Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrons flowing like liquid in graphene start a new wave of physicsA new understanding of the physics of conductive materials has been uncovered by scientists observing the unusual movement of electrons in graphene.
8h
Gizmodo
The People Behind Game of Thrones Admit This Week's Rescue Timeline Didn't Quite Work Image: HBO The most recent episode of Game of Thrones , “Beyond the Wall,” was one of the most divisive in recent memory. Much of that was because of the highly questionable timeline linking the group in the North with Daenerys, who was much further South. In a new interview Alan Taylor, a veteran Game of Thrones director who came back to do “Beyond the Wall,” discussed the timeline and admitted
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Futurity.org
Sing to protect swallowing from Parkinson’s Singing can significantly improve muscle activity associated with swallowing and respiratory control, research finds. The effects of Parkinson’s disease on these functions can lead to death. Elizabeth Stegemöller, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University, holds weekly music therapy classes for people with Parkinson’s disease. Her clients are even preparing for an upcoming mu
4h

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hormonal tug-of-war helps plant roots navigate their journey through the soilA sophisticated mechanism that allows plant roots to quickly respond to changes in soil conditions has been identified by an international research team.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gravity, 'mechanical loading' are key to cartilage developmentMechanical loading is required for creating cartilage that is then turned to bone; however, little is known about cartilage development in the absence of gravity. Now, bioengineers have determined that microgravity may inhibit cartilage formation. Findings reveal that fracture healing for astronauts in space, as well as patients on bed rest here on Earth, could be compromised in the absence of mec
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
miR-122 target sites in liver cancer: study links three genes to patient survivalA new study shows that a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, such as during liver-cancer development, the activity of certain cancer-promoting genes goes up. The findings could one day help doctors better predict survival in liver cancer patients and hel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Serotonin may worsen tinnitusMillions of people suffer from the constant sensation of ringing or buzzing in the ears known as tinnitus, creating constant irritation for some and severe anxiety for others. Research shows why a common antidepressant medication may worsen the condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bond dissociation energies for transition metal silicides accurately determinedTransition metal silicides are promising for future developments in electronic devices, but fundamental aspects of the chemical bonding between their transition metal atoms and silicon remain poorly understood. One of the most important, but poorly known, properties is the strength of these bonds -- the thermochemical bond dissociation energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hoping to be seen as powerful, consumers prefer wider faces on watches, cars, study findsPeople are typically averse to wider human faces because they elicit fears of being dominated. However, consumers might like wider faces on some products they buy, such as watches or cars, when they want to be seen in a position of power in certain situations, according to a new study.
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Futurity.org
Microgravity may keep fractures from healing in space Bioengineers have discovered that microgravity, experienced in space, may inhibit cartilage formation. The research suggests that healing fractures for astronauts in space—or patients on long bed rest here on Earth—could be compromised by the absence of what’s called mechanical loading. Mechanical loading, forces that stimulate cellular growth for development, is required for creating cartilage t
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient Earth's hot interior created 'graveyard' of continental slabsMIT geologists have found that ancient Earth's hotter interior created a "graveyard" of continental slabs, as higher mantle temperatures than today caused subducting tectonic plates to sink all the way to the Earth's core.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Firing of neurons changes the cells that insulate themThrough their pattern of firing, neurons influence the behavior of the cells that upon maturation will provide insulation of neuronal axons, according to a new study publishing Aug. 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Balint Nagy, Maria Kukley and colleagues at the University of Tübingen, Germany. The findings suggest the existence of a complex and nuanced interplay between neurons and t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does a mother's pre-pregnancy weight determine her child's metabolism?The link between a mother's body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy and the metabolic traits of her children is likely mediated by shared genetics and familial lifestyle rather than effects on the fetus during gestation, according to study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Debbie Lawlor of the University of Bristol, UK, and colleagues.
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Futurity.org
Immigrant detention looks a lot like prison, say lawyers Detention centers that hold immigrant women and their families function like jails and prisons, report researchers. The findings challenge federal officials’ description of the centers as “alternative to detention.” Women held with their children in such centers are often required to wear orange jumpsuits and are color-coded by a level of threat, according to the research conducted in interviews
26min
Gizmodo
Cyborg Bacteria Beat Plants at the Photosynthesis Game Image Source: NIAID/Gizmodo Reading science news all day can be real grim. Animals are dying, the climate is changing, the nuke’s a coming, yadda yadda. But sometimes (in fact, often) scientists do something that’s just neat, important, and won’t keep you up at night—that is, if you’re cool with photosynthesizing cyborg bacteria. Photosynthesis is a process by which plants use light from the sun
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find RNA with special role in nerve healing processThe discovery in lab mice that an 'anti-sense' RNA is expressed after nerve injury to regulate the repair of damage to the nerve's myelin coating could lead to a treatment that improves healing in people.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The environment can become a noninvasive therapeutic approach to bolster white matter healthThose parents you overhear transforming trips to the grocery store into sensory adventures -- telling babies too young to babble that broccoli is GREEN, radishes are RED and tangerines are ORANGE -- are onto something. Being exposed to a complex and stimulating environment rich with new sights, sounds and a full vocabulary can play a powerful role in strengthening infants' developing brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infection model developed for tickborne flavivirusesScientists have filled a research gap by developing a laboratory model to study ticks that transmit flaviviruses, such as Powassan virus. Powassan virus was implicated in the death of a New York man earlier this year. The unusual model involves culturing organs taken from Ixodes scapularis ticks and then infecting those organ cultures with flaviviruses.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish stress hormones linked to whether they take the baitTake a fish out of water and its stress hormones will go up. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the 'fight or flight' hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid crisis in Staten Island affects all races, ages, and socioeconomic backgroundsContrary to media reports, the opioid epidemic on New York's Staten Island is not confined to affluent young white residents, and affects all neighborhoods, races, ages, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forestIn the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. Today, that area is covered in lush, vine-laden forest.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oropouche virus could emerge and cause a public health problemBrazil runs a serious risk of being afflicted by Oropouche, another virus that is widely distributed throughout South and Central America and the Caribbean. An arbovirus transmitted by a mosquito (like Zika and yellow fever), Oropouche causes acute fever and may lead to meningitis and meningoencephalitis (inflammation of the brain and meninges).
29min
Latest Headlines | Science News
New antennas are up to a hundredth the size of today’s devicesA new type of antenna could be used in tiny electronics for wearable tech, injectable medical devices and more.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Like adults, children show bias in attributing mental states to othersYoung children are more likely to attribute mental states to characters that belong to the same group as them relative to characters that belong to an outside group, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study shows that 5- and 6-year-olds were more likely to describe interactions between two characters in terms of wh
35min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The FBI Wanted To Publish The Unabomber Manifesto To See If Anyone Would Recognize His Writing Manhunt: UNABOMBER | Tuesdays at 10p on Discovery and Discovery GO Ackerman must make a recommendation to Attorney General Janet Reno on whether to publish the Unabomber Manifesto. Will she approve such an unprecedented gamble? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/manhunt Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discover
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It goes to 11: Florida lab sets new magnet strength recordFlorida's National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is reclaiming its status as home to the world strongest magnet.
36min
NYT > Science
Worried About Your Eyes After the Eclipse? Here’s What You Should KnowYou were warned about looking at the solar eclipse without protection, but you did it anyway. Eye specialists are ready to help.
39min
Ars Technica
When it comes to controversial science, a little knowledge is a problem For a lot of scientific topics, there's a big gap between what scientists understand and what the public thinks they know. For a number of these topics—climate change and evolution are prominent examples—this divide develops along cultural lines, typically religious or political identity. It would be reassuring to think that the gap is simply a matter of a lack of information. Get the people with
42min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Speeding up chemical screening to prioritize toxicity testingResearchers have developed a high-throughput technique that can determine if a chemical has the potential to activate key genes in seconds rather than the typical 24 hours or more. The technique can be used to prioritize chemicals for in-depth testing to determine their toxicity.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microreactor made to study formation of methane hydrateResearchers are using a novel means of studying how methane and water form methane hydrate that allows them to examine discrete steps in the process faster and more efficiently.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ShAPEing the future of magnesium car partsA new process should make it more feasible for the auto industry to incorporate very lightweight magnesium alloys into structural components. The method has the potential to reduce cost by eliminating the need for rare-earth elements, while simultaneously improving the material's structural properties.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No microbes? No problem for caterpillarsCaterpillars have far less bacteria and fungi inhabiting their gut than other animals and the microbes that inside them seem to lack any identifiable role, aside from occasionally causing disease.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormonesA bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. Researchers now explore how plant hormones may influence human health.
43min
Gizmodo
New Report Finds Police Have Used Tasers in a Staggering Number of Killings Photo: Getty Axon (the company formerly known as Taser) claims that their stun guns have only directly killed 24 people, and that those deaths were due to falls or fires related to the strikes, not because of shocks to the body. But a new investigative report by Reuters found 1,005 cases in the United States where a person died after police used the weapon on them. The news outlet also found auto
45min
Gizmodo
Amazon's Snack Sample Box Is Back In Stock, Complete With a $10 Snack Credit Snack Sample Box , $10 + $10 credit towards a future snack purchase If you missed it a few weeks ago, Amazon’s $10 snack sample box is back in stock! Spend $10 to get 10 or more snack samples to munch on, and then use the included $10 credit to buy more of your favorites . That’s basically like getting all of those samples for free! I ordered this the last time it was available, and everything I’
45min
Gizmodo
The Defenders’ Best Storytelling Trick Doesn’t Use Any Words at All Image: Netflix The Defenders is at its very best when it lets go of whatever designs it had on being a serious prestige drama and embraces the fact that it’s a pulpy, cape procedural about a bunch of toughs taking on a supernatural crime syndicate. The Defenders knows that it’s a comic book show and it’s stronger for it. There are a handful of ways that The Defenders openly nods to its comic book
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The moving Martian bow shockPhysicists throw new light on the interaction between the planet Mars and supersonic particles in the solar wind.
58min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When given the chance to pay less, patients choose cheaper prescription drugsAs prescription drug spending continues to rise in the United States, along with prices for new and well-established drugs, insurers, employers and patients are searching for ways to cut costs. A new study found that a policy called reference pricing is effective at encouraging patients to spend significantly less on prescription drugs by choosing cheaper drugs over name brand options.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cytoplasm 'feels' to a cell's componentsIn a study that may guide drug design, researchers find organelles encounter varying levels of resistance, depending on their size and speed, as they move through a cell's cytoplasm.
58min
Live Science
Leaping Lizards! Live Gecko Found Inside a Man's EarTalk about an earache: When a man in China went to the hospital because of severe ear pain, doctors found a live gecko curled up in his ear canal, according to news reports.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Hackers Are Coming for Your Cell-Phone Number
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Latest Headlines | Science News
These chip-sized spacecraft are the smallest space probes yetSpace initiative dubbed Breakthrough Starshot sent the smallest spacecraft yet into orbit around Earth.
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Gizmodo
How to Find Anyone Online Image: Gizmodo If your efforts to track down long-lost relatives and obscure musicians (or anyone else you’re looking for on the web) stop at Googling their name then you’ve come to the right place. Here’s how to seriously go about searching for people online, including some advice from the professionals who do it for a living, and if you’d rather not be found than read on to understand exactly h
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The Atlantic
Paul Ryan Doesn't Want to Fight With Trump Paul Ryan will distance himself from the president. He’ll occasionally offer some polite and always constructive criticism of Trump’s most egregious tweets and statements. But the Republican House speaker will not do battle with a man who, as of about a year and a half ago, he wanted to see anywhere but the Oval Office. That was the main, not-particularly-surprising takeaway from Ryan’s CNN town
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Science : NPR
American Science And The Nazis By standing strong against the Nazis, America became a beacon of hope to some of the world's greatest scientists — whose positive effects on American science we still feel today, says Adam Frank. (Image credit: Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds that gravity, 'mechanical loading' are key to cartilage developmentMechanical loading, or forces that stimulate cellular growth for development, is required for creating cartilage that is then turned to bone; however, little is known about cartilage development in the absence of gravity or mechanical loads. Now, in a study led by the University of Missouri, bioengineers have determined that microgravity may inhibit cartilage formation. Findings reveal that fractu
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hormonal tug-of-war helps plant roots navigate their journey through the soilA sophisticated mechanism that allows plant roots to quickly respond to changes in soil conditions has been identified by an international research team.
1h
Gizmodo
The Texting Bromance Behind Travis Kalanick's Self-Driving Truck Joyride Photo: AP As Uber and Waymo frantically prepare for the October trial over self-driving technology, we’re getting more and more insight into what went on in the months leading up to Uber’s $680 million acquisition of the autonomous trucking startup Otto. Text messages between Otto co-founder Anthony Levandowski and former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, as well as a deposition with Kalanick, were made
1h
New Scientist - News
Bacterial optical fibre helps shine lasers through murky watersNormally lasers cannot penetrate very far through murky liquids. Bacteria can act as a lens to boost their range, which could be used to aid medical diagnoses
1h
Live Science
Solar Eclipse Is Backdrop for Breathtaking Dives (Photos)Cliff divers took to a platform above a water tank yesterday (Aug. 21) in Oregon for a stunning photo shoot during the solar eclipse.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Genetic engineering yields food crops in striking hues Engineered tomatoes produce red-violet betalain pigments. Betalains, which are a group of red and yellow plant pigments, are used as natural dyes in dairy, meat, and confectionery products, and as antioxidants in dietary supplements. Few edible plants yield commercial quantities of pure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Edge effects in temperate forests subjected to high nitrogen deposition [Biological Sciences]Reinmann and Hutyra (1) measured an increase in aboveground forest growth and biomass at temperate oak forest edges (0–10 m) compared with the interior (20–30 m). When scaling their results up to the region of southern New England, they obtained an increase in aboveground carbon (C) uptake (13%) and C...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Remy et al.: Local and global limitations to forest productivity as mediators of biogeochemical response to forest edge effects [Biological Sciences]Despite the heavily fragmented nature of the world’s forests (1), the response of forest carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to edge effects is understudied. Contrasting our findings that edge effects did not alter soil C and N storage of temperate forests within residential landscapes in New England (2), Remy...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Alan Hastings [QnAs]Theoretical ecology uses conceptual and mathematical models, computer simulations, and data analysis to study ecological systems. Alan Hastings, a Distinguished Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at the University of California, Davis, has contributed significantly to the development of this field over the past four decades. Much of his research...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Nahum Sonenberg [Profile]Five years after the final shots of World War II rang out, a child and his father stood on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. From their vantage point in a cemetery in the town of Jaffa, Israel, the boy gazed across the sea and envisioned stepping onto the sands...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Peidong Yang [Profile]In the fall of 2015, Peidong Yang, professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, received a phone call from the MacArthur Foundation. The caller asked if Yang was alone. Having just finished his lunch, Yang hurried to his office. The caller identified himself as the director of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Decoding ants’ olfactory system sheds light on the evolution of social communication [Evolution]Chemical communication is the primordial and possibly most efficient way of transmitting messages between living units (1). It has reached its apex in the “superorganisms” (2), for example in colonies of eusocial insects, such as honey bees (3). Colony survival and reproductive success rely on the chemical communication channel to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inflammation correlates with symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome [Immunology and Inflammation]It is not unusual for patients who say they are sick to have normal results on standard laboratory testing. The physician often concludes that there is no “real” illness and that the patients’ symptoms likely stem from a psychological disorder. An alternative conclusion, often honored in the breach, is that...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Measuring the effects of farming on human skull morphology [Anthropology]Approximately 10,000 years ago, certain human groups began to rely on diets derived from domesticated plants and animals rather than acquiring wild sources of food via hunting, gathering, and foraging. This transition in subsistence economy occurred independently in several global regions, with particular starchy crops (e.g., wheat, barley, rice, maize,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pictures of the prologue to neurotransmitter release [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Membrane fusion and fission determine compartmentalization in eukaryotic cells and uptake or secretion of various molecular species. For example, a very rapid, tightly regulated, Ca2+-triggered fusion event releases neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft (1). A long history of identifying and characterizing its essential components has allowed in vitro reconstitution, as...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ballistic thermophoresis of adsorbates on free-standing graphene [Applied Physical Sciences]The textbook thermophoretic force which acts on a body in a fluid is proportional to the local temperature gradient. The same is expected to hold for the macroscopic drift behavior of a diffusive cluster or molecule physisorbed on a solid surface. The question we explore here is whether that is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Janus dendrimersomes coassembled from fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers as models for cell fusion and fission [Chemistry]A three-component system of Janus dendrimers (JDs) including hydrogenated, fluorinated, and hybrid hydrogenated–fluorinated JDs are reported to coassemble by film hydration at specific ratios into an unprecedented class of supramolecular Janus particles (JPs) denoted Janus dendrimersomes (JDSs). They consist of a dumbbell-shaped structure composed of an onion-like hydrogenated vesicle and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inkjet-printed point-of-care immunoassay on a nanoscale polymer brush enables subpicomolar detection of analytes in blood [Engineering]The ELISA is the mainstay for sensitive and quantitative detection of protein analytes. Despite its utility, ELISA is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and infrastructure-dependent, limiting its availability in resource-limited regions. Here, we describe a self-contained immunoassay platform (the “D4 assay”) that converts the sandwich immunoassay into a point-of-care test (POCT). The D4...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A study of problems encountered in Granger causality analysis from a neuroscience perspective [Statistics]Granger causality methods were developed to analyze the flow of information between time series. These methods have become more widely applied in neuroscience. Frequency-domain causality measures, such as those of Geweke, as well as multivariate methods, have particular appeal in neuroscience due to the prevalence of oscillatory phenomena and highly...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Near-atomic resolution cryoelectron microscopy structure of the 30-fold homooligomeric SpoIIIAG channel essential to spore formation in Bacillus subtilis [Biochemistry]Bacterial sporulation allows starving cells to differentiate into metabolically dormant spores that can survive extreme conditions. Following asymmetric division, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, surrounding it with two bilayer membranes. During the engulfment process, an essential channel, the so-called feeding tube apparatus, is thought to cross both membranes to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism of DNA alkylation-induced transcriptional stalling, lesion bypass, and mutagenesis [Biochemistry]Alkylated DNA lesions, induced by both exogenous chemical agents and endogenous metabolites, interfere with the efficiency and accuracy of DNA replication and transcription. However, the molecular mechanisms of DNA alkylation-induced transcriptional stalling and mutagenesis remain unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated how RNA polymerase II (pol II) recognizes and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Histone phosphorylation by TRPM6’s cleaved kinase attenuates adȷacent arginine methylation to regulate gene expression [Biochemistry]TRPM6 and TRPM7 are members of the melastatin-related transient receptor potential (TRPM) subfamily of ion channels. Deletion of either gene in mice is embryonically lethal. TRPM6/7 are the only known examples of single polypeptides containing both an ion channel pore and a serine/threonine kinase (chanzyme). Here we show that the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Self-organization process in newborn skin organoid formation inspires strategy to restore hair regeneration of adult cells [Cell Biology]Organoids made from dissociated progenitor cells undergo tissue-like organization. This in vitro self-organization process is not identical to embryonic organ formation, but it achieves a similar phenotype in vivo. This implies genetic codes do not specify morphology directly; instead, complex tissue architectures may be achieved through several intermediate layers of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Zbtb7b engages the long noncoding RNA Blnc1 to drive brown and beige fat development and thermogenesis [Developmental Biology]Brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy into heat through uncoupled respiration to defend against cold stress. Beyond thermogenesis, brown and beige fats engage other metabolic tissues via secreted factors to influence systemic energy metabolism. How the protein and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulatory networks act in concert to regulate...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protein kinase C delta phosphorylates ecdysone receptor B1 to promote gene expression and apoptosis under 20-hydroxyecdysone regulation [Developmental Biology]The nuclear receptor EcRB1, which is activated by the insect steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), is reportedly phosphorylated by a protein kinase after 20E induction. However, the protein kinase has not been identified, and the significance of EcRB1 phosphorylation is unclear. In this study, we identified a protein kinase C δ...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetic background-dependent role of Egr1 for eyelid development [Developmental Biology]EGR1 is an early growth response zinc finger transcription factor with broad actions, including in differentiation, mitogenesis, tumor suppression, and neuronal plasticity. Here we demonstrate that Egr1−/− mice on the C57BL/6 background have normal eyelid development, but back-crossing to BALB/c background for four or five generations resulted in defective eyelid...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
miR-146a-Traf6 regulatory axis controls autoimmunity and myelopoiesis, but is dispensable for hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and tumor suppression [Immunology and Inflammation]microRNA-146a (miR-146a) has been previously implicated as an essential molecular brake, preventing immune overreaction and malignant transformation by attenuating NF-κB signaling, putatively via repression of the Traf6 and Irak1 genes. The exact contribution of miR-146a–mediated silencing of these genes to the control of immune activation is currently unknown. Therefore, we...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cytokine signature associated with disease severity in chronic fatigue syndrome patients [Immunology and Inflammation]Although some signs of inflammation have been reported previously in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), the data are limited and contradictory. High-throughput methods now allow us to interrogate the human immune system for multiple markers of inflammation at a scale that was not previously possible. To...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stress-inducible gene Atf3 in the noncancer host cells contributes to chemotherapy-exacerbated breast cancer metastasis [Medical Sciences]Chemotherapy is a double-edged sword. It is anticancer because of its cytotoxicity. Paradoxically, by increasing chemoresistance and cancer metastasis, it is also procancer. However, the underlying mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced procancer activities are not well understood. Here we describe the ability of paclitaxel (PTX), a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, to exacerbate metastasis...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early cytoplasmic uncoating is associated with infectivity of HIV-1 [Microbiology]After fusion, HIV delivers its conical capsid into the cytoplasm. To release the contained reverse-transcribing viral genome, the capsid must disassemble in a process termed uncoating. Defining the kinetics, dynamics, and cellular location of uncoating of virions leading to infection has been confounded by defective, noninfectious particles and the stochastic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Glycine receptor {alpha}3 and {alpha}2 subunits mediate tonic and exogenous agonist-induced currents in forebrain [Neuroscience]Neuronal inhibition can occur via synaptic mechanisms or through tonic activation of extrasynaptic receptors. In spinal cord, glycine mediates synaptic inhibition through the activation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) composed primarily of α1 and β subunits. Inhibitory GlyRs are also found throughout the brain, where GlyR α2 and α3 subunit...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adiponectin protects against development of metabolic disturbances in a PCOS mouse model [Physiology]Adiponectin, together with adipocyte size, is the strongest factor associated with insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study investigates the causal relationship between adiponectin levels and metabolic and reproductive functions in PCOS. Prepubertal mice overexpressing adiponectin from adipose tissue (APNtg), adiponectin knockouts (APNko), and their wild-type..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Arabidopsis SH3P2 is an ubiquitin-binding protein that functions together with ESCRT-I and the deubiquitylating enzyme AMSH3 [Plant Biology]Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins is an essential regulatory process that controls plasma membrane protein abundance and is therefore important for many signaling pathways, such as hormone signaling and biotic and abiotic stress responses. On endosomal sorting, plasma membrane proteins maybe recycled or targeted for vacuolar degradation, which is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Flower-specific jasmonate signaling regulates constitutive floral defenses in wild tobacco [Plant Biology]Optimal defense (OD) theory predicts that within a plant, tissues are defended in proportion to their fitness value and risk of predation. The fitness value of leaves varies greatly and leaves are protected by jasmonate (JA)-inducible defenses. Flowers are vehicles of Darwinian fitness in flowering plants and are attacked by...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Urban sustainability in an age of enduring inequalities: Advancing theory and ecometrics for the 21st-century city [Social Sciences]The environmental fragility of cities under advanced urbanization has motivated extensive efforts to promote the sustainability of urban ecosystems and physical infrastructures. Less attention has been devoted to neighborhood inequalities and fissures in the civic infrastructure that potentially challenge social sustainability and the capacity of cities to collectively address environmental...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inferring patterns of folktale diffusion using genomic data [Anthropology]Observable patterns of cultural variation are consistently intertwined with demic movements, cultural diffusion, and adaptation to different ecological contexts [Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman (1981) Cultural Transmission and Evolution: A Quantitative Approach; Boyd and Richerson (1985) Culture and the Evolutionary Process]. The quantitative study of gene–culture coevolution has focused in particular
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany [Anthropology]Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Functional New World monkey oxytocin forms elicit an altered signaling profile and promotes parental care in rats [Anthropology]The neurohormone oxytocin is a key player in the modulation of reproductive and social behavioral traits, such as parental care. Recently, a correlation between different forms of oxytocin and behavioral phenotypes has been described in the New World Monkeys (NWMs). Here, we demonstrate that, compared with the Leu8OXT found in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in human skull morphology across the agricultural transition are consistent with softer diets in preindustrial farming groups [Anthropology]Agricultural foods and technologies are thought to have eased the mechanical demands of diet—how often or how hard one had to chew—in human populations worldwide. Some evidence suggests correspondingly worldwide changes in skull shape and form across the agricultural transition, although these changes have proved difficult to characterize at a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Engineered gray mold resistance, antioxidant capacity, and pigmentation in betalain-producing crops and ornamentals [Applied Biological Sciences]Betalains are tyrosine-derived red-violet and yellow plant pigments known for their antioxidant activity, health-promoting properties, and wide use as food colorants and dietary supplements. By coexpressing three genes of the recently elucidated betalain biosynthetic pathway, we demonstrate the heterologous production of these pigments in a variety of plants, including three...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CRISPR-Cas9 vectors for genome editing and host engineering in the baculovirus-insect cell system [Applied Biological Sciences]The baculovirus–insect cell system (BICS) has been widely used to produce many different recombinant proteins for basic research and is being used to produce several biologics approved for use in human or veterinary medicine. Early BICS were technically complex and constrained by the relatively primordial nature of insect cell protein...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dual-reporter SERS-based biomolecular assay with reduced false-positive signals [Applied Physical Sciences]We present a sensitive and quantitative protein detection assay that can efficiently distinguish between specific and nonspecific target binding. Our technique combines dual affinity reagents with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and chemometric analysis. We link one Raman reporter-tagged affinity reagent to gold nanoparticles and another to a gold film, such...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cytotoxic protein from the mushroom Coprinus comatus possesses a unique mode for glycan binding and specificity [Biochemistry]Glycans possess significant chemical diversity; glycan binding proteins (GBPs) recognize specific glycans to translate their structures to functions in various physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, the discovery and characterization of novel GBPs and characterization of glycan–GBP interactions are significant to provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention of many diseases
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of the Tau phosphorylation pattern that drives its aggregation [Biochemistry]Determining the functional relationship between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has proven a challenge owing to the multiple potential phosphorylation sites and their clustering in the Tau sequence. We use here in vitro kinase assays combined with NMR spectroscopy as an analytical tool to generate well-characterized phosphorylated Tau samples and show...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Permeability transition in human mitochondria persists in the absence of peripheral stalk subunits of ATP synthase [Biochemistry]The opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membranes of mitochondria can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane and ATP synthesis, and cell death. Pore opening can be inhibited by cyclosporin A...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular basis for the substrate specificity of quorum signal synthases [Biochemistry]In several Proteobacteria, LuxI-type enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of acyl–homoserine lactones (AHL) signals using S-adenosyl–l-methionine and either cellular acyl carrier protein (ACP)-coupled fatty acids or CoA–aryl/acyl moieties as progenitors. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of signal biosynthesis, the basis for substrate specificity, or the rationale for donor specificity...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphorylation of serine96 of histidine-rich calcium-binding protein by the Fam20C kinase functions to prevent cardiac arrhythmia [Biochemistry]Precise Ca cycling through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a Ca storage organelle, is critical for proper cardiac muscle function. This cycling initially involves SR release of Ca via the ryanodine receptor, which is regulated by its interacting proteins junctin and triadin. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) pump then refills...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Beyond icosahedral symmetry in packings of proteins in spherical shells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The formation of quasi-spherical cages from protein building blocks is a remarkable self-assembly process in many natural systems, where a small number of elementary building blocks are assembled to build a highly symmetric icosahedral cage. In turn, this has inspired synthetic biologists to design de novo protein cages. We use...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into the catalytic mechanism of a sacrificial sulfur insertase of the N-type ATP pyrophosphatase family, LarE [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The lar operon in Lactobacillus plantarum encodes five Lar proteins (LarA/B/C/D/E) that collaboratively synthesize and incorporate a niacin-derived Ni-containing cofactor into LarA, an Ni-dependent lactate racemase. Previous studies have established that two molecules of LarE catalyze successive thiolation reactions by donating the sulfur atom of their exclusive cysteine residues to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chaperonin GroEL accelerates protofibril formation and decorates fibrils of the Het-s prion protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We have studied the interaction of the prototypical chaperonin GroEL with the prion domain of the Het-s protein using solution and solid-state NMR, electron and atomic force microscopies, and EPR. While GroEL accelerates Het-s protofibril formation by several orders of magnitude, the rate of appearance of fibrils is reduced. GroEL...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Morphologies of synaptic protein membrane fusion interfaces [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Neurotransmitter release is orchestrated by synaptic proteins, such as SNAREs, synaptotagmin, and complexin, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We visualized functionally active synaptic proteins reconstituted into proteoliposomes and their interactions in a native membrane environment by electron cryotomography with a Volta phase plate for improved resolvability. The images revealed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
3.3 A structure of Niemann-Pick C1 protein reveals insights into the function of the C-terminal luminal domain in cholesterol transport [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Niemann–Pick C1 (NPC1) and NPC2 proteins are indispensable for the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes. Mutations in these proteins result in Niemann–Pick type C disease, a lysosomal storage disease. Despite recent reports of the NPC1 structure depicting its overall architecture, the function of its C-terminal luminal domain (CTD)...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Origins of coevolution between residues distant in protein 3D structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Residue pairs that directly coevolve in protein families are generally close in protein 3D structures. Here we study the exceptions to this general trend—directly coevolving residue pairs that are distant in protein structures—to determine the origins of evolutionary pressure on spatially distant residues and to understand the sources of error...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
On the mechanism of long-range orientational order of fibroblasts [Cell Biology]Long-range alignment ordering of fibroblasts have been observed in the vicinity of cancerous tumors and can be recapitulated with in vitro experiments. However, the mechanisms driving their ordering are not understood. Here, we show that local collision-driven nematic alignment interactions among fibroblasts are insufficient to explain observed long-range alignment. One...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction activity comparable to platinum exhibited by the Ni/Ni(OH)2/graphite electrode [Chemistry]Electrochemical dual-pulse plating with sequential galvanostatic and potentiostatic pulses has been used to fabricate an electrocatalytically active Ni/Ni(OH)2/graphite electrode. This electrode design strategy to generate the Ni/Ni(OH)2 interface on graphite from Ni deposits is promising for electrochemical applications and has been used by us for hydrogen generation. The synergetic effect...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Redox variations in Mauna Kea lavas, the oxygen fugacity of the Hawaiian plume, and the role of volcanic gases in Earth’s oxygenation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The behavior of C, H, and S in the solid Earth depends on their oxidation states, which are related to oxygen fugacity (fO2). Volcanic degassing is a source of these elements to Earth’s surface; therefore, variations in mantle fO2 may influence the fO2 at Earth’s surface. However, degassing can impact...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stabilization of ammonia-rich hydrate inside icy planets [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The interior structure of the giant ice planets Uranus and Neptune, but also of newly discovered exoplanets, is loosely constrained, because limited observational data can be satisfied with various interior models. Although it is known that their mantles comprise large amounts of water, ammonia, and methane ices, it is unclear...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electrical conductivity of SiO2 at extreme conditions and planetary dynamos [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Ab intio molecular dynamics simulations show that the electrical conductivity of liquid SiO2 is semimetallic at the conditions of the deep molten mantle of early Earth and super-Earths, raising the possibility of silicate dynamos in these bodies. Whereas the electrical conductivity increases uniformly with increasing temperature, it depends nonmonotonically on...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Arctic photographers bring climate change into focus [Environmental Sciences]In 2009, a hunter shot a polar bear and carried it by dogsled about 750 meters to the town of Ittoqqortoormiit on the eastern coast of Greenland. Typically, the town’s hunters encounter polar bears on distant sea ice a couple of hours or even days from town. They skin their...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global urban signatures of phenotypic change in animal and plant populations [Sustainability Science]Humans challenge the phenotypic, genetic, and cultural makeup of species by affecting the fitness landscapes on which they evolve. Recent studies show that cities might play a major role in contemporary evolution by accelerating phenotypic changes in wildlife, including animals, plants, fungi, and other organisms. Many studies of ecoevolutionary change...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lampreys, the jawless vertebrates, contain only two ParaHox gene clusters [Evolution]ParaHox genes (Gsx, Pdx, and Cdx) are an ancient family of developmental genes closely related to the Hox genes. They play critical roles in the patterning of brain and gut. The basal chordate, amphioxus, contains a single ParaHox cluster comprising one member of each family, whereas nonteleost jawed vertebrates contain...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Complete overview of protein-inactivating sequence variations in 36 sequenced mouse inbred strains [Genetics]Mouse inbred strains remain essential in science. We have analyzed the publicly available genome sequences of 36 popular inbred strains and provide lists for each strain of protein-coding genes that acquired sequence variations that cause premature STOP codons, loss of STOP codons and single nucleotide polymorphisms, and short in-frame insertions...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lethality of MalE-LacZ hybrid protein shares mechanistic attributes with oxidative component of antibiotic lethality [Microbiology]Downstream metabolic events can contribute to the lethality of drugs or agents that interact with a primary cellular target. In bacteria, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with the lethal effects of a variety of stresses including bactericidal antibiotics, but the relative contribution of this oxidative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging [Microbiology]The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are aggravated by incorrect prescription and use of antibiotics. A core problem is that there is no sufficiently fast diagnostic test to guide correct antibiotic prescription at the point of care. Here, we investigate if it is possible to develop a point-of-care susceptibility...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala maintains hippocampus-dependent accuracy of remote memory [Neuroscience]Emotional enhancement of memory by noradrenergic mechanisms is well-described, but the long-term consequences of such enhancement are poorly understood. Over time, memory traces are thought to undergo a neural reorganization, that is, a systems consolidation, during which they are, at least partly, transferred from the hippocampus to neocortical networks. This...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Arc restores juvenile plasticity in adult mouse visual cortex [Neuroscience]The molecular basis for the decline in experience-dependent neural plasticity over age remains poorly understood. In visual cortex, the robust plasticity induced in juvenile mice by brief monocular deprivation during the critical period is abrogated by genetic deletion of Arc, an activity-dependent regulator of excitatory synaptic modification. Here, we report...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MicroRNA-mediated disruption of dendritogenesis during a critical period of development influences cognitive capacity later in life [Neuroscience]The prenatal period of cortical development is important for the establishment of neural circuitry and functional connectivity of the brain; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Here we report that disruption of the actin–cytoskeletal network in the developing mouse prefrontal cortex alters dendritic morphogenesis and synapse formation,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Anomalous relaxation kinetics and charge-density-wave correlations in underdoped BaPb1-xBixO3 [Physics]Superconductivity often emerges in proximity of other symmetry-breaking ground states, such as antiferromagnetism or charge-density-wave (CDW) order. However, the subtle interrelation of these phases remains poorly understood, and in some cases even the existence of short-range correlations for superconducting compositions is uncertain. In such circumstances, ultrafast experiments can provide new.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proteolytic cleavage and PKA phosphorylation of {alpha}1C subunit are not required for adrenergic regulation of CaV1.2 in the heart [Physiology]Calcium influx through the voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel (CaV1.2) rapidly increases in the heart during “fight or flight” through activation of the β-adrenergic and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. The precise molecular mechanisms of β-adrenergic activation of cardiac CaV1.2, however, are incompletely known, but are presumed to require phosphorylation...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-precision chronology for Central American maize diversification from El Gigante rockshelter, Honduras [Plant Biology]The first steps toward maize (Zea mays subspecies mays) domestication occurred in the Balsas region of Mexico by ∼9,000 calendar years B.P. (cal B.P.), but it remains unclear when maize was productive enough to be a staple grain in the Americas. Molecular and microbotanical data provide a partial picture of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Aquaporins facilitate hydrogen peroxide entry into guard cells to mediate ABA- and pathogen-triggered stomatal closure [Plant Biology]Stomatal movements are crucial for the control of plant water status and protection against pathogens. Assays on epidermal peels revealed that, similar to abscisic acid (ABA), pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22 requires the AtPIP2;1 aquaporin to induce stomatal closure. Flg22 also induced an increase in osmotic water permeability (Pf) of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phototropin perceives temperature based on the lifetime of its photoactivated state [Plant Biology]Living organisms detect changes in temperature using thermosensory molecules. However, these molecules and/or their mechanisms for sensing temperature differ among organisms. To identify thermosensory molecules in plants, we investigated chloroplast positioning in response to temperature changes and identified a blue-light photoreceptor, phototropin, that is an essential regulator of chloroplast p
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Asymmetric percolation drives a double transition in sexual contact networks [Population Biology]Zika virus (ZIKV) exhibits unique transmission dynamics in that it is concurrently spread by a mosquito vector and through sexual contact. Due to the highly asymmetric durations of infectiousness between males and females—it is estimated that males are infectious for periods up to 10 times longer than females—we show that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hippocampal maturity promotes memory distinctiveness in childhood and adolescence [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Adaptive learning systems need to meet two complementary and partially conflicting goals: detecting regularities in the world versus remembering specific events. The hippocampus (HC) keeps a fine balance between computations that extract commonalities of incoming information (i.e., pattern completion) and computations that enable encoding of highly similar events into unique...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stress promotes generalization of older but not recent threat memories [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Stress broadly affects the ability to regulate emotions and may contribute to generalization of threat-related behaviors to harmless stimuli. Behavioral generalization also tends to increase over time as memory precision for recent events gives way to more gist-like representations. Thus, acute stress coupled with a delay in time from a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bilingual infants control their languages as they listen [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Infants growing up in bilingual homes learn two languages simultaneously without apparent confusion or delay. However, the mechanisms that support this remarkable achievement remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that infants use language-control mechanisms to preferentially activate the currently heard language during listening. In a naturalistic eye-tracking procedure, bilingual infants were...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effects of maternal investment, temperament, and cognition on guide dog success [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]A continuing debate in studies of social development in both humans and other animals is the extent to which early life experiences affect adult behavior. Also unclear are the relative contributions of cognitive skills (“intelligence”) and temperament for successful outcomes. Guide dogs are particularly suited to research on these questions....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Core Concept: Probing the phytobiome to advance agriculture [Sustainability Science]The Colorado potato beetle had Gary Felton stumped. Felton, an entomologist at Pennsylvania State University, has built his career on revealing how plants defend themselves against voracious insects. Plants often detect chemicals in an insect’s oral secretions and respond by producing proteins that wreak havoc on insect digestion and nutrient...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Emergence of a global science-business initiative for ocean stewardship [Sustainability Science]The ocean represents a fundamental source of micronutrients and protein for a growing world population. Seafood is a highly traded and sought after commodity on international markets, and is critically dependent on healthy marine ecosystems. A global trend of wild stocks being overfished and in decline, as well as multiple...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Marine reserves solve an important bycatch problem in fisheries [Sustainability Science]Management of the diverse fisheries of the world has had mixed success. While managing single species in data-rich environments has been largely effective, perhaps the greatest challenge facing fishery managers is how to deal with mixed stocks of fish with a range of life histories that reside in the same...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sustainability in an urbanizing planet [Social Sciences]Sustainability science is use-inspired fundamental research that links knowledge to action such that meeting the needs of society can be balanced with sustaining the life support systems of the planet (1, 2). Nowhere is this action-oriented research needed more than in urban areas that are now home to more than...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Future urban land expansion and implications for global croplands [Sustainability Science]Urban expansion often occurs on croplands. However, there is little scientific understanding of how global patterns of future urban expansion will affect the world’s cultivated areas. Here, we combine spatially explicit projections of urban expansion with datasets on global croplands and crop yields. Our results show that urban expansion will...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global scenarios of urban density and its impacts on building energy use through 2050 [Sustainability Science]Although the scale of impending urbanization is well-acknowledged, we have a limited understanding of how urban forms will change and what their impact will be on building energy use. Using both top-down and bottom-up approaches and scenarios, we examine building energy use for heating and cooling. Globally, the energy use...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Heterogeneity and scale of sustainable development in cities [Sustainability Science]Rapid worldwide urbanization is at once the main cause and, potentially, the main solution to global sustainable development challenges. The growth of cities is typically associated with increases in socioeconomic productivity, but it also creates strong inequalities. Despite a growing body of evidence characterizing these heterogeneities in developed urban areas,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Air-quality implications of widespread adoption of cool roofs on ozone and particulate matter in southern California [Sustainability Science]The installation of roofing materials with increased solar reflectance (i.e., “cool roofs”) can mitigate the urban heat island effect and reduce energy use. In addition, meteorological changes, along with the possibility of enhanced UV reflection from these surfaces, can have complex impacts on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations. We aim to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Landowner behavior can determine the success of conservation strategies for ecosystem migration under sea-level rise [Sustainability Science]The human aspects of conservation are often overlooked but will be critical for identifying strategies for biological conservation in the face of climate change. We surveyed the behavioral intentions of coastal landowners with respect to various conservation strategies aimed at facilitating ecosystem migration for tidal marshes. We found that several...
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Live Science
Total Solar Eclipse Leaves Southern Illinois College Town in AwePesky clouds threatened to spoil the view for tens of thousands of people who journeyed from near and far to this southern Illinois college town to witness the Great American Solar Eclipse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds that gravity, 'mechanical loading' are key to cartilage developmentMechanical loading is required for creating cartilage that is then turned to bone; however, little is known about cartilage development in the absence of gravity. Now, in a study led by the University of Missouri, bioengineers have determined that microgravity may inhibit cartilage formation. Findings reveal that fracture healing for astronauts in space, as well as patients on bed rest here on Ear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormonal tug-of-war helps plant roots navigate their journey through the soilA sophisticated mechanism that allows plant roots to quickly respond to changes in soil conditions has been identified by an international research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cytoplasm 'feels' to a cell's componentsIn a study that may guide drug design, MIT researchers find organelles encounter varying levels of resistance, depending on their size and speed, as they move through a cell's cytoplasm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newest solar cells underperform in cloudy countriesTo determine how efficient new solar cells convert sunlight into electricity, small sample cells are tested under ideal conditions. However, the reported efficiency is not very representative of the actual annual yield when the cells are placed onto a rooftop and exposed to the Dutch weather. In an article published in ACS Energy Letters on August 22, 2017, AMOLF researchers present a model that p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach makes lightest automotive metal more economic, usefulMagnesium—the lightest of all structural metals—has a lot going for it in the quest to make ever lighter cars and trucks that go farther on a tank of fuel or battery charge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No microbes? No problem for caterpillarsThe microbiome seems ubiquitous: humans and many other species rely on billions of tiny organisms in their guts to aid in digestion, metabolism and other functions. Now, scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder are questioning the idea that the microbiome is universal among animals.
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Ars Technica
Sony blocks yet another game from cross-console play with Xbox One Enlarge / Thanks to Sony, these two versions of the same game will not be compatible with each other for online play. Back in June, Sony told Eurogamer that the company did not have "a profound philosophical stance" against letting PS4 users play games with those on other platforms. That said, the company's continued refusal to allow for cross-console play between PS4 and Xbox One players has bec
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Gizmodo
Fun Police Confiscate Thousands of Ecstasy Pills That Look Like Trump Image: Osnabrück Polizei / Gizmodo German police confiscated some 5,000 orange ecstasy tablets shaped like Donald Trump’s head last weekend. That’s over $45,000 worth of fun drugs that European nightclub-goers will not be enjoying this August. Sad! But seriously, the pills are really funny-looking. The design is clearly Trump’s face, although it looks little bit like Trump’s face mixed with the f
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Science : NPR
'Smart' Pill Bottles Aren't Enough To Help The Medicine Go Down Lots of people forget to take their medicine on time. Now firms are selling "smart" pill bottles that send patients reminders through the Internet. But maybe the real problem isn't forgetfulness. (Image credit: amphotora/Getty Images)
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The Scientist RSS
Sugars in Breast Milk Kill Pathogenic Bacteria: StudyOligosaccharides from one mom wiped out a Group B Strep colony in culture.
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Science : NPR
Hospitals Could Do More For Survivors Of Opioid Overdoses, Study Suggests Researchers say hospitals are missing an opportunity to help people with opioid addiction get into treatment by not doing enough when they show up in emergency rooms after an overdose. (Image credit: FangXiaNuo/Getty Images)
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Quanta Magazine
Mathematicians Tame Rogue Waves, Illuminating Future of LED Lighting In the 1950s, Philip Anderson, a physicist at Bell Laboratories, discovered a strange phenomenon. In some situations where it seems as though waves should advance freely, they just stop — like a tsunami halting in the middle of the ocean. Anderson won the 1977 Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery of what is now called Anderson localization, a term that refers to waves that stay in some “local
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Gizmodo
Dogs Are Turning Blue in India for the Saddest Reason All stories about dogs should be Good Stories, which is why the situation in Taloja, India is especially heartbreaking. Recently, photos and videos of blue pooches in the industrial town have cropped up online , raising the obvious question: What the hell happened? Sadly, the answer isn’t very cute. According to The Hindustan Times , the dogs were swimming in a local river that had been polluted
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When given the chance to pay less, patients choose cheaper prescription drugsAs prescription drug spending continues to rise in the United States, along with prices for new and well-established drugs, insurers, employers and patients are searching for ways to cut costs. A new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers found that a policy called reference pricing is effective at encouraging patients to spend significantly less on prescription drugs by choo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Out-of-pocket health costs can cause financial problems for survivors of childhood cancerAdult survivors of childhood cancer face an increased likelihood of financial difficulties related to out-of-pocket costs for their health care, compared with adults not affected by childhood cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No microbes? No problem for caterpillarsCaterpillars have far less bacteria and fungi inhabiting their gut than other animals and the microbes that inside them seem to lack any identifiable role, aside from occasionally causing disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ShAPEing the future of magnesium car partsA new process developed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, should make it more feasible for the auto industry to incorporate very lightweight magnesium alloys into structural components. The method has the potential to reduce cost by eliminating the need for rare-earth elements, while simultaneously improving the material's structural properties.
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Popular Science
Did staring at the eclipse damage my eyes? Health If you're wondering, you're (really) not alone. So you looked. Everyone told you not to, but you did. Rest easy—eye pain isn't one of the signs of retinal damage.
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Popular Science
4 hidden Mac tweaks to speed up your computer DIY Take macOS to the next level. Is your Mac computer crawling to a standstill? It doesn't have to be that way—try these advanced tricks to grant macOS the best possible performance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study links fish stress hormones to whether they take the baitTake a fish out of water and its stress hormones will go up. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the "fight or flight" hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient Earth’s hot interior created 'graveyard' of continental slabsPlate tectonics has shaped the Earth's surface for billions of years: Continents and oceanic crust have pushed and pulled on each other, continually rearranging the planet's façade. As two massive plates collide, one can give way and slide under the other in a process called subduction. The subducted slab then slips down through the Earth's viscous mantle, like a flat stone through a pool of honey
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Gizmodo
The Characters Most Likely to Die in the Game of Thrones Season Finale All images: HBO Season seven of Game of Thrones , short as it is, has been surprisingly light on major deaths. Sure, there have been people who have died, but nothing on the level that we’ve come to expect from a show that, last year, had us deeply mourning the death of Hodor. So chances are this Sunday’s finale will have at last one big death coming—and based on where the show seems to be headin
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Birth control research is moving beyond the pillAfter decades of research, reproductive biologists are on the verge of developing new birth control options that stop sperm from maturing or save a woman's eggs for later.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers devise microreactor to study formation of methane hydrateResearchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering are using a novel means of studying how methane and water form methane hydrate that allows them to examine discrete steps in the process faster and more efficiently.
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The Defenders Could Punch Better if They Learned Some PhysicsWhat's the best way to punch someone if you possess superhuman strength?
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Ars Technica
Intel shows off a mysterious and attractive black Surface Book Intel's 8th generation Core processors starring, oddly, a black Surface Book. To coincide with yesterday's launch of the new 8th-generation processors , which pack four cores and eight threads into the 15W chips found in Ultrabooks, Intel released a sizzle video to give people an idea of what to expect from the new processors. The star of the video is a little surprising, however. At first glance
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Viden
VIDEO: Google-fyring skaber stor kønsdebatHar det biologiske betydning for kvinders interesser og deres evner til at passe bestemte jobs?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating the mobile web: 'Vroom' software could double its speedDespite that most web traffic today comes from smartphones and tablets, the mobile web remains inconveniently slow. Even on fast 4G networks, a page takes 14 seconds to load on average—an eternity in today's connected world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers devise microreactor to study formation of methane hydrateResearchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering are using a novel means of studying how methane and water form methane hydrate that allows them to examine discrete steps in the process faster and more efficiently.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An AADR perspective on the 'Advancing dental education: Gies in the 21st century' projectIn 1926, William Gies published the seminal report 'Dental Education in the United States and Canada,' however dental education is now challenged by a new set of issues. A national project was created to address these complex modern issues and develop a broad strategic plan for the future of dental education. This project is divided into three phases. AADR's response to the completion of Phase One
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Technique speeds chemical screening to prioritize toxicity testingResearchers from North Carolina State University have developed a high-throughput technique that can determine if a chemical has the potential to activate key genes in seconds rather than the typical 24 hours or more. The technique can be used to prioritize chemicals for in-depth testing to determine their toxicity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The environment can become a noninvasive therapeutic approach to bolster white matter healthThose parents you overhear transforming trips to the grocery store into sensory adventures -- telling babies too young to babble that broccoli is GREEN, radishes are RED and tangerines are ORANGE -- are onto something. Being exposed to a complex and stimulating environment rich with new sights, sounds and a full vocabulary can play a powerful role in strengthening infants' developing brains.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests serotonin may worsen tinnitusMillions of people suffer from the constant sensation of ringing or buzzing in the ears known as tinnitus, creating constant irritation for some and severe anxiety for others. Research by scientists at OHSU shows why a common antidepressant medication may worsen the condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find RNA with special role in nerve healing processThe discovery in lab mice that an 'anti-sense' RNA is expressed after nerve injury to regulate the repair of damage to the nerve's myelin coating could lead to a treatment that improves healing in people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mouse model of human immune system inadequate for stem cell studiesA type of mouse widely used to assess how the human immune system responds to transplanted stem cells does not reflect what is likely to occur in patients, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormonesA bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. In an opinion article published in Trends in Plant Science, researchers i
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NYT > Science
La Morra Journal: In Italy’s Drought-Hit Vineyards, the Harvest of a Changing ClimateSome producers in Barolo say this year’s heatwave will improve their wines. But others warn of a loss of balance, in the season and in the grapes.
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Ars Technica
Stop hiding 47,000 net neutrality complaints, advocates tell FCC chair Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Peter Dazeley) The Federal Communications Commission is being pressured to release the text of 47,000 net neutrality complaints before going through with Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. The FCC has refused to release the text of most neutrality complaints despite a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request that asked for all complaints f
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Opposing Coaches And Players Console Little League Pitcher After Walk-Off | Jezebel Wearing Deadspin Opposing Coaches And Players Console Little League Pitcher After Walk-Off | Jezebel Wearing #Hermes And #Valentino, Louise Linton Boldly Rants About Self-Sacrifice On Instagram | Splinter Hellboy’s Casting Mess Shows That Hollywood’s Addiction to Whitewashing Can’t Be Quenched | The Grapevine New R. Kelly Accuser Violates Nondisclosure Agreement With Underage Sex Claims |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting hold of quantum dot biosensorsQuantum dots (QDs) have found so many applications in recent years, they can now be purchased with a variety of composite structures and configurations. Some are available suspended in a biologically friendly fluid, making them well poised to serve as biomarkers for single-molecule tagging and tracking. But suppose you wanted to trap and move one of these single nanoparticle tags the same way othe
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Feed: All Latest
Alec Baldwin’s Trump Impression Is a Technical MarvelThe actor's impersonation isn't just funny, it's very technically proficient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A silent search for dark matterResults from its first run indicate that XENON1T is the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth. The sensitivity of the detector -- an underground sentinel awaiting a collision that would confirm a hypothesis - stems from both its size and its 'silence.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designing custom robots in a matter of minutesResearchers have created a system called 'Interactive Robogami' that lets you design a robot in minutes, and then 3-D-print and assemble it in as little as four hours.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The brains of newborns distinguish between caressesThe ability to distinguish between different kinds of caresses on the skin already exists at a very early age. This is evident from a study in which the blood supply in brains of infants 6 to 10 weeks old was investigated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female fish 'more reluctant' to change sex than malesScientists in the UK have observed a fascinating new fact about sex changing fish: the direction of sex change has implication for population numbers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: Molecular volume control and perceiving mechanical stimuliAbout two years ago, scientists discovered that a certain class of receptors is capable of perceiving mechanical stimuli. Now they have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the discovery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Verizon tweaks prices, cuts video quality on unlimited plansVerizon is raising the price of its unlimited plan while introducing a slightly cheaper, more limited version as wireless carriers battle each other for customers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormonesA bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. In an opinion article published August 22 in the journal Trends in Plant
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Blog » Languages » English
Operation Spywire: Marathon Chase August 23rd, 7:30 AM. Your submersible ferry from Waikīkī arrives at the underwater base for RAGE. All around you are colorful tropical fish, swimming to and fro, but dead ahead sits this huge, ironclad monstrosity. Once inside, you are given a change of clothing and shown through a few sterile labs: the Lab for Unpleasant Stuff, the Lab for Really Unpleasant Stuff, and the Lab for Stuff Nobody E
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Gizmodo
This Snake Is So Deadly Its Venom Hasn't Had to Change in 10 Million Years Tiger snake. Image Courtesy Steward Macdonald. Being bitten by an Australian tiger snake is a wholly unpleasant experience. Within minutes, you start to feel pain in your neck and lower extremities—symptoms that are soon followed by tingling sensations, numbness, and profuse sweating. Breathing starts to become difficult, paralysis sets in, and if left untreated, you’ll probably die. Remarkably,
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Futurity.org
To dominate others, we pick products with wider ‘faces’ Consumers may prefer wider “faces” on some products they buy, such as watches or cars, when they want to be seen in a position of power in certain situations, a new study suggests. “These kinds of things are automatically going on in people’s brains…” “When consumers are motivated to dominate others, or when they use the product in public, their liking will be heightened toward high-ratio product
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting hold of quantum dot biosensorsHarnessing the nano-tractor-beam like abilities of optical tweezers, researchers from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, developed an all-silicon nanoantenna to trap individual quantum dots suspended in a microfluidic chamber.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A silent search for dark matterResults from its first run indicate that XENON1T is the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth. The sensitivity of the detector—an underground sentinel awaiting a collision that would confirm a hypothesis—stems from both its size and its "silence." Shielded by rock and water, and purified with a sophisticated system, the detector demonstrated a new record low radioactivity level, many orders
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earth history: How continents were recycledResearchers have used computer simulations to analyse how plate tectonics have evolved on Earth over the last three billion years. They show that tectonic processes have changed in the course of the time, and demonstrate how those changes contributed to the formation and destruction of continents. The model reconstructs how present-day continents, oceans and the atmosphere may have evolved.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New test for rare immunodeficiencyResearchers have developed a test to quickly and reliably diagnose a rare and severe immune defect, hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut-on-chip good predictor of drug side-effectsResearch has established that guts-on-chips respond in the same way to aspirin as real human organs do. This is a sign that these model organs are good predictors of the effect of medical drugs on the human body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A disposable alcohol test reveals whether you are fit to drive within two minutesA rapid alcohol test that measures the blood alcohol content from saliva has been developed. The disposable test fits easily into a small wallet and reveals the user's fitness to drive within couple of minutes.
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Gizmodo
Astronaut Pee and Sweat Could Be the Key to Getting Humans to Mars Image: The Martian In The Martian , Matt Damon used his own shit to fertilize potatoes and survive the Red Planet. While we all know Matt Damon isn’t actually an astronaut, we do know that human excrement is very much real—and it could be integral to getting real humans to Mars in the near future. Researchers from Clemson University are studying how molecules from astronauts’ sweat and pee can be
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Gizmodo
Verizon Will Totally Start Throttling Customers' Video This Week GIF And the great telecom throttling wars of 2017 have begun. Back in July, Verizon customers noticed that the quality of video streams was being manipulated. Verizon insisted that it was just running a test. Then the company got trounced by T-Mobile (which already throttles video on mobile) in an overall speed test, and now, all bets are off. Verizon will officially begin limiting the quality of
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: 55" TV, Cowboy Bebop, Velcro Cable Ties, and More A 55" Roku-enabled TV , UE’s Boom 2 Bluetooth speaker , and the complete Cowboy Bebop Blu-ray lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals 100 Velcro Cable Ties , $6 Update : Back up to $10, sorry! Velcro cable ties can transform the rat king of cables behind your desk or home theater into something more manageable , and yo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links fish stress hormones to whether they take the baitTake a fish out of water and its stress hormones will go up. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, the 'fight or flight' hormones, peak first, followed more gradually by cortisol. A new study finds that largemouth bass whose cortisol levels rise most after a brief bout of stress are inherently harder to catch by angling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A silent search for dark matterResults from its first run indicate that XENON1T is the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth. The sensitivity of the detector -- an underground sentinel awaiting a collision that would confirm a hypothesis - stems from both its size and its 'silence.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid crisis in Staten Island affects all races, ages, and socioeconomic backgroundsContrary to media reports, the opioid epidemic on New York's Staten Island is not confined to affluent young white residents, and affects all neighborhoods, races, ages, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The study conducted by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) was issued by the District Attorney's Office for Staten Island.
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The Atlantic
When Will Enough Be Enough in Afghanistan? Trump is the American Everyman on Afghanistan. He is frustrated that we’re still there after 16 years—who wouldn’t be?—and questions why we’ve spent so much blood and treasure in a land-locked country in Central Asia when roads and bridges go unrepaired at home. But Trump the president is not Trump the private citizen and, like every policy maker who has looked at Afghanistan with actual responsi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wealth disparity and family income impact the brain development of female youthFemale teenagers living in neighborhoods with wide salary gaps and a low-income household show changes to their brain maturation that could indicate a higher risk of developing mental illness in adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Where do heart cells come from?Scientists were surprised to discover that the four genes in the Id family play a crucial role in heart development, telling undifferentiated stem cells to form heart tubes and eventually muscle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key compounds to resolve abnormal vascular growth in age-related macular degeneration identifiedA compound of specific bioactive products from a major family of enzymes reduced the severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a preclinical model, according to a new study.
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Popular Science
For sale: China's brand new, souped-up tanks From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The country shows off new infantry-fighting vehicles. China shows off new infantry fighting vehicles, including one built from converted tank, and an explosive missile defense system for tanks. Read on.
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Gizmodo
If You Own a Sony Phone You Might Be Owed Up to $300 Image: Kat Hannaford/Gizmodo Are you one of the four people who owns a Sony phone in the United States? Well get excited because you could be owed up to $300. That’s thanks to a new settlement that will see Sony paying owners of Xperia phones due to some less than accurate advertising. One of the reasons Sony phones have remained pretty cool (even while being very difficult to find in the US) is
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Ars Technica
You missed your first chance to pre-order the Super NES Classic Edition [Updated] Enlarge / The Super NES Classic Edition is out standing in its field. (credit: Seb Anthony) Further Update: Super NES Classic pre-orders were up for a brief moment at Wal-Mart starting at 1 p.m. ET, but appear to have sold out in less than a minute. Targets pre-orders went up about 15 minutes later and sold out within a couple of minutes. Gamestop, meanwhile, announced it is taking pre-orders in
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mysteries of Turbulence UnraveledSimulations follow how swirls in a fluid transfer and dissipate energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Great American Eclipse Hangover CROSSVILLE, Tenn.—The path of totality is emptying out. Soon after the the Great American Eclipse was over on Monday, hundreds of thousands of people began their migration home, many driving for hours, their eclipse glasses crumpled in the backseat like a ticket after a big show. Many are still on the road. They’ll show up to work tired and yawning, the skin under their eyes ringed with darkness,
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The Atlantic
It's Not Too Late for Halt and Catch Fire For years now, America’s best TV drama has consistently been one of its least watched. With Halt and Catch Fire now in its fourth and final season, ratings don’t really matter anymore, especially since the show is airing on AMC on Saturday nights (an audience dead zone if there ever was one). What’s important is that the series gets to complete its story, and will likely be discovered as a hidden
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Feed: All Latest
Stormfront Nazis Think the Alt-Right Is Full of IdiotsWhite supremacist message board users has taken issue with the alt-right, in an echo of past divisions.
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Live Science
What to Do with Your Eclipse GlassesPeople who purchased eclipse viewers for the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse don't need to throw them away; they can donate them to children for the next eclipse, or hold on to them until 2024.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designing custom robots in a matter of minutesResearchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) created a system called 'Interactive Robogami' that lets you design a robot in minutes, and then 3-D-print and assemble it in as little as four hours.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bond dissociation energies for transition metal silicides accurately determinedTransition metal silicides are promising for future developments in electronic devices, but fundamental aspects of the chemical bonding between their transition metal atoms and silicon remain poorly understood. One of the most important, but poorly known, properties is the strength of these bonds -- the thermochemical bond dissociation energy. Researchers from the University of Utah have investiga
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steroids not effective for chest infections in non-asthmatic adultsOral steroids should not be used for treating acute lower respiratory tract infection (or 'chest infections') in adults who don't have asthma or other chronic lung disease, as they do not reduce the duration or severity of symptoms, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Updated analysis finds newer type of LDL-C reducing drugs still not cost-effectiveAn updated analysis of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering drugs, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, finds they are not cost-effective at current prices and that even greater price reductions than previously estimated may be needed to meet cost-effectiveness thresholds, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oral steroid does not reduce lower respiratory tract infection symptoms in nonasthmatic adultsAmong adults without asthma who developed an acute lower respiratory tract infection, use of the oral steroid prednisolone for five days did not reduce symptom duration or severity, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicaid patients continue high prescription opioid use after overdoseDespite receiving medical attention for an overdose, patients in Pennsylvania Medicaid continued to have persistently high prescription opioid use, with only slight increases in use of medication-assisted treatment, according to a study published by JAMA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bond dissociation energies for transition metal silicides accurately determinedTransition metal silicides, a distinct class of semiconducting materials that contain silicon, demonstrate superior oxidation resistance, high temperature stability and low corrosion rates, which make them promising for a variety of future developments in electronic devices. Despite their relevance to modern technology, however, fundamental aspects of the chemical bonding between their transition
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Ars Technica
Liveblog: The Galaxy Note 8 launches August 23 at 11am ET Enlarge / The Note 8 invitation. It's about time for Samsung to take the wraps off its latest flagship, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8. On Wednesday, August 23 at 11am ET (8am PT) , the company will hold a massive event in New York City to show off its latest flagship. We know pretty much all the basics about the Galaxy Note 8. Samsung gave the Galaxy S8 a big redesign with slimmer bezels, on-screen n
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Gizmodo
The Right Is Falling for Its Own Fake Antifa Accounts Image: Getty Will a time come when the right doesn’t actively try to deceive its own base? Perhaps. But this weekend wasn’t it. Antifa—short for anti-fascist action—has grown in notoriety since the election of Donald Trump. Supporters see it as the front line in street-level protests against racism. But in the minds of the far-right, antifa are painted in cartoonishly broad strokes, either as the
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Gizmodo
Sony Legalizes Remixes Image: Pixabay In a rare instance of a record company doing the right thing, Sony became the first major label to legalize unofficial remixes and DJ mixes. It’s not like DJs were ever going to stop borrowing copyrighted samples for remixes. Remixes can’t be stopped! But now, finally, you’re going to start seeing more remixes on Spotify and Apple Music. The somewhat surprising (if long overdue) mo
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Gizmodo
This Samsung Robotic Vacuum Is Under $200 For the First Time Samsung POWERbot R7010 , $198 ~$200 robotic vacuums aren’t anything new. But $200 robotic vacuums from a name brand like Samsung don’t come around often. The Samsung POWERbot R7010 features a ton of vacuuming power, a suite of nine sensors that help it map out your room, and mercifully, a washable filter. It debuted in April for over $400, and now you can get it for less than half that. That’s a
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The Atlantic
Trump's Recycled Afghanistan Policy President Donald Trump’s speech on Afghanistan on Monday night wasn’t remarkable for it’s new ideas—there wasn’t much new to be found. There wasn’t, as administration officials had led many to expect, a new number for the U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan, or a new approach to Pakistan, or a new regional strategy for South Asia. Instead, Trump’s speech was remarkable for what was old. It represe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forestIn the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. Today, that area is covered in lush, vine-laden forest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial intelligence predicts dementia before onset of symptomsImagine if doctors could determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. Such prognostic capabilities would give patients and their families time to plan and manage treatment and care. Thanks to artificial intelligence research conducted at McGill University, this kind of predictive power could soon be available to clinicians everywhere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oropouche virus could emerge and cause a public health problemBrazil runs a serious risk of being afflicted by Oropouche, another virus that is widely distributed throughout South and Central America and the Caribbean. An arbovirus transmitted by a mosquito (like Zika and yellow fever), Oropouche causes acute fever and may lead to meningitis and meningoencephalitis (inflammation of the brain and meninges).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forestIn the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. Today, that area is covered in lush, vine-laden forest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies miR-122 target sites in liver cancer, links 3 genes to patient survivalA new study shows that a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, such as during liver-cancer development, the activity of certain cancer-promoting genes goes up. The findings could one day help doctors better predict survival in liver cancer patients and hel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yoga and meditation improve mind-body health and stress resilienceA new research article investigates the effects of yoga and meditation on people by looking at physiological and immunological markers of stress and inflammation. By studying the participants of an intensive three-month yoga and meditation retreat, the researchers found that the practices positively impacted physiological and immunological markers of stress and inflammation, and in addition improv
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crystal structure reveals new details of nonstandard RNA transcriptionBy capturing the crystal structure of RNA polymerase during a nontraditional form of transcription -- reiterative transcription -- researchers have identified a new pathway used by RNA to exit an enzyme.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
You may be as friendly as your genesScientists have found that CD38 and CD157 genes that regulate oxytocin, the supreme human social hormone, are associated with the sociality of young individuals. They found that young adults who have higher expression of the CD38 gene as well as differences in CD157 gene sequence are friendlier and more socially adept than others. They have more close friends and show greater social skills.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Frontline supervisors use micro-power strategies to cope with middle-manager statusProbation and parole officers and their frontline supervisors widely differ on their views of the power of the frontline supervisor, according to a new study.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Hero' of Paris climate agreement diesFormer Marshall Islands minister Tony De Brum, who played a key role in securing the Paris pact passes away aged 72.
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Scientific American Content: Global
People Furthest Apart on Climate Views Are Often the Most EducatedFor attitudes on global warming, political identity is a more important signal than academic acumen or scientific literacy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Best Buy's Pre-Orders for the SNES Classic Were a Goddamn Nightmare While playing the “just one more episode” game with Netflix last night, I noticed a tweet from a former coworker: Best Buy, it seemed, had opened up pre-orders for the SNES Classic. Nintendo’s followup to the much sought-after NES-themed nostalgia box was sure to sell out quickly. But the hard part was getting Best Buy to take my money, and it turns out I was far from the only one with issues. Ba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Professor calls for federal guarantee of quality education for kidsAmerican children, no matter where they live or what school they attend, deserve to be guaranteed a quality education, much as we guarantee a safety net for seniors, argued Professor Marta Tienda of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Without a federal guarantee to restore the "educational social contract," she wrote, the United States will never close
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum ruler for biomoleculesQuantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified with a set of vitamins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solidifying advanced alloy designUsing a combination of theory and experiment, a multi-institutional team are creating simulations to speed up advanced material design.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Methane hydrate is not a smoking gun in the Arctic OceanMethane hydrate under the ocean floor was assumed to be very sensitive to increasing ocean temperatures. But a new study shows that short term warming of the Arctic ocean barely affects it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's the annual value of trees? $500 million per megacity, study saysIn the megacities that are home to nearly 10 percent of the world's 7.5 billion people, trees provide each city with more than $500 million each year in services that make urban environments cleaner, more affordable and more pleasant places to live.
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Ars Technica
Danish submarine mystery takes gruesome, bizzare turns [Updated] Enlarge / The UV3 Nautilus in early sea trials in 2008. (credit: Frumperino ) On Monday, a Copenhagen Police spokesperson released new information regarding the investigation into the disappearance of Kim Wall, a Swedish journalist who had been l ast seen aboard the UC3 Nautilus —the crowd-funded, amateur-built diesel-electric submarine designed and piloted by Peter Madsen. Madsen now confirms th
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The era of blind faith in big data must end | Cathy O'NeilAlgorithms decide who gets a loan, who gets a job interview, who gets insurance and much more -- but they don't automatically make things fair, and they're often far from scientific. Mathematician and data scientist Cathy O'Neil coined a term for algorithms that are secret, important and harmful: "weapons of math destruction." Learn more about the hidden agendas behind these supposedly objective f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do international development projects affect property values?When looking to buy a home or other property in the U.S., location is typically at the top of the list—many buyers value properties with access to amenities like schools, parks, and an easy commute. But is that value shared by home buyers in developing countries? University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson looked at property transactions in Kenya near what she assumed would be a highly desirab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where do heart cells come from?Researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, the Cardiovascular Institute at Stanford University and other institutions were surprised to discover that the four genes in the Id family play a crucial role in heart development, telling undifferentiated stem cells to form heart tubes and eventually muscle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wealth disparity and family income impact the brain development of female youthFemale teenagers living in neighbourhoods with wide salary gaps and a low-income household show changes to their brain maturation that could indicate a higher risk of developing mental illness in adulthood, suggests a recently published study by Canadian researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study documents continued decline in use of hormone therapy by Canadian womenEver since menopause was first discussed publicly, the debate over the use of hormone therapy (HT) has monopolized headlines. Recognized as the most effective option for managing hot flashes and other menopause symptoms, the use of HT has continued to decline, largely as a result of the data released from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002. New study results published in Menopause, docume
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's the annual value of trees? $500 million per megacity, study saysIn the megacities that are home to nearly 10 percent of the world's 7.5 billion people, trees provide each city with more than $500 million each year in services that make urban environments cleaner, more affordable and more pleasant places to live.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do young adults post harmful personal content on social media?A new study looked at self-presentation of potentially damaging content on social media and examined whether this risky behavior is more likely associated with impulsivity and spontaneity or deliberate self-monitoring.
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Ingeniøren
Rørsangeren bruger magnetisk misvisning til at bestemme længdegradenEksperimenter viser, at den magnetiske sans hos voksne rørsangere er så god, at den også hjælper fuglenene til at holde styr på længdegraden og dermed finde vej over lange afstande.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a bacterium can live on methanolResearchers have identified all the genes required by a bacterium to use methanol as a food source. The results will help scientists advance the use of this resource in the field of biotechnology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social media culture can encourage risky and inappropriate posting behaviorYoung adults who adapt their behavior to match a social situation are just as likely to post offensive content online as those who act impulsively, according to a new study -- suggesting there's a wider social media culture that encourages risky behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Studies into inflammation in the infarcted heart could lead to changes in therapyScientists have demonstrated that the response of the human heart to an infarction is very different to what was previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Schools need to encourage broader participation in science learning outside of the classroomSchools are failing to offer sufficient opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to engage in science-based learning outside of the classroom, and should be doing more to open up participation, according to new research.
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Live Science
After 'Super Bowl of Eclipses,' US Looks Forward to 2024 Total Solar EclipseThe Great American Solar Eclipse has ended, but another total solar eclipse is coming to the U.S. in 2024 and planning is already underway.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sales newbies, don't fret—just go above and beyondGood news for novice salespeople worried about becoming successful: Expressing your gratitude to customers by going above and beyond your job description may be as effective as developing long-term relationships with them, indicates a first-of-its-kind study.
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Ars Technica
Facebook’s evolutionary search for crashing software bugs Enlarge / A wall of user photos form a Facebook logo at the company's data center in Lulea, Sweden. (credit: JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images) With 1.3 billion daily users, the Facebook site and its apps are the most-used pieces of software in the world. Only a handful of software companies have ascended to a similar echelon of ubiquity, including Microsoft, Google, and Apple. For better or w
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The Atlantic
Give Trump Credit For His Afghanistan Plan Donald Trump campaigned on ending the war in Afghanistan, calling it “a complete waste” and advocating walking away from it. I’d been arraying the possibility around 60 percent that, as president, he’d write off Afghanistan entirely. So it’s very much to his credit that he let himself be persuaded to embrace a policy diametrically opposed to his campaign rhetoric. And it’s important that he took
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Futurity.org
Tougher composite for teeth mimics sticky mussels A new type of composite that provides an extra layer of durability to treated teeth gets its inspiration from the way mussels stick to just about any surface. The potential payoff? Longer lasting fillings, crowns, and implants—and fewer trips to the dentist. “It’s as hard as a typical dental restoration but less likely to crack,” says Kollbe Ahn, a materials scientist at the University of Califor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yoga and meditation improve mind-body health and stress resilienceA new research article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience investigates the effects of yoga and meditation on people by looking at physiological and immunological markers of stress and inflammation. By studying the participants of an intensive three-month yoga and meditation retreat, the researchers found that the practices positively impacted physiological and immunological markers of st
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Princeton professor calls for federal guarantee of quality education for kidsAmerican children, no matter where they live or what school they attend, deserve to be guaranteed a quality education, much as we guarantee a safety net for seniors, argued Professor Marta Tienda of Princeton University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sales newbies, don't fret -- just go above and beyondGood news for novice salespeople worried about becoming successful: expressing your gratitude to customers by going above and beyond your job description may be as effective as developing long-term relationships with them, indicates a first-of-its-kind study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do international development projects affect property values?Home buyers in the US, location typically value properties with access to amenities like schools, parks, and an easy commute. But is that value shared by home buyers in developing countries? University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson looked at property transactions in Kenya near what she assumed would be a highly desirable location and found the real estate mantra, "'ocation, location, locati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop infection model for tickborne flavivirusesNIH scientists have filled a research gap by developing a laboratory model to study ticks that transmit flaviviruses, such as Powassan virus. Powassan virus was implicated in the death of a New York man earlier this year. The unusual model involves culturing organs taken from Ixodes scapularis ticks and then infecting those organ cultures with flaviviruses, according to researchers at Rocky Mounta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid misuse can be tracked using TwitterSocial media can be a useful tool to find out how widespread the misuse of prescribed opioid drugs is, or to track the dynamics of opioid misuse in a given locality over time. This is according to a study in Springer Nature's Journal of Medical Toxicology. Lead author Michael Chary and his team analyzed more than 3.6 million tweets and found that the information about opioid misuse was significant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thoracic kyphosis in those over 50 may not be a predictor of physical declineA recently published study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has found that using CT scans to evaluate early signs of hyperkyphosis (extreme forward curvature of the upper spine) in people over age 50 does not help to identify those at risk of subsequent physical function decline.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crystal structure reveals new details of nonstandard RNA transcriptionBy capturing the crystal structure of RNA polymerase during a nontraditional form of transcription -- reiterative transcription -- researchers have identified a new pathway used by RNA to exit an enzyme.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New test for rare immunodeficiencyResearchers at the University of Basel have developed a test to quickly and reliably diagnose a rare and severe immune defect, hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency. They reported on their findings in the Journal of Clinical Immunology.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular volume controlAbout two years ago, scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered that a certain class of receptors is capable of perceiving mechanical stimuli. Now they have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the discovery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticle ink produces glowing holograms with simple inkjet printerResearchers at ITMO University unveiled a new approach for printing luminescent structures based on nanoparticle ink. The unique optical properties of the ink were achieved by means of europium-doped zirconia. Particles of this material were proven to be useful for manufacturing glowing holographic coatings with a high degree of protection. Importantly, the developed approach enables the fabricati
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists have analyzed the process of rock destructionMembers of the Faculty of Geology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University together with their colleagues have studied the stages of rock deformation. They have revealed a criterion, with the help of which you could predict the critical stage of fracture when the rock destroys.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abstinence-only-until-marriage programs and policies are a failure, research showsTwo scientific review papers show that abstinence-only-until-marriage programs and policies in the United States are ineffective as they do not delay sexual initiation or reduce sexual risk behaviors. They also violate adolescent human rights, withhold medically accurate information, stigmatize or exclude many youth, reinforce harmful gender stereotypes, and undermine public health programs. Absti
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Big Think
Why Having a Bad Job Is Worse for Your Health Than Having No Job at All A new study shows the link between the quality of a job and mental health. Read More
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Ars Technica
SNES Classic Mini: Quick preview by someone who has never barrel rolled Sebastian Anthony I have an awkward confession to make: growing up, I never owned a SNES. I had a NES, but then no other console until the N64: my dad brought an Olivetti 8086 PC home from the office, and I was much more interested in learning how to use MS-DOS than play games. Imagine the collective chagrin, then, when I was first to receive the SNES Classic Mini, rather than Kyle, Sam, or Mark.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Popular Robots Have Been Hacked to Potentially Cause Physical Harm
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting fat to 'talk' again could lower blood glucose and weightResearchers are exploring a novel approach to treating diabetes: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels -- by getting the fat to 'talk' again.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cyborg bacteria outperform plants when turning sunlight into useful compoundsPhotosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient. To enable humans to capture more of the sun's energy, scientists have taught bacteria to cover themselves in tiny, highly efficient solar panels to produce useful compounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Coffee-ring effect' harnessed to provide rapid, low-cost analysis of tap water'What's in your water?' has become an increasingly fraught question for many people, and getting the answer isn't always easy or cheap. Today, scientists are reporting that they are using the familiar 'coffee-ring effect' to analyze multiple components in a single drop of water easily, quickly and cheaply.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning human waste into plastic, nutrients could aid long-distance space travelImagine you're on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you'll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide into chemicals to make a new tool. That's one goal of scientists developing ways to make long space trips feasible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Contact in sports may lead to differences in the brains of young, healthy athletesPeople who play contact sports show changes to their brain structure and function, with sports that have greater risk of body contact showing greater effects on the brain, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Growing number of people in Ontario treated for opioid addictionThe rate at which people are being prescribed opioids to treat pain in Ontario has stabilized while the amount of drugs they receive has declined considerably, a new report has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devicesA team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain's self-regulation in teens at risk for obesityIn a small study that scanned the brains of teenagers while exposing them to tempting 'food cues,' researchers report that reduced activity in the brain's 'self-regulation' system may be an important early predictor of adult obesity.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can 'large stars' anti-aging research' help future memory devices?Nothing is forever, but is it possible to slow down inescapable decay? An inquiry into the delay of deterioration of quantum memory devices and formation of black holes explained with intuitive analogies from everyday life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Fashnology' a factor for picking wearable devicesFrom fitness bands to smart glasses, wearable technology has grown in popularity in recent years. But what prompts people to put on a wearable device? A recent study provides some answers.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Intelligence and the DNA RevolutionScientists identify 22 genes associated with intelligence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team uses computation and experiment to understand how novel material properties formSince the dawn of Enlightenment-era chemistry and physics, scientists have tried to document materials' properties different conditions. These investigations spawned the field of materials science and have helped humanity create aircraft and spacecraft, revolutionize healthcare, and build industrial processes to create products from adhesives and cosmetics to jet fuel and fertilizers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schools need to encourage broader participation in science learning outside of the classroomSchools are failing to offer sufficient opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to engage in science-based learning outside of the classroom, and should be doing more to open up participation, according to new research published in the International Journal of Science Education.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How continents were recycledResearchers from Germany and Switzerland have used computer simulations to analyse how plate tectonics have evolved on Earth over the last three billion years. They show that tectonic processes have changed in the course of the time, and demonstrate how those changes contributed to the formation and destruction of continents. The model reconstructs how present-day continents, oceans and the atmosp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite photos reveal gigantic outburst floodsResearchers from Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, studied satellite photographs of Lake Catalina, an ice-dammed lake in East Greenland -- and were truly amazed: Unnoticed by science as well as people living in the area, the lake has been the source of four major outburst floods over the last 50 years -- each representing an astounding mass of energy, equaling up to 240 Hiro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Methane hydrate is not a smoking gun in the Arctic OceanMethane hydrate under the ocean floor was assumed to be very sensitive to increasing ocean temperatures. But a new study in Nature Communications shows that short term warming of the Arctic ocean barely affects it.
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Futurity.org
Liking different brands could hurt your relationship Preferring different brands than your partner can affect your happiness in the relationship more than shared interests or personality traits, new research suggests. “It’s an extremely robust effect, we found it over and over and over again…” “People think compatibility in relationships comes from having similar backgrounds, religion, or education,” says Gavan Fitzsimons, a marketing professor at
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prey cannot evolve resistance to tiger snake venomAustralian tiger snakes have 'hit the jackpot' because prey cannot evolve resistance to their venom. While that may sound foreboding, an expert said that this discovery may have a medical benefit for humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A potential breeding site of a Miocene era baleen whaleBaleen whales are amongst the largest animals to have ever lived and yet very little is known about their breeding habits. One researcher's second look at previously found baleen whale fossils from Japan provides new evidence of a now long-gone breeding ground of the extinct baleen whale Parietobalaena yamaokai dating back over 15 million years.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is childhood obesity a psychological disorder?A team of researchers used fMRI to investigate neural responses to food cues in overweight compared with lean adolescents.
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Futurity.org
Can statins shield us from malaria and typhoid? That statin you’ve been taking to lower your risk of heart attack or stroke may one day pull double duty, providing protection against a whole host of infectious diseases, including typhoid fever, chlamydia, and malaria. Scientists recently discovered that a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels could increase risk of contracting typhoid fever. They also learned that a common cholesterol-l
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Schools need to encourage broader participation in science learning outside of the classroomSchools are failing to offer sufficient opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to engage in science-based learning outside of the classroom, and should be doing more to open up participation, according to new research.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New recommendations for managing menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivorsA large proportion of the world's estimated 9.3 million breast cancer survivors experience menopausal symptoms or clinical manifestations of estrogen deficiency. A comprehensive review published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism focuses on current and future approaches to management of menopausal symptoms after breast cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solidifying advanced alloy designUsing a combination of theory and experiment, a multi-institutional team based at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are creating simulations to speed up advanced material design.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum ruler for biomoleculesQuantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified wit
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dogma overturned: New studies into inflammation in the infarcted heart could lead to changes in therapyScientists at the CNIC and FJD and Salamanca University Hospitals have demonstrated that the response of the human heart to an infarction is very different to what was previously thought.
4h
The Atlantic
When It’s Hard for Women to Find Male Mentors In March, political chatter erupted over the a fact dredged up by The Washington Post from a 2002 The Hill article: Vice President Michael Pence won’t dine alone with any woman other than his wife, or at least that was the case in 2002. ( The Hill article also noted that he will often decline drinks or dinner with solo male colleagues as well, though that was largely lost in the public conversati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iran in talks to unblock Twitter, says new ministerIran's new communications minister said Tuesday that negotiations were underway with Twitter to unblock the service, which has been banned for years despite being used even by the country's supreme leader.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Officials: Do not eat fish caught in Shenango RiverState officials are warning people not to eat fish caught in a stretch of a western Pennsylvania river after tests found extremely high levels of a potentially dangerous chemical.
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Gizmodo
Music City Converts Visitors to Eclipsapalians A clouded out eclipse in Indiana (Image: AP) NASHVILLE— Eclipse fever struck Nashville like an unexpected sunset, clogging parking lots and bars with eager visitors. It inspired country musicians to invent new words, and sent vendors to the streets to hawk merchandise as if it were the Solar Super Bowl. Everyone’s eclipse experience is unique. The largest city along the path of totality, Nashvill
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare white koala born at Australian zooA koala at an Australian zoo has given birth to a rare white joey, staff announced Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Personifying places can boost travel intentionsPeople who see animals as people and assign human traits to non-human objects are more likely to travel to destinations that are presented as being human-like, according to Queensland University of Technology (QUT) research.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Religious affiliation impacts language use on FacebookAre you more likely to use words like "happy" and "family" in your social media posts? Or do you use emotional and cognitive words like "angry" and "thinking?" The words you use may be a clue to your religious affiliation. A study of 12,815 U.S. and U.K. Facebook users finds use of positive emotion and social words is associated with religious affiliation whereas use of negative emotion and cognit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why tiger snakes are on a winnerAustralian tiger snakes have "hit the jackpot" because prey cannot evolve resistance to their venom.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unconventional quantum systems may lead to novel optical devices(Phys.org)—Physicists have experimentally demonstrated an optical system based on an unconventional class of quantum mechanical systems that could lead to the development of new quantum optical devices. The system is called a "PT-symmetric quantum walk," since it consists of single photons that occupy a superposition of states, called quantum walks, that obey parity-time (PT) symmetry—the property
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Some secrets of China’s terra-cotta army are baked in the claySpecialized production system lay behind the famous terra-cotta troops found in ancient Chinese emperor’s tomb.
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Science | The Guardian
Space savers: astronaut urine could make supplies from nutrients to tools Urine, faeces and breath could be recycled to produce food supplements and plastics for 3D printing, freeing up space on long journeys, say researchers Astronauts could find themselves eating nutrients and using plastics produced by yeast fed with their own urine, according to researchers exploring ways to harness human waste in space. Urine is already recycled on board the International Space St
5h
Ars Technica
The solar eclipse produced some fantastic photos—here are our favorites NASA/Bill Ingalls On Monday, Ars writers shared some thoughts with readers about the total solar eclipse that spanned the United States and took some backyard photographs of the event. But let's be honest; none of us are professional photographers, and we didn't possess the right equipment to do the celestial event justice. Fortunately, there's a space agency for that. Two, even. And on Monday NA
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A potential breeding site of a Miocene era baleen whaleBaleen whales are amongst the largest animals to have ever lived and yet very little is known about their breeding habits. One researcher's second look at previously found baleen whale fossils from Japan provides new evidence of a now long-gone breeding ground of the extinct baleen whale Parietobalaena yamaokai dating back over 15 million years.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hoping to be seen as powerful, consumers prefer wider faces on watches, cars, study findsPeople are typically averse to wider human faces because they elicit fears of being dominated. However, consumers might like wider faces on some products they buy, such as watches or cars, when they want to be seen in a position of power in certain situations, according to a new study led by a University of Kansas marketing researcher.
5h
Ingeniøren
Truslen fra Zika-virus har toppetDen myggebårne zika-virus blev udråbt som en global helbredstrussel sidste år, men nu ser problemet ud til at være svundet kraftigt ind.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists measure molecular electronic properties of vitaminsQuantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified wit
5h
Ars Technica
Spyware backdoor prompts Google to pull 500 apps with >100m downloads Enlarge (credit: portal gda ) At least 500 apps collectively downloaded more than 100 million times from Google's official Play Market contained a secret backdoor that allowed developers to install a range of spyware at any time, researchers said Monday. The apps contained a software development kit called Igexin, which makes it easier for apps to connect to ad networks and deliver ads that are t
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large study reveals women have superior response to esophageal cancer treatmentFemale patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer that is treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery are more likely to have a favorable response to the treatment than male patients are, and women are less likely to experience cancer recurrence, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social media culture can encourage risky and inappropriate posting behaviorYoung adults who adapt their behavior to match a social situation are just as likely to post offensive content online as those who act impulsively, according to a new study by the University of Plymouth -- suggesting there's a wider social media culture that encourages risky behavior.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a bacterium can live on methanolETH Zurich researchers have identified all the genes required by a bacterium to use methanol as a food source. The results will help scientists advance the use of this resource in the field of biotechnology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test predicts prostate tumor resistanceWhen bacteria develop antibiotic resistance, treatment with these medications becomes ineffective. Similarly, tumor cells can also change in such a way that renders them resistant to particular medications. This makes it vitally important for cancer patients and their doctors to determine as early as possible whether a specific therapy is working or not. A new blood test developed by researchers a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create magnetic RAMA team of researchers has now developed a magnetoelectric random access memory (MELRAM) cell, which consists of two components: piezoelectric material and a layered structure characterized by a high magnetoelasticity. When a voltage is applied to the memory cell, the piezoelectric layer of the structure is deformed. Depending on the nature of the strain, magnetization assumes a particular orientat
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can 'large stars' anti-aging research' help future memory devices?Nothing is forever, but is it possible to slow down inescapable decay? An inquiry into the delay of deterioration of quantum memory devices and formation of black holes explained with intuitive analogies from everyday life
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical study shows that retinal imaging may detect signs of Alzheimer's diseaseA study led by researchers at Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision Imaging LLC provides the scientific basis for using noninvasive eye imaging to detect the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's. The experimental technology, developed by Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision, scans the retina using techniques that can identify beta-amyloid protein deposits that mirror those in the brain.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hoping to be seen as powerful, consumers prefer wider faces on watches, cars, study findsPeople are typically averse to wider human faces because they elicit fears of being dominated. However, consumers might like wider faces on some products they buy, such as watches or cars, when they want to be seen in a position of power in certain situations, according to a new study led by a University of Kansas marketing researcher.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why tiger snakes are on a winnerAustralian tiger snakes have 'hit the jackpot' because prey cannot evolve resistance to their venom.While that may sound foreboding, University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences expert Associate Professor Bryan Fry said this discovery had medical benefit for humans.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personifying places can boost travel intentionsPeople who see animals as people and assign human traits to non-human objects are more likely to travel to destinations that are presented as being human-like, according to Queensland University of Technology research. A study from the QUT Business School, found that writing about a destination as if it were human could boost its appeal as a travel destination.
5h
The Atlantic
Trump's Speech Can't Change Recalcitrant Realities President Trump will not rapidly withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan. But then, you already knew that: The first year of his presidency is two-thirds over, and there has been no move to implement his campaign promises to withdraw them. Trump will focus the U.S. mission in Afghanistan, not on nation-building, but on chasing and killing military enemies one-by-one. But you already knew that too:
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Gizmodo
The Never-Ending Descent Into This Infinite Fractal City Will Melt Your Brain GIF In Julius Horsthuis ’ short film Recurrence , he takes the audience on a slow descent into a sprawling metropolis he’s created. But as you get closer and closer to the city, and try to make out details like houses and skyscrapers, you start to realize that those tiny details only reveal more of the same, and that your descent is never going to end. Using computer animation to cover complex ma
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Ars Technica
Lawsuit against Daily Stormer is stuck; founder can’t be served papers Andrew Anglin (credit: Azzmador / YouTube) A Jewish real estate agent's anti-harassment lawsuit against the owner of the racist Daily Stormer website hasn't progressed at all, despite being filed nearly four months ago. The reason for the stall, the plaintiff's lawyers say, is that Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin simply can't be found. They've tried, but failed, to serve him papers at four
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New Scientist - News
Newborn babies already have a sense of how numbers workDo you think of smaller numbers being on the left of larger ones? Even two-day-old babies may think this way, suggesting we’re born with mental number lines
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New Scientist - News
I watched the eclipse with scientists hunting the sun’s secretsLeah Crane joined solar researchers to watch yesterday’s eclipse, a rare chance to look at a scorching ring of space around the sun that we can almost never see
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to win the climate wars – talk about local 'pollution' not global warmingDonald Trump has done many things to tarnish America's reputation, but his decision to walk away from the Paris Agreement is probably the most internationally symbolic and damaging. That a US president can put climate change denial at the centre of his climate and energy policy is truly unprecedented, and it is difficult to remember an administration that has been so intent on undermining the inte
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Gizmodo
There's Already Rumors About Doctor Who's Next, and Very Different, Companion An iconic Spider-Man adversary could appear in a weird way in Silver and Black . Charlie Cox discusses the comic book influences behind Daredevil ’s third season. The Hellboy reboot is close to recruiting another member of its supernatural cop squad. Plus, new clips from Killyjoys , from Preacher , and more Inhumans posters. Spoilers now! Doctor Who British tabloid The Mirror alleges that the sho
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Popular Science
Five amazing natural phenomena that are harder to see than a total eclipse Environment Start planning your next trip. The August eclipse has Americans in a tizzy, but it's not actually that hard to see a total eclipse. Not compared to these natural wonders.
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Feed: All Latest
Fujifilm's Instax SQ10 Instant Camera Review: It Mixes Analog and Digital, With Mixed ResultsFujifilm's latest instant camera shoots square film, but is it worth tolerating a quirky camera?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaner diesel on the horizonOn September 1, 2017, new emissions regulations for passenger vehicles will come into force in the EU and Switzerland. These will plug the gaps in the existing legislation and ensure that diesel vehicles in particular become considerably cleaner as regards their nitric oxide emissions. However, they will also permit existing vehicles to continue to be sold for some time. Empa recommends buying die
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers detect methanol maser emission towards nearby galaxy(Phys.org)—Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), a team of astronomers has detected methanol emission toward a nearby galaxy known as NGC 4945. The finding, reported Aug. 18 in a paper published on arXiv.org, could be helpful in improving our understanding of star formation processes.
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Ars Technica
Mac virtualization: Parallels and VMware want you to buy new versions Windows 10, Windows 7, and Ubuntu running in Parallels. (credit: Parallels ) Parallels and VMware both announced new versions of their virtualization products for Macs today, with performance improvements and optimizations for the upcoming releases of MacOS and Windows. VMware is also releasing a new version of Workstation, its desktop virtualization software for Windows and Linux PCs. Parallels
5h
The Atlantic
Would You Doxx a Nazi? After Charlottesville, white supremacists’ physical and digital presences—and the tactics used to combat them—are under renewed scrutiny. There have been attempts, most prominently by Logan Smith, who runs the Twitter account Yes, You’re Racist , to tack real names and identities onto the pictures of people who showed up to rally for white supremacy in the city. Some people have called this “doxx
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An echo from the past to the future on abrupt seasonal changes of the general circulationProfessor Duzheng YE was decades ahead of his time in proposing a model experiment to investigate whether abrupt seasonal changes of the general circulation can arise through circulation feedbacks alone, unrelated to underlying inhomogeneities at the lower boundary. A new paper summarizes the circulation feedbacks that lead to the abrupt seasonal transitions found in the model experiments without
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain's self-regulation in teens at risk for obesityIn a small study that scanned the brains of teenagers while exposing them to tempting 'food cues,' researchers report that reduced activity in the brain's 'self-regulation' system may be an important early predictor of adult obesity.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High moral reasoning associated with increased activity in the human brain's reward systemIndividuals who have a high level of moral reasoning show increased activity in the brain's frontostriatal reward system, both during periods of rest and while performing a sequential risk taking and decision making task according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Shanghai International Studies University in Sh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is childhood obesity a psychological disorder?Researchers use fMRI to compare neural responses to food cues in both overweight and lean adolescents and observe that adolescents at an increased risk for obesity had less neural activity in areas of the brain responsible for self-regulation and attention.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New meta-analysis finds a plant-based vegetarian diet is associated with lower cholesterolA new dietary review of 49 observational and controlled studies finds plant-based vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower levels of total cholesterol, including lower levels of HDL and LDL cholesterol, compared to omnivorous diets. The meta-analysis appears as an online advance in Nutrition Reviews.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meter-sized single-crystal graphene growth becomes possibleGrowth of single-crystal graphene is the foundation of the high-end applications of graphene. Recently, scientists from Peking University and their collaborators developed a creative method to realize the ultrafast epitaxial growth of meter-sized single-crystal graphene on industrial Cu foil. It is very likely that this approach can be scaled up to achieve exceptionally large and high-quality grap
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Futurity.org
Nurses learn to convince patients to take blood thinners A new study suggests that online courses given to nurses can lower the rate of nonadministration of prescribed and necessary doses of blood thinners, meant to prevent lethal blood clots in hospitalized patients. More than 100,000 people die from VTE annually—that’s more than the number of lives taken by breast cancer, AIDS, and motor vehicle collisions combined. The research was spurred by a docu
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Dana Foundation
International Neuroethics Society Interviews: Making Way for Truth and Technology As we look forward to the 2017 International Neuroethics Society (INS) Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, November 9-10, we’ll be bringing you a sneak peek of what to expect through a series of interviews with some of the meetings’ speakers. Registration for the meeting is now open, and an early bird discount is in effect until September 30 . First published in the INS Newsletter: To recognize you
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prototype technology for unearthing minefields with fire developed by teamEngineers have developed prototype technology that uses controlled burning to partially reveal landmines buried in peat soil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biotechnology researchers turn to landfill sitesFar from being a load of rubbish, landfill sites should be considered one of the great untapped resources in the search for new enzymes for biotechnology, and could fuel more efficient biofuel production.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Flying Blood BagA novel contrast agent capable of staining the finest blood vessels reveals an elaborate, entwined network in this pigeon's CT scan.
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Ars Technica
Tales of an IT professional sailing around the Antarctic loop Jen Thomas Carles Pina i Estany is not what comes to mind when you picture your typical Polar explorer. A native of sunny Barcelona, he works as a Software Engineer at Mendeley —a London-based technology company owned by science publishers Elsevier. Before this year, he had never even slept aboard a ship. But when the invitation came for him to embark on a three-month expedition around the Antarc
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The Atlantic
The Fight for America's Disappearing Ancient Dairy Cows Crossing the vast network of American roadways, drivers pass through fields of corn, soy, and wheat. They see power lines, roadside World’s Largests, kitschy diners—and cows. About 9 million dairy cows occupy the nation’s rural landscape, and of those, 94 percent are the familiar black-and-white Holsteins, a breed so archetypal that even the cow emoji is a Holstein. But this wasn’t always the cas
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Futurity.org
$1 minimum wage increase could cut child neglect cases Raising the minimum wage by $1 could lead to a substantial decrease in the number of reported cases of child neglect, research shows. “When caregivers have more disposable income, they’re better able to provide a child’s basic needs…” Congress is considering increases to the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, and several state and city governments have enacted or are considering minimum wage
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular volume controlAbout two years ago, scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered that a certain class of receptors is capable of perceiving mechanical stimuli. Now they have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind the discovery.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Model reveals best approach to get people to conserve water in different areas(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Australia has developed a model that sheds light on the social factors involved in getting users to cooperate on water conservation efforts. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes the factors they used to build their model and what it revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Captive lemurs get a genetic health checkupCareful matchmaking can restore genetic diversity for endangered lemurs in captivity, researchers report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique expedites chemical screening to prioritize toxicity testingResearchers from North Carolina State University have developed a high-throughput technique that can determine if a chemical has the potential to activate key genes in seconds rather than the typical 24 hours or more. The technique can be used to prioritize chemicals for in-depth testing to determine their toxicity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inexpensive, accurate and rapid characterisation of metal-contaminated sitesA new accurate, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing metal-contaminated sites has been trialled by environmental scientists from Macquarie University, Sydney. The method uses a combination of portable X-ray Fluorescence technology (pXRF) – a popular on-site contamination-measuring system – with conventional laboratory analysis to accurately measure the extent and distribution of metal contam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social media culture can encourage risky and inappropriate posting behaviour, new study suggestsThe use of social media is pervasive among young adults, but not all posted content is necessarily appropriate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The moving Martian bow shockAs the energetic particles of the solar wind speed across interplanetary space, their motion is modified by objects in their path. A study, based on data from ESA's Mars Express orbiter, has thrown new light on a surprising interaction between the planet Mars and supersonic particles in the solar wind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female fish 'more reluctant' to change sex than malesScientists in the UK have observed a fascinating new fact about sex changing fish: the direction of sex change has implication for population numbers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secret life of slugs and snailsWA agriculture researchers have made it possible to watch five consecutive evenings of slug antics with time-lapse photography of canola crops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kodiak bears found to switch to eating elderberries instead of salmon as climate changes(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found that warming in Alaska has sometimes caused the Kodiak bear to switch to eating elderberries during salmon spawning periods instead of eating salmon. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their multi-pronged study of the impact that seasonal changes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A disposable alcohol test reveals whether you are fit to drive within two minutesThe Finnish company Goodwiller has launched a rapid alcohol test it has developed in collaboration with VTT that measures the blood alcohol content from saliva. A disposable test fits easily into a small wallet and reveals the user's fitness to drive within couple of minutes.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a bacterium can live on methanolETH Zurich researchers have identified all the genes required by a bacterium to use methanol as a food source. The results will help scientists advance the use of this resource in the field of biotechnology.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny institutleder på Niels Bohr InstitutetJan W. Thomsen tiltræder som ny institutleder på Niels Bohr Institutet ved Københavns...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To fight climate change, put seaweed in the mixThe next stage of humanity's fight to reduce greenhouse emissions may revolve around seaweed, according to tonight's episode of ABC's Catalyst, presented by Professor Tim Flannery, which asks the question "can seaweed save the world?"
6h
The Atlantic
Evangelicals Are Bitterly Split Over Advising Trump Last week, a few days after white supremacists rallied in Charlottesville, A.R. Bernard became the first member of President Trump’s evangelical advisory board to resign. “It became obvious that there was a deepening conflict in values between myself and the administration,” the pastor of New York City’s Christian Cultural Center wrote in a statement. He had been quietly backing away for months,
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The Atlantic
The Book He Wasn't Supposed to Write I had written five books for Scott Moyers, following him as he moved from editing jobs at Scribner’s to Random House and then to Penguin Press. We worked well together, and in part thanks to his strong editing hand, my last three books had been bestsellers. So what happened when I finished years of work and sent him the manuscript of my sixth book stunned me. In fact, I was in for a series of sur
6h
The Scientist RSS
Trump Administration Disbands Climate Advisory PanelOn Friday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that the panel's charter would not be renewed.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the smartphone affected an entire generation of kidsAs someone who researches generational differences, I find one of the most frequent questions I'm asked is "What generation am I in?"
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New York's waterways are swimming in plastic microbeadsIt's morning. Brush your teeth. A quick shower, shampoo. Going to the beach? Get on the sunscreen. OK, ready to roll. You've just sent countless microscopic plastic bits swirling down the drain, through the sewer system and into the nearest water body.
6h
New Scientist - News
China’s quantum submarine detector could seal South China SeaA major advance in SQUIDs, quantum devices that measure magnetic fields, could allow China to detect submarines at longer range than anyone else
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New Scientist - News
The push for UK fracking may be 55 million years too lateCuadrilla is pressing ahead with a project to drill for shale gas in Lancashire, but a geologist thinks plans for industrial-scale fracking may be doomed
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Futurity.org
More than heat determines where wood frogs survive Precipitation may be nearly as important as temperature in figuring out which animals are in the most danger of decline or disappearance. That’s especially true for moisture-sensitive frogs and other amphibians, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at long-term monitoring data from 746 wood frog populations in 27 study areas, from Tennessee to Canada. The data focused on how climatic variatio
6h
Feed: All Latest
Netflix Is Using 'The Defenders' to Understand Its AudienceThe crossover show lets the streaming service see how their shows' fans overlap.
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Feed: All Latest
Watch Hackers Hijack Three Robots for Spying and SabotageAn early taste of the hacked robot uprising.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Autonomous Forklift Wants to Eat Up Warehouse Jobs
6h
The Atlantic
Trump Backs a Surge into Afghanistan He's Unfit to Lead Is the war in Afghanistan winnable? I fear not, under any commander in chief. I suspect withdrawal in the very near future would be the best course among a set of bad options. If the U.S. is going to surge more troops into its longest war, however, doing so under Donald Trump is folly. And the brave men and women who volunteered for the U.S. military deserve better. It is hard to imagine a comman
6h
The Atlantic
Transplantees Find Catharsis in Holding Their Old Hearts Kamisha Hendrix’s heart lay on the table between us. Seventy days ago, this heart had been beating inside of her, back behind the dark scar that plunged into the neckline of her blouse. “No—my heart didn’t beat,” Hendrix clarified. “It trembled.” The chemo used to treat her non-Hodgkin's lymphoma had damaged her cardiac muscle irreparably, reducing its strength to 15 percent. She regularly lapsed
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine microplastics detected in bottom-dweller bellies for the first timeAround half of marine creatures living at depths of more than 2,000 metres in the North Atlantic could be eating microplastic material, marine scientists have discovered.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How green roofs can help cities sponge away excess stormwaterSpring and summer 2017 have been among the wettest on record in eastern North America, including southern Ontario.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert discusses how cities should respond to urban vehicular attacksLast week, a van was driven into pedestrians on Las Ramblas in Barcelona, killing 13 and injuring at least 130 people, and the driver then killed a 14th victim in order to steal his car and escape. Later in the same day, five men from the same terrorist cell drove into pedestrians in nearby Cambrils, killing one woman and injuring six others. Here, Reader in International Politics Martin Coward di
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Ingeniøren
Norsk rapport: Hybrid-fiskerbåde kan halvere CO2-udledning på ti årEn ny rapport anbefaler elektrificering af 3.000 norske fiskerbåde over de næste ti år. Brancheforening tror dog på maks. 100.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's hard to find a humble CEO. Here's whyHumility is the latest badge of virtue for those in positions of influence. From politicians, to executives, to chart-topping artists.
6h
The Scientist RSS
Vitamin C Depletion Accelerates Leukemia in MiceHigh levels of vitamin C absorbed by blood-forming stem cells are important for their normal development.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Australia Zoo asks public to name white koala joeyAustralia Zoo has asked the public to name a white koala joey.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A trace of galaxies at the heart of a gigantic galaxy clusterVery large yet faint galaxies have been found where no one would have expected them – in the middle of a giant galaxy cluster. Heidelberg astronomers discovered the extremely-low density galaxies, known as ultra-diffuse galaxies, a find that is "both remarkable and puzzling", states Dr Thorsten Lisker. The research work was carried out by Carolin Wittmann in Dr Lisker's team at the Centre for Astr
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greening the concrete jungle—how to make environmentally friendly cementCement is the world's most widely used material apart from water, largely because it is the key ingredient in concrete, the world's favourite building material.
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Blowing Out Privé Revaux's Most Popular Sunglasses For Just $22, Today Only Privé Revaux Gold Box If you missed out on our exclusive Privé Revaux discount last week, here’s another chance to pick from 37 different frames for just $22 each in today’s Gold Box, because you need sunglasses year ‘round. This price is for today only, so don’t let the sun set on your new pair. Here are a couple more popular pairs, but head over to Amazon to see them all. More Deals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There could be snow on Mars – here's how that's possibleGiven that there are ambitious plans to colonise Mars in the near future, it is surprising how much we still have to learn about what it would be like to actually live on the planet. Take the weather, for instance. We know there are wild fluctuations in Mars's climate – and that it is very windy and at times cloudy (though too cold and dry for rainfall). But does it snow? Might settlers on Mars be
7h
Ingeniøren
Den amerikanske flåde indstiller al aktivitet efter fjerde Destroyer-uheld i årFlådens operationelle aktiviteter sættes i bero, mens det undersøges, hvad der ligger til grund for, at fire Destroyers i Stillehavet har været involveret i uheld 2017.
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Viden
Klitoris minder om en skjult penis inde i kroppenDet kvindelige sidestykke til penis kan være op til 10 cm langt og svulmer op, når kvinden bliver seksuelt ophidset.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Car industry needs cybersecurity rules to deal with the hacking threatIt's common to hear modern cars referred to as computers on wheels. They boast sensors that measure fuel and braking, along with built-in navigation and infotainment systems. These digital systems could be hacked and Australia needs to preemptively tackle this threat.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A potential breeding site of a Miocene era baleen whaleBaleen whales are amongst the largest animals to have ever lived and yet very little is known about their breeding habits. One researcher's second look at previously found baleen whale fossils from Japan provides new evidence of a now long-gone breeding ground of the extinct baleen whale Parietobalaena yamaokai dating back over 15 million years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can anti-aging research help future memory devices?Nothing is forever, but is it possible to slow down inescapable decay? An inquiry into the delay of deterioration of quantum memory devices and formation of black holes explained with intuitive analogies from everyday life
7h
New Scientist - News
Scanning your brain can predict what will happen in the futureCan neuroforecasting predict the next election result or market crash? Analysing activity in a part of our brain can predict things that haven’t happened yet
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mimicking the reflexive detection ability of the animal visual system for computer detection of moving objectsThe detection of moving objects is one of the most fundamental and important mechanisms of the animal visual system, having evolved to quickly detect both predators and prey. Yet reproducing the ability of animals to reflexively detect moving objects has remained elusive.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find soil bacteria require two-layer security, just like digital worldThose people at Google think they're sooooo smart. So, too, the Apple and Microsoft wunderkinds.
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Feed: All Latest
How to Get Free Kindle Books With Your Library CardAll you need is an internet connection, a library card, and a good e-reader to dive into your next page-turner.
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Feed: All Latest
Why It’s So Hard to Define What Online Hate Speech IsWhy did YouTube remove a World War II video? Because algorithms, and humans, are flawed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Fashnology' a factor for picking wearable devices, researchers findFrom fitness bands to smart glasses, wearable technology has grown in popularity in recent years. But what prompts people to put on a wearable device? A recent study conducted by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology provides some answers.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dyes detect disease through heartbeat signalsVibrant tones of yellow, orange, and red move in waves across the screen. Although the display looks like psychedelic art, it's actually providing highly technical medical information – the electrical activity of a beating heart stained with voltage-sensitive dyes to test for injury or disease.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crystal structure reveals details of nonstandard RNA transcriptionHigh-resolution crystal structure reveals a new pathway for RNA during a nontraditional form of transcription—the process by which RNA is produced from a DNA template. Caught during the act of reiterative transcription, a form of transcription in which a single base of DNA (represented by the letters A, T, C, and G) codes for several corresponding bases in the RNA (one G in DNA leads to several Gs
7h
Dagens Medicin
Førende forsker i nedbringelse af tvang ansat i SyddanmarkDen britiske professor Joy Ann Duxbury er blevet ansat hos Psykiatrien i Region Syddanmark. Tilknytningen skal styrke psykiatrisygehusets forskningskvalitet og hjælpe med at halvere brugen af tvang.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
It's Crucial to Upgrade America's Water InfrastructureDams, reservoirs, canals and safe drinking water matter for absolutely everyone -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New open-source software for analyzing intact proteinsAn estimated 20,300 genes in the human genome encode proteins. The number of proteins themselves, as intact proteoforms, could be as high as one billion.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algorithm speeds metabolic pathway analysis, spurring computational advances in network scienceScientists need a systematic understanding of cellular functioning to metabolically engineer microbes that produce biofuels and other high-value products, and to design drugs that combat pathogens and cancers. Metabolic networks are highly complex, however, so researchers computationally break them down into simplified metabolic pathways in order to analyze function. Think of the complex network o
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cytoplasm 'feels' to a cell's componentsUnder a microscope, a cell's cytoplasm can resemble a tiny underwater version of New York's Times Square: Thousands of proteins swarm through a cytoplasm's watery environment, coming together and breaking apart like a cytoskeletal flash mob.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Earth's hot interior created 'graveyard' of continental slabsPlate tectonics has shaped the Earth's surface for billions of years: Continents and oceanic crust have pushed and pulled on each other, continually rearranging the planet's façade. As two massive plates collide, one can give way and slide under the other in a process called subduction. The subducted slab then slips down through the Earth's viscous mantle, like a flat stone through a pool of honey
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Variable sunshine— researchers explain why our Sun's brightness fluctuatesThe Sun shines from the heavens, seemingly calm and unvarying. In fact, it doesn't always shine with uniform brightness, but shows dimmings and brightenings. Two phenomena alone are responsible for these fluctuations: the magnetic fields on the visible surface and gigantic plasma currents, bubbling up from the star's interior. A team headed by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Cryptographers and Geneticists Unite to Analyze Genomes They Can't SeeComputer-security methods could help scientists identify disease-causing genes—while preserving patient privacy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cassini's "Grand Finale" Could Solve Saturn's Lingering MysteriesIn its last hours the spacecraft’s observations could reveal the origins of the planet’s rings—and more -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ingeniøren
Forskere omdanner stemmestyret assistent til spion-sonar Enheder med både mikrofoner og højtalere - som intelligente TV'er og Amazon Echo - udgør potentielt privacy-problem, mener forskerhold https://www.version2.dk/artikel/forskere-omdanner-intelligente-hoejtalere-spion-sonar-1079292 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
Eksperter: Kort levetid på elektroniske dimser fortsætter længe endnuHvis vi virkelig skal have holdbare produkter og forhindre, at firmaer spænder ben for reparationer, fordrer udviklingen meget mere markante tiltag end Europa-Parlamentet og USA's copyright-kontor har i sinde , siger eksperter i bæredygtighed.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make a breakthrough toward the next generation of memory devicesA*STAR and NTU researchers have created a thin film material that allows them to control the size and density of magnetic skyrmions. In addition, they have also achieved electrical detection of these skyrmions. The fabrication process for these films is compatible with current industrial methods. This discovery is a breakthrough and is a key step towards the creation of a skyrmion-based memory dev
8h
Dagens Medicin
Patienterne føler sig godt behandlet hos de praktiserende speciallægerDe praktiserende speciallæger får ros fra patienterne. Men enkelte områder kunne være bedre, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists explore a new recipe for heating plasmaIn the quest for fusion energy, scientists have spent decades experimenting with ways to make plasma fuel hot and dense enough to generate significant fusion power. At MIT, researchers have focused their attention on using radio-frequency (RF) heating in magnetic confinement fusion experiments like the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, which completed its final run in September 2016.
8h
New Scientist - News
Atomic assembly lines are a small victory for chemistsChemists are about to realise their ultimate goal – precise control of the building blocks of matter
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers produce new map of seismic hazards in BrazilResearchers are working on a new national map of seismic hazards for Brazil. In preparing the seismic hazard map, the researchers first conducted a survey of the tremors that have occurred in Brazil in recent decades in order to determine the level of seismic activity in each region.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mechanism that impairs production of bovine embryos is revealedA longstanding obstacle to the market for bovine embryos is lipid accumulation in oocytes. Researchers have now described a hitherto unknown mechanism of lipid accumulation in oocytes that limits the success of in vitro production of bovine embryos.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore new chapter of physicsInteractions between light and matter are a fundamental unit of modern physics, but recently researchers have started to look beyond the standard textbook interactions.
8h
Ars Technica
After years of investigation, feds bust one of AlphaBay’s largest drug rings Enlarge (credit: Thomas Trutschel / Getty Images News ) Six Southern Californians have been arrested for being involved in one of the largest drug rings on the now-shuttered Silk Road and AlphaBay . Prosecutors accuse them of selling more than $7 million dollars' worth of narcotics on the two notorious underground websites. According to a newly issued criminal complaint , which was filed in feder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study calls for better information on changes in wild animal populationsKey statistics about the world's animal and plant life could present a misleading picture about the natural world according to new research from the University of St Andrews.
8h
Feed: All Latest
We Can’t Stop Checking the News Either. Welcome to the New FOMOWho cares about my friends? I'm missing the news!
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Feed: All Latest
Self-Driving Cars. Rogue Nuke Launches. Evil AI. What Tech Threats You Should (and Shouldn't) Worry AboutTechnology is changing all our lives so profoundly, so quickly, that it can be scary. We asked experts to weigh in on how stressed we should be.
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Feed: All Latest
Virginia Heffernan on Learning to Read the Internet, Not Live in ItVirginia Heffernan on why we all need to learn to read the Internet, not live in it.
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Feed: All Latest
Your Handy Guide to the Many Tech Anxieties of Our TimeWill you Slack the wrong gossip to the wrong person? Probably, but who cares. Will Skynet become self-aware and kill us all? Nah. At least, not yet.
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Feed: All Latest
The Confessions: What If All Your Secrets Became Public? A Story by Joshua Cohen
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Feed: All Latest
The Web’s Most Toxic Trolls Live in … Vermont?Never read the comments. ­We worked with Disqus to quantify the online troll problem, from the trolliest time of day to the nastiest state in the union.
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Feed: All Latest
Your Kids Will Look at Internet Porn. Deal With It. A Conversation with Peggy Orenstein.It is inevitable. Peggy Orenstein explains how to cope with it.
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Feed: All Latest
How to Survive the Great Tech Panic of 2017Every generation regards its reckoning with new technology as a turning point for the species. You just have to learn to stop worrying and love the future.
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Ars Technica
Verizon to start throttling all smartphone videos to 480p or 720p Enlarge (credit: Verizon ) Verizon Wireless will start throttling video streams to resolutions as low as 480p on smartphones this week. Most data plans will get 720p video on smartphones, but customers won't have any option to completely un-throttle video. 1080p will be the highest resolution provided on tablets, effectively ruling out 4K video on Verizon's mobile network. Anything identified as
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Enduring Legacy of ZorkThe innovative text-adventure game still influences technologists 40 years after its creation.
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Gizmodo
Pro-Trump Rallies in 36 States Canceled, Will Be Held As Online Demonstrations (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) Pro-Trump rallies that were originally being planned for roughly 37 locations across the US have been canceled. The rallies, scheduled for September 9th, were being coordinated by ACT For America, a pro-Trump and anti-Muslim hate group best known for its “March Against Sharia” back in June . The group said it will instead hold online demonstrations. ACT For Ame
8h
Ingeniøren
Forskere: Jorden har sin egen termostat, der holder temperaturen næsten konstantDesværre får den mekanisme os ikke til at slippe fri af klimaforandringerne, for genopretningstiden er lang.
8h
The Atlantic
Growing Up in the Shadow of the Confederacy For most of my life I didn’t know Confederate statues could come down. Throughout my childhood, those equestrian statues of victory, obelisks, and granite figures of soldiers were as immovable and immutable as the hills and the lakes. Other symbols of the South as it was before 1865 were also part of the fabric of reality. Old battle flags were inevitabilities, waving in the wind. Plantations mig
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flaw detector for testing composite aircraftsA thermal flaw detector developed at Tomsk Polytechnic University will be used in the manufacturing of a new aircraft to replace the AN-2. The new model fully consists of composite materials and is developed by the Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute S. A. Chaplygin (SibNIA), Novosibirsk, Russia.
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Dagens Medicin
Regeringen vil forlænge skattelettelse til udenlandske forskere Erhvervsminister ønsker, at højtuddannede udlændinge skal have mulighed for at betale en lavere skat i syv år mod i øjeblikket i fem år.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Systematically studying slippery surfacesBetaines are materials with both a positively charged functional group and a negatively charged functional group linked by an alkyl chain spacer. This combination of functional groups causes betaines to strongly attract water, which makes them useful for water retention. Betaines prevent cell dehydration in organisms and also play roles in some reactions. Commercially, betaines are used in DNA amp
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Science | The Guardian
How much can you exercise while pregnant?For years, mothers-to-be have been told to cut back on exercise and take it easy despite the positive effects on body and mind. So how much is OK – and what workouts are recommended? ‘Stop running, kill the wild swimming and be careful about cycling.” I like my GP – he is a funny, hardworking man, practising in a diverse community with stretched resources. But when I walked into his office, six we
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Cyborg' bacteria deliver green fuel source from sunlightScientists create bacteria covered in tiny solar panels that generate a potential new fuel from the Sun.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retaining one normal BRCA gene in breast, ovarian cancers influences patient survivalResearchers found a relationship between the genetics of tumors with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and whether the tumor retains the normal copy of the BRCA1/2 gene, and risk for primary resistance to a common chemotherapy that works by destroying cancer cells' DNA.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning human waste into plastic, nutrients could aid long-distance space travel (video)Imagine you're on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you'll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide into chemicals to make a new tool. That's one goal of scientists developing ways to make long space trips feasible. The researchers will present their results today at the 254th National
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Coffee-ring effect' harnessed to provide rapid, low-cost analysis of tap water (video)'What's in your water?' has become an increasingly fraught question for many people, and getting the answer isn't always easy or cheap. Today, scientists are reporting that they are using the familiar 'coffee-ring effect' to analyze multiple components in a single drop of water easily, quickly and cheaply. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of t
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cyborg bacteria outperform plants when turning sunlight into useful compounds (video)Photosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient. To enable humans to capture more of the sun's energy, scientists have taught bacteria to cover themselves in tiny, highly efficient solar panels to produce useful compounds. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254t
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting fat to 'talk' again could lower blood glucose and weightResearchers are exploring a novel approach to treating diabetes: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels -- by getting the fat to 'talk' again. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical
9h
Ingeniøren
Tidligere topembedsmand: Offentlig it sættes i værk hen over hovedet på brugerne Den tidligere direktør for Socialstyrelsen mener, at den offentlige sektor skal arbejde anderledes med it. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tidligere-topembedsmand-offentligt-it-koerer-groeften-fordi-man-taler-hovedet-paa-brugerne Version2
9h
Ingeniøren
DSB: Bremserne på IC3 lever op til alle kravDSB’s sikkerhedschef afviser, at de mange bremseproblemer med IC3 udgør en sikkerhedsrisiko. DSB har fået udarbejdet en rapport, der frikender det udbredte tog.
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
To reduce gender biases, acknowledge them A former Google engineer’s memo on diversity reveals psychological blind spots, not biological differences, says Debbie Chachra. Nature 548 373 doi: 10.1038/548373a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyborg bacteria outperform plants when turning sunlight into useful compoundsPhotosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient. To enable humans to capture more of the sun's energy than natural photosynthesis can, scientists have taught bacteria to cover themselves in tiny, highly efficient solar panels to produce useful compounds.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Coffee-ring effect' harnessed to provide rapid, low-cost analysis of tap water"What's in your water?" has become an increasingly fraught question for many people in the U.S. and around the world. Getting the answer isn't always easy or cheap. Today, scientists are reporting that they are using the familiar "coffee-ring effect" to analyze multiple components in a single drop of water easily, quickly and cheaply. And someday, the public could use the method to test their own
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning human waste into plastic, nutrients could aid long-distance space travelImagine you're on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you'll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2) into chemicals to make a new one. That's one of the ultimate goals of scientists who are developing ways to make long space trips feasible.
9h
Ingeniøren
Derfor trækker det ud med den nye elektriske færge til ÆrøTekniske udfordringer og myndighedskrav har skubbet idriftsættelsen af den nye elfærge i Det Sydfynske Øhav med trekvart år. Det er selve konstruktionen og især batteripakken, som har drillet.
9h
Ingeniøren
Afgiftsrapport dumper omstridt energispareordningElnet-tarifferne bør ligeledes laves om, fremgår det af Skatteministeriets afgiftsrapport, der konkluderer, at nettarifferne sammen med energiselskabernes spareordning koster samfundet godt 1 mia. kroner for meget om året.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Ventelisterne alt for lange – Danmark mangler 90 neurologer DF og S: Sundhedsminister bør tage ansvar for, at flere neurologer uddannes.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Hospitaler i hovedstaden skal fyre folk På grund af bl.a. en såkaldt gevinstrealisering som følge af Sundhedsplatformen skal politikerne i Region Hovedstaden i dag diskutere besparelser på 102 mio. kr. 110-120 personer står til fyring.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Religious affiliation impacts language use on FacebookA study of 12,815 US and UK Facebook users finds use of positive emotion and social words is associated with religious affiliation whereas use of negative emotion and cognitive processes is more common for those who are not religious than those who are religious. The work replicates Ritter et al.'s 2013 results on religious and nonreligious language use on Twitter and appears in the journal Social
11h
Science-Based Medicine
Viotren and Other Dietary Supplements for Erectile Dysfunction: Buyer BewareViotren and other dietary supplements are being illegally marketed to treat erectile dysfunction. Some of them work, but only because they are adulterated with prescription drugs like Viagra (at up to 31 times the prescription dose). Using them can be risky.
11h
Ingeniøren
De yngste hos IBM vil have kollegernes 'likes'IBM fik et bud på, hvordan man bedst tiltrækker og fastholder Generation Z fra de unge selv. Konklusion: De vil ikke låses fast, og kollegernes vurdering betyder – næsten – lige så meget som chefens.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Tværsektorielt forum skal hjælpe den komplekse diabetes-patient Patienter med type 2-diabetes kan være ramt på så mange fronter sygdomsmæssigt og socialt, at de ikke kan få tilstrækkelig hjælp af læge, kommune eller ambulatorium. I København vil hospitaler, praktiserende læger og ambulatorier nu løfte i flok.
11h
Science | The Guardian
We can’t ban killer robots – it’s already too late | Philip BallTelling international arms traders they can’t make killer robots is like telling soft-drinks makers that they can’t make orangeade One response to the call by experts in robotics and artificial intelligence for an ban on “killer robots” (“lethal autonomous weapons systems” or Laws in the language of international treaties) is to say: shouldn’t you have thought about that sooner? Figures such as Te
11h
Ars Technica
HP stuffed the best gaming desktop perks into the 10-pound Omen X laptop Enlarge (credit: HP) HP gave its Omen gaming line a big boost before this year's E3 with the launch of new gaming PCs, peripherals, a GPU accelerator, and a VR backpack. While the company wants to provide devices for all kinds of gamers, its newest launch targets enthusiasts who don't want to compromise power when choosing a portable device. The new Omen X laptop is a behemoth gaming notebook, me
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boeing, Northrop get contracts for nuclear missile workThe Air Force said Monday it has awarded contracts to Boeing Co. and Northrop Grumman Corp. for work that could lead to replacement of the nation's intercontinental ballistic missiles.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where's the kelp? Warm ocean takes toll on undersea forestsWhen diving in the Gulf of Maine a few years back, Jennifer Dijkstra expected to be swimming through a flowing kelp forest that had long served as a nursery and food for juvenile fish and lobster.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to serve next version of Android as 'Oreo"An upcoming update to Google's Android software finally has a delectable name. The next version will be known as Oreo, extending Google's tradition of naming each version after a sweet treat.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frontline supervisors use micro-power strategies to cope with middle-manager statusProbation and parole officers and their frontline supervisors widely differ on their views of the power of the frontline supervisor, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas researcher.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic iceAntarctic researchers from Rice University have discovered one of nature's supreme ironies: On Earth's driest, coldest continent, where surface water rarely exists, flowing liquid water below the ice appears to play a pivotal role in determining the fate of Antarctic ice streams.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists show how plants turn off genes they don't needA plant has one genome, a specific sequence of millions of basepairs of nucleotides. Yet how this genome is expressed can vary from cell to cell, and it can change as a plant goes through various life stages, from germination to vegetative growth to flowering to dormancy. Some genes must be turned on and others shut off to ensure each plant cell is doing what it needs to do when it needs to do it.
11h
Ingeniøren
DevOps i DR: »Man skal erkende, at man ikke kan bruge et år på at teste et værktøj« Der er brug for fleksibilitet i alle lag, når it-ansatte bag Danmarks største hjemmeside skal arbejde efter DevOps-principper. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/devops-dr-man-skal-erkende-at-man-ikke-kan-bruge-aar-paa-at-teste-vaerktoej-1079266 Version2
12h
Science | The Guardian
Reflected glory: solar eclipse shadows – in pictures While millions across America looked skyward during the eclipse, others looked down to see the event projected onto the ground and other surfaces Continue reading...
13h
Feed: All Latest
California Proves That Environmental Regulations Don't Kill ProfitsWill California's long-term green ambitions turn its economy as chilly as a San Francisco summer?
13h
NYT > Science
$417 Million Awarded in Suit Tying Johnson’s Baby Powder to CancerA Los Angeles jury voted the damages for a medical receptionist who developed ovarian cancer after using Johnson & Johnson’s talc for decades.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frontline supervisors use micro-power strategies to cope with middle-manager statusProbation and parole officers and their frontline supervisors widely differ on their views of the power of the frontline supervisor, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas researcher.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devicesA team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report finds growing number of people in Ontario treated for opioid addictionThe rate at which people are being prescribed opioids to treat pain in Ontario has stabilized while the amount of drugs they receive has declined considerably, a new report has found.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Contact in sports may lead to differences in the brains of young, healthy athletesPeople who play contact sports show changes to their brain structure and function, with sports that have greater risk of body contact showing greater effects on the brain, a new study has found.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common antiseptic ingredients de-energize cells and impair hormone responseA new in vitro study by University of California, Davis, researchers indicates that quaternary ammonium compounds, or 'quats,' used as antimicrobial agents in common household products inhibit mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, as well as estrogenic functions in cells. Quats are used as antiseptics in toothpastes, mouthwashes, lozenges, nasal sprays, eye drops, shampoos, lotions, intravagi
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Close friendships in high school predict improvements in mental health in young adulthoodA new longitudinal study suggests that the types of peer relationships youth make in high school matter for mental health through young adulthood.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers' responses to their babies' distress help predict infant attachmentA new study sought to identify factors that predict infants' avoidance and resistance, looking specifically at how mothers respond physiologically and emotionally to their infants' distress.
14h
Gizmodo
Flying Sucked Before It Involved Urine-Soaked Seats, Which By the Way, It Apparently Does Now Photo: AP Flying is terrible these days. It flat-out sucks. From ballooning lines to get through security procedures that mostly don’t work to random fees and seats so small analysts believe they may be safety hazards , it’s really just not a pleasant way to spend your time. So news that a British Airways passenger who paid nearly $1,500 for an 11-hour flight was forced to sit on a urine-soaked s
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Hackers Are the Real Obstacle for Self-Driving VehiclesOut-of-work truckers armed with “adversarial machine learning” could dazzle autonomous vehicles into crashing.
14h
The Atlantic
Trump's Depressingly Normal Speech About Afghanistan On Monday evening, Donald Trump gave a speech about Afghanistan that we might have heard from any mainstream politician over the past 15 years. In some realms, the idea of a “normal” presentation by Trump would be heartening. For instance, as I noted last week , among the usual expectations of a president is that at times of national shock or fear, he will speak to all of the people and reassert
14h
Ingeniøren
Topchef i Rambøll: Fire lektier unge ingeniører skal lære på universitetet Arbejdsmarkedet udvikler sig konstant. Det samme gør de kompetencer, der er brug for. Studerende såvel som erfarne folk bør derfor få styr på særligt fire ting, mener Rambølls administrerende direktør. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/topchef-ramboell-fire-lektier-unge-ingenioerer-skal-laere-paa-universitetet-9534 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
Ingeniøren
Lokoførere om bremseproblemer med IC3: »Det er ikke ordentligt sikkerhedsarbejde«Selv om DSB mener at have løst problemerne, oplever lokomotivførerne stadig bremseproblemer med IC3. Toget er ikke konstrueret til det, som det bliver brugt til, siger formand for lokomotivførerne.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alternative mode of bacterial quorum sensingResearchers have revealed the existence of a new quorum-sensing molecule that increases the virulence of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New targets for drugs to treat fatty liver disease and liver cancerThere may no silver bullet for treating liver cancer or fatty liver disease, but knowing the right targets will help science develop the most effective treatments. Researchers have just identified a number of drug targets that can be used in the development of new efficient treatment strategies with minimum side effects.
16h
The Atlantic
Full Transcript: Donald Trump Announces His Afghanistan Policy In primetime remarks Monday night, President Trump unveiled the broad strokes of a new U.S. strategy for the war in Afghanistan without offering details about changes to troop levels. The announcement marks a turnabout for Trump, who as a private citizen once advocated for full U.S. withdrawal. Since launching his campaign in 2015, Trump has been far less vocal publicly about how the United State
16h
Science | The Guardian
'Most impressive thing any president's ever done': Tucker Carlson on Trump's eclipse viewing – video Fox News anchor Tucker Carlson has described Donald Trump’s actions during Monday’s eclipse – when he watched the sun without protective glasses , prompting a reminder from an aide – as ‘perhaps the most impressive thing any president’s ever done’. Sarcasm or genuine praise? You decide. How to tell if you damaged your eyes during the eclipse Continue reading...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic iceUsing the most precise seafloor maps ever created of Antarctica's Ross Sea, researchers have discovered a long-dead river system that once flowed beneath Antarctica's ice and influenced how ice streams melted after Earth's last ice age.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How plants turn off genes they don't needNew research has identified small sequences in plant DNA that act as signposts for shutting off gene activity, directing the placement of proteins that silence gene expression.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Afternoon slump in reward responseActivation of a reward-processing brain region peaks in the morning and evening and dips at 2 p.m., finds a study of healthy young men. This finding may parallel the drop in alertness people tend to feel in mid-afternoon.
16h
Science : NPR
How To Tell If Watching The Eclipse Damaged Your Eyes If you heeded all the warnings, you're likely fine. But spots or blurred vision that shows up 12 hours later or the next day might be a sign that the sun's direct rays permanently hurt the retina. (Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
16h
Gizmodo
Staring Directly at a Solar Eclipse Is Good Now, Actually Image: Screengrab via Twitter Scientists, the medical community and tech bloggers have been exhorting the public to only look at solar eclipses like the one on Monday with shielded glasses or other protective equipment, because skipping that step is probably one of the easiest ways to fry out your eyeballs known to science. But after President Donald J. Trump looked directly at the partial eclips
16h
Feed: All Latest
Two Minutes of Total Solar Eclipse in John Day, OregonSome 600 people watched the eclipse in a field in eastern Oregon. And photographer Brian Guido watched them.
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Gizmodo
Adam Scott Suspects His Stepson Is Satan's Son in the Trailer for Little Evil Image: Netflix Writer-director Eli Craig made the horror comedy Tucker and Dale vs. Evil —about a pair of good ol’ boys who get mistaken for backwoods maniacs and hilariously upend the “cabin in the woods” genre in the process. His latest, the Adam Scott-starring Little Evil , looks like it’ll do the same for movies about spooky, bad-seed kids. The first trailer made its way on the internet today
17h
Science | The Guardian
'Not too bright': Trump trolled for staring at the eclipse with no eye protection The internet has had fun with images of the US president looking up at the sky during the eclipse without glasses, in defiance of repeated health warnings The internet has made hay with images of the US president looking up at the sky during the solar eclipse without glasses, despite repeated warnings that doing so can lead to permanent eye damage . Donald Trump was filmed on the balcony of the W
17h
NYT > Science
Experience Eclipse TotalitySqueeze in among the crowds and witness the first total solar eclipse to cross the entire continental United States since 1918. An exclusive video by The New York Times in partnership with NOVA/PBS.
17h
NYT > Science
Perspectives on the EclipseThe 2017 solar eclipse seen from up above and down below.
17h
Gizmodo
Julian Assange, Eclipse Truther Photo: Screengrab via KnowYourMeme Astronomers, doctors and other experts alike are in total agreement on one point—don’t stare at a solar eclipse without eye protection unless you want to damage your vision or go blind , you goddamn idiot. This warning was in large part heeded by all but the very uninformed or the very impulsive, categories which both naturally included President Donald Trump ,
17h
Popular Science
Your best photos of the 2017 total solar eclipse Science There goes the sun, doo doo doo doo. We asked you to show us snapshots of the best moments from this year's total eclipse. Here's what you sent in.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
High viewBBC correspondent James Cook views the total eclipse from 40,000ft above the Pacific Ocean.
18h
Feed: All Latest
Charlottesville's Turmoil in Two Powerful PhotosImages taken days apart capture the emotions polarizing the country.
18h
Science | The Guardian
The total eclipse watched across America – video The US mainland has experienced its first total solar eclipse since 1979. The moon blocked out the sun on Monday as the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the US in nearly a century began over the west coast. ‘Worth everything’: America takes in total solar eclipse from coast to coast Continue reading...
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Gizmodo
Surprise: OXO Made a Better Cocktail Shaker Necessity is the mother of invention, but has no familial relation to good design. Sticking two cups of different sizes together and hoping they don’t spill is medieval (not literally, it’s actually 19th century), and even in modern shakers, the process of getting the shaken beverage out of the shaker is sleight of hand at best. OXO fixed it . OXO’s Press and Pour Cocktail Shaker is insulated and
18h
NYT > Science
Pictures From the Great American EclipseVisual highlights from Times photographers’ work on the eclipse from across the United States.
18h
Latest Headlines | Science News
On a mountain in Wyoming, the eclipse brings wonder — and, hopefully, answersAstronomy writer Lisa Grossman joined scientists on a mountain in Wyoming who were measuring the corona using four different instruments to try to figure out why it’s so hot.
18h
Feed: All Latest
Enigma ICO Heist Robs Nearly $500,000 in Ethereum From InvestorsCrypto's fine and good, but make sure you're looking after the basics.
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Feed: All Latest
Google is About to Make Your Browser More ParanoidForthcoming version of Chrome will display more warnings for unencrypted sites.
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Light and Shadow What We’re Following Policy Updates: President Trump will announce his new plan to deal with Afghanistan this evening. The plan is expected to include sending additional troops to Afghanistan, but it’s unlikely to offer new military solutions in the long-running war. Meanwhile, a bill to cut back on legal immigration has been making its way through the Senate this month. The bill, introduced by S
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A&E attendance for people with dementia is common and increasingA new paper published today in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association found that accident and emergency (A&E) attendance among people with dementia in their last year of life is common and is increasing.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Chile rejects iron mine to protect penguinsMinisters said plans to extract iron near a penguin reserve lacked sufficient environmental guarantees.
19h
Science | The Guardian
Total solar eclipse across the United States – in pictures Sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America on Monday as the sun vanished behind the moon in total eclipse for the first time in nearly a century Continue reading...
19h
Live Science
Did the Solar Eclipse Damage Your Eyes? Here's How to TellMany watchers of today's solar eclipse may have glanced at the sun without proper eye protection. But how do you know if you've hurt your eyes?
20h
Gizmodo
You Can Actually Do Something Good With Those Eclipse Glasses Photo: Getty Congratulations to those of you who used proper solar eclipse glasses and witnessed the phenomenon without permanently damaging your vision . Good job! But now you’re probably wondering what to do with those flimsy pieces of cardboard and black polymer that were basically priceless just hours ago. Fortunately, Astronomers Without Borders has offered to take them off your hands so tha
20h
NYT > Science
Q&A: Do Animals Overeat in the Wild?Gluttony can be a survival strategy for some species, scientists say.
20h
NYT > Science
Out There: A Reverie for the Voyager Probes, Humanity’s Calling CardsLaunched 40 years ago, the spacecraft have sailed beyond the solar system, artifacts of a civilization that may be gone before they’re found.
20h
NYT > Science
Take a Number: Hospitals Are Clogged With Patients Struggling With OpioidsAs President Trump declares a national emergency, new data indicates hospitalizations for problems linked to prescription and illicit opioid abuse have risen sharply.
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Feed: All Latest
Sorry, Banning ‘Killer Robots’ Just Isn’t PracticalElon Musk and others seek restrictions on use of autonomous weapons
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Science : NPR
PHOTOS: The Day The Eclipse Came To America A total solar eclipse crossed the entire country earlier today. Many Americans were treated to a rare and stunning view. (Image credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shocking gaps in basic knowledge of deep sea lifeHuman interference in the deep sea could already be outpacing our basic understanding of how it functions. As a result, without increased research and an immediate review of deep ocean conservation measures, the creatures that live there face an uncertain future, Oxford University scientists have warned.
20h
Live Science
Great American Eclipse Casts Shadow Over Great American DesertThe Great American Desert becomes a more pleasant place during a Great American Solar Eclipse.
20h
Live Science
Cliff Divers Plunge into Oregon Water Tank During Total Solar EclipseA group of cliff divers created their own celestial spectacle today (Aug. 21) in McMinnville, Oregon, by diving into a tank of water in the darkness of the total solar eclipse.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shocking gaps in basic knowledge of deep sea lifeHuman interference in the deep sea could already be outpacing our basic understanding of how it functions.
20h
Big Think
Intelligent People Deal with Stereotypes Differently Than Others, Study Finds Everyone encounters stereotypes. But what you do afterward says something about you Read More
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Gizmodo
Today's Solar Eclipse Left a Path of Nightmarish Traffic in Its Wake GIF Image: Google Maps/Gizmodo For months, even years, amateur astronomers, photographers, and anyone wanting the best possible view of today’s solar eclipse have been planning trips into the phenomenon’s path of totality. Now that it’s over, all that’s left are millions of grainy Instagram photos—and a traffic nightmare that traces the same path as the eclipse’s shadow. Twitter’s @dicktoblerone
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
A Duct Tape Bikini And A Firesaw Are The Latest Addition To These Survivalists' Arsenal #NakedAndAfraid | Thursdays at 9p While Cory attempts to start a fire, Anastasia uses the duct tape to fashion a bikini. Only one proves successful. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on T
20h
Ars Technica
Microsoft to remove full ReFS support from Windows 10 Pro, push Workstation SKU Enlarge (credit: Anna ) In the Fall Creators Update, Microsoft is removing the ability to create volumes using its new ReFS file system from Windows 10 Pro. Existing volumes will continue to work, but Pro will no longer be able to create new ones. After rumors in June , Microsoft confirmed last week that it was producing yet another variant of Windows 10: Pro for Workstations. The main features o
20h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US government disbands climate-science advisory committee Panel sought to help businesses and state and local governments prepare for the effects of global warming. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22484
20h
NYT > Science
Coal Mining Health Study Is Halted by Interior DepartmentThe study, begun under the Obama administration, was examining the health and environmental impacts of mountaintop-removal coal mining in Appalachia.
20h
NYT > Science
Missed the Solar Eclipse? You’ll Have Another Chance in 7 YearsOn April 8, 2024, a total solar eclipse will traverse the United States from Texas to Maine. After that, your next shot won’t be until 2045.
20h
NYT > Science
How Deep Sea Creatures Emit Their Own LightThe depths of the ocean are a lot brighter than you might think. New research from the Monterey Bay Aquarium shows that nearly three quarters of deep sea creatures emit their own light using bioluminescence.
20h
NYT > Science
A Total Solar Eclipse Leaves a Nation in AweA total eclipse that crossed the sky from Oregon to South Carolina brought out throngs of spectators, who exulted in seeing the midday sky go briefly dark.
20h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Moon Trumps Sun Today in 5 Lines President Trump will deliver an address on the U.S. strategy in Afghanistan at 9 p.m. ET from Fort Myer in Arlington, Virginia. Americans watched as the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in decades swept across the country. Federal authorities said Andrew Schneck, a 25-year-old Houston man, was charged with attempting to bomb a Confederate statue. The Navy’s top admiral
20h
Big Think
Keeping It in the Family: Why We Pick Partners the Way We Do Much of our sense of what is attractive comes into focus when viewed through the lens of successful reproduction. Read More
20h
Gizmodo
Everything We Know About Game of Thrones' Newest Magical Threat Image: HBO If there’s one thing to take away from l ast night’s episode of Game of Thrones , it’s that even in death, Daenerys’ older brother Viserys continues to be an incredibly huge pain in her ass. Though the show’s never spent too much time fleshing out the personalities of Daenerys’ two smaller dragons, Rhaegal and Viserion, last night we saw that at least in that particular way, Viserion t
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRC screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy reduces risk for deathA re-analysis of all-cause mortality in the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) evidence review for colorectal cancer screening found that flexible sigmoidoscopy reduces risk for death. These findings suggest that the USPSTF guidelines for colorectal cancer screening, which concluded that no colorectal cancer screening methods reduced all-cause mortality, could be reassessed.
21h
The Atlantic
The President Who Looked at the Sun During the solar eclipse today, President Donald Trump stepped onto the White House balcony with his wife and his son Barron, and he looked up at the sun. According to White House reporters, an aide shouted a warning that he should not look at the sun. Nevertheless, he persisted. There were parts of the United States, along path of totality, that allowed people to look directly at the eclipse. Bu
21h
Live Science
Trump Stares at the Sun During the Eclipse: Will It Harm His Eyes?Even the president of the United States couldn't look away from the Great American Solar Eclipse.
21h
Science | The Guardian
Your underwhelming photos of the solar eclipse We asked Guardian readers to submit photos of the total solar eclipse that streaked across America on Monday. As you can see, eclipse photography is tricky but we’re grateful for their efforts Continue reading...
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Gizmodo
Stare All You Want at These Incredible Eclipse Images Photo: AP If you’re reading this post, congratulations on following basic instructions and not burning out your retinas while watching today’s eclipse. For a few hours, folks across America could put aside the myriad horrors of this year and stare at the hot ball of gas literally keeping us all alive. It was actually quite pleasant! Now that it’s all over, you can gaze longingly into some images
21h

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