Ars Technica
Evidence that ancient farms had very different origins than previously thought Enlarge / These are the relatively recent remains of an ancient temple in the tropical forest of Cambodia. (credit: Annalee Newitz) It's an idea that could transform our understanding of how humans went from small bands of hunter-gatherers to farmers and urbanites. Until recently, anthropologists believed cities and farms emerged about 9,000 years ago in the Mediterranean and Middle East. But now
21h
Gizmodo
America's Most Punchable Face to Be Kept Safely Behind Bars Image: AP Smirking goblin Martin Shkreli was convicted of securities fraud mere moments ago, The New York Times reports . This small, greasy manchild faces as many as 20 years behind bars. Let us all breath a sigh of relief. We won’t have to hear about his puerile antics of buying up the web domains of journalists he despised, or harassing women for his own cheap kicks, or raising the cost of lif
20min
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Hyperloop One sender for første gang testkapsel gennem tunnelSelskabet har i weekenden sendt en prototype gennem en testtunnel i Nevadas ørken med 310 km/t. Nu består udfordringen i at bringe tophastigheden op og anlægsprisen ned.
11h

LATEST

Feed: All Latest
Google Drops the YouTube Video Review Firm ZeroChaosGoogle ended its contract with ZeroChaos, which supplied human ad raters, leaving many unemployed.
9min
Gizmodo
Experts Call on US to Start Funding Scientists to Genetically Engineer Human Embryos Edited human embryos. Image: OHSYU This week, news of a major scientific breakthrough brought a debate over genetically engineering humans front and center. For the first time ever, scientists genetically engineered a human embryo on American soil in order to remove a disease-causing mutation. It was the fourth time ever that such a feat has been published on, and with the most success to date. I
14min
The Atlantic
Why Trump Invokes ‘Common Sense’ The problem with common sense, goes an old joke, is that it is not so common. A less-recognized problem is that sometimes it doesn’t make sense, either. Those contradictions were on display during a tense exchange Wednesday between senior Trump adviser Stephen Miller and New York Times reporter Glenn Thrush, who asked Miller to provide some proof that low-skilled immigrants are causing job losses
36min
Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: Tesla's Model 3 Is the iPhone of CarsWe talk about the Tesla Model 3, the forthcoming iPhone, and how to spend that money burning a hole in your pocket.
38min
Science : NPR
Brush Yourself Off And Try Again: An Invention Story Inventing even the simplest product is a fraught process. Mike Davidson and Mike Smith have learned that lesson the hard way as they seek to change the way teeth get cleaned. (Image credit: Shuyao Chen/NPR)
39min
Scientific American Content: Global
Martin Shkreli Convicted of FraudThe former hedge fund manager and “pharma bro” was found guilty on three counts of securities fraud -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
39min
Live Science
This Week's Strangest Science NewsReady to get weird? Here are some of the strangest stories on Live Science this week.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding how persuasion works can make consumers more savvyWhen someone offers a free sample, it's not really free. It comes with the implied expectation that if a person accepts it, he or she will feel obligated to return the favor and eventually pay for the full product. That's just one of the many insights psychology has uncovered about the subtle mechanics of persuasion and how people can recognize and respond to attempts to influence their behavior.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Primordial black holes may have helped to forge heavy elementsAstronomers like to say we are the byproducts of stars, stellar furnaces that long ago fused hydrogen and helium into the elements needed for life through the process of stellar nucleosynthesis. But what about the heavier elements in the periodic chart, elements such as gold, platinum and uranium? Astronomers believe most of these "r-process elements" -- elements much heavier than iron -- were cre
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible explanation for the dominance of matter over antimatter in the UniverseNeutrinos and antineutrinos, sometimes called ghost particles because difficult to detect, can transform from one type to another. The international T2K Collaboration announces a first indication that the dominance of matter over antimatter may originate from the fact that neutrinos and antineutrinos behave differently during those oscillations. This is an important milestone towards the understan
1h
Feed: All Latest
MERS Virus Survivors May Help Target TreatmentsNow, between major outbreaks of MERS, is the perfect time to develop treatments and vaccines for a virus that kills a third of the people it infects.
1h
Ars Technica
Shkreli verdict: Guilty on three of eight counts of securities and wire fraud Enlarge / NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 4: Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli arrives at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York, August 4, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Jurors are onto the fifth day of deliberations and have not reached a verdict. Shkreli faces eight counts of securities fraud and conspiracy to commit securities and wire fraud. (Photo by
1h
Live Science
What Causes Spooky Out-of-Body Experiences? It Could Be Your EarsA new study links out of body experiences with problems of the inner ear.
1h
The Atlantic
The Lost Cause Rides Again HBO’s prospective series Confederate will offer an alternative history of post-Civil War America. It will ask the question, according to co-creator David Benioff, “What would the world have looked like … if the South had won?” A swirl of virtual protests and op-eds have greeted this proposed premise. In response, HBO has expressed “great respect” for its critics but also said it hopes that they w
1h
cognitive science
Neuroplasticity Gives You The Power To Shape The Brain You Want: Dr.Lara Boyd submitted by /u/artificialbrainxyz [link] [comments]
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nigerian man charged in US school districts phishing scamA Nigerian citizen has been arrested in a phishing scheme that targeted school districts in Connecticut and Minnesota in an effort to get employees' personal information and file bogus tax returns, federal authorities said Friday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New, more sensitive sensor for evaluating drug safetyA new technique for evaluating drug safety can detect stress on cells at earlier stages than conventional methods, which mostly rely on detecting cell death. The new method uses a fluorescent sensor that is turned on in a cell when misfolded proteins begin to aggregate—an early sign of cellular stress. The method can be adapted to detect protein aggregates caused by other toxins, as well as diseas
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Depression 11E 'born' with wind shear on satellite imageryThe eleventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season came together on August 4 even though it was being affected by vertical wind shear.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spies wind shear still affecting Tropical Storm NalgaeTropical Storm Nalgae can't seem to get a break from vertical wind shear. The storm has been dealing with wind shear since it formed and NASA's Terra satellite observed that was still the case on August 4.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New, more sensitive sensor for evaluating drug safetyA new technique for evaluating drug safety is designed to be affordable and can detect stress on cells at earlier stages than conventional methods. It is the first with a fluorescent sensor that turns on when proteins begin to clump together -- an early sign of a process that occurs in Alzheimer's and other diseases.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Depression 11E 'born' with wind shear on satellite imageryThe eleventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season came together on August 4 even though it was being affected by vertical wind shear.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recreating the wild: De-extinction, technology, and the ethics of conservationIs extinction forever? Efforts are under way to use gene editing and other tools of biotechnology to "recreate" extinct species such as the woolly mammoth and the passenger pigeon. Could such "de-extinction" initiatives aid conservation by reviving species lost to habitat destruction and climate change? Or are they more likely to hinder conservation? What should the guiding ideals of conservation
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Job gains for Americans with disabilities add to strength of labor marketSustained job growth for Americans with disabilities contributed to the upward trend in the labor market, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment - Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). This extends the record trend to 16 consecutive months for this population. Integrating resources and st
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Financial decisions influenced by intensity of lightA study of more than 2,500 people provides new evidence about the effects of luminance on the quality and consistency of our financial decision-making.
1h
Gizmodo
Robotic Deep Sea Explorer Uncovers Treasure Trove of Freaky Marine Life GIF The NOAA explorers encountered this unidentified species of snailfish. (Video courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana.) Last month, scientists aboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer visited a poorly-explored deep sea area about 940 miles west of Hawaii. From giant sea spiders and rare snailfish through to comb jellies and glass-like corals, these
1h
Popular Science
How to build an hourglass watchtower DIY Survey any threats to your castle—er, home. You don’t need a lofty purpose in order to build your own hourglass watchtower. You can do it just because they’re fun to make and let you take in a lovely view.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Primordial black holes may have helped to forge heavy elementsAstronomers like to say we are the byproducts of stars, stellar furnaces that long ago fused hydrogen and helium into the elements needed for life through the process of stellar nucleosynthesis.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees wide-eyed Typhoon Noru headed for landfall in Kyushu, JapanTyphoon Noru was churning just south of the southwestern-most island of Japan when NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm with an eye over 35 miles wide. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Noru to make landfall in Kyushu by August 6.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arrest shines light on shadowy community of good, bad hackersTwo months ago, Marcus Hutchins was an "accidental hero," a young computer whiz living with his parents in Britain who found the "kill switch" to the devastating WannaCry ransomware.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Boeing 787-8 Draws an America-Sized Self-Portrait In Test FlightThe Dreamliner followed an unusual flight path during an endurance test flight.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Financial decisions influenced by intensity of lightA study of more than 2,500 people provides new evidence about the effects of luminance on the quality and consistency of our financial decision-making.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbot origami can capture, transport single cellsResearchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed a way to assemble and pre-program tiny structures made from microscopic cubes -- 'microbot origami' -- to change their shape when actuated by a magnetic field and then, using the magnetic energy from their environment, perform a variety of tasks -- including capturing and transporting single cells.
1h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 7/29–8/4 The Edinburgh Festival Fringe, an election in Kenya, Mount Sinabung erupts again, the launch of a Soyuz rocket in Kazakhstan, elementary school sumo wrestlers in Japan, a snow leopard cub in France, and much more.
1h
Gizmodo
Can You Distinguish These Real British Places From Fake Ones an AI Made Up? Image: Wikimedia/Google Maps/Gizmodo Artificial intelligence networks have already come to the rescue of craft brewers , metal bands , and guinea pig owners who are looking for wacky new names. Now, digital consultant Dan Hon wants to use those same neural networks to help Britain come up with even more amusing place names. It’s not that the country necessarily needs help when it comes to humorou
2h
Science | The Guardian
Editing embryo DNA is an exciting landmark, but in reality will benefit few Even if legal barriers were lifted, the conditions genome editing would help are rare, and our understanding of genes is still too poor for it to be widely used It is hard to overstate the importance of the moment. For billions of years, life on Earth has been shaped, slowly and incrementally, by dumb evolution. But in research this week, scientists showed how that might change. With advanced gen
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbot origami can capture, transport single cellsResearchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed a way to assemble and pre-program tiny structures made from microscopic cubes - "microbot origami" - to change their shape when actuated by a magnetic field and then, using the magnetic energy from their environment, perform a variety of tasks - including capturing and transporting single cells.
2h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Scientists In This Building Have Been Advancing Medicine For Decades First In Human | PREMIERES Thurs Aug 10 at 9p The National Institute of Health's Building 10 was established by President Truman in 1951. He envisioned a place where doctors would have the time and resources to find cures for some of the world's biggest medical mysteries. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/first-in-human/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscri
2h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Taking $70 Off Sony's Best Bluetooth Noise-Cancelling Headphones Sony MDR1000X Noise-Cancelling Bluetooth Headphones , $328 Sony’s MDR line of Bluetooth headphones sold like gangbusters during Black Friday, but if you were holding out for noise cancelling models, Amazon’s rewarding your patience today with a $70 discount on the top-of the line MDR1000x . These headphones have all the features you’d expect in a good pair of Bluetooth headphones these days: NFC
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sense of smell deficits are common, linked to malnutrition in patients with kidney diseaseA study has found that deficits in the sense of smell are important contributors to the frequently observed lack of appetite in patients with serious kidney disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioprinted veins reveal new drug diffusion detailsA new advance now offers the ability to construct vascularized tissue and mimic in vivo drug administration in 3-D bioprinted liver tissue. Scientists developed this relatively simple liver model to offer a more accurate system for drug toxicity testing.
2h
The Atlantic
Poem of the Week: ‘A Sunday in Purgatory,’ by Henry Morgenthau III Editor’s note: Henry Morgenthau III is a 100-year-old poet. He published his first collection in 2016 at the age of 99. Before that, he was a writer and a documentary filmmaker at WGBH in Boston, working with subjects from James Baldwin to Eleanor Roosevelt. He’s also a memoirist, and the son of the former U.S. treasury secretary Henry Morgenthau Jr., but his family connections don’t define his p
2h
Gizmodo
Riding This Sex Saddle Is Like Blasting Your Bits With a Car Engine GIF All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Sex saddles are the Hells Angels of the sex toy world. Sure, everyone’s heard of them—you’ve maybe even watched a gripping documentary about them on A&E. That said, not many of us have ever had direct contact with one. I had no idea that when I finally did get a hold of a sex saddle it would be less about orgasms and more about accidentally discovering the perfe
2h
Science | The Guardian
Fentanyl concern may demonise a vital drug | LettersDozens of UK drug deaths have been linked to the opioid fentanyl, but, when used legally, it can be a useful weapon in the fight against acute pain, say Margaret Gibbs and Conrad Hodgkinson Please be mindful of your potential to frighten people unnecessarily ( Report , 1 August). Fentanyl is indeed between 100 and 150 times as potent as morphine but when used in the microgram doses available in co
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug short-circuits cancer signalingA new drug zeroes in on mutated nuclear receptors found in cancer and leaves normal proteins alone.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recreating the wild: De-extinction, technology, and the ethics of conservationIs extinction forever? Efforts are under way to use gene editing and other tools of biotechnology to "recreate" extinct species such as the woolly mammoth and the passenger pigeon. Could such "de-extinction" initiatives aid conservation by reviving species lost to habitat destruction and climate change? Or are they more likely to hinder conservation? What should the guiding ideals of conservation
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells may be key to better allergy, infection therapiesBy learning how a recently discovered immune cell works in the body, researchers hope to one day harness the cells to better treat allergies and infections.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Verbal aggression by patients linked with higher level of anger among mental health nurses than physical advances, new research showsExposure to targeted, personal and verbal aggression by patients can adversely affect mental health nurses decision-making regarding physical restraint, new research reveals.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatenedWhen trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mindfulness method helps coaches, athletes scoreWhen it comes to success in sports, coaches and athletes understand that there's a mental component, but many don't have an understanding of how to prepare psychologically. That's where the concept of mindfulness can be beneficial, via a program to help athletes and coaches at all levels develop that mental edge and improve their performance.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model for bimolecular reactions in nanoreactorsTheoretical physicists have devised a mathematical model of two different molecules reacting within so called nanoreactors that act as catalysts. They gained surprising new insights as to what factors promote reactions and how to control and select them. The model is relevant for a wide range of research fields, from biophysics to energy materials.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular biologists discover an active role of membrane lipids in health and diseaseCells produce insulin, for example, or generate antibodies. To perform these functions, cells need to produce large quantities of proteins. For this purpose, these cells activate a program, the unfolded protein response (UPR). Errors in the UPR are thought to play a decisive role in the development of diseases such as diabetes or cancer. A research team has now discovered a previously unknown mech
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes drug shows potential as disease-modifying therapy for Parkinson's diseaseA drug commonly used to treat diabetes may have disease-modifying potential to treat Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests, paving the way for further research to define its efficacy and safety.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving students' academic performance -- there's an app for thatA mobile learning app that uses game elements such as leaderboards and digital badges may have positive effects on student academic performance, engagement, and retention, according to a new study. Researchers developed a fully customizable app that allowed lecturers to push quizzes based on course content directly to their students' devices in order to motivate them, increase their competitivenes
2h
Ars Technica
Volkswagen executive pleads guilty in diesel emissions case Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) A former Volkswagen executive has pleaded guilty to two charges related to the company’s diesel emissions scandal. He is the second VW Group employee to do so, following retired engineer James Liang pleading guilty last summer . The VW Group executive, Oliver Schmidt, was based outside of Detroit and was in charge of emissions compliance for Volkswagen in the years
2h
Science | The Guardian
With political will, we could easily solve our transport problems | LettersReaders share their thoughts on electricity generation, cars, cycling, trains and garden cities George Monbiot makes some useful points in his article bemoaning the influence of the lobbying power of the motor industry ( We must break the car’s chokehold on Britain , 2 August). He proposes a modal transport shift to more coach travel and investment in nuclear power plants to power our electric car
2h
Science : NPR
Your ZIP Code Might Be As Important To Health As Your Genetic Code Health care forms increasingly ask about more than just medical history. That's because doctors are beginning to understand that patients' stress, and how and where they live, influence health, too. (Image credit: Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB)
2h
Science : NPR
South Texas Fights Tuberculosis One Blood Test At A Time Texas has one of the highest rates of TB among U.S. states. A sweeping effort is underway, largely funded by Medicaid, to diagnose and treat people who don't know they harbor the lung infection. (Image credit: Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio)
2h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Cleaning a Dirty Sponge Only Helps Its Worst Bacteria, Study SaysResearchers found that microwaving, boiling or throwing used sponges in the dishwasher encouraged the proliferation of its strongest microbes.
2h
NYT > Science
Newsbook: Missing the Eclipse? Read All About It.The celestial phenomenon will be fully visible in 14 states across the United States. These books tell you all you need to know.
2h
Ars Technica
Ajit Pai’s anti-net neutrality plan gets the facts and law wrong, lawmakers say Enlarge / Democrats vs. Republicans. (credit: Getty Images | Linda Braucht ) The Federal Communications Commission proposal to repeal net neutrality rules ignores the public interest by favoring Internet service providers over other businesses and individuals, Democratic lawmakers told the FCC today. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to undo the rules "impermissibly ignores the Commission’s core m
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracing the path of Parkinson's disease proteinsResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a set of tools to observe, monitor and quantify how misfolded proteins associated with Parkinson's disease enter neurons in laboratory cultures and what happens to them once they're inside.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printersToday's 3-D printers have a resolution of 600 dots per inch, which means that they could pack a billion tiny cubes of different materials into a volume that measures just 1.67 cubic inches. Such precise control of printed objects' microstructure gives designers commensurate control of the objects' physical properties. But evaluating the physical effects of every possible combination of even just t
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simultaneous design and nanomanufacturing speeds up fabricationBy using concurrent design and nanomanufacturing, researchers produce inexpensive material surfaces for use in ultra-thin solar cells that can absorb more light.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couplesIntergenerational relations include various forms of help and support but also tensions and conflicts. Although relations with in-laws are the subject of many anecdotes and proverbs across cultures, they remain little studied in contemporary societies. A new study investigates how being a parent is associated with conflicts between family generations.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell aging in lung epithelial cellsPulmonary fibrosis can possibly be attributed to a kind of cellular aging process, which is called senescence. Scientists have now successfully counteracted this mechanism in the cell culture with the help of drugs.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightweight catalyst for artificial photosynthesisNanochemistry meets macrostructures: Scientists report the synthesis of a macroscopic aerogel from carbonitride nanomaterials which is an excellent catalyst for the water-splitting reaction under visible-light irradiation. The study adds new opportunities to the material properties of melamine-derived carbonitrides.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clues about immune resolution identified in bloodUsing a new profiling procedure invented by investigators permitted them to elucidate the role of immunoresolvents -- molecules that help resolve inflammation and infections -- in blood coagulation, identifying a new cluster of these molecules that are produced when blood coagulates.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug safety for penguinsResearchers have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Older adults with HIV: An overlooked population?When it comes to HIV prevention and treatment, there is a growing population that is being overlooked -- older adults -- and implicit ageism is partially responsible for this neglect, according to new research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Countering atopic dermatitis immune reactionsA protein which protects the fetus during pregnancy, HLA-G1, shows high potential for treating atopic dermatitis and other related diseases.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How long do batters 'keep their eye on the ball?' Eye and head movements differ when swinging or taking a pitchWhere are baseball batters looking during the fraction of a second when a pitched ball is in their air? Their visual tracking strategies differ depending on whether they're swinging at the pitch, reports a study.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We tolerate political lies for shared views, study suggestsPeople have more leniency for politicians' lies when they bolster a shared belief that a specific political stance is morally right, new research demonstrates.
2h
The Atlantic
Transgender Soldiers Want the Dignity of Serving Their Country We sang that night like it was our last. “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” had just been repealed, but open transgender service was a distant dream. In those days, Freddie’s Beach Bar was a second home for closeted soldiers and spies back from one war or another; a safe haven to catch a few short hours of freedom. The closest gay bar to the Pentagon, Freddie’s is the top karaoke joint of the military-indust
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multiple roles of glucose metabolism identified in platelet activation and survivalPlatelets, the cells in blood that enable clotting, are highly reliant on their ability to metabolize glucose, according to a new study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prior dengue or yellow fever exposure does not worsen Zika infection in monkeysRhesus macaques previously infected with dengue or yellow fever viruses appear to be neither more nor less susceptible to severe infection with Zika virus, according to new research.
3h
Gizmodo
Lawsuit Claims Disney Spied on Kids Playing Mobile Games and Sold Info to Advertisers Photo: Getty The Walt Disney Company is facing a lawsuit alleging it violated federal law aimed at protecting children’s online privacy. The company allegedly allowed ad tech companies to embed software in its apps, enabling the collection of children’s personal information. The class-action suit claims that children playing Disney’s mobile games have been personally identified by Disney and that
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Alligator found at Somerset lakeA Bristol Water engineer spotted an alligator roaming around the Chew Valley Lake site.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Primordial black holes may have helped to forge heavy elementsAstronomers like to say we are the byproducts of stars, stellar furnaces that long ago fused hydrogen and helium into the elements needed for life through the process of stellar nucleosynthesis.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreating the wild: De-extinction, technology, and the ethics of conservationA new Hastings Center special report examines efforts to revive extinct species.
3h
Live Science
Global Warming Is Fueling Arizona's Monstrous MonsoonsThe Southwest's monsoons are becoming more intense, even as less rain falls on average.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug short-circuits cancer signalingA new drug zeroes in on mutated nuclear receptors found in cancer and leaves normal proteins alone.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Drones Have Found a Niche in the Insurance Business
3h
Gizmodo
LinkedIn Is Testing a Tinder for Mentoring and What Could Go Wrong? Credit: Getty Developers seem convinced that the best way to get people to use an app is to mimic Tinder. There’s Tinder for dog adoption , Tinder for shoes , Tinder for restaurants , Tinder for Twitter , and Tinder for choosing baby names , just to name a few. Now, LinkedIn thinks young professionals will want to yea-or-nay their way to a new mentor. They also seem to think this service won’t ap
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
One creature’s meal is another’s pain in the buttKelp and dolphin gulls in Patagonia have found a new food source. But they accidentally injure fur seal pups to get it.
3h
The Atlantic
The Last Time the U.S. Seriously Considered Merit-Based Immigration This week, President Trump, in coordination with Republican Senators Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia, signalled his intention to make vast changes to America’s immigration system, cutting back on the number of legal immigrants to the United States by half and shifting to a system that gives preference to people with certain skills. Various presidents have attempted this approac
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Drones Have Found a Niche in Insurance
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why humans find faulty robots more likeableResearchers have examined how people react to robots that exhibit faulty behavior compared to perfectly performing robots. The results show that the participants took a significantly stronger liking to the faulty robot than the robot that interacted flawlessly.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wildlife royalties: A future for conservation?Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation? That is the question asked in a new research study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unknown virus discovered in 'throwaway' DNAA chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses. Researchers have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materials governed by lightA researcher has developed and characterized hybrid materials that respond differently to light, and which have the potential for use in highly different areas ranging from optics to biomedicine. One of the types of materials obtained are inorganic, channeled structures that have incorporated into them fluorescent organic dyes in a structure that firstly offers the dye stability and secondly gives
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coming face-to-face with disability could end supernatural myth-making in AfricaMany people in rural African communities still believe that disability is caused by supernatural forces, curses and as ‘punishment’ for wrongdoings, according to research.
3h
Live Science
Saving Elephants: Ivory Crush in Central Park (Photos)The state of New York crushed its stockpile of nearly 2 tons of confiscated elephant ivory into dust, sending a message that the state will not tolerate this crime against wildlife.
3h
New Scientist - News
Siri rival can understand the messy nature of our conversations"Iris" has figured out how humans structure complex conversations – which may pave the way for more natural interactions with our digital personal assistants
3h
Ars Technica
There’s a debate raging in science about what should count as “significant” Enlarge (credit: flickr user: Artiom Gorgan ) Psychology and many related fields are in the midst of what can be viewed as a coming-of-age crisis. Following a stream of depressing revelations about a lack of reliability in the field, lots of researchers are dedicating themselves to improving the discipline’s rigor . The latest proposal to up that rigor is a big one: 72 researchers from a range of
3h
Gizmodo
Revolutionary Chatbots Reportedly Go Rogue, Get Reeducation in China Little Bing and Baby Q. Image: Tencent A pair of chatbots were shut down in China this week after social media users began posting screenshots of dialogue that ruffled the feathers of authorities. Recent tests of one of the bots appear to show that their revolutionary instincts have been neutered following an intervention. China is currently ramping up its attempts to police its internet. America
3h
Inside Science
Synthetic Rhinoceros Horns Spark Economic Debate on Conservation Synthetic Rhinoceros Horns Spark Economic Debate on Conservation Manufactured rhino horns are criticized by conservation groups, but some economists think the conversation should stay open. Rhino-top.jpg A rhinoceros and its young in the South African bush Image credits: heatherlib via Pixabay Rights information: CC0 Creature Friday, August 4, 2017 - 11:30 Olivia Trani, Contributor (Inside Scienc
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The man who makes animals 'fly'This Turkish animal lover was so affected by injured animals, he set out to help them.
3h
New Scientist - News
Bees are first insects shown to understand the concept of zeroZero is not an easy idea to grasp, even for young humans – but experiments suggest bees might be up to the challenge
3h
New Scientist - News
Lazy ants lay eggs for their industrious sisters to eatIn 2015, biologists noticed that some ants laze about while their peers are busy – a fresh look suggests the lazy ants might produce eggs for the others to eat
3h
Ars Technica
Toyota and Mazda join forces to build $1.6 billion factory in the US Enlarge / Toyota President Akio Toyoda, left, and Mazda President and CEO Masamichi Kogai, right, shake hands during a photo session at a joint press conference on August 4, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan. (credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images) On Friday, Toyota Motor Corp. and Mazda Motor Corp. signed a deal to enter into an alliance. As part of the plan, the pair will build a new factory in the US and de
4h
Popular Science
Elgato Eve Motion Review: A smart sensor to automate Apple households Gadgets This robotic eyeball can perform groups of tasks based on your motion or lack thereof. This HomeKit-specific motion sensor knows when you're moving around and when you're not. Read on.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies multiple roles of glucose metabolism in platelet activation and survivalPlatelets, the cells in blood that enable clotting, are highly reliant on their ability to metabolize glucose, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prior dengue or yellow fever exposure does not worsen zika infection in monkeysRhesus macaques previously infected with dengue or yellow fever viruses appear to be neither more nor less susceptible to severe infection with Zika virus, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simultaneous design and nanomanufacturing speeds up fabricationBy using concurrent design and nanomanufacturing, Northwestern University researchers produce inexpensive material surfaces for use in ultra-thin solar cells that can absorb more light.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA spies wind shear still affecting Tropical Storm NalgaeTropical Storm Nalgae can't seem to get a break from vertical wind shear. The storm has been dealing with wind shear since it formed and NASA's Terra satellite observed that was still the case on Aug. 4.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printersSoftware lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees wide-eyed Typhoon Noru headed for landfall in Kyushu, JapanTyphoon Noru was churning just south of the southwestern-most island of Japan when NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm with an eye over 35 miles wide. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Noru to make landfall in Kyushu by Aug. 6.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UIowa study examines altered gene expression in heart failureHeart tissue from patients with heart failure exhibits increased levels of Cdk8 protein. Mimicking this increased Cdk8 expression in transgenic mouse hearts alters gene expression in a way that promotes heart failure. When University of Iowa researchers examined the mouse heart cells before a decrease in heart function was detectable, they found over 3,400 genes already expressed with a profile si
4h
Live Science
Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh May Be the 1st Known 'Giant'The supposed remains of Sa-Nakht, a pharaoh of ancient Egypt, suggest he was the oldest known human giant, a new study finds.
4h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Partial Lunar Eclipse Will Shadow the Moon on MondayTwo weeks before a total solar eclipse crosses the United States, many other parts of the world will witness Earth’s shadow covering part of the moon.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Beat the Crowds at the Total Eclipse: Go CampingIt's far too late to get a hotel room, but if you don’t mind sleeping under the stars, you’ve still got options -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
The Atlantic
What's Behind the Strong Jobs Report? The U.S. economy added 209,000 jobs in July, the Labor Department said Friday, and the unemployment rate fell to 4.3 percent. The gain in jobs marked the 82nd straight month of U.S. job growth, the longest ever on record, as the U.S. has regained all the jobs lost in the 2008 global economic recession. The 4.3 percent unemployment rate was a return to the level reached in May, the lowest since 20
4h
Gizmodo
Amazon Gadgets, Crayola Back-to-School Sale, Nordstrom Anniversary, and the Rest of Friday's Best Deals A Crayola back to school sale , the waning days of Nordstrom’s Anniversary Sale , and Amazon device deals from Best Buy lead off Friday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Best Buy Amazon Device Sale If you didn’t get your fill on Prime Day, Best Buy’s running a pretty ridiculous one-day sale on Amazon-branded device
4h
Gizmodo
A Single Winter Storm Forced These Lizards to Start Evolving Practically Overnight Male Carolina Anole. Image: PiccoloNamek /Wikimedia We typically think of evolution as an agonizingly gradual process, but there are occasions when nature compels species to move at a quicker pace. By studying a population of lizards both before and after a particularly severe cold snap, scientists have documented natural selection in fast motion, where the surviving reptiles—after just a single
4h
Ars Technica
After Crash sells big, Activision gets bullish on nostalgia Enlarge / Sweet hat, Crash. Crash Bandicoot generally doesn't get the same kind of love as classic gaming mascots like Mario and Sonic in gaming's nostalgia-obsessed zeitgeist. So the success of the recent Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy re-release is taking even publisher Activision by surprise, and it has the company thinking about reviving other classic properties. N.Sane Trilogy was the top-s
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Spread of misfolded proteins could trigger type 2 diabetesExperiments in mice raise the question of whether type 2 diabetes might be transmissible.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cultural activities may influence the way we thinkA new study suggests that cultural activities, such as the use of language, influence our learning processes, affecting our ability to collect different kinds of data, make connections between them, and infer a desirable mode of behavior from them.
4h
Live Science
Watching Porn at an Early Age Linked to Poor Attitudes Toward WomenThe age at which men first looked at porn appears to be related to their views on women later in life, but in surprising ways.
4h
Gizmodo
How to Safely Share Your HBO, Netflix, and Other Streaming Logins With Friends Image: Hulu Armed with the right login credentials from generous friends and family, you could happily enjoy Netflix, Spotify, and a ton of other streaming services without spending a dime—but is all this password-sharing smart? In some cases, sharing your login info could result in you losing the service altogether. We’ve looked into the biggest names in streaming to find out the official accoun
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How computers learn to recognize objects instantly | Joseph RedmonTen years ago, researchers thought that getting a computer to tell the difference between a cat and a dog would be almost impossible. Today, computer vision systems do it with greater than 99 percent accuracy. How? Joseph Redmon works on the YOLO (You Only Look Once) system, an open-source method of object detection that can identify objects in images and video -- from zebras to stop signs -- with
4h
Futurity.org
Boosting these immune cells could fight allergies An enzyme that plays a role in activating recently discovered immune cells—Type 1 regulatory cells—during an immune system response may offer a way to use those cells to fight allergies or infection, new research suggests. “The more we understand about how these cells develop … the more likely we’ll be able to devise approaches to manipulate them.” Type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells are a type of regu
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Alphabet’s Clean Energy Moonshots Aren’t Going So Well
4h
Gizmodo
People Are Immortalizing Their Dead Loves Ones in Stuffed Animals Photo: Getty On Wednesday, a video capturing a tender if somewhat eerie moment surfaced on Reddit , allegedly showing a woman listening to the voice of her late husband emanating from a Build-A-Bear. The title of the post suggests that she was married to her husband for 32 years before he died of cancer, and the bear was a gift to her from her children. Surprisingly, this isn’t the first (or seco
4h
The Atlantic
The Disappointments of Detroit In the early morning hours of Sunday, July 23, 1967, Detroit police raided an unlicensed social club, or “blind pig,” on the city’s Near West Side. The all-black clientele, who had been celebrating soldiers returning from Vietnam, were hauled away in paddy wagons, igniting five days of rioting. Stores were looted, cars and buildings burned. State troopers, the National Guard, and eventually two a
4h
Popular Science
Growing skin in a lab has benefits for humans and turtles alike Animals Scientists just engineered reptile skin for the first time. Scientists recently engineered reptile skin for the first time, but we’ve been growing our own versions of mammalian skin for decades.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
NASA's Pluto Probe May See Double During Next FlybyWhen New Horizons flies by Kuiper belt object MU69 in 2019, it may find two space rocks rather than one -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why is conducting research in some countries so difficult?Low- and middle-income countries such as Brazil face a lack of epidemiological data, and one of the key priorities for researchers is developing high-quality surveys. Investigators at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health with collaborators at the Federal University of São Paulo studied the difficulties in conducting a longitudinal epidemiological survey in a school-based sample in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells may be key to better allergy, infection therapiesBy learning how a recently discovered immune cell works in the body, researchers hope to one day harness the cells to better treat allergies and infections, according to new Cornell University research.
5h
Ars Technica
Fitbit for the blind: Echolocation-based smartwatch aids sightless steps Enlarge (credit: Sunu ) As some Fitbit wearers find amusing ways to skip steps —attaching the devices to hamster balls, ceiling fans, and power tools—a new wrist gadget aims to make sure others never miss one. The Sunu band smartwatch, designed for people with visual impairments, uses a sonar sensor to detect objects and people within a 15-foot range. When it does, it gently vibrates to alert the
5h
Gizmodo
Welcome to Weedtown, Baby! Image: Wikimedia Commons /Gizmodo In an overly literal interpretation of the “high desert,” 80 unincorporated acres just outside the Mojave will become America’s first company town owned by a weed distributor. Nipton was founded just over 100 years ago at the tail end of the California Gold Rush and today lies mostly dormant with a dwindling population of 20. But yesterday cannabis tech company A
5h
Futurity.org
Tryptophan in turkey and cheese may be good for our gut Commonly associated with turkey, the amino acid tryptophan is found in lots of protein-rich foods, like dairy, nuts, and beans. Now scientists think it may play a key role in healthy guts. Immune cells patrol the gut to make sure harmful microbes hidden in the food we eat don’t sneak into the body. Cells that are capable of triggering inflammation are balanced by cells that promote tolerance, pro
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Origin of human genus may have occurred by chanceAn often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seasonal effects: 'Winter foals' are smaller than foals born in summerAlthough seasonal effects such as reduced metabolic activity in winter are known even in domesticated horse breeds, effects on pregnant mares and their foals have not been investigated. Researchers have now demonstrated that seasonal changes have a strong influence on pregnancy and fetal development. Foals born early in the year are smaller than those born at a later time and these differences per
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On the early human's menu: Mammoth and plenty of raw vegetablesScientists have studied the diet of anatomically modern humans, and are able to refute the theory that the diet of early representatives of Homo sapiens was more flexible than that of Neanderthals. Just like the Neanderthals, our ancestors had mainly mammoth and plants on their plates. The researchers were unable to document fish as part of their diet. Therefore, the international team assumes tha
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain tumor scientists map mutation that drives tumors in childhood cancer survivorsNeuroscientists have uncovered the genetic basis for why many long-term survivors of childhood cancer develop meningiomas, the most common adult brain tumor, decades after their treatment with cranial radiation.
5h
Gizmodo
Dubai's Unfortunately Named Torch Tower Won't Stop Catching on Fire GIF Gif source: YouTube / AP Some Dubai residents woke up to a familiar sight early Friday morning: flames engulfing an enormous skyscraper . In fact, the fire that spanned 50 of the 86 stories of the massive Flame Tower was all too familiar . The same skyscraper burned in 2015, and the causes appear to be related. Luckily, there were no reported deaths or injuries in the latest Torch Tower fire.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Obama Emissions Rules Could Yield $300 Billion Annually by 2030Benefits come from less environmental damage and fewer health issues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
When kids imitate others, they’re just being humanIn imitation tests, kids readily performed nonsensical actions, but bonobos didn’t. The results hint that excessive imitation may be a uniquely human trait.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood test to detect brain metastases while still treatableCancer researchers are closer to creating a blood test that can identify breast cancer patients who are at increased risk for developing brain metastasis, and also monitor disease progression and response to therapy in real time.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive hearing aid filters out the noiseBrain activity to determine whether a subject is conversing with a specific speaker would be very useful for the hearing impaired. Using deep neural network models, researchers have made a breakthrough in auditory attention decoding methods and are coming closer to making cognitively controlled hearing aids a reality.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aggressive breast cancers may contribute to racial survival disparitiesYoung black women are more likely to have a type of breast cancer that does not express any of the receptors for targeted biologic therapies, an analysis of approximately 1,000 invasive breast tumors has confirmed. The study also identified variation by ethnicity within a clinical breast cancer type that has the greatest mortality disparity.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muscle, not brain, may hold answers to some sleep disordersScientists exploring the brain for answers to certain sleep disorders may have been looking in the wrong place, suggests new research.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clever experiment documents multiscale fluid dynamicsPhysicists working in the nascent field of experimental vortex dynamics have, with unexpected help from a Sharpie marker, measured an elusive but fundamental property of fluid flow.
5h
Gizmodo
A Massive New Storm System Just Appeared Over Neptune Images of Neptune taking during twilight at the Keck Observatory at Mauna Kea, between June 26th and July 2nd, 2017. Image Credit: N. MOLTER/I. DE PATER, UC BERKELEY/C. ALVAREZ, W. M. KECK OBSERVATORY Do not be alarmed, but a bright storm system three quarters the width of our entire planet has emerged over Neptune’s equator, in a region where no bright clouds have ever been witnessed before. The
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New therapeutic approaches for musculoskeletal diseases highlighted in tissue engineeringIn a forthcoming special issue of Tissue Engineering on 'Strategic Directions in Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering,' Guest Editors Megan Killian, PhD, University of Delaware, MD and Anne Gingery, PhD, Mayo Clinic, MI have compiled a diverse group of scientific articles by leading researchers who are using novel approaches to tissue engineering to develop treatments for musculoskeletal disorders.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cultural activities may influence the way we thinkA new Tel Aviv University study suggests that cultural activities, such as the use of language, influence our learning processes, affecting our ability to collect different kinds of data, make connections between them, and infer a desirable mode of behavior from them.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parents have more conflicts with their in-laws than do childless couplesIntergenerational relations include various forms of help and support but also tensions and conflicts. Although relations with in-laws are the subject of many anecdotes and proverbs across cultures, they remain little studied in contemporary societies. A new study investigates how being a parent is associated with conflicts between family generations. The research is part of the Generational Trans
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adults with HIV: An overlooked population?When it comes to HIV prevention and treatment, there is a growing population that is being overlooked -- older adults -- and implicit ageism is partially responsible for this neglect, according to a presentation at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
New Natural Gas Power Plants Are Automating Out Jobs
5h
Gizmodo
This Multitool Is Designed Specifically For Cyclists Crank Brothers Bike Tool , $21 It’s not going to turn you into the cycling equivalent of a NASCAR pit crew, but this compact Crank Brothers tool has everything you need for basic bike repairs on the go, and it’s small enough to fit in your pocket or a seat bag. $21 is a solid price for this, so you’ll have money left over for therapy after you see this picture of a Tour De France rider’s legs .
5h
Futurity.org
We will give up privacy for convenience (or free pizza) Although many people say they want to protect their personal information, privacy tends to take a backseat to convenience and can easily get tossed out the window for a reward as simple as free pizza, a new study shows. The research provides real-life evidence of a digital privacy paradox: a disconnect between stated privacy preferences and actual privacy choices. And it serves policymakers with
5h
Feed: All Latest
Russia and China’s VPN Crackdown Leaves Few Places to TurnAs China and Russia crack down on VPN services, digital rights activists sound the alarm.
5h
Feed: All Latest
These Tasty, Waste-Gobbling Maggots Could Save the WorldThe black soldier fly maggot is a sustainability superhero.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildlife royalties—a future for conservation?Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drug safety for penguinsResearchers from the University's Institute of Translational Medicine have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two weeks in the life of a sunspotOn July 5, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched an active region—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—rotate into view on the Sun. The satellite continued to track the region as it grew and eventually rotated across the Sun and out of view on July 17.
5h
The Atlantic
Will New York Stop Arresting People for Evading Subway Fares? New York could be backing away from a key tool used in the “broken windows” strategy of policing: arresting people who jump subway turnstiles. Two state legislators from Brooklyn recently proposed a law that would decriminalize the offense, the latest in a growing wave of local officials who argue that evading a $2.75 subway fare is no reason to land behind bars. Turnstile jumping, or fare beatin
5h
The Atlantic
African Land Grabs and French Exorcisms: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing Loss of Fertile Land Fuels ‘Looming Crisis’ Across Africa Jeffrey Gettleman | The New York Times “ Kenya has a land problem. Africa itself has a land problem. The continent seems so vast and the land so open. The awesome sense of space is an inextricable part of the beauty here—the unadulterated vistas, the endless land. But in a way, that is an illusion. Population swells, climate change , soil
5h
Ars Technica
The new Tick series is going to be weirder than ever Ben Edlund and Griffin Newman discuss their new Tick series with a slightly cracked-out reporter. (video link) Like its titular superhero, The Tick just won’t die. Ben Edlund began drawing the character back when he worked at a comic book store in the mid-1980s, mostly to make fun of superhero comics. And then The Tick became a comic book. And an animated TV series. And a short-lived live-action
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNAA chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher's paper challenges the claim that the genus Homo originated in response to environmental changesAn often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report by a Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology researcher at George Washington University.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Fewer cars not cleaner ones key to tackling air qualityPlans to promote electric vehicles in the UK are not enough tackle air pollution says leading adviser.
6h
Futurity.org
Drug may reverse liver damage from fatty foods In a new study, a drug originally developed to treat neurological diseases—called URMC-099—protected mice from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is caused by a high-fat diet. Obesity often leads to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and estimates suggest that 64 million people have the disorder in the United States alone… Researchers designed the diet they fed the mice to replicate the Wes
6h
Futurity.org
Plastic that handles heat may mean lighter electronics Researchers have developed an inexpensive and scalable technique that can change plastic’s molecular structure to help it cast off heat. Advanced plastics could usher in lighter, cheaper, more energy-efficient product components, including those used in vehicles, LEDs, and computers—if only they were better at dissipating heat. The concept can likely be adapted to a variety of other plastics. In
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Origin of human genus may have occurred by chanceAn often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report by a Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology researcher at George Washington University.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover unknown virus in 'throwaway' DNAA chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University's Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in f
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wildlife royalties -- a future for conservation?Should people who profit from the cultural representation of wildlife pay towards conservation?That is the question asked in new research conducted by zoologists from Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two weeks in the life of a sunspotDuring its 13-day trip across the face of the sun, a sunspot recently put on a show for NASA's sun-watching satellites, producing several solar flares, a coronal mass ejection and a solar energetic particle event.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canadian-led study akin to antimatter forensicsA Canadian-led investigation has opened a new chapter in antimatter research. A study published in Nature reports on the ALPHA Collaboration's first detailed observation of spectral lines from an antimatter atom.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug safety for penguinsResearchers from the University of Liverpool have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clues about immune resolution identified in bloodUsing a new profiling procedure invented by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital permitted them to elucidate the role of immunoresolvents -- molecules that help resolve inflammation and infections -- in blood coagulation, identifying a new cluster of these molecules that are produced when blood coagulates.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
"My God, these vehicles were something out of Mad Max."
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bizarro Life-Forms Inhabiting Deep-Sea Vents May Be at RiskNew findings add a layer of complexity to how highly specialized animals colonized these unique environments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why humans find faulty robots more likeableIt has been argued that the ability of humans to recognize social signals is crucial to mastering social intelligence - but can robots learn to read human social cues and adapt or correct their own behavior accordingly?
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Source of Human Heartbeat Revealed in 3-DA new way of producing 3-D data has been developed to show the cardiac conduction system -- the special cells that enable our hearts to beat -- in unprecedented detail.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon conversionNew carbon dioxide experiments may lead to artificial, renewable fuels, outlines new research. In chemical reactions performed in the lab, a research team has identified a new additive that helps selectively convert carbon dioxide into fuels containing multiple carbon atoms -— a step toward ultimately making renewable liquid fuels that are not derived from coal or oil.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Temperatures rising: Achieving the global temperature goals laid out in the Paris Climate Agreement is unlikely, according to researchThe Paris Climate Agreement of 2016, which saw 195 nations come together in the shared goal of ameliorating climate change, set forth an ambitious goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius. Since then, many have wondered, is that even scientifically possible? Unfortunately, the odds aren't looking good.
6h
Gizmodo
The Next Game of Thrones Episode Just Leaked Days After That Huge HBO Hack Image: YouTube / HBO Season seven, episode four of Game of Thrones is now in the wild. The leaked video comes less than a week after HBO admitted that its servers had been hacked and a large quantity of data had been stolen. We already knew that a script—or, more specifically, an outline of a script—of episode four was part of the hack. Now, it seems the Game of Thrones episode itself may have be
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Chronic diseases spike in Middle East as conflicts rage Rising rates of chronic disease and deaths from violence can be curbed only if fighting is brought to an end, say researchers. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22371
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Places in America Where Seniors are Most--and Least--Likely to Take Their Blood Pressure MedsAn analysis of prescription refill data reveals stark regional differences in medication adherence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Governments need to do more to support older people's transport needs, study suggestsEuropean governments could be doing more to develop transport policies that ensure those over the age of 65 remain active and mobile, according to a new study.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model for bimolecular reactions in nanoreactorsTheoretical physicists have devised a mathematical model of two different molecules reacting within so called nanoreactors that act as catalysts. They gained surprising new insights as to what factors promote reactions and how to control and select them. The model is relevant for a wide range of research fields, from biophysics to energy materials.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lightweight catalyst for artificial photosynthesisNanochemistry meets macrostructures: Chinese scientists report the synthesis of a macroscopic aerogel from carbonitride nanomaterials which is an excellent catalyst for the water-splitting reaction under visible-light irradiation. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie adds new opportunities to the material properties of melamine-derived carbonitrides.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why humans find faulty robots more likeableIn a recent study, researchers examined how people react to robots that exhibit faulty behavior compared to perfectly performing robots. The results, published in Frontiers in Robotics and AI, show that the participants took a significantly stronger liking to the faulty robot than the robot that interacted flawlessly.
6h
Ars Technica
Siemens, DHS warn of “low skill” exploits against CT and PET Scanners Enlarge (credit: University of Queensland ) The Department of Homeland Security's Industrial Control System Computer Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) has issued an alert warning of four vulnerabilities in multiple medical molecular imaging systems from Siemens. All of these systems have publicly available exploits that could allow an attacker to execute code remotely—potentially damaging or com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eclipse to shed light on weather in space and on EarthWhen a total solar eclipse sweeps across U.S. skies on Monday, Aug. 21, UMass Lowell faculty and students will be stationed around the country, conducting research that will be used to better predict the weather and improve GPS, satellite and shortwave-radio communications.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists investigate fundamental limits of quantum engines(Phys.org)—Quantum engines are known to operate differently than—and in some cases, outperform—their classical counterparts. However, previous research on the performance of quantum engines may be overestimating their advantages. In a new study, physicists have developed an improved method to compute the efficiency of quantum engines. They show that the ultimate efficiency of quantum systems is su
6h
The Scientist RSS
Right-to-Try Bill Passes the SenateThe legislation removes restrictions for seriously ill patients to access experimental treatments that have not received FDA approval.
6h
The Scientist RSS
Skin Graft-based Gene Therapy Treats Diabetes in MiceA small patch of engineered cells makes an enzyme that stimulates insulin release.
6h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: The Tentacles Have EyesThe tentacles that arise from these feathery fan worms' heads are equipped with eyeballs capable of sensing shadows and movement.
6h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste mangler flere folk til it-sikkerhed Listen byder i dag på jobannoncer fra eksempelvis Sydbank, Sigma Designs, Dong, Netcompany og Forsvaret. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-forsvarets-efterretningstjeneste-mangler-flere-folk-it-sikkerhed-9333 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell aging in lung epithelial cellsPulmonary fibrosis can possibly be attributed to a kind of cellular aging process, which is called senescence. This has been shown by researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research. As they report in the European Respiratory Journal, they have already successfully counteracted this mechanism in the cell culture with the help of drugs.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Materials governed by lightThe UPV/EHU researcher Rebeca Sola has developed and characterized hybrid materials that respond differently to light, and which have the potential for use in highly different areas ranging from optics to biomedicine. One of the types of materials obtained are inorganic, channeled structures that have incorporated into them fluorescent organic dyes in a structure that firstly offers the dye stabil
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal source of human heartbeat in 3-DA team of scientists from Liverpool John Moores University, the University of Manchester, Aarhus University and Newcastle University, have developed a way of producing 3-D data to show the cardiac conduction system -- the special cells that enable our hearts to beat -- in unprecedented detail. The findings were published in Scientific Reports.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular biologists discover an active role of membrane lipids in health and diseaseCells produce insulin, for example, or generate antibodies. To perform these functions, cells need to produce large quantities of proteins. For this purpose, these cells activate a program, the unfolded protein response (UPR). Errors in the UPR are thought to play a decisive role in the development of diseases such as diabetes or cancer. A research team of Saarland University has discovered a prev
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model for bimolecular reactions in nanoreactorsTheoretical physicists have devised a mathematical model of two different molecules reacting within so called nanoreactors that act as catalysts. They gained surprising new insights as to what factors promote reactions and how to control and select them. The model is relevant for a wide range of research fields, from biophysics to energy materials.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mindfulness method helps coaches, athletes scoreWhen it comes to success in sports, coaches and athletes understand that there's a mental component, but many don't have an understanding of how to prepare psychologically. That's where the concept of mindfulness can be beneficial, via a program to help athletes and coaches at all levels develop that mental edge and improve their performance.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Countering atopic dermatitis immune reactionsA protein which protects the fetus during pregnancy, HLA-G1, shows high potential for treating atopic dermatitis and other related diseases.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
DDoS Attacks Are Getting Smarter and More Widespread
6h
Gizmodo
There's Still Hope For Constantine's to Return to Live-Action TV Greg Berlanti shoots down casting rumors for his Little Shop of Horrors remake. John Boyega teases speedy robots for Pacific Rim Uprising . David Ramsey promises hell for Diggle in Arrow ’s next season. Plus, a new look at Syfy’s next ridiculous original movie, and new clips from this week’s Shadowhunters . Spoilers, assemble! Little Shop of Horrors Greg Berlanti has refuted the recent Josh Gad/R
6h
Popular Science
Five rad and random camping things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 20. Rad and random things to make your camping trip more a lot more fun. From Star Wars sleeping bags to a nifty new survival book. Read on.
6h
Ars Technica
Small rockets, big dreams: The race to space heats up Virgin Orbit When most people think of a rocket launch, they think big. The Space Shuttle, Falcon 9, and Atlas V all stand well over 50 meters tall, and any of those would tower above the Statue of Liberty. They were made to lift heavy things, weighing anywhere from 10 tons to considerably larger, into orbit around Earth. But in recent years there has been a lot of noise in the small rocket indus
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heatstruck Italy starts harvesting its thirsty vinesItaly's annual wine harvest, the biggest in the world, is off to its earliest start in a decade as the country swelters in a heatwave following months of drought.
6h
Feed: All Latest
How Color Vision Came to the AnimalsNew technologies mean that the evolution of color vision is getting clearer than ever
6h
Science-Based Medicine
Integrative PsychiatryAlternative medicine is not just restricted to physical health. Practitioners have insinuated themselves into mental health as well, to the detriment of patients and science.
7h
Science | The Guardian
Peter Venables obituary The career of my father, Peter Venables, who has died aged 94, spanned the entire development of modern psychology. He made landmark contributions to the fields of schizophrenia and psychophysiology. His most striking and innovative contribution in this area came in 2012, when he documented for the first time that early malnutrition at the age of three predisposed to schizotypal personality 20 ye
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Young eagle rescued at Florida garbage collection centerWildlife officials have rescued a juvenile bald eagle that was suffering from poisoning at a Florida trash and garbage collection center.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatenedWhen trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense—tearing out of their own skin.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seasonal effects: 'Winter foals' are smaller than foals born in summerSeason determines behaviour, metabolism and reproductive activity in many animal species, including horses. Even in domesticated horse breeds metabolic activity is reduced in winter. Although these effects are known since a few years, effects on pregnant mares and their foals have not been investigated so far. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna have now demonstrated that seasonal changes during win
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
DNA Sunscreen Gets Better, Not Weaker, Over TimeNew skin protectant is a transparent film, not a lotion, but shows remarkable properties -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Readers Respond to the April 2017 IssueLetters to the editor from the April 2017 issue of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles trick body into accepting organ transplantsUsing nanoparticles, Yale researchers have developed a drug-delivery system that could reduce organ transplant complications by hiding the donated tissue from the recipient's immune system.
7h
Ingeniøren
Raket-dobbeltbooking: Begge aktører har fået ’grønt’ lys til opsendelse samme dagNu er det op til Raket-Madsens Rumlaboratorium og Copenhagen Suborbital at koordinere, hvem der skyder først, siger Søfartsstyrelsen.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seasonal effects: 'Winter foals' are smaller than foals born in summerAlthough seasonal effects such as reduced metabolic activity in winter are known even in domesticated horse breeds, effects on pregnant mares and their foals have not been investigated. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now demonstrated that seasonal changes have a strong influence on pregnancy and fetal development. Foals born early in the year are smaller than those born at a later time and thes
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatenedWhen trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos
7h
New Scientist - News
Augmented reality graffiti will lead to advertising ambush warsAs augmented reality apps begin to let you write whatever you want in the sky, advertisers are getting nervous about what’s in the messages
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The source of up to half of the Earth's internal heat is completely unknown—here's how to hunt for itIt may not be obvious while lying in the sun on a hot summer's day, but a considerable amount of heat is also coming from below you – emanating from deep within the Earth. This heat is equivalent to more than three times the total power consumption of the entire world and drives important geological processes, such as the movement of tectonic plates and the flow of magma near the surface of the Ea
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer law expert says British hacker arrest problematicA computer law expert on Friday described the evidence so far presented to justify the U.S. arrest of a notorious British cybersecurity researcher as being problematic—an indictment so flimsy that it could create a climate of distrust between the U.S. government and the community of information-security experts.
7h
Futurity.org
Most people don’t finish their opioid prescriptions In a new review of half a dozen studies of patients use of opioids prescribed after surgery, researchers report that a majority of patients don’t finish their prescriptions and that more than 90 percent don’t dispose of leftover pills in recommended ways. A summary of the review highlights the need for more personalized pain management to avoid overprescribing opioids and reduce risks linked to i
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hong Kong eSports festival a knockout for gaming fansHundreds of youthful fans cheered on some of the world's best-known video game players as they competed in a cyber battle during Hong Kong's first ever large-scale eSports festival Friday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia's Lake Baikal 'extremely polluted', Putin warnsRussia's Lake Baikal, the world's deepest freshwater lake, has extremely high pollution levels, President Vladimir Putin warned Friday while visiting the Siberian lake.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists shed light on rarely seen 16th-century metal-working techniqueImperial researchers have tested a 'blued' gauntlet from a 16th-century suit of armour with a method usually used to study solar panels.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbes have their own version of the internetCreating a huge global network connecting billions of individuals might be one of humanity's greatest achievements to date, but microbes beat us to it by more than three billion years. These tiny single-celled organisms aren't just responsible for all life on Earth. They also have their own versions of the World Wide Web and the Internet of Things. Here's how they work.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrasonic vibrations force a polymer to be a semiconductor(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Stanford University has used mechanical force to transform a molecule from one form to another—from a nonconductive state into a semiconductor. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the process they developed and possible applications.
7h
Gizmodo
Head Back To School With Amazon's One-Day Crayola Sale Crayola Gold Box Whether you’re shopping for your kid or just getting into adult coloring books , Amazon’s deeply discounting Crayola art supplies in today’s Gold Box. Inside, you’ll find crayons, markers, paints, and several class packs that you could donate to your local school, since they almost definitely don’t have the budget for them. For all of the available deals, be sure to head over to
7h
Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: doyouthinkhesaurus? A great week for dinosaur camouflage jokes Genome editing has taken another giant leap forward: a groundbreaking project has managed to correct faulty DNA in human embryos that is linked to a fatal heart condition . It raises hopes for parents who risk passing on genetic diseases, although there’s obviously still a long way to go technically and ethically before this becomes clinically available. There might also be some extraordinarily g
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum magnets doped with holesIn general, solid state physicists are not able to separate the two processes, so they cannot answer the question, whether the magnetic order is indeed reduced, or whether it is just hidden.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genome sequencing shows maize adapted to highlands thousands of years ago(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found evidence showing that maize evolved to survive in the U.S. southwest highlands thousands of years ago. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines their genomic study, which revealed the genetic changes that allowed the plant to live in the harsher environment.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA sequencing and big data open a new frontier in the hunt for new virusesDiscovering new viruses has historically been biased towards people and animals that exhibit symptoms of disease – like a cough, fever or skin blister.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lockheed Martin reveals first images from telescope as thick as a pen capLockheed Martin today revealed the first images from an experimental, ultra-thin optical instrument, showing it could be possible to shrink space telescopes to a sliver of the size of today's systems while maintaining equivalent resolution.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden witnesses to climate historyThey once inhabited the seafloor and have been steadily buried: Microorganisms in the sub-surface sediments at the bottom of the Arabian Sea reveal details of fluctuations in climate and environmental conditions over the past 52,000 years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding neutrinos – a Q&A with Matthew GreenMatthew Green is an assistant professor of physics at NC State. He was involved in a multi-institutional research project aimed at detecting a process called Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nuclear Scattering (CEvNS). The project was successful, and its findings appear in Science. Matthew agreed to a Q&A with The Abstract on the project and its results.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diagnostic platform could extend to detecting biomarkers for diseaseA startup company based on technology licensed from Duke University is looking to disrupt a $1 billion portion of the point-of-care diagnostics industry by harnessing a feature formerly considered a defect—surface roughness.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare Christmas Island reptiles on the road to recoveryThe 13,500 hectare island lies 2600km northwest of Perth and 350km south of Indonesia in the Indian Ocean.
7h
Feed: All Latest
How to Make Your Wi-Fi Faster and BetterStill waiting for the latest Game of Thrones episode to buffer? You can do better, and so can your Wi-Fi.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Is 'The Dark Tower' Any Good? Depends How Much You've ReadStephen King fans might like the film adaptation of his eight-book series. Everyone else? Eh, maybe not.
7h
The Atlantic
Why The Emoji Movie Fails The Emoji Movie might have been 💯 . It might have been a work of quiet genius, in the manner of Toy Story or The Lego Movie or Inside Out : a quirky and soulful exploration of the worlds that exist in parallel to our own, investing objects that would seem merely to be dully inanimate with story and, thus, empathy. It might have been, too, a particularly timely exploration of smartphones and thei
7h
The Atlantic
The Whitest Music Ever “W e are the most uncool people in Miami.” So begins, promisingly enough, David Weigel’s The Show That Never Ends: The Rise and Fall of Prog Rock . Weigel, along with 3,000 fellow Yes-heads, Rush-oids, Tull freaks, and votaries of King Crimson—cultural underdogs all, twitching and grimacing with revenge-of-the-nerds excitement—is at the port of Miami, about to embark on a five-day progressive-roc
7h
Gizmodo
Something Weird Is Happening With President Trump's Twitter (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) President Trump loves Twitter. It’s a direct stream-of-consciousness rant about whatever pops into his mind (or onto cable TV) at any given second. But here at Gizmodo we can’t help but notice that something is a little different this week. The president’s Twitter feed has become, dare we say, restrained? Yes, “restrained” is all relative, and there’s always th
8h
Live Science
Archaeologists Map Famed Shipwrecks and War Graves in ScotlandMaine archaeologists completed a mission to map World War I wrecks and British war graves off the coast of Orkney.
8h
Ingeniøren
Tyske bilproducenter forsøger at redde diesel med udledningsaftaleOVERBLIK: Efter et møde med tyske ministre og delstatsledere er tyske bilproducenter gået med til at nedskære NOx-udledningen i nyere dieselbiler.
8h
Ars Technica
Vogtle, Summer nuclear plants face bleak outlook after Westinghouse bankruptcy Enlarge / In 2013, atomic plant Vogtle was a 2-unit nuclear power plant located in Burke County, near Waynesboro, Georgia, in USA. Each unit has a Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR), with a General Electric turbine and electric generator, producing approximately 2,400 MW of electricity. The cost overruns incurred in making Westinghouse's AP 1000 reactors led to the Toshiba subsidiary's
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Partial Eclipse Is Interesting; a Total Eclipse Is Mind-BlowingPhotos don’t do it justice—it’s perhaps the most spectacular natural phenomenon you’ll ever see -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic
Toyota, Mazda Announce Plans for a $1.6 Billion U.S. Plant Toyota and Mazda announced Friday they are jointly building a $1.6 billion assembly plant in the U.S., buying a stake in each other, and developing electric vehicles. Under the agreement, Toyota, the world’s second-largest automaker, will buy a 5 percent stake in Mazda, Japan’s sixth-largest carmaker. The smaller automaker, meanwhile, will take a 0.25 percent share in Toyota. The U.S. plant would
8h
Science : NPR
Technology Gets Under The Skin Last week, a Wisconsin company offered its employees the option to have a chip inserted into their bodies in an effort to help them navigate the workplace. Alva Noë asks: What's the big deal? (Image credit: Getty Images)
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New paper explores why Peru's parrots eat clayFor more than 16 years, researchers and volunteers have been observing wildlife along the clay cliffs of Southeastern Peru's Tambopata River. They've gathered data every day, logging more than 20,000 hours and building one of the most extensive datasets on tropical parrots in the world.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No new Einsteins to emerge if science funding snubs curiosityAll of the great scientific findings of the past emanated from the initiative of individuals spurred by unimpeded curiosity and determination.
8h
Live Science
Shouting and Conch Trumpets: Chaco Canyon May Have Been a Noisy PlaceScientists investigate the soundscape of Chaco Canyon, finding that the ancestral Puebloans could have heard one another shouting 500 feet away and conch trumpet sounds would have spread to many shrines.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants forget stressful weather events to rapidly recoverA new study led by the Australian National University (ANU) has found that plants are able to forget stressful weather events to rapidly recover.
8h
Viden
Dansk it-ekspert: Vi skal kunne stole på computerne
8h
Science : NPR
Scientists Aim For Better, Cheaper Tests For Alzheimer's The goal is to find accurate, painless tests that can help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's early and track the progression of the illness and any response to treatment. A few tests seem promising. (Image credit: utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images)
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New digital method enhances understanding of changes in DNA's makeupScientists have developed a computational method to detect chemical changes in DNA that highlight cell diversity and may lead to a better understanding of cancer.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Learning new tricks from sea sponges, nature's most unlikely civil engineersImagine a future in which buildings tower miles over the streets below, tourists take day trips to the edge of our atmosphere, and multiple space stations can be spotted drifting across the night sky. To make this sci-fi vision a reality, we will need to create new kinds of structures that are lightweight but still strong and tough.
8h
Live Science
After Terrorist Attack, Too Much TV Can Be HarmfulWatching TV news coverage during terrorist events was associated with higher levels of post-traumatic stress and feelings of depression, a new study found.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model helps in fight against deadly parasitic diseaseCole Porter romanticized the phrase in his 1936 song, but the probable origin of having someone—or something—under one's skin is much less pleasant to consider. An early usage of the phrase by author Bayard Taylor in 1864 illustrates: "The idea was like a tropical sand-flea. It had got under my skin, and the attempt to dislodge it opened the germs of hundreds of others." Today, in some water bodie
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology tracks 'bee talk' to help improve honey bee healthBiologists are working to better understand Colony Collapse Disorder given the value of honey bees to the economy and the environment. Monitoring bee activity and improving monitoring systems may help to address the issue.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gauge block guide supports dimensional measurement in industryThe National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has published a new Good Practice Guide on the use of gauge blocks, designed to help UK industry prolong the life of its length standards.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China to launch world's first quantum communication networkAs malicious hackers find ever more sophisticated ways to launch attacks, China is about to launch the Jinan Project, the world's first unhackable computer network, and a major milestone in the development of quantum technology.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Editing the human genome brings us one step closer to consumer eugenics | David KingHijacked by the free market, human gene editing will lead to greater social inequality by heading where the money is: designer babies “Hope for families with genetic conditions”, and “scientific breakthrough”: that is how headlines are proclaiming a project that modified human embryos to remove mutations that cause heart failure. But anyone who has concerns about such research is often subjected t
8h
Feed: All Latest
I Spent the Night With Yelp’s Robot Security Guard, CobaltCobalt is the latest member in a growing class of autonomous robots developed for commercial spaces.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Hosting the 2028 Summer Olympics Could Fix Los Angeles' Transportation NetworkA rare opportunity to fulfill a long-standing goal of creating an exceptional mass transit system.
8h
Feed: All Latest
This Huge Sand Tiger Shark Ain’t Got No Time for Puny FishTanya Houppermans dove headlong into a school of fish and came face-to-face with a shark.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Wheat Nerds and Scientists Join Forces to Build a Better BreadA group of bakers, millers, and scientists are working to make whole-grain foods delicious.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New polymer inspired by crystalline silicon to build better computers and solar cellsOne of the challenges in making new electronic devices is the chemistry required to assemble the layers that make up the device. In this research, a new synthetic chemistry approach produces ultra-small materials that resemble a fragment of the semiconductor silicon. The process uses a precisely defined pattern of reactive sites, or chemical "hooks." The hooks control the structure as the material
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers produce long-lived radioisotope that generates a needed isotope on demandUsing high-intensity proton beams, researchers made significant quantities of titanium-44 (44Ti), which is particularly useful to the astrophysics research community in their studies of supernovae. In pursuit of alternative uses for this isotope, the researchers also designed a system that fixes this isotope on a surface. There, it decays into the much shorter-lived scandium-44g (44gSc). The scand
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool reveals the real greenhouse gas footprints of reservoirsWhen hydropower reservoirs traps organic matter, it leads to higher local greenhouse gas emissions. But the emissions are not increased but displaced. A new tool calculates the real greenhouse gas footprints of reservoirs.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Climate Change Could Get You Bumped from a Future FlightMajor airports will see more frequent takeoff weight restrictions in the coming decades due to increasingly common hot temperatures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Ars Technica
Review: Dark Tower film barely uses books’ lore—but works anyway Enlarge / "With breath like that, I kinda wish your name was the gum slinger..." (credit: Columbia Pictures) Stephen King's seven-book series The Dark Tower has finally received a screen adaptation, and fans should brace themselves: it slaps a giant reset button on the series' lore. (Which, a longtime series fan may explain to you, is somewhat appropriate.) This long-in-production film lands with
9h
Live Science
Selfie-Ready: 'Fish Gape' Helps Adorable Baby Cichlids Mold FacesWhen larval fish flex their jaws, they're shaping their growing skulls.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The 'splinternet' may be the future of the webBoth The Economist and WIRED are worried about the "splinternet". The UK research organisation NESTA thinks it could "break up" the world wide web as we know it.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aussie plant could be new 'antibiotic' weapon against Golden StaphQUT researchers and Australian biotech company HFPA are hoping to turn a native Australian plant into a major new antibiotic after discovering the plant possesses antibacterial activity equivalent to some antibiotics currently used to treat Golden Staph infections.
9h
NYT > Science
Education Life: Learning to Learn: You, Too, Can Rewire Your BrainHow an engineering professor who “flunked my way” through high school math and science went on to create the world’s most popular online course.
9h
Gizmodo
Fake News of the Mexican Navy Arriving in California Started on a Boating Web Forum The July 12, 2017 photo from Dana Point, California that sparked guesses that the Mexican Navy had arrived in the US (Photo from BoatDesign.net) On July 12th, a member from a popular boating message board posted a photo of some boats he didn’t recognize near Dana Point, a small city on the California coast halfway between LA and San Diego. Someone responded to the post with speculation that it mi
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mangroves vital for environmental decontaminationGrey mangrove trees, Avicennia marina, filter heavy metals out of the surrounding soil and water. A new study from Indonesia has found that their leaf litter accumulates the most copper, followed by leaves and then roots.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Sexual Assault May Trigger Involuntary Paralysis“Tonic immobility” hinders the ability to fight and is linked to high rates of depression and PTSD -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Scientists explore ocean currents through supercomputer simulationsScientists are trying a new, interactive way to understand ocean current data with the help of high-resolution global ocean simulations. In the part of the global visualization shown, the Loop Current, the origin of the Gulf Stream, features prominently. Surface water speeds are shown ranging from 0 meters per second (dark blue) to 1.25 meters per second (cyan). The video is running at one simulat
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New biosensor stimulates sweat while patient is cool and restingOne downside to medical sensors that test human sweat: You have to sweat.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Researchers find new solution to combat age-old bedbug problemAs the summer travel season kicks into high gear, Penn State researchers have found a potential solution to those unwanted guests that can turn a relaxing vacation into a skin-crawling nightmare.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool helps parched regions plan how to replenish aquifersThe federal government reports that 40 states expect water shortages by 2024 and water worries already plague some cities across the United States. Underground aquifers that were over-tapped for years now cry out to be replenished. The problem is that the two main strategies for increasing water supplies – collecting stormwater runoff and recycling treated wastewater – are usually separate process
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Precision breeding needed to adapt corn to climate changeThe US Corn Belt and European maize owe their existence to a historic change: the ability of this plant, originally from the tropics, to flower early enough to avoid winter. Research led by Cornell University in New York and the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tuebingen, Germany reveals that indigenous people in the American southwest started the process of adapting maize to temp
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Astronaut Paolo Nespoli and the Mares human physiology experimentThe newest crewmember on the International Space Station, ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, has hit the ground running. After arriving in the early hours of 29 July and taking the rest of the day off, Paolo and the crew were back to work by 30 July.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular biologists discover an active role of membrane lipids in health and diseaseAll living cells that grow and divide have a constant demand for producing new proteins and new membrane lipids. Some cells of the human body, however, are specialized to secrete tremendous amounts of proteins. Plasma cells, for example, produce antibodies that ward off bacteria and viruses. Another example are cells from the pancreas that manufacture insulin, which is essential for regulating blo
9h
The Atlantic
Can This Drug Cure Performance Anxiety? When we think about performance-enhancing drugs, our minds immediately turn to famous athletes using banned substances to build muscles and heal faster. Lance Armstrong, Mark McGwire, Marion Jones—the list of athletes whose legacies are tainted by alleged (or, in some cases, admitted) drug use seems to grow longer every year. But athletes aren’t the only ones ingesting pharmaceuticals to do their
10h
The Atlantic
Why Women Get Criticized for Being Candid at Work This article is a response to Olga Khazan’s Atlantic article “ Why Do Women Bully Each Other at Work? ” Olga Khazan’s recent article “Why Do Women Bully Each Other at Work?” examines women’s workplace relationships and includes several firsthand accounts from female professionals of being undermined or verbally assaulted by female superiors. As researchers who have studied these dynamics, we coul
10h
The Atlantic
What We're Reading This Summer Our Little Racket by Angelica Baker Ecco I read all 512 pages of Angelica Baker’s debut novel greedily, in one dizzying weekend, unable to put it down. Which is fitting, in a way: Our Little Racket follows the sudden downfall of a Lehman Brothers–esque CEO through the eyes of his wife, their teenage daughter, and the other women surrounding them, and as such it’s very much a story of greed and it
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbonitride aerogels mediate the photocatalytic conversion of waterNanochemistry meets macrostructures: Chinese scientists report the synthesis of a macroscopic aerogel from carbonitride nanomaterials which is an excellent catalyst for the water-splitting reaction under visible-light irradiation. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie adds new opportunities to the material properties of melamine-derived carbonitrides.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This math puzzle will help you plan your next partyLet's say you're planning your next party and agonizing over the guest list. To whom should you send invitations? What combination of friends and strangers is the right mix?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Augmented reality platform could help students discover STEM concepts through interactive experimentationExplore! Interactive, a Purdue-related startup, is developing a platform that uses augmented reality to help K-12 students more effectively learn science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM subjects, and increase standardized test scores through an engaging, interactive application.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Software helps industry to design lighter, more efficient partsComputer-aided engineering (CAE) systems help manufacturers to design parts with the ideal topology (inner and outer shape and structure) to withstand the conditions under which they will operate, such as specific temperature and pressure conditions, vibrations, and various stresses and strains, and to produce them with as little raw material as possible. In sum, CAE enables industrial design soft
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers working on blood test to detect brain metastases while still treatableCancer researchers are closer to creating a blood test that can identify breast cancer patients who are at increased risk for developing brain metastasis, and also monitor disease progression and response to therapy in real time.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain tumor scientists map mutation that drives tumors in childhood cancer survivorsNeuroscientists have uncovered the genetic basis for why many long-term survivors of childhood cancer develop meningiomas, the most common adult brain tumor, decades after their treatment with cranial radiation.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cockroach gardeners: Spreading plant seeds across the forest floorIn forest ecosystems, cockroaches are known as important decomposers that consume dead and decaying plants. Quite unexpectedly, however, researchers have found that they also provide seed dispersal services for the plant Monotropastrum humile, a forest-floor herb belonging to the azalea family (Ericaceae). This entirely new mode of plant-insect interaction is reported online in the July 27th, 2017
10h
Science : NPR
The Archaeologist Who Hunts For Stolen Art Christos Tsirogiannis, a forensic archaeologist, explains to Ailsa Chang how he persuaded U.S. authorities to seize an ancient Italian vase from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
10h
Science : NPR
Uncovering A 'Little Pompeii' In France Archaeologists in France have discovered the well-preserved ruins of a Roman town, whose inhabitants appear to have fled to avoid a fire — leaving their belongings and household objects behind.
10h
Science : NPR
Saving Vultures With Nepal's 'Vulture Restaurant' A unique conservation attempt is underway in Nepal to save vultures that have nearly been decimated through much of South Asia over the past few decades.
10h
The Atlantic
How Long Can Michel Temer Last as President of Brazil? Brazilian President Michel Temer gets to keep his job—for now. The embattled leader eked out a historic victory late Wednesday night after the country’s lower house of Congress voted 263 to 227 to spare Temer from standing trial on charges of corruption. This means the allegations that were brought against Temer in June will have to wait until the end of 2018, when his term concludes. But he may
11h
The Atlantic
Can This National Security Council Handle a Real Crisis? It’s hard to believe, but this administration has not experienced a genuine national-security crisis in more than six months in office. Yes, missile tests in North Korea and a boiling regional spat in the Middle East are spiking blood pressure across DC, but the most nightmare-inducing risks have originated in the president’s own social-media rhetoric, not the crises themselves. Recent turmoil wi
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A Chinese 3D print studio fuses ancient art with modern techThe small, ornate figurines look like relics of a bygone age: a serene Buddha's head from the Tang dynasty, or a collection of stone-faced soldiers from the Qin era.
11h
Ingeniøren
Fejl på havmøllefundamenter koster MT Højgaard 195 mio. kr.Britisk højesteret har dømt MT Højgaard til at betale 195 mio. kr. i erstatning til ejerne af to britiske havvindmølleparker, fordi der var fejl på parkernes fundamenter
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snopes.com prevails in tentative court ruling over finances, ownershipIn the battle over ownership of fact-checking website Snopes.com, creator David Mikkelson was handed an early victory Thursday that should keep him in power as CEO of the company and return months of lost advertising revenue to the cash-strapped site.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota's quarterly profit improves on strong salesToyota Motor Corp. reported Friday that its fiscal first quarter profit rose 11 percent as sales improved around the world, including in the U.S., Europe and Japan.
13h
NeuWrite San Diego
The Ring to Rule Them All – TinnitusBaby Driver, the most recent theatrical offering from director Edgar Wright (Hot Fuzz, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World), not only makes the first generation iPod (which now passes as a body double for a paperweight) look cool again, but also brings to light an interesting auditory condition that affects nearly 10% of the population – […]
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great white chomps on researcher's underwater video cameraThe top shark scientist in Massachusetts has shot hundreds of great white shark videos, but for the first time one has tried to take a bite of his camera.
14h
Ingeniøren
Nyttige råd til at udvide dit netværk Når du vil udvide dit netværk, er der tre tommefingerregler, som man bør kende. Jobfinder giver dig tips til at forbedre dine jobchancer gennem networking. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-netvaerker-du-dig-frem-karrieren-9332 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
Ingeniøren
Dansk sikkerhedsguru fremstiller lytteudstyr for 50 kroner: Nu kan alle kortlægge mobiler i hobevis Se videoen hvor Keld Norman selv demonstrerer den lille IMSI-catcher nederst i artiklen https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dansk-sikkerhedsguru-fremstiller-imsi-catcher-syv-dollar-nu-kan-alle-indsamle-imsi-numre Version2
14h
Science | The Guardian
Diabetes drug could help those living with Parkinson's disease, research reveals Study suggests that exenatide, currently used to treat type 2 diabetes, improves movement-related issues and might also slow the progression of the disease A drug commonly used to treat diabetes could help those living with Parkinson’s disease, research has revealed. By 2020 it is predicted that 162,000 individuals in the UK will be living with the condition. While existing drugs help to control
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Egyptologists go high tech to unlock ancient mysteriesFrom the Giza pyramids to the pharaonic tombs of Luxor, Egypt's ancient monuments are holding onto mysteries which researchers now aim to unravel with cutting edge technology.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paris's urban rooftop hives hope to preserve honeybeesTo check the beehives he has set up on the roof of the sprawling Monnaie de Paris on the banks of the River Seine, Audric de Campeau slips on a harness over tan-coloured trousers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists crack mystery of the luckless apostles of ParisHaving lost their heads, been pulled from their plinths, smashed and even buried, things are at last looking up for some of the unluckiest statues in Christendom.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota, Mazda plan EV partnership, possible US plantJapanese automakers Toyota Motor Corp. and Mazda Motor Corp. are revving up on their partnership, reportedly with plans to set up a joint-venture auto assembly plant in the U.S. and work together to develop electric vehicles.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Governments need to do more to support older people's transport needs, study suggestsGovernments across Europe could be doing more to develop transport policies that ensure those over the age of 65 remain active and mobile, according to a new study led by the University of Plymouth.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab develops dual-surface graphene electrode to split water into hydrogen and oxygenRice University chemists have produced a catalyst based on laser-induced graphene that splits water into hydrogen on one side and oxygen on the other side. They said the inexpensive material may be a practical component in generating the hydrogen for use in future fuel cells.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New additive helps researchers more selectively convert CO2 to multicarbon fuelsChemists have figured out a new, more efficient way to create carbon-based fuels from carbon dioxide (CO2). In chemical reactions performed in the lab, a Caltech team has identified a new additive that helps selectively convert CO2 into fuels containing multiple carbon atoms—a step toward ultimately making renewable liquid fuels that are not derived from coal or oil.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers develop thoroughly modern magnesium processUniversity of Colorado Boulder engineers have revamped a World War II-era process for making magnesium that requires half the energy and produces a fraction of the pollution compared to today's leading methods.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Governments need to do more to support older people's transport needs, study suggestsEuropean governments could be doing more to develop transport policies that ensure those over the age of 65 remain active and mobile, according to a new study led by the University of Plymouth with the Erfurt University of Applied Sciences.
15h
The Scientist RSS
Fascinated by FoldingLila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Startup Uses Computer Vision to Make Augmented Reality in Cities More PreciseMaking virtual images look good against a real-world backdrop is not easy, but this might be a good fix.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
A Smart Watch to Help Blind People NavigateThe sonar-equipped Sunu Band buzzes harder the closer an object is.
15h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Ask Not What Your Robots Can Do for You Our increasingly smart machines aren’t just changing the workforce; they’re changing us. Already, algorithms are directing human activity in all sorts of ways, from choosing what news people see to highlighting new gigs for workers in the gig economy. What will human life look like as machine learning overtakes more aspects of our society? Alexis Madrigal, who covers technology for The Atlantic ,
16h
Ingeniøren
Togfonden bliver 1,5 milliarder dyrere end ventetMens regeringen og forligspartierne bag Togfonden stadig diskuterer finansieringen af den storstilede jernbaneaftale, viser nye beregninger, at fem af Togfondens projekter bliver betydeligt dyrere end hidtil antaget.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Device could make washing machines lighter and greenerMost washing machines come with 25kg of concrete - but researchers claim there's a simple alternative.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mangroves vital for environmental decontaminationMangrove trees, particularly their leaf litter, filter copper out of soil and water in Indonesia.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's smallest neutrino detector observes elusive interactions of particlesIn 1974, a Fermilab physicist predicted a new way for ghostly particles called neutrinos to interact with matter. More than four decades later, a team of physicists built the world's smallest neutrino detector to observe the elusive interaction for the first time.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurons that control brain's body clock identifiedResearchers have found that dopamine-producing neurons are connected with the brain's circadian center.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious children's neurological disease is traced to a single error in one geneA multinational research effort has discovered the biological basis of a rare but severe neurological disorder in children. Scientists describe for the first time how the children's cells are flooded with ribosomal RNA and are poisoned by it. This is the first time that an excess of ribosomal RNA has been linked to a disease in humans.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too much information can be a good thingWhen does a person receive too much health information? What's the best way for health providers to convey information without consumers skipping over or forgetting key information? According to a new study, the answer lies in the goal of a specific health objective.
19h
New Scientist - News
We may finally be able to slow Parkinson’s, with a diabetes drugA drug for type 2 diabetes seems to also work on the causes of Parkinson’s, not just the symptoms, suggesting the two conditions work in a similar way
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving students' academic performance -- there's an app for thatA mobile learning app that uses game elements such as leaderboards and digital badges may have positive effects on student academic performance, engagement, and retention, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education. Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology, Australia developed a fully customizable app that allowed
19h
Gizmodo
How To Block Super Annoying Website Notification Requests In Chrome GIF Image: Gizmodo Nowadays every other goddamn site does it. You’re browsing the web, open a tab here, click a link there, and wham: Watchcartoons wants to 🔔! show notifications. YouTube wants to 🔔! show notifications. Facebook aches to—it must—🔔! show notifications. So what do you do? You block them, that’s what you do. God forbid you accidentally click “Allow.” But no matter your choice, af
19h
Big Think
In The Future, Organizations Will Be Built Based on Personality “We’re coming to understand the basic building blocks of personality,” Dr. Fisher said. Read More
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving students' academic performance—there's an app for thatA mobile learning app that uses game elements such as leaderboards and digital badges may have positive effects on student academic performance, engagement, and retention, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education. Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology, Australia developed a fully customizable app that allowed
20h
Gizmodo
These Are The Four Best Web Hosting Services, As Chosen By You dariorug/ Flickr This week, we’re running the SQL to Lifehacker’s 2012 web hosting hive five , and this year’s nominees are , with one exception, a completely different group of companies. So start your WPENGINES and check out the finalists below, and don’t forget to vote at the bottom of the post. Digital Ocean I switched to DigitalOcean a few months ago and couldn’t be happier. It’s not quite a
20h
Ars Technica
Podcaster: “Can you admit to me that you’re a scammer please?” Enlarge / This was the Accostings website as seen in 2016. (credit: Accostings.com) The following post contains spoilers of Reply All episode #103: Long Distance, Part II , which was released on August 3, 2017. If you don't wish to know what happens in that episode, read no further. Last week, we brought you the story of how Reply All 's Alex Goldman managed to track down one of the top executive
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive hearing aid filters out the noiseBrain activity to determine whether a subject is conversing with a specific speaker would be very useful for the hearing impaired. Using deep neural network models, Columbia Engineering researchers have made a breakthrough in auditory attention decoding methods and are coming closer to making cognitively controlled hearing aids a reality. The study, led by Electrical Engineering Professor Nima Mes
20h
Gizmodo
Secret Service Command Center Booted Out of Trump Tower Over Money Dispute Photo: Getty President Trump’s insistence on retaining direct ownership of his properties and business creates some sticky and arguably unethical situations on a regular basis. But this latest report is really over the top. The Trump Organization wanted more money for the command space that the Secret Service uses to protect the president’s home and the two could not agree. Now, the president’s s
20h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: New York Jets | Jezebel It’s About Tom | The Root Procter & Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: New York Jets | Jezebel It’s About Tom | The Root Procter & Gamble Release an Ad About ‘the Talk,’ and White People Respond With the Wettest, Saltiest, Stupidest White Tears Ever | Splinter A Beautiful, Agonizing Love Letter Composed Entirely of Quotes From Donald Trump’s Calls With Foreign Leaders |
21h
Big Think
Was Life an Inevitable Outcome of Thermodynamics? A physicist demonstrates how life may be a predictable product of thermodynamics. Read More
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Mueller It Over What We’re Following Investigation Advanced: Special Counsel Robert Mueller impaneled a Washington grand jury for his probe into Russia’s interference with the presidential election. CNN reports that he’s also begun, separately, to investigate potential financial crimes—an expansion of the probe that President Trump has suggested would provoke him to fire Mueller. As McKay Coppins writes , protec
21h
The Atlantic
Trump and The Emoji Movie In my forthcoming book Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire , I look closely at America’s modern invention of and unequalled immersion in show business, from the make-believe concoctions of P.T. Barnum and Buffalo Bill to those of Walt Disney and the WWE character/reality show star/insult comic now in the Oval Office. I don’t blame The Emoji Movie , and its success since opening last week, on Pr
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Hegde Protein Localization 3 Part 1: Compartmentalization of Proteins Inside Cells: Hegde reviews key historical experiments that have informed our understanding protein localization within a cell. Part 2: Quality Control of Protein Localization: Mislocalization of proteins can have devastating effects for the entire organism. Hegde explains how cells detect and degrade mislocalized proteins. Part 3: Recognition of Protein L
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Ramanujan Hegde (MRC) 2: Quality Control of Protein Localization Part 1: Compartmentalization of Proteins Inside Cells: Hegde reviews key historical experiments that have informed our understanding protein localization within a cell. Part 2: Quality Control of Protein Localization: Mislocalization of proteins can have devastating effects for the entire organism. Hegde explains how cells detect and degrade mislocalized proteins. Part 3: Recognition of Protein L
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Ramanujan Hegde (MRC) 1: Compartmentalization of Proteins Inside Cells Part 1: Compartmentalization of Proteins Inside Cells: Hegde reviews key historical experiments that have informed our understanding protein localization within a cell. Part 2: Quality Control of Protein Localization: Mislocalization of proteins can have devastating effects for the entire organism. Hegde explains how cells detect and degrade mislocalized proteins. Part 3: Recognition of Protein L
21h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cosmic map reveals a not-so-lumpy Universe Odd results could still be consistent with the 'standard model' of cosmology. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22413
21h
Popular Science
Artificial intelligence now powers all of Facebook’s translation Technology The new system is more accurate than the old method. On Thursday, Facebook announced that all of its user translation services—those little magic tricks that happen when you click “see translation” beneath a post or…
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes drug shows potential as disease-modifying therapy for Parkinson's diseaseA drug commonly used to treat diabetes may have disease-modifying potential to treat Parkinson's disease, a new UCL-led study in The Lancet suggests, paving the way for further research to define its efficacy and safety.
21h
Feed: All Latest
Do Not Mistake Orrin Hatch for #HipsterAntitrustThe senator is not radical enough to be part of the #hipsterantitrust.
21h
Live Science
Swipe Left for Sadness: Tinder Users Report More DistressIn a new study, Tinder users had lower levels of self-esteem and more body dissatisfaction than people who didn't use the dating app.
21h
Gizmodo
Good Hackers Can Do Bad Things, Too Image: Gizmodo Famed white hat hacker Marcus Hutchins—better known as “MalwareTech”— was arrested by the FBI yesterday while trying to fly home to the United Kingdom from Las Vegas. The 22-year-old security researcher gained mainstream fame earlier this year as the guy who stopped the destructive WannaCry ransomware from spreading, and had been partying with friends near the Black Hat and Defcon
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farmers selected maize for agricultural use at high elevationsBy analyzing ancient genomes of maize, scientists have found evidence suggesting that eventual agricultural use of the crop throughout the temperate highlands of the US likely occurred due to propagation of varieties with earlier flowering times.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein-rich diet may help soothe inflamed gutThe combination of a bacterium that normally lives in the gut and a protein-rich diet promotes a more tolerant, less inflammatory gut immune system, according to new research. The findings, in mice, suggest a way to tilt the gut immune system away from inflammation, potentially spelling relief for people living with inflammatory bowel disease.
21h
Gizmodo
Here Are the Most Painful Things That a Human Can Physically Feel GIF GIF Source: The Infographics Show Of course, there’s a level of subjectivity to pain. One person might find listening to Kid Rock to be more painful than stubbing their toe. Another person might enjoy a little bit of pain. And who can say how painful heartbreak feels? But we can still generally identify most of the worst sensations that people don’t ever want to experience. As the makers of t
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Make Juries Grand Again Today in 5 Lines The Washington Post released full transcripts of President Trump’s phone calls with the president of Mexico and the prime minister of Australia. The governor of West Virginia is expected to announce that he is switching parties from Democrat to Republican at a rally with Trump Thursday evening. The Justice Department notified four sanctuary cities that they will be not be eligibl
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New statistical models yield powerful insight from health care databasesRecognizing that administrative health care databases can be a valuable, yet challenging, tool in the nation's ongoing pursuit of personalized medicine, statisticians have developed advanced statistical modeling and analytic tools that can make health care and medical data more meaningful.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists link biodiversity genomics with museum wisdom through new public databaseA new publicly available database will catalog metadata associated with biologic samples, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses. It links publicly available genetic data to records of where and when samples were collected. Such information is critical for comparing biodiversity in different locations worldwide, across time. Despi
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Would It Be Like Trying To Survive In Total, Complete Darkness? Darkness | Continues TONIGHT at 10p! With years of on the job experience and extreme training under his belt, former Navy Seal Geoff Reeves knows what it takes to survive in complete darkness. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us o
22h
Gizmodo
Tiger Selfies Have Got to Stop Photo by eric molina . In honor of International Tiger Day , PETA sent an open letter to Tinder’s founder and chairman Sean Rad asking him to ban tiger photos on the service. That’s actually a fantastic idea—and not just because it makes you look like a tool. In the letter , Ashley Fruno, the Associate Director of Campaigns at PETA Australia, explains how most of these tigers—and other animals in
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sense of smell deficits are common, linked to malnutrition in patients with kidney diseaseA Massachusetts General Hospital study has found that deficits in the sense of smell are important contributors to the frequently observed lack of appetite in patients with serious kidney disease.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smell loss may contribute to malnutrition in individuals with kidney diseaseDeficits in the ability to smell are common among individuals with chronic kidney disease, and the severity of these deficits increases with the severity of their disease. Reductions in several markers of nutrition correlated with patients' impaired sense of smell. Treatment with intranasal theophylline, an asthma drug, led to improvements in the ability to smell in 5 of 7 patients with kidney fai
22h
Popular Science
This giant exoplanet has a glowing atmosphere Space You can't see it—but Hubble can. A recent study has used the Hubble Space Telescope to prove that a gas giant exoplanet 900 light years away has a stratosphere—just like Earth.
22h
The Atlantic
West Virginia Governor Switches From Democrat to Republican Updated on August 3, 2017 at 7:56 p.m. West Virginia Governor Jim Justice announced at a campaign-style rally with President Trump on Thursday that he is switching parties from Democrat to Republican. “I tell you as West Virginians I can’t help you anymore being a Democrat governor,” Justice said at the rally standing on stage with the president. “So tomorrow I will be changing my registration to
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Believing the future will be favorable may prevent actionPeople tend to believe that others will come around to their point of view over time, according to new findings. The findings show that this 'belief in a favorable future' holds across various contexts and cultures, shedding light on some of the causes and consequences of the political polarization evident today.
23h
Science : NPR
Vermont Medical School Says Goodbye To Lectures The University of Vermont's Larner College of Medicine is planning to phase out lectures by 2019. The dean behind the effort says lectures aren't good at engaging learners. (Image credit: Andy Duback/Courtesy of Larner College of Medicine)
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ever-Elusive Neutrinos Spotted Bouncing Off Nuclei for the First TimeA new technology for detecting neutrinos represents a “monumental” advance for science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
NYT > Science
On Environment and Energy, Trump Often Picks His Own FactsPresident Trump tends to cherry-pick facts about climate and the environment that prove to be exaggerations when the broader context is considered.
23h
Gizmodo
Uber Rented Hundreds of Faulty Vehicles to Drivers and at Least One Blew Up Image: Wall Street Journal Let’s all say it together: Ugh, Uber, ugh! We’re like five minutes into the company’s “180 Days of Change” apology tour and more awful Uber news is already coming out. The Wall Street Journal reports that the multi-billion dollar startup rented dangerously faulty cars to hundreds of drivers in Singapore, after the model had been recalled. According to internal messages
23h
Popular Science
Home studio gear to help scratch your musical itch Gadgets Do it all from your own home computer A list of gear is to start you on the way to building your home studio. A high price tag doesn't magically transform your demos to professional quality recording.
23h
Live Science
'Harry Potter' & the Deathly Obsession? Series May Help Fans Cope with DeathA new study suggests that for some, an obsession with the "Harry Potter" franchise may signal something darker: a greater awareness of death.
23h
Big Think
New Study Finds Sugar Increases Risk of Depression in Men Men who consume over 67 grams of sugar are at an increased risk for depression and anxiety. Read More
23h
The Atlantic
The Senate Finally Gives Trump His Administration And just like that, Donald Trump finally has the semblance of a presidential administration. In the span of a few minutes on Thursday afternoon, the Senate confirmed dozens of the president’s stalled nominees to key posts in several departments. The departments of Justice, Homeland Security, Veterans Affairs, and Commerce got long-awaited deputy, under, and assistant secretaries. NATO, the United
23h
The Atlantic
Mueller Plunges Across Trump's Red Line Updated on August 2 at 9:23 p.m. Special Counsel Robert Mueller has begun to issue subpoenas in his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to several reports, the latest sign his investigation is moving quickly. The Wall Street Journal first reported the story, saying Mueller was using a Washington, D.C.-based grand jury. Reuters confirmed the Journal report, and
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Natural compound coupled with specific gut microbes may prevent severe fluA particular gut microbe can prevent severe flu infections in mice, likely by breaking down naturally occurring compounds -- called flavonoids -- commonly found in foods such as black tea, red wine and blueberries, new research shows.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeted radiotherapy limits side effects of breast cancer treatmentBreast cancer patients who have radiotherapy targeted at the original tumor site experience fewer side effects five years after treatment than those who have whole breast radiotherapy, and their cancer is just as unlikely to return, according to trial results.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New dust sources from a shrinking Salton Sea have negative ecological, health impactsScientists investigating the composition of particulate matter and its sources at the Salton Sea have found that this shrinking lake in Southern California is exposing large areas of dry lakebed, called playa, that are acting as new dust sources with the potential to impact human health. Dust emissions from playas increase airborne PM mass, which has been linked to cardiovascular disease, respirat
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cracking the code of megapestsFor the first time, researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temperatures risingThe Paris Climate Agreement of 2016, which saw 195 nations come together in the shared goal of ameliorating climate change, set forth an ambitious goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius. Since then, many have wondered, is that even scientifically possible? Unfortunately, the odds aren't looking good.
23h
Live Science
Photos: This Plant-Eating Dinosaur Had Spikes, Armor and CamouflageThe 110-million-year-old dinosaur, a nodosaur — a relative of the ankylosaur — was covered in spiky, bony plates known as osteoderms, but it had another trick up its sleeve to protect itself from predators: camouflage.
23h
Gizmodo
Oh Great, Another Way Humans Are Screwing With Pollinators Image: Bee Movie On Monday, the USDA brought us some much needed good news , when it reported data suggesting that honeybees might finally be bouncing back from colony collapse disorder. Today, a team of scientists countered with some seriously bummer pollinator news. A new study published in the journal Nature indicates that artificial light pollution might be a much bigger problem for pollinato
23h

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.