Science : NPR

White House Reverses Effort To Delay Obama Ozone Regulations The Trump administration has reversed its effort to delay implementation of an Environmental Protection Agency regulation lowering acceptable ozone emissions, a major component of smog. The reversal comes after 16 states filed a lawsuit saying the delay was unlawful.
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Gizmodo

A Game That Explains Why Nobody Trusts Each Other Anymore GIF The Evolution of Trust is an interactive presentation by Nicky Case that explores cheating and cooperation. The short narrative experience attempts to explain the rise of mistrust and suspicion in today’s society through the lens of game theory. It’s fascinating, and it’s this week’s Indie Pick. The Christmas Truce of 1914 was a remarkable show of charity, as soldiers from World War One laid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aggressive breast cancers may contribute to racial survival disparitiesIn the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, UNC Lineberger researchers led an analysis of approximately 1,000 invasive breast tumors. The study confirmed that young black women are more likely to have a type of breast cancer that does not express any of the receptors for targeted biologic therapies. The study also identified variation by race within a clinical breast cancer type that has the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon conversionNew CO2 experiments may lead to artificial, renewable fuels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers: Too much information can be a good thingWhen does a person receive too much health information? What's the best way for health providers to convey information without consumers skipping over or forgetting key information? According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the answer lies in the goal of a specific health objective. Dolores Albarracin, professor of psychology, led a study of the behavior of some 459 people to shine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two sides to this energy storyRice University scientists turn laser-induced graphene into a two-sided electrocatalyst that efficiently splits water into oxygen and hydrogen.
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Gizmodo

The WannaCry Ransomware Attackers Are Cashing Out Their Bitcoin at a Dangerous Time When the WannaCry ransomware attack hit back in May, it was really good at causing chaos but not so great at generating ransom money. Some analysts said that the attackers were amateurish in their methods. If the people behind the malware are as clumsy as they seem, they should be worried, because they recently started moving what Bitcoin they did collect during a particularly perilous time for c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

RNAi multiplies its effect in repressing gene expression, structural view suggestsRNAi is a mainstay of contemporary biological research. But how exactly this crucial mechanism functions in humans remains a partial mystery that we are now one step closer to solving. Structural biologists have now published atomic-resolution pictures and a comprehensive analysis of the workings of a part of the RNAi machinery in Molecular Cell. They've discovered how several parts of the machine
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Isotope fingerprints in feathers reveal songbirds' secret breeding groundsUsing isotope fingerprints in feathers, researchers have pinpointed the northern breeding grounds of a small, colorful songbird.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gadgets: Tech gear tops the list for back-to-school shoppingBack to school shopping lists in my day included pens, pencils, and notebook paper. These days your list is a lot more modern and tech-related. Here are a few items that would make great additions to any back-to-school shopping list.
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Gizmodo

The Dark Tower Turns an Epic Fantasy Into a Shockingly Mundane Movie Idris Elba is The Gunslinger in The Dark Tower. All Images: Sony The biggest problem with The Dark Tower movie is that when it ends, you don’t feel the need to see more. Unlike the epic books that inspired it, the movie is streamlined to be one complete story. Hypothetically, this should be a good thing. But with The Dark Tower , that process removes any gravitas needed to make us care about what
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'Confederate' and 'Black America': Is There a Right Way to Put Slavery Onscreen?Two recently announced projects tackle the nation's most shameful legacy—with a speculative-fiction twist. Does it still matter who tells the story?
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Live Science

Weird: How Does a Baby's 'Twin' End Up Inside His Abdomen?A baby boy in India was born with his own "twin" inside his abdomen — an extremely rare condition called "fetus in fetu."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yoga effective at reducing symptoms of depressionA multi-week regimen may be an effective complement to traditional therapy for depression, multiple studies suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Low-power cold-atom source developed for atomic clocks, physics experimentsA reversible alkali atom source has been developed that runs at low power and low voltage, which is beneficial in applications such as smaller, more efficient, and ultimately portable atomic clocks that use cold atoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twilight observations reveal huge storm on NeptuneStriking images of a storm system nearly the size of Earth have astronomers doing a double-take after pinpointing its location near Neptune's equator, a region where no bright cloud has been seen before. The discovery was made at dawn on June 26 as researchers were testing the Keck telescope to see whether it could make useful observations during twilight, a time most astronomers consider unusable
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Promising results for patients with endoscopic treatmentsA simpler procedure for collecting biopsy specimens during various procedures can improve patient care, research shows. Additionally, study indicates how a relatively new procedure, POEM, has been adapted to help an additional set of patients with gastroparesis, a troubling stomach problem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Of mice and cheeseburgers: Experimental drug reverses obesity-related liver diseaseAn experimental drug protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The drug reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a high fat, sugar and cholesterol diet. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease found in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lizard blizzard survivors tell story of natural selectionAn unusually cold winter in the US in 2014 took a toll on the green anole lizard, a tree-dwelling creature common to the southeastern United States. A new study offers a rare view of natural selection in this species, showing how the lizard survivors at the southernmost part of their range in Texas came to be more like their cold-adapted counterparts further north.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How low-cost fuel cell catalysts workNew work is resolving difficult fuel-cell performance questions, both in determining efficient new materials and understanding how they work at an atomic level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The power of radiomics to improve precision medicinePrecision medicine has become the leading innovation of cancer treatment. Patients are routinely treated with drugs that are designed to target specific tumors and molecules. Despite the progress that has been made in targeted cancer therapies, the path has been slow and scientists have a long road ahead. In a collaborative project, investigated the emerging field of radiomics has the potential to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New hope to prevent dangerous blood clots found in the legsCommon anti-allergy medicines could prove to be an effective treatment for potentially fatal blood clots in the legs, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New hope for faster acting antidepressantsFor people suffering from depression, a day without treatment can seem like a lifetime. A new study explains why the most commonly prescribed antidepressants can take as long as six weeks to have an effect. The findings could one day lead to more effective and faster acting drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate plays role in decline of one of Asia's most critical water resourcesClimate variability -- rather than the presence of a major dam -- is most likely the primary cause for a water supply decline in East Asia's largest floodplain lake system, according to an expert.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Different sensory pathways engaged in feeling and responding to external temperatureResearchers have investigated different sensory neural pathways involved in thermoregulation by injecting toxins into parts of the brain involved in 'feeling' and responding to temperature changes in the environment. They found that, even upon disabling the pathway for such feeling, rats were able to avoid uncomfortably hot and cold floor plates, but that disabling part of the lateral parabrachial
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA provides new insights on the control of invasive Russian knapweedA recent study sheds new light on the control of Russian knapweed, an invasive plant found in the Western US.
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NYT > Science

Flash Dance: Adventures in Lightning Photography“It was behind the clouds, so I didn’t see any bolts, but it lit up the sky for long enough to allow me to capture its frequency.”
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NYT > Science

The Test Was ‘Bogus’: Readers Debate Live-or-Die Tests for DogsNew York Times readers debated live-or-die tests for dogs, which animal shelters use when evaluating aggression in dogs.
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NYT > Science

Feature: The Loyal Engineers Steering NASA’s Voyager Probes Across the UniverseAs the Voyager mission is winding down, so, too, are the careers of the aging explorers who expanded our sense of home in the galaxy.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why a Birth Control Pill For Men Is Still Not Here
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New Scientist - News

Giant loner asteroids suggest baby planets formed quicklyThe oldest intact asteroids hint that planets didn’t grow by slowly gathering small space rocks, but came from rapidly collapsing dust
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New Scientist - News

Hot yoga classes reduce emotional eating and negative thoughtsThere’s growing evidence that yoga can help with symptoms of depression, suggesting the practice might complement talking therapies and antidepressants
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New Scientist - News

It took 2000 years to make seed for America’s famous ‘corn belt’Maize reached the southern US 4000 years ago, but wasn’t farmed in cooler areas until 2000 years later – because it took that long to develop cool-hardy strains
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New Scientist - News

Teacup tornado’s inner twists and writhes seen for first timeThe first ever detailed look inside a liquid tornado could help explain everything from how storms form to the inner workings of the sun’s plasma
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WannaCry-Stopping Hacker MalwareTech Charged With Helping Write Kronos Banking TrojanMarcus Hutchins is under arrest in Las Vegas for allegedly writing Kronos, a banking trojan, three years ago.
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Gizmodo

Watch Metallic Birthday Balloons Touch a Power Line and Explode Like a Grenade GIF If a looming helium shortage isn’t enough to dissuade you from getting balloons for your next birthday party, consider the consequences if they escape from their ribbon moorings and end up brushing against some high-voltage power lines. You might be safer decorating for your kid’s party with hand grenades. This incident was filmed in Long Beach, California, and the explosion is likely the res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bioprinted veins reveal new drug diffusion detailsA new advance, published this week in the journal Biomicrofluidics, now offers the ability to construct vascularized tissue and mimic in vivo drug administration in 3-D bioprinted liver tissue. A truly international collaboration, with researchers affiliated with Chile, Italy, Saudi Arabia, Korea and the US, developed this relatively simple liver model to offer a more accurate system for drug toxi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hacker who helped stop global cyberattack arrested in US (Update)Marcus Hutchins, a young British researcher credited with derailing a global cyberattack in May, was arrested for allegedly creating and distributing malicious software designed to collect bank-account passwords, U.S. authorities said Thursday.
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Live Science

What's Causing So Many Earthquakes in Oklahoma?A 4.2-magnitude earthquake hit Edmond, Oklahoma last night (Aug. 2) at 9:56 pm. local time, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Inside Science

Einstein Papers Project Einstein Papers Project Early writings from Einstein reveal more than historians ever knew. Einstein Papers Project Video of Einstein Papers Project Culture Thursday, August 3, 2017 - 15:30 Keith Landry, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Albert Einstein. A brilliant mind. A compelling theorist. And a strong advocate for peace. Einstein revolutionized physics and science with his general theory of r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bioprinted veins reveal new drug diffusion detailsArtificially constructed human tissues and organs have been developed with a number of different purposes in mind, from advanced robotics and novel materials to drug screening. The precision demanded by drug screening applications puts especially large demands on how accurately biomimetic constructs replicate tissue characteristics and behaviors involved in drug absorption.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twilight observations reveal huge storm on NeptuneSpectacular sunsets and sunrises are enough to dazzle most of us, but to astronomers, dusk and dawn are a waste of good observing time. They want a truly dark sky.
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Ars Technica

The FCC is full again, with three Republicans and two Democrats Enlarge / Ajit Pai, Jessica Rosenworcel, and Brendan Carr prepare to testify before the Senate Commerce Committee during a confirmation hearing on July 19, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla ) The US Senate today confirmed the nominations of Republican Brendan Carr and Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel to fill the two empty seats on the Federal Communications Commission. FCC Chairman Ajit
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Gizmodo

You Can Stream Thousands of Movies for Free With a New York Public Library Card GIF Gif source: YouTube Starting Friday, anyone with a New York Public Library or Brooklyn Public Library will be able to stream thousands of awesome movies, including the entire Criterion Collection. Why? Because libraries are awesome, that’s why. Truth be told, New York is playing a bit of catch up, after Los Angeles offered its public library card holders streaming movie privileges last month.
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Ars Technica

Defendant who texted teen to commit suicide sentenced to 15 months in jail Enlarge / Michelle Carter listens in during her sentencing hearing Thursday with one of her attorneys by her side. (credit: Clickondetroit.com ) A Massachusetts woman convicted of involuntary manslaughter because of text messages that cajoled her 18-year-old friend to commit suicide was sentenced Thursday to serve 15 months in jail. Michelle Carter, now 20, faced a maximum 20-year prison term. He
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The Atlantic

Even Trump Is Surprised by Australia's Cynical Migrant Policy One can learn a lot from the transcripts of President Trump's phone calls with Enrique Peña Nieto and Malcolm Turnbull, which were leaked and published in The Washington Post on Thursday. For one thing, it's evident that Trump did not prepare much for these discussions. But in neglecting to research the most basic questions ahead of time, he ended up just asking some, and in particular forcing Au
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cognitive science

Don't fear, AI is here... a great breakdown of ethics for artificial intelligence submitted by /u/alexa_y [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

Save $20 On The Trimmer Designed Specifically For Self-Haircuts Remington Shortcut Pro Haircut Kit , $34 after $10 in-cart discount and $10 clippable coupon Update : The $10 coupon is gone, but you’ll still see $10 off at checkout, bringing it down to $44. If you’re enough of a daredevil to give yourself a haircut, Remington’s Shortcut Pro makes the process as simple as possible. Advertisement For $34 (after a $10 off $50 promotion Amazon’s running, plus the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

August GIE studies show promising results for patients with endoscopic treatmentsThe August issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), features a study reporting that a simpler procedure for collecting biopsy specimens during various procedures can improve patient care, and a study showing how a relatively new procedure, POEM, has been adapted to help an additional set of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Twilight observations reveal huge storm on NeptuneStriking images of a storm system nearly the size of Earth have astronomers doing a double-take after pinpointing its location near Neptune's equator, a region where no bright cloud has been seen before. The discovery was made at dawn on June 26 as UC Berkeley graduate student Ned Molter was testing the Keck telescope to see whether it could make useful observations during twilight, a time most as
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HRL develop a low-power cold-atom source for atomic clocks and physics experimentsHRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have developed a reversible alkali atom source that runs at low power and low voltage, which is beneficial in applications such as smaller, more efficient, and ultimately portable atomic clocks that use cold atoms. The research on the device was published online June 13, 2017 in Applied Physics Letters.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Art Training Slideshow -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alaska's North Slope snow-free season is lengtheningOn the North Slope of Alaska, snow is melting earlier in the spring and the snow-in date is happening later in the fall, according to a new study.
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Gizmodo

How to Read a Silicon Valley Diversity Report So You Don’t Get Hoodwinked Photo: AP On Tuesday, Facebook released its annual diversity report with a mighty claim. For the first time in three years, the company said it actually increased its proportion of black employees, from 2 percent to 3 percent. But here’s the thing: Facebook hasn’t released the hard numbers that would actually prove that. By omitting this crucial data, Facebook’s cheerful, easy-to-read diversity r
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Ars Technica

After 43 years, gentle touch of a neutrino is finally observed Enlarge / The neutron source at Oak Ridge National Lab. (credit: Oak Ridge National Lab ) Neutrinos are noted for being extremely reluctant to interact with other matter. While it's possible to build hardware that will detect them, these detectors tend to be enormous in order to provide sufficient material for the neutrinos to interact with. Those interactions also take the form of energetic even
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Gizmodo

America Once Planned An Unstoppable Nuclear Doomsday Nightmare Weapon If you were to take the collective nuclear anxiety of the world during the height of the Cold War and somehow transfigure that into cold, hard engineering, you’d probably end up with something like this : the supersonic, low-altitude missile known as ‘The Flying Crowbar.’ Just to give an idea what this beast was like, here’s how Air and Space magazine described it: ...a locomotive-size missile th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada OKs Idaho company's genetically engineered potatoesThree types of potatoes genetically engineered by an Idaho company to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat, Canadian officials said Thursday.
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Ars Technica

America’s newest aircraft carrier uses “digital” catapult on fighter for first time Enlarge / An F/A-18 flies above the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) as its pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Jaime Struck, prepares for the first arrested landing aboard the new carrier on July 28. (credit: US Navy ) Last week, an F/A-18F Super Hornet from the US Navy's Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23 successfully landed and then took off from the recently commissioned USS Gerald R. Ford —the first full use of th
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Scientific American Content: Global

Beyond Medical IllustrationThe surprising applications of a profession you may not know exists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animal coloration research: On the threshold of a new eraIn the last 20 years, the field of animal coloration research has experienced explosive growth thanks to numerous technological advances, and it now stands on the threshold of a new era.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Primordial asteroids discoveredAstronomers recently discovered a relatively unpopulated region of the main asteroid belt, where the few asteroids present are likely pristine relics from early in solar system history. The team used a new search technique that also identified the oldest known asteroid family, which extends throughout the inner region of the main asteroid belt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologic drug APOSEC offers possible new treatments for dermal woundsAPOSEC is a substance obtained from white blood corpuscles. Even during its preclinical development, it was demonstrated that the multifactorial agent can be used in heart attacks, strokes, spinal cord injuries and for healing wounds. This promising substance is now in the clinical phase of the approval process that will license it as a new drug for healing external wounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alaska's North Slope snow-free season is lengtheningOn the North Slope of Alaska, snow is melting earlier in the spring and the snow-in date is happening later in the fall, according to a new study by CIRES and NOAA researchers. Atmospheric dynamics and sea ice conditions are behind this lengthening of the snow-free season, the scientists found, and the consequences are far reaching—including birds laying eggs sooner and iced-over rivers flowing ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New statistical models key yield powerful insight from health care databasesRecognizing that administrative health care databases can be a valuable, yet challenging, tool in the nation's ongoing pursuit of personalized medicine, statisticians Liangyuan Hu and Madhu Mazumdar of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed advanced statistical modeling and analytic tools that can make health care and medical data more meaningful. Hu will present their findings
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines tolerance of political lies for shared viewsWhy do political figures appear to be able to get away with mild truth bending and sometimes even outrageous lies?
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cognitive science

This Is How Your Fear and Outrage Are Being Sold for Profit [Article on the rise of clickbait.] submitted by /u/owenshen24 [link] [comments]
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Mountain Goats on Your Trail? They Like You, and Your UrineMountain goats in Glacier National Park, drawn to tourist sites because of protection from bears and easy access to minerals, have abandoned some predator defenses.
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Gizmodo

Facebook's Latest Solution to Fake News? More Machines, Baby Take a shot every time Facebook evades editorial accountability. On Thursday, Facebook announced that it is going to use “updated machine learning” algorithms in order to better spot and counter misinformation on its platform. The company says it will use its existing third-party fact checkers to review stories that the new algorithm flags, and their reports may be shown below flagged stories in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The future of search enginesNew efforts to combine artificial intelligence with crowdsourced annotators and information encoded in domain-specific resources have now been revealed by researchers. The work has the potential to improve general search engines, as well as ones like those for medical knowledge or non-English texts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate changeResearchers investigating nutrients in runoff from agricultural land warn that phosphorus losses will increase, due to climate change, unless this is mitigated by making major changes to agricultural practices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In the test tube instead of under the knifeNew forms of diagnosis and therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy have now been revealed by a team of neuroscientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

ART: New injectable antiretroviral treatment proved to be as effective as standard oral therapyA new clinical trial concludes that intramuscular administration of antiretrovirals every 4 or 8 weeks gets results similar to daily pill intake, shows research. Spacing drug intake would lead to greater adherence to treatment and an improved quality of life for HIV patients, add investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arts engagement can help counter divisions in societyEngagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research shows.
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Science | The Guardian

A Becoming Resemblance: artist creates portraits using Chelsea Manning's DNA In a new exhibition, Heather Dewey-Hagborg used hair clippings and cheek swabs from Manning, collected during a two-year correspondence In the center of the room at New York’s Fridman Gallery are multiple faces – white, black and brown, each bearing an almost imperceptible resemblance to one another – suspended on wires from the ceiling. The 30 portraits were created by the artist Heather Dewey-H
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Ars Technica

Charter has moved millions of customers to new—and often higher—pricing Enlarge / A Charter Spectrum vehicle. (credit: Charter ) Charter Communications has moved 30 percent of the customers it acquired in a blockbuster merger onto new pricing plans, resulting in many people paying higher prices. Charter closed the acquisitions of Time Warner Cable (TWC) and Bright House Networks in May 2016. Before the merger, Charter had about 6.8 million customers; afterward, Chart
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Muscle, not brain, may hold answers to some sleep disordersScientists exploring the brain for answers to certain sleep disorders may have been looking in the wrong place.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows the power of radiomics to improve precision medicinePrecision medicine has become the leading innovation of cancer treatment. Patients are routinely treated with drugs that are designed to target specific tumors and molecules. Despite the progress that has been made in targeted cancer therapies, the path has been slow and scientists have a long road ahead. In a collaborative project, researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Dana-Farber Cancer I
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New statistical models key yield powerful insight from health care databasesRecognizing that administrative health care databases can be a valuable, yet challenging, tool in the nation's ongoing pursuit of personalized medicine, statisticians Liangyuan Hu and Madhu Mazumdar of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed advanced statistical modeling and analytic tools that can make health care and medical data more meaningful.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines tolerance of political lies for shared viewsA new study, from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and published online in Social Psychological and Personality Science, suggests people have more leniency for politicians' lies when they bolster a shared belief that a specific political stance is morally right.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Ancient genomes show how maize adapted to life at high altitudes Changes to flowering times helped the staple crop spread into new areas thousands of years ago. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22403
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Ars Technica

What kind of gaming rig can run at 16K resolution? The consumer gaming world might be in a tizzy about 4K consoles and displays of late, but that resolution standard wasn't nearly enough for one team of PC tinkerers. The folks over at Linus Tech Tips have posted a very entertaining video showing off a desktop PC build capable of running (some) games at an astounding 16K resolution. That's a 15260×8640, for those counting the over 132 million pixe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Believing the future will be favorable may prevent actionPeople tend to believe that others will come around to their point of view over time, according to findings from a series of studies published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings show that this 'belief in a favorable future' holds across various contexts and cultures, shedding light on some of the causes and consequences of the political p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From battle to business: UC researchers help veterans return to workAfter a survey revealed that many veterans struggle when returning to the civilian workforce, a team of University of Cincinnati researchers are helping them to better make the switch from the battleground to the business world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How long do batters 'keep their eye on the ball'? Eye and head movements differ when swinging or taking a pitchWhere are baseball batters looking during the fraction of a second when a pitched ball is in their air? Their visual tracking strategies differ depending on whether they're swinging at the pitch, reports a study in the August issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Of mice and cheeseburgers: Experimental drug reverses obesity-related liver diseaseAn experimental drug protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The drug reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a high fat, sugar and cholesterol diet. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease found in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alaska's North Slope snow-free season is lengtheningOn the North Slope of Alaska, snow is melting earlier in the spring and the snow-in date is happening later in the fall, according to a new study by CIRES and NOAA researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals exactly how low-cost fuel cell catalysts workNew work at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge national laboratories is resolving difficult fuel-cell performance questions, both in determining efficient new materials and understanding how they work at an atomic level. The research is described this week in the journal Science
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SwRI part of international team identifying primordial asteroidsSouthwest Research Institute (SwRI) was part of an international team that recently discovered a relatively unpopulated region of the main asteroid belt, where the few asteroids present are likely pristine relics from early in solar system history. The team used a new search technique that also identified the oldest known asteroid family, which extends throughout the inner region of the main aster
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clever experiment documents multiscale fluid dynamicsUniversity of Chicago physicists working in the nascent field of experimental vortex dynamics have, with unexpected help from a Sharpie marker, measured an elusive but fundamental property of fluid flow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The biology of colorScientists are on a threshold of a new era of color science with regard to animals, according to a comprehensive review of the field by a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by professor Tim Caro at UC Davis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The biology of colorIn a wide-ranging and comprehensive review, a group of evolutionary scientists, turn their attention to a diverse area of science and set out what they believe are the key questions for the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein-rich diet may help soothe inflamed gutThe combination of a bacterium that normally lives in the gut and a protein-rich diet promotes a more tolerant, less inflammatory gut immune system, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, suggest a way to tilt the gut immune system away from inflammation, potentially spelling relief for people living with inflammatory bowel diseas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural compound coupled with specific gut microbes may prevent severe fluResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a particular gut microbe can prevent severe flu infections in mice, likely by breaking down naturally occurring compounds -- called flavonoids -- commonly found in foods such as black tea, red wine and blueberries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coming face-to-face with disability could end supernatural myth-making in AfricaMany in rural Africa believe disability is caused by supernatural forces, curses and as 'punishment'.The stigma leaves disabled people vulnerable to neglect and abuse - with sexual abuse reported by 90 percent those with learning difficulties.Disabled children are often kept 'locked up' at home. But the more that communities come into contact with disability, the more awareness grows.Medical expla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animal coloration research: On the threshold of a new eraIn the last 20 years, the field of animal coloration research has experienced explosive growth thanks to numerous technological advances, and it now stands on the threshold of a new era.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farmers selected maize for agricultural use at high elevationsBy analyzing ancient genomes of maize, scientists have found evidence suggesting that eventual agricultural use of the crop throughout the temperate highlands of the US likely occurred due to propagation of varieties with earlier flowering times.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lizards demonstrate rapid evolution in the face of extreme coldBy studying a population of lizards before and after a sudden cold snap that struck the US, scientists have observed how the surviving population underwent rapid adaptation in response to the event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The first observation of a coherent neutrino-nucleus collisionThe possibility that neutrinos interact coherently with the nucleus of an atom was first theoretically described in 1974 -- and now physicists report the first observation of such an event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient asteroid family unveils the early solar systemAstronomers have identified an ancient family of asteroids residing in the Main Belt (the area between Mars and Jupiter) that is nearly as old as the solar system itself, yielding important insights into how the planets and asteroids formed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's smallest neutrino detector finds big physics fingerprintAfter more than a year of operation at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the COHERENT experiment, using the world's smallest neutrino detector, has found a big fingerprint of the elusive, electrically neutral particles that interact only weakly with matter. The research, performed at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and published in the journal Science, provides comp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's smallest neutrino detector observes elusive interactions of particlesIn 1974, a Fermilab physicist predicted a new way for ghostly particles called neutrinos to interact with matter. More than four decades later, a UChicago-led team of physicists built the world's smallest neutrino detector to observe the elusive interaction for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lizard blizzard survivors tell story of natural selectionAn unusually cold winter in the US in 2014 took a toll on the green anole lizard, a tree-dwelling creature common to the southeastern United States. A new study offers a rare view of natural selection in this species, showing how the lizard survivors at the southernmost part of their range in Texas came to be more like their cold-adapted counterparts further north. The findings are reported in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animals have it all over us when it comes to colorUniversity of Queensland researchers have developed new knowledge on how animals see and use color, and how their color vision has evolved. The Queensland Brain Institute's Professor Justin Marshall, co-author of a study undertaken with international colleagues, said color had an important role in reproduction and prey-predator interactions, although it served diverse functions in various animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists link biodiversity genomics with museum wisdom through new public databaseA new publicly available database will catalog metadata associated with biologic samples, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses. It links publicly available genetic data to records of where and when samples were collected. Such information is critical for comparing biodiversity in different locations worldwide, across time. Despi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yoga effective at reducing symptoms of depressionPeople who suffer from depression may want to look to yoga as a complement to traditional therapies as the practice appears to lessen symptoms of the disorder, according to studies presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method for organ transplant monitoring promises better care for patientsUsing a combination of DNA sequencing and computer science techniques, a team of researchers has developed a new method for monitoring the health of organ transplant patients -- one that promises to provide life-saving clues to diagnose organ rejection at an early stage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Air travel responsible for spread of dengue through AsiaWhile the incidences of many other infectious diseases have declined over the past decade, the number of cases and outbreaks of dengue virus have continued to increase. The spread of dengue to new areas is likely due in large part to trends in air travel, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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Ars Technica

Samsung’s Bixby—A frustrating voice assistant with all the wrong features Bixby versus the Google Assistant. Video edited by Justin Wolfson. (video link) Bixby—Samsung's voice assistant designed to take on Apple's Siri, Amazon's Alexa, Google's Google Assistant, and Microsoft's Cortana—has finally been released. Its launch has already been a bumpy one—Bixby was supposed to launch three months ago with the Galaxy S8, and while that happened in Korea, getting Bixby to ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

ONC201 may inhibit cancer stem cell self-renewals by altering their gene expressionONC201 may inhibit cancer stem cell self-renewals by altering their gene expression, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deciphering potent DNA toxin's secretsResearchers have worked out the molecular details that explain how one of the most potent bacterial toxins known -- yatakemycin (YTM) -- kills cells by preventing their DNA from replicating.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alkaline soil, sensible sensorProducers sometimes face challenges that go deep into the soil. They need answers to help the soil, on site. A portable field sensor can accurately measure minerals in soils more easily and efficiently than existing methods. And a research team, including a middle school student and her scientist father, can confirm it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting therapeutic sound waves through thick skullsUltrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers has now developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring basis.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Neutrinos seen scattering off an atom’s nucleus for the first timeNew type of interaction confirms that neutrinos play by the rules.
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Gizmodo

Book Purists, It's Finally Time to Give Up and Start Watching Game of Thrones Image: HBO Hello, folks! Remember how I thought I was going to turn in a mail column last week after working 10 days in a row, most of which were spent covering the San Diego Comic-Con? Oh, to be so young and naive again. Hopefully this week makes up for it by answering why Fantastic Four movies don’t and can’t work in the modern superhero movie era, if it’s possible to worry about Jodie Whittake
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New Scientist - News

Space cucumbers may help plants grow better water-seeking rootsAway from Earth’s gravity, cucumber roots head towards water. Mimicking that moisture-seeking behaviour on our planet could help plants adapt to drought
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The Atlantic

How a Backhoe Operator Found 3,000-Year-Old Footprints in Arizona Not long after Dan Arnit made the biggest archaeological find of his career, he had to go build a parking lot. The news of his discovery— 3,000-year-old footprints made by a family walking through ancient fields—had made it up the chain at the Pima County government in Arizona, which wanted to show off the oldest footprints ever found in the Southwest . But the archaeological site was a mess. Arn
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The Atlantic

The Marble of Michelangelo's Dreams High in the Apuan Alps of Tuscany sits Monte Altissimo, a 5,213-foot (1,589-meter) mountain, climbed in 1517 by the Italian artist Michelangelo in pursuit of fine marble for his sculptures. There, according to Reuters , he “found the marble of his dreams. It was, the Renaissance master wrote, ‘of compact grain, homogeneous, crystalline, reminiscent of sugar.’” After receiving the blessing of Pope
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Physicists Capture the Elusive Neutrino Smacking Into an Atom's CoreBy measuring how a nucleus bounces off a neutrino, scientists crack a window into the personality of the shyest particle.
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Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on adjusting DNA: a new world | EditorialA hope that embryos could be purged of a genetic disease has been fulfilled in part. However, we are some way off reimplanting modified embryos into their mothers – for all the right reasons The news that a team of scientists from America and Korea have corrected a genetic defect in single-cell embryos is tremendous. In the short term it affirms the revolutionary principles of the gene editing tec
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Science : NPR

Artificial Light Deters Nocturnal Pollinators, Study Suggests Scientists in Switzerland used mobile street lamps to light up patches of cabbage thistle. They found that nocturnal pollinators, such as beetles and flies, mostly stayed away. (Image credit: Andy Feltham / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm)
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Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo CoffinThe paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.
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Ars Technica

Slayer of WCry worm charged with creating unrelated banking malware Enlarge / Hutchins in his office. (credit: Frank Augstein / AP) Marcus Hutchins, the 23-year-old security professional who accidentally stopped the spread of the virulent WCry ransomware worm in May, has been named in a federal indictment that alleges he was part of a conspiracy that created and distributed a piece of unrelated malware that steals banking credentials from unsuspecting computer us
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predatorsResearchers have named a new genus and species of armored dinosaur. The 110-million-year-old Borealopelta markmitchelli discovered in Alberta, Canada belongs to the nodosaur family. Now, an analysis of the 18-foot-long (5.5 m) specimen's exquisitely well-preserved form, complete with fully armored skin, suggests that the nodosaur had predators, despite the fact that it was the 'dinosaur equivalent
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The solar system's earliest asteroids may have all been massiveA team of astronomers says the original asteroids all came in one size: extra large.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian given almost 4 years in US botnet fraudA US judge on Thursday sentenced a Russian citizen to 46 months in prison for his role in a global computer fraud that took in millions, the Justice Department announced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Italy heatwave and drought spark killer wildfiresA heatwave that has left Italy sweltering in record temperatures sparked wildfires Thursday which claimed the life of one elderly woman and forced the closure of a major highway.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers identify oldest known asteroid familySouthwest Research Institute (SwRI) was part of an international team that recently discovered a relatively unpopulated region of the main asteroid belt, where the few asteroids present are likely pristine relics from early in solar system history. The team used a new search technique that also identified the oldest known asteroid family, which extends throughout the inner region of the main aster
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists link biodiversity genomics with museum wisdom through new public databaseA new publically available database will catalog metadata associated with biologic samples, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Animal coloration research: On the threshold of a new eraIn the last 20 years, the field of animal coloration research has experienced explosive growth thanks to numerous technological advances, and it now stands on the threshold of a new era.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals exactly how low-cost fuel cell catalysts workIn order to reduce the cost of next-generation polymer electrolyte fuel cells for vehicles, researchers have been developing alternatives to the prohibitively expensive platinum and platinum-group metal (PGM) catalysts currently used in fuel cell electrodes. New work at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge national laboratories is resolving difficult fuel-cell performance questions, both in determining effici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's smallest neutrino detector observes elusive interactions of particlesIn 1974, a Fermilab physicist predicted a new way for ghostly particles called neutrinos to interact with matter. More than four decades later, a UChicago-led team of physicists built the world's smallest neutrino detector to observe the elusive interaction for the first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lizard blizzard survivors tell story of natural selectionAn unusually cold winter in the U.S. in 2014 took a toll on the green anole lizard, a tree-dwelling creature common to the southeastern United States. A new study offers a rare view of natural selection in this species, showing how the lizard survivors at the southernmost part of their range in Texas came to be more like their cold-adapted counterparts further north.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intertwining vortices finally measured in laboratoryUniversity of Chicago physicists working in the nascent field of experimental vortex dynamics have, with unexpected help from a Sharpie marker, achieved the first measurements of an elusive but fundamental property of fluid flow.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

How Does This Devil's Canyon Prospector's Gold Haul Stack Up Against His Expectations? Devil's Canyon | Tuesdays at 10/9c Ben is the last man standing in Devil's Canyon - but in this environment, a longer stay does not guarantee a bigger payoff. Who found the most gold? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: http://discoverygo.com/devils-canyon More: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/devils-canyon/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook
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Gizmodo

Scientists Just Discovered the Oldest Asteroid Family Ever Artist’s depiction of asteroids in the Main Belt between Mars and Jupiter. (Image: NASA) For billions of years, the Solar System’s asteroids have been involved in an endless game of bumper cars, smashing into each other and splintering into smaller bits. But get this—astronomers have just detected a clump of asteroids that has managed, quite miraculously, to stay intact since they first formed so
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Gizmodo

Physicists Prove 40-Year-Old Prediction With Incredible Neutrino Observation SNS (Image: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US DOE, Genevieve Martin) Physicists make a lot of statements about stuff they hope will happen, but might not happen in their lifetimes. One physicist, for example, thought that in certain cases, the incredibly common but hard-to-detect neutrino particles would somehow make entire atomic nuclei wiggle. He thought it a silly idea to even propose, given h
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cold Snap Shapes Lizard SurvivorsAn epic bout of cold weather quickly altered a population of lizards—an example of natural selection in action. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science current issue

UBE2O remodels the proteome during terminal erythroid differentiation During terminal differentiation, the global protein complement is remodeled, as epitomized by erythrocytes, whose cytosol is ~98% globin. The erythroid proteome undergoes a rapid transition at the reticulocyte stage; however, the mechanisms driving programmed elimination of preexisting cytosolic proteins are unclear. We found that a mutation in the murine Ube2o gene, which encodes a ubiquitin-con
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Science current issue

The biology of color Coloration mediates the relationship between an organism and its environment in important ways, including social signaling, antipredator defenses, parasitic exploitation, thermoregulation, and protection from ultraviolet light, microbes, and abrasion. Methodological breakthroughs are accelerating knowledge of the processes underlying both the production of animal coloration and its perception, ex
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Scientists can't be silent
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Stealing industrial secrets pays off--at first
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China cracks down on fraud
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Science current issue

Embryo editing takes another step to clinic
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Science current issue

Cosmic ray catcher will probe supernovae from new perch
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Science current issue

Anthrax cousin wreaks havoc in the rainforest
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Science current issue

Elderly chimps may get Alzheimer's disease
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Science current issue

The stem cell skeptic
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Science current issue

House of the sun
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Science current issue

Helicity--invariant even in a viscous fluid
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Science current issue

New developments for protein quality control
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Science current issue

Evolution, climate change, and extreme events
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Science current issue

A low-loss origami plasmonic waveguide
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Science current issue

Amphibians on the brink
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Science current issue

Targeting an energy sensor to treat diabetes
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Science current issue

Estimating the health benefits of environmental regulations
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Science current issue

The perils of permanence
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Science current issue

Postmodern Prometheus
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Science current issue

Elemental haiku
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Science current issue

Toward a targeted treatment for addiction
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Science current issue

Neuromodulation with nanoparticles
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Science current issue

Estimating temperate adaptation in ancient maize
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Forcing polymers to be semiconductors
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Fragmented by diabetic stress
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Science current issue

Eat more plants for influenza resilience
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Science current issue

Hitting a dozen enzymes with one drug
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Science current issue

Linking fluids as they twist and writhe
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Science current issue

Extreme events bring rapid change
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Science current issue

Spin-charge separation in atomic chains
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Science current issue

Fixing with folate
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Science current issue

Containing fungal threats to amphibians
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Science current issue

Accumulating evidence for the Zundel motif
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Science current issue

DREADD not the designer compound
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Science current issue

Removing orphan proteins from the system
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Science current issue

Replacing platinum in air-fed fuel cells
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Science current issue

Messaging with RNAs
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In living color
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Science current issue

Cas9 endonuclease and off-target activity
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Science current issue

New flier glides into the Pacific
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Electing the best and the broadest
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Science current issue

Changing ecosystems in cow stomachs
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Globalization is not recent
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Mysterious Mediator multiprotein
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Science current issue

Bacterial signals promote mosquito development
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Science current issue

Removing the rainbow from diffractive optics
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Science current issue

UBE2O is a quality control factor for orphans of multiprotein complexes Many nascent proteins are assembled into multiprotein complexes of defined stoichiometry. Imbalances in the synthesis of individual subunits result in orphans. How orphans are selectively eliminated to maintain protein homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we found that the conserved ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2O directly recognized juxtaposed basic and hydrophobic patches on unassembled p
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Science current issue

Mechanochemical unzipping of insulating polyladderene to semiconducting polyacetylene Biological systems sense and respond to mechanical stimuli in a complex manner. In an effort to develop synthetic materials that transduce mechanical force into multifold changes in their intrinsic properties, we report on a mechanochemically responsive nonconjugated polymer that converts to a conjugated polymer via an extensive rearrangement of the macromolecular structure in response to force.
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Science current issue

Direct atomic-level insight into the active sites of a high-performance PGM-free ORR catalyst Platinum group metal–free (PGM-free) metal-nitrogen-carbon catalysts have emerged as a promising alternative to their costly platinum (Pt)–based counterparts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) but still face some major challenges, including (i) the identification of the most relevant catalytic site for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and (ii) demonstration of competitive PEFC performan
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Science current issue

Revealing hidden antiferromagnetic correlations in doped Hubbard chains via string correlators Topological phases, like the Haldane phase in spin-1 chains, defy characterization through local order parameters. Instead, nonlocal string order parameters can be employed to reveal their hidden order. Similar diluted magnetic correlations appear in doped one-dimensional lattice systems owing to the phenomenon of spin-charge separation. Here we report on the direct observation of such hidden mag
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Science current issue

Complete measurement of helicity and its dynamics in vortex tubes Helicity, a topological measure of the intertwining of vortices in a fluid flow, is a conserved quantity in inviscid fluids but can be dissipated by viscosity in real flows. Despite its relevance across a range of flows, helicity in real fluids remains poorly understood because the entire quantity is challenging to measure. We measured the total helicity of thin-core vortex tubes in water. For he
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Science current issue

Large-amplitude transfer motion of hydrated excess protons mapped by ultrafast 2D IR spectroscopy Solvation and transport of excess protons in aqueous systems play a fundamental role in acid-base chemistry and biochemical processes. We mapped ultrafast proton excursions along the proton transfer coordinate by means of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, both in bulk water and in a Zundel cation (H 5 O 2 ) + motif selectively prepared in acetonitrile. Electric fields from the environment an
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Science current issue

Winter storms drive rapid phenotypic, regulatory, and genomic shifts in the green anole lizard Extreme environmental perturbations offer opportunities to observe the effects of natural selection in wild populations. During the winter of 2013–2014, the southeastern United States endured an extreme cold event. We used thermal performance, transcriptomics, and genome scans to measure responses of lizard populations to storm-induced selection. We found significant increases in cold tolerance a
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Science current issue

The microbial metabolite desaminotyrosine protects from influenza through type I interferon The microbiota is known to modulate the host response to influenza infection through as-yet-unclear mechanisms. We hypothesized that components of the microbiota exert effects through type I interferon (IFN), a hypothesis supported by analysis of influenza in a gain-of-function genetic mouse model. Here we show that a microbially associated metabolite, desaminotyrosine (DAT), protects from influe
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Science current issue

Chemogenetics revealed: DREADD occupancy and activation via converted clozapine The chemogenetic technology DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) is widely used for remote manipulation of neuronal activity in freely moving animals. DREADD technology posits the use of "designer receptors," which are exclusively activated by the "designer drug" clozapine N-oxide (CNO). Nevertheless, the in vivo mechanism of action of CNO at DREADDs has never been
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Science current issue

Systemic pan-AMPK activator MK-8722 improves glucose homeostasis but induces cardiac hypertrophy 5'-Adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of energy homeostasis in eukaryotes. Despite three decades of investigation, the biological roles of AMPK and its potential as a drug target remain incompletely understood, largely because of a lack of optimized pharmacological tools. We developed MK-8722, a potent, direct, allosteric activator of all 12 mammalian AM
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Science current issue

Genomic estimation of complex traits reveals ancient maize adaptation to temperate North America By 4000 years ago, people had introduced maize to the southwestern United States; full agriculture was established quickly in the lowland deserts but delayed in the temperate highlands for 2000 years. We test if the earliest upland maize was adapted for early flowering, a characteristic of modern temperate maize. We sequenced fifteen 1900-year-old maize cobs from Turkey Pen Shelter in the tempera
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New Products
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Fighting through the darkness
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Popular Science

I floated in zero-g with former astronaut Scott Kelly Space And no, I did not throw up. What its like to float in a zero g plane.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'It's hurt my wallet'—How one fake news publisher is faring after Facebook crackdown"President Donald Trump signs an executive order allowing the hunting of bald eagles," a headline from the St. George Gazette blared last month.
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Gizmodo

Conserve Precious Counter Space With This Ingenious Roll-Up Drying Rack Veego Roll-Up Drying Rack , $16 with code S4A4S5J9 Dish drying racks take up a ton of space, especially if you don’t use them regularly, but this model from Veego rolls up for easy storage . Just unroll it across one side of your sink, and you’re ready do go. Use promo code S4A4S5J9 at checkout to save $3.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increasing risk of drug withdrawal in newborns as US opioid epidemic acceleratesTaking a combination of opioids (strong prescription painkillers) and psychotropic medications (widely used to treat mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression) during pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of drug withdrawal in newborns, finds a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How can we achieve greater balance in future cases like Charlie Gard's, asks expert?Much of the public discussion about the Charlie Gard case has been distinctly unbalanced, argues an expert in a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acid attack bystanders can make a real difference if they act fast, say expertsEducating the public to act quickly after an acid attack can minimise injury and substantially improve outcomes for victims, say experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists deliver knockout blow to multiple cancersTargeting healthy cells that have been hijacked by cancer cells could help treat many different types of the disease, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Music therapy helps people with Parkinson's build strength through songA music therapy class is helping people with Parkinson's disease build strength through song. A new study shows singing improves the muscles used for swallowing and respiratory control -- two functions complicated by Parkinson's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein involved in Alzheimer's disease may also be implicated in cognitive abilitiesRare mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) have previously been shown to be strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
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The Atlantic

The Russians Are Glad Trump Detests the New Sanctions When President Donald Trump finally signed the new congressionally mandated Russia sanctions into law on Wednesday, Dmitry Peskov, Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, announced that the Kremlin wouldn’t implement any new retaliatory measures to mark the signing. “Retaliatory measures have already been taken,” he said, referring to Putin’s Sunday diktat that would cut America’s diplomatic presence in Russ
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The Atlantic

Is Trump Right About Afghanistan? President Trump reportedly told his top advisers he thinks the U.S. is “losing” the war in Afghanistan, and is reportedly considering replacing his top general in the country with Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster, his national-security adviser. That Trump is skeptical about the need for more U.S. troops in Afghanistan isn’t a surprise. Last month ahead of a meeting with veterans of the Afghan wa
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The Atlantic

The Problem With Taking Credit for a Soaring Stock Market Presidents normally decline to take credit for gains in the stock market. The Dow Jones and the Standard & Poor’s 500 are simple reflections of market sentiment and short-term profits, after all. And what goes up has a way of inevitably going sideways or crashing down. That has not stopped Donald Trump and his administration from celebrating the Dow hitting 22,000 for the first time this week. A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UVA researchers identify neurons that control brain's body clockResearchers have found that dopamine-producing neurons are connected with the brain's circadian center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New genetic mutation that causes male infertility discovered by Ben-Gurion university researchersProfs. Ruti Parvari and Mahmoud Huleihel of the Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics discovered the mutation in the gene, which normally protects the full DNA sequence in sperm. This mutation inactivates the function of the gene and arrests sperm production."With the link between this damaged gene and male infertility now identified, specific scans will be available to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Standard model of the universe withstands most precise test by Dark Energy Survey (Update)Astrophysicists have a fairly accurate understanding of how the universe ages: That's the conclusion of new results from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a large international science collaboration, including researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, that put models of cosmic structure formation and evolution to the most precise test yet.
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Live Science

'Sleeping Dragon' Dinosaur Wore Camouflage to Elude PredatorsThe remains of a 110-million-year-old tank-size dinosaur — so well preserved that a museum preparator said it looks like a statue of a sleeping dragon — show that this fearsome creature was covered in armor and spikes, and also used camouflage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does early life affect the adult brain?The visual environment that zebrafish grew up in affected their spontaneous brain activity and, in turn, affected their behavior and ability to catch prey, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene therapy via skin could treat many diseases, even obesityScientist have now overcome challenges that have limited the use of gene therapy. They demonstrate how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat human diseases. The researchers provide 'proof-of-concept,' treating mice with two common related human ailments: type-2 diabetes and obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal diseaseEngineers have devised a way to assess a cell's mechanical properties simply by observation. The researchers use standard confocal microscopy to zero in on the constant, jiggling motions of a cell's particles -- telltale movements that can be used to decipher a cell's stiffness. Unlike optical tweezers, the team's technique is noninvasive, running little risk of altering or damaging a cell while p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electrical grounding technique may improve health outcomes of NICU babiesA technique called 'electrical grounding' may moderate preterm infants' electromagnetic exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and improve their health outcomes, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dark Energy Survey reveals most accurate measurement of universe's dark matterDark Energy Survey scientists have unveiled the most accurate measurement ever made of the present large-scale structure of the universe. These measurements of the amount and 'clumpiness' (or distribution) of dark matter in the present-day cosmos were made with a precision that, for the first time, rivals that of inferences from the early universe by the European Space Agency's orbiting Planck obs
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's diagnoses trigger lower self-ratings of quality of lifeA patient's awareness of a diagnosis of cognitive impairment may diminish their self-assessment of quality of life, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our solar system's 'shocking' origin storyAccording to one longstanding theory, our Solar System's formation was triggered by a shock wave from an exploding supernova. It injected material from the exploding star into a neighboring cloud of dust and gas, causing it to collapse in on itself and form the Sun and its surrounding planets. New work offers fresh evidence supporting this theory, modeling the Solar System's formation beyond the i
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Science : NPR

Do You Have What It Takes To Be NASA's Next Planetary Protection Officer? The job posting has elicited headlines about how the space agency is seeking a person to defend Earth from aliens. But it's really more about microorganisms than little green men. (Image credit: NASA)
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Scientific American Content: Global

Molecular Movie Reveals Inner Workings of New Solar CellsPerovskite is a lauded new solar cell material, and high-speed images show how its atoms react to light -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Standard model of the universe withstands most precise test by Dark Energy SurveyAstrophysicists have a fairly accurate understanding of how the universe ages: that's the conclusion of new results from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a large international science collaboration, including researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, that put models of cosmic structure formation and evolution to the most precise test yet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why are doctors underusing a drug to treat opioid addiction?A drug approved for private physicians to treat opioid addiction is being underprescribed, and a survey of addiction specialists suggests that many of them are not willing to increase their use of it, despite an expanding opioid addiction epidemic in the United States, according to research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.
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Futurity.org

Glaciers may have kept Earth from freezing Although it seems counterintuitive, over the eons, glaciers may have made Earth warmer, a new study suggests. Researchers took a data-driven dive into the mechanics of weathering by glaciation over millions of years to see how glacial cycles affected the oceans and atmosphere and continue to do so. They wanted to know how and when chemicals released by weathering of the land reached the atmospher
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New on MIT Technology Review

The CRISPR Competitor That Wasn’t
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook Is Finally Automating Its Fake News Fight (a Little)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Climate Change Could Bring Killer Humid Heatwaves to South Asia
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New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla Is Getting Into the Offshore Wind Energy Game
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New on MIT Technology Review

"No."
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Pocket AI Is Fast Enough to Retouch Smartphone Pics Before You Snap Them
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Hyperloop Pod, Fired Through a Tube at 200 MPH for the First Time
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New on MIT Technology Review

Rechargeable Alkaline Batteries Sound Great, But Now Comes the Hard Part
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New on MIT Technology Review

"[Autonomous] systems can be used in a variety of ways. A vehicle is only one, but there are many different areas of it. And I don’t want to go any further with that."
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New on MIT Technology Review

Security Researchers Must Think More Like Crooks
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New on MIT Technology Review

“[Uber’s] dominance is good for neither drivers nor passengers. There is, however, an elegant answer: to copy the very symbol of free market capitalism and treat Uber like what it truly is, a stock exchange.”
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New Scientist - News

CRISPR skin grafts could replace insulin injections for diabetesSkin grafts of gene-edited cells have boosted insulin levels in mice, and protected them from gaining weight and developing diabetes under a high-fat diet
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New Scientist - News

Big, armoured dinosaur still had camouflage to evade predatorsThe world’s most impressively preserved dinosaur fossil reveals that the 5.5-metre-long Borealopelta had camouflage despite its heavy armour
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Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPRMice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells that have an HIV receptor gene, CCR5, disrupted by gene editing allows the animals to ward off HIV infection.
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Live Science

How US Navy's Futuristic Laser Weapon Uses Old-School Telephone TechThe U.S. Navy's recent demonstration of its new laser weapon, designed to blast enemy drones out of the sky, proves that these systems no longer solely exist in the world of science fiction.
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New on MIT Technology Review

An Algorithm Trained on Emoji Knows When You’re Being Sarcastic on TwitterUnderstanding sarcasm could help AI fight racism, abuse, and harassment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cautious but proactive approach to gene editing urged by multiple organizationsAn international group of 11 organizations with genetics expertise has issued a policy statement on germline genome editing in humans, which recommends against genome editing that culminates in human pregnancy; supports publicly funded, in vitro research into its potential clinical applications; and outlines scientific and societal steps necessary before implementation of such clinical application
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First observation of the hyperfine splitting in antihydrogenScientists are one step closer to answering the question of why matter exists and illuminating the mysteries of the Big Bang and the birth of the universe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online assessment could improve math marks of deaf learnersOnline mathematics assessment could help improve the mathematics performance of deaf and hard-of-hearing learners in South Africa, suggests a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why Facebook is so hard to resistWhy is social media such a hard habit to break? Because it makes us feel good, say investigators. They found even brief exposure to a Facebook-related image (logo, screenshot) can cause a pleasurable response in frequent social media users, which in turn might trigger social media cravings. The combination of pleasant feelings and cravings makes social media too difficult to resist.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists track Zika virus transmission in miceScientists have developed a mouse model to study Zika virus transmitted sexually from males to females, as well as vertically from a pregnant female to her fetus. They are using the model to study how and when the virus is spread, including how the virus crosses the placenta, as well as to investigate potential treatments to block virus transmission.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patients, breakthrough findsA drug used for arthritis could be used to treat blood cancer, scientists have found. Polycythemia vera, a type of blood cancer, affects 3,000 people a year. This breakthrough offers an affordable and effective treatment, say the investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicians evaluate new device to test for cervical cancerWhen a woman has an abnormal pap smear she usually undergoes colposcopy. Typically a metal instrument is used to obtain a small sampling of cells inside the cervix -- an oftentimes painful procedure for the patient. Now researchers have tested an alternative device called fabric-based endocervical curettage. This less painful device had significantly fewer 'inadequate' specimens -- meaning, patien
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Light pollution as a new threat to pollinationArtificial light disrupts nocturnal pollination and leads to a reduced number of fruits produced by the plant. This loss of night time pollination cannot be compensated by diurnal pollinators. The negative impact of artificial light at night on nocturnal pollinators might even propagate further to the diurnal community, as ecologists were able to show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deadly heat waves could hit South Asia this centuryIn South Asia, new research suggests that by the end of this century climate change could lead to summer heat waves with levels of heat and humidity that exceed what humans can survive without protection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Financial incentives could conserve tropical forest diversityThe past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. In what might be a first of its kind study, researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to assess the impact of conservation payments in Ecuador's Amazon Basin forests. They found that conservation payment prog
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The VA’s New App Tries to Reach Vets Wherever They LiveThe move is part of a broader trend toward telemedicine across America.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's what's on the dark web: Child snuff videos, WMD recipes, your phone numberAn internet realm known as the dark web was once promoted as a safe haven for political dissidents and libertarians worldwide, and financed partly by the State Department. But it has turned into a criminal cesspool.
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Ars Technica

Google’s second AR phone, the Asus ZenFone AR, is finally official If you'll recall, back at CES Asus announced the Zenfone AR, the second-ever Google Tango phone. Today, a whopping 8 months later, the device is finally hitting the market. The MSRP is $599 for the 6GB RAM/64GB Storage version, or $699 for the 8GB/128GB version. Amazon has an unlocked version that will work on the big 5 carriers, while Verizon is selling a carrier-locked version as a "Verizon Exc
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The Atlantic

The Thorny Relationship Between Asians and Affirmative Action Despite the complexity of the issues at stake, the debate over affirmative action in America is rarely as nuanced as it ought to be. Treating affirmative action as a practice that either hurts or helps an entire racial group, for instance, prevents productive conversations about its role in college admissions. The limitations of such interpretations of affirmative action are, at times, revealing.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Giant armored dinosaur may have cloaked itself in camouflageAn armored dinosaur the size of a Honda Civic also wore countershading camouflage, a chemical analysis of its skin suggests.
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New dust sources from a shrinking Salton Sea have negative ecological and health impactsScientists at the University of California, Riverside investigating the composition of particulate matter and its sources at the Salton Sea have found that this shrinking lake in Southern California is exposing large areas of dry lakebed, called playa, that are acting as new dust sources with the potential to impact human health. Dust emissions from playas increase airborne PM mass, which has been
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Mysterious children's neurological disease is traced to a single error in one geneA multinational research effort led by researchers in Israel has discovered the biological basis of a rare but severe neurological disorder in children. In a research paper published today, scientists describe for the first time how the children's cells are flooded with ribosomal RNA and are poisoned by it. This is the first time that an excess of ribosomal RNA has been linked to a disease in huma
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Researchers want to know how early life affects the adult brainThe study found the visual environment that zebrafish grew up in affected their spontaneous brain activity and, in turn, affected their behavior and ability to catch prey.
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11 organizations urge cautious but proactive approach to gene editingAn international group of 11 organizations with genetics expertise has issued a policy statement on germline genome editing in humans, which recommends against genome editing that culminates in human pregnancy; supports publicly funded, in vitro research into its potential clinical applications; and outlines scientific and societal steps necessary before implementation of such clinical application
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Structural view suggests RNAi multiplies its effect in repressing gene expressionRNAi is a mainstay of contemporary biological research. But how exactly this crucial mechanism functions in humans remains a partial mystery that we are now one step closer to solving. Structural biologists have now published atomic-resolution pictures and a comprehensive analysis of the workings of a part of the RNAi machinery in Molecular Cell. They've discovered how several parts of the machine
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Gene therapy via skin could treat many diseases, even obesityA research team has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy. They demonstrate how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat human diseases. The researchers provide 'proof-of-concept,' treating mice with two common related human ailments: type-2 diabetes and obesity.
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Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predatorsResearchers reporting in Current Biology have named a new genus and species of armored dinosaur. The 110-million-year-old Borealopelta markmitchelli discovered in Alberta, Canada, on view at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, belongs to the nodosaur family. Now, an analysis of the 18-foot-long (5.5 m) specimen's exquisitely well-preserved form, complete with fully armored skin, suggests th
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Researchers engineer therapeutic skin grafts for diabetic miceResearchers have used CRISPR gene editing to engineer stem cell-grown mouse skin grafts to secrete a blood glucose-regulating hormone. When transplanted onto diabetic mice with healthy immune systems, the skin grafts regulate blood glucose levels over 4 months and reverse insulin resistance as well as weight gain related to a high-fat diet. Therapeutic human skin grafts were also tested in nude mi
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Scientists ID tiny prehistoric sea worm with 50 head spinesLong before dinosaurs roamed the Earth, a bizarre creature with a Venus flytrap-like head swam the seas.
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Regulators: Menhaden fish population in good shapeOne of the most important little fish in the sea is in good shape.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New dust sources from a shrinking Salton Sea have negative ecological and health impactsScientists at the University of California, Riverside investigating the composition of particulate matter (PM) and its sources at the Salton Sea have found that this shrinking lake in Southern California is exposing large areas of dry lakebed, called playa, that are acting as new dust sources with the potential to impact human health.
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Gizmodo

An Old-School Voltron Set Is Officially Coming to Lego A little over a year after len_d69's custom Lego Voltron set was submitted to the Lego Ideas platform , the toymaker has officially decided to put it into production after the fantastic model of the five transforming robots from the original animated series successfully received 10,000 votes of support from fans. It always feels corny to say that the fans made this thing happen, but they honestly
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Race to Reveal Antimatter's SecretsIn the shadow of the Large Hadron Collider, six teams are competing to answer one of the Universe’s deepest existential questions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

One day without notifications changes behaviour for two yearsTurning off phone notifications for 24 hours amped anxiety, but raised productivity. Two years on, the experience is still helping people call the shots
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New Scientist - News

Hidden cancers detected by combining genetic tests with MRIIf genetic screening says you’re predisposed to cancer, what can you do about it? Whole-body scans could be a way to find tumours before they turn deadly
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New Scientist - News

Cancer runs in my family, but now we can pick it up in timeWhen Natalie Coutts found out she was genetically predisposed to cancer, she was devastated. But regular screens for early tumours now let her feel in control
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dark Energy Survey reveals most accurate measurement of dark matter structure in the universeImagine planting a single seed and, with great precision, being able to predict the exact height of the tree that grows from it. Now imagine traveling to the future and snapping photographic proof that you were right.
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Ars Technica

Verizon wants you to give up Web privacy—in exchange for movie tickets Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) Verizon Wireless is offering a new rewards program that requires opting in to another Verizon program that shares customers' Web browsing history with "vendors and partners." The new program is called Verizon Up , a replacement for the similar Smart Rewards program, and it lets customers earn a credit for every $300 they spend on Verizon Wireless products a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Well-Preserved Armored Fossil Reveals Cretaceous CamouflageThe Cretaceous Period was a dangerous time for many animals, even for the “dinosaur equivalent of a tank.” Watch how researchers analyzed the pristine remains of a heavily armored... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Climate change is making our favorite carbs less nutritious From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Crops are losing protein and iron as the planet warms. New research shows that rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are producing crops with less protein and iron.
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Science | The Guardian

Heavily armoured dinosaur had ginger camouflage to deter predators – study Analysis of organic material from the 110m-year-old nodosaur suggests it had red and white camouflage, indicating its spikes alone did not put off predators It was built like a tank, covered in armour, and weighed about the same as a caravan – but this beefy dinosaur was still at risk of being gobbled up by predators, scientists have discovered. Thought to have lived about 110m years ago, the gia
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Gizmodo

Incredibly Well-Preserved Fossil Changes Our Understanding of Armored Dinosaurs Fossils don’t get much better than this. (Courtesy of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, Canada) On a fateful day in the Early Cretaceous, a large, four-legged armored dinosaur dropped dead on a beach in what is now modern day Alberta. The remains of this 18-foot-long beast drifted out to sea and eventually sank, where it became buried in a thick layer of mud. Over time, the d
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Futurity.org

Algorithms don’t yet spare us from bias Proponents of algorithms say computer programs can fix the inefficiency and bias of humans. Critics point to the opacity of algorithms and argue that they are not necessarily neutral. “Technology changes things, but perhaps not always as much as we think,” says Angelé Christin, assistant professor of communication at Stanford University . “Social context matters a lot in shaping the actual effect
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The Atlantic

Leaked Transcripts Show How Foreign Leaders Manipulate Trump What goes on when heads of state chat? It’s highly unusual for the public to know. Both parties usually release a “readout” that crisply summarizes the call and smooths over the roughest spots. Sometimes, there are revealing differences in the readouts, but often they’re close—neither side wants to publicize private conversations. (And when there’s no agreed-upon readout, as after President Trump
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The Atlantic

A Dinosaur So Well Preserved It Looks Like a Statue In March 2011, a construction worker named Shawn Funk visited an impressive dinosaur collection at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta. As he walked through halls full of ancient bones, he had no idea that a week later, he’d add to their ranks by finding one of the most spectacular dinosaur fossils of all time. It’s an animal so well preserved that its skeleton can’t be seen for the skin and soft
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Live Science

Photos: Primordial Worm Snatched Prey with Spines on Its HeadMore than 500 million years ago, a worm swam in the ocean's deep waters, hunting for tiny prey that it could capture with its 50 pointy spines.
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Live Science

Spiny Worm Beast Haunted the Seas 500 Million Years AgoAbout 508 million years ago, a skinny, flat worm swam through the deep sea, waiting for the right moment to extend its 50 sharp spines and nab its next meal, a new study finds.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Fuzzy Pikas Adapt to Climate Change at Different RatesAn elusive mix of factors may influence whether a species can survive in changing landscapes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

The race to reveal antimatter's secretsThe six experiments at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator employ a variety of techniques to study antimatter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predatorsResearchers reporting in Current Biology on August 3 have named a new genus and species of armored dinosaur. The 110-million-year-old Borealopelta markmitchelli discovered in Alberta, Canada, on view at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, belongs to the nodosaur family. Now, an analysis of the 18-foot-long (5.5 m) specimen's exquisitely well-preserved form, complete with fully armored skin,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook makes diversity gains but still struggles in key areaFacebook made progress in improving the gender and racial balance of its workers, with women, African Americans and Hispanics all gaining more representation in the Silicon Valley company's ranks over the last year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structural view suggests RNAi multiplies its effect in repressing gene expressionContinuously throughout our lives, our cells are expressing genes. It's the first step in making proteins, the stuff of all the structures in the body and molecular players in the countless dramas unfolding every second as cells execute tasks that enable our organs to function.
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Science | The Guardian

Gene editing isn’t about designer babies, it’s about hope for people like me | Alex Lee What gives someone without an incurable condition such as blindness the right to stand in the way of potentially life-saving treatments? A landmark US study by scientists at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland has for the first time successfully edited out a genetic mutation that could cause heart disease, but the fearmongering over designer babies rages on. Where would research into
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forensic entomologist unearths Chinese migrant fly in EuropeAn investigator first detected a Chinese migrant fly on corpses in Italy, but the insect has now also been found in Spain and Portugal, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vertical axis wind turbines can offer cheaper electricity for urban and suburban areasSmall vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) possess the ability to effectively operate in the presence of high turbulent flow, which makes them ideal energy harvesting devices in urban and suburban environments. In a new article, researchers present results indicating that an optimally designed VAWT system can financially compete with fossil-fuel based power plants in urban and suburban areas, and e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secrets of ancient Irish funeral practices revealedNew insights into the lifeways -- and death rites -- of the ancient people of Ireland are being provided through recent funerary studies.
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Dark Energy Survey reveals most accurate measurement of universe's dark matterDark Energy Survey scientists have unveiled the most accurate measurement ever made of the present large-scale structure of the universe. These measurements of the amount and 'clumpiness' (or distribution) of dark matter in the present-day cosmos were made with a precision that, for the first time, rivals that of inferences from the early universe by the European Space Agency's orbiting Planck obs
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Study: Most newborns with epilepsy benefit from genetic testingGenetic testing benefits the youngest epilepsy patients and their families, study finds.
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New research offers hope for faster acting antidepressantsFor people suffering from depression, a day without treatment can seem like a lifetime. A new study explains why the most commonly prescribed antidepressants can take as long as six weeks to have an effect. The findings could one day lead to more effective and faster acting drugs.
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Gizmodo

Intel Has No Idea What to Do With VR, but It's Fun to Watch It Try GIF Gif source: Mindshow Virtual Reality is tech’s biggest question mark. Could it become a mainstream medium, like movies or video games, or something completely different? A lot of people have tried and failed to answer that question, and while Intel’s VR Happy Hour at the New Museum on Tuesday is no exception, roleplaying as a tree and directing a monster is a pretty entertaining way to spend
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Gizmodo

Under Armour Sale, Cool Kitchen Gear, Robotic Vacuum, and the Rest of Thursday's Best Deals A one-day Under Armour sale , Eparé kitchen accessories , and a $160 Wi-Fi-connected robotic vacuum lead off Thursday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundBuds Lite , $23 Anker’s SoundBuds have long been our readers’ favorite affordable Bluetooth headphones , and if you prefer neckbuds, the new SoundBuds Lite are down to their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant cage could help cut number of burned birds over NJ MeadowlandsSoon, there should be fewer birds getting burned or killed by an invisible flame as they fly over the New Jersey Meadowlands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report gives methods for developing dietary reference intakes based on chronic diseaseA new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine outlines how to examine whether specific levels of nutrients or other food substances (NOFSs) can ameliorate the risk of chronic disease and recommends ways to develop dietary reference intakes (DRI) based on chronic disease outcomes.
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Electrical grounding technique may improve health outcomes of NICU babiesA technique called 'electrical grounding' may moderate preterm infants' electromagnetic exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and improve their health outcomes, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
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Ars Technica

After phishing attacks, Chrome extensions push adware to millions Enlarge / One of the ads displayed by a fraudulently updated version of the Web Developer extension for Chrome. (credit: dviate ) Twice in five days, developers of Chrome browser extensions have lost control of their code after unidentified attackers compromised the Google Chrome Web Store accounts used to issue updates. The most recent case happened Wednesday to Chris Pederick, creator of the We
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Website services help drivers fight ticketsSummer is the busiest travel season, and that means long stretches of highway, wandering attention and maybe a few miles through counties or states spent over the speed limit.
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Popular Science

How a snowflake gets its shape Science Do you want to build a snowflake? Snow can be soft or stinging; perfect for skiing or prone to melt. The difference lies in the shapes of the flakes, which depend on temperature and humidity.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Armoured tank-like dino used camouflage to hideA new species of mega-herbivore dinosaur discovered in Alberta, Canada preserves incredible details of its skin, scales and spines.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Hubble Detects Alien StratosphereThe upper atmosphere of the giant exoplanet WASP-121b may be wreathed in layers of glowing water vapor -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

'Autistic' mice make littermates less social Mice genetically engineered to show autism-like symptoms can affect behaviour of unmodified animals when the two are kept together. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22411
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Live Science

A History of Global Warming, In Just 35 SecondsMove over, temperature spiral. A new animation shows what global warming looks like in more than 100 countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The rising usage of swear words in literature suggests that American society is becoming increasingly individualisticComedian George Carlin's 1972 routine "the seven words you can never say on television" underlined his generation's rejection of the niceties and constraints of post-war American society. Seeing how the use of these swear words has changed over time captures the evolving American psyche, according to a new study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge.
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Swearing is a sign of the timesGeorge Carlin's 1972 routine 'the seven words you can never say on television' underlined his generation's rejection of the niceties of post-war American society. Seeing how the use of these swear words has changed over time captures the evolving American psyche, according to a new study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge.
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Hereditary cancer syndromes focus of JAMA Oncology collectionJAMA Oncology published a collection of articles on hereditary cancer syndromes, including Li-Fraumeni and Lynch syndromes.
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NCI study shows feasibility of cancer screening protocol for Li-Fraumeni syndrome patientsIn a new study from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, researchers found a higher than expected prevalence of cancer at baseline screening in individuals with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a rare inherited disorder that leads to a higher risk of developing certain cancers. The research demonstrates the feasibility of a new, comprehensive cancer screening
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Age of first exposure to pornography shapes men's attitudes toward womenThe age at which a boy is first exposed to pornography is significantly associated with certain sexist attitudes later in life, but not necessarily in the way people might think, according to research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.
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The Atlantic

The Largest Mass Migration to See a Natural Event Is Coming Mid-morning on February 15, 2013, in Russia’s southern Ural mountains, a visitor arrived from outer space. A 20-meter asteroid that no one saw coming slammed into the atmosphere at 43,000 miles an hour. As the meteor burned up, it briefly shone brighter than the sun. Its shockwave packed a punch 30 times greater than the bomb dropped over Hiroshima. Windows shattered. People were knocked off thei
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The Atlantic

Why Leaking Transcripts of Trump's Calls Is So Dangerous Leaking the transcript of a presidential call to a foreign leader is unprecedented, shocking, and dangerous. It is vitally important that a president be able to speak confidentially—and perhaps even more important that foreign leaders understand that they can reply in confidence. Thursday’s leak to The Washington Post of President Trump’s calls with the president of Mexico and the prime minister
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The Atlantic

Why Men Pretend to Be Women to Sell Thrillers Almost 10 years ago, Martyn Waites, a British crime writer, was having coffee with his editor. Waites, who was at something of a loose end project-wise, was looking for new ideas. His editor, though, was looking for a woman. Or, more specifically, a high-concept female thriller writer who could be the U.K.’s Karin Slaughter or Tess Gerritsen. “I said I could do it,” Waites recalls. His editor was
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BBC News - Science & Environment

New map of Universe's dark matterResearchers have released the most accurate map ever produced of the dark matter in our Universe.
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Gizmodo

Why NASA Will Test its Asteroid Defense System This October GIF Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Sometimes, NASA gets to have a bit of fun—with asteroids. This fall, the agency will have a grand ol’ time with one such object called 2012 TC4 , which will whizz past us at a comfortable distance of about 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometers) at its absolute closest. Since the asteroid is pretty small—only about 30 to 100 feet (roughly nine to 30 meters) across—this is the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA eyes Tropical Storm Nalgae negotiating wind shearInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Nalgae and revealed that wind shear was still affecting the storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Oriental eye fly that transmits conjunctivitis newly recorded in ChinaThe conjunctivitis-transmitting Oriental eye fly (Siphunculina funicola) has been recorded for the first time in China. In the same paper, published in the open access journal ZooKeys, a team of three scientists further describe three species of the same genus, which are new to science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GOES-S and GOES-T satellites coming togetherProgress continues on the development of NOAA's GOES-S and GOES-T spacecraft that will follow the successful launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite or GOES-R, renamed GOES-16 upon reaching geostationary orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA team miniaturizes century-old technology for use on CubeSatsA century-old technology that scientists use to probe the ionosphere—the important atmospheric layer that can interfere with the transmission of radio waves—is getting smaller.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees high clouds fill Typhoon Noru's eyeNASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Noru early on August 3 and saw that high clouds had moved over the eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public hearing on Wisconsin $3B Foxconn tax break billThe public is getting a chance to tell Wisconsin lawmakers what they think of a $3 billion tax incentive package that's part of an agreement struck with electronics giant Foxconn Technology Group.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How realistic are plans to ban new gas and diesel cars?Ban the sale of gasoline and diesel cars by a deadline—2040, 2030, even 2025. More and more governments are proposing just that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malawi hails 'historic' relocation of 520 elephantsMalawi on Thursday celebrated the successful conclusion of a two-year project moving 520 sedated elephants by truck to a reserve where the animals had been nearly wiped out by poaching.
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The Atlantic

What Republicans Could Do About Trump It is August 2017, and you are a principled Republican member of Congress. You are appalled by the president’s character; disturbed by his erratic behavior in office; upset by his defenestration of democratic norms; and increasingly worried about the apparent abuses of power in his administration. While you have voted overwhelmingly to confirm his nominees and advance the conservative legislation
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Builds Global Reporting Team Washington, D.C. (August 3, 2017)—As The Atlantic continues to expand internationally, Editor in Chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today the addition of three journalists to its global reporting team . Rachel Donadio, recently the European culture correspondent for The New York Times , will be The Atlantic’s culture and politics writer based in Paris; Yasmeen Serhan joins the newly established Lon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA eyes Tropical Storm Nalgae negotiating wind shearInfrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Nalgae and revealed that wind shear was still affecting the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal diseaseMIT engineers have devised a way to assess a cell's mechanical properties simply by observation. The researchers use standard confocal microscopy to zero in on the constant, jiggling motions of a cell's particles -- telltale movements that can be used to decipher a cell's stiffness. Unlike optical tweezers, the team's technique is noninvasive, running little risk of altering or damaging a cell whi
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First observation of the hyperfine splitting in antihydrogenSwansea University scientists are one step closer to answering the question of why matter exists and illuminating the mysteries of the Big Bang and the birth of the universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees high clouds fill Typhoon Noru's eyeNASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Noru early on Aug. 3 and saw that high clouds had moved over the eye.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NOAA's GOES-S and GOES-T satellites coming togetherProgress continues on the development of NOAA's GOES-S and GOES-T spacecraft that will follow the successful launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite or GOES-R, renamed GOES-16 upon reaching geostationary orbit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Oriental eye fly that transmits conjunctivitis newly recorded in ChinaSome grass fly species are known as 'eye flies' as they transmit conjunctivitis, as well as other eye diseases, to both humans and domestic animals. The larvae feed on feces or thrive in decaying flesh, so they can usually be found in birds' nests, excrement or carcasses. In a paper published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, a team of scientists record four grass fly species in China with three
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The Scientist RSS

Microbiology Professor Wanted for MurderAn arrest warrant has been issued for Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University in connection with a stabbing death in Chicago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Facebook is so hard to resistWhy is social media such a hard habit to break?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany moves to stop eggs contaminated by insecticideGermany on Thursday moved to block the distribution of hundreds of thousands of eggs mainly from the Netherlands contaminated by a toxic insecticide outlawed from use in the production of food.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple, Huawei, Amazon gain in sluggish tablet marketApple, Huawei and Amazon boosted tablet sales over the past quarter, despite the ongoing slump in the overall market for the devices, surveys showed Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Active machine learning for the discovery and crystallization of gigantic polyoxometalate moleculesWho is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fat shaming in the doctor's office can be mentally and physically harmfulMedical discrimination based on people's size and negative stereotypes of overweight people can take a toll on people's physical health and well-being, according to a recent review.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solving the mystery of the sun's hot atmosphereThe elemental composition of the Sun's hot atmosphere known as the 'corona' is strongly linked to the 11-year solar magnetic activity cycle, a team of scientists has revealed for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans have been altering tropical forests for at least 45,000 yearsA new study counters the view that tropical forests were pristine natural environments prior to modern agriculture and industrialization. Moreover, humans have in fact been having a dramatic impact on such forest ecologies for tens of thousands of years, through techniques ranging from controlled burning of sections of forest to plant and animal management to clear-cutting.
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Futurity.org

Just seeing Facebook’s logo makes users crave more Researchers studying Facebook users have found that social media may be such a hard habit to break because it makes users feel good, and those positive feelings in turn may make users crave more social media. “People are learning this reward feeling when they get to Facebook…” The researchers conducted two studies of frequent and less frequent Facebook users and found that even brief exposure to
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Gizmodo

Trump Aide on Conflict With North Korea: We Can Tweet Our Way Out of This Photo: Getty Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Trump, spoke to Fox News about the mounting threat of North Korea. When asked about how the Trump administration might compel China to act against Kim Jong Un’s regime, Gorka had a big idea . Trump can tweet about it. No seriously, that was the idea. Watch: Is Donald Trump’s Twitter presence strong enough to compel the world’s most pop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forensic entomologist unearths Chinese migrant fly in EuropeAn insect that was once found mainly in China and in South America has begun to appear in Europe. Forensic entomologists - who gain vital crime scene information such as time of death by studying the infestation of human cadavers - need to learn as much as they can about the newcomer. The University of Huddersfield's Dr Stefano Vanin, assisted by some of his students, is leading the way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online assessment could improve math marks of deaf learnersOnline mathematics assessment (OMA) could help improve the mathematics performance of deaf and hard-of-hearing learners in South Africa.
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Big Think

Rationality Deficits of the Poor, of the Rich—and of Economists Rationality isn't the rule, it's rare. That's true of the sort of optimizing rationality that economists presume we all have (even though many economists themselves fall short of that standard). Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New work offers fresh evidence supporting the supernova shock wave theory of our Solar System's originAccording to one longstanding theory, our Solar System's formation was triggered by a shock wave from an exploding supernova. The shock wave injected material from the exploding star into a neighboring cloud of dust and gas, causing it to collapse in on itself and form the Sun and its surrounding planets.
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Ars Technica

WannaCry operator empties Bitcoin wallets connected to ransomware Enlarge (credit: Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images) Whoever was behind the WannaCry cryptoransomware worm that ravaged networks worldwide in May has finally collected the ransom paid by some of the worm's victims. The value of bitcoins had grown to about $140,000, but the currency's value got about a 20 percent boost on August 1 triggered by a split in the Bitcoin market , Quartz reports. After the i
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The stories behind The New Yorker's iconic covers | Françoise MoulyMeet Françoise Mouly, The New Yorker's art director. For the past 24 years, she's helped decide what appears on the magazine's famous cover, from the black-on-black depiction of the Twin Towers the week after 9/11 to a recent, Russia-influenced riff on the magazine's mascot, Eustace Tilley. In this visual retrospective, Mouly considers how a simple drawing can cut through the torrent of images tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secrets of ancient Irish funeral practices revealedNew insights into the lifeways - and death rites - of the ancient people of Ireland are being provided through funerary studies led by a researcher at the Department of Anatomy at New Zealand's University of Otago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds climate plays role in decline of one of Asia's most critical water resourcesClimate variability—rather than the presence of a major dam—is most likely the primary cause for a water supply decline in East Asia's largest floodplain lake system, according to a Kansas State University researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate changeMajor changes in agricultural practices will be required to offset increases in nutrient losses due to climate change, according to research published by a Lancaster University-led team.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Current threats to our oceans are revealedCovering two-thirds of our planet, the ocean was once thought to be too big to be threatened by human activity. Scientific evidence now shows that our use and abuse of this environment is having a detrimental effect on marine habitats across the globe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in MadridThe fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Current threats to our oceans revealedA survey of tens of thousands of marine studies from the last decade reveals current threats to our marine environment. These include: the effects of climate change, marine plastic pollution, conservation, as well as social and economic impacts. It is hoped the method used to obtain this information, which has only just been made possible with advances in computational power, will enable the devel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecules that could help to prevent the development of brain tumorsResearchers have identified molecules which are responsible for metastatic lung cancer cells binding to blood vessels in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could mutations and inherited genes play a role in cerebral palsy?Hemiplegic cerebral palsy hampers movement in one side of a person's body. In the first genetic study of its kind to exclusively focus on those with hemiplegic cerebral palsy, a group of researchers has investigated the genetic differences and hereditary factors involved in this neurodevelopmental condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tree-of-heaven's prolific seed production adds to its invasive potentialTree-of-heaven -- or Ailanthus -- is an invasive triple threat, according to a team of plant pathologists. The species produces seeds early in its lifespan, tends to make millions of viable seeds during its life, and continues to produce seeds for decades and, in some cases, for more than a century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The truth about cats' and dogs' environmental impactUS cats and dogs cause 25-30 percent of the environmental impact of meat consumption in this country. The nation's 163 million cats and dogs eat as much food as all the people in France. People should keep their pets -- and keep feeding them meat -- but there may be steps pet owners can take to reduce their environmental impact, says a researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man versus (synthesis) machineWho is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research into childhood obstructive sleep-disordered breathing examinedThrough a comprehensive review of published research, investigators have identified important gaps in how and where children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) are best managed. Their findings are published in the journal CHEST.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists track Zika virus transmission in miceNational Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed a mouse model to study Zika virus transmitted sexually from males to females, as well as vertically from a pregnant female to her fetus. They are using the model to study how and when the virus is spread, including how the virus crosses the placenta, as well as to investigate potential treatments to block virus transmission.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for hepatobiliary scintigraphy in abdominal painThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for hepatobiliary scintigraphy in abdominal pain. This is the third in a series of new AUC developed by SNMMI in its role as a qualified provider-led entity (PLE) under the Medicare Appropriate Use Criteria Program for Advanced Diagnostic Imaging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA provides new insights on the control of invasive Russian knapweedA recent study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management sheds new light on the control of Russian knapweed, an invasive plant found in the western U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers brighten perspective of mysterious mini-halosThe largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe are galaxy clusters that form at the intersection of cosmic web filaments. These entities are shaped and grow through massive collisions as material streams into their gravitational pull. Within the heart of some galaxy clusters are mysterious and little known radio mini-halos. These rare, dispersed, and steep-spectrum (brighter at low freq
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Gizmodo

Can We Put Coal Miners Back to Work in Clean Energy? In August 2016, fewer coal miners were employed in the US than anytime in modern history: just 48,600. A year later, little more than 50,000 miners are working, but the industry is still in dire straits—layoffs and mine shutdowns have led to rampant unemployment in West Virginia, Kentucky and Montana. President Trump has taken credit for the few jobs that have been added, promising to end the “wa
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Use Light to Turn Off Autism Symptoms in MiceThe findings hint at treatments that could restore the balance of brain activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prediciting TB's behaviorWhen it comes to predicting response to treatment and risk of dying, molecular tests that detect resistance to a class of TB drugs known as fluoroquinolones may be as good and even superior to traditional drug-sensitivity tests conducted in lab cultures, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cell therapy for lung fibrosis conditionsA team of scientists has developed promising research towards a possible stem cell treatment for several lung conditions, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis -- often-fatal conditions that affect tens of millions of Americans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery points to drugs that would 'short-circuit' deadly leukemiaCells of a deadly acute myeloid leukemia can be killed by blocking production of a molecular 'battery,' scientists have discovered.
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The Atlantic

The Student Who Almost Got Away This is the fifth installment in an audio series called What My Students Taught Me. Each episode features a teacher reflecting on a particularly challenging student, in counterpoint with the student’s version of the same events. Listen to the fourth one here . As a young teacher, Ingrid Chung saw herself in 12-year-old Kayshaun Brown. “What I saw in Kayshaun was the same type of intelligence, reb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why Facebook is so hard to resistWhy is social media such a hard habit to break? Because it makes us feel good, said Michigan State University's Allison Eden, assistant professor in the Department of Communication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our solar system's 'shocking' origin storyAccording to one longstanding theory, our solar system's formation was triggered by a shock wave from an exploding supernova. It injected material from the exploding star into a neighboring cloud of dust and gas, causing it to collapse in on itself and form the sun and its surrounding planets. New work offers fresh evidence supporting this theory, modeling the solar system's formation beyond the i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gaining weight between pregnancies boosts diabetes riskThe risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) drastically increases with weight gain between pregnancies, according to a Norwegian study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forensic entomologist unearths Chinese migrant fly in EuropeDr Stefano Vanin first detected the insect on corpses in Italy, but the insect has now also been found in Spain and Portugal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's diagnoses trigger lower self-ratings of quality of lifeResearchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that a patient's awareness of a diagnosis of cognitive impairment may diminish their self-assessment of quality of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vertical axis wind turbines can offer cheaper electricity for urban and suburban areasSmall vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) possess the ability to effectively operate in the presence of high turbulent flow, which makes them ideal energy harvesting devices in urban and suburban environments. In this week's Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers present results indicating that an optimally designed VAWT system can financially compete with fossil-fuel based power
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modularity metric summarizes network fragmentation to explain aphasia recovery differencesMedical University of South Carolina (MUSC) investigators report in the August, 2017, Scientific Reports - Nature, that white matter network fragmentation in relatively spared brain areas explains variations in aphasia recovery after strokes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For the first time, researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapestsFor the first time, researchers from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The future of search engines: Researchers combine artificial intelligence, crowdsourcing and supercomputersHow do search engines generate lists of relevant links?
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Gizmodo

Galaxy Note 8 Rumor Roundup: Everything We Think We Know Image: Samsung After the literal garbage fire that was the Galaxy Note 7, Samsung’s upcoming flagship phablet needs to be more than just a big Galaxy S8 with a stylus. So before Samsung officially unveils the Galaxy Note 8 on August 23, we’re going to run through all the rumors and speculation to see if the Note 8 even has a chance of delivering on all the hype. Name Now, you and I might decide t
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Gizmodo

This One-Day Amazon Sale Is Full Of Useful Kitchen Accessories Eparé Gold Box You may not have heard of Eparé, but their one-day kitchenware sale on Amazon has some pretty cool stuff to check out. First up, you can get a 2-pack of big ice cube trays for $12 . These big cubes present less surface area to your drink than a bunch of smaller cubes, which means less melting, and less dilution. For the wine lover in your life, you can also find a battery-operated
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NYT > Science

E.P.A. Reverses Course on Ozone RuleThe agency said in June that states would have extra time to meet a new standard for ozone pollution. The change reverts to the date set by the Obama administration.
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NYT > Science

Overweight Asian-Americans Are Seen as More ‘American,’ Study FindsAssumptions about how much Asians and Americans weigh appears to influence perceptions of national identity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creature-cataloging contest for computersAt a glance, would you be able to tell the difference between a donkey and a mule? A jaguar and a leopard? Most computers can't, at least not yet, but a contest hosted by Caltech and Cornell Tech, the engineering campus of Cornell University, aimed to change that.
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Quanta Magazine

Scientists Unveil a New Inventory of the Universe’s Dark Contents In a much-anticipated analysis of its first year of data, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) telescope experiment has gauged the amount of dark energy and dark matter in the universe by measuring the clumpiness of galaxies — a rich and, so far, barely tapped source of information that many see as the future of cosmology. The analysis, posted on DES’s website today and based on observations of 26 millio
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Gizmodo

The Largest 'Dead Zone' Ever Has Been Recorded off the Coast of Louisiana Measuring 8,776 square miles, this year’s dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest ever recorded. (Image: N. Rabalais, LSU/LUMCON) A recent expedition to the Gulf of Mexico has yielded the largest “dead zone” ever recorded in the area. Measuring 8,776 square miles, this massive patch of oxygen depleted water is wreaking havoc on the Gulf’s marine life—a consequence of unchecked agricultural
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low-power, high-performance optical receiversThanks to IBM scientists, replacing copper wires with light to transfer data at improved speeds and with optimal energy efficiency is within reach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using angles to improve the future of electronicsNanotechnology is a term which applied to a variety of fields from clothing and automotive paints to sporting equipment and electronics. In the end it's all referring to a size, the nanometer (nm), and humankind's ability to understand, control and manipulate the unique phenomena which occur at this dimension. For perspective, a sheet of paper is about 100,000 nm thick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soundscapes in the past—adding a new dimension to our archaeological picture of ancient culturesPicture an archaeological site, what comes to mind? Sandstone walls, standing in the desert heat? Stonehenge, watching over a grassy field?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal-free nanoparticle could expand MRI use, tumor detectionWhat do newborns and people with kidney problems have in common?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An insider's perspective on the science behind wildfiresAs climate change continues to have an impact on the ecology of landscapes across the world, wildfires in Arizona have become more frequent and more intense over time. As monsoon rains finally extinguished the 27,000-acre Burro Fire on Mount Lemmon, we asked University of Arizona fire ecologist Donald Falk to drive up the mountain with us and tell us some things we might not know about wildfires.
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Gizmodo

We've Run Out of Beer Names and AI Is Here to Help Image: Tama Leaver /Flickr Craft brewers are running out of beer names. NPR reports that companies are having to compromise over shared a name, or getting in Twitter fights over them. Even lawyers are settling spats over imagery, or hop puns like Hopscotch and Bitter End. So, rather than relying on our boring human brains, why not use artificial intelligence to come up with fresh new names? That’
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Similar characteristics found in human-induced and natural earthquakesHumanmade and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central US share the same characteristics, researchers have found. This information will help scientists predict and mitigate damage from future earthquakes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds climate plays role in decline of one of Asia's most critical water resourcesClimate variability -- rather than the presence of a major dam -- is most likely the primary cause for a water supply decline in East Asia's largest floodplain lake system, according to a Kansas State University researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In the test tube instead of under the knifeFreiburg neuroscientists develop new forms of diagnosis and therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What role does the gut play in type 2 diabetes?In the destructive cycle that leads to and perpetuates type 2 diabetes, driven by overeating, excessive blood glucose, defective pancreatic beta cell function, and imbalances in insulin-regulating hormone levels, the gut appears to play a key role.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NRL brightens perspective of mysterious mini-halosThe US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), working in conjunction with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), employs the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) to 'peer' into the cluster of galaxies in the constellation Perseus, 250 million light-years from Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA provides new insights on the control of invasive Russian knapweedA recent study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management sheds new light on the control of Russian knapweed, an invasive plant found in the western US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicians evaluate new device to test for cervical cancerWhen a woman has an abnormal pap smear she usually undergoes colposcopy. Typically a metal instrument is used to obtain a small sampling of cells inside the cervix--an oftentimes painful procedure for the patient. A clinical faculty member in the UC Riverside School of Medicine and colleagues have tested an alternative device called fabric-based endocervical curettage. This less painful device had
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Secrets of ancient Irish funeral practices revealedNew insights into the lifeways -- and death rites -- of the ancient people of Ireland are being provided through funerary studies led by a researcher at the Department of Anatomy at New Zealand's University of Otago.
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Scientific American Content: Global

What the Polarized U.S. Needs Is an Eclipse Fix It helped bring national healing in 1878, so can’t history repeat itself? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Striking Evidence Linking Football to Brain Disease Sparks Calls for More ResearchThe biggest study of its kind offers the best evidence to date linking the sport to mood and cognitive impairments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One way to promote green infrastructure in your cityNatural assets – "green infrastructure" – can provide communities with invaluable ecosystem services that clean our air, filter our water, mitigate natural disasters and improve our quality of life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving understanding of the quantum world with quantum dotsQuantum behavior plays a crucial role in novel and emergent material properties, such as superconductivity and magnetism. Unfortunately, it is still impossible to calculate the underlying quantum behavior, let alone fully understand it. Scientists of QuTech, the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft and TNO, in collaboration with ETH Zurich and the University of Maryland, have now succeeded in b
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Ars Technica

Gulf of Mexico dead zone is largest on record Enlarge / Hypoxic areas are shown in red, where the amount of dissolved oxygen is 2 milligrams per liter, or lower. (credit: N. Rabalais, Louisiana State University & Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium) Every summer for the last three decades, researchers have cruised the northern Gulf of Mexico during July to study the extent of hypoxia, or low oxygen levels. This summer, they found the la
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Gizmodo

NASA Will Chase the Upcoming Solar Eclipse Using Telescopes Mounted on Jets GIF Observed from the ground, the total solar eclipse happening on August 21, when the Moon completely blocks your view of the Sun, will be visible for up to 160 seconds. It will be a fleeting glimpse of a rare phenomenon, which is why NASA plans to chase the Moon’s shadow using a pair of jets. The planes NASA will be flying are modified versions of the WB-57F that first took to the skies way bac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could mutations and inherited genes play a role in cerebral palsy?Hemiplegic cerebral palsy hampers movement in one side of a person's body. In the first genetic study of its kind to exclusively focus on those with hemiplegic cerebral palsy, a group of 26 Canadian researchers has investigated the genetic differences and hereditary factors involved in this neurodevelopmental condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The future of search enginesResearchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Northeastern University presented two papers at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics that describe efforts to combine artificial intelligence with crowdsourced annotators and information encoded in domain-specific resources. The work has the potential to improve general search engines, as well as ones like t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate changeResearchers investigating nutrients in runoff from agricultural land warn that phosphorus losses will increase, due to climate change, unless this is mitigated by making major changes to agricultural practices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies molecules that could help to prevent the development of brain tumorsResearchers from the University of Portsmouth's Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence have identified molecules which are responsible for metastatic lung cancer cells binding to blood vessels in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Current threats to our oceans are revealedA survey of tens of thousands of marine studies from the last decade reveals current threats to our marine environment. These include: the effects of climate change, marine plastic pollution, conservation, as well as social and economic impacts. It is hoped the method used to obtain this information, which has only just been made possible with advances in computational power, will enable the devel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough by scientists finds arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patientsUniversity of Sheffield scientists discover drug used for arthritis could be used to treat blood cancer.Polycythemia vera, a type of blood cancer, affects 3,000 people a year. The breakthrough offers an affordable and effective treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Different sensory pathways engaged in feeling and responding to external temperatureResearchers at Nagoya University investigated different sensory neural pathways involved in thermoregulation by injecting toxins into parts of the brain involved in 'feeling' and responding to temperature changes in the environment. They found that, even upon disabling the pathway for such feeling, rats were able to avoid uncomfortably hot and cold floor plates, but that disabling part of the late
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Futurity.org

Our antibodies may show when we had the flu Measuring the quantity of influenza-specific antibodies in a person’s blood may show if they had the flu, but also possibly when they experienced the virus. This information could improve the way doctors monitor influenza, particularly in places where flu season does not end. In a new study, researchers found that they could identify concentrations of antibodies that corresponded to recent and pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To restore trust in online transactions, retailers need to develop a virtual handshakeAt one time, transactions between merchants and consumers were often sealed with a handshake. This handshake was more than a kind gesture—it helped reassure both parties that the other was committed to the deal and would correct any problems. As more transactions occur online, finding fair and efficient resolution of problems that arise can be challenging. In a new book, a University of Missouri l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Getting CCL technology ready for use at coal power plantsAmong second generation carbon capture technologies stands 'Calcium carbonate looping' (CCL). But even though it is considered less toxic than alternatives and proved to yield low efficiency penalties, the method is still far from being market-ready. SCARLET-enabled breakthroughs are expected to give it a push.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How hot weather and climate change affect airline flightsHot weather has forced dozens of commercial flights to be canceled at airports in the Southwest this summer. This flight-disrupting heat is a warning sign. Climate change is projected to have far-reaching repercussions – including sea level rise inundating cities and shifting weather patterns causing long-term declines in agricultural yields. And there is evidence that it is beginning to affect th
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The Atlantic

The Campus-Speech Debate Spends Summer Break in Statehouses Until this summer, the debate about free speech on college campuses was shaped by small groups of student activists, forcefully protesting an ever-expanding list of controversial speakers, and their critics and defenders, who were mostly reactive. The clearest conflict, amid many shades of gray, concerned the subset of those activists who went beyond mere protest and tried to shut down events. Th
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Ars Technica

Alcohol as a study tool? Drinking after learning boosts memory Enlarge (credit: Getty | FRANCOIS GUILLOT ) Cheers!—not to your health, but to your memory. Drinking alcohol after learning information appears to aid the brain’s ability to store and remember that information later, according to a study of at-home boozing in Scientific Reports . The memory-boosting effect—which has been seen in earlier lab-based studies—linked up with how much a person drank: th
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Futurity.org

Fluid spins trillions of times faster than mightiest tornado The spin of the strongest tornado is a pale shadow of the vortex at the heart of matter colliding into a nearly perfect fluid, according to researchers. Collisions between gold ions produce a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that swirls faster than any other fluid ever observed, report researchers that operate the STAR detector, part of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National La
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Gizmodo

Samsung Is Keeping the Joy of Flip Phones Alive Image: Samsung Nowadays, the only people still using flip phones are octogenarians who can’t handle all the newfangled tech out there. But this flip phone might just be too cool for grandma. There’s something inexplicably attractive about a flip phone, whether it’s being able to hang up a call by slamming it shut, or being able to break out your T9 texting skills again. And thanks to Samsung’s ne
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Ars Technica

Red Hydrogen phone gets a video preview: It’s big—very big Enlarge / Well, it certainly doesn't look like other phones. Many were confused earlier in July when Red, makers of ultra high-end 4K and 8K cameras for Hollywood, announced it was making an Android smartphone. Dubbed Red Hydrogen , the phone's substantial $1,595 price tag was accompanied by all manner of lofty promises about shattering "the mould of conventional thinking" and "nanotechnology." A
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Popular Science

What to do with your pet if you need to evacuate Animals Leaving them behind could be disastrous. A recent study shows that forcing people to leave behind their furry friends can lead to problems ranging from mental health to refusal to evacuate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why scorpion stings are so painful(Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from the U.S. and China has figured out why scorpion stings are so painful. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team explains how scorpion venom containing a variety of toxins and is mildly acidic, causing a lot of pain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemotactic movement used to carry drugs through blood-brain barrier(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has developed a way to take advantage of chemotactic movement to carry drugs through the blood-brain barrier. In their paper published on the open access site Sciences Advances, the researchers describe the technique and its effectiveness in test rats.
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Ingeniøren

Første udgaver af 3D-printere til masseproduktion ser dagens lysOpskalering er én af nøglerne til at gøre industriel 3D-print modent til serie- og masseproduktion. Stratasys har nu fremvist et bud på en flercellet 3D-printer, der kan fremstille adskillige emner på samme tid med et minimum af manuel betjening.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in MadridThe fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejectionAn experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Isotope fingerprints in feathers reveal songbirds' secret breeding groundsUsing isotope fingerprints in feathers, researchers have pinpointed the northern breeding grounds of a small, colorful songbird.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Steps toward a promising therapy for a rare bone diseaseStudy examines the therapeutic potential of a small molecule to treat hereditary bony tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fat shaming in the doctor's office can be mentally and physically harmfulMedical discrimination based on people's size and negative stereotypes of overweight people can take a toll on people's physical health and well-being, according to a review of recent research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Correction of a faulty gene in human embryosPublished in Nature, CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors open up new pathways to treat and prevent genetic diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cockroach gardeners: Spreading plant seeds across the forest floorResearchers in Japan have discovered that cockroaches can disperse seeds like birds and mammals. A variety of seed dispersing animals had been identified, including birds, monkeys, ants, and even slugs, but no cockroaches. This unexpected discovery was made during a study of the seed dispersal mechanism of Monotropastrum humile, a small herb that thrives in the same temperate forests of Japan that
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Popular Science

China's army is showing off its new tanks, stealth fighters, and missiles From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal It's all part of the PLA's 90th anniversary celebration. The PLA shows off its latest high tech tanks, stealth fighters, artillery, and ICBMs. Read on.
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Gizmodo

The Alt-Right Goes Panhandling When all digital spaces are controlled by liberal snowflakes, how’s a guy supposed to earn a living promoting hate online? Three new crowdfunding sites think they have the answer. While leading figures of the alt-right (and alt-lite) have access to wealthy benefactors like the Mercer family, the income streams of the movement’s B-listers are remarkably similar to anyone else trying to make a livi
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An Oral History of the 2004 Darpa Grand ChallengeThe legendary competition created the self-­driving community as we know it, the men and women in too-big polo shirts who would dominate an automotive revolution.
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Ars Technica

Game of Thrones script for “Spoils of War” leaks after HBO hack Enlarge (credit: HBO) The next episode of Game of Thrones , S7E4 "Spoils of War," has leaked online in script, summary, and video storyboard form after HBO suffered a large hack earlier in the week. HBO has been working hard to clean up the leaked files via a flurry of DMCA takedown notices—but conversely, one DMCA notice sent to Google, and apparently seen by Variety , reveals that "thousands" o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prejudice against black and ethnic Scots widespreadAround one third of black and ethnic minority people in Scotland have experienced discrimination within the last two years, research reveals.
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Gizmodo

Motorola’s New Phone Makes a Great Case For Why Modular Phones Shouldn't Exist All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo Every once and while you run across a gadget that would be perfect if only it wasn’t missing one tiny feature. That sucks, and often there’s nothing you can do about it because there’s no way for multi-billion dollar companies to anticipate your need for a cattle prod or tiny projector that attaches to your phone. But what if there was? What if you could just sw
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Ars Technica

Federal prosecutor struggles to describe stingray use in attempted murder case Enlarge / Oakland Police headquarters, as seen in 2012. (credit: Daniel Arauz ) OAKLAND, Calif.—A federal prosecutor seemed to trip up during a Wednesday court hearing in an attempted murder case. The reason? This prosecutor had to explain how cell-site simulators, sometimes known as stingrays , actually operate. Joseph Alioto, the lead federal prosecutor, initially suggested that the suspect’s m
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Gizmodo

Weird New Rumors About Carol Danvers' Origins in the Captain Marvel Movie The Apocalypse’s cancellation will have to wait, as Pacific Rim Uprising gets delayed. The live action Lion King may be close to finding its Scar. Who is the Barb of Stranger Things season two? Plus, Samuel L. Jackson on Glass , another new look at Deadpool 2 's Domino, and a bevy of new Game of Thrones pictures. Spoilers get! Captain Marvel A wild new report from MCU Exchange claims that, despit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding corrosion processes in concreteWill reinforced concrete bridges still be standing for years to come, or has corrosion already set in? ETH scientists have discovered that previous concrete samples were too small to allow a reliable statement on the condition of reinforced concrete.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cracking the code of megapestsFor the first time researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year.
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New Scientist - News

NASA’s planetary protection officer will defend Mars, not EarthA NASA job advert has made for excited headlines, but the agency isn’t hiring someone to protect us from aliens – it wants someone to protect alien microbes from us
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The Atlantic

What Does 'Late Capitalism' Really Mean? The cynical #latecapitalism meme going around social media calls out the inequities and absurdities of the modern economy. Google search interest in the phrase has more than doubled in the past year. In this episode of Unpresidented, Atlantic contributing editor Annie Lowrey explains where the phrase comes from, how it got so popular, and the deeper meaning of its current usage. For more, read he
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Scientific American Content: Global

Inside Australia's War on Invasive SpeciesThe island country has a long history of unique efforts to battle nonnative flora and fauna -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Teeny Tiny Delivery BallsScientists designed autonomous nanovesicles capable of following glucose concentration gradients, even through the blood brain barrier in rats.
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The Scientist RSS

Investigation Finds Cell Biologist Guilty of MisconductYoshinori Watanabe of the University of Tokyo was found to have tampered with images in five prominent publications.
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Futurity.org

Wearable cuffs would detect dehydration in kids A prototype mobile device shows promise for monitoring dehydration in children. Two identical blue cuffs attach to a child’s hand and foot, each with two embedded electrodes connected by a cable. Through the electrodes, a weak electrical current goes into the body and the resistance is calculated. Walter Karlen, professor at ETH Zurich, and his team of researchers have developed the inexpensive m
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Futurity.org

Climate change in India causes spike in suicides There have been more than 59,000 suicides in India in the past 30 years. Now, experts say failing harvests that push farmers into poverty are likely the key culprits. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that warming a single day by 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) during India’s agricultural growing season leads to roughly 65 suicides across the count
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Scientific American Content: Global

No One Should Have Sole Authority to Launch a Nuclear AttackLeaving the decision to strike to the president alone is dangerous -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Will America’s Epic Eclipse Impact Our Electric Grid? Illustration: Sam Woolley/Gizmodo For about three hours on August 21st, power grid operators across the United States will be confronted with a sudden drop in available electricity, owing to the first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in nearly a century. Power disruptions are not expected, but only because measures are being taken to make up for the sudden energy shortfall. Here’s the amount of solar
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Science : NPR

Animal Images In Prehistoric Rock Art: Looking Beyond Europe Animals are depicted in rock art in more than 100 countries, not just in the famous "painted caves" of Europe. Barbara J. King talks to an archaeologist with a global view of human meaning-making. (Image credit: Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

Run, Don't Walk to Amazon's One-Day Under Armour Sale Under Armour Gold Box Amazon’s running a new fitness-focused Gold Box deal with a solid selection of Under Armour apparel for men, women, and kids, all marked down to great low prices. Head over here to find deals on shorts, tops, sneakers, and more. Just note that lots of the items have multiple color options once you get to their product pages, and that these prices are only available today, so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery points to drugs that would 'short-circuit' deadly leukemiaSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have found that cells of a deadly acute myeloid leukemia can be killed by blocking production of a molecular 'battery.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create stem cell therapy for lung fibrosis conditionsA team of scientists from the UNC School of Medicine and North Carolina State University (NCSU) has developed promising research towards a possible stem cell treatment for several lung conditions, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis -- often-fatal conditions that affect tens of millions of Americans.
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Feed: All Latest

You’d Have to Click a Mouse 10 Million Times to Burn One CalorieThat'll only take 11.5 days. Get to work!
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Feed: All Latest

The Perlan Project's Glider Aims for New Heights in Argentina Testing (Video)The aircraft will ride 'stratospheric mountain waves' high above the Argentine Andes.
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Ingeniøren

General Electric sagsøger Vestas for patentbrudVestas er blevet stævnet af sin amerikanske konkurrent General Electric. GE mener, at Vestas har overtrådt det amerikanske patent på turbineteknologi.
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The Atlantic

The Uneven Health Toll of Sleep Deprivation Compared to whites, African Americans are more likely to suffer from a constellation of health problems referred to as “cardiovascular and metabolic diseases:” high blood pressure , diabetes , and stroke. Things like diet, exercise, and smoking contribute to those conditions, but when researchers control for those behaviors, the disparity persists. Now scientists are examining an unexpected facto
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New Scientist - News

Al Gore’s Inconvenient Sequel could just make climate rift worsePerhaps the veteran Democrat should have stayed in the wings for the follow-up to hit documentary An Inconvenient Truth, suggests Adam Corner
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Live Science

More than Myth: Ancient DNA Reveals Roots of 1st Greek CivilizationsScientists took DNA from Bronze Age skeletons to learn more about the origins of the Minoan and Mycenaean people, who built the first advanced civilizations in Greece.
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New on MIT Technology Review

China Builds One of the World’s Largest Geoengineering Research ProgramsBacked by $3 million in federal funds, scientists are assessing how geoengineering would impact agriculture, glaciers, sea levels and more.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Biological Teleporter Could Seed Life Through GalaxyStarting with just a digital file, scientists manufactured the common flu virus.
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Gizmodo

Game of Thrones Star Says She Got Acting Role Because She Has Millions of Social Media Followers (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Sophie Turner, best known as Sansa Stark in the hit HBO show Game of Thrones , has a lot of followers on social media. And according to Turner, producers take that kind of thing into consideration when casting different projects. In fact, Turner says that she only got a recent acting gig because she has a large presence on social media. Turner has built up a h
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Live Science

Ancient Fidget Spinner? Nope — That's a Weapon from MesopotamiaA 4,000-year-old Mesopotamian artifact that looks just like a fidget spinner and that a museum labeled as a "spinning toy" for 85 years is actually — unexpectedly — an ancient weapon, curators told Live Science.
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Live Science

Gorgeous Crater Lake Stuns in This Photo from SpaceSouthern Oregon's idyllic Crater Lake — snow ringed and shade dappled — belies its violent past.
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Live Science

Eat, Pray, Fossilize? Praying Mantis Fossil Is 110 Million Years OldA Cretaceous mantis fossil is helping scientists piece together how these insects evolved their prey-nabbing adaptations.
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Live Science

What Do You Do with a 26-Pound Diseased Liver? Donate It to a Medical SchoolA medical school in Queensland, Australia, was the recent recipient of a big donation: a diseased liver that weighed more than 26 lbs.
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Feed: All Latest

Gay Dating Simulator 'Dream Daddy' Might Just Be the Gaming Miracle of the YearOn its race to the top of the Steam charts, indie smash 'Dream Daddy' upended everything you thought you knew about game culture.
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Feed: All Latest

How to Photograph the 2017 Solar Eclipse Using Your SmartphoneDon't have a DSLR with a fancy lens? That's fine. You can still get some great photos using your phone's camera.
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Feed: All Latest

Argentinians Are So Sick of the Media, They’re Inventing Their OwnDon't like the news? Set up a radio or TV station and start broadcasting.
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The Atlantic

Ava DuVernay on Queen Sugar and Her Hollywood Journey It’s been a busy five years for Ava DuVernay. Since winning the Best Director Award at Sundance Film Festival in 2012, she has accrued many “firsts”: becoming the first black female director to have a movie ( Selma) nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, to be nominated for a Golden Globe Award, and now to helm a film with a $100 million budget (Disney’s A Wrinkle in Time ). DuVernay’s work goes bey
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Ingeniøren

Velfungerende danske vindmøller flyttes til lande med højere elpriserHøje elpriser og støtteordninger har gjort det til en god forretning at flytte danske vindmøller, der ikke længere får støtte, til udlandet - hvor de kan få ny støtte.
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Science | The Guardian

Millions of eggs removed from European shelves over toxicity fears Recalls in Germany, Netherlands and Belgium and criminal inquiry launched as tests show high levels of insecticide fipronil Millions of eggs are being recalled from shops and warehouses in Germany and the Netherlands and being blocked from sale in Belgium after some were found to contain high levels of a toxic insecticide banned from use in the production of food for human consumption. About 180
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nocturnal Pollinators Go Dark under Street LampsPlants illuminated by artificial lights see a drop in the number of insects that move pollen at night -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Scaramucci Is Hosting an Online Event Because America Hasn't Seen the Last of The Mooch [Update: We Regret To Inform You That The Mooch Cancelled The Event To Spend More Time With His Family Which Is Probably For The Best If You Heard About The Fact That He Missed His Kid's Birth To Spend Time With Trump] (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Anthony “the Mooch” Scaramucci may have lasted just 10 days in the White House before getting booted, but America hasn’t gotten rid of him. The widely ridiculed Trump regime official says he plans to host an online event on Friday. Because Scaramucci clearly isn’t ready to give up the limelight just yet. As CNN reports, Scaramucci is getting some help with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in MadridThe fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from.
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Science | The Guardian

Sam Clovis: Trump's pick for top science job called progressives 'race traitors' Donald Trump’s nominee to be the department of agriculture’s lead scientist used to run a blog that also likened Obama to a ‘communist’ and ‘dictator’ Sam Clovis, who has been nominated by Donald Trump to be the Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) top scientist, previously ran a blog where he called progressives “race traders and race ‘traitors’” and likened Barack Obama to a “communist” and a “di
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Scientific American Content: Global

Al Gore Says Climate's Best Hope Lies in Cities and Solar PowerIn an exclusive interview Gore also maintains that the Trump administration is relinquishing U.S. climate leadership to China and India -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Border wall would put more than 100 endangered species at risk, says expertLast week the U.S. House approved a spending bill that includes $1.6 billion to fund the start of the "contiguous and impassable wall" along the Mexican border. Yesterday the Department of Homeland Security issued a news release announcing "a waiver to waive certain laws, regulations and other legal requirements to ensure the expeditious construction of barriers and roads in the vicinity of the in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Isotope fingerprints in feathers reveal songbirds' secret breeding groundsUsing isotope fingerprints in feathers, researchers have pinpointed the northern breeding grounds of a small, colourful songbird.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Argonne uses digital tools to preserve Southwestern cultural heritageHollywood's Indiana Jones gained fame for wielding his pistol and bullwhip, but researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory prefer to equip themselves with something far more sophisticated: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technique to synthesize monolayer filmsA NIMS research group has developed a novel technique to synthesize monolayer films composed of neatly tiled two-dimensional materials, such as oxide nanosheets and graphene, on substrate surfaces in as quickly as one minute.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists edit human embryos to safely remove disease for the first time – here's how they did itScientists in the US have released a paper showing that they have successfully edited human embryos to correct a mutation that causes an inheritable heart condition. The findings are hugely important as they demonstrate for the first time that the technology may one day be used safely to edit out many devastating diseases.
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New Scientist - News

Nano aluminium offers fuel cells on demand – just add waterThe accidental discovery of a new aluminium alloy could lead to portable hydrogen and could kick-start the struggling hydrogen economy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China issues bike-sharing guidelines as complaints riseChina on Thursday issued national guidelines governing bike-sharing operations to nurture a new industry credited with spurring a transport revolution while addressing mounting complaints over an accumulation of millions of bikes on city streets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA-developed technologies showcased on Dellingr's debut flightAlong for the ride on Dellingr's maiden journey is a suite of miniaturized NASA-developed technologies—one no larger than a fingernail—that in many cases already have proven their mettle in suborbital or space demonstrations, boosting confidence that they will perform as designed once in orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From greenhouse gas to 3-D surface-microporous grapheneTiny dents in the surface of graphene greatly enhances its potential as a supercapacitor. Even better, it can be made from carbon dioxide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Space station flyover of Super Typhoon NoruNASA astronaut Randy Bresnik photographed Super Typhoon Noru in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on August 1, 2017, as the International Space Station passed overhead. He shared images of the massive storm on social media, writing, "Super Typhoon #Noru, amazing the size of this weather phenomenon, you can almost sense its power from 250 miles above."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA selects proposals to study sun, space environmentNASA has selected nine proposals under its Explorers Program that will return transformational science about the sun and space environment and fill science gaps between the agency's larger missions; eight for focused scientific investigations and one for technological development of instrumentation. One, called sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (sunRISE), is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two Voyagers taught us how to listen to spaceAs NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft were changing our understanding of the solar system, they also spurred a leap in spacecraft communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal diseaseThe stiffness or elasticity of a cell can reveal much about whether the cell is healthy or diseased. Cancer cells, for instance, are known to be softer than normal, while asthma-affected cells can be rather stiff.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved air quality research software to help reduce emissions, pollutionPurdue University researchers are developing an on-site computer and software system that could provide a more flexible, high-quality and user-friendly way to conduct agriculture-based air quality research to better understand and limit emission and pollution impact.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Authors retract controversial NgAgo gene-editing study Researchers pull study after several failed attempts by others to replicate findings describing a proposed alternative to CRISPR. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22412
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team sets new record for magnetic tape storage—makes tape competitive for cloud storageResearch scientists have achieved a new world record in tape storage – their fifth since 2006. The new record of 201 Gb/in2 (gigabits per square inch) in areal density was achieved on a prototype sputtered magnetic tape developed by Sony Storage Media Solutions. The scientists presented the achievement today at the 28th Magnetic Recording Conference (TMRC 2017) here.
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Ars Technica

The external graphics dream is real: Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box reviewed Enlarge / The Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box and Sapphire RX 580. (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box Power 350W Asaka AK-PS035AF01 SFX Ports 1x PCIe 3.0 X16, 1x Thunderbolt 3.0 Size 18.5cm x 34.0cm x 20.2cm Other perks 120mm Asaka Fan Price $300 (~£300, but TBC) The external graphics card (or eGFX), long the pipe dream of laptop-touting gamers the world over, has finall
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Observation of the hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogenA Canadian-led investigation has opened a new chapter in antimatter research. In a study published today in Nature, the ALPHA Collaboration, which includes 50 physicists from 17 institutions, reports the first detailed observation of spectral lines from an antimatter atom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light pollution as a new threat to pollinationArtificial light disrupts nocturnal pollination and leads to a reduced number of fruits produced by the plant. This loss of night time pollination cannot be compensated by diurnal pollinators. The negative impact of artificial light at night on nocturnal pollinators might even propagate further to the diurnal community, as ecologists of the University of Bern were able to show.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saving the monarch butterfly—biologist explains population census discrepanciesMonarch butterfly populations have taken a nosedive over the last 20 years, according to researchers who monitor the number of butterflies that spend the winter in Mexico every year. But organizations of citizen scientists in the United States who conduct yearly censuses of monarchs in state parks and other locations in the summer have reported no consistent dip in the number of butterflies they s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glasses generate power with flexible organic solar cellsOrganic solar cells are flexible, transparent and lightweight, and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. In Energy Technology, researchers from KIT report sunglasses with colored, semitransparent solar cells applied to the lenses that supply a microprocessor and two dis
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Ingeniøren

Efter læserinput: Pendul-entusiaster har fokus på en tyndere wireSidste uges appel til Ingeniørens læsere har givet idémagerne bag verdens største udendørs Foucault-pendul masser af forslag at gruble over.
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NYT > Science

In Sweltering South, Climate Change Is Now a Workplace HazardWorkers laboring outdoors in southern states are wrestling with the personal and political consequences of a worsening environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New botulinum neurotoxin discovered -- potential to treat a number of medical conditionsThe first new botulinum neurotoxin in almost half a century has been discovered by researchers at Stockholm University and Harvard Medical School. Botulinum toxins are widely used to treat a growing list of medical conditions. The article has been published in Nature Communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humans have been altering tropical forests for at least 45,000 yearsA new study, published in Nature Plants, counters the view that tropical forests were pristine natural environments prior to modern agriculture and industrialization. Moreover, humans have in fact been having a dramatic impact on such forest ecologies for tens of thousands of years, through techniques ranging from controlled burning of sections of forest to plant and animal management to clear-cut
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New clue to solving the mystery of the sun's hot atmosphereThe elemental composition of the Sun's hot atmosphere known as the 'corona' is strongly linked to the 11-year solar magnetic activity cycle, a team of scientists from UCL, George Mason University and Naval Research Laboratory has revealed for the first time.
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The Atlantic

The Executive Branch's Sharp Turn to the Right In the few hours on Monday between the installation of John Kelly as President Trump’s new chief of staff and the dismissal of Anthony Scaramucci as his communications director, the Natural Resources Defense Council and two other environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Federal Highway Administration. The suit, concerning regulations that require state transportation agencies to develop p
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The Atlantic

Will Brexit Reopen Old Wounds Between Ireland and Northern Ireland? Perhaps the most discernible aspect of the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland is just how indiscernible it is. With few signposts marking the end of one jurisdiction and the beginning of another, travelers going between the two rely on subtle clues indicating they’ve crossed from one country into another—the changing color of road signs, speed limits switching from kilome
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New clue to solving the mystery of the Sun's hot atmosphereThe elemental composition of the Sun's hot atmosphere known as the 'corona' is strongly linked to the 11-year solar magnetic activity cycle, a team of scientists from UCL, George Mason University and Naval Research Laboratory has revealed for the first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans have been altering tropical forests for at least 45,000 yearsThe first review of the global impact of humans on tropical forests in the ancient past shows that humans have been altering these environments for at least 45,000 years. This counters the view that tropical forests were pristine natural environments prior to modern agriculture and industrialization. The study, published today in Nature Plants, found that humans have in fact been having a dramatic
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Science : NPR

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen A record-setting "dead zone," where water doesn't have enough oxygen for fish to survive, has appeared this summer. One major cause is pollution from farms. (Image credit: NASA/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

Earthquake Shakes Central Oklahoma, One Of 7 In 28 Hours An earthquake of preliminary magnitude 4.2 hit Wednesday night. Earthquakes used to be rare in Oklahoma. Scientists say they're linked to the disposal of wastewater from fracking. (Image credit: U.S. Geological Survey)
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Ingeniøren

Luxembourg giver virksomheder lov til at gå på rov i rummetMinedrift i rummet bliver nu også tilladt for ikke-amerikanske virksomheder. Luxembourg har som det første europæiske land indført lovgivning, der sikrer mineselskabernes rettigheder til de udvundne materialer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Activists sound alarm over Russia's whale tradeA young beluga whale looks down as it is winched in a net onto the deck of a rusty Russian ship moored at a far-eastern port.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Voting machines and election systems - a quick lookDigital voting machines are in the spotlight in Venezuela, where the head of Smartmatic, a maker of election systems used in the country's tumultuous constituent-assembly election, said Wednesday that the official turnout figure had been "tampered with ." The company's CEO said the count was off by at least 1 million votes—possibly in either direction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mishap doesn't dampen enthusiasm for security robotsOn his first day at work as a security guard, Steve was greeted warmly, drawing attention from passersby, including some taking selfies with him at the tony retail-residential complex he patrolled. Then he fell into the fountain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arts engagement can help counter divisions in societyEngagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research co-ordinated by psychologists at the University of Kent shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spousal age gap affects marriage satisfaction over time: studyMen and women both report greater marital satisfaction with younger spouses, but that satisfaction fades over time in marriages with a significant age gap between the partners, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Payments to rural communities offer a new opportunity to restore China's native forestsDespite massive efforts at reforestation, China's native forests continue to be displaced by plantations. A new study by researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Kunming Institute of Botany (KIB), Princeton University, and Sun Yat-sen University argues that rural communities could help reverse this trend if they were given incentives to protect and restore native forests on their ow
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Science | The Guardian

Royal Society science book prize shortlist tackles 'the big questions' Judges hail writers’ blend of eloquence and erudition on subjects ranging from the evolution of the octopus to the impact of technology on modern man From the vastness of infinity to the microbes that live within us, the shortlist for the Royal Society Insight Investment science book prize tackles “the big questions of our time”, according to chair of judges Richard Fortey. Palaeontologist and wr
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Ingeniøren

Putin forbyder Tor og kvæler Signal: »Lovlige brugere kommer til at betale prisen« To nye love vil gøre det langt mere kompliceret at færdes og kommunikere anonymt i Rusland. Det falder sammen med det kommende valg, som forestår i marts næste år. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/putin-leverer-nyt-slag-mod-privacy-paa-internettet-1078755 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Efterladte skibsvrag udgør ikke nogen særlig miljørisikoDet er ikke et miljøproblem, at omtrent 30 synlige skibsvrag bliver liggende ved de danske kyster. Det siger Miljøministeriet. Både SF og Kommunernes Internationale Miljøorganisation vedkender, at deres kritik bygger på vragenes udseende.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prediciting TB's behaviorResearch led by scientists at Harvard Medical School reveals that when it comes to predicting response to treatment and risk of dying, molecular tests that detect resistance to a class of TB drugs known as fluoroquinolones may be as good and even superior to traditional drug-sensitivity tests conducted in lab cultures.
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Science-Based Medicine

Chiropractic pediatrics conference features anti-vaccination ideology . . . as usualFor the third time in four years, a chiropractic pediatrics conference will feature anti-vaccination propaganda as part of its program. Chiropractors will spread this misinformation to their patients' parents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spousal age gap affects marriage satisfaction over timeMen and women both report greater marital satisfaction with younger spouses, but that satisfaction fades over time in marriages with a significant age gap between the partners, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Payments to rural communities offer a new opportunity to restore China's native forestsDespite massive efforts at reforestation, China's native forests continue to be displaced by plantations. A new study argues that rural communities could help reverse this trend if they were given incentives to protect and restore native forests on their own land. A proposed new umbrella policy for environmental protection in China currently falls short of the measures needed, but if amended, coul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New injectable antiretroviral treatment proved to be as effective as standard oral therapyA new clinical trial concludes that intramuscular administration of antiretrovirals every 4 or 8 weeks gets results similar to daily pill intake Spacing drug intake would lead to greater adherence to treatment and an improved quality of life for HIV patients
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arts engagement can help counter divisions in societyEngagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research coordinated by psychologists at the University of Kent shows.
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Gizmodo

Jaden Smith's Recyclable Water Box Startup Is Suing Sketchy Mayo Startup Hampton Creek Over a Font Photo: AP Jaden Smith, co-founder of boxed water startup Just Good Inc. , has launched a legal war with another startup selling mayonnaise. According to Bloomberg , Smith’s company which sells water in recyclable cartons has filed suit against Hampton Creek, claiming the latter company violated a trademark agreement established in 2014. Hampton Creek markets itself as a science-driven tech startu
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Different Story from the Middle East: Entrepreneurs Building an Arab Tech EconomyMiddle Eastern startups are overcoming cultural and other barriers to tap into a growing local taste for technology, from Bitcoin wallets to digital publishing.
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Gizmodo

Trump Really, Really Wanted to Play the President in Sharknado 3 Image: Syfy If only we lived in the reality where the phrase “President Trump” referred to a clever bit of stunt casting in Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! , instead of the actual White House occupant. Alas, we do not. But at least we have an amusing anecdote, courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter , that allows us to dare to dream. The moment in history was January 2015, when the Asylum—the schlock-minded
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Science | The Guardian

Guardian of the galaxy: Nasa seeks new 'planetary protection officer' Role involves safeguarding Earth from extra-terrestrial infection, and stopping other planets being contaminated by robotic or human explorers Nasa is looking for a planetary protection officer who will help safeguard Earth from alien bacteria. No, it isn’t the script of an elaborate science fiction film, but an actual job advertisement on the US government’s website. Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren

Fire mangler, som mange chefer døjer med Ledere, der kan motivere deres medarbejdere, er afgørende for gode resultater. Men mange chefer har ofte et af fire træk, som en dygtig leder bør ligge fra sig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fire-mangler-mange-chefer-doejer-med-9322 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where there's fire, there's smoke -- and social mediaThe fact that people reliably flock to social media to discuss smoke and fire was the inspiration for a new study by atmospheric scientists. The researchers showed striking correlation between numbers of Facebook users posting about visible smoke, and commonly used datasets for estimating harmful smoke exposure. These include satellite observations, chemical transport models and surface particulat
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Big Think

Best Job Ever? NASA Is Hiring Someone to Defend Earth from Aliens Greatest job ever? NASA will pay six-figures to a Planetary Protection Officer. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Countryside faces 'damaging uncertainty'The National Trust weighs into the campaign to keep subsidies for Britain's farmers at the current level.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

DNA clue to origins of early Greek civilizationDNA is shedding light on the people who built Greece's earliest civilizations.
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Gizmodo

God Help Us All, Mark Zuckerberg Has Hired Hillary Clinton's Chief Strategist Photo: AP Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg publicly claims he is not preparing to run for president, despite the fact he has spent an awful lot of time traveling around the country in an effort to understand the little people . So news from Politico that Zuckerberg has secured the services of Democratic pollster Joel Benenson, one of Barack Obama’s chief advisers and chief strategist to presidential
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Gizmodo

Tesla Succumbs To Practical Reasoning, Will Build Next Car On Model 3 Platform Photo via AP Images Hundreds of engineers and investors around the world collectively sighed in relief today as Tesla CEO Elon Musk revealed that he has decided against spending too much time and money on developing a new platform for the company’s next car, and will instead use the one they just finished developing. When Tesla confirmed it would be working on adding a smaller crossover to its li
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to reprogram cells in our immune systemScientists have revealed, for the first time, a method to reprogram specific T cells. More precisely, they discovered how to turn pro-inflammatory cells that boost the immune system into anti-inflammatory cells that suppress it, and vice versa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists deliver knockout blow to multiple cancersTargeting healthy cells that have been hijacked by cancer cells could help treat many different types of the disease, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marriage of microscopy techniques reveals 3D structure of critical protein complexResearchers have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Collaboration between pet owners, vets and researchers helps dogs and children with a rare and severe epilepsyNew hope is being given to children who suffer from a rare and severe form of epilepsy, thanks to new, unique research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Autism may reflect excitation-inhibition imbalance in brain, study findsKey features of autism reflect an imbalance in signaling from excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a portion of the forebrain, and that reversing the imbalance could alleviate some of its hallmark symptoms, explain researchers in a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saving the monarch butterfly: Biologist explains population census discrepanciesNew research provides an explanation for why citizen scientists taking censuses of monarch butterfly populations didn’t note the same drops in population recorded in Mexico, where the monarchs spend their winters. The research supports previous studies suggesting that an increase in available milkweed could help the monarch population rebound.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A Braf kinase-inactive mutant induces lung adenocarcinomaThe initiating oncogenic event in half of human lung adenocarcinomas is still unknown, a fact that complicates the development of selective targeted therapies. Researchers have demonstrated that the expression of an endogenous Braf kinase-inactive isoform in mice triggers lung adenocarcinoma in vivo, indicating that BRAF-inactivating mutations are initiating events in lung oncogenesis. The paper i
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Gizmodo

Trump's Pick For USDA Chief Scientist Isn't a Scientist, But He Is a Self-Declared Expert on 'Race Traitors' Photo: AP Sam Clovis, the climate-change-denying Iowa business professor with no formal scientific qualifications President Donald Trump has nominated to serve as chief scientist at the Dept. of Agriculture, should maybe have been a little more judicious about his blogging habits. CNN’s KFile dug up a number of blog posts written as recently as 2011 to 2012 for the since-deleted website of his ol
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Ars Technica

Take Two cancels plans to stop printing money via Grand Theft Auto Online (credit: Rockstar Games) When will Grand Theft Auto Online stop operating? The series' developers at Rockstar and its corporate parents at Take Two have hinted at an eventual cancellation , but we've finally gotten official word that the wildly popular online game's updates were going to be canceled... until plans changed. In a note tucked into a very successful-sounding report for its first 2018
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Futurity.org

Paper byproduct makes greener ‘glue’ for houses New research suggests that lignin, a byproduct of paper and bioethanol production, can completely replace phenol in phenolic adhesive formulation, used in building materials. This research directly affects housing manufacturing by introducing bio-based adhesives made of lignin, a renewable resource, instead of petroleum-based phenol. “This will help the housing market to be less dependent on petr
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Gizmodo

Here's a Solid Deal On a Switch-Compatible 8Bitdo Gamepad 8Bitdo NES30/FC30 , $33 8Bitdo’s retro gaming controllers have taken off like Mario with a cape feather seemingly overnight, and MassDrop has a great deal on the NES30 and FC30 , complete with dual analog sticks. These controllers can pair over Bluetooth to your PC, iPhone, Android device, and yes, even your Nintendo Switch. Luke Plunkett over at Kotaku is a big fan, and you can read his full rev
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Futurity.org

Why monarch butterfly estimates didn’t match New research suggests that monarch butterflies’ moving away from farm fields once covered with milkweed explains a discrepancy between the decreasing population of the butterflies wintering in Mexico and American citizen scientists’ yearly census of the population, which have not shown the same decrease. Researchers’ findings also bolster the view that loss of milkweed, the only plant on which mo
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Futurity.org

Earthquakes we cause are just as strong as nature’s New research suggests naturally occurring earthquakes and those caused by unconventional oil and gas recovery in the central US share the same shaking potential and can thus cause similar damage. “People have been debating the strength of induced earthquakes for decades—our study resolves this question…” The finding contradicts previous observations suggesting that induced earthquakes exhibit wea
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sticky SituationInspired by the land slug Arion subfuscus's sticky, durable slime, researchers created a tough yet bendy biocompatible glue that can adhere to moist surfaces, including a beating pig heart.
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Ars Technica

The Windows console is getting a new, easier to read color scheme Enlarge (credit: Microsoft ) In the Fall Creators Update, Microsoft is going to change the default color scheme used by Windows' console windows. After years of neglect, Microsoft has been working to update and overhaul the Windows command-line interface. With the development of the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and continued investment in PowerShell, the shortcomings of the Windows command-l
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Gizmodo

Okay, So Now Star Trek: Discovery Can Say 'God' Image: CBS The USS Discovery has got to be a ship stuck in one location, based on the number of weird u-turns and backpedals it has done. Contrary to the article in which Entertainment Weekly previewed its cover story on Star Trek: Discovery , apparently “God” is a perfectly fine word for a Terran to say. Post-TCA, Nerdist caught up with executive producer Gretchen Berg who said that not only is
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The US Press Freedom Tracker Follows Abuses of Journalists To Help Stop ThemThe US Press Freedom Tracker catalogues the increasingly common abuses against American journalists.
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Ars Technica

Tesla lost $401 million from revenues of $2.7 billion in Q2 2017 Enlarge / The Tesla Model 3. (credit: Tesla) On Wednesday afternoon, Tesla released its Q2 2017 financial results : a loss of $401 million from total revenues of $2.7 billion over the three months up until June 30th. That's more or less the same performance as the company reported for Q1 2017 , but it does show a 49 percent jump in revenue and 53 percent jump in vehicle deliveries compared to the
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: National-Security Shakeup What We’re Following Job Insecurity: National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster removed Ezra Cohen-Watnick , the controversial senior director for intelligence , from the National Security Council. Last month, he also forced out a top official who had authored a memo claiming President Trump’s agenda was under attack by subversive forces inside and outside the government. The dismissals speak both t
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Live Science

Quarter-Million Glitter iPhone Cases Recalled for Burn HazardMore than 260,000 glitter iPhone cases are being recalled because the sparkling mixture inside the cases can leak out and cause skin burns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeted radiotherapy limits side effects of breast cancer treatmentBreast cancer patients who have radiotherapy targeted at the original tumor site experience fewer side effects five years after treatment than those who have whole breast radiotherapy, and their cancer is just as unlikely to return, according to trial results published in The Lancet today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increasing risk of drug withdrawal in newborns as US opioid epidemic acceleratesTaking a combination of opioids (strong prescription painkillers) and psychotropic medications (widely used to treat mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression) during pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of drug withdrawal in newborns, finds a study in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How can we achieve greater balance in future cases like Charlie Gard's, asks expert?Much of the public discussion about the Charlie Gard case has been distinctly unbalanced, argues an expert in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acid attack bystanders can make a real difference if they act fast, say expertsEducating the public to act quickly after an acid attack can minimise injury and substantially improve outcomes for victims, say experts in The BMJ today.
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Live Science

Flesh-Eating Bacteria at the Beach? How You Can Become InfectedA woman visiting Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, reportedly developed an infection with flesh-eating bacteria. But how do you catch this at the beach?
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Gizmodo

Yup, Verizon and AT&T Are a Lot Slower After Adding Unlimited Plans GIF GIF: Gizmodo The verdict is in: Verizon and AT&T have screwed the pooch on their rollouts of unlimited data plans. Verizon was the biggest loser according to a new study, with a 2 Mbps drop in its average download speed. T-Mobile ate everyone else’s lunch and its clown of a CEO is being just as annoying as you’d expect. Mobile industry research company Open Signal released it last State of Mo
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Big Think

James Franco Has a New Show All About Philosophy Would you rather learn philosophy from James Franco or a professor of philosophy? Well, now you don't have to choose. Read More
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Want a Look at Netflix’s Future? Follow the AnimeNetflix just picked up a dozen new anime shows, a move that showed off its blueprint for big-time growth.
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Feed: All Latest

Trump's Radical Immigration Crackdown Won't Help TechAnd it's ripped from the playbooks of anti-immigrant groups the SPLC considers hate groups.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CAREFOR calls on EU to safeguard independent academic researchThree leading European organisations in the fight against cancer have called the EU to urgently increase its support for independent academic research for the benefit of cancer patients, in an article published today in ESMO Open.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lesser spotted eagle conservation success depends on youngsters following migrating adultsIn a bid to save the endangered lesser spotted eagle population in Germany, Bernd-Ulrich Meyburg and colleagues have relocated chicks from Latvia to Brandenburg, but it was unclear whether the translocated chicks would successfully complete their first migration to southern Africa. In an ambitious tracking program, the team has shown that all thought the death toll is high, sufficient juvenile bir
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The Atlantic

Why Europe Opposes America's New Russia Sanctions When President Trump on Wednesday signed into law a bill that will impose new sanctions on Russia, he simultaneously expressed his opposition to the measure. The law aims to punish Moscow for its interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and limit the president’s own ability to unilaterally lift such sanctions. “By limiting the Executive’s flexibility, this bill makes it harder for the
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Ars Technica

New Web tool tracks Russian “influence ops” on Twitter German Marshal Fund for the US/Alliance for Securing Democracy The Alliance for Securing Democracy, a bipartisan project backed by the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF), has launched a Web tool to keep tabs on Russia's ongoing efforts to influence public opinion in the United States and abroad. Called Hamilton 68 —named for the 68 th edition of the Federalist Papers, in which Alexan
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Popular Science

NASA is hiring a Planetary Protection Officer, but it’s not Earth that needs saving Space Terrestrial life is a huge risk for other planets The position NASA is hiring for is probably nothing like the image conjured by the trending headlines. It’s actually way more important.
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Live Science

Want to Protect Earth from Aliens? NASA Is HiringNASA is looking to hire a planetary protection officer, a person who will lead the agency's efforts to keep its spacecraft from contaminating worlds with life-forms that don't belong there.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Miller Time Today in 5 Lines President Trump signed a bill that imposes new sanctions on Russia, despite calling it “seriously flawed.” He, along with two Republican senators, unveiled a plan to dramatically reduce legal immigration to the United States. At a White House press briefing, senior policy adviser Stephen Miller got into a heated exchange with CNN reporter Jim Acosta over the proposal. National-Se
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The Atlantic

H.R. McMaster Cleans House at the National Security Council The National Security Council’s controversial senior director for intelligence programs has been removed from his position, sources say, in the latest sign that National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster is asserting control over the office he runs. Ezra Cohen-Watnick, a 31-year-old former Defense Intelligence Agency officer who was brought in to the administration by former National-Security Advise
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Get A Look At The Psychological Effects The "Darkness" Survivalists Might Suffer Darkness | Starts TONIGHT at 10p! Psychologist Dr. Scott T. Wilson breaks down the cognitive and emotional repercussions of extended periods of sensory deprivation, and explains the nature of bizarre hallucinations ranging from flashes of light to full-blown encounters and narratives. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://
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Gizmodo

Police Commissioner to Baltimore Cops: Please Don't Use Body Cams to Falsify Evidence Screenshot: Baltimore Police/ Baltimore Sun On Tuesday, the Baltimore Public Defender’s Office released footage it says shows officers planting drugs and staging their discovery for body cameras, the second such video to be released in the last two weeks. Prosecutors have now dropped more than 40 felony cases that relied on testimony from the officers seen in the videos. In response to the ongoin
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Live Science

21 National Parks Where You Can Enjoy the 2017 Solar EclipseThe Great American Total Solar Eclipse will race across the U.S. on Aug. 21, 2017, casting a shadow over 21 of the country's National Parks coast to coast.
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Gizmodo

Two-Headed Bat Found in Brazil Is the Stuff of Nightmares Image Courtesy of Nadja L. Pinheiro, from Área de Embriologia, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro Nature isn’t always sunshine and kitties. This proved itself yet again recently, when researchers at the Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro published a study on a pair of conjoined bat twins discovered in southeastern Brazil back in 2001. The animals were dead when they were disco
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The Atlantic

A Kerfuffle About Diversity in the Roman Empire Okay so, it all started with a children’s cartoon. In December, the BBC released on YouTube an old animated video about life in Roman Britain, which featured a family with a dark-skinned father. This depiction recently caught the ire of an Infowars editor, who tweeted , “Thank God the BBC is portraying Roman Britain as ethnically diverse. I mean, who cares about historical accuracy, right?” To wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HBO plays down threat of hacked internal emailsHBO, which acknowledged Monday that hackers had broken into its systems and stolen "proprietary information," now says the attackers likely haven't breached the network's entire email system.
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The Atlantic

What America Should Learn from North Korea's Latest Missile Test North Korea’s second test of an intercontinental missile on July 28 demonstrated at least two important new realities. First, even experts who doubted the country’s range capabilities after the first test on July 4 now concede that it can likely strike the eastern coast of the United States with a nuclear weapon, if it were to fire this missile along the right trajectory. Second, North Korea appe
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The Atlantic

A Reservation, Restored In the late 19th-century legend of Crazy Horse, the Oglala Sioux leader prophesied an economic, spiritual, and social renaissance among Native Americans. Now that prophesied generation, the Seventh Generation, is here—and they’re determined to live up to the legend. The South Dakota-based photographer Kristina Barker spent several days on Pine Ridge Reservation recently meeting the young leaders
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how to reprogram cells in our immune systemScientists at the Gladstone Institutes revealed, for the first time, a method to reprogram specific T cells. More precisely, they discovered how to turn pro-inflammatory cells that boost the immune system into anti-inflammatory cells that suppress it, and vice versa.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Light pollution can foil plant-insect hookups, and not just at nightUpsetting nocturnal pollinators has daylight after-effects for Swiss meadow flowers.
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cognitive science

Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? YES: Sandrine Thuret submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

This Trigger-Happy Glove Lets You Simulate Machine Gun Fire, But How Is It Legal? GIF GIF Source: Guntruth The AutoGlove, scheduled to enter production next month, bills itself as a mechanism that allows for “full-auto fire without ATF approval, tax stamp or firearm modifications.” Powered by a battery pack that can be attached to a user’s arm or body, the device looks like a military-inspired Power Glove and is designed to fire a standard semi-automatic firearm at a rate of u
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Lyme Disease’s Worst Enemy? It Might Be FoxesNew data suggests the rise of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases may be tied to a scarcity of traditional mouse predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big impact, tiny element—hydrogen power on the nanoscaleUsing hydrogen for energy production is nothing new. But with his research, Carnegie Mellon University Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) Ph.D. candidate Ajay Pisat hopes to unlock its full potential as a primary, mainstream energy storage medium by maximizing the efficiency of hydrogen production through photocatalysis.
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New Scientist - News

Enormous exoplanet has an atmosphere hot enough to boil ironA planet nearly double the size of Jupiter and 900 light years away has a glowing stratosphere and an atmosphere hot enough that iron there exists as a vapour
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Gizmodo

Outsource Vacuuming To This Wi-Fi Enabled Robot, Just $160 Today ECOVACS N79 Robotic Vacuum , $160 with code 74BFP5GV Vacuuming is simultaneously the worst chore, and the chore most easily pawned off to a robot. How convenient! While it lacks the brand recognition of a Roomba, and we can’t personally vouch for them like we can for the Eufy RoboVac 11 , this ECOVACS vacuum has solid reviews, and are insanely affordable today at $160. You can even control it fro
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Viden

Forskere fjerner for første gang fremtidig hjertelidelse fra fosterForsøget kan ifølge forskerne vise sig at være et stort gennembrud for ændring af dna.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less than half of stroke patients nationwide are prescribed recommended cholesterol-lowering medicationMany people leaving the hospital after a stroke are not getting prescriptions for statins, even though research shows the medication can reduce the recurrence of stroke. The study finds geographic discrepancies in prescribing trends: in the so-called Stroke Belt of the southeastern US, men and older stroke patients were less likely to receive statins than women and younger patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quitting statins after stroke may raise risk of another strokeStopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method may help predict risk of bleeding after strokeA new scoring method may help predict who is at high risk of serious bleeding after a stroke, according to a study published in the Aug. 2, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interdisciplinary team designs gas flow cell to analyze catalytic behaviorResearchers at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) now have access to a cutting-edge capability for studying catalysts.
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Science : NPR

Environmental Groups Challenge EPA In Court Over Ozone Rule The Trump administration seeks to roll back and delay dozens of regulations across government, including one to lower smog-creating ozone. Environmental groups are challenging the EPA in court.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Art museum will send art directly to your phone with new texting featureThe San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is making it easier for art lovers to see its extensive collection, no matter where they are in the world.
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Popular Science

North Korea's new ICBMs can reach most of the United States Military This is a threat Russian ICBMs still pose today, as they have for decades. North Korea's new ICBM has the range to be a threat to the United States. So, too, do the ICBMs of Russia and China, which have been around for decades.
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Gizmodo

That HBO Game of Thrones Hack Was Worse Than We Thought Image: HBO Well, this isn’t terribly surprising. According to the latest dispatch from Variety , the hackers who broke into HBO’s servers and stole 1.5 terabytes of data, including at least one Game of Thrones script, also stole employee data. More specifically, the hackers made off with “thousands of Home Box Office (HBO) internal company documents.” That’s bad. Thanks to a DMCA takedown notice,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unwanted record: Biggest ever dead zone in Gulf of MexicoThere's an unwanted record in the Gulf of Mexico: This year's "dead zone," where there's too little oxygen to support marine life, is the biggest ever measured.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where there's fire, there's smoke—and social mediaWhen people see smoke on the horizon, what do they do? Besides (hopefully) calling fire authorities, they post to social media, of course.
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Ars Technica

New docs: Otto deal couldn’t happen until Uber agreed to protect co-founders Enlarge / Travis Kalanick, seen here in 2013, served as the CEO of Uber from December 2010 until June 2017. (credit: Fortune Live Media ) The intrigue deepens surrounding the early 2016 discussions around Uber’s acquisition of a self-driving trucking company, Otto, according to newly released court documents. Otto was founded by two then-high-level Google engineers. Waymo now says that Uber is dr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where there's fire, there's smoke -- and social mediaThe fact that people reliably flock to social media to discuss smoke and fire was the inspiration for a new study by Colorado State University atmospheric scientists. The researchers showed striking correlation between numbers of Facebook users posting about visible smoke, and commonly used datasets for estimating harmful smoke exposure. These include satellite observations, chemical transport mod
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hyperloop startup says superfast rail a realityThe near-supersonic rail system known as hyperloop has passed another key milestone on its path to become reality, the US startup Hyperloop One said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tree-of-heaven's prolific seed production adds to its invasive potentialTree-of-heaven—or Ailanthus—is an invasive triple threat, according to a team of plant pathologists. The species produces seeds early in its lifespan, tends to make millions of viable seeds during its life, and continues to produce seeds for decades and, in some cases, for more than a century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marriage of microscopy techniques reveals 3-D structure of critical protein complexResearchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine biologists study the diets of dolphin species to understand the animals' foraging habitsThe health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA look at Tropical Storm Nalgae in infrared lightNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nalgae and gathered temperature data to determine the location of the most powerful storms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA looks at Tropical Cyclones Irwin and Hilary rainfall and Fujiwara EffectNASA used satellite data to tally the rainfall generated by Hurricanes Hilary and Irwin as they interacted in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The truth about cats' and dogs' environmental impactWith many Americans choosing to eat less meat in recent years, often to help reduce the environmental effect of meat production, UCLA geography professor Gregory Okin began to wonder how much feeding pets contributes to issues like climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A dolphin dietThe health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. Marine biologists have now studied the diets of dolphin species to understand the animals' foraging habits and how they share ocean resources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ebola detected in semen of survivors two years after infectionResearchers have found Ebola RNA in the semen of survivors two years after infection. They are calling on the World Health Organization to update its guidelines on sexual transmission.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat-conducting plastic could lead to lighter electronics, carsAdvanced plastics could usher in lighter, cheaper, more energy-efficient product components, including those used in vehicles, LEDs and computers -- if only they were better at dissipating heat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increasing productivity by one day each monthCorporate wellness programs have been shown to save companies money by reducing absenteeism and health insurance costs. Researchers have now quantified an additional benefit to companies' bottom line, showing that a wellness program they studied resulted in higher productivity for all participating employees. This improvement was dramatic: approximately equal to an additional productive work day p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three Klebsiella species cause life-threatening infections and share drug resistance genesThree different species of Klebsiella bacteria can cause life-threatening infections in hospital patients and that all three share genes that confer resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics, new research shows. The study improves physicians' understanding of Klebsiella infections and could point toward better ways to fight multi-drug resistant strains of these bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pros and cons: Free dental care in exchange for community serviceThe majority of low-income Michigan residents and dentists who participated in a program that provided free dental care in exchange for volunteer work said they liked it, and most patients felt their oral health had improved.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scholars shed light on 'moving target' of drone regulation in the USFor some, they're a hobby. For other people, they're tools. And for many, they're just a big nuisance. Love 'em or hate 'em, drones—or, unmanned aerial systems—are increasingly a part of life for millions in the U.S. In fact, the Federal Aviation Administration estimates annual sales of drones should hit 7 million by 2020.
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Ars Technica

Taking quark-gluon plasma for a spin may un-break a fundamental symmetry Enlarge / The STAR detector, with a bunch of physicists thrown in for scale. (credit: Brookhaven National Lab ) Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC particle accelerator have determined that an exotic form of matter produced in their collisions is the most rapidly spinning material ever detected. The material is called a quark-gluon plasma, and it provides us an opportunity to stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ebola detected in semen of survivors two years after infectionResearchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found Ebola RNA in the semen of survivors two years after infection. They are calling on the World Health Organization to update its guidelines on sexual transmission.
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The Atlantic

Russia's Back-to-the-80s Foreign Policy “ History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme .” The latest round of Russian-American embassy staff hits—Russia cut hundreds of U.S. Embassy employees in an escalatory response to U.S. expulsion of 35 Russian diplomats last December—recall the big Soviet-American embassy staff expulsions of 1986. Few recall the details of these Reagan-era fights. But many remember that the 1980s ended badly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How prisoners dressed for executions says a lot about condemned and pageantry of capital punishmentWhat would you wear to your own execution?
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Popular Science

U.S. researchers have used gene editing to combat heart disease in human embryos Health The effort was strictly for practice, but represent a major first step in its potential future clinical use. Researchers used the new gene editing technique colloquially known as CRISPR to correct a defective gene that causes a specific type of heart disease.
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Gizmodo

Clever Camera App Uses Deep Learning to Perfectly Retouch Your Photos Before You Take Them GIF Professional photographers often spend hours painstakingly perfecting their images in Lightroom and Photoshop before sharing them with the world. But researchers at MIT are promising similar results generated so quickly that your smartphone can correct and retouch a photo before you’ve even taken it. As with many image-processing breakthroughs we’ve seen over the past few years, the ‘secret s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Field sensor quickly, accurately identifies soil issuesProducers sometimes face challenges that go deep into the soil. They need answers to help the soil, on site. A portable field sensor can accurately measure minerals in soils more easily and efficiently than existing methods. And a research team, including a middle school student and her scientist father, can confirm it.
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The Scientist RSS

Company Sells a Biological Age KitWhile the epigenetic clock is a useful tool for research and has solid scientific backing, scientists say the product's use to consumers is limited.
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The Scientist RSS

Great Lakes Gray Wolf to Retain Endangered StatusA US Court of Appeals ruled that the Interior Department acted prematurely in removing the animals from the endangered species list.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Math Puzzles Help You Plan the Perfect PartyThe right mix of people who already know one another, of boys and girls--Ramsey numbers may hold the answer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers designing an instrument to identify uranium, atoms at a timeCreating a new instrument capable of detecting trace amounts of uranium and other materials will be the focus of a new research partnership spearheaded by scientists at Colorado State University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Getting therapeutic sound waves through thick skullsUltrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside has developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring bas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tree-of-heaven's prolific seed production adds to its invasive potentialTree-of-heaven -- or Ailanthus -- is an invasive triple threat, according to a team of plant pathologists. The species produces seeds early in its lifespan, tends to make millions of viable seeds during its life, and continues to produce seeds for decades and, in some cases, for more than a century.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A dolphin dietThe health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

South Asia could face deadly heat and humidity by the end of this centuryIf climate change is left unchecked, simulations show extreme heat waves in densely populated agricultural regions of India and Pakistan.
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The Atlantic

Menashe Is a Moving Drama of Hasidic Life The titular schlubby hero of Menashe might, with a few tweaks, be a perfect fit for the lead of a Judd Apatow comedy about a wayward man-child. He works a fairly menial job at a supermarket stocking shelves, but still manages to be bad at it; he’s well-liked by his co-workers, but irritating to his boss and his family, all of whom wish he’d stop cracking jokes and iron his shirts once in a while.
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Gizmodo

NASA Isn't Hiring Someone to Stop an Alien Invasion, You Jabronis Image: Comedy Central These days, reading anything (e.g. the news) feels like squeezing your head into a Juicero. Just when I thought we had hit the apex of bad reporting and general dystopia, today, several outlets ran stories about NASA hiring someone “to defend Earth from aliens.” It quickly skyrocketed to become the top story on Facebook news, despite being the media equivalent of horse dropp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat-conducting plastic could lead to lighter electronics, carsAdvanced plastics could usher in lighter, cheaper, more energy-efficient product components, including those used in vehicles, LEDs and computers—if only they were better at dissipating heat.
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Ars Technica

Man used DDoS attacks on media to extort them to remove stories, FBI says Enlarge (credit: zodman ) A 32-year-old Seattle man is behind bars while awaiting a federal hacking trial for launching a DDoS attack. He is being held without bail on allegations that he attacked a US-based legal services website to force it to remove a link to a case citation about his past criminal conduct. The authorities also say the suspect launched distributed denial of service attacks on
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Science : NPR

Al Gore Warns That Trump Is A 'Distraction' From The Issue Of Climate Change "I have no illusions about the possibility of changing Donald Trump's mind," he says. Instead, the former vice president wants to build bipartisan consensus to address the crisis. (Image credit: Claire Harbage/NPR)
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The Atlantic

What Drives Sally Yates Sally Yates knew she had found her calling during her first week of law school. She spent the next 27 years working at the Justice Department, rising from the U.S. Attorney’s office in Georgia to the number two position at the Department of Justice. Her career abruptly ended when President Trump fired Yates after she ordered the Department of Justice not to defend his travel ban. “I couldn't in g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marriage of microscopy techniques reveals 3-D structure of critical protein complexResearchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.
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Gizmodo

A History of Doctor Who's Weird, Wonderful, and Very Awkward Doctor Replacements Images: BBC Doctor Who has been on and off the air for nearly 54 years, and part of the key to the show’s longevity is that the baton of its lead character can be passed from actor to actor, from the First Doctor, William Hartnell, all the way to the upcoming 13th Doctor, Jodie Whittaker. But Doctor Who goes far beyond recasting—changing the lead character is a fundamental part of the show itself
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New simulations could help in hunt for massive mergers of neutron stars, black holesNow that scientists can detect the wiggly distortions in space-time created by the merger of massive black holes, they are setting their sights on the dynamics and aftermath of other cosmic duos that unify in catastrophic collisions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early gene-editing success holds promise for preventing inherited diseasesScientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing. The technique, which uses the CRISPR-Cas9 system, corrected the mutation for a heart condition at the earliest stage of embryonic development so that the defect would not be passed on to future generations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comprehensive sequencing program shows promise of precision medicine for advanced cancerA new study shows just how complex metastatic cancer is and offers some clues to attacking it. The study represents one of the largest and most comprehensive efforts to examine the genetic and molecular landscape of advanced cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Good cellular neighbors combat incipient cancersScientists have spent decades studying the nature of tumor cells, but few have looked to see what was happening in the surrounding tissue. When researchers took a closer look at skin cells, they discovered the unaffected neighbor cells are not helplessly awaiting invasion of cancer cells but acting like cellular police, actively correcting tissue flaws created by their aberrant neighbors, the inve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Perfect liquid' quark-gluon plasma is the most vortical fluidParticle collisions recreating the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that filled the early universe reveal that droplets of this primordial soup swirl far faster than any other fluid. The new analysis shows that the 'vorticity' of the QGP surpasses the whirling fluid dynamics of super-cell tornado cores and Jupiter's Great Red Spot, and even beats out the fastest spin record held by nanodroplets of superfl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First civilizations of Greece are revealing their stories to scienceA new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures.
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Science : NPR

Carbon Dioxide May Rob Crops Of Nutrition, Leaving Millions At Risk Two new studies suggest that changing atmospheric conditions could reduce protein and iron in food, leading to more health problems for people in countries where malnutrition is already a problem. (Image credit: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Your solar eclipse experience can help scienceThe Aug. 21 total solar eclipse offers a rare opportunity for crowdsourced data collection on a spectacular celestial phenomenon.
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Live Science

Penis Enlargement Surgery Leads to Man's Death: What Went Wrong?A man in Sweden died during penis enlargement surgery, according to a new report of the case.
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Futurity.org

App could offer daily seizure forecast Researchers have outlined a new framework that may pave the way for a smartphone app that could predict seizures in advance. Every morning, you wake up and check the weather app on your smartphone to see if it will rain. If the forecast probability is high enough, let’s say 80 percent, you decide to bring an umbrella to work. Previous attempts to develop prediction systems for epilepsy patients h
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Gizmodo

Battery Packs With AC Outlets Are Finally a Thing, And You Can Save Over $30 On Yours Today RAVPower 27,000mAh AC Battery Pack , $139 with code kja27000 | 20,100mAh , $110 with code kja20100 You guys, they’re finally here. USB battery packs with an actual, bona fide AC power outlets built in . Obviously, they’re larger and more expensive than USB-only battery packs with a similar capacity, but RAVPower’s portable chargers still only weighs 1.9 pounds , and can charge your laptop via bui
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The truth about cats' and dogs' environmental impactUCLA research found that US cats and dogs cause 25-30 percent of the environmental impact of meat consumption in this country. The nation's 163 million cats and dogs eat as much food as all the people in France. People should keep their pets -- and keep feeding them meat -- but there may be steps pet owners can take to reduce their environmental impact, says UCLA Professor Gregory Okin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deciphering potent DNA toxin's secretsA team of Vanderbilt University researchers have worked out the molecular details that explain how one of the most potent bacterial toxins known -- yatakemycin (YTM) -- kills cells by preventing their DNA from replicating.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Collaboration between pet owners and researchers helps children and dogs with rare epilepsyNew hope is being given to children who suffer from a rare and severe form of epilepsy, thanks to unique research carried out by the University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine and Fitzpatrick Referrals in Surrey.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cancer therapy eliminates toxic delivery vehicles for microRNAResearchers at Purdue University have discovered a mechanism for delivering tumor-suppressing microRNAs that eliminates the need for toxic delivery vehicles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trapdoor spiders crossed Indian Ocean to get to AustraliaAn Australian trapdoor spider, which usually moves no further than a couple of meters from where it was hatched, must have traveled to Australia over the Indian Ocean from South Africa, University of Adelaide research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deadly heat waves could hit South Asia this centuryIn South Asia, new MIT research suggests that by the end of this century climate change could lead to summer heat waves with levels of heat and humidity that exceed what humans can survive without protection
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Autism may reflect excitation-inhibition imbalance in brain, Stanford study findsA study by Stanford University investigators suggests that key features of autism reflect an imbalance in signaling from excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a portion of the forebrain, and that reversing the imbalance could alleviate some of its hallmark symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In South Asia, humid heat expected to surpass fatal levels by the late 21st centuryHot and humid temperatures in South Asia, which contains one-fifth of the global population, will exceed the upper limit of human survivability by the late 21st century, scientists project, underscoring an urgent need to adopt alternative strategies on top of those currently proposed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking down allergy-causing T helper cellsScientists have finally homed in on a specific subset of immune cells that are central to allergies, clearing up the longstanding mystery behind why some individuals develop allergic diseases, and potentially identifying new therapeutic targets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shake it up: Human-induced and natural earthquakes in central US are 'inherently similar'The stresses released by human-induced and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central United States are in many cases indistinguishable, meaning that existing tools to predict shaking damage can be applied to both types.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting 'Achilles' heel' could supercharge breast cancer treatmentA new class of anti-cancer agents targeting cancer cells' 'Achilles' heel' could help to supercharge breast cancer treatment, improving outcomes for the most aggressive types of breast cancer.Combining anti-cancer compound S63845 with currently used cancer drugs was more effective in killing triple negative breast cancers and HER2-positive breast cancers.This is the first time the S63845 compound
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford researchers find similar characteristics in human-induced and natural earthquakesNew research shows manmade and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central US share the same characteristics, information that will help scientists predict and mitigate damage from future earthquakes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ONC201 may inhibit cancer stem cell self-renewals by altering their gene expressionONC201 may inhibit cancer stem cell self-renewals by altering their gene expression, according to a study published Aug. 2, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Varun Vijay Prabhu from Oncoceutics Inc., USA, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trapdoor spider may have dispersed across the ocean from Africa to AustraliaAn Australian trapdoor spider may have crossed the ocean from Africa rather than being the product of geographical separation, according to a study published Aug. 2, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sophie Harrison from the University of Adelaide, Australia, and colleagues.
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New Scientist - News

The renewables reality: clean energy hasn’t risen for 25 yearsBig countries are already cutting back on support for solar and wind. They should be doing the opposite, or else the renewable revolution will falter
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New Scientist - News

First results from US CRISPR gene editing on human embryosThe revolutionary CRISPR genome editing technique could be used safely to prevent some genetic diseases, according to the first embryo study conducted in the US
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Quanta Magazine

What Made the Moon? New Ideas Try to Rescue a Troubled Theory On Dec. 13, 1972, Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt walked up to a boulder in the moon’s Sea of Serenity. “This boulder’s got its own little track, right up the hill,” he called to his commander, Eugene Cernan, pointing out the mark the boulder left when it rolled down a mountainside. Cernan bounded over to collect some samples. “Think how it would have been if you were standing there before t
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Gizmodo

What's Your Favorite Extinct Epcot Song? Scene of the future from the extinct Epcot attraction Horizons, closed in 1999 (Disney Parks) When I was a kid in the 1990s I’d listen to the Epcot soundtrack on repeat. It had so many amazing songs that would instantly hit all the nostalgia centers of my brain, even if this particular brand of nostalgia was for something as recent as my last trip to Epcot from a year earlier. The horror of the T
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anthrax: A hidden threat to wildlife in the tropicsAnthrax, a disease so far not associated with tropical rain forests, is common in the Ivory Coast's Taï National Park and is posing a serious threat to wildlife there. The bacterium could soon even cause the extinction of local chimpanzee populations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exoplanet shines with glowing water atmosphereScientists have found compelling evidence for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system. The planet's stratosphere -- a layer of atmosphere where temperature increases with higher altitudes -- is hot enough to boil iron.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New simulations could help in hunt for massive mergers of neutron stars, black holesScientists have developed new computer models to explore what happens when a black hole joins with a neutron star - the superdense remnant of an exploded star.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Warming to boost deadly humidity levels across South AsiaBy 2100, millions of people could face a lethal threat from heat and humidity driven by global warming.
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Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get a $50 Visa gift card when you buy two Apple AirPods Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have a bunch of new deals to share with you. Today, you can get a $50 Visa gift card when you buy two pairs of Apple AirPods from Verizon. That's a great deal if you've been itching for Apple's new wireless earbuds—snag a pair for yourself and a friend, and get $50 back in your pocket. Check out the full list of deals below. Ars Tec
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Gizmodo

Tiny Spider Appears to Have Sailed Across an Entire Ocean An image of an unidentified species of Moggridgea. Image Credit: Jason Bond via Wikimedia Commons Spiders in the family Migidae don’t get out much. Known as “tree trapdoor spiders,” they are unapologetic homebodies, spending nearly their entire lives chilling in a single burrow. Unlike their close, but much more famous relatives the tarantulas, tree trapdoor spiders are teeny, with most species s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shake it up: Human-induced and natural earthquakes in central US are 'inherently similar'The stresses released by human-induced and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central United States are in many cases indistinguishable, meaning that existing tools to predict shaking damage can be applied to both types.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly heat waves could hit South Asia this century: studyIn South Asia, a region of deep poverty where one-fifth of the world's people live, new research suggests that by the end of this century climate change could lead to summer heat waves with levels of heat and humidity that exceed what humans can survive without protection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trapdoor spiders crossed Indian Ocean to get to AustraliaAn Australian trapdoor spider, which usually moves no further than a couple of metres from where it was hatched, must have travelled to Australia over the Indian Ocean from South Africa, University of Adelaide research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study in Nature demonstrates method for repairing genes in human embryos that prevents inherited diseaseScientists have demonstrated an effective way of using a gene-editing tool to correct a disease-causing gene mutation in human embryos and stop it from passing to future generations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scholars shed light on 'moving target' of drone regulation in the USTo help sort out the current 'adolescence' of drone laws, William Johnson, professor of geography and atmospheric science, and KU graduate student Dakota Burt recently published new research detailing myriad legal underpinnings of operating drones in the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early gene-editing success holds promise for preventing inherited diseasesScientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

This "Widowmaker" Tree Is Threatening To Kill The People Trying To Take It Down Homestead Rescue | Wednesdays at 10/9c Even an experienced logger like Marty finds himself sweating in the shadow of a widowmaker. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/homestead-rescue/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Rescues! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/homestead-rescue/ Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Homeste
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Viden

Politi styrer online-narkohandel i ugevisEfter snedigt internationalt politisamarbejde er to store markeder med salg af både våben og narkotika nu lukket.
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Science | The Guardian

From bae to millennial, 11 words that make the heart sink The 5,000 funniest words have been revealed, but drop ‘gamification’ at a party and you may as well say ‘TED talk for one’ Comedy is simple. Just give an egghead a tinkle, get them to waddle over to play some bebop on a twerp’s ass, and you’ve got yourself a laugh riot. Psychologists at the University of Warwick recently asked 800 people to rate 5,000 word on which were the most inherently comic.
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Ars Technica

Privacy warnings spell trouble for millions of low-cost Android phone owners Enlarge (credit: Blu) Amazon said it's suspending sales of Android phones made by Blu following a presentation last week that said that three of the manufacturer's models sent sensitive personal information to third parties in China. Last week's presentation at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas by security firm Kryptowire came eight months after the same company first warned about An
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NYT > Science

In Breakthrough, Scientists Edit a Dangerous Mutation From Genes in Human EmbryosResearchers have found a way to reliably remove disease-causing mutations from human embryos, an achievement sure to renew concerns over so-called designer babies.
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Gizmodo

Price Mistake! Get a Car Massager For $14 Instead of $46. Naipo Car Seat Massager , $14 with code NAIPO168 Update : Rather than subtracting $14 from the price as intended, promo code NAIPO168 is currently subtracting the price to $14. As always with price mistakes, you run the risk of having your order canceled after the fact, but there’s no harm in trying. Your commute home after work is valuable unwinding time, at least if you manage to avoid infuriat
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

The race to reveal antimatter’s secrets In the shadow of the Large Hadron Collider, six teams are competing to answer one of the Universe’s deepest existential questions. Nature 548 20 doi: 10.1038/548020a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

CRISPR fixes disease gene in viable human embryos Gene-editing experiment pushes scientific and ethical boundaries. Nature 548 13 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22382
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Nocturnal pollinators go dark under street lamps Plants illuminated by artificial lights see a drop in the number of insects that move pollen at night. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22395
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The Atlantic

An NSC Staffer Is Forced Out Over a Controversial Memo Updated August 2 at 4:29 p.m. ET A top official of the National Security Council was fired last month after arguing in a memo that President Trump is under sustained attack from subversive forces both within and outside the government who are deploying Maoist tactics to defeat President Trump’s nationalist agenda. His dismissal marks the latest victory by National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster i
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Gizmodo

Antarctica's Massive Iceberg Has Become a Major Scientific Experiment View of the A68 iceberg captured by the ESA’s Sentinel-1 satellite on July 30th. Image: A. Fleming, British Antarctic Survey Last month, humanity watched with a mixture of awe and terror as an iceberg half the size of Jamaica broke clean off the Antarctic Peninsula. But the story isn’t over for Larsen C, or its recently-shed belly fat, the iceberg now known as A68. As both ‘berg and shelf continu
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Inside Science

Primordial particle soup smashes spin-speed record Primordial particle soup smashes spin-speed record Physicists discover the universe’s most violent vortices inside the exotic state of matter. RHIC.jpg The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York. Image credits: Brookhaven National Laboratory Physics Wednesday, August 2, 2017 - 13:00 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- The particles i
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Inside Science

Meet the Newest Mineral of the Year: Merelaniite Meet the Newest Mineral of the Year: Merelaniite Magnified, the whisker-like deposits look like tiny rolled cigars. Merelaniite_topNteaser.jpg A 0.73 mm long cigar-shaped sample of merelaniite is nestled among green dravite crystals. Image credits: John Jaszczak Earth Wednesday, August 2, 2017 - 10:45 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- A shiny gray material that forms as teensy round wh
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The Scientist RSS

Details Published on CRISPR-treated EmbryosScientists correct a mutation in fertilized eggs that causes a severe cardiac disease.
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Science : NPR

NASA Jets Will Extend Eclipse By Chasing Moon's Shadow Cold War-era tactical bombers specially equipped with stabilized telescopes will fly over the central United States on Aug. 21, taking detailed observations of the Sun's atmosphere. (Image credit: Bardur Eklund/NASA/Faroe Islands/SwRI)
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New Scientist - News

How to strip 99 per cent of harmful BPA from water in 30 minutesBPA has been linked to a range of health problems, but after decades of research, there’s now a cheap way to remove almost all of it from contaminated water
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers detect exoplanet with glowing water atmosphereScientists have found compelling evidence for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system. The planet's stratosphere -- a layer of atmosphere where temperature increases with higher altitudes -- is hot enough to boil iron. WASP-121b, located approximately 900 light-years from Earth, is a gas giant exoplanet commonly referred to as a 'hot Jupiter.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A Braf kinase-inactive mutant induces lung adenocarcinomaThe initiating oncogenic event in half of human lung adenocarcinomas is still unknown, a fact that complicates the development of selective targeted therapies. Researchers at the CNIO have demonstrated that the expression of an endogenous Braf kinase-inactive isoform in mice triggers lung adenocarcinoma in vivo, indicating that BRAF-inactivating mutations are initiating events in lung oncogenesis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anthrax: A hidden threat to wildlife in the tropicsResearchers illuminate the epidemiology of a cryptic pathogen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble detects exoplanet with glowing water atmosphereScientists have found the strongest evidence to date for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system, with an atmosphere hot enough to boil iron. An international team of researchers, led by the University of Exeter, made the new discovery by observing glowing water molecules in the atmosphere of the exoplanet WASP-121b with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The first civilizations of Greece are revealing their stories to scienceA new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans by HHMI investigator and colleagues offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Perfect liquid' quark-gluon plasma is the most vortical fluidParticle collisions recreating the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that filled the early universe reveal that droplets of this primordial soup swirl far faster than any other fluid. The new analysis from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) shows that the 'vorticity' of the QGP surpasses the whirling fluid dynamics of super-cell tornado cores and Jupiter's Great Red Spot, and even beats out the fas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Good cellular neighbors combat incipient cancersScientists have spent decades studying the nature of tumor cells, but few have looked to see what was happening in the surrounding tissue. When Yale researchers took a closer look at skin cells, they discovered the unaffected neighbor cells are not helplessly awaiting invasion of cancer cells but acting like cellular police, actively correcting tissue flaws created by their aberrant neighbors, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comprehensive sequencing program shows promise of precision medicine for advanced cancerA new study shows just how complex metastatic cancer is and offers some clues to attacking it. The study represents one of the largest and most comprehensive efforts to examine the genetic and molecular landscape of advanced cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean originsDNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. They likely migrated from Anatolia to Greece and Crete thousands of years before the Bronze Age. Modern Greeks are largely descendants of the Mycenaeans, the study found.The Minoan civilization flourished on Crete beginning in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and MycenaeansThe question of the origins of the Minoans and their relationship to the Mycenaeans, Europe's first literate societies, has long puzzled researchers. A paper published today in Nature suggests that, rather than being advanced outsiders, the Minoans had deep roots in the Aegean and were closely related to the Mycenaeans, and to modern Greeks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three Klebsiella species cause life-threatening infections and share drug resistance genesA team of US researchers has discovered that three different species of Klebsiella bacteria can cause life-threatening infections in hospital patients and that all three share genes that confer resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics. The study, published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, improves physicians' understanding of Klebsiell
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The Atlantic

The Complicated History of Affirmative Action: A Primer The Justice Department is poised to investigate and potentially sue universities over admissions policies that it believes practice race-based discrimination, according to an internal document obtained Tuesday by The New York Times . The document invites interested lawyers to apply to participate in the initiative, which according to the Times will be overseen by the department’s political appoin
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The Atlantic

Why the Justice Department Is Targeting Affirmative Action Updated on August 2 at 6:20 p.m. You can tell a lot about an administration by what cases the civil-rights division of its Justice Department pursues. In the Obama administration, for example, the division made police reform a priority, reaching more than twice as many consent decrees to force police departments to change their practices as any previous administration. According to a document fir
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The Atlantic

The Designer Baby Era Is Not Upon Us One week ago, MIT Technology Review reported that scientists at an Oregon-based lab had modified the DNA of human embryos using the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. That was a first for the United States; until then, such a procedure had only ever been done in China. The researchers, led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov from Oregon Health and Science University, had altered the gene behind an unspec
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The Atlantic

A Strange Type of Anthrax Is Killing Chimpanzees When chimps first started to drop dead in front of him, Fabian Leendertz had no idea why. “It’s normal for wildlife to hide their weakness until they can’t anymore,” he says. One minute he’d be running through the Taï forest in the Ivory Coast, tracking chimps who looked in the peak of health. The next minute, the animals would be lying down and breathing heavily. A few hours later, they were dea
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Pollination threatened by artificial lightResearchers have discovered a new global threat to pollination - artificial light at night.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defying predictions, wind tunnels find new customers in autos, athletics—even fast foodWind tunnels were supposed to be put out of work by now.
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Science : NPR

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene In experimental embryos, scientists were able to repair the gene that causes a serious heart disorder. More research is needed to confirm the method would produce healthy babies, they say. (Image credit: Courtesy of OHSU)
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Science | The Guardian

Deadly gene mutations removed from human embryos in landmark study Groundbreaking project corrects faulty DNA linked to fatal heart condition and raises hopes for parents who risk passing on genetic diseases Scientists have modified human embryos to remove genetic mutations that cause heart failure in otherwise healthy young people in a landmark demonstration of the controversial procedure. It is the first time that human embryos have had their genomes edited ou
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Human embryos edited to stop diseaseThe technique could prevent deadly diseases being passed down the generations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA look at Tropical Storm Nalgae in infrared lightNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nalgae and gathered temperature data to determine the location of the most powerful storms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting therapeutic sound waves through thick skullsUltrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside has developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring bas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alkaline soil, sensible sensorProducers sometimes face challenges that go deep into the soil. They need answers to help the soil, on site. A portable field sensor can accurately measure minerals in soils more easily and efficiently than existing methods. And a research team, including a middle school student and her scientist father, can confirm it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA looks at Tropical Cyclones Irwin and Hilary rainfall and Fujiwara EffectNASA used satellite data to tally the rainfall generated by Hurricanes Hilary and Irwin as they interacted in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New simulations could help in hunt for massive mergers of neutron stars, black holesScientists at Berkeley Lab have developed new computer models to explore what happens when a black hole joins with a neutron star - the superdense remnant of an exploded star.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Gene editing of human embryos gets rid of a mutation that causes heart failureGene editing of human embryos can efficiently repair a gene defect without making new mistakes.
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Gizmodo

It’s Official: For the First Time Ever, US Scientists Have Edited the DNA of a Human Embryo Image: Shutterstock American scientists have accomplished a major first: For the first time on US soil, a human embryo has been genetically modified. The details of the breakthrough, which was leaked to the press last week , are reported in a study published today in the journal Nature. In their new paper, a consortium of scientists in California, Oregon and Asia detailed using the genome-editing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anthrax: A hidden threat to wildlife in the tropicsAnthrax, a disease so far not associated with tropical rain forests, is common in the Ivory Coast's Taï National Park and is posing a serious threat to wildlife there. The bacterium could soon even cause the extinction of local chimpanzee populations. This is revealed in a study by scientists from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the Universi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble detects exoplanet with glowing water atmosphereScientists have found the strongest evidence to date for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system, with an atmosphere hot enough to boil iron.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean originsAn analysis of ancient DNA has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Perfect liquid' quark-gluon plasma is the most vortical fluidParticle collisions recreating the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that filled the early universe reveal that droplets of this primordial soup swirl far faster than any other fluid. The new analysis of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) - a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory - shows that the "vorticity
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New Details on the First Crispr-Edited Human Embryos in the USScientists are excited about how effectively Crispr removed mutations in embryos. But it didn't work the way they expected.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Gene Editing Study in Human Embryos Points toward Clinical TrialsResearchers used CRISPR to correct a gene in embryos that causes sudden heart failure.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Embryo Gene-Editing Experiment Reignites Ethical DebateAmerican researchers publish highly anticipated study using CRISPR in developing humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Brave New World? Not Even CloseScientists have edited a human embryo, but we’re not in scary scifi territory by a long shot -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Condemned prisoners prefer formalwear at executions, UC study findsUniversity of Cincinnati professors Annulla Linders and Erynn Masi de Casanova used historical news accounts to examine the cultural norms of executions through prisoner attire.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heat-conducting plastic could lead to lighter electronics, carsAdvanced plastics could usher in lighter, cheaper, more energy-efficient product components, including those used in vehicles, LEDs and computers -- if only they were better at dissipating heat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increasing productivity by one day each monthCorporate wellness programs have been shown to save companies money by reducing absenteeism and health insurance costs. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, UCLA, and Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., have now quantified an additional benefit to companies' bottom line, showing that a wellness program they studied resulted in higher productivity for all participating emp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Catalysts efficiently and rapidly remove BPA from waterChemists have developed an approach that quickly and cheaply removes more than 99 percent of bisphenol A (BPA) from water. BPA, a ubiquitous and dangerous chemical used in the manufacturing of many plastics, is found in water sources around the world. Concerns over BPA's health effects prompted manufacturers to start making BPA-free products like baby bottles and water bottles starting in 2010. Ir
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cicada wings may inspire new surface technologiesResearchers are looking to insects -- specifically cicadas -- for insight into the design of artificial surfaces with de-icing, self-cleaning and anti-fogging abilities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

System automatically retouches cellphone images in real-timeResearchers have created a new system that can automatically retouch images in the style of a professional photographer. It's so energy-efficient, however, that it can run on a cellphone, and it's so fast that it can display retouched images in real-time, so that the photographer can see the final version of the image while still framing the shot.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurobiology: Use it or lose itA new study reveals that sound-evoked activity of neurons in the auditory system of the mouse increases the thickness of their myelin sheaths -- and enhances the speed of signal transmission -- both during development and in the adult brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bone loss after denosumab, only partial protection with zoledronateTo counter the decline in BMD after denosumab treatment is discontinued, osteoporosis patients may be transitioned from denosumab to other anti-resorptives. This report investigates whether a single infusion of zoledronate might also be an effective option to prevent bone loss after long-term denosumab treatment in postmenopausal patients is discontinued.
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Futurity.org

‘Swiss cheese’ pipes reveal cause of Flint water crisis In Flint, Michigan, researchers have found a “Swiss cheese pattern” in the interior crust of lead service lines in the city’s damaged drinking water system, with holes where lead used to be. The findings support the generally accepted understanding that lead leached into the system because that water wasn’t treated to prevent corrosion. While previous studies had pointed to this mechanism, this i
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Apple's China VPN Crackdown Is Just the Latest in a Long Line of Companies CavingBy pulling VPN apps from the App Store in China, Apple joins a long list of tech companies that have given in to censorship.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Sherlock' and the case of narrative perception'Chunking' is the means by which individual items or words are grouped together into larger units so that they can be processed or stored as single ideas. But until recently, there was no way to observe this phenomenon in the neural activity of the brain. Now researchers are reporting a way to use fMRI to investigate how the brain segments experiences during perception and how these experiences be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The nitty-gritty behind how onions make you cryAdding onions to a recipe can make a meal taste rich and savory, but cutting up the onion can be brutal. Onions release a compound called lachrymatory factor (LF), which makes the eyes sting and water. Scientists know that a certain enzyme causes this irritating compound to form but precisely how it helps LF form in the onion remained an open question. Now, one group reports that they have the ans
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An app for the perfect selfieComputer scientists have developed a smartphone app that helps people learn the art of taking great selfies. Inside the app is an algorithm that directs the user where to position the camera allowing them to take the best shot possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An end to cavities for people with sensitive teeth?An ice cold drink is refreshing in the summer, but for people with sensitive teeth, it can cause a painful jolt in the mouth. This condition can be treated, but many current approaches don't last long. Now researchers report the development of a new material with an extract from green tea that could fix this problem -- and help prevent cavities in these susceptible patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Logic circuits with diamond-based transistorsScientists have succeeded in developing logic circuits equipped with diamond-based MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors) at two different operation modes. This achievement is a first step toward the development of diamond integrated circuits operational under extreme environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lighting the way: Sensors show drug uptakeWhen designing and characterizing new drugs, a key aspect is making sure the drug actually goes where it is intended to. But current tests for drug uptake monitor the process under unrealistic conditions and do not provide information on the amounts of drugs that cross into a cell. Now, one group reports that fluorescent detector proteins can overcome these challenges.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exposure to toxins in e-cig vapor varies depending on scenarioE-cigarettes are often perceived to be less harmful than their traditional counterparts, but they could still expose the people who 'vape' and those around them to harmful compounds. Researchers now report that heavy use and secondhand emissions could lead to inhaled levels of toxins that exceed set exposure limits. But under typical use, secondhand exposure would have a lower impact on health tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catalysts developed at Carnegie Mellon efficiently and rapidly remove BPA from waterCarnegie Mellon University chemist Terrence J. Collins has developed an approach that quickly and cheaply removes more than 99 percent of bisphenol A (BPA) from water. BPA, a ubiquitous and dangerous chemical used in the manufacturing of many plastics, is found in water sources around the world. The CMU team and collaborators at the University of Auckland and Oregon State University also compiled
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Sherlock' and the case of narrative perception'Chunking' is the means by which individual items or words are grouped together into larger units so that they can be processed or stored as single ideas. But until recently, there was no way to observe this phenomenon in the neural activity of the brain. Now, in Neuron, researchers are reporting a way to use fMRI to investigate how the brain segments experiences during perception and how these ex
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Alaska's whale hunters wait for Trump's Arctic oil planThe BBC's Claire Marshall travels more than 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle to meet the Inupiat, who call the ocean their "garden".
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Live Science

Why Fat on Your Hips May Be HealthyA little extra padding around the hips and thighs may be a good thing.
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Science : NPR

Oh, Snap! Scientists Are Turning People's Food Photos Into Recipes Researchers have created an artificial neural network that analyzes an image of a dish and tells you how to make it. Still in the early stages, the technology might help improve our dietary health. (Image credit: Carlina Teteris/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech sector battles US lawmakers on sex trafficking billThe tech sector is digging in for battle with US lawmakers over a proposed law aimed at curbing human trafficking by holding website owners liable for illegal content posted by others.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is there finally some relief from annoying robocalls?For Michael Rizzo, answering the phone is too often a waste of time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students at two-year colleges and vocational schools more likely to be hungryFor the majority of college students, having enough food is not on the list of challenges they face in their education. However, a recent study shows that, for some college students, hunger is definitely one of the problems they face and this can impede their ability to succeed in college.
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Ars Technica

Comcast fails to get hidden fee class-action suit thrown out of court (credit: Getty Images | DonNichols) A class-action complaint against Comcast can move forward after a federal judge rejected a Comcast motion to dismiss it. The lawsuit, filed in October 2016 in US District Court in Northern California, accuses Comcast of falsely advertising low prices and then using poorly disclosed fees to increase the amount paid by cable TV customers. Those fees are the "Broa
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Gizmodo

This Treat Camera Gave My Cat Trust Issues All images: Rae Paoletta/Gizmodo My cat, Artemis, is a bustling career woman. She has many jobs that she juggles between stealing my hair ties and spilling her kibble; in addition to serving as the Mayor of Fluffingsville, she runs a network of freelancers as Editor-in-Chief of Catmodo . Since both of us are busy most of the day at our respective places of work, we forget to check in on each othe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New catalysts efficiently and rapidly remove BPA from waterCarnegie Mellon University chemist Terrence J. Collins has developed an approach that quickly and cheaply removes more than 99 percent of bisphenol A (BPA) from water. BPA, a ubiquitous and dangerous chemical used in the manufacturing of many plastics, is found in water sources around the world.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Drug companies flock to supercharged T-cells in fight against autoimmune disease Researchers target suppressive cells to keep the body from attacking itself. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22393
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Scientific American Content: Global

Rare “Superluminous” Supernova Traced to “Heavy Metal” GalaxyThe finding raises new questions about the nature of these colossal cosmic explosions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bone loss after denosumab, only partial protection with zoledronateTo counter the decline in BMD after denosumab treatment is discontinued, osteoporosis patients may be transitioned from denosumab to other anti-resorptives. This report investigates whether a single infusion of zoledronate might also be an effective option to prevent bone loss after long-term denosumab treatment in postmenopausal patients is discontinued.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of a fatty heart linked to race, type of weight gain in middle-aged womenA woman's race and where on her body she packs on pounds at midlife could give her doctor valuable clues to her likelihood of having greater volumes of heart fat, a potential risk factor for heart disease, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Europe's most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risksThe impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pneumonia or sepsis in adults associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseasePneumonia or sepsis in adults that results in hospital admission is associated with a six-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the first year, according to new research. Cardiovascular risk was more than doubled in years two and three after the infection and persisted for at least five years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cicada wings may inspire new surface technologiesResearchers are looking to insects - specifically cicadas - for insight into the design of artificial surfaces with de-icing, self-cleaning and anti-fogging abilities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA set to launch Dellingr; CubeSat purposely designed to improve reliability of small satellitesNASA scientists and engineers named their new CubeSat after the mythological Norse god of the dawn. Now, just days from launch, they are confident Dellingr will live up to its name and inaugurate a new era for scientists wanting to use small, highly reliable satellites to carry out important, and in some cases, never-before-tried science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Financial incentives could conserve tropical forest diversityThe past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. Until now, assessments of these programs have largely overlooked decreases in forest diversity. In what might be a first of its kind study, University of Missouri researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to
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Gizmodo

Watch Some Lego Engines Rev Until They Explode GIF Little Lego engines with actual pistons and crankshafts that turn and move are one of the true simple joys of human life in the modern era. So, it just stands to reason that the best way to maximize that joy is to rev the crap out of these Lego engines until they blow apart. That’s how you get the most joy out of everything. One inline-four and two V8 Lego engines gave their structural integr
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New Scientist - News

Deforestation may soar now Colombian civil war is overNow that the 52-year Colombian conflict that killed tens of thousands of people is over, the country's forests are once more under threat
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Popular Science

Songs to sing your way through the 2017 eclipse Entertainment Your body is ready for our celestial bodies playlist. From the painfully obvious to the unexpected, here are some tunes to help you enjoy a total eclipse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla fending off worker complaints on pay, safetyAs electric carmaker Tesla prepares to release quarterly results Wednesday, it is also trying to fend off escalating worker complaints about pay and safety at its California factory, where a move to unionize is gaining steam.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Babies of kidnapped brides suffer, tooBride kidnapping remains a common practice in a handful of countries. And when young women are kidnapped into marriage, their babies pay a price, suggests new research. The researchers looked at the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan, where bride kidnapping remains widespread. Infants born to kidnapped brides had birthweights 80 to 190 grams lower than other babies, says the new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research and design for carbon quantum dots catalystsA new study that provides a new approach for the rational design of carbon quantum dots (CQD) modified catalysts with potential applications in energy and environmental areas. The study discusses the introduction of CQDs into Bi2WO6 photocatalyst and the demonstration of its good photocatalytic performance in pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solar glasses generate solar powerOrganic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight -- and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. Researchers now present sunglasses with colored, semitransparent solar cells applied onto lenses that supply a microprocessor and two displays with electric powe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gamblers more likely to have suffered childhood traumasMen with problem and pathological gambling addictions are more likely to have suffered childhood traumas including physical abuse or witnessing violence in the home, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Puzzling pockets of rock deep in Earth's mantle explainedThe boundary between Earth's core and mantle is home to isolated pockets of rock which scientists have been unable to explain up until now.
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The Atlantic

Ignore, but Sanction: The Trump Administration's Strange Russia Policy Updated at 6:44 p.m. ET U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s reported resistance to taking $80 million allocated by the U.S. Congress to fight Russian and ISIS propaganda has been described as “highly unusual.” But it fits into a larger pattern of what’s shaping up to be a very odd Russia policy. Consider this: Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered on Sunday that the U.S. reduce its diploma
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Gizmodo

Trump’s Border Wall Could Threaten More Than a Hundred Endangered Species, Ecologist Warns The Mexican Grey Wolf is one of over a hundred endangered species that would be at risk from an impassable border wall between the US and Mexico. (Image: Wikimedia) It looks like President Donald Trump might get his stupid wall after all. Last week, the House approved a $1.6 billion spending bill that funds the construction of a “contiguous and impassable wall” along the Mexican border, and just
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: MLS Gear, Smart Notebook, Velcro Cable Ties, and More MLS apparel , a notebook that you can erase in the microwave , and a 30% discount on Soylent lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals 100 Velcro Cable Ties , $6 Update : Now up to $10. Advertisement Velcro cable ties can transform the rat king of cables behind your desk or home theater into something mo
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Ars Technica

Hyperloop One says it sent a demo pod down its test track Hyperloop One Today Hyperloop One claimed that its demo pod reached 192mph (310 kph) on the 500m (1/3 mile) test track that the startup built outside of Las Vegas. Hyperloop One showed off that demo pod last month—it’s basically an 8.7m (28.5 ft) carbon-fiber shell on a magnetically levitating chassis. This test run follows on a “Phase 1” test that sent a bare-bones sled down the test track at 70
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The Atlantic

The Lost Boys’ Subtly Radical Vision of Family Joel Schumacher’s The Lost Boys —which turns 30 years old this week—has, in some respects, the very things you’d want from a 1980s horror-comedy: big-haired vampires, noisy motorcycles, big-haired vampires riding noisy motorcycles, Corey Feldman. True to ’80s form, the film embraces some of the best excesses of American popular culture, employing ridiculous blood baths and an over-the-top rock-in
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Gizmodo

Tinder Booted From Beach House Over Unauthorized Parties for Dating App Elite Another hashtagged Tinder event in Montauk. (Photo: Getty) For humble swipers looking for love, double-fisting your phone and a slice of pizza on the couch is a fitting setting for mediocre matching. But for Tinder’s dating app elite, only a sick beach house party in Montauk will do. Just make sure your host has the proper permits, or the only match you’ll end up making is with local authorities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most prescribed opioid pills go unused, study confirmsIn a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or none of the pills, and more than 90 percent failed to dispose of the leftovers in recommended ways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery timesA team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons is using 3-D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3-D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Loss of 350 miles of Great Plains streams causing changes in aquatic food webThe food web in Great Plains streams could be unraveling. A decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing the aquatic food web.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change could put rare bat species at greater riskAn endangered bat species with a UK population of less than 1,000 could be further threatened by the effects of global warming, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line danceMeiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring, new research shows. And not just for humans. Creatures from geckos to garlic and cactuses to cockroaches pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zika infections unlikely to be passed by kissing, casual contactCasual contact like kissing or sharing a fork or spoon is not enough for the Zika virus to move between hosts, according to researchers who conducted studies with monkeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurobiology: Use it or lose itAn Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich study reveals that sound-evoked activity of neurons in the auditory system of the mouse increases the thickness of their myelin sheaths -- and enhances the speed of signal transmission -- both during development and in the adult brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

System automatically retouches cellphone images in real-timeThis week at Siggraph, the premier digital graphics conference, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Google are presenting a new system that can automatically retouch images in the style of a professional photographer. It's so energy-efficient, however, that it can run on a cellphone, and it's so fast that it can display retouched images in real-time,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cicada wings may inspire new surface technologiesResearchers are looking to insects -- specifically cicadas -- for insight into the design of artificial surfaces with de-icing, self-cleaning and anti-fogging abilities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Financial incentives could conserve tropical forest diversityThe past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. In what might be a first of its kind study, University of Missouri researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to assess the impact of conservation payments in Ecuador's Amazon Basin forests. They found that co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study adds to evidence that most prescribed opioid pills go unusedIn a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or none of the pills, and more than 90 percent failed to dispose of the leftovers in recommended ways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prescription opioids often go unused after surgeryMore than two-thirds of patients reported unused prescription opioids following surgery, and safe storage and disposal rarely occurred, suggesting an important source for nonmedical use, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What six years in captivity taught me about fear and faith | Ingrid BetancourtIn 2002, the Colombian guerilla movement known as the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) kidnapped Ingrid Betancourt in the middle of her presidential campaign. For the next six years, Betancourt was held hostage in jungle prison camps where she was ravaged by malaria, fleas, hunger and human cruelty until her rescue by the Colombian government. In this deeply personal talk, the politic
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NYT > Science

Nations Will Start Talks to Protect Fish of the High SeasAfter years of plunder, countries will begin treaty talks at the United Nations to create marine reserves in international waters.
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Ars Technica

Super NES Classic pre-orders start later this month Is this an SNES Classic Edition in a normal-sized hand, or a normal SNES in a giant-sized hand? (credit: Nintendo ) Though the Super NES Classic was announced over a month ago , US retailers have yet to begin offering pre-orders for the console ahead of its September 29 launch (though international pre-orders are already being flipped for inflated eBay prices ). Now, Nintendo is promising via Fac
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Live Science

More Than Two-Thirds of Patients Have Leftover Opioids After SurgeryMost patients who are prescribed opioids after surgery don't take all of the prescribed pills, leaving leftover opioids that could be used inappropriately, a new review of studies finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Don't fall for these financial scamsBeware of the stranger on the phone—it could be a scammer.
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The Atlantic

Britain's Great Tea Heist This week, Gastropod tells the story of two countries and their shared obsession with a plant: Camellia sinensis , otherwise known as the tea bush. The Chinese domesticated tea over thousands of years, but they lost their near monopoly on international trade when a Scottish botanist, disguised as a Chinese nobleman, smuggled it out of China in the 1800s, in order to secure Britain's favorite beve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber's bumpy CEO searchGetting rid of Travis Kalanick may have been hard for Uber's investors and board of directors. But replacing him could prove harder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pros and cons: Free dental care in exchange for community serviceThe majority of low-income Michigan residents and dentists who participated in a program that provided free dental care in exchange for volunteer work said they liked it, and most patients felt their oral health had improved.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool increases adaptability, autonomy of 'Skyrim' nonplayer charactersComputer science researchers at North Carolina State University and Universidade de Lisboa have developed a tool for use with the game Skyrim that can be used to create nonplayer characters that allow for more variability and flexibility in game play. The tool, called CIF-CK, is an artificial intelligence architecture program that uses social behavior models to make individual NPCs more reactive a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Students at 2-year colleges and vocational schools more likely to be hungryFor the majority of college students, having enough food is not on the list of challenges they face in their education. However, a recent study shows that, for students in two-year colleges and vocational schools, hunger is definitely one of the problems they face and can impede their ability to succeed in college.
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Gizmodo

Magnetic Tape Data Storage Breakthrough Will Make Your Hard Drive Seem Tiny Photo: IBM Research The amount of data you can squeeze onto a hard drive continues to grow by leaps and bounds, with Seagate announcing a 60TB SSD late last year. But thanks to IBM and Sony, tape might still reign supreme when you need to archive massive amounts of data, as the companies have jointly developed a new kind of tape that can reportedly hold 201-gigabits, or roughly 25GB, per square i
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Futurity.org

To kill microbial ‘vampires’ like MRSA, use light Researchers have found a way to destroy antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus —like the deadly MRSA—using light. Just as daylight strips Dracula of his power, “photodynamic therapy” can help kill bacteria… Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Antibiotic-resistant strains of the bug, like MRSA, can be deadly. Staph, which needs iron to
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What to Watch Before Your Next Getaway, From 'Chewing Gum' to the Entire Bourne FranchiseGoing on vacation? Here's every film and show you should watch before you leave—broken down by destination.
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Gizmodo

Footage From the First Fast Hyperloop Test Looks Like a Tron-Inspired Fantasy Photo: Hyperloop One Hyperloop One recently crossed a major milestone , after it hurdled a vehicle through a vacuum-sealed tube at an eye-peeling 192 miles-per-hour. That’s almost Formula One speed, and by God, it looks incredible. Too bad people inside the windowless pod will never get to see it. The test took place over the weekend, when Hyperloop One loaded the 28-foot-long pod into a concrete
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clarifiying complex chemical processes with quantum computersScience and the IT industry have high hopes for quantum computing, but descriptions of possible applications tend to be vague. Researchers have now come up with a concrete example that demonstrates what quantum computers will actually be able to achieve in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microscopic body snatchers infest our oceansPredatory microbes which enslave prey to acquire photosynthetic capability are abundant in our oceans, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at riskScientists have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgeryResearchers have developed a hybrid rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes with integrated sensing, flexibility, and multiple degrees of freedom. This arm -- built using a manufacturing paradigm based on pop-up fabrication and soft lithography -- lies flat on an endoscope until it arrives at the desired spot, then pops up to assist in surgical procedures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changes in biodiversity: Better assessmentAssessing the state of an ecosystem solely on the basis of short-term changes in the number of different species it contains can lead to false conclusions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hypertensive women may benefit most from drugs that directly block the action of the hormone aldosteroneWhen women are hypertensive their physicians should consider measuring their level of aldosterone, a hormone that at high levels damages the cardiovascular system, scientists say.
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Forsker i stjernestøv drysser fem bøger ud til sommerenAnja C. Andersen giver bud på fem bøger, som hun anbefaler dig at læse henover sommeren.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smartphone sales slip as top vendors consolidate market shareGlobal smartphone sales saw a modest decline in the second quarter of 2017, as market leaders Samsung and Apple consolidated their positions, a survey showed Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remnant clouds of former Tropical Storm Emily over AtlanticFormer Tropical Storm Emily appeared as swirl of clouds on imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on August 2.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural preservatives on the riseBeginning this year, Oscar Mayer stopped adding artificial preservatives to their hot dogs. Taking their place is celery juice, a natural source of the preservative sodium nitrite. This week Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines the trend toward "clean labels" and natural preservatives, and the efforts to incorporate them without sacrificin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA keeps an eye on Typhoon NoruNASA's Aqua satellite is keeping track of Typhoon Noru as it continues its slow trek through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Babies of kidnapped brides suffer, tooBride kidnapping remains a common practice in a handful of countries. And when young women are kidnapped into marriage, their babies pay a price, suggests new research from Duke University.
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Popular Science

Inside Salt Lake City's dreary, dangerous smog dome Environment How it's fighting a perennial pollution problem. In Salt Lake City, a "smog dome" can last four days on average, but some have lingered almost three weeks. These periods aren’t just dreary; they’re dangerous.
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Ars Technica

Gruesome case of flesh-eating bacteria has beach city anxious, skeptical Enlarge / Typically, Myrtle Beach is quite picturesque—as evidenced by this early morning view toward the end of the Cherry Grove fishing pier. (credit: Kelly Verdeck Photography / Getty Images) Authorities and vacationers in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, are waiting anxiously for more information on a case of flesh-eating bacteria that struck a Lumberton, North Carolina, grandmother who had been
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An end to cavities for people with sensitive teeth?An ice cold drink is refreshing in the summer, but for people with sensitive teeth, it can cause a painful jolt in the mouth. This condition can be treated, but many current approaches don't last long. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a new material with an extract from green tea that could fix this problem—and help prevent cavities in the
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The Atlantic

The Turkey in the Left Turn Lane As 2016 gave way to 2017, a turkey moved into the left turn lane of a major intersection in my hometown. Some say he arrived in January of this year; others are sure he was around in late 2016. But regardless, once he was there, he was there to stay. When he wasn’t in the street, he rarely strayed far from the nearby corner that he’d decided to make his home. In suburban Ypsilanti, Michigan, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists propose a new method for improving the assessment of changes in biodiversityAssessing the state of an ecosystem solely on the basis of short-term changes in the number of different species it contains can lead to false conclusions. This is the conclusion reached by an international team including researchers of the Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity (HIFMB) at the University of Oldenburg and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA keeps an eye on Typhoon NoruNASA's Aqua satellite is keeping track of Typhoon Noru as it continues its slow trek through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Babies of kidnapped brides suffer, tooBride kidnapping remains a common practice in a handful of countries. And when young women are kidnapped into marriage, their babies pay a price, suggests new research from Duke University. The researchers looked at the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan, where bride kidnapping remains widespread. Infants born to kidnapped brides had birthweights 80 to 190 grams lower than other babies, says the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Remnant clouds of former Tropical Storm Emily over AtlanticFormer Tropical Storm Emily appeared as swirl of clouds on imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on August 2.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC Nephrology director addresses acute kidney injury as journal guest editorCharuhas Thakar, MD, professor and director of the Division of Nephrology, Kidney CARE Program in the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine addresses acute kidney injury (AKI) as guest editor of the July 2017 issue of the ACKD Journal. His approach looks at the impact on patients and the health care system of having fewer patients develop AKI.
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