Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hemorrhagic fevers: Countering inflammation to prevent circulatory failureHemorrhagic fevers are severe viral diseases that are often fatal. Researchers have now identified messenger substances of the immune system, which in infected mice lead to the development of shock.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists discover a brain circuit dedicated to retrieving memoriesNeuroscientists who study memory have long believed that when we recall an event, our brains turn on the same hippocampal circuit that was activated when the memory was originally formed. However, neuroscientists have now shown, for the first time, that recalling a memory requires a 'detour' circuit that branches off from the original memory circuit.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Untangling what goes on when a relationship is being questionedKnowing whether to stay in or leave a romantic relationship is often an agonizing experience and that ambivalence can have negative consequences for health and well-being. Now a new study offers insights into what people are deliberating about and what makes the decision so difficult, which could help therapists working with couples and stimulate further research into the decision-making process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing themA new study suggests it may be possible to slow dangerous infections by manipulating the messages microbes send to one another, allowing the body to defeat an infection without causing the bacteria to develop resistance to the treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Athletic ability and finger length linked?Researchers have studied the correlation between athletic ability and finger length.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobaccoNew research suggests that teenagers who had tried an e-cigarette were almost four times more likely to start smoking a conventional cigarette within a year, when compared to classmates who had not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning deviceIn what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Disrupted gut microbiome makes children more susceptible to amoebic dysenteryChildren with lower diversity of microbial species in their intestines are more susceptible to severe infection with the Entamoeba histolytica parasite, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tuberculosis drug may work better than others in its classTreatment of tuberculosis involves a combination of several drugs, sometimes including drugs from a class known as fluoroquinolones. Using computer simulations, scientists have shown that the fluoroquinolone known as moxifloxacin may be superior to two other commonly used fluoroquinolones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain regions most likely to cause epilepsy seizuresScientists have developed a new way to detect which areas of the brain contribute most greatly to epilepsy seizures, according to a new study. The strategy could help surgeons select specific brain areas for removal to stop seizures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New terahertz imaging approach could speed up skin cancer detectionResearchers have developed a new terahertz imaging approach that, for the first time, can acquire micron-scale resolution images while retaining computational approaches designed to speed up image acquisition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Super-photostable fluorescent labeling agent for super-resolution microscopyChemists have developed a super-photostable fluorescent dye, PhoxBright 430 (PB430), to visualize cellular ultrastructure by super resolution microscopy. The exceptional photostability of this new dye enables continuous STED imaging and together with its ability to fluorescently label proteins, PB430 demonstrates its use in the 3D construction and multicolor imaging of biological structures.
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Live Science

Kidney Stones: Causes, Symptoms & TreatmentA kidney stone is a hard mass that forms in the kidneys from minerals in the urine, and if large enough, can cause serve pain.
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Ars Technica

OkCupid bans white supremacist “for life,” asks daters to report others Enlarge (credit: OkCupid ) Dating site OkCupid made the unusual move of announcing that it had given a single member a "lifetime" ban on Thursday—and naming him—in order to make a point. "We were alerted that white supremacist Chris Cantwell was on OkCupid," the company wrote at its official Twitter account on Thursday . "Within 10 minutes, we banned him for life." Cantwell was the subject of a V
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The laws of attraction: Pheromones don't lie, fruit fly research suggestsFor the first time, scientists have shown that a female fruit fly's pheromone signals can actually tell males how much energy her body has invested in egg production versus in storing away energy for her own survival. And it's a signal that she can't change in order to make herself more attractive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprisesOceanographers report completing the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in the evolution of ocean microbe genomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of MS drug currently blocked by regulatorsA drug that is blocked by the EU regulatory system has now been found to improve the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggersResearchers have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Female mouse embryos actively remove male reproductive systemsA protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to new research. The discovery changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male hormones, in the embryo make it male.
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Futurity.org

4 things to know about Monday’s eclipse A total eclipse of the sun will be visible across the continental United States on Monday. Your next chance to see such an event in the US won’t occur until April 8, 2024. Solar eclipses occur during the new moon, when the moon is directly between the Earth and sun, causing the disk of the moon to partially or totally cover the disk of the sun. In the US, the path of the total eclipse will sweep
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An unusual white dwarf may be a supernova leftoverAstronomers have identified a white dwarf star in our galaxy that may be the leftover remains of a recently discovered type of supernova.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaustResearchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Communicating in a foreign language takes emotion out of decision-makingIf you could save the lives of five people by pushing another bystander in front of a train to his death, would you do it? And should it make any difference if that choice is presented in a language you speak, but isn't your native tongue? Psychologists know communicating in a foreign language matters. In a new study, they take a major step toward understanding why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial womb raises hope for premature babiesResearchers hope an artificial womb used to incubate healthy baby lambs can be used in future technology for premature babies.
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Gizmodo

Napoleon's TravelQ Pro is Good Enough to be Your Home and Away Grill Napoleon’s TravelQ Pro 285X Grill with Scissor Cart In a camping and tailgating scene dominated by budget portable grills, Napoleon’s TravelQ Pro 285X rolls up with premium design, engineering, and presence. I’ve used this tiny mobile propane grill to produce everything from burgers, chicken thighs, and pork butt to some of the most perfect sous-vide meat sears imaginable. Napoleon’s TravelQ PRO2
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Futurity.org

Dementia can double health care costs of aging Neurodegenerative conditions can more than double the health care expenditures of aging, report researchers who simulated the costs and the course of the dementia epidemic affecting US families. The research also suggests that the vast majority of that financial burden remains with families rather than government insurance programs. …understanding what dementia costs families and public insurance
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This Lumbering Self-Driving Truck Is Designed to Get HitAutonomous vehicles will saves lives by avoiding crashes—except this one.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Total solar eclipse: Meet Sharon and Billy HahsNow Sharon and Billy Hahs are preparing for one in their own backyard.
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Futurity.org

‘Virtual house calls’ work just fine for Parkinson’s Telemedicine can successfully deliver quality care for people with Parkinson’s disease, according to research on a nationwide program that links neurologists and patients via video conferencing. The findings offer a new way to improve care for people who suffer from the disease, but may not have access to a neurologist. “Virtual house calls for chronic diseases like Parkinson’s are not only as ef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Only two-thirds of trainee GPs plan to work in NHS general practiceA new study by the University of Warwick indicates that only two in three doctors who are completing their training to become GPs plan to work in NHS general practice.
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The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Ta-Nehisi Coates and Yoni Appelbaum on Charlottesville's Aftermath After white supremacists and neo-Nazis rallied in Virginia, resulting in the deaths of three Americans, President Trump's equivocating responses shocked Republicans and Democrats alike. Did this represent a major breakpoint in American politics? Why have Confederate symbols and ideas suddenly returned to the public sphere, not to mention HBO ? And how should Americans comprehend the relationship
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Responding to Violence What We’re Following Terror in Barcelona: At the tourist site Las Ramblas, a van was driven into a crowd of pedestrians , killing 13 and injuring 50. Spanish police arrested a suspect who has been identified as a Moroccan-born man, Driss Oukabir. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack, but not before President Trump described it as “terror” on Twitter—a rapid response that stands in direct co
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Scientific American Content: Global

Social Media Sites Can Profile Your ContactsWhy you should think twice before you give an app access to your phone’s address book. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Assange Turned Down Dirt on Russia, Strongly Suggesting Ties to Being an Asshole Photo: Getty According to a newly released Foreign Policy report , leaked communications show Wikileaks declined to release a cache of hacked Russian documents in the summer of 2016, dismissing the only partially published records as “already public.” While there will be plenty of talk about this being proof of founder Julian Assange’s loyalties to Russia, it most prominently displays his general
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Feed: All Latest

Proposed California Law Targets Sexual Harassment in Venture CapitalBill is a direct response to the deluge of sexual-harassment allegations from female startup founders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genuinely extinct or just not worth looking for? Scientists set out to discover just how endangered certain species areScientists are heading off in search of a rare species of bird which has not been seen for 17 years.
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Gizmodo

The Concourse Everything Is So Bad | Splinter Everything About Disney and ABC’s ‘Pink Slime’ Settlem The Concourse Everything Is So Bad | Splinter Everything About Disney and ABC’s ‘Pink Slime’ Settlement Should Scare the Hell Out of You | Jezebel You Have to Read Dylan Sprouse’s Amazing Response to His Ex-Girlfriend’s Cheating Allegations | Very Smart Brothas The Most Racist Statue in America Is in ... Pittsburgh, and It’s the Most Ridiculous Magical Negro You’ll Ever See |
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Contraceptive pill linked to lowered risk of rheumatoid arthritisTaking the contraceptive pill, particularly for seven or more consecutive years, is linked to a lowered risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, finds research published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First evidence that e-cigarettes may be prompting UK teens to try the real thingE-cigarettes may be prompting UK teens to start smoking the real thing, and to escalate tobacco consumption, finds the first UK study to report this trend, and published online in the journal Tobacco Control.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobaccoNew research suggests that teenagers who had tried an e-cigarette were almost four times more likely to start smoking a conventional cigarette within a year, when compared to classmates who had not.
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Popular Science

Drones will fly into the path of the eclipse to study weather Aviation As the sky does dark, robots will conduct atmospheric science. Drones in Nebraska and Oklahoma will fly during the eclipse to measure the impact of solar heating on storm formation.
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Ars Technica

Sharp sues Hisense over a foreign “gag order” Enlarge / Hisense televisions at the Consumer Electronics Show in Asia in 2015. (credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images ) Sharp, a Japanese electronics manufacturer, has filed a lawsuit challenging a foreign gag order that company lawyers say prevents Sharp from talking about its own brand. The dispute is rooted in a licensing deal gone sour between Sharp and Hisense, a fast-growing Chinese maker of televi
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Ars Technica

Hyundai looks to build a >300-mile-range electric car Enlarge / Signage for an electric car charging booth is displayed at Federation Square car park in Melbourne, Australia, on Friday, April 28, 2017. Photographer: Carla Gottgens/Bloomberg via Getty Images (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images ) On Thursday, Hyundai said that it intends to produce a long-range electric vehicle by 2021 that will be capable of traveling 310 miles on a charge. That vehicl
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The Atlantic

Will Congress Remove Confederate Statues From the Capitol? More than 150 years after Ulysses S. Grant’s forces captured the Confederate capital, some members of Congress are trying to eject Robert E. Lee and his allies from Capitol Hill. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday backed the growing calls to remove a group of Confederate statues from the Capitol building complex. “The Confederate statues in the halls of Congress have always been repre
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Why Are The Browns Giving Away Their Boat, The Integrity? | Alaskan Bush People #AlaskanBushPeople | Fridays at 9/8c Rain, Bear, and Bird must get rid of The Integrity on behalf of the entire Brown family. They do so with their signature Bush spirit. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alaskanbushppl https://www.facebook.com/
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The Atlantic

'Before I Make a Statement, I Need the Facts' President Trump said Tuesday he waited days to condemn the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, because he wanted to get all the facts. Trump has not explicitly described as terrorism the attack that took place there, which like today’s Barcelona attack involved a vehicle striking pedestrians. In response to a question about whether it met the definition of terrorism, given the by-then widely rep
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Monumental Debate Today in 5 Lines President Trump railed against the removal of Confederate monuments, tweeting that he is “sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart.” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi called on Speaker Paul Ryan to take down the Confederate statues in the U.S. Capitol Building , but a spokesman for Ryan said Congress should leave that decision to the states. In
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Ars Technica

Final Defenders trailer gives us the best kind of villain This is the final trailer for Defenders , which hits Netflix tomorrow. The long-awaited Neflix series Defenders premieres tomorrow, bringing together Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist—all of whom have already starred in their own series for the streaming network. The final Defenders trailer teases us with our longest look yet at bad guy Alexandra (Sigourney Weaver). And she's jus
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Live Science

Solar Eclipse Injury Risk: Doctors Brace for Rise in ER VisitsAs potentially millions of Americans travel to see the total solar eclipse on Monday (Aug. 21), doctors are bracing for a spike in visits to emergency rooms.
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New Scientist - News

Solar eclipse will reveal the roiling fog of plasma we call homeThe 21 August solar eclipse gives scientists and the public alike a chance to observe the sun’s corona, a ring of plasma that stretches as far as Earth
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Popular Science

How to avoid email pileups DIY Six tips to keep your inbox under control. What is the best way to review and action the emails you get every day? Probably the opposite of what you are doing now. Here's the right way to manage your inbox.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancerBy combining an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with an emerging tumor-roasting nanotechnology, researchers improved the efficacy of both therapies in a proof-of-concept study using mice. The potent combination also attacked satellite tumors and distant cancerous cells, completely curing two mice and effectively vaccinating one against the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cigarette makers shifted stance on nicotine patches, gum, study showsTobacco companies have known for decades that, without counseling, NRT hardly ever works, and that consumers often use it to complement smoking. This insight from the formerly secret industry documents, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they formWhat makes quasicrystals so interesting? Their unusual structure. Now scientists are actively pursuing this relatively new area of study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study validates East Antarctic ice sheet to remain stable even if western ice sheet meltsA new study validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New strategy to treat aggressive lung cancerResearch on a novel therapeutic avenue for an aggressive and difficult to treat subgroup of lung cancer has now been shared in a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Injecting manure instead of spreading on surface reduces estrogen loadsWith water quality in the Chesapeake Bay suffering from excess nutrients and fish populations in rivers such as the Susquehanna experiencing gender skewing and other reproductive abnormalities, understanding how to minimize runoff of both nutrients and endocrine-disrupting compounds from farm fields after manure applications is a critical objective for agriculture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily e-cigarette users had highest rates of quitting smokingAmong US adults who were established smokers in the past five years, those who use e-cigarettes daily were significantly more likely to have quit cigarettes compared to those who have never tried e-cigarettes. Over half of daily e-cigarette users had quit smoking in the past five years, compared to 28 percent who had never tried e-cigarettes. This is one of the first studies to reveal the patterns
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The laws of attraction: Pheromones don't lie, fruit fly research suggestsFor the first time, scientists have shown that a female fruit fly's pheromone signals can actually tell males how much energy her body has invested in egg production versus in storing away energy for her own survival. And it's a signal that she can't change in order to make herself more attractive.
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Gizmodo

Before Getting Banned From OkCupid, White Supremacist Chris Cantwell Wrote Tips for Dating Online Source: YouTube OkCupid has banned white supremacist Chris Cantwell from their dating site after a Vice News documentary about the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, featured him expressing his violently racist views. Gizmodo first learned of OKCupid’s decision from a now-deleted tweet by Vice News social editor Rex Santus. OkCupid confirmed to Gizmodo that the company had remove
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The Scientist RSS

Peanut Allergy Treatment Works Long TermFour years after taking a probiotic and peanut protein for 18 months, two-thirds of children in a small clinical trial can eat peanuts with no health issues.
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The Scientist RSS

Basic Science in OrbitStudying biology in space sheds light on future space missions and life on Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cholesterol crystals are sure sign a heart attack may loomA new Michigan State University study on 240 emergency room patients shows just how much of a role a person's cholesterol plays, when in a crystallized state, during a heart attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A better way to measure mortality trends?A new study from Cleveland Clinic suggests long-term mortality trends may be better understood by focusing on life-years lost -- remaining life expectancy for a decedent -- instead of solely looking at cause of death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows cigarette makers shifted stance on nicotine patches, gumA new study conducted by scientists at UC San Francisco reports that tobacco companies have known for decades that, without counseling, NRT hardly ever works, and that consumers often use it to complement smoking. This insight from the formerly secret industry documents known as the "Tobacco Papers" reveals why companies that once viewed nicotine patches and gum as a threat to their cigarette sale
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher rural suicide rates driven by use of gunsSuicide rates in rural areas of Maryland are 35-percent higher than in the state's urban settings, a disparity that can be attributed to the significantly greater use of firearms in rural settings, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Community health workers lead to better health, lower costs for Medicaid patientsAs politicians struggle to solve the nation's healthcare problems, a new study finds a way to improve health and lower costs among Medicaid and uninsured patients. Researchers at Penn Medicine showed that patients who received support from community health workers (CHWs) had 30 percent fewer hospital admissions in one year compared to those who did not receive CHW support. The results also showed
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Gizmodo

Twisted Anatomy Book Shows What it Would Be Like to Dissect Your Favorite Pokémon Image: Christopher Stoll Pokémon-obsessed kids who grew into pokémon obsessed-semi-adults probably think they know everything there is to know about these mythical creatures. Honestly, though, it’s not good enough to merely “catch” ‘em all—to be a real pokémaster means knowing them inside and out. Literally. PokéNatomy—An Unofficial Guide to the Science of Pokémon is a newly available book that t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene that makes large, plump tomatoes identifiedFarmers can grow big, juicy tomatoes thanks to a mutation in the cell size regulator gene that occurred during the tomato domestication process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique overcomes genetic cause of infertilityScientists have created healthy offspring from genetically infertile male mice, offering a potential new approach to tackling a common genetic cause of human infertility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-toxic, lubricant-infused coatings deter mussels and prevent their attachment by disrupting their mechanosensory and adhesive systemsMussels are one of the worst perpetrators of biofouling, or the unwanted accumulation of organisms on underwater structures. A team of scientists has demonstrated that a lubricant-infused surface effectively prevents mussels from sticking by masking the solid surface with a layer of liquid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart failure patients, clinicians have differing perceptions of risk levelPhysicians identified a majority of patients with advanced heart failure as at high risk for transplant, left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or death while few of those patients considered themselves to be at high risk, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Greenland ice flow likely to speed upFlow of the Greenland Ice Sheet is likely to speed up in the future, despite a recent slowdown, because its outlet glaciers slide over wet sediment, not hard rock, new research based on seismic surveys has confirmed. This sediment will become weaker and more slippery as global temperatures rise and meltwater supply becomes more variable. The findings challenge the view that the recent slowdowns in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evolutionary history of imperiled salmon stocksNew technologies for analyzing DNA may transform how imperiled species are considered and managed for conservation protection, according to a study. These technologies can be applied to a wide range of species around the world -- from mushrooms to walruses -- but the study focuses on two iconic species of Pacific salmon: steelhead and chinook.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New test differentiates between Lyme disease, similar illnessThere is now a way to distinguish Lyme disease from similar conditions, report scientists. Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. But it can be confused with similar conditions, including Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness.
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NeuWrite San Diego

Zika: Has this virus lost its bite?Do you live in a generally cool, dry place and rarely think about mosquitoes? Was last year’s Zika outbreak of little personal concern? You may not have the option of staying carefree for much longer. The Zika-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquito is already enjoying widespread breeding grounds as temperatures steadily rise across the globe, indicating that […]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech companies banishing extremists after CharlottesvilleIt took bloodshed in Charlottesville to get tech companies to do what civil rights groups have been calling for for years: take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprisesMicrobes dominate the planet, especially the ocean, and help support the entire marine food web. In a recent report published in Nature Microbiology, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) oceanography professor Ed DeLong and his team report the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Journalists successfully used secure computing to expose Panama Papers, researchers sayA team of researchers from Clemson University, Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered a security success in an unlikely place: the "Panama Papers."
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Live Science

Why It's Dangerous to Condition Your Hair After a Nuclear AttackLast week, when North Korea was threatening to send a ballistic missile toward the U.S. territory of Guam, the island's inhabitants were warned that in the case of a nuclear attack, they should not condition their hair.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Supernova’s messy birth casts doubt on reliability of astronomical yardstick Brightness of exploding stars may vary more than researchers realized. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22066
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Journalists successfully used secure computing to expose Panama Papers, researchers sayA team of researchers from Clemson University, Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered a security success in an unlikely place: the 'Panama Papers.' "Success stories in computer security are rare,'" said Franzi Roesner, assistant professor at the University of Washington and one of the principal investigators on this project. "But we discovered that the journalists invo
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Gizmodo

New Method Could Allow Scientists to Catalog Every Human Cell Image: NIH NIAID /Flickr Cells, they’re all different. Even two similar-looking cells that are supposed to work together in the same tissue might express completely different traits, and make different proteins. So how do you make left and right of it all? Being able to quickly classify lots of cells quick and efficiently has been a difficult task, and previous methods have required looking at on
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Gizmodo

Grab Sunglasses For As Low as $2 From Sunglass Warehouse [Exclusive] Extra 40% off sale styles with code KINJASALE40 Sunglass Warehouse has some of the best pricing out there, but they’ve amped it up this week. Their clearance section is already full of deeply discounted shades, but use the code KINJASALE40 and get an additional 40% off . That means you can grab pairs for as low as $2, so you really have no excuse not to get a backup.
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Ars Technica

How the tech sector can legally justify breaking ties to extremists Enlarge / CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA—A woman leaves a note on the ground as people gather at a memorial for Heather Heyer after her funeral service on Wednesday. Heyer was killed after a car rammed into a group of people during a planned Unite the Right rally last Saturday. The Daily Stormer's celebration of the death sparked a tech-sector backlash against extremism. (credit: The Washington Post,
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The Atlantic

Justin Bieber Has Another Question for the Pop World Justin Bieber just wants to ask you a question, again. Owing either to marketing efforts or issues that can only be determined in a therapy session, the signature hits of the Canadian child star’s adult career have boasted choruses as interrogatives. When he transitioned to semi-adventurous dance-pop: “Where are you now that I need you?” Amid metronome and burbling keys : “What do you mean?” Over
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Cancer “Atlas” to Predict How Patients Will FareResearchers use a big-data approach to find links between different genes and patient survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprisesIn a recent report published in Nature Microbiology, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) oceanography professor Ed DeLong and his team report the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in the evolution of ocean microbe genomes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study validates East Antarctic ice sheet to remain stable even if western ice sheet meltsA new study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer scientists offer new techniques to measure social bias in softwareToday, banks are increasingly using software to decide who will get a loan, courts to judge who should be denied bail, and hospitals to choose treatments for patients. These uses of software make it critical that the software does not discriminate against groups or individuals, say computer science researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancerBy combining an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with an emerging tumor-roasting nanotechnology, Duke University researchers improved the efficacy of both therapies in a proof-of-concept study using mice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning deviceIn what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications.
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Viden

Har smartphonen ødelagt en generation?Amerikansk forsker tegner et dystert billede af kommende generationer.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Eclipses show wrong physics can give right resultsMath for making astronomical predictions doesn’t necessarily reflect physical reality.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A practical way to help the homeless find work and safety | Richard J. BerryWhen Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque, saw a man on a street corner holding a cardboard sign that read "Want a job," he decided to take him (and others in his situation) up on it. He and his staff started a citywide initiative to help the homeless by giving them day jobs and a place to sleep -- and the results were incredible. Find out how your city can replicate Albuquerque's model with
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Gizmodo

US Voting Machine Supplier Leaks 1.8 Million Chicago Voter Records [Updated] Photo: Getty A leading US supplier of voting machines confirmed on Thursday that it exposed the personal information of more than 1.8 million Illinois residents. State authorities and the Federal Bureau of Investigation were alerted this week to a major data leak exposing the names, addresses, dates of birth, partial Social Security numbers, and party affiliations of over a million Chicago reside
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reed warblers have a sense for magnetic declinationResearchers recently showed that migratory reed warblers depend on an internal geomagnetic map to guide them on their long-distance journeys. But it wasn't clear how the birds were solving the difficult 'longitude problem,' determining where they were along the east-west axis and which way to go. The team's latest report shows birds rely on changes from east to west in magnetic declination, the an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lithuanian man brought to US to face $100 million fraud caseA Lithuanian man has been extradited to the United States to face charges that he duped Google and Facebook into sending him over $100 million.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning deviceIn what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMass Amherst computer scientists offer new techniques to measure social bias in softwareBrun says, "Unchecked, biases in data and software run the risk of perpetuating biases in society. For example, prior work has demonstrated that racial bias exists in online advertising delivery systems, where online searches for traditionally-minority names were more likely to yield ads related to arrest records. Such software behavior can contribute to racial stereotypes and other grave societal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gold nanostars and immunotherapy vaccinate mice against cancerBy combining an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with an emerging tumor-roasting nanotechnology, Duke researchers improved the efficacy of both therapies in a proof-of-concept study using mice. The potent combination also attacked satellite tumors and distant cancerous cells, completely curing two mice and effectively vaccinating one against the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptomsCedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer's disease affects the retina -- the back of the eye -- similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer's disease years before patients experience symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study validates East Antarctic ice sheet to remain stable even if western ice sheet meltsA new study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astrophysicists explain the mysterious behavior of cosmic raysThe model focuses mainly on the nature of Fermi bubbles and explains the spectral distribution of the observed cosmic rays flux. It can be said that the processes they described are capable of re-accelerating galactic cosmic rays generated in supernova explosions. Unlike electrons, protons have a significantly greater lifetime, so when accelerated in Fermi bubbles, they can fill up the volume of t
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New Scientist - News

Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertilityMen with extra sex chromosomes can have difficulty producing fertile sperm. Now researchers have got around this in mice by making stem cells from their skin
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New Scientist - News

Speedy white dwarf may have survived a rare type of supernovaType Iax supernovae are weak enough that part of the exploding star may be able to survive. Now, we may have spotted the first star that lived to tell the tale
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New Scientist - News

Monkeys can be tricked into thinking all objects are familiarThere is a cluster of neurons in monkeys’ brains that decides whether or not they have seen objects before, and stimulating it makes them see everything as familiar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple CEO makes $2 million pledge to fight hateApple is donating $2 million to two human rights groups as part of CEO Tim Cook's pledge to help lead the fight against the hate that fueled the violence in Virginia during a white-nationalist rally last weekend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

July ranks 2nd for heat globally, hottest recorded on landEarth yet again sizzled with unprecedented heat last month.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team images tiny quasicrystals as they formWhen Israeli scientist Daniel Shechtman first saw a quasicrystal through his microscope in 1982, he reportedly thought to himself, "Eyn chaya kazo"—Hebrew for, "There can be no such creature."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversionWith more than two dozen companies in Pennsylvania manufacturing potato chips, it is no wonder that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel approach to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. This process may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers.
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Popular Science

Chemists confirm that whiskey really does taste better with a splash of water Science The logic behind your bartender's advice. Chemists figure out the logic behind your bartender's advice.
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The Atlantic

What Kind of Monuments Does President Trump Value? On Thursday morning, President Donald Trump announced his unequivocal support for preserving statues of Confederate generals and leaders, moving a step past his previous statements that the fate of the statues should be left to cities and states. In full, his tweets read: “Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicineA new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Depression 9 form east of Lesser AntillesNOAA's GOES-East Satellite spotted Tropical Depression 9 organizing east of the Lesser Antilles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellites show Hurricane Gert being affected by wind shearNASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an infrared and visible look at Atlantic Hurricane Gert. Both images showed the storm was being affected by wind shear and had become elongated.
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Ars Technica

Rare pubic-grooming data reveals injuries, odd habits, and nicked bits Be careful in there. (credit: TJStamp ) Trimming and shaping the shrubbery down below can be dangerous business, according to a new study. Combing through survey responses from a nationally representative group of 7,456 US adults, researchers at University of California, San Francisco, found that 76 percent (5,674) were pubic groomers. Of those, one in four reported injuring themselves at least o
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Scientific American Content: Global

Deadline for Google Lunar X Prize Extended to March 2018The remaining teams in this private space race have more time—and the opportunity for more money—on their way to the Moon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Will The Eclipse Make Crops And Animals Flip Out? Scientists Ask (Really) During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. And scientists are waiting to see what happens on the ground. (Image credit: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

Chemists Say You Should Add A Little Water To Your Whiskey. Here's Why It's a common refrain from whiskey enthusiasts: Adding a few drops of water to a glass opens up the flavors of the drink. Chemists in Sweden provide a molecular explanation for why this works. (Image credit: Andy Buchanan /AFP/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees potential Tropical Cyclone 9 form east of Lesser AntillesNOAA's GOES-East Satellite spotted potential Tropical Cyclone 9 organizing east of the Lesser Antilles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellites show Hurricane Gert being affected by wind shearNASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an infrared and visible look at Atlantic Hurricane Gert. Both images showed the storm was being affected by wind shear and had become elongated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they formWhat makes quasicrystals so interesting? Their unusual structure. A Cornell lab has joined scientists pursuing this relatively new area of study.
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The Atlantic

Will Trump Take Notice of the Eclipse? Just a week shy of 40 years ago, humanity’s emissary to the stars left this planet for a journey through the solar system. The twin Voyager spacecraft carry a shimmering golden record which, if placed on a phonograph, will play the sound of laughter and language and life on Earth. The record was accompanied by a message from the president . “We are a community of 240 million human beings among th
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Gizmodo

EpiPen Maker to Finally Pay $465 Million for Ripping Off Taxpayers Photo: Getty EpiPen manufacturer Mylan has been involved in a contentious legal case over its overcharging of the US government. On Thursday, the Department of Justice finalized its settlement with Mylan, which will pay $465 million in penalties. But many believe that’s not enough. According to Reuters , Mylan admitted no wrongdoing by agreeing to the settlement: The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Mas
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Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New AgainOptogenetic stimulation of the perirhinal cortex can cause macaques to process never-before seen-objects as familiar and known objects as brand new.
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Science | The Guardian

Mother preferred Dr over Miss or Mrs | Brief lettersAcademic titles | Margarets as a dying breed | Big Ben | Girls’ and boys’ clothes | Dogs on escalators Alison Hackett ( Letters , 17 August) complains at the use of “Dr” and “Prof” titles. But they can prove useful. Our mother Anne McLaren (a single parent, and a biologist who, working with mice, created the world’s first IVF birth, and became the first woman officer of the Royal Society in their
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How particular fear memories can be erasedResearchers have devised a method to selectively erase particular fear memories by weakening the connections between neurons involved in forming these memories. In their experiments, they found that fear memory can be manipulated in such a way that some beneficial memories are retained while others, detrimental to our daily life, are suppressed. The research, done using a mouse model, offers insig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprising discovery about how neurons talk to each otherNew findings challenge existing dogma that neurons release fixed amounts of chemical signal at any one time and could have implications for brain disorders including Parkinson's and schizhophrenia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Peroxisomes identified as 'fighters' in the battle against bacterial infectionsPeroxisomes are required for cells in the innate immune response to bacteria and fungi. Now scientists have found that peroxisomes are necessary for proper functioning of the innate immune system, the body's first line of defense against microorganisms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop novel immunotherapy technology for prostate cancerA novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer based on the use of synthetic DNA to directly encode protective antibodies against a cancer-specific protein has been described in a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite controlDouble-blind test bolsters observational data that walnuts promote feelings of fullness. Results provide a quantitative measure for testing other compounds' ability to control appetite, including potential medications for the treatment of obesity.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Embryos kill off male tissue to become femaleFemale embryos actively dismantle male reproductive tissue, a textbook-challenging study suggests.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How an itch hitches a ride to the brainScientists have figured out how your brain registers the sensation of itch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotics found to weaken body's ability to fight off diseaseAdding another reason for doctors to avoid the overuse of antibiotics, new research shows that a reduction in the variety of microbes in the gut interferes with the immune system's ability to fight off disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Female mouse embryos actively remove male reproductive systemsA protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. The discovery, which appeared online August 17 in the journal Science, changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two-step process leads to cell immortalization and cancerImmortalization of cells is a necessary step in the development of cancer, and scientists think that the main cause is turning on an enzyme -- telomerase -- that lengthens chromosomal telomeres and prevents normal cell death. A new study by UC Berkeley scientists shows that turning on telomerase is not a one-step process. In melanoma, and probably other cancers, a mutation turns up telomerase slig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggersResearchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Vienna have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early Indian Ocean trade routes bring chicken, black rat to eastern AfricaThe earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime trade routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD. In a paper published today in the journal PLOS ONE, an international team of researchers, led by director Nicole Boivin of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, used new techniques to analyze ancient DNA and pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaustResearchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicineA new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify central neural circuit for itch sensationA recent study carried out by Dr. Sun Yangang's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a central neural circuit that is critical for transmitting the itch signal. By using optogenetic, chemogenetic, patch clamp recording, and in vivo fiber photometry techniques, the researchers demonstrated that the spino-parabrachial pathway plays a key role in transmit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An unusual white dwarf may be a supernova leftoverAstronomers have identified a white dwarf star in our galaxy that may be the leftover remains of a recently discovered type of supernova.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lubricant-infused material is a slick trick against musselsA lubricant-infused polymer could reduce the problem of fouling, in which mussels, barnacles and other organisms encrust themselves to ship hulls and marine pipes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaching the sexual differentiation paradigm for reproductive tract developmentGoing against the general consensus, scientists have unveiled an unexpected mechanism for sexual differentiation of critical reproductive structures during embryonic development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reprogrammed cells rescue infertility in miceReprogramming cells carrying a third chromosome resulted in the loss of the extra chromosome in mice and human cells, scientists report, which could eventually pave the way to novel approaches that treat developmental defects or infertilities associated with extra chromosomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome analysis with near-complete privacy possible, say Stanford researchersIt is now possible to scour complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes without revealing any genetic information not directly associated with the inquiry, say Stanford University researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Slippery liquid surfaces confuse musselsMussels are one of the worst perpetrators of biofouling, or the unwanted accumulation of organisms on underwater structures. A team of scientists from the Wyss Institute and NTU, Singapore has demonstrated that a lubricant-infused surface effectively prevents mussels from sticking by masking the solid surface with a layer of liquid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pioneering research reveals how altered brain networks can lead to seizuresAn international team of scientists, led by mathematicians from the University of Exeter's Living Systems Institute, have developed a ground-breaking new method that can identify regions of brain tissue most likely to generate seizures in people with epilepsy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique overcomes genetic cause of infertilityScientists have created healthy offspring from genetically infertile male mice, offering a potential new approach to tackling a common genetic cause of human infertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Worm atlas profiles gene readouts in every cell type in the animalA worm atlas has been built that profiles gene readouts for every kind of cell in the animal. This is the first time this type of comprehensive profiling for a multi-cellular organism has been created. The study was conducted at a larval stage of the roundworm C. elegans. The resource should have many uses, such as for studies on how genetic instructions guide the formation of body parts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method identifies brain regions most likely to cause epilepsy seizuresScientists have developed a new way to detect which areas of the brain contribute most greatly to epilepsy seizures, according to a PLOS Computational Biology study. The strategy, devised by Marinho Lopes of the University of Exeter and colleagues, could help surgeons select specific brain areas for removal to stop seizures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tuberculosis drug may work better than others in its classTreatment of tuberculosis involves a combination of several drugs, sometimes including drugs from a class known as fluoroquinolones. Using computer simulations, scientists have shown that the fluoroquinolone known as moxifloxacin may be superior to two other commonly used fluoroquinolones, according to a new paper in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Male fruit flies can smell a good mate based on her metabolismA female fruit fly must balance her energy usage between making eggs now and storing nutrients for later. This balance affects the pheromones that she produces and impacts whether male fruit flies find her attractive, report Tatyana Fedina of the University of Michigan and colleagues, Aug. 17, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers describe gene that makes large, plump tomatoesFarmers can grow big, juicy tomatoes thanks to a mutation in the Cell Size Regulator gene that occurred during the tomato domestication process. Esther van der Knaap of the University of Georgia, Athens and colleagues describe this gene variant in a study published in open-access journal PLOS Genetics on Aug. 17, 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disrupted gut microbiome makes children more susceptible to amoebic dysenteryChildren with lower diversity of microbial species in their intestines are more susceptible to severe infection with the Entamoeba histolytica parasite, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why Do We Scratch an Itch?
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Futurity.org

Software makes movie-style digital animation easier New animation software simplifies the process of animating movements for digital characters, such as those found in big-budget animated movies. New software offers novice animators the possibility to bring characters to life. (Credit: Disney Research via ETH Zurich) “We want to make it quick and easy to create animations—without compromising on quality,” says lead author Loïc Ciccone, a doctoral
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New Scientist - News

Culture not biology is behind many differences between the sexesIt is becoming ever clearer that environment and culture may be determining traits we think are down to male or female biology, says neuroscientist Gina Rippon
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NYT > Science

Matter: A Speedier Way to Catalog Human Cells (All 37 Trillion of Them)Many types of cells remain unknown, but researchers have discovered a faster way to group cells by function, paving the way for a complete census.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaustResearchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The laws of attraction: Pheromones don't lie, fruit fly research suggestsLife as a fruit fly seems pretty simple: Hatch, grow, eat some fruit, find a mate, produce hundreds of tiny offspring and die—all in a month or so.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worm atlas profiles gene readouts in every cell type in the animalThe roundworm stars in the first-ever compilation of gene readouts in every kind of cell in an animal. The readouts, which were taken at a particular stage in the worm's life, reveal, for example, which genes are turned on or off in each cell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggersBacteria have to watch out for amoeba. Hungry amoebae hunt them: they catch them with their pseudopodia and then absorb and digest them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early Indian Ocean trade routes bring chicken, black rat to eastern AfricaThe earliest introduction of domestic chickens and black rats from Asia to the east coast of Africa came via maritime routes between the 7th and 8th centuries AD. In a paper published August 17, 2017 in the journal PLOS ONE, an international team of researchers, led by Director Nicole Boivin of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, used new techniques to analyze ancient DNA an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers describe gene that makes large, plump tomatoesFarmers can grow big, juicy tomatoes thanks to a mutation in the Cell Size Regulator gene that occurred during the tomato domestication process. Esther van der Knaap of the University of Georgia, Athens and colleagues describe this gene variant in a study published in open-access journal PLOS Genetics on August 17th, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slippery liquid surfaces confuse musselsIt all began with a bet at a conference in Italy in 2013. Nicolas Vogel, Ph.D., then a postdoctoral fellow in Joanna Aizenberg's lab at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), gave a talk about the group's Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces (SLIPS) coatings, which promised t
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Blog » Languages » English

Operation Spywire: Accuracy Happy Hours Ah, an ordinary day at HQ. Or is it? You’ve been engaged in your usual routine: honing your aim out on the range, pumping iron at the gym, tracing dozens of cubes, engaging in witty banter. During these activities, it’s fairly typical to see new recruits touring the premises and being shown the ropes. Until, that is, you squint for a moment and realize there’s someone whose recruit uniform looks
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Science | The Guardian

New sperm creation method could overcome genetic male infertility – study Healthy sperm have been created in mice with a common form of infertility, raising hope for future treatment for men with extra sex chromosomes A common genetic cause of male infertility has been overcome in mice using a technique that creates healthy sperm in the laboratory, scientists have shown. The research raises the future prospect of hope for men who cannot father children because they hav
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Science : NPR

Trump Rolls Back Obama-Era Flood Standards For Infrastructure Projects An Obama order called for new public infrastructure projects to be built to withstand rising sea levels caused by climate change. President Trump revoked that order to accelerate the review process. (Image credit: Michael Reynolds/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

Can We Feed The World With Farmed Fish? New research suggests there is space on the open ocean to farm essentially all the seafood humans can eat — and then some. But such volumes of fish and shellfish could not be grown without costs. (Image credit: Maxim Zmeyev/AFP/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

Getting Hate Speech Off Music-Streaming Services In a week of renewed national attention to organized white supremacy, the music-streaming platform Spotify has removed a number of bands alleged to be associated with neo-Nazism. On Monday, Paul Resnikoff at Digital Music News pointed out that 29 bands identified as racist by the Southern Poverty Law Center were available for listening on Spotify (as well as another eight apparently hateful artis
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Revisit NIH biosafety guidelines
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2.7-million-year-old ice opens window on past
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Science current issue

Where has all the Zika gone?
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Australia to ax support for long-term ecology sites
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Science current issue

Astrophysics missions vie for NASA money
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U.S.-Mexico water pact aims for a greener Colorado delta
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'Safe spaces may save the European mink
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On the trail of yellow fever
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Playing marble run to make methane
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Circulating peptide prevents preeclampsia
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Vortex generation reaches a new plateau
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How microbes survive in the open ocean
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Ductal sex determination
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Addressing spin states with infrared light
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What do revised U.S. rules mean for human research?
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Beyond the museum's mandate
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A twin tale to keep you up at night
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Evaluating Science's open-data policy
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Editor's note
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Helping less-prepared students excel
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Best cost estimate of greenhouse gases
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When you don't want things to stick
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The circuits of itching and scratching
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Sequencing each cell of the nematode
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Unusual star may be supernova debris
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Identification of a new injection system
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A new therapeutic target in view?
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Modeling a pregnancy disorder
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Treating a tumor to metastasize
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Sharing data, protecting privacy
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Collaborative governance
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The makings of the reproductive tract
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Suppressing Sjögren syndrome
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Faulty remembrance of objects past
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Modeling the cancer transcriptome
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Beating bands in substellar atmospheres
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Conjugated covalent networks
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Methanogenic archaea metabolism
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A spin-valve solar cell
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Making the right catch
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Breathing in the dark
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A phenyl ring hops with a light step
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Heavy elements are intergalactic travelers
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Wired-up wash and go
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Protection by a parasitic plant
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Bugs and drugs: A work in progress
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Human spit contains ancestral surprises
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Science current issue

Comprehensive single-cell transcriptional profiling of a multicellular organism To resolve cellular heterogeneity, we developed a combinatorial indexing strategy to profile the transcriptomes of single cells or nuclei, termed sci-RNA-seq (single-cell combinatorial indexing RNA sequencing). We applied sci-RNA-seq to profile nearly 50,000 cells from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans at the L2 larval stage, which provided >50-fold "shotgun" cellular coverage of its somatic ce
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Science current issue

Preventing mussel adhesion using lubricant-infused materials Mussels are opportunistic macrofouling organisms that can attach to most immersed solid surfaces, leading to serious economic and ecological consequences for the maritime and aquaculture industries. We demonstrate that lubricant-infused coatings exhibit very low preferential mussel attachment and ultralow adhesive strengths under both controlled laboratory conditions and in marine field studies.
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Science current issue

Two-dimensional sp2 carbon-conjugated covalent organic frameworks We synthesized a two-dimensional (2D) crystalline covalent organic framework (sp 2 c-COF) that was designed to be fully -conjugated and constructed from all sp 2 carbons by C=C condensation reactions of tetrakis(4-formylphenyl)pyrene and 1,4-phenylenediacetonitrile. The C=C linkages topologically connect pyrene knots at regular intervals into a 2D lattice with conjugations extended along both x a
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Science current issue

A molecular spin-photovoltaic device We fabricated a C 60 fullerene–based molecular spin-photovoltaic device that integrates a photovoltaic response with the spin transport across the molecular layer. The photovoltaic response can be modified under the application of a small magnetic field, with a magnetophotovoltage of up to 5% at room temperature. Device functionalities include a magnetic current inverter and the presence of diver
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Science current issue

An unusual white dwarf star may be a surviving remnant of a subluminous Type Ia supernova Subluminous Type Ia supernovae, such as the Type Iax–class prototype SN 2002cx, are described by a variety of models such as the failed detonation and partial deflagration of an accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarf star or the explosion of an accreting, hybrid carbon-oxygen-neon core. These models predict that bound remnants survive such events with, according to some simulations, a high kick velo
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Science current issue

Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres Brown dwarfs are massive analogs of extrasolar giant planets and may host types of atmospheric circulation not seen in the solar system. We analyzed a long-term Spitzer Space Telescope infrared monitoring campaign of brown dwarfs to constrain cloud cover variations over a total of 192 rotations. The infrared brightness evolution is dominated by beat patterns caused by planetary-scale wave pairs a
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Science current issue

Conversion of object identity to object-general semantic value in the primate temporal cortex At the final stage of the ventral visual stream, perirhinal neurons encode the identity of memorized objects through learning. However, it remains elusive whether and how object percepts alone, or concomitantly a nonphysical attribute of the objects ("learned"), are decoded from perirhinal activities. By combining monkey psychophysics with optogenetic and electrical stimulations, we found a focal
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Science current issue

Deriving genomic diagnoses without revealing patient genomes Patient genomes are interpretable only in the context of other genomes; however, genome sharing enables discrimination. Thousands of monogenic diseases have yielded definitive genomic diagnoses and potential gene therapy targets. Here we show how to provide such diagnoses while preserving participant privacy through the use of secure multiparty computation. In multiple real scenarios (small patie
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Science current issue

A central neural circuit for itch sensation Although itch sensation is an important protective mechanism for animals, chronic itch remains a challenging clinical problem. Itch processing has been studied extensively at the spinal level. However, how itch information is transmitted to the brain and what central circuits underlie the itch-induced scratching behavior remain largely unknown. We found that the spinoparabrachial pathway was acti
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Science current issue

Methanogenic heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC-MvhAGD) uses two noncubane [4Fe-4S] clusters for reduction In methanogenic archaea, the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) fixation and methane-forming steps are linked through the heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC)–[NiFe]-hydrogenase (MvhAGD) complex that uses flavin-based electron bifurcation to reduce ferredoxin and the heterodisulfide of coenzymes M and B. Here, we present the structure of the native heterododecameric HdrABC-MvhAGD complex at 2.15-angstrom resol
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Science current issue

Vinculin forms a directionally asymmetric catch bond with F-actin Vinculin is an actin-binding protein thought to reinforce cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. However, how mechanical load affects the vinculin–F-actin bond is unclear. Using a single-molecule optical trap assay, we found that vinculin forms a force-dependent catch bond with F-actin through its tail domain, but with lifetimes that depend strongly on the direction of the applied force. Force towa
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Science current issue

ELABELA deficiency promotes preeclampsia and cardiovascular malformations in mice Preeclampsia (PE) is a gestational hypertensive syndrome affecting between 5 and 8% of all pregnancies. Although PE is the leading cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality, its molecular etiology is still unclear. Here, we show that ELABELA (ELA), an endogenous ligand of the apelin receptor (APLNR, or APJ), is a circulating hormone secreted by the placenta. Elabela but not Apelin knock
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Science current issue

In situ architecture, function, and evolution of a contractile injection system Contractile injection systems mediate bacterial cell-cell interactions by a bacteriophage tail–like structure. In contrast to extracellular systems, the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) is defined by intracellular localization and attachment to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we used cryo-focused ion beam milling, electron cryotomography, and functional assays to study a T6SS in Amoebophilus asiatic
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Science current issue

Elimination of the male reproductive tract in the female embryo is promoted by COUP-TFII in mice The sexual differentiation paradigm contends that the female pattern of the reproductive system is established by default because the male reproductive tracts (Wolffian ducts) in the female degenerate owing to a lack of androgen. Here, we discovered that female mouse embryos lacking Coup-tfII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II) in the Wolffian duct mesenchyme became inte
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New Products
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Webinar | Humanized mouse models in checkpoint inhibitor development
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When personal becomes professional
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Science current issue

Collaborative environmental governance: Achieving collective action in social-ecological systems Managing ecosystems is challenging because of the high number of stakeholders, the permeability of man-made political and jurisdictional demarcations in relation to the temporal and spatial extent of biophysical processes, and a limited understanding of complex ecosystem and societal dynamics. Given these conditions, collaborative governance is commonly put forward as the preferred means of addre
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Science current issue

A pathology atlas of the human cancer transcriptome Cancer is one of the leading causes of death, and there is great interest in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of individual tumors. We used systems-level approaches to analyze the genome-wide transcriptome of the protein-coding genes of 17 major cancer types with respect to clinical outcome. A general pattern emerged: Shorter patient s
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Science current issue

Erratum for the Research Article "Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen" by R. P. Dias and I. F. Silvera
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversionWith more than two dozen companies in Pennsylvania manufacturing potato chips, it is no wonder that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel approach to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. This process may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Richard Rawlings Takes Over Wednesday Nights | GARAGE REHAB Garage Rehab | PREMIERES Wed Aug 30 10p Richard's hitting the road looking for the autobody shops and garages in need of his Midas (Monkey) touch! Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/garage-rehab/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GarageRehabTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter:
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cognitive science

A paper in JPSP examines why and when stories of personal change are inspiring to others. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Ars Technica

AT&T’s attempt to stall Google Fiber construction thrown out by judge Enlarge (credit: Google Fiber ) AT&T has lost a court case in which it tried to stall construction by Google Fiber in Louisville, Kentucky. AT&T sued the local government in Louisville and Jefferson County in February 2016 to stop a One Touch Make Ready Ordinance designed to give Google Fiber and other new ISPs quicker access to utility poles. But yesterday, US District Court Judge David Hale dis
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Gizmodo

Biker Miraculously Survives a 250-Foot Plunge Off a Mountain Road GIF GIF: YouTube In addition to capturing moments of road rage, an action cam mounted on a motorcycle rider’s helmet can occasionally record a straight-up miracle, as was the case with Matthew Murray who ended up plummeting 250-feet off a mountain road after a problem with his bike’s steering. After a failed attempt to lean into the corner, Murray hit the mountain road’s gravel shoulder at more t
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Gizmodo

Logitech's Tricked Out MX Master Mouse Is An Absolute Steal At $50 The successor to one of the most popular mice ever made is within a few cents of its lowest price ever , while supplies last. The Logitech MX Master Mouse comes with all the accoutrements you’d expect form a high end mouse—namely a rechargeable battery, adjustable DPI, and a dark field laser that works on glass—and a few that you wouldn’t, like a side thumb wheel for horizontal navigation and ges
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older users like to snoop on Facebook, but worried others might snoop on themOlder adults are drawn to Facebook so they can check out pictures and updates from family and friends, but may resist using the site because they are worried about who will see their own content, according to a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Digging in the dirt: Researchers develop new methods for assesing risk of subsurface phosphorusNew methods for assessing the loss of phosphorus in soil have now been developed by researchers. While current measurements focus mainly on surface runoff, the new research is looking at the best way to measure the risk of underground phosphorus that winds up in drainage water.
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The Atlantic

Another Fatal Ramming Attack, This Time in Barcelona Updated at 3:34 p.m. Authorities in Barcelona are confirming 13 deaths and 50 injuries in what they are describing as a terrorist attack at Las Ramblas, the popular tourist attraction that was immortalized in George Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia . Authorities said a van was driven onto a sidewalk and hit pedestrians. A suspect was arrested more than an hour after the incident, police said , descri
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The Atlantic

When Corporations Are Good Citizens Of the many rebukes Donald Trump received for his performance after the Charlottesville massacre, the collapse of his business advisory councils of corporate leaders may sting the worst. It undermines his core claim of business expertise and skill at managing the economy, and his central boast that he is adept at creating jobs and growth. Meanwhile, 2,500 miles to the west, DreamHost LLC, a webho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early rotator cuff surgery yields good long-term outcomesEarly surgery to repair tears of one of the shoulder rotator cuff muscles provides lasting improvement in strength, function, and other outcomes, reports a study in the Aug. 16, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of nervous system cells can help to understand degenerative diseasesA collaborative research by Brazilian and Dutch scientists shows that many of the genes that are expressed by microglia are different between humans and mice, which are frequently used as animal models in research on Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The findings will be important for studies of the gene expression profile of normal microglia during human aging.
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Gizmodo

Fieldwork Fail Shows How Science Is Sometimes a Hilarious Trainwreck All images Courtesy Jim Jourdane After long years of research, your efforts have paid off: the archaeological site you’re digging in has turned up a stash of rare, striking bones, no doubt the beginning of a groundbreaking discovery. Only then, you find the KFC wrapper, revealing that this “ancient burial ground” is just the leftovers of someone’s lunch. In the summer of 2015, scientists on Twitt
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The Scientist RSS

Vitamin C Blocks Leukemia Progression in MiceHigh-dose vitamin C injections reverse the effects of a leukemia-promoting genetic deficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell cycle-blocking drugs can shrink tumors by enlisting immune system in attack on cancerA new study explains why CDK4/6 inhibitors can shrink tumor in some advanced breast cancers. CDK4/6 inhibitors trigger the immune system to attack tumor cells. CDK4/6 inhibitors can also enhance anti-cancer effect of immunotherapy agents.
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Gizmodo

The Final Defenders Trailer Is All About Sigourney Weaver Getting Her Menace On Image: Still via Youtube There’s a lot we still don’t know about Alexandra, the mysterious villain at the heart of Netflix and Marvel’s superhero team-up show—but the third and last full trailer for the series is about exactly what you need to know about her: It’s Sigourney Goddamn Weaver getting to be evil as hell, and it’s delightful . Despite the show being just less than a day away at this po
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Ars Technica

Health benefits of wind and solar offset all subsidies Enlarge Wind and solar energy are obviously essential in reducing carbon emissions, but they also have a remarkable side effect: saving lives. As they edge out fossil fuels, renewables are reducing not just carbon emissions, but also other air pollutants. And the result is an improvement in air quality, with a corresponding drop in premature deaths. A paper in Nature Energy this week dives into t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HBO regains control of hacked social media accountsHBO says it has regained control of its social media accounts after the latest security breach to hit the entertainment company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Older users like to snoop on Facebook, but worried others might snoop on themOlder adults are drawn to Facebook so they can check out pictures and updates from family and friends, but may resist using the site because they are worried about who will see their own content, according to a team of researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lab tests show molecule appears to spur cell death in tumors, inflammationA drug-like molecule developed by Duke Health researchers appears to intercede in an inflammatory response that is at the center of a variety of diseases, including some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study challenges long-accepted views on human-autonomy interactionA team of Army scientists and engineers have challenged long-held views in the area of human-autonomy interaction to change the way science involves people, especially in developing advanced technical systems that involve artificial intelligence and autonomy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop model for lighter armorThe US Army Research Laboratory is working on developing new light-weight ceramic materials that resist fracture, and has teamed with researchers from the University of Florida to better understand exactly how these materials, which are suited for Soldier personal protection and Army systems, fracture, and how they can be further improved. They are focusing on failure through cracking; the materia
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Gizmodo

New Image of Jupiter Is So Beautiful It's Making Us Angry Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran Despite our squabbles here on Earth, the universe is full of so much beauty it’s almost stupid. Jupiter is perhaps the most unreasonably beautiful thing in our entire solar system, and it’s not shy about flexing. Recently, citizen scientists/JunoCam superstars Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created one of the most incredible enhancem
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Gizmodo

Everything About Disney and ABC's 'Pink Slime' Settlement Should Scare the Hell Out of You Illustration by Sam Woolley News of perhaps the largest defamation settlement in U.S. history came and went with a whimper last week. In two footnotes in its third-quarter earnings report , The Walt Disney Company whispered that it spent a cool $177 million—not including additional cash from insurers—“in connection with the settlement of litigation.” A lawyer for Beef Products Inc., a food proces
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New Scientist - News

Vitamin C helps genes to kill off cells that would cause cancerMany blood cancers are caused by mutations in the protective TET2 gene, but vitamin C may enhance drug treatments by helping to tell out-of-control cells to stop dividing
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Ars Technica

Neo-Nazi Daily Stormer loses its Russian domain, too Putin us on. (credit: Presidential Press and Information Office ) When the Daily Stormer lost control of its .com domain in the face of a social media protest, the infamous hate site sought virtual refuge in Russia . For a few hours on Wednesday, the site re-appeared at the domain "dailystormer.ru" before the site lost DDoS protection from CloudFlare and disappeared from the Web once again. Now t
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Ingeniøren

Cern erklærer jagtsæsonen for indledt – får LHC ram på noget?Ugen bød også på en forskningsbaseret forklaring på, hvorfor du skal blande vand i din whisky, og hvorfor du kradser, når det klør – samt et tilbud om et væddemål på 200.000 dollar.
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Popular Science

A lot of people are getting injured while shaving their pubic hair Health But how big a deal is it really? A quarter of people who groom down there say they injury themselves. Three quarters of people are lying.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lab tests show molecule appears to spur cell death in tumors, inflammationA drug-like molecule developed by Duke Health researchers appears to intercede in an inflammatory response that is at the center of a variety of diseases, including some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.
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Science | The Guardian

Memories of fear could be permanently erased, study shows Research in mice reveals a new approach to wiping memories from the brain, demonstrating that specific memories can be weakened or strengthened The eternal sunshine of a spotless mind has come one step closer, say researchers working on methods to erase memories of fear. The latest study, carried out in mice, unpicks why certain sounds can stir alarming memories, and reveals a new approach to wip
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The Atlantic

Donald Trump Is a Lame-Duck President In many ways, the Trump presidency never got off the ground: The president’s legislative agenda is going nowhere, his relations with foreign leaders are frayed, and his approval rating with the American people never enjoyed the honeymoon period most newly elected presidents do. Pundits who are sympathetic toward, or even neutral on, the president keep hoping that the next personnel move—the appoi
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The Atlantic

Can Dogs Smell Their ‘Reflections’? In 1970, a psychologist named Gordon Gallup Jr. anesthetized four chimpanzees and applied red dye to their eyebrows. When the chimps came around, they caught sight of their reflections in a mirror that had been placed in their enclosure. And they did what you or I might do in those circumstances—they touched their eyebrows, prodding at the marks. Gallup concluded that chimps could recognize their
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Gizmodo

Why Can't This Soap Dispenser Identify Dark Skin? GIF GIF: Facebook/ Chukwuemeka Afigbo On Wednesday, a Facebook employee in Nigeria shared footage of a minor inconvenience that he says speaks to tech’s larger diversity problem. In the video, a white man and a dark-skinned black man both try to get soap from a soap dispenser. The soap dispenses for the white man, but not the darker skinned man. After a bit of laughter, a person can be overheard
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Ars Technica

New feature in iOS 11 quickly and temporarily disables Touch ID Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple is slated to release iOS 11 to all users this fall, but with the public beta available for anyone to try, some previously unannounced features have been discovered. According to a report from The Verge, a feature in the updated operating system allows users to easily change settings so your fingers can't unlock your iPhone using Touch ID. Pressing the pow
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New Scientist - News

Shutting down neo-Nazi Daily Stormer sets a dangerous precedentThe neo-Nazi website has been booted out by web services for crossing moral lines, but should tech firms decide what we see online?
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Gizmodo

We Asked Five Security Experts If Smart Locks Are Ever Safe Image via LockState An automatic firmware update broke LockState’s internet-enabled “smart locks” for around 500 customers earlier this month, including around 200 Airbnb hosts who use the locks to remotely manage rental access. Customers have to replace their locks or ship them back for repairs. (The locks can still be operated with a physical key.) Smart locks, like so many “Internet of Things”
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army researcher's paper named 'Editor's Pick' in journal Optics LettersA recently published paper by Army Research Laboratory Scientist Dr. Fredrik Fatemi was chosen as 'Editor's Pick' in the journal Optics Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older users like to snoop on Facebook, but worried others might snoop on themOlder adults are drawn to Facebook so they can check out pictures and updates from family and friends, but may resist using the site because they are worried about who will see their own content, according to a team of researchers.
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Gizmodo

What the Coming USB 3.2 Standard Means for You Image: Gizmodo Just when you thought you could chitchat with authority about USB standards at your next dinner party, a new one comes along to shake everything up again. The latest USB 3.2 standard is going to be confirmed in September, and here’s what that means for your laptop, your phone, and those new USB-C cables you just went out and bought. A very brief history of USB Image: Gizmodo USB, o
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Ars Technica

Oldest Antarctic ice ever found shows climate of 2.7 million years ago (credit: NASA/EO ) Antarctic ice cores have recorded an impressive span of climatic history for us, covering the last 800,000 years. But scientists are greedy, always looking to go back just a little further . Climate records based on things like seafloor sediment cores already take us much further back, but ice cores can reveal unique details. Groups are currently searching for locations to dril
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Feed: All Latest

*Sonic Mania* Review: Sega Makes Sonic Super Again By Trusting the Hits (and the Fans)It's the best Sonic in years. Maybe ever.
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Quanta Magazine

Symmetry, Algebra and the Monster You could forgive mathematicians for being drawn to the monster group, an algebraic object so enormous and mysterious that it took them nearly a decade to prove it exists. Now, 30 years later, string theorists — physicists studying how all fundamental forces and particles might be explained by tiny strings vibrating in hidden dimensions — are looking to connect the monster to their physical quest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reed warblers have a sense for magnetic declinationResearchers recently showed that migratory reed warblers depend on an internal geomagnetic map to guide them on their long-distance journeys. But it wasn't clear how the birds were solving the relatively difficult "longitude problem," determining where they were along the east-west axis and which way to go. Now, the team's latest report published in Current Biology on August 17 has an answer. The
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New on MIT Technology Review

California Researchers Want a Climate Science Institute to Plug Holes Left by Trump
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The Atlantic

Constant Anxiety Won't Save the World When New York Magazine published a story about the apocalyptic dangers of climate change last month, it was shared widely, and with alarm. People tweeted things like “Read this and get very, very scared,” or otherwise prescribed fear and worry as the appropriate reaction to the piece. They were mimicking the tone of the story itself, which starts by saying “It is, I promise, worse than you think,
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The Atlantic

Would You Believe Jon Snow? This post references plot points through Season 7, Episode 5 of Game of Thrones . “Perhaps we ought to listen to what he has to say.” Sam Tarly is trying his best to convince the maesters of the Citadel that Jon Snow has not completely lost his mind. Sam is not having an easy time of it. Which is not entirely surprising: The truth Jon is telling, after all, involves murderous zombies rising from
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Gizmodo

Life As We Know Could Have Come From Algae on Steroids Image: Harsha K R /Flickr What was life really like here on planet Earth before animals were big enough to leave fossils behind? How did living things turn from dinky capsules of genetic material into the intelligent, complex organisms that do things like fart and type curse words into posts on the internet? Scientists think they’ve found the answer... in algae steroids. A team of researchers in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Florida, US Army develop model for lighter armorThe US Army Research Laboratory is working on developing new light-weight ceramic materials that resist fracture, and has teamed with researchers from the University of Florida to better understand exactly how these materials, which are suited for Soldier personal protection and Army systems, fracture, and how they can be further improved. They are focusing on failure through cracking; the materia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should I stay or should I leave?Knowing whether to stay in or leave a romantic relationship is often an agonizing experience and that ambivalence can have negative consequences for health and well-being.Now a new study offers insights into what people are deliberating about and what makes the decision so difficult, which could help therapists working with couples and stimulate further research into the decision-making process.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers make surprising discovery about how neurons talk to each otherNew findings challenge existing dogma that neurons release fixed amounts of chemical signal at any one time and could have implications for brain disorders including Parkinson's and schizhophrenia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin C may encourage blood cancer stem cells to dieVitamin C may 'tell' faulty stem cells in the bone marrow to mature and die normally, instead of multiplying to cause blood cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hemorrhagic fevers: Countering inflammation to prevent circulatory failureHemorrhagic fevers are severe viral diseases that are often fatal. Researchers from the University of Basel have now identified messenger substances of the immune system, which in infected mice lead to the development of shock. These results, published in the scientific journal Cell Host & Microbe, open up new possibilities for the development of life-saving therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bird-brained? Not at all: Reed warblers reveal a magnetic mapWriting in the current issue of Current Biology an international team of biologists, including Richard Holland and Dmitri Kishkiniev of Bangor University, UK, explain how they identified for the first time, that mature reed warblers are able to detect the declination from magnetic north, and use the scale of the declination or change from true north to geolocate themselves to a longitude, from whi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How we recall the pastNeuroscientists who study memory have long believed that when we recall an event, our brains turn on the same hippocampal circuit that was activated when the memory was originally formed. However, MIT neuroscientists have now shown, for the first time, that recalling a memory requires a 'detour' circuit that branches off from the original memory circuit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers show how particular fear memories can be erasedResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have devised a method to selectively erase particular fear memories by weakening the connections between neurons involved in forming these memories. In their experiments, they found that fear memory can be manipulated in such a way that some beneficial memories are retained while others, detrimental to our daily life, are suppressed. The resea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mind flexThe human brain has a region of cells responsible for linking sensory cues to actions and behaviors and cataloging the link as a memory. Cells that form these links have been deemed highly stable and fixed.Now, the findings of a Harvard Medical School study conducted in mice challenge that model, revealing that the neurons responsible for such tasks may be less stable, yet more flexible than previ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No direct flights for memory retrievalAccording to new research from the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics, experiencing something and remembering it later is not a neural 'direct flight.' The pathway in the brain's hippocampus that underlies long-term memory formation contains at least one 'stopover' that is important specifically for retrieving episodic, personally experienced memories. This is in contrast to known direct
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reed warblers have a sense for magnetic declinationResearchers recently showed that migratory reed warblers depend on an internal geomagnetic map to guide them on their long-distance journeys. But it wasn't clear how the birds were solving the difficult 'longitude problem,' determining where they were along the east-west axis and which way to go. The team's latest report published in Current Biology shows birds rely on changes from east to west in
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Live Science

Woman Born Without a Vagina Speaks Out About Rare ConditionA woman in Arizona who was born without a vagina — the result of a rare condition — is speaking out about her condition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfires trap 2,000 villagers in PortugalForest fires cut off a village of 2,000 people in Portugal, as firefighters struggled Thursday to control two major blazes in the centre of the country, local officials said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spacewalking cosmonauts release 3-D-printed satelliteSpacewalking cosmonauts set free the world's first satellite made almost entirely with a 3-D printer on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ray of hope for more abundant wheat cropsCrops such as wheat could be up to 21% more efficient at turning the sun's energy into food, according to new research by Lancaster University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smithsonian manatee count informs policy recommendationsAll three of the world's manatee species are threatened with extinction: the Amazonian Manatee, the African Manatee and the West Indian Manatee. The Antillean Manatee, an endangered subspecies, feeds and calves in rivers and coastal wetlands from the Gulf of Mexico to Brazil. Smithsonian scientists were the first to use sonar to estimate Antillean Manatee populations in the murky waters of Panama'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers have identified olfactory receptors that enable ants to smell and recognize workers, males, and their queenQueen ants spend most of their time having babies. To reign supreme in a colony, they exude a special scent, or pheromone, on the waxy surface of their body that suppresses ovary development in their sisters, rendering the latter reproductively inactive workers that find food, nurse the young and protect the colony.
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Live Science

Solar Eclipse-Chasing Jets Aim to Solve Mystery of Sun's CoronaScientists will use cameras on two of NASA's WB-57 research jets to make high-resolution moving observations of the sun's corona during the total solar eclipse.
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Gizmodo

Chuck E. Cheese's Animatronic Band Is Starting to Break Up and Fans Are Heartbroken GIF GIF: YouTube/CEC Colorado Earlier this week, America’s most popular rat-fronted pizza restaurant and entertainment venue announced a plan to phase out some of its animatronic performers, and admirers of Chuck E. Cheese’s iconic leering robots are in mourning. According to a report from CBS News, Chuck E. Cheese plans to modernize several restaurants by toning down the wacky, colorful design,
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Gizmodo

Tech Companies Race to Finally Enforce Policies After Charlottesville Violence [Updated] Nearly all the major technology services we’ve come to rely on have been negligent in enforcing their own user protection guidelines. Repeated calls to act on the Terms of Service these companies outlined for themselves without any meaningful response has arguably emboldened the worst elements taking root on them—with years of simmering hatred brought to boil this weekend in Charlottesville. In t
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI Is Taking Over the CloudCloud storage company Box is using Google’s vision technology to make its service considerably smarter.
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The Atlantic

How the President, the Police, and the Media Embolden the Far-Right When former FBI agent Michael German heard President Trump characterize the deadly violence that unfolded in Charlottesville, Virginia, after white nationalists rallied in support of a Confederate statue as the fault of “both sides,” he saw it as part of a broader pattern. “I do think there’s blame on both sides,” the president said during a press conference on Tuesday, referring to the deadly ev
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The Atlantic

The Tax Break Dividing the Republican Party There are few more-prized constituencies in American politics than small businesses, those emblems and underdogs of Main Street U.S.A. that are, as any seasoned officeholder will describe, “the backbone” of the nation’s economy. And for Republicans trying to sell the public on the job-creating potential of a once-in-a-generation tax overhaul, there may be no handier example than Neutral Posture,
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The Atlantic

The Legacy of Confederate Symbols The white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend was a defining moment in Donald Trump’s presidency. But the event, held in protest of the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, was only a piece of the larger national debate over the legacy of the Civil War and the symbols associated with it. From the 2015 shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, w
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Popular Science

I write about space for a living—and I’m probably skipping the total eclipse Space Even partial eclipses can be exciting. Listen, it's ok if you don't migrate with millions of other people to see a two-minute-long event.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hemorrhagic fevers: Countering inflammation to prevent circulatory failureHemorrhagic fevers are severe viral diseases that are often fatal. Researchers from the University of Basel have now identified messenger substances of the immune system, which in infected mice lead to the development of shock. These results, published in the scientific journal Cell Host & Microbe, open up new possibilities for the development of life-saving therapies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why a few drops of water make whisky taste betterIgnore the snobs, because most experts agree: a few drops of water enhance the taste of whiskies, from well-rounded blends to peat bombs redolent of smoke, tobacco and leather.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turkey bones may help trace fate of ancient cliff dwellersResearchers say they have found a new clue into the mysterious exodus of ancient cliff-dwelling people from the Mesa Verde area of Colorado more than 700 years ago: DNA from the bones of domesticated turkeys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smithsonian manatee count informs policy recommendationsSmithsonian scientists use sonar to estimate Antillean Manatee populations in the murky waters of Panama's internationally protected San San Pond Sak wetlands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smells like queen spiritTo reign supreme in a colony, queen ants exude a special scent, or pheromone, on the waxy surface of their body that suppresses ovary development in their sisters, rendering the latter reproductively inactive workers that find food, nurse the young and protect the colony. Now, researchers at the University of California, Riverside have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind how ants sens
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ray of hope for more abundant wheat cropsUsing infrared gas analyzers connected to a miniature controlled environment chamber, Dr. Samuel Taylor and Professor Steve Long, at the Lancaster Environment Centre simulated a sudden increase in sunlight following shade, and measured the time it took for the plant to regain its maximum photosynthesis efficiency and take full advantage of the extra energy from light. They found it took about 15 m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next-generation transportFor most of us, fluid dynamics and mechanics aren't particularly significant—that is, until we're white-knuckling it on a bumpy plane ride or trying to stay buoyant in unusually bubbly water. The way we navigate through air and water may one day be improved thanks to UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the complex properties and interactions of fluids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop new methods for assesing risk of subsurface phosphorusWhen it comes to advancing nutrient management planning for croplands across the United States, it is important to evaluate phosphorus indices to ensure accurate phosphorus loss risk assessment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender norms are still important for women's choice of college majorTraditional cultural norms about gendered roles and femininity still matter for women's choice of college major, says Ann Beutel of the University of Oklahoma in the US. Beutel and her colleagues published a study in Springer's journal Gender Issues showing how long-held cultural norms about femininity may contribute to ongoing gender segregation in academia, and to the college majors that women d
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Live Science

In Photos: Eclipse-Chasing Jets Aim to Get Best-Ever View of Sun's CoronaThe pilots of two of NASA's WB-57 high-altitude research jets will enjoy what may be the best view ever of a total solar eclipse on Aug. 21.
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Ars Technica

FCC’s claim that it was hit by DDoS should be investigated, lawmakers say Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Kheng ho Toh) Two Democratic members of Congress today called for an independent investigation into the Federal Communications Commission's claim that it suffered DDoS attacks on May 8, when the net neutrality public comments system went offline. "While the FCC and the FBI have responded to Congressional inquiries into these DDoS attacks, they have not released any
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them, researchers reportResearchers at the University of Illinois have discovered a mechanism that allows bacteria of the same species to communicate when their survival is threatened. The study suggests it may be possible to slow dangerous infections by manipulating the messages these microbes send to each other, allowing the body to defeat an infection without causing the bacteria to develop resistance to the treatment
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the genome sets its functional micro-architectureThe genes that are involved in the development of the fetus are activated in different tissues and at different times. Their expression is carefully regulated by so-called "enhancer sequences", which are often located far from their target genes, and requires the DNA molecule to loop around and bring them in close proximity to their target genes. Such 3D changes of the DNA are in turn controlled b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists compare soil microbes in no-till, conventional tilling systems of Pacific Northwest farmsIn recent decades, growers have increasingly been adopting no-till farming to reduce soil erosion and decrease fuel, labor, and inputs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New proposal for a subspecies definition triggered by a new longhorn beetle subspeciesThe discovery of a new subspecies of longhorn beetle from Scandinavia triggered a discussion on the vague organism classification rank 'subspecies'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First successful wild whale shark health assessments performedFor the first time ever, scientists successfully performed health assessments, including collecting blood and biological samples, taking measurements and attaching satellite tracking tags, to a population of wild whale sharks - the world's largest fish, classified as "endangered" since 2016. The research advancement, which occurred in Indonesia's remote Cendrawasih Bay, has significant implication
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do occupational factors affect reproductive health and chronic disease risk for nurses?A prospective study of more than 20,000 nurses aged 20-45 years, 88 percent of whom had worked night shifts, reported their most common health issues, disease history, reproductive experiences, occupational exposures, and other lifestyle- and work-related factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists have transferred an office scanner into a new tool for soil color evaluationA scientist of the Soil Science Department of the Lomonosov Moscow State University together with the colleagues have designed a simple technique for quantitative characteristic of soil color with the help of a low-cost digital device. The available color control technique is promising as it decreases incorrect diagnostic of soil horizons and consequently, increases the accuracy of soil maps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When Russian teenagers start drinkingHigh school students intending to pursue vocational education consume alcohol more often than their peers who are planning to go to universities. These findings come from a survey of 1,000 Russian high school students that was carried out as part of a joint research project by scholars from Higher School of Economics and New York University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists compare soil microbes in no-till, conventional tilling systems of Pacific Northwest farmsWheat growers of the inland Pacific Northwest have been slow to adopt no-till farming, in part because short-term residue accumulation can encourage fungal soil-borne disease outbreaks. But over longer periods, researchers at Washington State University and the University of Idaho noticed fewer outbreaks in fields where no-till was practiced for multiple seasons. New and cutting-edge research feat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them, researchers reportA new study suggests it may be possible to slow dangerous infections by manipulating the messages microbes send to one another, allowing the body to defeat an infection without causing the bacteria to develop resistance to the treatment.
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Gizmodo

Vanderbilt University Recalls 8,000 Eclipse Viewing Glasses If your Vanderbilt branded eclipse glasses look like this, get them exchanged immediately. (Image: Vanderbilt Health) Officials at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have decided to recall 8,000 pairs of eclipse viewing glasses that were distributed last weekend at the Williamson County Fair. The recall was prompted after the original manufacturer of the glasses could not be confirmed. We’re on
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Cold Brew Coffee, $20 Smart Plugs, Free Trail Mix, and More Cold brew coffee , overstuffed pillows , and free snacks lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals 2-Pack TP-Link Smart Plug , $40 with code 15SMARTKIT Like the idea of a Belkin WeMo Switch, but not willing to spend $40-$50 to try one out? This TP-Link alternative has a nearly identical feature set for ha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene-like materials printed with inkjet printerResearchers have developed inks made of graphene-like materials for inkjet printing. New black phosphorous inks are compatible with conventional inkjet printing techniques for optoelectronics and photonics. The inkjet printing demonstration makes possible for the first time the scalable mass fabrication of black phosphorous based photonic and optoelectronic devices with long-term stability necessa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young people with chronic illness more likely to attempt suicideYoung people between the ages of 15 and 30 living with a chronic illness are three times more likely to attempt suicide than their healthy peers, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in ancient PompeiiThe ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Telling people not to 'down' drinks could make them drink moreCampaigns designed to stop young people 'bolting' drinks can be ineffective and can even make them more likely to do it, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whales turn tail at ocean mining noiseA new international study has measured the effect of loud sounds on migrating humpback whales as concern grows as oceans become noisier. Scientists have said one of the main sources of ocean noise was oil and gas exploration, due to geologists firing off loud acoustic air guns to probe the structure of the ocean floor in search of fossil fuels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astrophysicists predict Earth-like planet in star system only 16 light years awayAstrophysicists have predicted that an Earth-like planet may be lurking in a star system just 16 light years away. The team investigated the star system Gliese 832 for additional exoplanets residing between the two currently known alien worlds in this system. Their computations revealed that an additional Earth-like planet with a dynamically stable configuration may be residing at a distance rangi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gender norms are still important for women's choice of college majorTraditional cultural norms about gendered roles and femininity still matter for women's choice of college major, according to new research. Researcher have shown how long-held cultural norms about femininity may contribute to ongoing gender segregation in academia, and to the college majors that women decide to pursue in particular.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pig-to-person spread of flu at fairs a continued concernThe spread of influenza among pigs is common at fairs and other gatherings, and protective measures including cutting the length of time pigs and people congregate make good sense for both the animals and humans, say the authors of a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophysicists predict Earth-like planet in star system only 16 light years awayAstrophysicists at the University of Texas at Arlington have predicted that an Earth-like planet may be lurking in a star system just 16 light years away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Collagen in cartilage tissues behaves like liquid crystals in a smart phone screenCartilage in our joints contains collagen which behaves a bit like the liquid crystals on a smart phone screen, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
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Ars Technica

Without Nathan Drake, Uncharted: Lost Legacy is still just Uncharted Enlarge / I'm legit proud of this screenshot, even though I didn't really do much except hit a button. Can Uncharted really be Uncharted without Nathan Drake? For nearly a decade now , the cinematic action-adventure series has been as tightly linked to its main character as the Indiana Jones movies are to, well, Indiana Jones. Spinning off Lost Legacy as a Nathan Drake-free Uncharted experiment—j
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The Atlantic

Steve Bannon Goes After Asia Officials Updated at 1:32 p.m. ET At a time when Asia threatens to present the Trump administration with its first real foreign-policy crisis, the White House chief strategist Steve Bannon has said he plans to marginalize the Asia-related bureaus at the U.S. State and Defense Departments, which he views as insufficiently committed to a hard line on China. “I’m changing out people at East Asian Defense; I’m
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Researchers Offer Solution to Puzzle of Sea Snakes With Jet-Black SkinTurtle-headed sea snakes that live closer to humans develop darker skin, which may be like a pollution trap that they shed.
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NYT > Science

Some Democrats See Tax Overhaul as a Path to Taxing CarbonTwo Senate Democrats are advocating a carbon tax plan that would cut the corporate tax rate as well as greenhouse gas emissions.
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NYT > Science

Art Review: How Do You Paint an Eclipse? Work Fast in the DarkIn 1918, astronomers invited the artist Howard Russell Butler to record the last total solar eclipse to cross the continental United States.
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Science : NPR

Bears Can Face Summer Challenges In Roadside Zoos Even when the Animal Welfare Act is followed, bears may not live in conditions that many would find reasonable for such large, intelligent animals to flourish, says anthropologist Barbara J. King. (Image credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Ars Technica

Major revamp of the Google app starts rolling out to Android users The Google Feed, Google's revamp and rebrand of its "Google Now" card feed inside of the Google app, is rolling out to Android users. The Feed is mostly a new coat of paint for features that already existed, but let's cover what's here. The first is the new tabbed-Feed interface. Open the Google app and at the bottom you'll see three sets of tabs: "Home," "Upcoming," and "Recent." "Home" is the n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Visual impairment among older adults associated with poor cognitive functionIn a nationally representative sample of older US adults, visual impairment was associated with worse cognitive function, according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology
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Gizmodo

I Refuse to Believe This World Champion Wasn't Born With Yo-Yos Attached to His Arms GIF Last week, the 2017 World Yo-Yo Championship was held in Reykjavík, Iceland. And as in years past, watching these performers, including world champion Shu Takada , can only lead you to a single conclusion: these competitors were probably born with yo-yos attached to their arms. How else could someone ever get this good at playing with yo-yos unless they had to spend every waking moment of the
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New on MIT Technology Review

You Think Silicon Valley Has a Problem with Diversity? China’s Is Way Worse
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

7 principles for building better cities | Peter CalthorpeMore than half of the world's population already lives in cities, and another 2.5 billion people are projected to move to urban areas by 2050. The way we build new cities will be at the heart of so much that matters, from climate change to economic vitality to our very well-being and sense of connectedness. Peter Calthorpe is already at work planning the cities of the future and advocating for com
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