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Oh My God Photo: AP Oh my god, he really did it. President Trump really did the one thing you’re not supposed to do during a solar eclipse. According to Wall Street Journal reporter Ted Mann, an unidentified aide even shouted “don’t look” as the president turned to point and look at the big, dumb Sun without eye protection. Stranger yet, Trump and his family actually had appropriate eyewear for the event.
1h
Live Science
Watch the International Space Station Cross Over the Eclipsed SunSky gazers watching today's Great American Solar Eclipse were treated to a rare view of the International Space Station (ISS) when the spacecraft flew past a partial eclipse of the sun.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farmingResearchers at the University of York working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.
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7 things happening in health and science today that aren’t the eclipse Science Because life will go on tomorrow, and you should be informed. Solving peanut allergies, dubious cancer links, and more that's happening while everyone else in America is focused on the eclipse.
11min
Gizmodo
Reports of Cuba's Deafening 'Covert Sonic Device' Are Only Getting Stranger Image: Amblin Entertainment The State Department has remained tight-lipped about the strange circumstances in which US diplomats to Cuba reportedly suffered permanent hearing damage from an “inaudible covert sonic device.” But new details reveal that “a deafeningly loud sound similar to the buzzing created by insects or metal scraping” was also used to harass the American envoys. What’s more, the
15min
Science : NPR
Total Solar Eclipse Travels From Oregon To South Carolina From coast to coast, a total solar eclipse crossed the United States on Monday. Fourteen states were in the path of total darkness, while a partial eclipse was visible in other parts of the country.
21min
Science : NPR
Americans View Astronomical Show As Total Solar Eclipse Sweeps Across U.S. The total solar eclipse swept across the country on Monday from Oregon to South Carolina. A partial eclipse was also visible in other parts of the U.S. All Things Considered checked in with some listeners who witnessed the eclipse.
21min
Science : NPR
Darkness Falls Across The Land As Total Solar Eclipse Passes Over U.S. It was dark during the day on Monday as the total solar eclipse traveled across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina. NPR heard from some people who witnessed the astronomical show.
21min
Science : NPR
States Work To Help Marijuana Industry Reduce Power Costs Growing marijuana takes a lot of energy, which comes into conflict with state efforts to reduce greenhouse gases. Now, some places are helping the pot industry to become more energy efficient.
21min
Science : NPR
People Travel Across The Country To Get A Glimpse Of The Solar Eclipse Americans are traveling to cities, towns and campsites across the country to get a good view of the Great American Eclipse. All Things Considered heard from a few of them as they witnessed eclipse in totality.
21min
Science : NPR
Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms? Walmart has promised big cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases. To meet that goal, though, the giant retailer may have to persuade farmers to use less fertilizer. It won't be easy. (Image credit: TheBusman/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
What Was the Point of Heroes' Eclipse, Again? GIF Though we may look back at Heroes as a superhero TV show that quickly petered off in terns of quality during later seasons, you’ve really got to respect that original viral marketing campaign NBC used to promote it. “Save the cheerleader, save the world.” That helix symbol . And of course, the eclipse. A large part of enjoying Heroes when it first aired back in 2006 was poring over the show i
27min
Ars Technica
Miss the totality? Google Maps will make you feel better. Enlarge (credit: https://www.google.com/search?q=Google&oq=Google&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l3j0j69i65.515j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 ) Earlier today, millions of Americans flocked to a strip of land about 70 miles wide, stretching from Portland, Oregon, to Columbia, South Carolina, to view a once-a-decade total solar eclipse. Now the totality is over, and everyone is trying to go home. And as the
32min
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The USS John S. McCain Crash Isn't Exactly Like the USS Fitzgerald'sThe collision with a tanker happened in one of the world's most congested waterways.
36min
Live Science
Scientists Respond to the Total Solar Eclipse on TwitterFrom sheer awe to Pac-Man jokes, here's how famous scientists reacted to the total eclipse on Twitter.
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn biologists show how plants turn off genes they don't needNew research led by University of Pennsylvania biologists and published this week in the journal Nature Genetics has identified small sequences in plant DNA that act as signposts for shutting off gene activity, directing the placement of proteins that silence gene expression.
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Using machine learning to improve patient careIn a new pair of papers, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) explore ways for computers to help doctors make better medical decisions.
39min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells contribute to treatment resistance in aggressive breast cancersAlthough early detection and targeted therapies have improved patient survival, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death for women in the United States. This week in the JCI, researchers in Jon Serody's lab at UNC Chapel Hill's Lineberger Cancer Center observed that a certain subtype of aggressive breast cancer contained high amounts of immunosuppressive cells and determined t
39min
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Study sheds light on why some breast cancers have limited response to immunotherapyIn the Journal of Clinical Investigation, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report on their study that explored a perplexing question: Why were drugs designed to unleash the immune system against cancer ineffective in a type of triple negative breast cancer with a heavy presence of immune cells? Their findings could lead to a strategy to improve immunotherapy responses in the
39min
Science | The Guardian
How to tell if you damaged your eyes during the eclipse Use this simple test to find out if viewing the eclipse through a kitchen colander has blinded you Hospitals around the country were inundated with people arriving at their emergency departments to see if they had sustained eye damage as a result of watching the eclipse . Doctors across the country also reported a huge volume of calls requesting information about the possible long term effects of
45min
Ars Technica
I was one of the first humans to see a solar eclipse in virtual reality Enlarge / Look all you want... in VR, this kind of view of the sun is completely safe to stare at. I've been told that being present for a total eclipse of the Sun is a life-changing experience . But I wasn't able to get my act together to travel to the path of totality for today's event. Luckily, I am part of the first generation to be able to experience an eclipse vicariously through the magic
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New climate change report likely to be ignored to deathThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officially confirmed last week that 2016 was the Earth's hottest year on record, surpassing 2015, which surpassed 2014. The NOAA had reported this unofficially back in January. What made last week's announcement noteworthy is that the NOAA is now part of the administration of President Donald Trump, who has famously called global warming a "hoax.
48min
Science | The Guardian
Eclipse: the view from 40,000ft above the Pacific Ocean A chartered Alaska Airlines flight offered eclipse enthusiasts a chance at a unique view of the phenomenon: ‘A dream come true’ Evgenya Shkolnik, a professor of astrophysics at Arizona State University, is not accustomed to getting high-fives from fellow passengers when she flies. But after standing up in front of a hundred or so eclipse aficionados, astronauts, astronomers, Alaska Airlines emplo
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Postnatal identification of Zika virus peptides from salivaFor the first time, researchers are using proteomics to examine proteins and peptides in saliva in order to accurately detect exposure to Zika virus. With 70 countries and territories reporting evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, there is an increased need for a rapid and effective test for the virus. This study offers a new, quicker and more cost-effective way to test for the viru
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materials scientists probe a protein's role in speeding Ebola's spreadScientists have pinpointed how a tiny protein seems to make the deadly Ebola virus particularly contagious.
54min
Ars Technica
Atari sues Nestle, says KitKat video game ad violates Breakout copyright Enlarge (credit: 2AM films / Nestle ) Atari claims that a commercial for Nestle's Kit Kat candy bars violates the copyright and trademark rights of Breakout , Atari's iconic 1975 video game. Nestle's 30-second spot "leverage[s] Breakout and the special place it holds among nostalgic Baby Boomers, Generation X, and even today's Millennial and post-Millennial 'gamers'" in order to maximize the adve
57min
The Atlantic
Trump Violates a Key Taboo Taboo and sacredness are among the most important words needed to understand Charlottesville and its aftermath. Taboo refers to things that are forbidden for religious or supernatural reasons. All traditional societies have such prohibitions—things you must not do, touch, or eat, not because they are bad for you directly, but because doing so is an abomination, which may bring divine retribution.
58min
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Researchers produce new map of seismic hazardsBuilders of hydroelectric dams are required to perform seismic hazard studies before their designs are approved.
1h
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Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic iceUsing the most precise seafloor maps ever created of Antarctica's Ross Sea, Rice University researchers have discovered a long-dead river system that once flowed beneath Antarctica's ice and influenced how ice streams melted after Earth's last ice age. The research appears online this week in Nature Geoscience.
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Heart Safe program boosts CPR and AED use in participating communitiesAllina Health researchers say individuals in Heart Safe Communities who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) are four times more likely to receive chest compressions (CPR) and twice as likely to have automated external defibrillators (AEDs) placed by bystanders and first responders before EMS personnel arrive, according to a Minnesota study published in the August issue of the journal, Re
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Solar eclipse: See it in 60 secondsA Nasa telescope captures the total solar eclipse as it passes over the western US state of Oregon.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GE's Immelt among finalists in Uber CEO searchTwo people briefed on Uber's search for a new CEO say former General Electric chief executive Jeffrey Immelt is among the finalists under consideration. But they say there's no clear consensus on Uber's board about a front-runner.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find an alternative mode of bacterial quorum sensingWhether growing in a puddle of dirty water or inside the human body, large groups of bacteria must coordinate their behavior to perform essential tasks that they would not be able to carry out individually. Bacteria achieve this coordination through a process called quorum sensing in which the microorganisms produce and secrete small molecules called autoinducers that can be detected by neighborin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemicals from gut bacteria maintain vitality in aging animalsA class of chemicals made by intestinal bacteria, known as indoles, help worms, flies and mice maintain mobility and resilience for more of their lifespans, scientists have discovered.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious diseaseScientists found a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels also could increase the risk of contracting typhoid fever. A common cholesterol-lowering drug could protect animal models against Salmonella Typhi, the culprit behind the potentially deadly infection. The findings give insight into the mechanisms that govern human susceptibility to infectious disease and point to possible avenues to p
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People favor highly reviewed products, even when they shouldn'tWhen we're trying to decide which cell phone case to buy or which hotel room to book, we often rely on the ratings and reviews of others to help us choose. But new research suggests that we tend to use this information in ways that can actually work to our disadvantage.
1h
Science | The Guardian
'Worth everything': America takes in total solar eclipse from coast to coast Viewers along the path of totality were treated to two minutes of nighttime in the day and the otherwise unimaginable sight of a 360-degree sunset The moon blocked out the sun on Monday as the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the US in nearly a century began over the west coast, while millions of Americans looked skyward in wonder through protective glasses, telescopes and cameras. Rel
1h
Gizmodo
Anker's Wi-Fi Enabled DashCam Is Back On Sale For Just $67 Anker Roav DashCam , $67 with code ANKERVC1 Anker’s beginning its drive into the automotive accessory space with an affordable new dash cam, and you can race over to Amazon to snag one for $67 with code ANKERVC1, the best price we’ve seen since our exclusive (and short-lived) $64 launch deal. I test drove the Anker Roav DashCam , and you can see my full impressions here . But to give you the clif
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Postnatal identification of Zika virus peptides from salivaFor the first time, researchers are using proteomics to examine proteins and peptides in saliva in order to accurately detect exposure to Zika virus. With 70 countries and territories reporting evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission, there is an increased need for a rapid and effective test for the virus. This study, published online today in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), offer
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins materials scientists probe a protein's role in speeding Ebola's spreadScientists have pinpointed how a tiny protein seems to make the deadly Ebola virus particularly contagious.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Once invincible superbug squashed by 'superteam' of antibioticsUniversity at Buffalo researchers have assembled a team of three antibiotics that, together, are capable of eradicating E. coli carrying mcr-1 and ndm-5 -- genes that make the bacterium immune to last-resort antibiotics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can 'reading' leaves lead to more drought-tolerant crops?The study was based on observations that the more successful crops in areas typically affected by drought are usually protected by a thicker layer of leaf wax than other plants.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A tougher toothFewer trips to the dentist may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find an alternative mode of bacterial quorum sensingResearchers have revealed the existence of a new quorum-sensing molecule that increases the virulence of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean energy scores a small victoryGovernment scientists worried that their long-in-the-works assessment of climate change would be suppressed. The concern hardly rates as overwrought. Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, says he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming. President Donald Trump has called the concept a hoax pushed by the Chinese. (Or maybe he was jokin
1h
Ars Technica
Total eclipse of the Ars Enlarge / The partial eclipse from New York City. (credit: John Timmer) Our staff is sharing its eclipse stories and photos from today. The post will be updated as more come in. OAKLAND, Calif. —Oakland and the surrounding Bay Area are well-known for morning fog, particularly in the summertime. So despite having two telescopes and the helpful staff at the Chabot Space & Science Center, the clouds
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analysis of a 'rusty' lunar rock suggests the moon's interior is dryThe moon is likely very dry in its interior according to a new study analyzing fragments of the 'Rusty Rock,' a rock collected from the moon's surface during the Apollo 16 mission in 1972.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dino-killing asteroid could have thrust Earth into two years of darknessTremendous amounts of soot, lofted into the air from global wildfires following a massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago, would have plunged Earth into darkness for nearly two years, new research finds. This would have shut down photosynthesis, drastically cooled the planet, and contributed to the mass extinction that marked the end of the age of dinosaurs.
1h
Gizmodo
6 Things We Liked About The Defenders (and 4 We Didn't) All images: Netflix Netflix’s long-awaited Defenders finally came together on Friday and we l argely enjoyed it . There was plenty to love, mostly in how the four main characters worked together and the banter between them. Technically the show was also firing on all cylinders. And yet, there were some things—things Marvel’s messed up before—that didn’t work. Here are the six things we loved most
1h
NYT > Science
Stitching Together Forests Can Help Save Species, Study FindsAs the world’s forests are carved up by roads and farms, the animals in them are vanishing. A simple fix may help.
1h
New Scientist - News
Low-calorie pizza and burgers won’t fix our child obesity crisisThe latest push to tackle growing waistlines among England's children is a call to cut calories in junk food. It won't work wonders, warns Tom Sanders
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolutionary arms 'chase'The study analyzed multiple species of Inga, a genus of tropical trees that produces defensive chemicals, and their various insect herbivores. The researchers found that closely-related plants evolved very different defensive traits. Additionally, their analysis revealed that herbivores may drive evolution of plant defenses, but may not show coevolutionary adaptations. Instead, they may 'chase' pl
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeted forest regeneration: A blueprint for conserving tropical biological diversity?A new University of Utah-led study shows that targeted forest regeneration among the largest and closest forest fragments in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil can dramatically reduce extinction rates of bird species over time.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify key compounds to resolve abnormal vascular growth in AMDA compound of specific bioactive products from a major family of enzymes reduced the severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a preclinical model, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virus reprograms ocean planktonA virus which infects ocean plankton can reprogram cells and change the way they absorb nutrients -- potentially changing how carbon is stored in the ocean, new research shows.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polarization for controversial scientific issues increases with more educationA commonly proposed solution to help diffuse the political and religious polarization surrounding controversial scientific issues like evolution or climate change is education.However, Carnegie Mellon University researchers found that the opposite is true: people's beliefs about scientific topics that are associated with their political or religious identities actually become increasingly polarize
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of a 'rusty' lunar rock suggests the moon's interior is dryThe moon is likely very dry in its interior according to a new study from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UC San Diego analyzing fragments of the 'Rusty Rock,' a rock collected from the moon's surface during the Apollo 16 mission in 1972.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dino-killing asteroid could have thrust Earth into 2 years of darknessTremendous amounts of soot, lofted into the air from global wildfires following a massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago, would have plunged Earth into darkness for nearly two years, new research finds. This would have shut down photosynthesis, drastically cooled the planet, and contributed to the mass extinction that marked the end of the age of dinosaurs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemicals from gut bacteria maintain vitality in aging animalsA class of chemicals made by intestinal bacteria, known as indoles, help worms, flies and mice maintain mobility and resilience for more of their lifespans, Emory scientists have discovered.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious diseaseDuke scientists found a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels also could increase the risk of contracting typhoid fever. A common cholesterol-lowering drug could protect animal models against Salmonella Typhi, the culprit behind the potentially deadly infection. The findings give insight into the mechanisms that govern human susceptibility to infectious disease and point to possible avenues
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zebrafish larvae could be used as 'avatars' to optimize personalized treatment of cancerEvery cancer is unique; so is every cancer patient. How, then, is it possible to choose the most efficient chemotherapy in each case? Two Portuguese scientists decided to test the idea of using zebrafish larvae to simulate in vivo the responses of human tumors to cancer drugs, literally transforming these larvae into 'avatar' of the patients. Their first results are very promising.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hackers hit Malaysian sites over Indonesia flag gaffeIndonesian hackers on Monday claimed responsibility for attacking more than 30 Malaysian websites following a gaffe that saw Indonesia's flag printed upside-down in a Southeast Asian Games commemorative magazine.
1h
Ars Technica
Android 8.0 Oreo is official, starts rollout to devices Enlarge (credit: Google ) NEW YORK CITY—Happy Eclipse Day! As the Moon slowly crept its way across the Sun, Google took the opportunity to host an Eclipse-themed Android 8.0 launch event in New York City. Along with eclipse glasses and a simulcast of NASA's eclipse livestream, Android "O" finally got its full name: "Android 8.0, Oreo." Like KitKat before it, Android's alphabetical snack-themed co
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to serve next version of Android as 'Oreo"An upcoming update to Google's Android software finally has a delectable name. The next version will be known as Oreo, extending Google's tradition of naming each version after a sweet treat.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Get Started: FBI warns of spreading W-2 email theft schemeThe IRS is warning businesses about a sharp increase in email phishing scams involving employees' W-2 forms—scams that can put staffers' Social Security numbers and other critical information in the hands of thieves.
1h
Gizmodo
Chemical Compound That Gives Poop Its Stink Extends Healthy Lifespan in Animals Image: Shutterstock Indole, an organic chemical compound that’s found in our gut and contributes to the smell of poop, increases the healthy lifespan of worms, flies, and mice, according to new research. Scientists say this likely applies to humans as well, and that this stinky substance could eventually be used to delay age-related diseases. New research published in Proceedings of the National
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virus reprograms ocean planktonA virus which infects ocean plankton can reprogramme cells and change the way they absorb nutrients - potentially changing how carbon is stored in the ocean, new research shows.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dino-killing asteroid could have thrust Earth into 2 years of darknessTremendous amounts of soot, lofted into the air from global wildfires following a massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago, would have plunged Earth into darkness for nearly two years, new research finds. This would have shut down photosynthesis, drastically cooled the planet, and contributed to the mass extinction that marked the end of the age of dinosaurs.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of a 'rusty' lunar rock suggests the moon's interior is dryThe moon is likely very dry in its interior according to a new study from researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, published August 21, 2017 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polarization for controversial scientific issues increases with more educationA commonly proposed solution to help diffuse the political and religious polarization surrounding controversial scientific issues like evolution or climate change is education.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chile rejects iron mine to protect penguinsChile on Monday rejected plans for a $2.5 billion iron-mining project in order to protect thousands of endangered penguins.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolutionary arms 'chase'In nature, plants engage in a never-ending battle to avoid being eaten. Unable to run away, plant species have evolved defenses to deter herbivores; they have spines, produce nasty chemicals, or grow tough leaves that are difficult to chew. For years, scientists have assumed that herbivores and plants are locked into evolutionary competition in which a plant evolves a defense, the herbivore evolve
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Targeted forest regeneration: A blueprint for conserving tropical biological diversity?Tropical forests contain more than one-half of all plant and animal species on Earth. Unfortunately, they are disappearing at the highest rate of any forests worldwide. Furthermore, many of the most threatened tropical species are restricted to 20 or so biodiversity hotspots, which are sites that have lost more than 70 percent of their original habitat.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemicals from gut bacteria maintain vitality in aging animalsA class of chemicals made by intestinal bacteria, known as indoles, help worms, flies and mice maintain mobility and resilience for more of their lifespans, scientists have discovered.
1h
The Atlantic
How Climate Change Canceled the Grizzly Salmon Run In the summer of 2014, William Deacy and Jonathan Armstrong returned to Kodiak Island, Alaska—a place where the world’s biggest grizzly bears gather to gorge themselves. Every year, hordes of sockeye salmon swim up from the ocean and fill the island’s streams in a spawning frenzy. Every year, the bears are waiting for them. And every year, Deacy and Armstrong had gone to wait for the bears. But i
1h
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Android Oreo: Features and Release DateYou’ll want it, even if you can't get it yet.
2h
Futurity.org
Little daggers let bacteria live inside amoeba New research reveals how a recently discovered bacterium survives—and thrives—inside predatory amoebae. Hungry amoebae hunt bacteria: they catch them with their pseudopodia and then absorb and digest them. Some bacteria, however, know how to defend themselves. One of these is Amoebophilus , which researchers at the University of Vienna discovered a few years ago. Those researchers and colleagues
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walmart expands grocery service with Uber to 2 more marketsWalmart is expanding its grocery delivery service with ride-hailing service Uber to two more markets—Dallas and Orlando, Florida.
2h
Gizmodo
Android 'O' Is Officially Called Oreo, But When Will Your Phone Get It? After being made available to developers back in March, and then more broadly through a public beta in May, the eighth major release of the Android operating system finally arrives today with Google revealing that the mysterious ‘O’ actually stands for Oreo: a sandwich cookie suffering from a terrible identity crisis over the past few years. Way back in 2009, Google dubbed Android 1.5 with the de
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Gizmodo
An Electric Ferrari With A Manual Gearbox Is Strangely Wonderful Driving a 1978 Ferrari 308 with zero engine noise was weird. Using a regular three-pedal five-speed manual gearbox connected to an electric motor was even odder. But Electric GT’s EV-swapped Ferrari has a distinctive driving experience that, once you wrap your brain around it, is uniquely satisfying. Eric Hutchinson has the broad-shouldered stature of a comic book Superman and an enormous persona
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Historic eclipse turns day into night across the US (Update)Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century.
2h
Live Science
Plane Crashes Near Madras, Eclipse 'Hotspot'A small plane en route to Madras, Oregon — a "hotspot" for eclipse watching — crashed on Saturday, killing one person.
2h
The Atlantic
The Foreign Places an Eclipse Can Take You On Monday, the moon will block out the sun across a band of America roughly 70 miles wide, from Oregon in the west to South Carolina in the east. Nashville, Lincoln, and Kansas City all get a few moments of darkness, as will several smaller cities. But what thrills the heart of this eclipse-watcher is how the shadow seems to prefer the back roads, shunning the big cities in favor of places where
2h
The Atlantic
Coaching Players for Life Over the course of a career that now spans four decades, University of Michigan’s head basketball coach, John Beilein, has worked with over 100 student athletes. More than a dozen of them have found their way into the NBA. Like many other coaches, Beilein has spent lots of time with the young men he coaches, and has tried to instill lessons not just about basketball, but about life and finding th
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars weather: 'Cloudy, chance of nighttime snowstorm'Mars is buffeted by turbulent snowstorms that occur only at night, according to a study released Monday that revises our understanding of Red Planet weather.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic salt-loving microbes provide insights into evolution of virusesScientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way the microbes can share DNA that could help them grow and survive. The research, based on 18 months of water sampling in remote Antarctic locations, could throw light on the evolutionary history of viruses. The team discovered some of the microbes contained small molecules of DNA called plasmids.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Exquisite selectivity' of neuronal wiring in the cerebral cortex revealed by researchAdvanced technologies has been used to illuminate the connectivity pattern of chandelier cells, a distinctive kind of inhibitory cell type in the mammalian brain. Scientists reveal for the first time how this candelabra-shaped cell interacts in a highly selective way with hundreds of excitatory cells in its neighborhood, receiving information from some, imparting information to others.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool identifies diabetes patients at risk for low blood sugar emergenciesA team of researchers has developed and validated a practical tool for identifying diabetes patients who are at the highest risk for being admitted to an emergency department or hospital due to severe hypoglycemia, or very low blood sugar.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are there ethnic differences in cognitive outcomes based on BP targets?A new article investigates how various blood pressure targets for older patients treated for hypertension were associated with cognitive function and if ethnic differences existed in long-term cognitive outcomes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What is the global prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder?New reserach estimates the global prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) among children and youth.
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Futurity.org
‘Genome cloaking’ keeps private genetic info hidden Researchers have developed a method for keeping private genetic information protected when scouring complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes. This “genome cloaking” technique ameliorates many concerns about genomic privacy and potential discrimination based on an individual’s genome sequence. “We now have the tools in hand to make certain that genomic discrimination doe
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People favor highly reviewed products, even when they shouldn'tWhen we're trying to decide which cell phone case to buy or which hotel room to book, we often rely on the ratings and reviews of others to help us choose. But new research suggests that we tend to use this information in ways that can actually work to our disadvantage.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biofuels from bacteriaYou might not cook with this sugar, but from a biofuels standpoint, it's pretty sweet. A Bay Area company has patented a group of three single-celled, algae-like organisms that, when grown together, can produce high quantities of sugar just right for making biofuels. Sandia National Laboratories is helping HelioBioSys Inc. learn whether farming them on a large scale would be successful.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A good read: AI evaluates quality of short storiesThe idea that artificial intelligence will someday be able to understand and even generate narratives has inspired and motivated researchers for years. A question inextricably bound to both lines of research remains unresolved, however: Can AI recognize a good story if it sees one?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biofuels from bacteriaScientists are working toward a better understand whether cyanobacteria can be grown for biofuels on a large scale.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What hours are worked by women, men in dual-physician couples with kids?In dual-physician couples, women with children worked fewer hours than women without children but similar differences in hours worked were not seen among men, according to a new research letter.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Security issues with health apps for dementia patients uncovered by researchersMany health apps designed to assist dementia patients and their caregivers have inadequate security policies or lack security policies altogether, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Searching for the 'signature' causes of BRCAness in breast cancerBreast cancer cells with defects in the DNA damage repair-genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have a mutational signature known in cancer genomics as 'Signature 3.' But not all breast tumor cells exhibiting Signature 3 have BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Therefore, some consider Signature 3 a biomarker for 'BRCAness,' a sign of a breakdown in BRCA-related DNA repair in general and not BRCA damage in particular.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential target for alcohol liver disease discoveredDrinking too much alcohol can damage the liver, but investigators have discovered a protective response in the organ that might be targeted to help treat alcoholic liver disease. The team also found that the same protective response may be involved in aversion to alcohol and could therefore help in the treatment of alcoholism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between cells associated with aging, bone lossA causal link between senescent cells -- the cells associated with aging and age-related disease -- and bone loss has been found in mice. Targeting these cells led to an increase in bone mass and strength.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of cell metabolismIn its attempt to fight a serious bacterial infection, caused by listeria, for example, the immune system can become so over-activated that the resulting inflammatory response and its consequences can quickly lead to death. Scientists have now demonstrated in an animal model that such an excessive response by the immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of the sugar metabolism to pr
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Live Science
Hawaii Says Aloha to the Solar EclipseWith the first light rays of light to touch Hawaii this early morning, people here bid aloha to a partial solar eclipse.
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Ars Technica
America’s biggest board game convention: Gen Con in pictures Every year, 60,000+ tabletop enthusiasts converge on Indianapolis to take part in Gen Con, the biggest board game party in America. The Indiana Convention center is the epicenter, but the entire city turns into a Bizzaro World where everywhere you go, random people are talking CCG strategy or discussing the proper way to build an economic engine in that hot new Eurogame. Just about every table in
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The Atlantic
Trump's Plan for Afghanistan What a difference four years and a presidential election victory make. In 2013, Donald Trump offered this prescription for what the U.S. should do in Afghanistan: We have wasted an enormous amount of blood and treasure in Afghanistan. Their government has zero appreciation. Let's get out! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 21, 2013 On Monday night, he is expected to offer a new plan fo
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
This Street Outlaw Is Concocting A Potion to Secure Victory | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c Shane tests a new Sticky mixture that he thinks will guarantee him a small tire tournament win. Full episodes streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitte
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Solar eclipse: Watch it happenThe US witnesses the spectacular effects of its first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in 100 years.
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Popular Science
How to look at the eclipse without damaging your eyes Health It’s always a bad idea to look directly at the sun, and today is no exception. Looking directly at the sun during a solar eclipse can cause damage to your eyes, known as solar retinopathy. Here's what it is and how to avoid it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flowing fluid bends tiny hairs inside usEngineers have predicted how tiny hairs lining blood vessels and intestines bend to flowing fluid. The results may help to design microfluidic devices such as hydraulic valves and diodes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotechnology helps rewarm fast-frozen donor tissue, enabling long-term viabilityResearchers have developed a new method for thawing frozen tissue that may enable long-term storage and subsequent viability of tissues and organs for transplantation. The method, called nanowarming, prevents tissue damage during the rapid thawing process that would precede a transplant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heating quantum matter: A novel view on topologyCertain quantities appear as integer multiples of fundamental and indivisible elements. This quantization of physical quantities at the heart of our description of nature, made its way through the centuries, as evidenced by the antique concept of the atom. The discovery of quantized quantities has often been associated with a revolution in our understanding of nature's law, a striking example bein
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Racial stereotypes influence perception of NFL quarterbacksRacial stereotypes affect the public's perception of NFL quarterbacks and may, in some cases, become a self-fulfilling prophecy for black athletes, new research shows.
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Gizmodo
Don't [Updated] Screenshot: Twitter We have told you not to stare at the Sun today. We have told you to use safety glasses. We have tried so very hard, and we are so very tired. Here are some people who’ve collectively said “fuck it, we’re doing it anyway.” Yeah, we know they’re kidding. BUT STILL. Don’t do it. Update 3:31pm EDT: We told you!!!! Image: Screen Shot via Twitter
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Top-Selling Thermostat Has Nest-Like Features For Under $100 Sensi Smart Thermostat , $99 This Sensi thermostat might not look like much, but you can control it with an app on your phone, or even with Alexa, meaning it’s basically an uglier Nest for less than half the price. No wonder it’s actually Amazon’s #1 selling thermostat . Today’s deal is a match for the best price Amazon’s offered all year.
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Live Science
The Eclipse Will Reveal the Sun's Scientific SecretsDespite fancy telescopes and solar observatories, total eclipses like the one today offer scientists a unique chance to understand the sun's dynamics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants under heat stress must act surprisingly quickly to surviveIn new results reported in The Plant Cell, molecular biologist Elizabeth Vierling at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues in India and China report finding a crucial mechanism that plants need to recover from heat stress.
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The Atlantic
Deus Ex Westeros This post contains spoilers through Season 7, Episode 6 of Game of Thrones . Jon Snow is about to die. Again. This time, his imminent death is coming at the bony hands of the army of the dead: Jon, attacked by wights, has plunged into an icy lake. Torn at by zombies and closed in on by frigid waters, he seems to be done for. And, yet—here is a spoiler that, if you have been watching Game of Thron
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Live Science
Photos: 2017 Great American Solar EclipseSee incredible images of the 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse.
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Gizmodo
Is Elon Musk Blind Now? [Updated] Like many, aspiring supervillain Elon Musk is gazing at the solar eclipse today. But regular sunglasses and a Tesla sunroof are not adequate eye protection for staring at the Sun. Is Elon Musk using special eclipse sunglasses? Is he blind now? We’ve reached out to Musk to find out and will update this post if he responds. Update 2:26pm: Elon Musk (who has presumably retained his sight) tells Gizm
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Science | The Guardian
Moss may prove cheap city pollution monitor, study finds Common moss changes shape in areas of high nitrogen pollution and drought and has potential to be big bioindicator, say scientists Delicate mosses found on rocks and trees in cities around the world can be used to measure the impact of atmospheric change and could prove a low-cost way to monitor urban pollution , according to Japanese scientists. Moss, a “bioindicator”, responds to pollution or d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare resistance mutation reduces treatment choices for urinary tract infectionsNearly 20 percent of women aged 15-29 are diagnosed with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Now, investigators have uncovered a rare mutation that renders a UTI-causing pathogen resistant to levofloxacin, a quinolone antibiotic used to treat UTIs. The research is published Aug. 21st in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Afternoon slump in reward responseActivation of a reward-processing brain region peaks in the morning and evening and dips at 2 p.m., finds a study of healthy young men published in The Journal of Neuroscience. This finding may parallel the drop in alertness people tend to feel in mid-afternoon.
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Gizmodo
Holy Shit, Something Horrible Is Happening to the Sun [Updated] Image: Getty/NASA, who I can’t believe didn’t inform us about this calamity. NASHVILLE— The Sun is disappearing. I don’t know how else to say it. I looked up in the sky, and part of the Sun was gone. It was completely missing, like a bite taken out of a cookie. Advertisement The Sun is a “star,” a ball of gas 93 million miles away from our planet, Earth. It serves a very important purpose: Plants
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The Atlantic
How to Repurpose a Bad Statue As Confederate statues come down across the American South, there is a question of what to do with them once they’ve fallen. Should these metal and stone colossuses be melted down and broken up? Discarded? Should the wishes of those who, like President Trump, see sentimental and historical value in the statues, be respected? And if so, how? The events of the last week and a half have reminded us
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Learns Sexism Just by Studying Photographs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRI scientists discover vitamin C regulates stem cell function, curbs leukemia developmentNot much is known about stem cell metabolism, but a new study from the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern has found that stem cells take up unusually high levels of vitamin C, which then regulates their function and suppresses the development of leukemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People favor highly reviewed products, even when they shouldn'tWhen we're trying to decide which cell phone case to buy or which hotel room to book, we often rely on the ratings and reviews of others to help us choose. But new research suggests that we tend to use this information in ways that can actually work to our disadvantage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Back-to-school worries for parents? One in three very concerned bullying, cyberbullyingWhat parents are most worried about as their children prepare to head back to school.
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Big Think
Game of Thrones: Why Do We Love Impossible Stories? Storytelling isn’t an escape from reality, it’s a deep dive into it. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism that impairs production of bovine embryos is revealedA longstanding obstacle to the market for bovine embryos is about to be removed. Researchers have described a hitherto unknown mechanism of lipid accumulation in oocytes that limits the success of in vitro production of bovine embryos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Identifying vulnerabilities posed by synthetic biologyGiven the possible security vulnerabilities related to developments in synthetic biology -- a field that uses technologies to modify or create organisms or biological components -- a new report proposes a framework to identify and prioritize potential areas of concern associated with the field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisolGut microbes have been in the news lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do they communicate with the brain? Results from a new study suggest a pathway of communication between certain gut bacteria and brain metabolites, by way of a compound in the blood known as cortisol. And unexpectedly, the findin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
aCar -- the electric 'all-rounder'An electric car for Africa, custom-designed for the needs of the population there, that strengthens rural structures and helps drive the economy: scientists have been working intensively towards this goal for four years. The new prototype, the aCar, is designed for passenger and cargo transportation and is also interesting for the European automotive market.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Before the flood: What drives preparedness?More targeted efforts are needed from both the public and private insurance sectors in order to encourage people to take action to reduce their risk of flood damage, according to a new study of three European countries.
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Futurity.org
Activating the amygdala makes rats want cocaine even more Activating part of the amygdala, an almond-shaped brain region, intensifies rats’ motivation to consume cocaine far beyond ordinary drug levels, research shows. This is similar to its ability to intensify motivation for sweet foods such as sugar. “This would suggest that the amygdala plays a key role in drug addiction,” says Shelley Warlow, a University of Michigan psychology graduate student and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plants under heat stress must act surprisingly quickly to surviveIn The Plant Cell, UMass Amherst molecular biologist Elizabeth Vierling reports that heat-stressed plants not only need to produce new proteins to survive the stress, they need to make them right away. 'We found that a delay of even six hours of new protein translation will inhibit optimal growth and reproduction. The plants might not outright die, but they are severely impaired without the rapid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer algorithm automatically recognizes soccer formations and defensive strategiesThough soccer players have assigned roles, it's routine for players to swap positions during the course of a game, or even of a single play. Other players and most fans recognize when this occurs and now, thanks to new work on multi-agent imitation learning, so can a computer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A good read: AI evaluates quality of short storiesThe idea that artificial intelligence will someday be able to understand and even generate narratives has inspired and motivated researchers for years. A question inextricably bound to both lines of research remains unresolved, however: can AI recognize a good story if it sees one? In the first large-scale attempt to tackle this challenging problem, scientists at Disney Research and the University
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Science | The Guardian
Astro-bling: scientists recreate 'diamond rain' of Neptune and Uranus Using lasers and polystyrene, researchers say they have mimicked the high temperatures and pressures thought to cause diamond rain within ice giants Diamond rain might sound like the stuff of poetry, but deep within the ice giants of our solar system it is thought to be reality – and now scientists say they have recreated the phenomenon. The furthest flung true planets of our solar system, the ic
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Popular Science
Come watch a live stream of today's total solar eclipse Space Experience over two minutes of glorious darkness. Experience a total solar eclipse from Union, Missouri, courtesy of the University of Missouri St. Louis and East Central College, Union Missouri.
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The Atlantic
Why Universities Are Phasing Out Luxury Dorms When I was a college freshman in the early 1990s, I lived in a dorm that was as sterile as a hospital room, a 193-square-foot box with white cinderblock walls that I shared with two other guys. The bathroom was also shared—with an entire floor. Such basic living quarters greeted generations of college students before me. For much of the history of American higher education, dorms and other studen
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NYT > Science
No, Seriously, Don’t Look at the Sun During the Eclipse Without Special GlassesHere’s how to ensure the eyeglasses you obtained will offer adequate protection before you look at the solar eclipse.
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Popular Science
WATCH: The coincidental geometry of a total solar eclipse Space It's both chance and certainty. And there's something kind of beautiful about that. The beautiful chance and certainty of a total solar eclipse explained.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisolGut microbes have been in the news lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do they communicate with the brain? Results from a new study suggest a pathway of communication between certain gut bacteria and brain metabolites, by way of a compound in the blood known as cortisol. And unexpectedly, the findin
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals potential target for alcohol liver diseaseDrinking too much alcohol can damage the liver, but investigators have discovered a protective response in the organ that might be targeted to help treat alcoholic liver disease. The team -- led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania -- also found that the same protective response may be involved in aversion to alc
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Ars Technica
Killer robots are coming, and Elon Musk is worried Enlarge (credit: Carolco Pictures) Dozens of AI-focused technology executives, including Tesla CEO Elon Musk, are urging a United Nations working group to push forward with a plan to ban killer robots. "Lethal autonomous weapons threaten to become the third revolution in warfare," the group of CEOs and CTOs wrote in an open letter organized by the Future of Life Institute and released Sunday. "On
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Live Science
Today's Eclipse May Help Scientists Predict Space Weather StormsA new simulation of the corona of the sun during the total solar eclipse today could test predictions about these huge jets of plasma that emanate from the sun.
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New Scientist - News
Antarctic mystery microbe could tell us where viruses came fromViruses are not like other organisms and nobody is quite sure where they originated, but a newly discovered single-celled organism seems to offer a clue
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New Scientist - News
It could be snowing on Mars right nowThe Red Planet may have had intense snowstorms long ago when it was wetter, but a model shows it could still have violent snowfall at night when the clouds cool
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Mysteries of turbulence unravelled Simulations follow how swirls in a fluid transfer and dissipate energy. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22474
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Gizmodo
Brands Celebrate Controversy-Free News Event Image: Getty / WikiCommons It’s been a tough year in the news. White supremacists are committing acts of domestic terrorism . North Korea is threatening nuclear war . Trump is president . How are brands supposed to have fun on social media when all this bad stuff is happening?! The great American solar eclipse is how. On Monday, brands unleashed a torrent of tweets about the solar eclipse. Most o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika virus stifles pregnant women's weakened immune system to harm babyThe Zika virus suppresses a pregnant woman's immune system, enabling the virus to spread and increasing the chances an unborn baby will be harmed, study finds. The study is the first to report that the Zika virus targets specific white blood cells, handicapping a pregnant woman's immune system in a way that almost resembles HIV. Pregnant women are more prone to immune suppression. Zika exploits th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a non-coding RNA encourages cancer growth and metastasisA pro-tumor environment in the cell can encourage a gene to produce an alternative form of RNA that enables cancer to spread, report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farmingResearchers working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and supportAll cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation, researchers urge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping robots correct errors on-the-fly and learn from each otherNew stochastic separation theorems have demonstrated how mathematicians could enhance capabilities of artificial intelligence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescentsHaving friends who smoke doubles the risk that youth ages 10 to 19 will pick up the habit, finds new meta-analysis of 75 longitudinal teen smoking studies. This influence is more powerful in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic ones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Systematically studying slippery surfacesPolymer brushes are polymers grown on surfaces, and are attractive for use in lubrication and anti-fouling applications. Researchers varied the length of the chain separating negatively and positively charged functional groups in polymer brushes to investigate how chain length affected the interaction of the polymer brushes with water. They found that the chain length influenced the ionic strength
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cellsNew research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified a long non-coding ribonucleic acid (ncRNA) that regulates genes controlling the ability of heart cells to undergo repair or regeneration. This novel RNA, called 'Singheart,' may b
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Live Science
Gorgeous Images of the Sun's Corona in SimulationA new simulation of the corona of the sun during the total solar eclipse today could test predictions about these huge jets of plasma that emanate from the sun.
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Ars Technica
The very dirty history of on-demand video technology Enlarge / It's the Sony U-Matic in all its analog glory. This device was used in the early 1970s to stream X-rated video to hotel rooms, often using a closed-circuit broadcasting device on the hotel roof. (credit: Wikimedia) In 1973, a young Roger Ebert reviewed the movie Deep Throat . He was not yet a household name or a Pulitzer Prize winner, but he was a respected film critic. The fact that he
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Claim lines with diagnoses of anaphylactic food reactions climbed 377 percent from 2007 to 2016Private insurance claim lines with diagnoses of anaphylactic food reactions rose 377 percent from 2007 to 2016, according to data from FAIR Health, a national, independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information. Consulting its database of over 23 billion privately billed healthcare procedures, FAIR Health investigated food al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Searching for the 'signature' causes of BRCAness in breast cancerBreast cancer cells with defects in the DNA damage repair-genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have a mutational signature known in cancer genomics as 'Signature 3.' But not all breast tumor cells exhibiting Signature 3 have BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Therefore, some consider Signature 3 a biomarker for 'BRCAness,' a sign of a breakdown in BRCA-related DNA repair in general and not BRCA damage in particular.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Collaborative effort aims to replace rabbit test for personal lubricant productsA first-of-its kind collaborative project is underway to find a non-animal test method to replace the rabbit vaginal irritation test for personal lubricants. The US Food and Drug Administration gave the project a green light as part of the agency's program aimed at modernizing the tests used to develop and evaluate medical devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
McLean researchers uncover security issues with health apps for dementia patientsIn a recent paper, a team of McLean Hospital researchers reported that many health apps designed to assist dementia patients and their caregivers have inadequate security policies or lack security policies altogether.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Now There’s a VR Rig for Lab Animals
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When fish swim in the holodeckStandard behavior experiments to investigate behavior in popular lab animals only incompletely mimic natural conditions. The understanding of behavior and brain function is thus limited. Virtual Reality helps in generating a more natural experimental environment but requires immobilization of the animal, disrupting sensorimotor experience and causing altered neuronal and behavioral responses. Rese
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Comprehensive genomic analysis offers insights into causes of Wilms tumor developmentMutations involving a large number of genes converge on two pathways during early kidney development that lead to Wilms tumor, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warmer waters from climate change will leave fish shrinking, gasping for airFish are expected to shrink in size by 20 to 30 per cent if ocean temperatures continue to climb due to climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding brittle crack behaviors to design stronger materialsScientists have discovered the mechanism that causes cracks to behave strangely when they spread very rapidly in brittle materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do video game players make the best unmanned pilots?New research highlights the usefulness of video game players as unmanned aircraft operators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
80 percent of Ebola survivors suffer disabilities one year after dischargeNew research highlights the need for long-term rehabilitation of Ebola survivors after almost 80 percent of those interviewed were found to have major limitations in mobility, cognition and vision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overcoming the last line of antibiotic resistance against bacterial infectionsA recent study presents a comprehensive overview of S. aureus' remarkable resilience against our body's immune system and how to better protect against deadly infections, with implications for overcoming antibiotic resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Our brains do change from early to mid-adulthoodScientists have been able to accurately estimate an individual's age from their brain structure. The researchers found that significant microstructural changes occur in the brain from early to mid-adulthood. Until now, scientists thought that brain structure was relatively stable during this period of life, and this is one of the first studies to show that our brains continue to change throughout
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancerResearchers recently developed and validated a nomogram that can predict 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with local-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated primarily with radiation-based therapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spaser can detect, kill circulating tumor cells to prevent cancer metastases, study findsA nanolaser known as the spaser can serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of finding metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then killing these cells, according to a new research study.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Nerf Guns, Lawn Tools, Outdoor Apparel, and More Amazon’s one-day Nerf gun sale , GreenWorks lawn tools , and a 500GB SSD lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD , $150 An SSD is the best upgrade you can give your older computer, and Samsung’s 850 EVO line is the most popular one there is. A worldwide NAND shortage has reversed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report proposes framework to identify vulnerabilities posed by synthetic biologyGiven the possible security vulnerabilities related to developments in synthetic biology -- a field that uses technologies to modify or create organisms or biological components -- a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposes a framework to identify and prioritize potential areas of concern associated with the field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism that impairs production of bovine embryos is revealedA longstanding obstacle to the market for bovine embryos is about to be removed. Researchers have described a hitherto unknown mechanism of lipid accumulation in oocytes that limits the success of in vitro production of bovine embryos.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Will the U.S. Ever Build Another Big Coal Plant?The coal industry is contracting as plants retire and utilities replace them with natural gas and renewables -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create 'diamond rain' that forms in the interior of icy giant planetsIn an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe 'diamond rain' for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eclipse data used to create musical compositionResearchers have created an original music composition for Monday's eclipse. They uses drums, synthesized tones and other sounds to symbolize the movements of the sun and moon and the gradual darkness they will produce during the August 21 event.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better odor recognition in odour-colour synesthesiaPeople who see colors while perceiving smells are better at distinguishing between different smells and different colors, and are better at naming odors, compared to a group without synesthesia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warmer waters from climate change will leave fish shrinking, gasping for airFish are expected to shrink in size by 20 to 30 per cent if ocean temperatures continue to climb due to climate change.
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Science : NPR
WATCH: Experts Weigh In On America's Solar Eclipse NASA was on eclipse watch as the moon blocked the sun in a celestial coincidence Monday. A segment of the country from Oregon to South Carolina was in the so-called path of totality.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Martian weather kicks into high gear at night Sundown sparks blustery snowstorms in the Red Planet’s lower atmosphere. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22476
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Ingeniøren
Forfatter: Mærsk-fiasko i Qatar kan have åbnet Totals øjneForsker og forfatter Morten Hahn-Pedersen, der følger Mærsk tæt, mener, at Totals overtagelse af Mærsk-felt i Qatar har givet selskabet appetit på Mærsks kompetencer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding brittle crack behaviors to design stronger materialsIn a paper published in Nature Physics, Northeastern University Department of Physics Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Alain Karma, in collaboration with his postdoctoral research associate Chih-Hung Chen and Professor Eran Bouchbinder of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Chemical Physics Department, discovered the mechanism that causes cracks to behave strangely when they spread very r
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Feed: All Latest
'Game of Thrones' Recap, Season 7 Episode 6: Heroes Do Stupid ThingsSometimes the game of thrones' smartest players make the dumbest moves.
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Inside Science
Snowstorms on Mars and Diamond Rains on Neptune Snowstorms on Mars and Diamond Rains on Neptune Two independent studies yield new insights into spectacular weather phenomena on our neighbor planets. mars-snow.jpg A simulated view of Chasma Boreale, a Martian canyon near the north polar cap. Image credits: NASA/JPL/Arizona State University, R. Luk Space Monday, August 21, 2017 - 11:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Two separate disc
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The Scientist RSS
Virtual Reality for Freely Moving AnimalsExperiments that place untethered fish, flies, and mice in simulated environments give clues about the animals' social behavior.
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The Scientist RSS
Video: Researchers Control Drosphila Flight with Virtual RealitySurrounded by a projection screen, a fly's flight path is influenced by a collection of moving dots.
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The Scientist RSS
Video: Swimming with Virtual SwarmsResearchers track a fish in a virtual-reality system as it responds to projections of other fish of the same species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
80 percent of Ebola survivors suffer disabilities one year after dischargeNew research, conducted by the University of Liverpool and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, highlights the need for long-term rehabilitation of Ebola survivors after almost 80 percent of those interviewed were found to have major limitations in mobility, cognition and vision.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warmer waters from climate change will leave fish shrinking, gasping for airFish are expected to shrink in size by 20 to 30 per cent if ocean temperatures continue to climb due to climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a non-coding RNA encourages cancer growth and metastasisA pro-tumor environment in the cell can encourage a gene to produce an alternative form of RNA that enables cancer to spread, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in Nature Cell Biology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding brittle crack behaviors to design stronger materialsIn a paper published in Nature Physics, Northeastern University Department of Physics Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Alain Karma, in collaboration with his postdoctoral research associate Chih-Hung Chen and Professor Eran Bouchbinder of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Chemical Physics Department, discovered the mechanism that causes cracks to behave strangely when they spread very r
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CAMH study shows global estimates of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder among childrenGlobally, nearly eight out of every 1,000 children in the general population is estimated to have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). In addition, it's estimated that one out of 13 women who consumed any alcohol at any point or frequency during pregnancy delivered a child with FASD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CHEO researchers identify practices leading to safer outcomes in procedural sedation for childrenThis study represents the largest and most robust prospective emergency department procedural sedation cohort to date. It includes children from six emergency departments across Canada, sedated with six different medication combinations. The results of the study show that choice of sedation medication had the biggest impact on the incidence of adverse events and need for significant interventions
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When fish swim in the holodeckStandard behavior experiments to investigate behavior in popular lab animals only incompletely mimic natural conditions. The understanding of behavior and brain function is thus limited. Virtual Reality helps in generating a more natural experimental environment but requires immobilization of the animal, disrupting sensorimotor experience and causing altered neuronal and behavioral responses. Rese
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In Neptune, it's raining diamondsResearchers at HZDR have managed to demonstrate 'diamond showers' forming in the ice giants of our solar system. Using the ultra-strong X-ray laser and other facilities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, they simulated the conditions inside the cosmic giants. For the first time ever, they were able to observe the fission of hydrocarbon and the conversion of carbon into diamonds in real tim
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Our hairy insidesMIT engineers have predicted how tiny hairs lining blood vessels and intestines bend to flowing fluid. The results may help to design microfluidic devices such as hydraulic valves and diodes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Link between cells associated with aging and bone lossMayo Clinic researchers have reported a causal link between senescent cells -- the cells associated with aging and age-related disease -- and bone loss in mice. Targeting these cells led to an increase in bone mass and strength. The findings appear online in Nature Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are there racial differences in cognitive outcomes based on BP targets?A new article published by JAMA Neurology investigates how various blood pressure targets for older patients treated for hypertension were associated with cognitive function and if racial differences existed in long-term cognitive outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What is the global prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder?An article published by JAMA Pediatrics estimates the global prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) among children and youth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What hours are worked by women, men in dual-physician couples with kids?In dual-physician couples, women with children worked fewer hours than women without children but similar differences in hours worked were not seen among men, according to a new research letter published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool identifies diabetes patients at risk for low blood sugar emergenciesA team led by Kaiser Permanente researchers has developed and validated a practical tool for identifying diabetes patients who are at the highest risk for being admitted to an emergency department or hospital due to severe hypoglycemia, or very low blood sugar. Their results are published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals 'exquisite selectivity' of neuronal wiring in the cerebral cortexIn a study appearing today in Nature Neuroscience, a team from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory uses advanced technologies to illuminate the connectivity pattern of chandelier cells, a distinctive kind of inhibitory cell type in the mammalian brain. They reveal for the first time how this candelabra-shaped cell interacts in a highly selective way with hundreds of excitatory cells in its neighborhood,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create 'diamond rain' that forms in the interior of icy giant planetsIn an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe 'diamond rain' for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antarctic salt-loving microbes provide insights into evolution of virusesUNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way the microbes can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.The research, based on 18 months of water sampling in remote Antarctic locations, could throw light on the evolutionary history of viruses. The team discovered some of the microbes contained small molecules of DNA called p
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FANTOM5 releases first integrated atlas of microRNA expression in human primary cellsFANTOM, an international scientific consortium led by RIKEN, has created the first extensive atlas of microRNA expression in human primary cells. Leveraging the collection of RNA samples established as part of the fifth edition of FANTOM, the team has sequenced microRNA libraries of hundreds of human samples, including many cell types for which the microRNA presence had never been investigated bef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comprehensive genomic analysis offers insights into causes of Wilms tumor developmentMutations involving a large number of genes converge on two pathways during early kidney development that lead to Wilms tumor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A holodeck for flies, fish and miceInspired by Star Trek, biologists are enabling new experiments in virtual reality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika virus stifles pregnant women's weakened immune system to harm baby, USC study findsThe Zika virus suppresses a pregnant woman's immune system, enabling the virus to spread and increasing the chances an unborn baby will be harmed, study finds. The study is the first to report that the Zika virus targets specific white blood cells, handicapping a pregnant woman's immune system in a way that almost resembles HIV. Pregnant women are more prone to immune suppression. Zika exploits th
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The Atlantic
Are You Sure You Want Single Payer? French women supposedly don’t get fat, and in the minds of many Americans, they also don’t get stuck with très gros medical bills. There’s long been a dream among some American progressives to truly live as the “Europeans 1 ” do and have single-payer health care. Republicans’ failure—so far—to repeal and replace Obamacare has breathed new life into the single-payer dream. In June, the majority of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuitNew research reveals the mechanisms behind the effects of chronic stress and tiny inflammations in the brain on fatal gut failure.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actionsDecades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation directly, and finds that the divide between humans and c
5h
Gizmodo
Watching How Game of Thrones Made a Zombie Polar Bear Might Be the Best Part of Last Night's Episode GIF Last night’s episode of Game of Thrones , Beyond the Wall , might have come with a few questionable plot points and sloppy storytelling now that HBO has run out of books. But so far the season has made up for it with some of the series’ best action sequences, including a battle with a zombie polar bear that’s even cooler to watch without all the special effects completed. With a renewed focus
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Futurity.org
These organs step up when virus enters via skin New information about how and where the innate immune system fights off viral infections that enter through the skin could lead to better treatments for viruses like Zika, dengue, and measles. The innate immune system is the body’s first line of defense, providing broad protection as opposed to the specific immune system, which targets the specific threat. “This means even something as small as a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
aCar—the electric 'all-rounder'An electric car for Africa, custom-designed for the needs of the population there, that strengthens rural structures and helps drive the economy: Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and partners have been working intensively towards this goal for four years. They will present their new prototype to the public at the International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt from September 12 t
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Science | The Guardian
How to view today's solar eclipse from the UK UK stargazers in the south-west, Wales and Shetland have the best chance of glimpsing a partial eclipse. Here’s a guide to getting a good view Solar eclipse – live How to see the solar eclipse – with maps With moon about to pass in front of the sun, blocking its rays from falling on the US in a total solar eclipse, it is not only stargazers in America who might want to reach for their protective
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mars has nighttime snow stormsWhen clouds of water-ice particles cool at night, snow starts to fall rapidly on Mars, simulations suggest. The squalls could explain observations made by the Phoenix lander in 2008.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite watches remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey near HondurasNOAA's GOES-East satellite has been watching the remnants for former Tropical Storm Harvey as it tracks west across the Caribbean Sea. Early on Aug. 21 the remnants were just off the coast of eastern Honduras.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees major Hurricane Kenneth in Eastern PacificFormer Tropical Depression 13E has strengthened into a Major Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. NASA's Terra satellite passed over Kenneth and captured an image that showed a well-developed storm with a visible eye.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers predict how flowing fluid will bend tiny hairs that line blood vessels and intestinesOur bodies are lined on the inside with soft, microscopic carpets of hair, from the grassy extensions on our tastebuds, to fuzzy beds of microvilli in our stomachs, to superfine protein strands throughout our blood vessels. These hairy projections, anchored to soft surfaces, bend and twist with the currents of the fluids they're immersed in.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create 'diamond rain' that forms in the interior of icy giant planetsIn an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe "diamond rain" for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic salt-loving microbes provide insights into evolution of virusesUNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way that the microbes can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A holodeck for flies, fish and miceHow do people orient themselves when they are in a new area? How do we use street signs or houses, for instance, to estimate the distance we have traveled? Put simply: how do we update our mental map? Neuroscientists have been studying such questions in animals to learn about the basic principles of spatial cognition. "Until now, we have envied an invention from the world of science fiction: a hol
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First integrated atlas of microRNA expression in human primary cellsThe human body consists of hundreds of different cell types with very different functions and behaviors, despite the fact that the genome sequence of almost all cells of an individual person is identical. The variation in functional roles of cells is accomplished by an intricate regulatory network consisting of regulatory proteins as well as regulatory RNAs such as microRNAs. Dysregulation of such
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Gizmodo
Scientists Say It's Raining Diamonds on Neptune and Uranus Image: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Move over Jupiter and Saturn, a crap load of diamonds could be found in two of the most mysterious places in the Solar System : Uranus and Neptune. Researchers using the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford have demonstrated in the lab— with one of the brightest sources of X-rays on the planet—that the depths of these ice giants are perf
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Gizmodo
Mars Might Have Freaky Snowstorms At Night Image: NASA Elon Musk’s home planet, which humans know as Mars, is abound with surprises. It has a moon crumbling under the weight of its own stress , might be suitable for growing potatoes , and harbors remains from a giant ancient ocean . Apparently, that’s just the beginning of Mars’ unreasonably wonderful weirdness. A new study published today in Nature Geoscience suggests the Red Planet migh
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Popular Science
Bill Nye's advice for enjoying the eclipse Space It's an event that should bring us all together, so don't mess it up. Monday's total eclipse should be a beautiful moment of unity across the nation. So don't make this one mistake.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do video game players make the best unmanned pilots?New research from the University of Liverpool highlights the usefulness of video game players as unmanned aircraft operators.
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Blog » Languages » English
Operation Spywire: Sportscars vs. Motorcycles The barrage of questions is at an end. “Very good, Jamie Pond,” declares Dr. Mischief. Inside his ice palace, he has removed his hat, and you can see that he is a bald man with an unusual scar across part of his forehead. The Chihuahua also never seems to leave his arms. “It seems that you are who you say you are. On the morning of Wednesday the 23rd you will be welcome to visit RAGE’s base and l
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Ars Technica
Microsoft outlines the upgrade procedures for Xbox One X Enlarge / Prepare yourself... Last night's pre-Gamescom Microsoft press presentation was light on major announcements. But the event did include some details about how current Xbox One owners will be able to move their games and settings over to the new, 4K-capable Xbox One X when it launches on November 7. The easiest way to get all your games to the new system, as outlined by Microsoft Vice Pre
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Feed: All Latest
Why the US Solar Industry Doesn't Want Government ProtectionA tariff on international solar panels threatens to curb an important contributor to the nascent clean energy boom.
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Gizmodo
Rich Tech Bros Have an Obnoxious New Hobby Image: Vimeo Life as a Silicon Valley tech bro is awesome because you’re rich, and all that sweet, green money buys you very expensive hobbies. The latest craze: foiling. It evidently feels like flying except you’re on the water and your bones get broken. “Foiling” is actually tech lord shorthand for hydrofoiling, a leisure sport that blends kiteboarding and fluid dynamics. You can think of it as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Before the flood: What drives preparedness?A new study across Austria, England, and Romania finds room for improvement in both public and private schemes that could help encourage risk reduction behaviors and reduce losses in future disasters.
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Viden
Solformørkelse kan give svar på brandvarmt mysteriumForskerne kan få svar på gåde om Solens hede atmosfære, når aftenens solformørkelse indtræffer. Tidligere solformørkelser har afsløret grundstoffet helium og bekræftet Einsteins relativitetsteori.
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Quanta Magazine
Janet Conrad, Seeker of Neutrinos and Other Curiosities Janet Conrad is something of a collector. Her professional target is neutrinos — the elusive air-kissers of the subatomic world, blowing past ordinary matter with only the faintest of effects. But she also collects curios. Her office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is filled with physics-related items — giant spherical electromagnets and the like. And her home, where she does so much
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progressionResearchers describe a new method to study biochemical changes that occur in the pancreas during the development of diabetes. The method is based on molecular spectroscopy and can be used to extract biochemical profiles (or 'fingerprints') containing information about disease progression. The method could facilitate improved understanding of the mechanistic processes on molecular and cellular leve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transitionResearchers probe a mysterious phase transition in an organic molecular conductor using synchrotron X-ray radiation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sedentary behavior increases risk of death for frail, inactive adultsSedentary time, for example, time spent sitting, increases the risk of death for middle-aged and older people who are frail and inactive, but does not appear to increase the risk for non-frail people who are inactive, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How physical exercise protects the heartNew research helps to elucidate part of the mechanism whereby aerobic exercise protects the sick heart. The benefits of exercise range from prevention of cachexia -- severe loss of weight and muscle mass -- and control of arterial blood pressure to improved cardiac function, postponing a degenerative process that causes progressive heart cell death. About 70% of heart failure patients die from the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK promises to prosecute online hate crimes vigorouslyBritish authorities are promising to prosecute hate crimes committed online as vigorously as those that take place face-to-face, recognizing the growth of hate speech on social media and the potential for such crimes to affect large numbers of people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Post-whaling recovery of Southern HemisphereBy 2100 some Southern Hemisphere whale species will not have reached half their pre-whaling numbers, while other species are expected to recover by 2050.The findings are part of new CSIRO and UQ research, which looks at the interaction of historical whaling, food availability and future climate changes to predict whale numbers to 2100.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actionsCopying the behaviour of others makes us effective learners and allow skills, knowledge and inventions to be passed on from one generation to the next. Imitation is therefore viewed as the key cognitive ability that enabled human culture to grow and create such things as language, technology, art and science. Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farmingResearchers at the University of York working on a 700-year old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cold-tolerant yeast strains for cider and wine makers to improve product qualityThe new cold-tolerant hybrid strains developed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland enable fermentation at lower and higher temperatures than before. Production at lower temperature reduces the risk of contamination and possibly allows reduction of the use of sulphates. Modulating temperatures can be used to fine-tune product aroma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Our brains do change from early to mid-adulthoodScientists in China have been able to accurately estimate an individual's age from their brain structure. The researchers found that significant microstructural changes occur in the brain from early to mid-adulthood. Until now, scientists thought that brain structure was relatively stable during this period of life, and this is one of the first studies to show that our brains continue to change th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harvard-Osher integrative medicine's mind-body partnership with JACMThe Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital has engaged a partnership with JACM, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine to highlight the best new research in the mushrooming field of mind-body medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overcoming the last line of antibiotic resistance against bacterial infectionsA recent study published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology presents a comprehensive overview of S. aureus' remarkable resilience against our body's immune system and how to better protect against deadly infections, with implications for overcoming antibiotic resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite watches remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey near HondurasNOAA's GOES-East satellite has been watching the remnants for former Tropical Storm Harvey as it tracks west across the Caribbean Sea. Early on Aug. 21 the remnants were just off the coast of eastern Honduras.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spaser can detect, kill circulating tumor cells to prevent cancer metastases, study findsA nanolaser known as the spaser can serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of finding metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then killing these cells, according to a new research study.
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How I found myself through music | Anika Paulson"Music is everywhere, and it is in everything," says musician, student and TED-Ed Clubs star Anika Paulson. Guitar in hand, she plays through the beats of her life in an exploration of how music connects us and makes us what we are.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Behavior theory may offer key to ensuring infants are put to sleep safelyIt is still common for infants to be placed in unsafe sleeping positions by their caregivers, report researchers. Fewer than half of infants are always placed on their backs for sleep, the recommended safe sleep position.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction?Nectar, the high-energy 'honey' produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower's reproductive parts, according to new research. Rather than merely providing a 'come-on' to bees and other insects to attract them to pollinate the flower, nectar could be playing a much more subtle and entrancing role.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wood frogs research clarifies risks posed to animals by warming climateAs conditions warm, fish and wildlife living at the southern edge of their species' ranges are most at risk, according to researchers who led a major collaborative study of how wood frogs are being affected by climate change.
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Futurity.org
Sugars in breast milk kill bacteria with one-two punch Researchers have discovered that some of the carbohydrates in breast milk have antibacterial properties that help protect babies from infections. While researchers have known that breast milk—a complex and continually changing blend of proteins, fats, and sugars—helps prevent infections in babies, scientists have concentrated much of their search for the source of breast milk’s antibacterial prop
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Science : NPR
Replay Live Coverage: Follow The Solar Eclipse It was dark during the day as a total solar eclipse traveled from Oregon to South Carolina. See highlights from the phenomenon's journey along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse. (Image credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
Man Behind Crowdfunded Submarine Admits That Missing Journalist Died and He Buried Her at Sea Photo: Getty After his vessel sank off the coast of Denmark earlier this month, Peter Madsen, the designer of what was once the world’s largest privately built submarine , was charged with the negligent homicide of missing Swedish journalist Kim Wall. Initially, Madsen claimed he’d dropped Wall off before the sinking and he didn’t know where she was. Now police say Madsen has admitted that Wall d
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Ingeniøren
Solformørkelse over USA skal teste strømnettetSelv om dagens solformørkelse kun rammer Californien delvist, opfordrer flere nu de californiske borgerne til at spare på strømmen, da en stor del af energien kommer fra solpaneler.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New meta-analysis shows peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescentsHaving friends who smoke doubles the risk that youth ages 10 to 19 will pick up the habit, finds new meta-analysis of 75 longitudinal teen smoking studies. This influence is more powerful in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic ones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees major Hurricane Kenneth in Eastern PacificFormer Tropical Depression 13E has strengthened into a Major Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. NASA's Terra satellite passed over Kenneth and captured an image that showed a well-developed storm with a visible eye.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancerNRG Oncology researchers recently developed and validated a nomogram that can predict 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with local-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated primarily with radiation-based therapy. This nomogram was developed with data from clinical trials NRG Oncology/RTOG 0129 and 0522. Results
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actionsDecades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study from Lund University, published in the journal Primates, has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Electronic skin' takes wearable health monitors to the next levelResearchers have developed a new, electronic skin which can track heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data. The electronic skins offers several improvements over existing trackers, including greater flexibility, portability, and the ability to stick the self-adhesive patch.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart label could one day let you know when to toss food and cosmeticsDetecting food and cosmetic spoilage and contamination. Identifying new medicinal plants in a remote jungle. Authenticating tea and wine. Scientists have developed a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can potentially carry out all of these functions with easy-to-read results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remarkable artistry hidden in ancient Roman painting revealedMolten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element, which could help them restore the painting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Into the wild for plant geneticsA new article reveals the opportunities for portable, real-time DNA sequencing in plant identification and naming. Using a handheld DNA sequencing device they conducted the first genomic plant sequencing in the field at a fraction of the speed of traditional methods, offering exciting possibilities to conservationists and scientists the world over.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Comparison of screening recommendations indicates annual mammographyWhen to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.
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Gizmodo
Game of Thrones Is at Its Best and Worst Right Now All images: HBO If the cracks in Game of Thrones ’ post-books storytelling were starting to show last week, they’ve now erupted into to actual fault lines. Last night’s episode was sometimes baffling, and occasionally outright sloppy on a storytelling level, as characters made countless questionable decisions—and yet the show continues to astonish with such incredibly epic, fantastic moments that
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Live Science
Solar Eclipse Traffic: What Are the Roads Like?The most anticipated celestial event of the year — the solar eclipse — is here, enchanting millions with midday darkness, leading to traffic jams in many areas of the United States.
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Futurity.org
Baby toys and books are ‘springboards’ for later learning Learning materials in the home, learning activities, and meaningful conversations as infants and toddlers make children more likely develop early cognitive skills that can help them succeed in school later. “…strong home learning environments arm children with foundational skills that are springboards to long-term academic achievement…” The study, which appears in the journal Applied Developmenta
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Gizmodo
Here's the Best Price of the Year On This 500GB SSD Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD , $150 An SSD is the best upgrade you can give your older computer, and Samsung’s 850 EVO line is the most popular one there is. A worldwide NAND shortage has reversed the previously inexorable downward price trend on these things over the past year or so, but today on Amazon, you can get a 500GB drive for $150 , the best price we’ve seen in 2017.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Volkswagen’s Iconic Microbus Is Back—and This Time, It’s Autonomous and Electric
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and supportAll cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuitNew research reveals the mechanisms behind the effects of chronic stress and tiny inflammations in the brain on fatal gut failure.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heating quantum matter: A novel view on topologyCertain quantities appear as integer multiples of fundamental and indivisible elements. This quantization of physical quantities at the heart of our description of Nature, made its way through the centuries, as evidenced by the antique concept of the atom. The discovery of quantized quantities has often been associated with a revolution in our understanding of nature's law, a striking example bein
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research could help robots to correct errors on-the-fly and learn from each otherNew stochastic separation theorems proved by University of Leicester mathematicians could enhance capabilities of artificial intelligence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transitionNagoya University researchers probe a mysterious phase transition in an organic molecular conductor using synchrotron X-ray radiation.
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Gizmodo
Homemade Remote Control Nerf Grenade Takes Out Opponents in Every Direction GIF They’re fun, but Nerf’s blasters, even the most powerful ones , aren’t known for their impeccable accuracy. So if you find yourself in the heat of battle surrounded by opponents, you’d be much better off with this Nerf grenade in your arsenal , which blasts foam darts in all directions. Designed and built by YouTube’s Giaco Whatever , the grenade uses a remote control valve and a small CO2 ca
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Science : NPR
Eclipse Map: Tracking The Astronomical Show A total solar eclipse began in Oregon and made its way to South Carolina starting at 1:16 p.m. ET. Take a look at where the eclipse was as it traveled across the United States. (Image credit: Katie Park and Leanne Abraham/NPR)
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Science : NPR
Live Coverage: Follow The Solar Eclipse It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Follow the phenomenon's journey along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse. (Image credit: Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2.7-million-year-old ice core pulled from AntarcticaA team of researchers from Princeton University, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of Maine and Oregon State University has drilled and retrieved a 2.7-million-year-old ice core from a spot in Antarctica. The team presented their findings at this year's Goldschmidt Conference in Paris.
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Science | The Guardian
Total solar eclipse captivates America – live! ‘Worth everything’: America takes in eclipse from coast to coast Total eclipse began in Oregon on west coast and passed through 14 states 9.51pm BST Well that was fun. We saw the moon totally eclipse the sun. We saw people observe it. We saw darkness briefly reign. 9.25pm BST Earlier today – pre-eclipse – we brought you news that Bonnie Tyler would be performing her hit “Total Eclipse of the Hear
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Gizmodo
Trump Is Bleeding the Secret Service Dry Photo: AP Over 1,000 agents for the United States Secret Service have already hit the salary and overtime caps allocated for the entire year, USA Today reports . According to the paper, this is largely due to Donald Trump’s decision to split time between multiple residences and vacation frequently, with each of those trips costing a small fortune . The Trump administration has also placed 42 peop
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The Atlantic
High Traffic, High Risk in the Strait of Malacca The Strait of Malacca, near where 10 U.S. sailors are missing after their vessel, the USS John S. McCain, collided Sunday with an oil tanker, has historically been one of the world’s busiest shipping routes and chokepoints—and growing traffic in the waterway has resulted in recent warnings of the increased risk of accidents. The strait connects the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Many of the world’s l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sopping up sunblock from oceans to save coral reefsCoral reefs can't seem to catch a break. Not only are rising temperatures wreaking havoc with their environment, but emerging evidence suggests that a certain sunblock component is a coral killer. Now, researchers have developed a biodegradable bead that can soak up the sunblock ingredient, oxybenzone, like a thirsty sea sponge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New vaccine could someday fight the effects of opioid combinationsSubstance abuse is a continuing problem in the US, to the point of being an 'epidemic.' Treatments exist, but far too often patients relapse with devastating impacts on themselves and those around them. Now, scientists report that they have made progress toward a vaccine against the effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in combination with heroin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clay-based antimicrobial packaging keeps food freshSometimes it seems as if fresh food goes bad in the blink of an eye. Consumers are left feeling frustrated, turning to cheaper, processed foods. Now scientists report that they developed a packaging film coated with clay nanotubes containing an antibacterial essential oil. The film prevents over ripening and microbial growth, improving the shelf life of perishables.
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Live Science
Crossroads of the Solar Eclipse: Best Photos from Carbondale 2017Here are some of the coolest photos from in and around Carbondale, a city along the path of totality for the August 2017 solar eclipse.
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Futurity.org
Dropped seeds from Kazakhstan got us modern apples New research clarifies the genetic exchange that brought us today’s domesticated apples. Silk Road travelers, trading their goods and ideas across Eurasia, brought with them hitchhiking apple seeds, discarded from the choicest fruit pulled from wild trees. This early selection would eventually lead to the 7,500 varieties of apple that exist today. As reported in Nature Communications , the resear
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progressionResearchers from Umeå University in Sweden describe a new method to study biochemical changes that occur in the pancreas during the development of diabetes. The method, recently published in Scientific Reports, is based on molecular spectroscopy and can be used to extract biochemical profiles (or 'fingerprints') containing information about disease progression. The method could facilitate improved
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Before the flood: What drives preparedness?More targeted efforts are needed from both the public and private insurance sectors in order to encourage people to take action to reduce their risk of flood damage, according to a new study of three European countries.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Systematically studying slippery surfacesPolymer brushes are polymers grown on surfaces, and are attractive for use in lubrication and anti-fouling applications. Kyushu University researchers varied the length of the chain separating negatively and positively charged functional groups in polymer brushes to investigate how chain length affected the interaction of the polymer brushes with water. They found that the chain length influenced
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Post-whaling recovery of Southern HemisphereBy 2100 some Southern Hemisphere whale species will not have reached half their pre-whaling numbers, while other species are expected to recover by 2050.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Electronic skin' takes wearable health monitors to the next levelKorean researchers developed a new, electronic skin which can track heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data. The electronic skins offers several improvements over existing trackers, including greater flexibility, portability, and the ability to stick the self-adhesive patch.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key protein to regulate synapse formationKorean researchers have identified the control mechanism of synapse formation using a protein crystallography method. It is expected to be used in the study of brain diseases caused by dysfunction of synapses and to develop therapeutic drugs.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Few women with history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer take a recommended genetic testMore than 80 percent of women living with a history of breast or ovarian cancer at high-risk of having a gene mutation have never taken the test that can detect it.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UAE nuclear programme edges toward 2018 launchAt first glance, the long hallway seems abandoned. But behind glass walls, in soundproof offices, engineers and physicists are putting the final touches to the Arab world's first nuclear programme.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Government Disbands Climate-Science Advisory CommitteePanel sought to help businesses and state and local governments prepare for effects of warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medicationsLicorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compoundsIn a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, contain a plethora of useful chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases, as well as to enhance the allure of cosmetics, perfumes and other consumer goods.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Læger rapporterer om vellykket penistransplantation Sydafrikanske mand genvandt alle kropsfunktioner efter transplantation af penis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better odour recognition in odour-colour synaesthesiaPeople who see colours while perceiving smells are better at distinguishing between different smells and different colours, and are better at naming odours, compared to a group without synaesthesia. Researchers from Radboud University have found this result.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cellsNew research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified a long non-coding ribonucleic acid (ncRNA) that regulates genes controlling the ability of heart cells to undergo repair or regeneration. This novel RNA, called 'Singheart,' may b
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D particle tracking? There's an app for thatSmartphones put state-of-the-art 3-D particle tracking in the hands of the masses.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
Tech Titans Call to Stamp Out Killer Robots
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People who 'hear voices' can detect hidden speech in unusual soundsPeople who hear voices that other people can't hear may use unusual skills when their brains process new sounds, according to new research.
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Gizmodo
More Teases For One of the Potential Game of Thrones Spinoffs Adam Wingard says there will be a victor in Godzilla vs. Kong . Willem Dafoe discusses filming underwater scenes without water in Aquaman . Krysten Ritter says Jessica Jones season 2 is all about heart. Plus, new pictures of Deadpool 2 's Cable and from the set of Avengers 4 and even more Han Solo movie set teases. Spoilers! Godzilla vs. Kong Adam Wingard spoke to Coming Soon about the dark t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Set the initial price discount right to turn new customers into loyal onesA study, recently accepted for publication at Journal of Marketing, reports nonlinear relationship between initial price discounts and customer retention.
7h
Ars Technica
Final Fantasy 15: Windows Edition coming to PC in 2018 Final Fantasy XV is coming to PC in the form of Final Fantasy XV: Windows Edition in "early 2018," Square Enix announced today. To make up for the delay following the release of the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of the game in November of 2016, Final Fantasy XV: Windows Edition includes all the DLC and updates previously released on console, as well as some PC-exclusive graphical enhancemen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wireless motion capture device with widespread applications in fitness, healthA new "Fitbit for biomechanics" designed by researchers from Deakin University's School of Engineering has potential for industries from healthcare to sport.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Machines Learn a Biased View of WomenImage recognition software showed a tendency to associate women with shopping and men with shooting.
7h
Ars Technica
So, you’re not seeing the eclipse today … Enlarge (credit: NASA ) Despite all the hype surrounding Monday's solar eclipse—and it has become nearly inescapable—most Americans will not see the totality. This is unfortunate, because the Sun disappearing during the middle of the day is truly a moving experience . But if you're not seeing it today, don't feel too bad—you're not alone. Only about 12 million people live within the 110km-wide pa
7h
Gizmodo
How to Watch Today's Solar Eclipse Live, No Cable Required GIF It’s finally here. The total solar eclipse that hasn’t happened in the US since 1979, and won’t happen again from coast to coast until 2045. But if you can’t see it in person, don’t sweat it. Gizmodo has got you covered. The total solar eclipse starts around 10am Pacific time and ends on the east coast around 3pm , with a partial eclipse on either end of that. The eclipse itself will last les
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing more plants and trees can cut down the heat in Nigerian citiesNigeria is regarded as a hot country. Average maximum temperature can reach 38℃ - one of the hottest in sub Saharan Africa. In the last few years extreme heat and intense heatwaves have become a common experience in both rural and urban areas, showing that the country is getting hotter. This year, the Nigerian Meteorological Agency has warned of an "above danger heat stress".
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray observations reveal new details about the solar-type star HD 209458(Phys.org)—By analyzing sets of data obtained by two X-ray space observatories, a team of German researchers has learned new insights into the nature of a solar-type star known as HD 209458. The new study, published Aug. 15 in a paper on arXiv.org, uncovers X-ray properties of the star.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Theft of South African relics riles researchers Efforts to relocate artefacts to sites of origin could stall after gold robbery at national park. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22479
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Ars Technica
StarCraft Remastered review: Brood War keeps on ticking, clicking Enlarge / It's, uh, not coming, dude. (credit: Blizzard Entertainment) Higher and widescreen resolution. Redone character portraits. Real-time lighting. Less compressed audio. That's about the long and short of what's new in StarCraft: Remastered . For $15 you can bolt these nicer-looking and sounding features onto your existing copy of the 1998 classic. (Which, even if you somehow avoided buying
8h
Viden
Over 100 år gammel og (næsten) spiselig frugtkage fundet på AntarktisDe new zealandske forskere vil dog ikke tage den velbevarede frugtkage med hjem på kontoret og dele den. Men hvad kan de lære af en gammel kage?
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revolutionary electric delivery vehicle tech prototypedA technology demonstrator for a new type of electric delivery vehicle that could make the courier industry greener and more efficient has been developed by WMG at the University of Warwick and Warwickshire-based design company Astheimer Ltd.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban butterflies under threat of extinctionAccording to an EPFL study, butterflies living in urban areas face the threat of consanguinity and potential extinction. The research drew on the fields of genetics and urban development to quantify the trend across an entire city.
8h
Ingeniøren
Derfor er det så svært at lokalisere noget til havsDer er utroligt mange faktorer, som spiller ind i eftersøgningen af et menneske til havs. Og hver eneste faktor er med til at komplicere efterforskningen yderligere. Ingeniøren har her lavet et sammendrag af de forgangne ugers artikler omkring eftersøgningen af Kim Wall.
8h
The Atlantic
Can a Decades-Old Immigration Proposal Pass Under Trump? When President Trump publicly backed a bill to curb legal immigration, he placed a decades-old idea—that until now had been largely sidelined—back into the mainstream. Earlier this month, Trump threw his weight behind a modified version of the Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy Act, a measure first introduced by Republican Senators Tom Cotton and David Perdue in February that wou
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The Atlantic
Scott Adams's Nihilistic Defense of Donald Trump Sam Harris, the atheist philosopher and neuroscientist, has recently been using his popular Waking Up podcast to discuss Donald Trump, whom he abhors, with an ideologically diverse series of guests, all of whom believe that the president is a vile huckster. This began to wear on some of his listeners. Wasn’t Harris always warning against echo chambers? Didn’t he believe in rigorous debate with a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Americans stake out prime viewing spots to see sun go darkAmericans with telescopes, cameras and protective glasses staked out viewing spots along a narrow corridor from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transitionNagoya University-led team of physicists use a synchrotron radiation X-ray source to probe a so-called "structure-less" transition and develop a new understanding of molecular conductors.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Alaskan tsunami that created waves as high as Seattle's Space NeedleSix-hundred-foot waves crashed down on the coasts of Taan Fiord, Alaska after a massive landslide sent more than 100 million tons of rocks into the water on Oct. 17, 2015.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We don't want AI that can understand us – we'd only end up arguingForget the Turing test. Computing pioneer Alan Turing's most pertinent thoughts on machine intelligence come from a neglected paragraph of the same paper that first proposed his famous test for whether a computer could be considered as smart as a human.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Kolesterolmedicin ser ud til at hjælpe mænd med prostatakræftDe kolesterolsænkende lægemidler, statiner, kan formentlig forbedre overlevelsen for mænd med prostatakræft, viser ny forskning.
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Dagens Medicin
Syddanmark har succes med at droppe krav om øget aktivitet på sygehuse Ledende overlæger i Region Syddanmark tilfredse med erfaringer efter et halvt års forsøg, hvor en række afdelinger har været undtaget fra kravet om at øge aktiviteten med to pct.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's twisted galaxyGravity governs the movements of the cosmos. It draws flocks of galaxies together to form small groups and more massive galaxy clusters, and brings duos so close that they begin to tug at one another. This latter scenario can have extreme consequences, with members of interacting pairs of galaxies often being dramatically distorted, torn apart, or driven to smash into one another, abandoning their
8h
The Scientist RSS
Custom-Made MoleculesA new prototype machine can make the biological molecules of one's choice from digital DNA sequences.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Gordon Awandare: Ghanas Homecoming KingThe infectious disease scientist spent seven years in the U.S. before returning home to establish a thriving center for research and help lead the fight against malaria.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The dangerous game of the 'highwayman' beetleWe all know the type. The project co-worker who doesn't really work on the project, but shows up for the group photo. The dinner companion who develops alligator arms when the check appears. Shirkers. Goldbrickers. Idlers. Malingerers.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Health benefits unlikely from lone parents welfare-to-work policiesImprovements in health have been used to justify mandating employment for lone parents, but new research shows that their health is unlikely to improve under these measures.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google memo completely misses how implicit biases harm womenWorkplace biases are back in the national conversation, thanks to the recent memo by a Google employee. The memo's author challenges the company's diversity policies, arguing that psychological differences between men and women explain why fewer women work in tech.
8h
Futurity.org
Injecting manure into soil cuts estrogen in farm runoff New research suggests that applying manure to crop fields via shallow disk injection into the soil—rather than scattering it on top—significantly reduces estrogens in surface runoff. This finding suggests that manure-application methods can be used to control the mobilization potential of estrogens and points to opportunities for protecting downstream water quality. With water quality in the Ches
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Science | The Guardian
Share your photos and videos of the total solar eclipse A total solar eclipse will streak across the continental US on 21 August. If you’re along its path, we’d love to see your pictures and videos How to see the total solar eclipse across America Solar eclipse – live A total solar eclipse will streak across the continental US on 21 August, when the sun will slide fully behind the moon and turn day into night. This year’s spectacle will be visible alo
8h
New Scientist - News
Solving how fish swim so well may help design underwater robotsTrout, dolphins and killer whales swim in remarkably similar ways – and a model of how they use little energy to do so may help design better aquatic robots
8h
New Scientist - News
Inside the fighter jet of the future where AI is the pilotNext-gen planes won't have controls – or maybe even a cockpit. Timothy Revell got on board to find out whether pilots are getting the ejector seat
8h
The Atlantic
The King of Totality Donald Liebenberg remembers clearly his first total solar eclipse. It was 1954, and he was a physics major at the University of Wisconsin. Liebenberg and his professors drove a station wagon up a hill in a small town south of Lake Superior and set up their instruments under a clear morning sky. Black flies buzzed around them in the June heat. The moon began its slow creep across the sun, inching
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Atlas V lifts-off with TDRS-MA United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-M. TDRS-M. Liftoff was at 8:29 a.m. EDT.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite photos reveal gigantic outburst floodsResearchers from Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, studied satellite photographs of Lake Catalina, an ice-dammed lake in East Greenland – and were truly amazed: Unnoticed by science as well as people living in the area, the lake has been the source of four major outburst floods over the last 50 years - each representing an astounding mass of energy, equaling up to 240 Hirosh
8h
Feed: All Latest
Driverless Cars Need Ears as Well as EyesHumans can hear approaching sirens, autonomous cars need to, too.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology to capture live cell images opening new possibilities to the study of cell biologyResearchers at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have developed a new generation of microscope, which not only could capture 3D live cell videos, but the resulted images are also of much higher quality, greatly enhancing the accuracy and the scope of research on cell biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists accelerate airflow in mid-airWhen a fan blows air across a room, the airflow typically decelerates and spreads out. Now in a new study, scientists have demonstrated the opposite: an airflow created by a carefully controlled ultrasound array can maintain its narrow shape and accelerate as it moves away from the source. The researchers explain that it's as if the airflow is being pushed along by a sequence of invisible fans flo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Avoiding disruptions that halt fusion reactionsInside a fusion experiment, where scientists study the reactions at the heart of our sun, disruptions—large-scale instabilities of the plasma—cause rapid and complete loss of magnetic confinement. Models of fusion plasmas now combine advanced numerical methods with high-performance computing capabilities. The result? Scientists can explore the causes and dynamics of disruptions in unprecedented de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D particle tracking? There's an app for thatUsing four low-cost smartphone cameras and some simple colored backlighting, KAUST researchers have dispensed with expensive research-grade camera equipment and dangerous lasers to construct a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) system that is capable of quantitative flow visualization. The proof-of-concept study demonstrates the research power of everyday devices, and puts a state-of-the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic ice-mapping project will fly for the last time in OctoberIn March 2002, when satellite images showed that 1300 square miles of Antarctica's Larsen B ice shelf—a slab bigger than the state of Rhode Island—had fragmented into a mass of floating ice chunks, scientists began to view Earth's polar regions in a new way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How heating up a quantum system can be used as a universal probe for exotic states of matterIn physical sciences, certain quantities appear as integer multiples of fundamental and indivisible elements. This quantization of physical quantities, which is at the heart of our description of nature, made its way through the centuries, as evidenced by the antique concept of the atom. Importantly, the discovery of quantized quantities has often been associated with a revolution in our understan
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Live Science
Can You Photograph the Solar Eclipse with Your Phone or Tablet?Can you photograph the phenomenon with my cell phone or tablet? With a few caveats, the answer is "yes."
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Live Science
The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 Is Happening TodayThe first total solar eclipse to cross the contiguous United States in 99 years occurs today and millions of skywatchers are ready to watch.
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Live Science
Total Solar Eclipse Transforms Illinois Town Into a Celestial Super BowlWhen it comes to total solar eclipses, "X" marks the spot for this college town, and excitement is building as people gear up for what's being heralded as the "Great American Solar Eclipse."
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Science | The Guardian
Portland in the spotlight: flood of people expected for the Great American Eclipse One million people are expected to head towards Portland, Oregon to witness an astronomical event that hasn’t taken place in the US since 1979 – but this city is familiar with population booms On the morning of 21 August, several hours after daybreak, a solar eclipse will plunge the city of Portland, Oregon into a twilight-like state. The temperature will drop; birds and other wildlife will start
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows impact on young Māori of widening inequalitiesAssociate Professor Joanna Kidman from Victoria's Te Kura Māori (School of Education), says her research team found that rising levels of poverty had left Māori youth with fewer resources to prepare for the future.
9h
Gizmodo
North Korea Releases New Video of Simulated Missile Attack Against Guam GIF Fox News declared President Trump victorious last week, insisting that his unhinged threats against North Korea had deterred the country from planning a missile launch. North Korea had previously threatened to shoot a missile over Japan that would land in the waters near Guam. But those celebrations may have been a bit premature. North Korea released a new animated video over the weekend depi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using machine learning to improve patient careDoctors are often deluged by signals from charts, test results, and other metrics to keep track of. It can be difficult to integrate and monitor all of these data for multiple patients while making real-time treatment decisions, especially when data is documented inconsistently across hospitals.
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Gizmodo
This Is Not a Drill: Amazon's Running a Massive One-Day Nerf Gun Sale Nerf Gun Gold Box Today only, Amazon’s offering big discounts on nearly a two dozen Nerf guns and accessories . So what are you still doing here? More Deals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The origin of binary starsThe origin of binary stars has long been one of the central problems of astronomy. One of the main questions is how stellar mass affects the tendency to be multiple. There have been numerous studies of young stars in molecular clouds to look for variations in binary frequency with stellar mass, but so many other effects can influence the result that the results have been inconclusive. These compli
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Washington Gridlock Delays High-Speed Broadband to Rural U.S.Former Congressman Rick Boucher talks about how Congress and electric power lines could break the federal government’s net neutrality deadlock -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
10 Sailors Still Missing After USS John McCain Collides With Oil Tanker Damage to the USS John S. McCain is visible as it steers towards Changi Naval Base in Singapore following a collision (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released) The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with an oil tanker near Singapore last night, leaving 5 injured and 10 sailors still missing. It’s the second US Navy ship to have a major c
9h
Ingeniøren
Nordjysk indendørs-drone er flyveklarVIDEO: Forskere på Aalborg Universitet og en gruppe af virksomheder har udviklet en prototype på en indendørs-drone, der kan bruges som flyvende buddreng i produktionshaller og allerede har tiltrukket sig opmærksomhed fra udlandet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using microwaves to break up rock saves energyIn a project funded by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, a research group from Leoben investigated how excavation methods for hard rock could be improved by using microwave irradiation so as to make classical mechanical excavation easier and save energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanomaterial wrap for improved tissue imagingResearchers at Tokai University describe in Advanced Materials how wrapping biological tissue in a nanosheet of a particular organic material results in high-quality microscopy images. Application of the wrap prevents the sample from drying out, and hence from shrinking, enabling larger image-recording times.
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New Scientist - News
To tackle extremism, we need to know the enemyWe can’t counter extremism without understanding it – and that means supporting those researching it, not suspecting their motives
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Feed: All Latest
Why You Can’t Download All the Streaming Media You WantYou should be able to TiVo the internet. Here's why you can't.
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Feed: All Latest
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Follow Live from Coast to CoastMonday, August 21 marks the first total solar eclipse to hit the mainland United States in nearly 40 years.
9h
The Atlantic
Why They Parade by Torchlight Last Saturday, self-proclaimed white nationalists carried torches through Charlottesville, Virginia, to invoke the racist legacy of Nazi Germany. Fire is more than a dramatic flare. In a charged context, it signals violence and destruction. The Nazi regime began by carrying torches at parades and rallies and, by 1938, burning buildings and Torah scrolls. It eventually burnt the bodies of millions
9h
The Atlantic
The Other Devil's Bargain Devil’s Bargain is the title of the best-selling book by Joshua Green about the relationship between Donald Trump and Steve Bannon—a relationship, of course, newly altered. But the Trump-Bannon relationship is not the only, or even the most important, devil’s bargain surrounding Trump—that distinction goes to the odd, strained, and curious relationship between Trump and Republicans in Congress. I
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The Atlantic
Benjamin Netanyahu and the Politics of Grievance A leader who portrays himself as one of the persecuted, the target of an incessant witch-hunt by the so-called deep state. A liberal media intent on revisiting an election gone badly. And a left-wing political machine supposedly out to get him. This leader, of course, is Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel. On August 4, Netanyahu’s former chief of staff signed a deal with the Israeli pol
9h
The Atlantic
America in the Shadows The forecast started darkening over the weekend. By almost all accounts, the weather on Monday should have been fine throughout the country; nationwide, late August is usually clear midday, though the odds of clouds increase as you move farther east and later into the afternoon. But after weeks of optimistic outlook, thunderstorms loomed. “It does not look as good for eclipse viewing,” a meteorol
9h
The Atlantic
A Thorny Debate in Plate Tectonics May Finally Be Resolved “In the grand scheme of things, plate tectonics is a young theory,” says Brian Savage, a seismologist at the University of Rhode Island. “The plate-tectonic theory is 50 or 60 years old. That’s not old. I always tell my students to compare it to evolution—that’s 150 years old, about as old as electricity and magnetism.” In the half century since it found general acceptance among geologists, plate
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Scientific American Content: Global
Harassment and Sexism in Science--the E-Mail DiariesA journal editor and educator has heard it all -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compoundsThe least appreciated part of an avocado could soon undergo a trash-to-treasure transformation. In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, are hidden gold mines packed with a previously unrecognized plethora of chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart label could one day let you know when to toss food and cosmeticsDetecting food and cosmetic spoilage and contamination. Identifying new medicinal plants in a remote jungle. Authenticating tea and wine. Scientists have developed a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can potentially carry out all of these functions with easy-to-read results.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Back-to-school worries for parents? 1 in 3 very concerned about bullying, cyberbullyingWhat parents are most worried about as their children prepare to head back to school.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction?Nectar, the high-energy 'honey' produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower's reproductive parts, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sopping up sunblock from oceans to save coral reefsCoral reefs can't seem to catch a break. Not only are rising temperatures wreaking havoc with their environment, but emerging evidence suggests that a certain sunblock component in many lotions that may help protect humans from developing skin cancer is a coral killer. Now, researchers have developed a biodegradable bead that can soak up the sunblock ingredient, oxybenzone, like a thirsty sea spon
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Gizmodo
Big Idiot Drives Into Even Bigger Sinkhole Because He Was Staring at His Phone GIF There are a lot of reasons not to stare at your phone while you’re driving. A little kid might jump into the road, a car in front of you might have to stop unexpectedly, or a giant fucking sinkhole might swallow the entire road. A man in China learned that last one the hard way recently. CCTV footage shows the man on his scooter, staring at his phone before driving directly into the sinkhole.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Today is the day! A last-minute guide for watching the Great American EclipseYou’ve probably heard this already, but there’s a total solar eclipse traversing the United States today, August 21. Here’s what you need to know.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Prioritering i sundhedsvæsenet er ikke et enten-ellerDet er mærkværdigt, at man kan høre nogle politikere sige, at der skal tilføres de nødvendige ressourcer til sundhedsvæsenet, så alle kan få et sundhedsvæsen i verdensklasse nærmest uden begrænsninger.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Danske Patienter bekymrede for ny cannabis-ordningDet er bekymrende, at den nye ordning for behandling med cannabis kun gælder en snæver patientgruppe, siger Danske Patienter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remarkable artistry hidden in ancient Roman painting revealedMolten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element. The technique could help conservators more precisely restore this image, as well as other
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists sequence a whole genome to identify a plant species within hoursIn a paper published today in Scientific Reports , researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, detail for the first time the opportunities for plant sciences that are now available with portable, real-time DNA sequencing.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
RRS Sir David Attenborough's stern on the moveA section of the UK's new polar research ship will get an early taste of the sea this week.
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New on MIT Technology Review
This App May Be the Future of Bedtime StoriesA startup is using voice recognition during story time to bridge the digital and real worlds.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Eclipse Across America: An Interactive Multimedia ExperienceWatch as Scientific American readers and reporters all over the country show off their eclipse viewing adventures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #14: Forstå blockchain – teknologien bag bitcoinBlockchain er teknologien bag bitcoin, men den kan bruges til meget mere som f.eks. indgåelse af aftaler. Faktisk kaldes den også fremtidens internet, men den er også fuld af udfordringer. Techtopia besøger European Blockchain Center på ITU.
11h
Ingeniøren
IOS 11 giver genvej til at deaktivere fingeraftrykslæseren Den kommende iOS-opdatering, 11, vil give brugerne en mulighed for hurtigt at deaktivere fingeraftrykslæseren i tilfælde af, at de kunne blive tvunget til at åbne telefonen for eksempelvis politi eller grænsevagter. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ios-11-giver-genvej-at-deaktivere-fingeraftrykslaeseren-1079247 Version2
11h
Ingeniøren
FBI til amerikanske selskaber: boykot Kaspersky Sikkerhedsselskabet er en trussel mod national sikkerhed, lyder advarsel fra FBI. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fbi-fraraader-amerikanske-selskaber-at-bruge-kaspersky-produkter-1079262 Version2
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists have synthesized new liquid-crystalline photochromChemists at the Lomonosov Moscow State University, in collaboration with Czech partners, have synthesized and studied new liquid-crystal photochromic polymers. These polymers combine optical properties of liquid crystals with mechanical properties of polymers. They quickly change molecular orientation under the influence of external fields and form coatings, films and details of complex shape. An
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying individual atmospheric equatorial waves from a total flow fieldOwing to the opposite vertical orientation with respect to the plane of Earth's rotation across the equator from the Southern Hemisphere to Northern Hemisphere, the equator serves as a waveguide that houses all kinds of atmospheric waves propagating along the west-east direction, which are referred to as "equatorial waves." Equatorial waves are generated from spatially non-uniform diabatic heating
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A map of the cell's power stationMitochondria are the cell's power stations; they transform the energy stored in nutrients for use by cells. If this function is disturbed, mitochondrial diseases can develop that often affect organs that have a high metabolism, like the brain or the heart. The research labs at the University of Freiburg led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger and Dr. Nora Vögtle successfully mapped the landscape of prote
11h
Ingeniøren
Mærsk og Dong gik fra hyggeindustri til milliardforretning – nu er de solgtMed salget af Maersk Oil til det franske olieselskab Total S.A. er begge de store danske olie- og gasselskaber på udenlandske hænder. Med Maersk Oil og Dong Energy i spidsen har den danske oliebranche over 50 år undergået en voldsom forvandling fra national hyggeindustri til global, højteknologis...
11h
Ingeniøren
Franske Mærsk-købere gør Danmark til centrum for sin Nordsø-forretningKøberen af Mærsks oliedivision, franske Total, lover fortsat udvikling af aktiver og kapaciteter i den danske del af Nordsøen. Også samarbejdet med danske universiteter skal fortsætte.
11h
NYT > Science
Eclipse Briefing: The Solar Eclipse: Live UpdatesFor the first time since 1918, an eclipse is traveling across the entire United States. Here’s a map of the eclipse’s path, how to view it and why it matters so much to scientists.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Into the wild for plant geneticsA new paper by scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew reveals the opportunities for portable, real-time DNA sequencing in plant identification and naming. Using a handheld DNA sequencing device they conducted the first genomic plant sequencing in the field at a fraction of the speed of traditional methods, offering exciting possibilities to conservationists and scientists the world over.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart label could one day let you know when to toss food and cosmetics (video)Detecting food and cosmetic spoilage and contamination. Identifying new medicinal plants in a remote jungle. Authenticating tea and wine. Scientists have developed a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can potentially carry out all of these functions with easy-to-read results. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chem
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clay-based antimicrobial packaging keeps food freshSometimes it seems as if fresh food goes bad in the blink of an eye. Consumers are left feeling frustrated, turning to cheaper, processed foods. Now scientists report that they developed a packaging film coated with clay nanotubes containing an antibacterial essential oil. The film prevents over ripening and microbial growth, improving the shelf life of perishables. The researchers are presenting
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New vaccine could someday fight the effects of opioid combinationsSubstance abuse is a continuing problem in the US, to the point of being an 'epidemic.' Treatments exist, but far too often patients relapse with devastating impacts on themselves and those around them. Now, scientists report that they have made progress toward a vaccine against the effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in combination with heroin. The researchers are presenting their research a
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sopping up sunblock from oceans to save coral reefs (video)Coral reefs can't seem to catch a break. Not only are rising temperatures wreaking havoc with their environment, but emerging evidence suggests that a certain sunblock component is a coral killer. Now, researchers have developed a biodegradable bead that can soak up the sunblock ingredient, oxybenzone, like a thirsty sea sponge. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Me
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Remarkable artistry hidden in ancient Roman painting revealedMolten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element, which could help them restore the painting. The researchers are presenting their results
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compoundsIn a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, contain a plethora of useful chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases, as well as to enhance the allure of cosmetics, perfumes and other consumer goods. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medicationsLicorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications. The researchers are presenting their results
11h
Ingeniøren
Udenlandske personbiler vil kunne give 300 mio. kroner i statskassenFra 2019 skal alle udenlandske bilister i Tyskland betale afgift til det tyske vejnet. Men hvor meget vil udenlandske bilister kunne bidrage til det danske vejnet, hvis de skulle betale tilsvarende afgifter? Svaret er 300 mio. kroner.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Cant Touch ThisScientists engineer a new polymer that prevents macrofouling mussels from sticking to underwater surfaces.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Bad weekend? How injecting a virus into the brain could wipe your memory | Mo CostandiUS scientific advances are making the premise of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind more of a reality – goodbye bad and sad times New research shows that weakening the connections between specific groups of brain cells can prevent the recall of fear memories in mice . The study , published earlier this week in the journal Neuron, has led some – including the study authors themselves – to specul
11h
Dagens Medicin
Allan Flyvbjerg får pris på en halv million kroner Direktør ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen og professor ved Københavns Universitet, Allan Flyvbjerg, modtager Bagger-Sørensen Prisen 2017.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nyt protestbrev støtter Rigshospitalets opråbI et åbent brev til sundhedsministeren tilslutter afdelingsledelserne på Bispebjerg - Frederiksberg hospital sig nu også Rigshospitalets protestbrev.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Habilitetsregler har sat Medicinrådets vurdering af kræftlægemidler i stå Fire udvalg under Medicinrådet står uden formænd, og det bremser arbejdet med at behandle ansøgninger på nye lægemidler til behandling af lunge- og brystkræft. ‘Forudsigelig udvikling’, mener formanden for de Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction?Nectar, the high-energy 'honey' produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower's reproductive parts, according to new research.Rather than merely providing a 'come-on' to bees and other insects to attract them to pollinate the flower, nectar could be playing a much more subtle and entrancing role.
12h
Science | The Guardian
Two-year-olds should learn to code, says computing pioneer Early start would encourage women to become programmers and reduce gender stereotyping, argues Stephanie Shirley Children as young as two should be introduced to the basics of coding, according to one of Britain’s most eminent computing pioneers. Dame Stephanie Shirley , whose company was one of the first to sell software in the 1960s, said that engaging very young children – in particular girls
12h
Ars Technica
HTC Vive gets its first permanent price cut, now down 25 percent Enlarge / Take heed: the newly discounted HTC Vive bundle, pictured here, includes the old head strap without either embedded headphones or a more comfortable fit. (credit: HTC) The HTC Vive has finally received its first major, and permanent, price drop since launching in April of last year. Starting today, the complete HTC Vive virtual reality kit , which includes a headset, two Vive wand contr
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Bohr-forskere afslører gigantisk ferskvandsudslip i GrønlandHvert af disse udslip har udløst en energi svarende til op mod 240 Hiroshima-bomber, og et nyt...
12h
Ingeniøren
Peter Madsen: Ulykke om bord på ubåd medførte Kim Walls dødIfølge Københavns Politi har Peter Madsen forklaret både politiet og byretten, at der skete en ulykke om bord på ubåden Nautilus, som kostede den kvindelige svenske journalist Kim Wall livet. Han har efterfølgende begravet hende til søs.
12h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Danfoss, Cowi, Vestas og Atkins mangler ingeniører På dagens liste efterspørges alt fra bro- og elektroingeniører til projektledere og forskningschefer. Find dit drømmejob. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-danfoss-cowi-vestas-atkins-mangler-ingenioerer-9527 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
Science | The Guardian
RPS International Images for Science competition shortlist – in pictures Here’s just a small selection of the 100 images shortlisted for the Royal Photographic Society’s International Images for Science competition. The competition is supported by Siemens as part of the Curiosity Project, which aims to engage young people with science and engineering. The five winners will be announced in an award ceremony in London on 12 September. Continue reading...
12h
Science | The Guardian
Solar eclipse science: how the motions of the heavens affect events on Earth | Rebekah Higgitt A total solar eclipse has always had the power to fascinate humans and affect the actions, purses, thoughts and knowledge of humans all over the world Solar eclipse – live While not in the ways claimed by astrologers, it can’t be denied that the motions of the heavens sometimes have a strong influence on events on Earth. We can with confidence predict that a full solar eclipse, such as that visib
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Millions pour into US towns in path of total eclipseOn Monday, when a total solar eclipse sweeps across the United States for the first time in 99 years, people gathering in Charleston, South Carolina, will be the last on the continent to experience it.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Defence firms eye billion-dollar chance for 'made in India'India has drawn up a shopping list for tens of billions of dollars of foreign fighter jets, armoured vehicles, submarines and helicopters but it will only sign the cheques if they are made in India.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Golddiggers i patientens tjenesteKan vi droppe det ensidige perspektiv på sondringen mellem akut og planlagt? Fra et behandlingsperspektiv er det langt mere interessant, om vi har at gøre med en kendt eller en ukendt patient.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech leaders warn against 'Pandora's box' of robotic weaponsMore than 100 robotics and artificial intelligence leaders including billionaire Elon Musk are urging the United Nations to take action against the dangers of autonomous weapons, known as "killer robots."
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Love beckons for recovering chimp in Brazil refugeMarcelino is calling to her, but Cecilia cannot be with him. Not yet. He may be handsome, but she has suffered a lot and isn't ready for a relationship.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nearly 600 dead in S. Asia floodsNearly 600 people have died and millions have been affected by monsoon floods in South Asia, officials said Saturday, as relief and rescue operations continued.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wood frogs research clarifies risks posed to animals by warming climateAs conditions warm, fish and wildlife living at the southern edge of their species' ranges are most at risk, according to Penn State researchers who led a major collaborative study of how wood frogs are being affected by climate change.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Free speech concerns as extreme-right evicted from webA sweeping crackdown by US internet and social media companies on neo-Nazi and white supremacist material has sparked warnings in America that the web's grand promise of free speech is on the rocks.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost prostheses offer Indian amputees a second chanceVishnu Kumar had barely reached adulthood when he lost his limbs in a freak electrical accident, seemingly condemning him to the life of penury endured by millions of amputees in India.
13h
Science-Based Medicine
No, a Vaccine Court ruling does not show that vaccines cause SIDSThere was a rumbling in the antivaccine underground over the weekend about a recent ruling by the Vaccine Court compensating parents of a child who died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In a confused and scientifically highly flawed decision, the Special Master Thomas Gowen didn't rule that vaccines cause SIDS, but did rule that they contributed to SIDS in this one case. Soon, the message w
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensorsFrom smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest "must-have" technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions in real time.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Testing TVs and tablets for 'green' screensTo improve viewing pleasure, companies have developed television—and tablet screens—that include quantum dots to enhance brightness and color. Some quantum dots are made with potentially harmful metals, which could leach into the environment when the device is discarded. But other TVs made with less hazardous nanomaterials require more energy to make. Today, researchers report preliminary results
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery saferWhether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the highly delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients.
13h
Science | The Guardian
Stop treating science denial like a disease Turning the rejection of scientific expertise into a pathology mistakenly presents individual ignorance as the bottleneck in political disagreements The elevation of science to a central theme in American politics is an extraordinary development in the co-evolution of science and society. Three months after Donald Trump’s inauguration, 40,000 or so people turned out in the rain in Washington, DC
13h
Gizmodo
Intel's New Coffee Lake Processors: What You Need to Know Coffee Lake processor dye. (All images: Intel) It’s that time of year when Intel, the largest maker of laptop and desktop processors in the world, announces the guts of your future PC. These CPUs are always a little faster and a a little more battery efficient. This year Intel is launching it’s latest processor on the same day as the first major solar eclipse in North America in four decades. Cof
13h
Ars Technica
Intel first 8th generation processors are just updated 7th generation chips Enlarge / A Kaby Lake refresh die. (credit: Intel) The first "8th generation" Intel Core processors roll out today: a quartet of 15W U-series mobile processors. Prior generation U-series parts have had two cores, four threads; these new chips double that to four cores and eight threads. They also bump up the maximum clock speed to as much as 4.2GHz, though the base clock speed is sharply down at
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Racial stereotypes influence perception of NFL quarterbacksRacial stereotypes affect the public's perception of NFL quarterbacks and may, in some cases, become a self-fulfilling prophecy for black athletes, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sugars in human mother's milk are new class of antibacterial agentsMother's milk, which consists of a complex and continually changing blend of proteins, fats and sugars, helps protect babies against bacterial infections.
14h
Ingeniøren
Forkælede? Tjah ... Generation Z kræver ind, fordi alt er muligt for demDe årgange, der kommer ind på arbejdsmarkedet de kommende år, ligner ingen tidligere generation. De har ubegrænsede muligheder takket være nettet, er vant til at iscenesætte sig selv på sociale medier og så er de digitalt dannede, vurderer fremtidsforsker Tanja Hall.
14h
Ingeniøren
Flydende naturgas kan nu blive rentabelt for færgerNy dansk metode reducerer energiforbruget til fremstilling af flydende naturgas (LNG) med op til 40 procent. Metoden er skalerbar og kan for eksempel etableres på en havn og forsyne den lokale færge med LNG.
14h
Big Think
The Business of Profiting from People's Sicknesses The pharmaceutical industry excels at exploiting the free market by making recovery often inaccessible. Read More
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Solar eclipse 2017: Americans gaze at sky spectacularSkywatchers in the US are treated to a spectacular coast-to-coast eclipse.
15h
Ingeniøren
Folkeskole etablerer eSports-linje: Elever skal være blandt de bedste Cosmosskolen i Esbjerg har som en af de første folkeskoler etableret en eSports-linje, hvor elever skal gå til eksamen i Counter Strike. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/folkeskole-etablerer-esports-linje-elever-skal-vaere-blandt-de-bedste-1079188 Version2
15h
Big Think
You’ll Never Guess What a Supermassive Black Hole’s Favorite Food Is Researchers are beginning to understand the relationship between black holes and galaxies. Read More
15h
The Atlantic
Is Game of Thrones on Thin Ice? Every week for the seventh season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we'll be posting our thoughts in installments. Spencer Kornhaber: In their post-episode interview with HBO, Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss said that they plot the show by mappi
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial stereotypes influence perception of NFL quarterbacksRacial stereotypes affect the public's perception of NFL quarterbacks and may, in some cases, become a self-fulfilling prophecy for black athletes, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavior theory may offer key to ensuring infants are put to sleep safelyIt is still common for infants to be placed in unsafe sleeping positions by their caregivers, report researchers from Yale and Boston University (BU). Fewer than half of infants are always placed on their backs for sleep, the recommended safe sleep position.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comparison of screening recommendations indicates annual mammographyWhen to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue to spark emotional debates.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sedentary behavior increases risk of death for frail, inactive adultsSedentary time, for example, time spent sitting, increases the risk of death for middle-aged and older people who are frail and inactive, but does not appear to increase the risk for non-frail people who are inactive, according to a new study published in CMAJ.
16h
Ingeniøren
Få bedre resultater: Fire tips til at sove bedre: En god nattesøvn er afgørende for dine præstationer på arbejde og på hjemmebanen med familien. Derfor giver Jobfinder dig fire råd til at sove bedre. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/faa-mere-overskud-tips-bedre-soevn-9521 Emner Arbejdsmiljø Jobfinder
17h
Ingeniøren
Københavns bioaffald skal køres helt til SønderjyllandI efteråret skal københavnerne begynde at sortere deres madaffald. Men der er meget lange udsigter til at kunne behandle det i København, da to samarbejdsparter nu er sprunget fra.
17h
Gizmodo
Game of Thrones Just Took Everything to the Next Level That was one hell of an episode of Game of Thrones . So much fire. And even more ice! Let’s try to wrap our heads around everything that happened—if you’ve managed to catch your breath and/or pick your jaw up off the ground, that is. Man. Well, Jon and his crew of frozen badasses have gotten their proof of the army of the dead, and Daenerys has seen for herself what danger lies beneath the Wall.
18h
Science : NPR
In Illinois, This College Town Won't Be Eclipsed By August's Celestial Event A town of 26,000 will more than double in size as the Great American Eclipse takes place in August. From the local state university to longtime bakery, people are getting ready for it to get dark. (Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
20h
Futurity.org
Potato chip scraps could make cheaper biofuel Researchers have created a new method to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. The findings may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers. More efficient bioethanol production is needed to meet the demand for renewable energy… Using potato mash made from the peelings and potato residuals from a Pennsylvania food-processing company
20h
Futurity.org
Hawaii’s magma ‘hot spots’ are super slow Hot spots like those that formed the Hawaiian Islands aren’t moving as fast as recently thought, a new analysis of volcanic tracks suggests. Hot spots are areas where magma pushes up from deep Earth to form volcanoes—and can be used to determine how fast tectonic plates move. New results from geophysicist Richard Gordon and his team confirm that groups of hot spots around the globe can be used to
20h
Futurity.org
Why so many farmed salmon are almost deaf Researchers have discovered why so many farm-raised salmon are partially deaf, pointing to a deformity in their ears caused by accelerated growth in aquaculture. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology , raise significant welfare issues and may also explain the poor survival of farmed hatchlings in conservation programs. Scientists looked at salmon farmed in Norway, Chile,
21h
Gizmodo
Donald Trump's NOAA Just Disbanded the National Climate Assessment Advisory Committee Photo: AP President Donald Trump and his administration’s assault on the climate science community has continued, the Washington Post reported, with the elimination of a 15-person advisory committee which helps translate federal scientific research into policy. According to the Post , acting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration chief Ben Friedman informed the Advisory Committee for the
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People who hear voices can detect hidden speech in unusual soundsPeople who hear voices that other people can't hear may use unusual skills when their brains process new sounds, according to research led by Durham University and University College London (UCL).
21h
The Atlantic
Is It Time for Trump Aides to Resign? John Kelly’s stricken look, head slumped on chest, as President Trump brayed a defense of the “fine people” on both sides in a Charlottesville march of neo-Nazis and white supremacists, said it all. A man raised to believe in a code of decency and honor had to endure language from his boss which would have earned one of Kelly’s Marine lieutenants the chewing-out of a lifetime. And he had to liste
22h
NYT > Science
Before a Solar Eclipse Crosses 14 States, a Great American Road TripTraffic and a run on Moon Pies were anticipated in some places as Americans prepared for Monday’s eclipse, the first to move coast to coast in nearly a century.
22h
Science : NPR
'Blinded By The Light': Your Contributions To Our Solar Eclipse Soundtrack While watching the total eclipse, folks might want to follow along with some toe-tapping music about the sun, stars and moon. We've got the playlist for the wondrous sky event.
22h
Science : NPR
Words You'll Hear: Eclipse Cheap Seats A total eclipse sweeps the U.S. on Monday. But most will see a partial eclipse. The question is: Is an 80 or even a 90 percent eclipse worth it? Or should people make the extra effort to see totality?
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
If You Follow Mr. Gold, You Might Get Screamed At Like This #BeringSeaGold | Fridays at 9p The Kellys are finally on the gold. But in the process of hitting the mother lode, they may have stepped on some toes. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/bering-sea-gold/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BeringSeaGold https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twi
23h
cognitive science
The Geometry of Consciousness submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
23h
The Atlantic
Remembering Jerry Lewis Jerry Lewis, one of Hollywood’s most iconic and influential comedians with a decades-long legacy as an actor, writer, singer, director, and humanitarian, died on Sunday morning in Las Vegas at the age of 91. Beloved beginning in the late 1940s as a broad family entertainer with an unparalleled gift for physical comedy, Lewis was many things to many people over his 70-plus years in the industry. H
23h
Gizmodo
Jurassic World Evolution Is A Theme Park Building Game Coming In 2018 Announced during Microsoft’s pre-Gamescom briefing, Jurassic World Evolution will let players build their very own deadly theme parks. The game is being created by the developers behind the space exploration sim Elite Dangerous, Frontier Developments , and will be based around the island from the 2015 movie. That means bioengineering new kinds of deadly prehistoric creatures, managing facilities
23h
Gizmodo
Jerry Lewis, Legendary Comic and the Original Nutty Professor, Dies at 91 Photo: Eric Pendzich/Shutterstock Comedic legend and star of the sci-fi comedy The Nutty Professor Jerry Lewis passed away today at his home. He was 91 years old. Born in 1926, Lewis went on to success as a comic, singer, actor and filmmaker. In 1963, he made The Nutty Professor as a wacky parody of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde , blending science fiction and romantic comedy into a winning combination.
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Gizmodo
PSA: Xbox One X Preorders Are Live Preorder Xbox One X , $500 I probably wouldn’t expect Nintendo-like supply shortages, but if you want to be absolutely sure to get an Xbox One X at launch, preorders are live now . Update : Sold out on Amazon (at least for now), but check out GameStop , Walmart , Best Buy , and Target for more ordering options. More Deals
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Science | The Guardian
Flowers to bring a buzz to the garden A study at the University of Sussex found that the most insect-friendly plants aren’t the ones recommended by garden centres There’s lots of publicity urging gardeners to grow flowers that attract bees and butterflies, but are we being led up the garden path? Even though many garden flowers are advertised as bee-friendly, a recent study reveals that most of them are fairly useless at attracting i
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Ars Technica
Jurassic World Evolution is a theme park sim from Planet Coaster dev Frontier Frontier, the developer behind the sublime Elite Dangerous and Planet Coaster has new sim in the works. Jurassic World Evolution is a theme park sim, but instead of ferris wheels you have Triceratops, and instead of worrying about guests getting sick, you have to worry about guests getting eaten by a freaking T-Rex. Jurassic World Evolution puts players in control of operations on the island of I
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Gizmodo
116 Experts From 26 Countries Ask UN to Ban Fully Autonomous Weapons Systems Photo: AP Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Google AI expert Mustafa Suleyman are among 116 experts from 26 countries who have signed a letter to the United Nations asking it to ban autonomous weapons worldwide, warning killer robots could usher in an unprecedented new era of deadly warfare. The group warned the UN’s Convention on Conventional Weapons review conference that “Once developed, lethal autonomo
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NYT > Science
Photos: The Eclipse Is Coming. Are You Ready?On Monday, the moon will blot out the sun. Here’s what people are doing to prepare.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Letters From the World of Turtle EvolutionSpills and thrills from the exciting world of turtle evolutionary history... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest
Mercedes-Benz's $2.8 Million Project One Hypercar Gets Huge Power From a Tiny EngineThe engineering lift behind the mysterious Project One.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Deadliest Catch Captains Have A Final Salute to Johnathan Hillstrand #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Here's one final salute - Time Bandit style! - to Johnathan Hillstrand as he ends his final season. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Step aboard the fishing vessels of DEADLIEST CATCH for an immersive 360° panoramic experience! http://www.deadliestcatch360.c
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Gizmodo
Gear Up For Football Season With Amazon's One-Day Tailgating Sale Coleman Tailgating Sale Football season is almost here, and you can have the best tailgate in the parking lot with this one-day Amazon sale . Save on grills, coolers, chairs, and more from Coleman. More Deals
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Gizmodo
Elon Musk Continues To Add Basic Features To Tesla Cars Based On Twitter Feedback Automotive pioneer and Tesla CEO Elon Musk invested a lot of time this weekend responding to Tesla owner feedback on Twitter. While the feedback was constructive and will likely quickly result in better cars, the forum highlights issues of customer service for the rapidly growing automaker. This weekends’ pitched improvements to the Tesla ownership experience came courtesy of a flurry of tweets f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel approach to track HIV infectionScientists used a novel live-cell fluorescent imaging system that allowed them for the first time to identify individual viral particles associated with HIV infection.
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Gizmodo
ICE Says It Doesn't Track Down Undocumented Immigrants Using 'Stingray' Devices Photo: AP Acting head of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement Thomas Homan told Sen. Ron Wyden the agency does not use cell-site simulators—a type of surveillance gear often referred to as a “Stingray” that can track down a specific mobile device by emulating cell phone towers—to locate undocumented immigrants. Per Ars Technica , the August 16th letter states ICE Enforcement and Removal Operation
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Live Science
1 Day Until the Solar Eclipse! NASA Scientist Explains What Makes Eclipses SpectacularWe're just one day away from the Great American Solar Eclipse, and people across the U.S. are getting ready to see this once-in-a-lifetime astronomical event.
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Ars Technica
Supreme Court asked to nullify the Google trademark Enlarge (credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images ) Is the term "google" too generic and therefore unworthy of its trademark protection? That's the question before the US Supreme Court. Words like teleprompter, thermos, hoover, aspirin, and videotape were once trademarked. They lost the status after their names became too generic and fell victim to what is known as "genericide." What's before the Supreme C
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Live Science
Total Solar Eclipse Could Cost US Nearly $700 Million in Lost ProductivityThe total solar eclipse of 2017 could cost U.S. companies nearly $700 million in lost productivity on Monday (Aug. 21) when workers pause to watch the moon block the sun.
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Big Think
Why Is It You Can Sense When Someone’s Staring at You? A very complex biological system must work in concert for daze detection to occur. Read More
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Ars Technica
Get out of the office, see the eclipse Enlarge (credit: NASA ) Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that August 21 will treat much of the United States to a partial or total solar eclipse. The total eclipse will be visible along a path that stretches from the Oregon-Washington border to South Carolina. But even if you're not on the path of totality, you'd have to be in northern Maine to see more than half the Sun during th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sugars in human mother's milk are new class of antibacterial agentsA new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections, making them a new class of antimicrobial agent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climatesSoldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. To keep military personnel more comfortable, scientists are trying to create high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could conceivably be used in future consumer clothing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Testing TVs and tablets for 'green' screensToday, researchers report preliminary results suggesting that under simulated landfill conditions, quantum dots can leach out of TVs and tablets. But because this happens in such tiny amounts, the team says that in the grand scheme of things, it might make sense to use the more toxic quantum dots that are made with a more eco-friendly process. The researchers are presenting their results at the 25
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletesScientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes -- and even amateur fitness enthusiasts -- recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to energy. The researchers will present their work today at the 254th Natio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensorsFrom smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest 'must-have' technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery saferWhether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients.
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Ars Technica
A gallery of Voyager’s greatest hits—and they are truly great NASA Sunday marks the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 which, at the time, confused the heck out of the press and public because it actually launched before Voyager 1. Why did they launch the second probe first? Because Voyager 2 was going to follow a longer trajectory to reach the Jupiter system, allowing it to fly by Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Voyager 1 launched 16 days later on a
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Scientific American Content: Global
Eclipse: It's All about the UmbraWhat makes a total solar eclipse seem so strange and awe-inspiring? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
This Silence of the Lambs Action Figure Is Too Realistic Image courtesy Bluefin Anyone who’s ever wanted the cold, hard eyes of a murderous Anthony Hopkins staring at them is in luck, because this Hannibal action figure is so accurate it’s uncanny. Designed and manufactured by Blitzway, this Silence of the Lambs figure is one of the most detailed I’ve ever seen. I’m normally not a huge action figure person, but those piercing blue eyes, the detailing i
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Gizmodo
Sunday's Best Deals: Sony Headphones, Amazon Devices, Tailgating Gear, and More Sony wireless headphones , Coleman tailgating gear , and Amazon device discounts lead off Sunday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals While not nearly as enticing as their Prime Day discounts, Amazon’s back-to-school price drops on their Kindle, Fire, and Echo devices are solid deals if you’re in the market. Advertise
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Science | The Guardian
Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban of killer robots Open letter signed by Tesla chief and Alphabet’s Mustafa Suleyman urges UN to block use of lethal autonomous weapons to prevent third age of war Some of the world’s leading robotics and artificial intelligence pioneers are calling on the United Nations to ban the development and use of killer robots. Tesla’s Elon Musk and Alphabet’s Mustafa Suleyman are leading a group of 116 specialists from acr
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Live Science
Spotlight on Carbondale: Illinois Town Sits at Solar Eclipse 'Crossroads'By pure cosmic coincidence, the town of Carbondale has found itself at the center of eclipse mania.
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Gizmodo
What If It's Cloudy During The Eclipse? Image: Daniel Ramirez /Flickr Tomorrow, 7.5 million people will crowd a 70-mile-wide, 2800-mile-long strip of land as the moon blocks the sun’s light for somewhere around two minutes. The sky will turn dark, the several million-degree solar corona will become visible, and the stars will appear in the middle of the day. All that is, of course, if it’s clear out. “It might get cloudy, even in the d
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Ars Technica
Accidental history—remastering the campy teen horror game Congress famously hated A scene like this doesn't exactly scream "2017 video game." And yet... Night Trap might not seem like a game that would be especially cumbersome to port to modern consoles. Among the first in the oft-forgotten early-’90s trend of “ FMV (full motion video) games ,” the title was nothing more than a lightly interactive series of pre-recorded videos. But after years of effort to get the project off
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Ars Technica
ICE: We don’t use stingrays to locate undocumented immigrants Enlarge / Thomas Homan, Acting Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, seen here during a February 2016 Senate hearing. (credit: Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images News ) The acting head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the federal agency charged with deportations, has confirmed in a new letter that it does not use cell-site simulators, also known as stingrays, to locat
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Ingeniøren
Nu kommer bilen til Den Gamle ByFra 1920’erne ændrede bilismen byerne. Den historie formidler Den Gamle By i Aarhus nu med en nybygget, gammel bilforhandler.
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Feed: All Latest
Tim Allen's Question About Apes Tops this Week's News RoundupThe comedian's Twitter inquiry had a lot of people ready to tell him a thing or two.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trundling toward ExtinctionA new study investigates what killed the Midwest's last mastodons -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Wreckage of U.S.S. Indianapolis, Lost for 72 Years, Is Found in the PacificA search team led by Paul G. Allen, a founder of Microsoft, found the Navy cruiser, whose sinking is among the worst disasters in American naval history.
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We need to talk about…CRISPR
21 August 2017 - by Giulia Cavaliere
Picture this - it's the last day in the office before the summer holidays, you're looking forward to some sunshine and warmth, email auto-response set, and all ready to go. Then, all of a sudden: the news... [Read More]

BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)

Sperm from stem cells could help some types of male infertility
21 August 2017 - by Shaoni Bhattacharya
Cells from genetically infertile male mice have been turned into sperm, and used to produce healthy pups... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)
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Americans becoming open to human genome editing
21 August 2017 - by Dr Rachel Huddart
A new survey suggests that Americans are becoming more accepting of the use of genome editing in humans, and there is strong support for more public involvement in discussions on the technology... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)
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Cancer atlas leads way to personalised treatment
21 August 2017 - by Marcia Costa
Genes linked to 17 types of cancer have been mapped in a new Pathology Atlas by Swedish researchers... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)
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Female is not 'default sex' of embryos
21 August 2017 - by Jamie Rickman
A protein that controls removal of male reproductive tissue in female mice embryos has been discovered... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)
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Liquid DNA biopsies could be used for cancer screening
21 August 2017 - by Dr Loredana Guglielmi
US researchers have developed a new blood test to detect cancer-related DNA alterations before patients experience symptoms... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)
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Vitamin C slows leukaemia in mice by tweaking key gene
21 August 2017 - by Emma Laycock
High doses of vitamin C may help fight certain leukaemias by boosting the activity of a particular gene, suggests a new study... [Read More]
BioNews Issue 914 (21 August 2017)

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