devastating congenital birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. The high level of cross-reactivity among flaviviruses and their cocirculation...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Altered metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 markers in PTSD: In vivo and postmortem evidence [Neuroscience]Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent and highly disabling disorder, but there is currently no targeted pharmacological treatment for it. Dysfunction of the glutamate system has been implicated in trauma and stress psychopathology, resulting in a growing interest in modulation of the glutamate system for the treatment of PTSD....
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sigma-1 receptors control immune-driven peripheral opioid analgesia during inflammation in mice [Pharmacology]Sigma-1 antagonism potentiates the antinociceptive effects of opioid drugs, so sigma-1 receptors constitute a biological brake to opioid drug-induced analgesia. The pathophysiological role of this process is unknown. We aimed to investigate whether sigma-1 antagonism reduces inflammatory pain through the disinhibition of the endogenous opioidergic system in mice. The selective...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metabolic profiles of exercise in patients with McArdle disease or mitochondrial myopathy [Physiology]McArdle disease and mitochondrial myopathy impair muscle oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) by distinct mechanisms: the former by restricting oxidative substrate availability caused by blocked glycogen breakdown, the latter because of intrinsic respiratory chain defects. We applied metabolic profiling to systematically interrogate these disorders at rest, when muscle symptoms are typically minimal
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maternal photoperiod programs hypothalamic thyroid status via the fetal pituitary gland [Physiology]In wild mammals, offspring development must anticipate forthcoming metabolic demands and opportunities. Within species, different developmental strategies may be used, dependent on when in the year conception takes place. This phenotypic flexibility is initiated before birth and is linked to the pattern of day length (photoperiod) exposure experienced by the...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nucleoredoxin guards against oxidative stress by protecting antioxidant enzymes [Plant Biology]Cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with a wide range of developmental and stress responses. Although cells have evolved to use ROS as signaling molecules, their chemically reactive nature also poses a threat. Antioxidant systems are required to detoxify ROS and prevent cellular damage, but little is...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Body ownership determines the attenuation of self-generated tactile sensations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Self-perception depends on the brain’s abilities to differentiate our body from the environment and to distinguish between the sensations generated as a consequence of voluntary movement and those arising from events in the external world. The first process refers to the sense of ownership of our body and relies on...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Support for redistribution is shaped by compassion, envy, and self-interest, but not a taste for fairness [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Why do people support economic redistribution? Hypotheses include inequity aversion, a moral sense that inequality is intrinsically unfair, and cultural explanations such as exposure to and assimilation of culturally transmitted ideologies. However, humans have been interacting with worse-off and better-off individuals over evolutionary time, and our motivational systems may have...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Wu et al., Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics [Corrections]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY Correction for “Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics,” by Hao Wu, Fabian Paul, Christoph Wehmeyer, and Frank Noé, which was first published May 25, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1525092113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:E3221–E3230). The authors note that the following statement should be added to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]How orangutans survive in fragmented habitats Bornean orangutan. Since 2016, Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), which inhabit the increasingly fragmented forests of the Sabah region of the Malaysian Borneo, have been listed as critically endangered in the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. Using high-resolution LiDAR and GPS-enabled visual...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Liqun Luo [QnAs]To make us who we are, each of around 86 billion neurons has to find and connect with thousands of other neurons, forming the dense and complex network of the human brain. How is the precision of neuronal wiring achieved? Liqun Luo, a neurobiologist at Stanford University, investigates this question....
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Christine Petit [Profiles]Over the last 20 years, geneticist and neurobiologist Christine Petit has written the canticle of the cochlea from scratch, revealing the long-shrouded machinery of the auditory system molecule by molecule. Along the way, she has identified more than 20 genes responsible for hearing impairments, with each of these cochlear deficits...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Whether the hearing brain hears it or the deaf brain sees it, it’s ȷust the same [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]“Now that he’d remembered what he meant to tell her, he seemed to lose interest. She didn’t have to see his face to know this. It was in the air. It was in the pause that trailed from his remark of eight, ten, twelve seconds ago” (1). Lauren Hartke, Don...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Designing toughness and strength for soft materials [Chemistry]Soft materials, such as hydrogels, elastomers, and plastics, are pervasive in nature and society. For example, except for teeth, nails, and bones, all other components of the human body are hydrogels, and we eat, wear, and use soft materials as foods, clothes, shoes, and car tires, just to name a...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Which way to low-density liquid water? [Commentary]When rapidly cooled, a liquid undergoes dynamic arrest, forming an amorphous solid commonly called glass. Amorphous solids can also be created by different routes, for example by destabilizing the crystal structure at low temperature by applying pressure or intense radiation, or by depositing gas molecules on very cold substrates. Even...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
On the promotion of human flourishing [Social Sciences]Many empirical studies throughout the social and biomedical sciences focus only on very narrow outcomes such as income, or a single specific disease state, or a measure of positive affect. Human well-being or flourishing, however, consists in a much broader range of states and outcomes, certainly including mental and physical...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Accurate age estimation in small-scale societies [Anthropology]Precise estimation of age is essential in evolutionary anthropology, especially to infer population age structures and understand the evolution of human life history diversity. However, in small-scale societies, such as hunter-gatherer populations, time is often not referred to in calendar years, and accurate age estimation remains a challenge. We address...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
X-ray crystal structure of a reiterative transcription complex reveals an atypical RNA extension pathway [Biochemistry]Reiterative transcription is a noncanonical form of RNA synthesis in which a nucleotide specified by a single base in the DNA template is repetitively added to the nascent transcript. Here we determined the crystal structure of an RNA polymerase, the bacterial enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, engaged in reiterative transcription during...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nitric oxide is an obligate bacterial nitrification intermediate produced by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase [Biochemistry]Ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) emit substantial amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which contribute to the harmful environmental side effects of large-scale agriculture. The currently accepted model for AOB metabolism involves NH3 oxidation to nitrite (NO2–) via a single obligate intermediate, hydroxylamine (NH2OH). Within this...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into the extracellular recognition of the human serotonin 2B receptor by an antibody [Biochemistry]Monoclonal antibodies provide an attractive alternative to small-molecule therapies for a wide range of diseases. Given the importance of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as pharmaceutical targets, there has been an immense interest in developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that act on GPCRs. Here we present the 3.0-Å resolution structure of a...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Methylcytosine dioxygenase TET3 interacts with thyroid hormone nuclear receptors and stabilizes their association to chromatin [Biochemistry]Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Here we identified the ten-eleven translocation protein 3 (TET3) as a TR interacting protein increasing cell sensitivity to T3. The interaction between TET3 and TRs is independent of TET3 catalytic activity and...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular mechanism of environmental d-xylose perception by a XylFII-LytS complex in bacteria [Biochemistry]d-xylose, the main building block of plant biomass, is a pentose sugar that can be used by bacteria as a carbon source for bio-based fuel and chemical production through fermentation. In bacteria, the first step for d-xylose metabolism is signal perception at the membrane. We previously identified a three-component system...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Potent competitive inhibition of human ribonucleotide reductase by a nonnucleoside small molecule [Biochemistry]Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRR) is crucial for DNA replication and maintenance of a balanced dNTP pool, and is an established cancer target. Nucleoside analogs such as gemcitabine diphosphate and clofarabine nucleotides target the large subunit (hRRM1) of hRR. These drugs have a poor therapeutic index due to toxicity caused by...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Activation and synchronization of the oscillatory morphodynamics in multicellular monolayer [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Oscillatory morphodynamics provides necessary mechanical cues for many multicellular processes. Owing to their collective nature, these processes require robustly coordinated dynamics of individual cells, which are often separated too distantly to communicate with each other through biomaterial transportation. Although it is known that the mechanical balance generally plays a significant...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The case for defined protein folding pathways [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We consider the differences between the many-pathway protein folding model derived from theoretical energy landscape considerations and the defined-pathway model derived from experiment. A basic tenet of the energy landscape model is that proteins fold through many heterogeneous pathways by way of amino acid-level dynamics biased toward selecting native-like interactions....
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Subunit conformational variation within individual GroEL oligomers resolved by Cryo-EM [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is an emerging tool for resolving structures of conformationally heterogeneous particles; however, each structure is derived from an average of many particles with presumed identical conformations. We used a 3.5-Å cryo-EM reconstruction with imposed D7 symmetry to further analyze structural heterogeneity among chemically identical subunits in...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Combining experimental and simulation data of molecular processes via augmented Markov models [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Accurate mechanistic description of structural changes in biomolecules is an increasingly important topic in structural and chemical biology. Markov models have emerged as a powerful way to approximate the molecular kinetics of large biomolecules while keeping full structural resolution in a divide-and-conquer fashion. However, the accuracy of these models is...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
VAMP3 and SNAP23 mediate the disturbed flow-induced endothelial microRNA secretion and smooth muscle hyperplasia [Cell Biology]Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) at arterial branches and curvatures experience disturbed blood flow and induce a quiescent-to-activated phenotypic transition of the adjacent smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a subsequent smooth muscle hyperplasia. However, the mechanism underlying the flow pattern-specific initiation of EC-to-SMC signaling remains elusive. Our previous study demonstrated that...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MitoNEET-dependent formation of intermitochondrial junctions [Cell Biology]MitoNEET (mNEET) is a dimeric mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated in many facets of human pathophysiology, notably diabetes and cancer, but its molecular function remains poorly characterized. In this study, we generated and analyzed mNEET KO cells and found that in these cells the mitochondrial network was disturbed. Analysis of...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cytosolic interaction of type III human CD38 with CIB1 modulates cellular cyclic ADP-ribose levels [Cell Biology]CD38 catalyzes the synthesis of the Ca2+ messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). It is generally considered to be a type II protein with the catalytic domain facing outside. How it can catalyze the synthesis of intracellular cADPR that targets the endoplasmic Ca2+ stores has not been resolved. We have proposed that...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bioinspired supramolecular fibers drawn from a multiphase self-assembled hydrogel [Chemistry]Inspired by biological systems, we report a supramolecular polymer–colloidal hydrogel (SPCH) composed of 98 wt % water that can be readily drawn into uniform (∼6-μm thick) “supramolecular fibers” at room temperature. Functionalized polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, a semicrystalline hydroxyethyl cellulose derivative, and cucurbit[8]uril undergo aqueous self-assembly at multiple length scales t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
De novo peptide sequencing by deep learning [Computer Sciences]De novo peptide sequencing from tandem MS data is the key technology in proteomics for the characterization of proteins, especially for new sequences, such as mAbs. In this study, we propose a deep neural network model, DeepNovo, for de novo peptide sequencing. DeepNovo architecture combines recent advances in convolutional neural...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Distinct requirements for energy metabolism in mouse primordial germ cells and their reprogramming to embryonic germ cells [Developmental Biology]Primordial germ cells (PGCs), undifferentiated embryonic germ cells, are the only cells that have the ability to become gametes and to reacquire totipotency upon fertilization. It is generally understood that the development of PGCs proceeds through the expression of germ cell-specific transcription factors and characteristic epigenomic changes. However, little is...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Broadly expressed repressors integrate patterning across orthogonal axes in embryos [Developmental Biology]The role of spatially localized repressors in supporting embryonic patterning is well appreciated, but, alternatively, the role ubiquitously expressed repressors play in this process is not well understood. We investigated the function of two broadly expressed repressors, Runt (Run) and Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)], in patterning the Drosophila embryo. Previous...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reassessing the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons leads to tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, with profound implications for air quality, human health, and climate. Toluene is the most abundant aromatic compound under urban environments, but its detailed chemical oxidation mechanism remains uncertain. From combined laboratory experiments and quantum chemical...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Catalysis and chemical mechanisms of calcite dissolution in seawater [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Near-equilibrium calcite dissolution in seawater contributes significantly to the regulation of atmospheric CO2 on 1,000-y timescales. Despite many studies on far-from-equilibrium dissolution, little is known about the detailed mechanisms responsible for calcite dissolution in seawater. In this paper, we dissolve 13C-labeled calcites in natural seawater. We show that the time-evolving...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thermodynamic constraint on the depth of the global tropospheric circulation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The troposphere is the region of the atmosphere characterized by low static stability, vigorous diabatic mixing, and widespread condensational heating in clouds. Previous research has argued that in the tropics, the upper bound on tropospheric mixing and clouds is constrained by the rapid decrease with height of the saturation water...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamic fluid connectivity during steady-state multiphase flow in a sandstone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The current conceptual picture of steady-state multiphase Darcy flow in porous media is that the fluid phases organize into separate flow pathways with stable interfaces. Here we demonstrate a previously unobserved type of steady-state flow behavior, which we term “dynamic connectivity,” using fast pore-scale X-ray imaging. We image the flow...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Canopy structure drives orangutan habitat selection in disturbed Bornean forests [Ecology]The conservation of charismatic and functionally important large species is becoming increasingly difficult. Anthropogenic pressures continue to squeeze available habitat and force animals into degraded and disturbed areas. Ensuring the long-term survival of these species requires a well-developed understanding of how animals use these new landscapes to inform conservation and...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nuclear genomes distinguish cryptic species suggested by their DNA barcodes and ecology [Ecology]DNA sequencing brings another dimension to exploration of biodiversity, and large-scale mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I barcoding has exposed many potential new cryptic species. Here, we add complete nuclear genome sequencing to DNA barcoding, ecological distribution, natural history, and subtleties of adult color pattern and size to show that a...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cryptic oxygen cycling in anoxic marine zones [Environmental Sciences]Oxygen availability drives changes in microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling between the aerobic surface layer and the anaerobic core in nitrite-rich anoxic marine zones (AMZs), which constitute huge oxygen-depleted regions in the tropical oceans. The current paradigm is that primary production and nitrification within the oxic surface layer fuel anaerobic...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Polymorphism at a mimicry supergene maintained by opposing frequency-dependent selection pressures [Evolution]Explaining the maintenance of adaptive diversity within populations is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology, with important implications for conservation, medicine, and agriculture. Adaptation often leads to the fixation of beneficial alleles, and therefore it erodes local diversity so that understanding the coexistence of multiple adaptive phenotypes requires deciphering the...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hitchhiking and epistasis give rise to cohort dynamics in adapting populations [Evolution]Beneficial mutations are the driving force of adaptive evolution. In asexual populations, the identification of beneficial alleles is confounded by the presence of genetically linked hitchhiker mutations. Parallel evolution experiments enable the recognition of common targets of selection; yet these targets are inherently enriched for genes of large target size...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Toll ligand Spatzle3 controls melanization in the stripe pattern formation in caterpillars [Genetics]A stripe pattern is an aposematic or camouflage coloration often observed among various caterpillars. However, how this ecologically important pattern is formed is largely unknown. The silkworm dominant mutant Zebra (Ze) has a black stripe in the anterior margin of each dorsal segment. Here, fine linkage mapping of 3,135 larvae...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Severe viral respiratory infections in children with IFIH1 loss-of-function mutations [Genetics]Viral respiratory infections are usually mild and self-limiting; still they exceptionally result in life-threatening infections in previously healthy children. To investigate a potential genetic cause, we recruited 120 previously healthy children requiring support in intensive care because of a severe illness caused by a respiratory virus. Using exome and transcriptome...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural determination of lipid antigens captured at the CD1d-T-cell receptor interface [Immunology and Inflammation]Glycolipid antigens recognized by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) drive the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, a specialized subset of innate T lymphocytes. Glycolipids with α-linked anomeric carbohydrates have been identified as potent microbial lipid antigens for iNKT cells, and their unusual α-anomeric linkage has been thought to...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
BRCT-domain protein BRIT1 influences class switch recombination [Immunology and Inflammation]DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) serve as obligatory intermediates for Ig heavy chain (Igh) class switch recombination (CSR). The mechanisms by which DSBs are resolved to promote long-range DNA end-joining while suppressing genomic instability inherently associated with DSBs are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we use a targeted short-hairpin RNA...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sialylation on O-glycans protects platelets from clearance by liver Kupffer cells [Medical Sciences]Most platelet membrane proteins are modified by mucin-type core 1-derived glycans (O-glycans). However, the biological importance of O-glycans in platelet clearance is unclear. Here, we generated mice with a hematopoietic cell-specific loss of O-glycans (HC C1galt1−/−). These mice lack O-glycans on platelets and exhibit reduced peripheral platelet numbers. Platelets from...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Internalized CD44s splice isoform attenuates EGFR degradation by targeting Rab7A [Medical Sciences]CD44 has been postulated as a cell surface coreceptor for augmenting receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. However, how exactly CD44 triggers RTK-dependent signaling remained largely unclear. Here we report an unexpected mechanism by which the CD44s splice isoform is internalized into endosomes to attenuate EGFR degradation. We identify a CD44s-interacting...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bacterial infection imaging with [18F]fluoropropyl-trimethoprim [Medical Sciences]There is often overlap in the diagnostic features of common pathologic processes such as infection, sterile inflammation, and cancer both clinically and using conventional imaging techniques. Here, we report the development of a positron emission tomography probe for live bacterial infection based on the small-molecule antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP). [18F]fluoropropyl-trimethoprim, or...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Virus found in a boreal lake links ssDNA and dsDNA viruses [Microbiology]Viruses have impacted the biosphere in numerous ways since the dawn of life. However, the evolution, genetic, structural, and taxonomic diversity of viruses remain poorly understood, in part because sparse sampling of the virosphere has concentrated mostly on exploring the abundance and diversity of dsDNA viruses. Furthermore, viral genomes are...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Diffusive dynamics during the high-to-low density transition in amorphous ice [Physics]Water exists in high- and low-density amorphous ice forms (HDA and LDA), which could correspond to the glassy states of high- (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL) in the metastable part of the phase diagram. However, the nature of both the glass transition and the high-to-low-density transition are debated and new...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Finding the plot in science storytelling in hopes of enhancing science communication [Political Sciences]Like the proverbial tree falling in a forest with no one around to hear it, science discoveries cannot have an impact unless people learn about them. The act of communication is part and parcel of doing research. And in an era increasingly defined by open access, crowdfunding, and citizen science...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Infants possess an abstract expectation of ingroup support [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]One pervasive facet of human interactions is the tendency to favor ingroups over outgroups. Remarkably, this tendency has been observed even when individuals are assigned to minimal groups based on arbitrary markers. Why is mere categorization into a minimal group sufficient to elicit some degree of ingroup favoritism? We consider...
20h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global analysis of depletion and recovery of seabed biota after bottom trawling disturbance [Sustainability Science]Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity affecting seabed habitats. Here, we collate all available data for experimental and comparative studies of trawling impacts on whole communities of seabed macroinvertebrates on sedimentary habitats and develop widely applicable methods to estimate depletion and recovery rates of biota after trawling. Depletion...
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Ars Technica
Republicans try to take cheap phones and broadband away from poor people (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) Nineteen Republican lawmakers are trying to eliminate subsidies that help poor people purchase cell phone service and broadband. The legislation filed on Friday targets Lifeline, which is a Universal Service Fund program paid for by surcharges on phone bills. If the bill passes, low-income Americans would no longer be able to use $9.25 monthly subsidies toward
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For white middle class, moderate drinking is linked to cognitive health in old ageOlder adults who consume alcohol moderately on a regular basis are more likely to live to the age of 85 without dementia or other cognitive impairments than non-drinkers, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart underwear proven to prevent back stress with just a tapUnlike other back-saving devices, this one is mechanized and was tested with motion capture, force plates and electromyography.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Revealed: The First Flower, 140-million Years Old, Looked Like a MagnoliaScientists have reconstructed the ancient plant and figured out how it reproduced -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
We Are Suing for Roger Ailes' FBI File Photo: Getty This morning, Gizmodo filed a lawsuit against the FBI seeking access to any files it holds on Roger Ailes, the one-time chief executive of Fox News. Gizmodo sought access to the records under the Freedom of Information Act on May 18, the day Ailes was found dead in his Palm Beach home due to a traumatic brain injury aggravated by his hemophilia. As one the most influential and contro
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The Atlantic
The Best Business Reads of July Each month, the editors of The Atlantic’ s Business Channel share the most interesting pieces of journalism about money and economics from around the web. This month’s picks include an investigation of Google’s influence on academic research; the ongoing tension between working Americans and those without jobs; extreme commutes; and a look at Texas as a proxy for America’s future in everything fr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effectsA team of Florida State University scientists has discovered that chemical weathering, a process in which carbon dioxide breaks down rocks and then gets trapped in sediment, can happen at a much faster rate than scientists previously assumed and could potentially counteract some of the current and future climate change caused by humans.
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Gizmodo
Signs of Alzheimer’s Detected in Brains of Chimps For First Time Image: AP Humans are the only animals known to develop Alzheimer’s disease, an age-related brain disorder that causes impaired cognitive functioning and other behavioral problems. Or at least, that’s what we thought. For the first time ever, researchers are claiming to have found signs of the disease in the brains of elderly chimps—a discovery that could yield new insights into the dreaded disord
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Size matters, and so do temperature and habitat, to scavengers and the carcasses they eatSize matters in the carrion world, and so do habitat and temperature. New research has shed fresh light on the largely understudied area of vertebrate scavenging ecology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Citizen science volunteers driven by desire to learnPeople who give up their time for online volunteering are mainly motivated by a desire to learn, a new study has found. The research surveyed volunteers on 'citizen science' projects and suggests that this type of volunteering could be used to increase general knowledge of science within society.
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Futurity.org
Gum health linked to cancer risk for older women A new study suggests that postmenopausal women with a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer. The study is the first to find an association between periodontal disease and gallbladder cancer risk in women or men. “There is increasing evidence that periodontal disease may be linked to an increased cancer risk…” “This study is the first national study focused on women, particularl
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New on MIT Technology Review
Under Near-Constant Assault, Ukraine Is Desperately Trying to Bolster Its Cyber DefensesA target of infrastructure hacks, the nation’s government has a long way to go if it’s to protect itself in the future.
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New Scientist - News
Voyage to study Earth’s mostly submerged hidden continent beginsThe research ship JOIDES Resolution is on its way to take samples from Zealandia, a continent that lies mostly below the waves
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New Scientist - News
Fast radio bursts may be dark matter ‘stars’ hitting black holesThe mysterious FRBs we’ve been tracking for a decade could be created by clumps of dark matter particles dancing along the edges of black holes
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Live Science
Self-Destructing Materials Could Create Vanishing InkA new method for creating self-destructing molecules could be used for drug delivery, erasable ink or other applications.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart underwear proven to prevent back stress with just a tapUnlike other back-saving devices, this one is mechanized and was tested with motion capture, force plates and electromyography.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building bridges within the cell, using lightEach cell in the body is made up of a number of tiny sealed membranous subunits called organelles, and they send things like lipids back and forth to allow the cell to function. A process called membrane tethering is responsible for bridging the gap between organelles, and now, researchers have discovered a way to manipulate this tethering.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High tsunami danger in Alaska, perhaps elsewhereScientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign. They say the feature closely resembles one that produced the 2011 Tohoku tsunami off Japan, killing some 20,000 people and melting down three nuclear reactors. Such structures may lurk unrecognized in other areas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resistance training may slow down the progression of multiple sclerosisIn the past, multiple sclerosis patients were advised not to exercise for fear of exacerbating the illness. However, it is now known that physical training can relieve many of the symptoms, including the excessive fatigue and mobility impairments that are often seen. New research now shows that resistance training may protect the nervous system and thus slow the progression of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study allays concerns over aspirin's safety for heart failure patientsA new study allays concerns among cardiologists that aspirin could increase the risk of hospitalization and death related to heart failure for patients with heart failure who take one of the first-line therapies: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For infants with skull flattening, earlier helmet therapy gives better resultsFor infants with skull flattening related to sleep position, starting helmet therapy at a younger age, especially before 24 weeks, increases the treatment success rate, suggests a study.
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Popular Science
Bookshelf speakers 50 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets They're $100. Rock yourself into the fall with JBL Arena B15 black bookshelf & surround speaker that are on sale for 50 percent off on Amazon.
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Popular Science
Build a portable computer on a USB stick DIY It's a PC that you can carry anywhere. Using modern-day Linux distributions, you can set up a portable computer that will fit on a standard USB flash drive. You simply plug it into any other machine.
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Science : NPR
Drug Puts A $750,000 'Price Tag On Life' The high cost of Spinraza, a new and promising treatment for spinal muscular atrophy, highlights how the cost-benefit analysis insurers use to make drug coverage decisions plays out in human terms. (Image credit: Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News)
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Gizmodo
Start Pulling out Your Tablets and E-Readers When You Go Through Airport Security Photo via AP Images . If you’ve flown at all in the last few years, you know the TSA wants you to pull out your laptop and place it in a separate bin for security screening. Well: now they want you to do the same with your tablets, e-readers, and even game consoles. The TSA announced the new procedures last week , but the changes will be rolling out to airports across the U.S. gradually over the
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The Atlantic
How Logan Lucky Can Bring Back the Mid-Budget Movie Upending the major-studio model of theatrical film releases is easier said than done. Even with streaming juggernauts like Netflix and Amazon muscling their way into the industry, there’s still really only one way to debut your movie nationwide in thousands of theaters, along with the kind of expensive marketing push needed to draw in audiences. And that’s with the help of a company like Warner B
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For white middle class, moderate drinking is linked to cognitive health in old ageOlder adults who consume alcohol moderately on a regular basis are more likely to live to the age of 85 without dementia or other cognitive impairments than non-drinkers, according to a University of California San Diego School of Medicine-led study.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A new portrait of the world’s first flower is unveiledA reconstruction of the first flowers suggests the ancient blooms were bisexual.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Say These Words Are the Funniest Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum You surely remember a time you said a word to yourself and started laughing. Something about the syllables bouncing around your mouth just didn’t make sense. Maybe the word was “booby” or “piss” or “dingus” or “moist.” Maybe it was the name “ Brumbpo Tungus ” or “ Scrimmy Bingus .” Well thankfully, now science is here to science its way through humor, ruining the joke fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steroid treatment for type of kidney disease associated with increased risk for serious infectionsAmong patients with IgA nephropathy and excess protein in their urine, treatment with pills of the steroid methylprednisolone was associated with an unexpectedly large increase in the risk of serious adverse events, primarily infections, according to a study. IgA nephropathy is a kidney disease that occurs when the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) lodges in the kidneys.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caffeine shortens recovery time from general anesthesiaCaffeine helps quickly boost wakefulness following general anesthesia, a new study finds. The stimulant — used daily by more than 90 percent of adults in the U.S. — appears to alter physiological function in two different ways to shorten recovery time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Investigators use light to kill microbial 'vampires'Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Antibiotic-resistant strains of the bug, like MRSA, can kill. If S. aureus is going to drink our blood like a vampire, let's kill it with sunlight, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers produce long lasting, energy density batteryA new generation of manganese dioxide-zinc batteries with unprecedented cycle life and energy density has now been revealed by scientists. The discovery has made the common household battery suitable for large grid storage applications.
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Live Science
Ebola May Linger in Men's Semen for More Than 2 YearsEbola virus may linger in semen for more than two years, a new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safely releasing genetically modified genes into the wildSo, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito, now what? How many mosquitos would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most effective distribution pattern? How could you stop a premature release of the engineered mosquitoes? Applied mathematicians and physicists from Harvard and Princeton Universities used mathematical modeling to guide the design and di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Size matters, and so do temperature and habitat, to scavengers and the carcasses they eatSize matters in the carrion world, and so do habitat and temperature. New research has shed fresh light on the largely understudied area of vertebrate scavenging ecology.
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The Atlantic
'We Pretended That the Emperor Wasn’t Naked' Senator Jeff Flake, an Arizona Republican, has published an excerpt of his forthcoming book, The Conscience of a Conservative, in Politico . The title is an echo of Barry Goldwater’s famous tome . The excerpt argues that congressional Republicans are in denial about President Trump. He urges them to do something. “There simply are not that many people who are in a position to do something about a
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The Atlantic
New U.S. Rules Would Ban Most Travel to North Korea The Trump administration is expected Wednesday to publish new rules that would make it all but impossible for most Americans to visit North Korea. The decision, which will be published in the Federal Register, comes after the death in June of Otto Warmbier, the 22-year-old University of Virginia student who was imprisoned by the communist state for more than a year and spent much of that time in
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The Atlantic
Winners of the 2017 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest The results of the 2017 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest are now in, with grand-prize winner Sergio Tapiro Velasco set to receive a 10-day trip for two to the Galápagos Archipelago with National Geographic Expeditions, for his incredible shot of lightning striking the erupting Colima Volcano in Mexico. National Geographic was kind enough to allow me to share the winners
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Gizmodo
Newly Discovered Giant Sea Pancake Looks Goofy As Hell Mola tecta stranded on Birdlings Flat south of Christchurch, New Zealand, May 2014. (Image: Marianne Nyegaard) Sunfish are the living, breathing embodiment of a dad joke—it’s kind of funny, but you feel disappointed in yourself for laughing at it because it’s painfully silly. Known as the world’s largest bony fish , ocean sunfish—which make up the genus mola—look like a drunk person’s rendition o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu shot's impact on pregnant women and their babiesFor most of us, getting the flu is a miserable inconvenience, but for some it can be dangerous, even deadly. Pregnant women and young babies are among those most at risk for complications from the flu, and while doctors have long recommended flu shots for protection, experts weren't exactly sure how the shots affect pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sun's core rotates four times faster than its surfaceThe sun's core rotates nearly four times faster than the sun's surface, an international team of astronomers reports. The most likely explanation is that this core rotation is left over from the period when the sun formed, some 4.6 billion years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structures, mechanisms that enable bacteria to resist antibioticsScientists have spent years studying the structures and mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics. Researchers can now describe the efflux pumps and transporters that certain disease-causing bacteria use to keep antibiotics away.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oil fields: Alternative to wasteful methane flaringResearchers say they have a solution to the oil field flares wasting 3.5 percent of the world's natural gas: an inexpensive reactor that can convert methane to electricity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bold new approaches needed to shrink Gulf of Mexico dead zone and meet elusive goalsShrinking the annual Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' down to the size of Delaware will require a 59-percent reduction in the amount of nitrogen runoff that flows down the Mississippi River from as far away as the Corn Belt.
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Gizmodo
YouTube Has a New Naughty Corner for Controversial Religious and Supremacist Videos Image: AP Today, YouTube clarified how it plans to handle videos that don’t violate any of its policies but still contain offensive religious and supremacist content: hide them and make sure they can’t make any money. The news comes as a status report on the promises made by Google general counsel Kent Walker in a June Financial Times op-ed , which announced YouTube was taking several steps to in
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effects of cognitive behavior therapy on parents of children with autismJonathan Weiss, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, discovered that parents who participate in cognitive therapy with their children with autism also experience improvements in their own depression, emotion regulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pennsylvania snowshoe hares differ from those in YukonSnowshoe hares in Pennsylvania -- at the southern end of the species' range -- show adaptations in fur color and characteristics, behavior and metabolism, to enable them to survive in less wintry conditions than their far northern relatives, according to a team of researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees tiny Tropical Depression Irwin winding downInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression Irwin found a very small area of cold clouds and no strong storms. Irwin appeared as a swirl of clouds as it continued to wind down.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are artificial sweeteners counterproductive when dieting?Artificial sweeteners combined with a low carbohydrate diet increases overall food consumed, a new study reveals. The finding expands on previous research that explained why artificial sweeteners increase feelings of hunger when consumed chronically.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise helps cells make decisionsRandom differences between cells could be the key to making different types of cells, according to new research. Different cell types all have their own roles, yet they all start out the same. For us to be healthy our bodies need the right number of each cell type. This latest research reveals that when cells specialize into cell types their genes become 'noisy' with slight differences in gene act
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealed: brain 'switch' tells body to burn fat after a mealScientists at Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute have found a mechanism by which the brain coordinates feeding with energy expenditure, solving a puzzle that has previously eluded researchers and offering a potential novel target for the treatment of obesity.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies enzyme that protects cells from toxic fatA new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute sheds light on how a key fat-producing enzyme helps protect cells from a toxic form of fat.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Characteristics of metabolically unhealthy lean peopleCompared to people who are of normal weight and metabolically healthy, subjects who are of normal weight but metabolically unhealthy have a three-fold higher risk of mortality and/or cardiovascular events. DZD scientists have now addressed characteristics determining metabolic health in lean, overweight and obese people, showed that a reduced accumulation of fat in the lower body puts lean people
22h
Popular Science
The three supplements you should never buy Health An expert on vitamins tells us what to avoid. The discovery of vitamins fundamentally changed our culture's relationship with health, nutrition, and mealtime.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithm finds the optimal bond breaking point for single moleculesRecent developments in atomic-force microscopy have enabled researchers to apply mechanical forces to individual molecules to induce chemical reactions. A research team has now developed a first-of-its-kind algorithm that determines the minimal force it takes to reach the optimal bond breaking point (BBP) at the molecular level to mechanically induce a chemical reaction.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hospital patients with dementia and other causes of confusion 'have worse outcomes'Hospital patients with dementia and other causes of confusion have longer stays and worse treatment outcomes than people without the condition, new research has found.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome sequencing shows spiders, scorpions share ancestorResearchers have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wildfires continue to beleaguer Western CanadaLike tourist season, wildfire season is also in full swing in British Columbia. Whereas tourists are welcomed to the Canadian province, wildfires are not. In British Columbia alone there are close to 500 wildfires active to date.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Algorithms that can sketch, recreate 3-D shapesA computer scientist has created a new software that can create a design sketch of an everyday object, addressing the challenge of accurately describing shapes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exascale computing aims to crack cancer codeResearchers are tackling cancer through deep learning with an eye towards the future and exascale computing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Babies of overweight, obese, or diabetic mothers have an increased risk of lung problemsBabies born to women who are overweight, obese or have diabetes during their pregnancy have less mature lungs than babies of normal weight pregnancies.
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The Atlantic
The Hair Dryer, Freedom’s Appliance I used to scandalize my friends with this confession: “I don’t own a hair dryer.” It was as if I’d told them I ride a horse to work. But their surprise was justified: 90 percent of U.S. homes own a hair dryer. They come standard in most hotel rooms. The hair dryer is tangled up with the history of fashion, the evolution of women’s roles, and the development of gendered social spaces. More From Ou
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Gizmodo
Hotel Industry Attack Ad Warns: What If Terrorists Use Airbnb? According to the Hotel Association of New York City and a New York hotel workers union, we should worry about terrorists using Airbnb. “Airbnb allows illegal listings on its site, and refuses to hand over the addresses to law enforcement,” an attack ad reads. “Are you at risk?” Advertisement The ad then cuts to media from the Manchester terrorist attack, noting that suicide bomber Salman Abedi st
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New Scientist - News
This is what the first flower on Earth might have looked likeSome time between 250 and 140 million years ago, the very first flower bloomed – an enormous evolutionary study offers clues about its appearance
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Science : NPR
Planning To Watch The Eclipse? Here's What You Need To Protect Your Eyes A total solar eclipse is one of the most magnificent sights you can ever see. But you need the right kind of eye protection, and some of what's being sold out there isn't safe. (Image credit: Joseph Okpako/Getty Images)
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Ars Technica
“E-mail prankster” phishes White House officials; hilarity ensues Enlarge / Anthony Scaramucci was trolled by a prankster posing as former White House Chief of Staff Reince Preibus, Ambassador Jon Huntsman, and friend Andrew Schwartz. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Over the past few weeks, a self-described "e-mail prankster" has posed as members of President Donald Trump's administration in a series of e-mails to White House officials, publishing respo
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The Atlantic
Ted Cruz's Thesis Adviser on How He's Changed Since College In the four years since he made national headlines for his infamous marathon speech against Obamacare , Senator Ted Cruz has become a household name—first as an ambitious young senator, then as a presidential candidate. But 25 years ago, Cruz was an undergraduate student at Princeton. When he wasn’t winning debate championships or provoking the ire of his freshman-year roommate , he was getting t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Typhoon Noru gives NASA's Terra satellite the eyeNASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Noru in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a close look at the eye of the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA tracks Tropical Depression Emily across Florida into AtlanticJust after Tropical Storm Emily made landfall in west central Florida, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. As Emily was weakening and tracking east across the Sunshine State, NASA used data from NOAA's GOES-East satellite to create an animation that showed Emily's progression toward the Atlantic Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies enzyme that protects cells from toxic fatA new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute sheds light on how a key fat-producing enzyme helps protect cells from a toxic form of fat.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noise helps cells make decisions: Team reveals the importance of genetic noise in developmentRandom differences between cells early in development could be the key to making different cells in the body, according to new research from a team co-led by Professor Wolf Reik. Different cell types - brain, blood, skin, gut etc. - all have unique and vital roles, yet they all start out the same. Cells become different as a result of a long sequence of biochemical choices made before we're born.
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Futurity.org
Weight can change who looks ‘American’ Asian Americans who appear heavier are not only perceived to be more “American,” but may also experience less prejudice directed at foreigners than those who are thinner, new research suggests. “We wanted to see whether ideas of nationality are malleable and how body shape factors into these judgments.” Researchers believe this effect relates to common stereotypes that Asians are thin and America
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Scientific American Content: Global
White House Opioid Panel Urges Trump to Declare State of EmergencyThe move would release millions of dollars for response -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: GORUCK Backpack, Anker PowerCore Fusion, Tea Kettle, and More Our readers’ favorite backpack , Anker’s 2-in-1 PowerCore Fusion , and JBL home theater audio deals lead off Tuesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerCore Fusion (White) , $24 with code KINJAFBG Update : The white model is completely sold out, but the black model is available for a couple bucks more, wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin dispute results in split-coinA dispute among developers of virtual currency Bitcoin gave birth Tuesday to a new version of the crypto coin after they failed to agree on software changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revealed: the mother (and father) of all flowersThe first flower to appear along the path of plant evolution, during the time of the dinosaurs, was a hermaphrodite with petal-like organs arranged in concentric circles, researchers said Monday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statistical analysis of batter productivity from changed strike zone could spell troubleNew statistical analysis examining changes in batter productivity as a result of the recently changed strike zone could raise concern for the Major League Baseball Players Union and individual baseball players.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's found in aged chimpanzee brainsHumans are considered uniquely susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, potentially due to genetic differences, changes in brain structure and function during evolution, and an increased lifespan. However, a new study provides the most extensive evidence of Alzheimer's disease brain pathology in a primate species to date. Researchers found that the brains of aged chimpanzees, our closest living relativ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Successful prediction of multi-year US droughts and wildfire riskA new study shows that difference in water temperature between the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans together with global warming impact the risk of drought and wildfire in southwestern North America. A new model proves capable of much longer-term forecasts of mega-drought and active wildfire seasons than those currently available to people in agriculture, water management and forestry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diagnosing and treating invasive fungal infectionsThousands of patients suffering from invasive fungal infections in intensive-care units or after organ transplantation will benefit from the latest insights into diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Help from the stomach for dry eyesAfter a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. Researchers have now demonstrated that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to the eye anymore.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teen depression increases risk for violenceAdolescent depression increases the risk of violence, suggests a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sprint posts rare profit, says a deal may be coming soonSprint said Tuesday that it should be able to "strike a deal" in the "near future," driving up shares of the fourth-largest U.S. wireless carrier.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildfires continue to beleaguer Western CanadaLike tourist season, wildfire season is also in full swing in British Columbia. Whereas tourists are welcomed to the Canadian province, wildfires are not. In British Columbia alone there are close to 500 wildfires active to date. Most of these wildfires are located in three general areas—in the Caribou Fire Centre located in the Frasier Plateau directly north of Vancouver, in the Kamloops Fire Cen
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whole genome sequencing identifies cause of zoonotic epidemicFor the first time, researchers have used whole genome sequencing to identify the cause of a zoonotic infection that sparked a national epidemic. In a study published this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers describe their use of whole genome sequencing to determine the cause of a respiratory disease that ripped through a population of native
22h
The Atlantic
The Racism Behind Alien Mummy Hoaxes Peruvian archaeologists are tired of debunking claims of extraterrestrial influence on human history. In 1968, Swiss author Erich von Däniken’s Chariots of the Gods? introduced the mainstream to the theory that the Nazca Lines, the massive geoglyphs in Southern Peru whose shapes are fully visible only from the air, were landing strips for “ancient astronauts.” Archaeologists calmly disagree, posi
23h
Ars Technica
Sexually explicit game returns to Steam after adding “censor” bars Enlarge / A carefully cropped shot of one of the less explicit sex scenes in House Party A sexually explicit game that was removed from Steam last week has come back to the popular game distribution service after the developer added forced censorship bars blocking the view of in-game private parts. Eek Games' House Party launched on Steam Early Access just over a month ago, attracting more than 3
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wildfires continue to beleaguer Western CanadaLike tourist season, wildfire season is also in full swing in British Columbia. Whereas tourists are welcomed to the Canadian province, wildfires are not. In British Columbia alone there are close to 500 wildfires active to date.
23h
Gizmodo
These Scientists Are Debating How We Decide What Results Count Image: Daniel Dionne /Flickr “Science” might mean something crazy to you, like groundbreaking new treatments, wild new animals, explosions in space, or crazy chemistry. But at its core, science is nothing more than ruling out hypotheses based on evidence. A new debate is flaring about one of science’s important concepts: How we decide what constitutes a positive result. At the center of the debat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA enhances online scientific tool used by hundreds worldwideHundreds of scientists worldwide currently use an online application that accesses at least one terabyte of data to calculate everything from the spectrum of an exoplanet and the weather on Mars to the chemical makeup and orbit of a celestial object. It's now expected to get even better.
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Ars Technica
UCF kicker ruled ineligible, loses scholarship after monetizing YouTube videos Enlarge (credit: YouTube, Deestroying ) University of Central Florida place-kicker Donald De La Haye had to choose between making YouTube videos and playing college football, and he chose YouTube. UCF announced Monday that De La Haye has been ruled ineligible to play for the school's team. The decision came after De La Haye refused to agree to an NCAA waiver that dictated the types of videos he c
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Gizmodo
Add All of These Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Your August Reading List Detail from cover of A Man of Shadows by Jeff Noon. Image: Angry Robot Books August brings the final book in N.K. Jemison’s Hugo-winning Broken Earth trilogy, The Stone Sky —as well as Stephen Baxter’s sequel to H.G. Wells’ classic The War of the Worlds (ominously titled The Massacre of Mankind ). And those are just two of the titles on this rather long list, so you’d better start turning some pa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Missing signals lead to diabetic nerve injuryMolecules that help cells communicate with each other -- called cytokines -- might be the key to repairing diabetic nerve damage. Diabetes devastates nerve cells, which can lead to poor circulation, muscle weakness, blindness, and other painful side effects. The new study showed diabetic mice can't repair nerve cells after damage due to low levels of specific cytokines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor appetite and food intake in older adultsStrategies to improve our appetites as we age include reducing portion size, increasing meal frequency, and using flavor enhancers. Until recently, however, these options have not proven to improve food intake or quality of life for older people. That's part of the reason why a team of researchers designed a study to examine the differences in food intake among older adults with varied appetite le
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles for 3-D printing in water open door to advanced biomedical materialsA new type of photoinitiator for 3-D printing in water could further the development of biomedical accessories, bring advances in traditional industries such as plastics, and offer an environmentally friendly approach to additive manufacturing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bird with super senses inspires researchersNot much surprises the oilbird. Its senses are super sharp and when combined, may function in a way that can inspire researchers to construct better drones and more advanced technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ferroelectric phenomenon proven viable for oxide electrodes, disproving predictionsFlux-closure domain (FCD) structures are microscopic topological phenomena found in ferroelectric thin films that feature distinct electric polarization properties. These closed-loop domains have garnered attention among researchers studying new ferroelectric devices, ranging from data storage components and spintronic tunnel junctions to ultra-thin capacitors.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers produce long lasting, energy density batteryA new generation of manganese dioxide-zinc batteries with unprecedented cycle life and energy density is the latest innovation at The City College of New York-based CUNY Energy Institute. The discovery has made the common household battery suitable for large grid storage applications.
23h
Science | The Guardian
Should we stop keeping pets? Why more and more ethicists say yes Ninety per cent of Britons think of their pet as part of the family – 16% even included them on the last census. But recent research into animals’ emotional lives has cast doubt on the ethics of petkeeping It was a Tupperware tub of live baby rats that made Dr Jessica Pierce start to question the idea of pet ownership. She was at her local branch of PetSmart, a pet store chain in the US, buying c
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building bridges within the cell—using lightEach cell in the body is made up of a number of tiny sealed membranous subunits called organelles, and they send things like lipids back and forth to allow the cell to function. A process called membrane tethering is responsible for bridging the gap between organelles at a specialized subcellular zone called membrane contact sites and, now, researchers have a way to manipulate this tethering.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video—Wine snobbery: Fact vs. fictionWe all know at least one wine snob who goes through all sorts of rituals that they swear will bring out the best flavor, like swirling the glass and decanting the bottle before drinking.
23h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Fears rise for US climate report as Trump officials take reins Officials at the US Environmental Protection Agency are consulting global-warming sceptics as they weigh up a technical review. Nature 548 15 doi: 10.1038/548015a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Bacteria could be key to freeing South Pacific of mosquitoes Islands in the region could be rid of the biting insects within a decade. Nature 548 17 doi: 10.1038/548017a
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The Atlantic
The Two Explanations for Trump's Meddling in the Russia Investigation When news of Donald Trump Jr.’s June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer broke, his father was surprisingly quiet. As his son’s explanation for the meeting crumbled, repeatedly , the president made little public comment, leaving it to his lawyers and White House press staff to say simply that he had not know about the meeting at the time. He eventually issued an unusually cool statement saying Tru
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Did the first flower look like this?All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor that lived about 140 million years ago, a study suggests.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome sequencing shows spiders, scorpions share ancestorResearchers have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital patients with dementia and other causes of confusion 'have worse outcomes'Hospital patients with dementia and other causes of confusion have longer stays and worse treatment outcomes than people without the condition, research led by the University of Stirling has found.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New theory of polymer length provides improved estimates of DNA and RNA sizeSince the seminal work of Paul Flory, researchers have developed various formulas for calculating distance between the ends of a curved polymer. However, these formulas have typically failed to consider the stretchiness of the molecule. In a new study, published this week in The Journal of Chemical Physics, scientists have derived a formula to determine the end-to-end distance of a semiflexible po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika infections unlikely to be passed by kissing, casual contactAccording to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who conducted studies with monkeys, casual contact like kissing or sharing a fork or spoon is not enough for the virus to move between hosts. Their findings were published Aug. 1, 2017, in the journal Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines fees, finances of medical specialty boardsAlthough many physicians have objected to high certification fees of the American Board of Medical Specialties member boards, which are nonprofit organizations and have a fiduciary responsibility to match revenue and expenditures, most of these boards had overall revenue that greatly exceeded expenditures in 2013, according to a study published by JAMA.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steroid treatment for type of kidney disease associated with increased risk for serious infectionsAmong patients with IgA nephropathy and excess protein in their urine, treatment with pills of the steroid methylprednisolone was associated with an unexpectedly large increase in the risk of serious adverse events, primarily infections, according to a study published by JAMA. IgA nephropathy is a kidney disease that occurs when the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) lodges in the kidneys.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm finds the optimal bond breaking point for single moleculesRecent developments in atomic-force microscopy have enabled researchers to apply mechanical forces to individual molecules to induce chemical reactions. A research team from Spain and Germany has now developed a first-of-its-kind algorithm that determines the minimal force it takes to reach the optimal bond breaking point (BBP) at the molecular level to mechanically induce a chemical reaction. The
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking it to the Tweets: Statistics proves Twitter a powerful tool in forecasting crimeAlthough most people don't broadcast in advance their intention to engage in criminal activity, scientists have discovered that the use of Twitter can help predict crime.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Kids, cash, and snacks: What motivates a healthier food choice?What determines how kids decide to spend their cash on snacks? In a study with Boston-area children, researchers show that their experience with money and their liking of brands influenced decisions -- and that for some children, higher prices for unhealthy snacks might motivate healthier choices.
23h
New Scientist - News
Quantum gravity detector will use atom clouds to survey for oilA commercial device that uses quantum technology to detect subtle differences in gravity, should be able to detect coal, oil or pipes underground
23h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Can art amend history? | Titus KapharArtist Titus Kaphar makes paintings and sculptures that wrestle with the struggles of the past while speaking to the diversity and advances of the present. In an unforgettable live workshop, Kaphar takes a brush full of white paint to a replica of a 17th-century Frans Hals painting, obscuring parts of the composition and bringing its hidden story into view. There's a narrative coded in art like th
23h
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Lake Erie's Bottom-Dwelling Robot Fights Toxic Algae BloomsLake Erie gets a submerged sensor to keep track of its summertime carpet of cyanobacteria.
23h
Live Science
Blossoming Bisexual: World's 1st Flower Had Male and Female PartsWhen the world's first flower sprouted about 140 million years ago, it was bisexual, possessing both male and female reproductive parts, according to the researchers who virtually reconstructed the blossom in a new study.
23h
Live Science
In Photos: Rare Conjoined BatsThese conjoined bats from Brazil are only the third set of conjoined bat twins to be recorded in the scientific literature.
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Science | The Guardian
Mother of all blooms: is this what the last common ancestor of flowers looked like? With no fossil flowers older than 130m years, their evolution has long been a mystery. A new structural discovery provides an important piece of the puzzle Delicate and upturned, with curving petals arranged in threes, it looks like the subject of a Monet painting. In fact, it is what scientists believe the bloom of the last common ancestor of all living flowers looked like. Flowering plants – or
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New algorithm finds the optimal bond breaking point for single moleculesRecent developments in atomic-force microscopy have enabled researchers to apply mechanical forces to individual molecules to induce chemical reactions.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory of polymer length provides improved estimates of DNA and RNA sizeUnlike the rigid plastic models from chemistry class, real chains of molecules can bend and stretch, like beads on an elastic cord. Some polymers, like DNA, are especially stretchy, a characteristic that can complicate attempts to model their behavior.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Rogue "Double Planet" Proves to Be 2 Failed StarsThe two co-orbiting brown dwarfs drift between the stars 95 light-years from Earth, and form the lightest binary system ever found -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new HER2 mutation, a clinical trial and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancerA phase II clinical trial of neratinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer carrying a HER2 mutation produces encouraging results in that about 30 percent of patients and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancer.
23h
New Scientist - News
You’re wrong, Amber Rudd – encryption is for ‘real people’The UK home secretary has claimed that end-to-end encryption only aids terrorists with something to hide. She’s mistaken – here's how it benefits all of us
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Viden
Livets små byggeklodser kan være svaret på miljøproblemerViden om mikroorganismer bidrager til mindre forurening – fx at vi kan vaske tøj rent i koldere vand og udnytte dyrefoder bedre, fortæller ekspert i bioteknologi Lene Lange.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since deathAccurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ferroelectric phenomenon proven viable for oxide electrodes, disproving predictionsFlux-closure domain structures are microscopic topological phenomena found in ferroelectric thin films that feature distinct electric polarization properties. These closed-loop domains have garnered attention among researchers studying new ferroelectric devices, and in the development of thin films for such devices, researchers have thought that contact with commonly used oxide electrodes limits F
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A semiconductor that can beat the heatA newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity - a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.
23h
Futurity.org
Earth will likely pass heat ‘tipping point’ by 2100 Warming of the planet by 2 degrees Celsius is often seen as a “tipping point” that people should try to avoid by limiting greenhouse gas emissions. But the Earth is very likely to exceed that by the end of the century. “Our analysis shows that the goal of 2 degrees is very much a best-case scenario.” A new study shows only a 5 percent chance that Earth will warm 2 degrees or less in that time—and
23h
Live Science
Jet Lightning! Rarely Seen 'Gigantic Jets' Spotted by Cloud Cam (Video)A spectacular outburst of jet lightning, also known as "gigantic jets," was captured by the Gemini Observatory’s cloud camera on Mauna Kea in Hawaii on July 24, 2017.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor appetite and food intake in older adultsStrategies to improve our appetites as we age include reducing portion size, increasing meal frequency, and using flavor enhancers. Until recently, however, these options have not proven to improve food intake or quality of life for older people. That's part of the reason why a team of researchers designed a study to examine the differences in food intake among older adults with varied appetite le
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Missing signals lead to diabetic nerve injuryMolecules that help cells communicate with each other--called cytokines--might be the key to repairing diabetic nerve damage, according to a new study published in Experimental Neurology. Diabetes devastates nerve cells, which can lead to poor circulation, muscle weakness, blindness, and other painful side effects. The new study showed diabetic mice can't repair nerve cells after damage due to low
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased α5β1 integrin could improve tumor cell-killing performance in geriatric patientsA new report in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology describes an important step toward developing cancer treatments involving the body's immune system.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elective freezing of IVF embryos linked to higher pregnancy rates in some casesA delay in transferring embryos to the mother improves the success of in vitro fertilization in certain cases, according to a study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Celmatix Inc. and several other institutions.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigators use light to kill microbial 'vampires'If S. aureus is going to drink our blood like a vampire, let's kill it with sunlight.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wine snobbery: Fact vs. fiction (video)We all know at least one wine snob who goes through all sorts of rituals that they swear will bring out the best flavor, like swirling the glass and decanting the bottle before drinking. But is there any merit to these claims? We talked to expert wine researchers and sommeliers to find out. Watch the latest Reactions video in which we play wine fact versus fiction: https://youtu.be/qA9AQGPcOcQ.
23h
NYT > Science
Islamic State and Climate Change Seen as World’s Greatest Threats, Poll SaysA Pew survey finds that while global warming is a top concern around the world, more Americans are more concerned about cyberwarfare than climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use of this visual technology is becoming popular for big eventsAt an after-party for the red carpet premiere of the seventh season of "Game of Thrones" at Walt Disney Concert Hall, partygoers watched as Westeros came to life on the building before them.
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Live Science
Earth Will Have Its Last Total Solar Eclipse in About 600 Million YearsDuring the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, skywatchers will direct most of their attention to the sun, but don't forget about the moon: Its slow progress away from Earth means these celestial events won't keep happening forever.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
One in three U.S. adults takes opioids, and many misuse themMore than a third of U.S. adults used prescription opioids in 2015, and nearly 13 percent of that group misused the painkillers in some way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's never too cold for quantumThe peculiar characteristics demonstrated by 'quantum critical points' at absolute zero remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climateAs climate change brings new pressures on wildlife, species must 'move, adapt, acclimate, or die.' Researchers have reviewed the literature on acclimation through behavioral flexibility, identifying patterns among invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fishes with focus on the American pika.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene-regulatory factors shown to improve pancreatic cancer response to chemotherapyResearchers revealed that, in pancreatic cancer, the microRNAs miR-509-5p and miR-1243 can promote E-cadherin expression and thereby reduce the likelihood of cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or indeed reverse this transition. This ability to stop cells from adopting a phenotype linked to high migration and invasiveness was also shown to synergistically increase the cancer cell-k
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cheap and simple detection of neurotoxic chemicalsChemical contamination from pesticides is a serious problem. Detection methods can be complicated, difficult to implement, and expensive. However, researchers have discovered a method to reduce the cost and simplify the process for detecting a neurotoxin found in several pesticides called Nereistoxin. It is hoped that the method will bring about improved detection techniques.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution of fan worm eyesScientists examining the multiple eyes found on the tentacles of fan worms have discovered they evolved independently from their other visual systems, specifically to support the needs of their lifestyle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazon forest's importance in regulating atmospheric chemistry reinforcedThe Amazon rainforest emits three times more isoprene than was previously estimated, airborne measurements show. Isoprene is one of the main precursors of ozone and indirectly influences the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy storage solution combines polymers, nanosheetsA new, lightweight composite material for energy storage in flexible electronics, electric vehicles and aerospace applications has been experimentally shown to store energy at operating temperatures well above current commercial polymers, according to a team of scientists. This polymer-based, ultrathin material can be produced using techniques already used in industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists challenge next-generation sequencing dogmaNext-generation sequencing -- the ability to sequence millions or billions of small fragments of DNA in parallel -- has revolutionized the biological sciences, playing an essential role in everything from locating mutations that cause human disease to determining how a newly discovered animal fits into the tree of life. But a new study reveals that a favored sequencing method for measuring microbi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beware doping athletes! This sensor may be your downfallA new light-trapping sensor makes infrared absorption more sensitive, inexpensive and versatile. It may improve scientists' ability use to sleuth out performance-enhancing drugs in blood samples, tiny particles of explosives in the air and more.
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Ars Technica
Nvidia and Remedy use neural networks for eerily good facial animation Enlarge Remedy, the developer behind the likes of Alan Wake and Quantum Break , has teamed up with GPU-maker Nvidia to streamline one of the more costly parts of modern games development: motion capture and animation. As showcased at Siggraph, by using a deep learning neural network—run on Nvidia's costly eight-GPU DGX-1 server, naturally—Remedy was able to feed in videos of actors performing lin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon under federal investigation over Iran-linked salesUnder federal investigation for possibly violating U.S. sanctions against Iran, Amazon.com has admitted to selling consumer goods to at least one person on the government's list of people and entities associated with terrorism.
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Scientific American Content: Global
More Than a Third of U.S. Adults Prescribed OpioidsAbout 92 million people were instructed to use the medications in 2015 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Gaping jaws give some baby guppies an edge To survive in a competitive world, some guppies are born not just bigger, but also more mature. To help offspring survive, some moms engage in a kind of trade-off: Churn out a bevy of offspring and hope for the best, or have fewer kids but invest more in their survival. Essentially one of two fates confront the Trinidadian guppies who inhabit the South American island’s mountain streams. Guppies
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Ars Technica
Galaxy Note 8 gets pictured, doesn’t fix S8 fingerprint sensor location Enlarge / The Galaxy Note 8 press image. Check out those cameras! (credit: Evan Blass ) Behold—above is the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 revealed in all its glory. The pictures come courtesy of VentureBeat's Evan Blass , who has proven reliable when it comes to these early press render leaks. After the massive redesign of the Galaxy S8 , it's no surprise that the Note 8 follows in its footsteps. You're
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building bridges within the cell -- using lightEach cell in the body is made up of a number of tiny sealed membranous subunits called organelles, and they send things like lipids back and forth to allow the cell to function. A process called membrane tethering is responsible for bridging the gap between organelles, and now, Texas A&M researchers have discovered a way to manipulate this tethering. The study was the cover story in the journal Ch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
City College engineers produce long lasting, energy density batteryA new generation of manganese dioxide-zinc batteries with unprecedented cycle life and energy density is the latest innovation at the City College of New York-based CUNY Energy Institute. The discovery has made the common household battery suitable for large grid storage applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women show cognitive advantage in gender-equal countriesWomen's cognitive functioning past middle age may be affected by the degree of gender equality in the country in which they live. The research is a first attempt to shed light on the adverse consequences of gender inequality on women's health in later life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study charts flu shot's impact on pregnant women and their babiesFor most of us, getting the flu is a miserable inconvenience, but for some it can be dangerous, even deadly. Pregnant women and young babies are among those most at risk for complications from the flu, and while doctors have long recommended flu shots for protection, experts weren't exactly sure how the shots affect pregnancy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ESA, NASA's SOHO reveals rapidly rotating solar coreAfter four decades of searching, solar scientists have at long last found evidence of a type of seismic wave in our Sun, thanks to ESA and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State researchers help find pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's in aged chimpanzee brainsHumans are considered uniquely susceptible to Alzheimer's disease, potentially due to genetic differences, changes in brain structure and function during evolution, and an increased lifespan. However, a new study published Aug. 1 in Neurobiology of Aging provides the most extensive evidence of Alzheimer's disease brain pathology in a primate species to date. Researchers found that the brains of ag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New images from under Alaska seafloor suggest high tsunami dangerScientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign. They say the feature closely resembles one that produced the 2011 Tohoku tsunami off Japan, killing some 20,000 people and melting down three nuclear reactors. Such structures may lurk unrecognized in other areas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bird with super senses inspires researchersNot much surprises the oilbird. Its senses are super sharp and when combined, may function in a way that can inspire researchers to construct better drones and more advanced technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ferroelectric phenomenon proven viable for oxide electrodes, disproving predictionsFlux-closure domain structures are microscopic topological phenomena found in ferroelectric thin films that feature distinct electric polarization properties. These closed-loop domains have garnered attention among researchers studying new ferroelectric devices, and in the development of thin films for such devices, researchers have thought that contact with commonly used oxide electrodes limits F
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists in China identify way to treat nerve damage caused by insecticides and chemicalNew research has uncovered a potential new therapy for the currently untreatable delayed neuropathy caused by acute exposure to insecticides or chemical weapons that attack the nervous system. The study, published in the open-access journal Cell Discovery, identifies a new biological mechanism responsible for the neuropathy, as well as the drugs to treat it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Whole genome sequencing identifies cause of zoonotic epidemicFor the first time, researchers have used whole genome sequencing to identify the cause of a zoonotic infection that sparked a national epidemic. In a study published this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers describe their use of whole genome sequencing to determine the cause of a respiratory disease that ripped through a population of native
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Gizmodo
Save Over $40 On the GORUCK GR1, Our Readers' Favorite Backpack [Exclusive] GORUCK’s military-inspired GR1 dominated our Co-Op for the best everyday backpack, and they’re rewarding our readers with an extremely rare 15% discount with promo code KINJAGORUCK15 . Now, even with the code, this is still a $250 backpack . I’m not blind to the fact that that’s a lot of money. But every GR1 is hand-built over the course of four hours in the USA, is covered by a lifetime warranty
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial biofilms, begoneA new material could form the basis for a new kind of antibacterial surface that prevents infections and reduces our reliance on antibiotics, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can insects be used as evidence to tell if a body has been moved?The use of insects as indicators of post-mortem displacement is a familiar technique depicted on many crime investigation TV shows. In reality, this practice is far from clear-cut. To cut through the hype, researchers have looked across existing studies to review how exactly insects have been used in legal investigations and to what extent these methods have been useful.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boat noise disrupts fish cooperationNoise from motorboats changes the behavior of cleaner fish and the species they help, outlines a new report.
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Futurity.org
New biomarkers could diagnose chronic fatigue New research links chronic fatigue syndrome to variations in 17 immune-system signaling proteins whose concentrations in the blood correlate with the disease’s severity. The findings provide evidence that inflammation is a powerful driver of this mysterious condition, whose underpinnings have eluded researchers for 35 years. The findings, described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sc
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Ingeniøren
Laserangreb viser selvkørende bilers sårbarhederForsøg indikerer, at det er nemt og billigt at sabotere selvkørende bilers sensorer. Alvorligt, men næppe et problem i praksis, siger dansk robotkonsulent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple results could hold clues to iPhone 8 sales dateApple's next iPhone is coming. But when, exactly?
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Gizmodo
Magnificent Sandstone Statue Uncovered Near Legendary Cambodian Temple Archaeologists hold a religious ceremony to ask the spirit protecting the site for permission to move the statue. (Image: Apsara Authority via The Cambodia Daily) Describing it as something that only happens in the movies, a team of Cambodian archaeologists have uncovered an 800-year-old sandstone statue weighing 440 pounds. Experts say it’s the most significant statue to be discovered in the fam
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Ars Technica
Next iPhone will have all-screen design, facial recognition tech, leaks suggest Enlarge / A concept render of what an edge-to-edge iPhone 8 might look like. No space for a fingerprint sensor, thus the need for another type of biometric login... (credit: Veniamin Geskin) A new phone icon, presumably of the D22 iPhone, discovered in the firmware. The next iPhone will feature an all-screen bezel-less design and infrared facial recognition tech, according to two software develop
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Ars Technica
Europa’s future: A runaway greenhouse Enlarge (credit: NASA ) Stars like the Sun brighten over the course of their history, a trend that has significant consequences for the habitability of Earth and other bodies both in our Solar System and beyond. An icy world on the far edge of the habitable zone may turn into a temperate paradise given enough time. Or, it could go straight to being a Venus-style hell if a new study turns out to b
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Scientific American Content: Global
Earth Almost Certain to Warm by 2 Degrees CelsiusExperts say new findings should inspire even more action to combat climate change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Harsh punishment for babies may linger into childhood Infants who experience physical discipline may still face negative effects in temperament and behavior as late as fifth grade and into their teenage years, research suggests. Past research has indicated that physical punishment, such as spanking, has negative consequences on child development. However, most research studies have examined short-term associations—less than one year—between discipli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain will shut down country's oldest nuclear plantThe Spanish government says it's closing the country's oldest nuclear power station because of lack of support among political parties and companies involved to keep it open.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered frog habitat sparks California farm lawsuitTiny frogs and toads used to swarm over the Sierra Nevada. Now, the government says nearly 2 million acres of land needs to be preserved to prevent them from going extinct.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Booty, booby and nitwit—academics reveal funniest wordsBooty, booby and nitwit are officially some of the funniest words in the English language, according to new peer-reviewed research by the University of Warwick.
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Gizmodo
Second Video of Cops Apparently Faking Body Cam Footage Uncovered in Baltimore Pinheiro’s body camera footage. Image Credit: Twitter/ Justin Fenton Days after a Baltimore cop was suspended for unwittingly filming himself apparently planting evidence , the Baltimore Public Defender’s Office has announced that they’ve uncovered a second video , with a different group of cops, which also “appears to depict multiple officers working together to manufacture evidence.” Additional
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Jared Kushner Comments on Middle East Peace in Leaked Q&A: "What Do We Offer That's Unique? I Don't Know."The White House senior adviser spoke to a group of congressional interns as part of an ongoing, off-the-record summer lecture series.
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Feed: All Latest
'Tacoma' Review: It's a Compelling Game, But You Can't 'Gone Home' AgainThe Fullbright Company's latest game builds on the legacy of its smash hit—but can't quite hit the same highs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Statistical analysis of batter productivity from changed strike zone could spell troubleNew statistical analysis examining changes in batter productivity as a result of the recently changed strike zone could raise concern for the Major League Baseball Players Union and individual baseball players. University of Florida Assistant Professor of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management Brian Mills will present new findings on this subject August 1 at the Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking it to the Tweets—statistics proves Twitter a powerful tool in forecasting crimeAlthough most people don't broadcast in advance their intention to engage in criminal activity, University of Virginia Assistant Professor of Systems and Engineering Information Matthew Gerber has discovered that the use of Twitter can help predict crime. Gerber's research and work developing statistical crime prediction methods will be presented on Tuesday, August 1, 2017, at the Joint Statistica
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Ars Technica
How to build an ancient robot overlord There's a great moment in The Hobbit when Bilbo Baggins is exploring a stinking troll cave and finds an ancient Elven short sword, lost for centuries, buried under the muck. It’s Sting, baby. And nobody wonders whether Sting will be less powerful than all the flashy new swords on the market. They assume that it’s more powerful. In some of the most engrossing worlds ever imagined—Star Wars, The Ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Booty, booby and nitwit: Academics reveal funniest wordsBooty, booby and nitwit are officially some of the funniest words in the English language, according to new peer-reviewed research by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the electrodes of lithium-air batteries become passivatedUsing molecular dynamics simulation technique, members of the Faculties of Physics and Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have defined the processes, underlying the transition of lithium-air batteries' electrodes to inactive state.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since deathAccurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles for 3-D printing in water open door to advanced biomedical materialsA new type of photoinitiator for (3-D printing in water could further the development of biomedical accessories, bring advances in traditional industries such as plastics, and offer an environmentally friendly approach to additive manufacturing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black holes are formed as a result of the most powerful explosions in the universeScientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University have managed to register for the first time polarization of intrinsic optical radiation of gamma-ray bursts -- the most powerful and very short bursts in the Universe, which last for several tens of seconds. Under intrinsic radiation of gamma-ray bursts one understands optical radiation at the instant of explosion. Such observations pose an ext
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kids, cash, and snacks: What motivates a healthier food choice?What determines how kids decide to spend their cash on snacks? In a study with Boston-area children, researchers show that their experience with money and their liking of brands influenced decisions -- and that for some children, higher prices for unhealthy snacks might motivate healthier choices.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statistical analysis of batter productivity from changed strike zone could spell troubleNew statistical analysis examining changes in batter productivity as a result of the recently changed strike zone could raise concern for the Major League Baseball Players Union and individual baseball players. University of Florida Assistant Professor of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management Brian Mills will present new findings on this subject Aug. 1 at the Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM) in
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking it to the Tweets -- statistics proves Twitter a powerful tool in forecasting crimeAlthough most people don't broadcast in advance their intention to engage in criminal activity, University of Virginia Assistant Professor of Systems and Engineering Information Matthew Gerber has discovered that the use of Twitter can help predict crime. Gerber's research and work developing statistical crime prediction methods will be presented on Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, at the Joint Statistical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecule's role in maintaining liver size and function revealedResearchers at TMDU found that the YAP molecule is a key mediator in the identification and clearance of damaged cells from the liver. They showed that, in the absence of injury, YAP activation led to hepatocyte proliferation. However, when injury was induced to mouse liver, it instead induced hepatocytes to migrate to the hepatic sinusoids, undergo cell death, and be degraded by the immune system
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bangladesh doubles wildlife sanctuary to save its tigersBangladesh has more than doubled the size of the wildlife sanctuary in the world's largest mangrove forest to try to protect endangered Bengal tigers whose numbers have fallen sharply, officials said Tuesday.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Chimpanzees Are First Animal Shown to Develop Telltale Markers of Alzheimer's DiseaseBrain analysis revealed protein plaques and tangles, but whether the animals develop dementia is unclear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Film a Polar BearIt starts with a terrifying helicopter ride -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Germany tests facial recognition technology at rail stationGerman authorities have launched a six-month test of automatic facial recognition technology at a Berlin railway station, which the country's top security official says could be used to improve security in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK presses tech firms to choke off online extremismBritain's interior minister is traveling to California to press Internet firms including Facebook, Twitter and Google to stem the flow of extremist content online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US firms buying timber from illegal PNG logging: NGOAmerican consumers may be fuelling logging linked to illegal land grabs in Papua New Guinea which have devastated local communities and the world's third largest tropical rain forest, Global Witness said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human-wildlife conflict in India: 1 human killed every dayA deadly conflict is underway between India's growing masses and its wildlife, confined to ever-shrinking forests and grasslands, with data showing that about one person has been killed every day for the past three years by roaming tigers or rampaging elephants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climateAs climate change brings new pressures to bear on wildlife, species must "move, adapt, acclimate, or die." Erik Beever and colleagues review the literature on acclimation through behavioral flexibility, identifying patterns in examples from invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fishes, in the cover article for the August issue of the Ecological Society of America's (ESA) journal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's never too cold for quantumThe peculiar characteristics demonstrated by 'quantum critical points' at absolute zero remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detecting radio waves with entangled atomsResearchers at ICFO have harnessed the weirdness of quantum entanglement to detect ultra-faint radio signals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines drowning-induced brain injury in childrenA new study indicates that children who develop brain injury due to non-fatal drowning often experience severe motor deficits but maintain relatively intact perceptual and cognitive capabilities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution of fan worm eyesScientists examining the multiple eyes found on the tentacles of fan worms have discovered they evolved independently from their other visual systems, specifically to support the needs of their lifestyle.
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Gizmodo
The All Controller Might Replace Every Last Controller You Own All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo Having lots of choice when it comes to consoles and platforms is great for gamers, but having piles of proprietary controllers and accessories in your gaming room is not. The creators of the All Controller tried to fix that problem by designing a gamepad that works with everything from the PS4, to PCs, to iPhones so you can use a single controller for every ga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cycad leaf physiology research neededThe living cycad species are among the world's most threatened plant groups, but are also among the world's least studied plant groups. The need for a greater understanding of basic physiology of cycads has been discussed for decades, yet to date the needed research is lacking.
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Gizmodo
LG's Modular Sound Bar Is Good, Newfangled Fun All photos: Adam Clark Estes With the new Sound Bar Flex, LG didn’t make the world’s best sound bar. It’s actually a bit of a stretch to call the modular, three-piece speaker system a sound bar at all. And at $430, the (mostly) wireless setup isn’t quite a bargain either. You know what, though? The Sound Bar Flex sure is fun to use. At CES in January, LG showed off an intriguing twist on the trad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial biofilms, begoneBy some estimates, bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics—so-called superbugs - will cause more deaths than cancer by 2050.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Scientific Reason You Don't Like LED Bulbs — and the Simple Way to Fix ThemLED flickering is even more pronounced than that of fluorescent lighting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inside Science
Tiny Electronic Tags Could Fit Inside Cells Tiny Electronic Tags Could Fit Inside Cells Researchers produce smallest known radio frequency identification tags. cells.jpg Conceptual illustration by Yuen Yiu , staff writer Image credits: zhouxuan12345678 via flickr/ CC BY-SA 2.0 Technology Tuesday, August 1, 2017 - 09:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Electronics small enough to fit inside cells may one day help scientists
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New Scientist - News
A US firm is microchipping staff – here’s what they should fearSure, an electronic implant will do away with troublesome security cards and forgotten computer passwords, but beware the hidden downsides, says Jamais Cascio
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Viden
Danske forskere har fundet en af årsagerne til demensNy viden om de biologiske årsager til demens kan hjælpe med udviklingen af medicin mod sygdommen.
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The Atlantic
Did 13 Reasons Why Spark a Suicide Contagion Effect? Within days of the release of 13 Reasons Why , Netflix’s teen-oriented drama about a high-school student who takes her own life, the show was being loudly criticized by suicide-prevention experts, who were concerned it could lead to a suicide-contagion effect and a spate of copycat attempts. Now, research published at the end of July argues that those concerns may have been founded. Google querie
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The Atlantic
Venezuelan Authorities Seize 2 Opposition Leaders Two Venezuelan opposition leaders were arrested overnight, their relatives said, two days after President Nicolas Maduro claimed victory in a vote that all but turns his country into a one-party dictatorship. Leopoldo López and Antonio Ledezma had both been under house arrest since 2014 for their role in deadly anti-government protests that year. Although both men remain influential, their direct
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The Atlantic
What We Lose: A Striking Novel About Filial Grief When Zinzi Clemmons was a graduate student at Columbia, at work on her MFA, her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Clemmons had been writing a novel with a more or less linear narrative structure. She moved back home to Philadelphia and kept writing, but differently now, taking notes and collecting fragments of text as she cared for her mother. “The only time and energy I could muster resul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows adolescent depression increases risk for violenceAdolescent depression increases the risk of violence, suggests a study published in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algorithms that can sketch, recreate 3-D shapesA University of British Columbia computer scientist has created a new software that can create a design sketch of an everyday object, addressing the challenge of accurately describing shapes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Help from the stomach for dry eyesAfter a long day of working at the computer, scratchy contact lenses are not only painful, over longer periods of time they can also damage ocular tissue. Relief may be in sight from a natural mucus component referred to as a mucin. A team from the Technical University of Munich has now succeeded in demonstrating that contact lenses coated with purified porcine gastric mucin do not cause damage to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into diagnosing and treating invasive fungal infections will help save livesThousands of patients suffering from invasive fungal infections in intensive-care units or after organ transplantation will benefit from the latest insights into diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cheap and simple detection of neurotoxic chemicalsChemical contamination from pesticides is a serious problem. Detection methods can be complicated, difficult to implement, and expensive. However, researchers in Japan have discovered a method to reduce the cost and simplify the process for detecting a neurotoxin found in several pesticides called Nereistoxin. It is hoped that the method will bring about improved detection techniques.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene-regulatory factors shown to improve pancreatic cancer response to chemotherapyTMDU researchers revealed that, in pancreatic cancer, the microRNAs miR-509-5p and miR-1243 can promote E-cadherin expression and thereby reduce the likelihood of cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or indeed reverse this transition. This ability to stop cells from adopting a phenotype linked to high migration and invasiveness was also shown to synergistically increase the cancer c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adorable alpine animal acclimates behavior to a changing climateAs climate change brings new pressures to bear on wildlife, species must 'move, adapt, acclimate, or die.' Erik Beever and colleagues review the literature on acclimation through behavioral flexibility, identifying patterns among invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fishes, in ESA's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, with focus on the American pika. Beever will e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate transmission of diabetes symptoms via prion-like mechanismResearchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered that the symptoms of diabetes can be induced by a misfolded form of a pancreatic protein. The findings, which are reported in a paper to be published August 1 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, raise the possibility that type 2 diabetes can be transmitted by a mechanism simila
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cycad leaf physiology research neededWhat pertains to conifers does not necessarily translate to cycads.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers find that the sun's core rotates 4 times faster than its surfaceThe sun's core rotates nearly four times faster than the sun's surface, an international team of astronomers reports in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. The most likely explanation is that this core rotation is left over from the period when the sun formed, some 4.6 billion years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Successful prediction of multi-year US droughts and wildfire riskA new study shows that difference in water temperature between the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans together with global warming impact the risk of drought and wildfire in southwestern North America. A new model proves capable of much longer-term forecasts of mega-drought and active wildfire seasons than those currently available to people in agriculture, water management and forestry.
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Gizmodo
Wild Rumors About A Secretive New Star Trek Project Rumors are circulating about the story of the next James Bond movie, including the return of some familiar faces. Brie Larson discusses the expectations of starring in Captain Marvel . New Flash set pictures reveal and updated suit for Barry Allen. Plus, American Horror Story: Cult loses a regular and a new Preacher clip. Spoilers now! James Bond 25 British tabloid The Mirror , claims that the ne
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