Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly staticIn recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to treat HIV identifiedMedical treatment that targets human proteins rather than ever-mutating viruses may one day help HIV-positive people whose bodies have built a resistance to 'cocktails' currently used to keep them healthy. Now researchers have pinpointed a protein variant that can be targeted to prevent the human immunodeficiency virus from harming HIV-positive individuals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-resolution modeling assesses impact of cities on river ecosystemsNew mapping methods can help urban planners minimize the environmental impacts of cities' water and energy demands on surrounding stream ecologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Worrisome trend for health of wild dolphinsTwelve years of data on the health of two Atlantic bottlenose dolphin populations paints a grim reality concerning the wellbeing of the Atlantic Ocean.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Will fairy tale Białowieża forest survive Poland’s fight with the EU?Campaigners in Poland are worried about the future of one of Europe's last primeval forests, as the Polish government defies an EU order to stop logging there.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could nicotine reduction help curb addiction?A new study examining the effects of nicotine reduction among more vulnerable smokers supports the FDA's recent recommendation for lowering nicotine to non-addictive levels.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The science of fluoride flippingSo much of what happens inside cells to preserve health or cause disease is so small or time-sensitive that researchers are just now getting glimpses of the complexities unfolding in us every minute of the day. Now researchers have discovered one such complexity -- a previously hidden mode of RNA regulation vital for bacterial defense against toxic fluoride ions. The discovery opens a new research
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A pair of medical magnets shows promise as a new tool for creating an anastomosisAn experimental device that employs a pair of magnets offers surgeons a new safe and simple alternative to standard methods for creating an anastomosis for the first time in nearly 50 years.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cells hack their own genesDNA in all organisms from yeast to humans encodes the genes that make it possible to live and reproduce. But these beneficial genes make up only 2% of our DNA. Now researchers have unveiled a novel mechanism for gene expression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clear it, but will they come? Native plants need re-seeding after rhododendron removal, study findsNative plants need a helping hand if they are to recover from invasive rhododendron, Scottish ecologists have discovered. A new study in the reveals that – even at sites cleared of rhododendron 30 years ago – much native flora has still not returned. As a result, rhododendron eradication programs may need to be supplemented by reseeding for the original plant community to re-establish.
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New Scientist - News

Doing meth raises the risk of strokes in young peopleStrokes aren’t common under the age of 45, but people who use methamphetamine are almost five times more likely to have a type of stroke that can be fatal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Epigenetics may explain how Darwin's finches respond to rapid environmental changeEpigenetics may explain how Darwin's finches respond to rapid environmental changes, according to new research published in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Screening reduces mortality for those with detectable type 2 diabetes but not for general population, large studies findScreening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors may not reduce mortality and cardiovascular disease in the general population, suggests new research.
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Science | The Guardian

Another US agency deletes references to climate change on government website The term ‘climate change’ was changed to simply ‘climate’ on website of the National Institutes of Health, the world’s leading public health research body The National Institutes of Health deleted multiple references to climate change on its website over the summer, continuing a trend that began when the Trump administration took charge of the dot.gov domain. The changes were first outlined in a
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Science : NPR

Washington Declares Open Season On Escaped Aquaculture Salmon State wildlife officials have asked the public to catch as many of the non-native Atlantic salmon as they can after an estimated 5,000 escaped from an aquaculture farm.
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Gizmodo

Buy a Sonos PLAYBAR, Get 40 Bucks and 6 Months of Music Unlimited For Free Sonos PLAYBAR + $40 Amazon Credit + 6 Months of Music Unlimited , $700 Years later the Sonos PLAYBAR is still the best sound bar for most people, and still just as rarely discounted. Take advantage of this opportunity to snag a free $40 gift card and six months of Music Unlimited if you’ve been in the market for one. I’ve loved mine since 2013.
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Gizmodo

No Man's Sky Players Who Colonized A Galaxy Now Have To Find A New Home Source: nphyx No Man’s Sky ’s vast universe was part of its initial appeal. You would go from planet to planet, completely alone, discovering and naming things along the way. For some players, that was too desolate, so they banded together to make the Galactic Hub , a portion of No Man’s Sky that acted as a home base. After the most recent update, those established trade routes, farms and bases b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What causes algal blooms to become toxic?Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by marine algae and discovered in 1987 as the cause of amnesic shellfish poisoning. Scientists have made substantial progress in understanding and predicting the conditions that lead to large blooms of the toxin-producing algae (diatoms called Pseudo-nitzschia). But one aspect of these toxic algal blooms, which affect wildlife as well as economically imp
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Scientific American Content: Global

Recycle Your Eclipse GlassesAstronomers Without Borders wants to share your used eclipse glasses with kids in other parts of the world for the 2019 total solar eclipse. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pheromone genes could dictate colony structure of the red fire antProteins involved in the production and perception of pheromones may determine if red fire ant colonies contain a single queen or multiple queens.
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11 minutes of mindfulness training helps drinkers cut backBrief training in mindfulness strategies could help heavy drinkers start to cut back on alcohol consumption, finds a new UCL study published in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Allergies? Exhausted regulatory T cells may play a roleNew research highlights the importance of immune cell metabolism for maintaining a balanced immune response.
20h
Ars Technica

A startup aims to stop gentrification, with help from the tech industry At Ars Technica Live, Catherine Bracy talked about her nonprofit startup TechEquity and how the tech industry can mitigate the housing crisis. (video link) If the headline on this article made your eyes burn with fire and your fingers twitch to comment without reading further, then you're in the majority. The relationship between Silicon Valley's tech industry and economic inequality in the Bay A
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Science | The Guardian

MRI scan that can predict stroke risk has 'promise to save lives' Scientists at Oxford University develop non-invasive technique to measure amount of cholesterol in carotid plaques A new type of MRI scan can predict the risk of having a stroke , researchers have said in a study. The non-invasive technique, developed by scientists at the University of Oxford, predicts whether plaques in the carotid arteries are rich in cholesterol and therefore more likely to ca
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How Taylor Swift Could Use Her Internet Powers for GoodThe pop star has the ability to grab the entire internet's attention with one tweet. Here's how she could use her influence to enact change.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Back to Backlash What We’re Following Trump’s Phoenix Rally: The president attacked the media and Arizona’s Republican senators while defending his response to Charlottesville and the former sheriff Joe Arpaio in an inflammatory speech last night. Notably, he accused journalists of dishonesty in covering his remarks about the violence—yet his own account omitted the very statements that caused controversy. James
21h
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Improvised explosive devices inflict much more serious injuries than land minesThe types of close contact injuries inflicted by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are much more serious than those associated with land mines, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antioxidant/zinc supplement cost saving and effective for degenerative eye diseaseA supplement that combines antioxidants with zinc and copper is a relatively inexpensive and effective means of halting the progression of a certain type of degenerative eye disease, concludes research published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Methamphetamine use linked to heightened stroke risk in the youngThe stimulant methamphetamine, also popularly known as 'speed,' 'ice' and 'meth,' is linked to a heightened risk of stroke among young people, reveals a review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large studies find screening reduces mortality for those with detectable type 2 diabetes but not for general populationThree large trials published today in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) show that screening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors may not reduce mortality and cardiovascular disease in the general population.
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Gizmodo

Microsoft Claims to Be 'Talking to Sony' About Playing Nice Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo With the launch of the Xbox One X only a few months away Microsoft needs an interim win to keep people interested in the console that is currently in a very distant second place to Sony. Which is why it is no surprise that Xbox Marketing Manager Aaron Greenberg told GameReactor it was “talking to Sony” about the potential for crossplay between the two consoles. Crossplay
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

There Is An Intense Battle Taking Place In This Young Girl's Lungs First In Human | Thursdays at 9p For patients like Lucy, a transplant is both life-saving and life-threatening. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/first-in-human/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/DiscoveryImpactTV/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discove
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: McConnell: Nothing to See Here Today in 5 Lines CNN reports that the White House has paperwork ready to pardon former Maricopa County Sheriff Jeff Arpaio, after President Trump hinted that he would do so at a rally in Phoenix on Tuesday night. House Speaker Paul Ryan said he doesn’t think lawmakers are interested in shutting down the government over funding for Trump’s border wall, as Trump suggested. Workers in Charlottesvill
22h
The Atlantic

What Are Sound Weapons? Earlier this month the U.S. State Department disclosed that several Havana-based diplomats have experienced “incidents which have caused a variety of physical symptoms.” Secretary Rex Tillerson said the incidents began last fall, calling them “health attacks.” They were not the good kind of health attacks. Symptoms have included severe hearing loss, headaches, and problems with balance—forcing so
22h
Big Think

These Two Apps Let You 'Shazam' Plants and Animals Don't just point and shoot, point and learn! These apps are fun for nature lovers, and contribute to scientific databases of flora and fauna. Read More
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Gizmodo

Here's What's Coming and Going From Netflix in September 2017 Miramax If September fills you with back-to-school nostalgia, you’ll probably be pleased by the many throwbacks coming to Netflix next month. Sharpen some new pencils as Vincent Vega plunges a syringe into Mia Wallace in Pulp Fiction ! Cover your textbooks while Todd Anderson climbs onto a desk in Dead Poets Society ! Make a bagged lunch as a refrigerator lurches after Sarah Goldfarb in Requiem f
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Meet the Bobcat Nanowagon, the world’s smallest monster truckChemists are scratching their heads over the wreckage of minuscule monster trucks.
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Gizmodo

Members of 'UES Mommas' Facebook Group Threaten Legal Action After Being Called Racist Illustration via Shutterstock / Photograph via Flickr /Angela N. “UES Mommas,” a popular private Facebook group with nearly 28,000 members, is generally what you’d expect from an Upper East Side internet mommy group. The forum is filled with vacation advice, nanny recommendations, morning sickness questions, and discussions about the best way to shield one’s child from the eclipse (though not eve
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies reveal worrisome trend for health of wild dolphinsTwelve years of data on the health of two Atlantic bottlenose dolphin populations paints a grim reality concerning the wellbeing of the Atlantic Ocean. The research compiles findings from Georgia Aquarium, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution at Florida Atlantic University and contributing partners as part of the Health and Environmental Risk Assessment Project (HERA) from 2003-2015. It informs
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Death rates from rheumatic heart disease falling since 1990The risk of dying from rheumatic heart disease, a condition of damaged heart valves caused by bacterial infection that leads to rheumatic fever, has dropped around the world over the last 25 years, according to a new scientific study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two studies support intensive blood pressure control for long-term health, quality of lifeTwo studies provide additional support for lowering systolic blood pressure to an intensive goal of 120 mmHg -- far below the standard guidelines of 140 mmHg -- to reduce the risk of heart disease in high-risk patients with hypertension. The new research shows that intensive blood pressure control is well-tolerated by patients and is cost-effective in terms of health-related quality of life and fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parents turn to Uber to shuttle kids, even though it's not allowedTeenager Emily Lieber needed a ride home from the bus stop, so she did what her parents might do: She called Uber.
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Ars Technica

FTC: We won’t stand in the way of pending Amazon-Whole Foods merger Enlarge (credit: Portal Abras ) The Federal Trade Commission has formally allowed Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods to go forward. According to a statement released Wednesday by acting FTC director Bruce Hoffman, "Based on our investigation, we have decided not to pursue this matter further. Of course, the FTC always has the ability to investigate anticompetitive conduct should such action be w
22h
Ars Technica

Feds: Son teaches dad how to sell drugs on AlphaBay, they both get busted Enlarge (credit: mementosis ) A New York City father and son have been arrested and indicted on allegations of selling fentanyl and oxycodone on the underground drug website AlphaBay, which was seized and closed by federal law enforcement in July. The indictment comes days after six Californians were indicted on similar charges of drug trafficking on AlphaBay, suggesting that federal law enforcem
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radiological crimes investigationThe results of the fifth and latest Collaborative Materials Exercise of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group, a global network of nuclear forensics experts, will be discussed at the American Chemical Society's national meeting in Washington DC on August. 24.
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Gizmodo

Calexit Is a Bloody, Dystopian Vision of Trump's America and the People Bold Enough To Resist It Image: Black Mask Studios Less than a year into his presidency, Donald Trump has repeatedly defended white supremacists and self-identified Nazis , toyed with the idea of going to war with North Korea , and stood by cluelessly as the Republican congress fought to rob millions of Americans of their healthcare . Objectively, these are dark times. When we talk about how America under Donald Trump fe
23h
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Google and Walmart's Partnership Will Be a Real Test For AmazonIf anyone can take a bite out of Amazon, it's the combined forces of Walmart and Google.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-resolution modeling assesses impact of cities on river ecosystemsNew mapping methods developed by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory can help urban planners minimize the environmental impacts of cities' water and energy demands on surrounding stream ecologies.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USC researcher identifies a new way to treat HIVMedical treatment that targets human proteins rather than ever-mutating viruses may one day help HIV-positive people whose bodies have built a resistance to 'cocktails' currently used to keep them healthy. I-Chueh Huang has spent 13 years researching how the human immune system controls viral infections. His lab recently pinpointed a protein variant that can be targeted to prevent the human immuno
23h
Ars Technica

Hands-on with the Galaxy Note8: Haven’t we seen this before? "Didn't this device launch earlier this year?" That's the overwhelming feeling I got after a test drive with the Galaxy Note8. Samsung's earlier flagship for 2017, the Galaxy S8 —specifically the Galaxy S8+—is so close to the Note8 I'm not sure why anyone would wait the five months of lag time between the two devices. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments
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It’s Going to Be Hard to Create a New Joker—Even for Martin ScorseseThere's a new Joker movie reportedly in the works. Can it possibly get close to what's come before?
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Science, Meet PoliticsThe events of the past six months have inspired advocacy for the first time.
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Climate-Change Research Is Getting a Big Dose of AI
23h
Live Science

How Stress in Your Brain Could Lead to Stress in Your BodyThe patterns in your brain may predict how your body physically reacts to stressful situations, a new study finds.
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Live Science

People Who Get Less REM Sleep May Be at Greater Risk of DementiaConsider it another strike against not getting enough sleep...
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Live Science

How to Protect Yourself from Cold and Flu in 2017Although there is no sure-fire way to avoid catching a cold or the flu, there are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of these illnesses this fall and winter.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of REM sleep may lead to higher risk for dementiaSpending less time in REM (rapid eye movement) sleep and taking longer to enter REM sleep are separately associated with a higher risk of developing dementia.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain activity may be predictor of stress-related cardiovascular riskA pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. People who have exaggerated responses to stressors, like large rises in blood pressure or heart rate, are at greater risk of developing hypertension and premature death from cardiovascular disease, researchers say.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Less REM sleep tied to greater risk of dementiaPeople who get less rapid eye movement (REM) sleep may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study published in the Aug. 23, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. REM sleep is the sleep stage when dreaming occurs.
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Gizmodo

Physicists Use Lasers to Set Up First Underwater Quantum Communications Link As usual, weird art for weird physics (Image: JaredZammit /Flickr) Quantum mechanics may force you to think some wild things about the way the Universe works, but it has some real applications. One of the theory’s main quirks allows for a special kind of quantum link, one that can send incredibly secure messages or transmit data for quantum computing. Tests of these links exist on Earth, in space
23h
The Atlantic

The Acrostic as a Form of Bureaucratic Dissent Hiding an acrostic message in an otherwise ordinary resignation letter isn’t exactly the boldest way to express a political view, yet it’s proven surprisingly effective. It’s a trick that’s been tried twice in recent days. First members of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities spelled out “RESIST” with the first letter of each paragraph in their joint resignation letter . Then Dani
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Patience is one virtue scientists must embraceActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses how being patient isn't always easy in scientific work.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Inquiries about the moon's twilight zone, and more reader feedbackReaders had questions about the moon's tidal locking, quantum communication, microneedles and more.
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Gizmodo

Diplomats Plagued by 'Sonic Weapon' in Cuba Reported to Suffer From Traumatic Brain Injury Photo: Getty The bizarre reports of a “sonic weapon” allegedly turned on American and Canadian diplomats in Havana, Cuba, are getting more and more curious, if not disturbing, by the day. Medical files reviewed by CBS News revealed a slew of physical symptoms associated with the mysterious “ covert sonic device ” that reportedly operates outside the range of audible sound, including some as serio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Allergies? Exhausted regulatory T cells may play a roleResearch led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital highlights the importance of immune cell metabolism for maintaining a balanced immune response.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The science of fluoride flippingSo much of what happens inside cells to preserve health or cause disease is so small or time-sensitive that researchers are just now getting glimpses of the complexities unfolding in us every minute of the day. UNC researchers have discovered one such complexity -- a previously hidden mode of RNA regulation vital for bacterial defense against toxic fluoride ions. The discovery opens a new research
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could nicotine reduction help curb addiction?A new study examining the effects of nicotine reduction among more vulnerable smokers supports the FDA's recent recommendation for lowering nicotine to non-addictive levels.
1d
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Lalita Ramakrishnan (Cambridge) 3: Tuberculosis as an Inflammatory Disease Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle, and explains how the TB bacteria gain entry into the host. Part 1: An Introduction to Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus: Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, and gives an overview of Mycoba
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Lalita Ramakrishnan (Cambridge) 2: The Troublesome Tubercle in Tuberculosis Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle, and explains how the TB bacteria gain entry into the host. Part 1: An Introduction to Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus: Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, and gives an overview of Mycoba
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Lalita Ramakrishnan (Cambridge) 1: Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle, and explains how the TB bacteria gain entry into the host. Part 1: An Introduction to Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus: Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, and gives an overview of Mycoba
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NYT > Science

Exxon Misled the Public on Climate Change, Study SaysA new paper argues that Exxon Mobil “contributed quietly to the science” of climate change “and loudly to raising doubts about it.”
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Gizmodo

London Tower Survivors Are Being Forced to Compete for New Homes Photo: Getty British prime minister Teresa May said on Wednesday that the tenants management organization responsible for the Grenfell Estate, where a violent tower fire killed at least 80 people in June, will be stripped of their responsibilities. Why? Turns out they’ve done a terrible job managing the aftermath of that disaster. In fact, it sounds like the past two months have been an absolute
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Gizmodo

Save On Anker's PowerCore Elite, the Sequel To Your Favorite Battery Pack Anker PowerCore II , $33 with code ANK20AH3 Anker’s PowerCore line has reigned as our readers’ favorite USB battery pack for over a year, and its long awaited sequel is down to $33 today , the best price we’ve seen. In addition to a fresh new design, the PowerCore Elite (previously called the PowerCore II) includes three high speed USB charging ports with a whopping 30W shared between them, plus
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The Atlantic

What Netflix Can Offer Shonda Rhimes Why would Shonda Rhimes, the star writer of ABC’s primetime lineup for the last decade and the creator behind shows like Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal, want to leave network TV? Her position atop the highly competitive pile of broadcast-television producers was unassailable, and her batting average for launching hit series to the widest possible audience remained strong. So why would she move to Net
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Latest Headlines | Science News

As Cassini’s tour of Saturn draws to a close, a look back at postcards from the probeAs Cassini prepares to plunge to its death, we celebrate the spacecraft's discoveries and breathtaking images of Saturn, its rings and moons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly staticIn recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same.
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Popular Science

Taking loads of vitamin B could increase your risk of lung cancer Health The price of supplements might be pretty steep. Because B vitamins are water soluble and don't cause acute toxicity (i.e. sudden death), large doses were generally thought to be safe.
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Gizmodo

No One Seems To Know Why Audi Shipped Thousands Of Cars With The Same VIN Graphic Credit: Jason Torchinsky If you were to spot someone furtively stuffing bottles of ammonia, large blocks of Swiss cheese, and an embalmed marmot into a large duffel bag while looking around nervously, you’d probably think that something was up. You wouldn’t really have any idea what, exactly, was up, but it sure as hell feels like some kind of fuckery is going on. That’s the same feeling
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regulators, Whole Foods shareholders approve Amazon dealWhole Foods shareholders and federal regulators approved Amazon's $13.7 billion acquisition of the organic grocer, a deal that could bring big changes to the supermarket industry and how people order groceries online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Seattle, behind-the-scenes Facebook team wrangles digital deluge in massive cloudMore than 2 billion people log into Facebook every month. Every day, the social-media crowd uploads billions of photos, calls up hundreds of millions of hours of video, and fires off a prodigious flurry of likes and comments. Somebody has to store that slice of humanity's digital record.
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The Atlantic

The Republican Party Is Enabling an Increasingly Dangerous Demagogue Last night I was in circumstances where I could hear only a few excerpts from Donald Trump’s inflammatory speech in Phoenix. The parts I heard were remarkable enough. They included Trump’s wink-wink implied promise to pardon ex-Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was first turned out of office by the voters of Maricopa County and then found guilty by a federal judge of criminal contempt-of-court. There was a
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Ars Technica

Wanted: Weaponized exploits that hack phones. Will pay top dollar (credit: Wikipedia ) In a sign of the soaring demand for zeroday attacks that target software that's becoming increasingly secure, a market-leading broker is offering serious cash for weaponized exploits that work against Signal, WhatsApp, and other mobile apps that offer confidential messaging or privacy. Zerodium, the Washington, DC-based broker that launched in 2015, said on Wednesday that it
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Live Science

Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Cast a 2-Year Shroud of Darkness Over EarthThe dinosaur-killing asteroid that collided with Earth about 65.5 million years ago plunged the planet into a darkness that lasted nearly two years, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo

It Turns Out That Knowing More About Science Doesn't Correct Misbelief Image: AP When Kevin Esvelt, an evolutionary biologist at MIT, started thinking about using genetically engineered mice to fight Lyme disease, among his first stops was a community meeting in the small Martha’s Vineyard town of Chilmark. Esvelt makes regular field trips to talk to the public about his work. If the potential of tools like CRISPR to solve the problems of disease, hunger and environ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Arsenic risk in Pakistan much greater than expectedArsenic-contaminated groundwater may threaten the health of 50 to 60 million people in Pakistan. This is shown by a study in which data from 1,200 groundwater samples was analyzed and combined with hydrological parameters to generate a hazard map. This reveals for the first time the full extent of the risks to which the population of Pakistan is exposed. In addition, there is growing evidence that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forestsA new study concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is 'highly recommended' to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases.
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The Scientist RSS

Science Envoy Resigns from US State Department in ProtestEnergy researcher Daniel Kammen criticized President Trump's response to events in Charlottesville, as well as the administration's decision to leave the Paris Climate Accord.
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Big Think

How To Achieve Enlightenment First step: recognizing it's a continual process, says Robert Wright in his new book, Why Buddhism is True. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This week from AGU: New research bolsters evidence for life on MarsThis Week from AGU features recent research published in journals of the American Geophysical Union.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forestsA new study by scientists from the Smithsonian, the Panamanian government and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, among other institutions, concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is "highly recommended" to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anglers' delight as algal blooms breakthrough highlights innovative scienceMillions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed.
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Live Science

Icy Planets' Diamond Rain Created in Laser Laboratory"Diamond rain" that may shower through the layers of Neptune and Uranus has been created in a laboratory for the first time, according to a new study.
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New Scientist - News

Robot suit helps children with cerebral palsy to walk betterHalf of children with cerebral palsy lose the ability to walk by adulthood. A new exoskeleton may improve their walking more than corrective surgery
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Popular Science

Your UTI keeps coming back because we use too many antibiotics Ask Us Anything Antibiotic resistance is making your UTI harder to treat. What UTIs are, how we get them, how to treat them, and how that's all changing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New microbe has potential to help rebalance Earth's nitrogen cycleMicrobiologists have now provided unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Dragonfly’ dual-quadcopter aims to explore Titan, Saturn’s largest moonThe Dragonfly mission concept would use an instrumented, radioisotope-powered, dual-quadcopter to explore Saturn's largest moon, Titan, one of our solar system’s “ocean worlds.”
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists get step closer to replicating nature with assembly of new 3-D structuresChemists have created a series of three-dimensional structures that take a step closer to resembling those found in nature.
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Live Science

'EPIC' Solar Eclipse View Captured from 1 Million Miles Away (Video)It's one "EPIC" eclipse view: NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera, aka EPIC, recorded the moon's shadow crossing the United States yesterday (Aug. 21) from 1 million miles (1.6 million kilometers) away.
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Gizmodo

Help Elon Musk Sell Teslas And He'll Reward You By Letting You Dig a Tunnel for Him Photo: Getty Tesla’s referral program has proven to be one of the company’s most effective tools for selling cars. By rewarding referrals with event invites, private tours, and car upgrades, the company has fueled the cult of Tesla and turned Tesla drivers into an army of brand ambassadors. As program members refer more people, they can unlock “secret level” prizes . Their latest secret-level off
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Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Science Envoy Resigns to Protest Trump PoliciesEnergy researcher Daniel Kammen faults president's positions on climate change, energy and his failure to condemn white supremacists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forestsA new study by scientists from the Smithsonian, the Panamanian government and the US Environmental Protection Agency, among other institutions, concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is 'highly recommended' to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Test reveals potential treatments for disorders involving MeCP2A team of researchers has developed a strategy that allows them to identify potential treatments that would restore altered levels of MeCP2.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dolphin that existed along South Carolina coast long agoResearchers have discovered a species of extinct dolphin off the coast of South Carolina.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Confederate submarine crew killed by their own weaponA powerful shockwave from the H.L. Hunley's own weapon killed the crew of the Confederate combat submarine as it sunk a Union ship. This finding comes from a four-year research project that involved repeatedly setting blasts near a scale model, shooting authentic weapons at historically accurate iron plate and many calculations on human respiration and the transmission of blast energy.
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New Scientist - News

NASA insists it is going to Mars, but it really can’t afford toThe long-held desire to send humans to the Red Planet is nowhere near being realised, despite NASA claiming it is on a Journey to Mars
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New Scientist - News

IBM to investigate role of microbiome in autoimmune disordersA project launched by tech firm IBM plans to analyse millions of bacterial genes, in an effort to understand what causes type 1 diabetes and Crohn's disease
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New Scientist - News

Google-sponsored private moon race delayed for the third timeCompetitors in the Google Lunar X Prize now have until 31 March 2018 to land a spacecraft on the moon
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New Scientist - News

Icy hard drives cram 5300 movies onto a postage stampTiny molecular hard drives offer a cool way to put all your old Gmail and Facebook photos on ice
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sci-fi to real life': US invests $17 million in laser techThe U.S. Defense Department is investing $17 million in high-powered laser technology that has the potential for practical uses on the battlefield, from destroying enemy drones to disrupting communication systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poodle gets tumor that's a third of its body weight removedA poodle named Oreo is on the mend after having a 6.4-pound (2.9-kilogram) tumor removed—nearly a third of its body weight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

You and some 'cavemen' get a genetic checkupHad an arrow in his back not felled the legendary Iceman some 5,300 years ago, he would have likely dropped dead from a heart attack. Written in the DNA of his remains was a propensity for cardiovascular disease.
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Futurity.org

‘Anti-sense’ RNA aids repair of damaged nerves Scientists have discovered that an “anti-sense” RNA (AS-RNA) is expressed after nerve injury to regulate how the damaged nerves rebuild their coating of myelin. That myelin, like the cladding around a cable or wire, is crucial for making nerves efficient conductors. The research, done in mice, may reveal a new opening to intervene in the process of healing peripheral nerve damage. The research te
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The Atlantic

Global Warming Is Threatening Alaska's Prized Wedding Flower A little more than a decade ago, Ron Illingworth and his wife, Marji, planted 25 peony roots on their family farm in North Pole, Alaska. They did it on a whim, really, curious whether the bright, ruffled blossoms would thrive alongside the runner beans, peas, and tomatoes they sold at the local farmers market. A horticulture-professor friend of theirs had planted some test plots on the grounds of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research identifies new microbe with potential to help rebalance Earth's nitrogen cycleNew research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. The findings, explained Lisa Stein, co-author and professor of biology, have significant implications for climate change research.
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Ars Technica

Time on a therapist’s couch yields persistent personality changes Enlarge / Even Lego clowns need therapy sometimes. (credit: Pascal / Flickr ) If you’ve ever wondered whether psychotherapy achieves meaningful, long-term change in a person’s life, wonder no more: combined evidence from multiple studies suggests that it does. A meta-analysis published recently in Psychological Bulletin reports that a variety of different therapeutic techniques result in positive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anglers' delight as algal blooms breakthrough highlights innovative scienceMillions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover species of dolphin that existed along South Carolina coastContinuing to uncover fossil evidence along the coast of South Carolina, researchers, led by a faculty member at College of Charleston, have discovered a species of extinct dolphin.
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Popular Science

The mystery of a spooky Confederate submarine might finally be solved Military We may finally know what killed Civil War soldiers on the Hunley . The first submarine to take down an enemy vessel was found with its crew still sitting at their battle stations. What killed them without causing panic?
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Gizmodo

This Epic Rube Goldberg Machine Includes a Gravity-Defying Whiteboard Flip GIF As someone who still struggles to string a bunch of words together into cohesive sentences, I can’t even begin to wrap my brain around the thought processes required to plan and execute an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine like this. That whiteboard flip is at least worth a nomination for a Nobel Prize. It takes almost four minutes for this Japanese Rube Goldberg machine to completely play out,
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Feed: All Latest

The Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet Rejects the Pod-Based Automotive FutureMercedes-Benz's latest convertible concept says "no" to a depressing, commoditized future.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Here Is the Safety Trick That Will Help SpaceX Fly You to the MoonAutomating rocket safety could catalyze rapid growth in the commercial space industry.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Warming Waters Could Mean Smaller FishAn increase of two degrees Celsius could cause fish to grow as much as 45 percent smaller -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New fly fossil sheds light on the explosive radiation of flies during the Cenozoic EraThe first unambiguous fossil from the botfly family adds to the few known fossils of a major clade of flies (Calyptratae), shedding light on their rapid radiation during the Cenozoic Era, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

You and some 'cavemen' get a genetic checkupEvolution has weeded out genetic variants associated with diseases for millennia and propagated variants that protect against ailments, a comparative genetics study shows. But in the last 500 to 1,000 years that trend appears to have changed. Is the apparent reversal in genetic health underpinnings real? Or an odd coincidence in the early data set of this very new research field?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery fuels hope for Rett syndrome treatmentResearchers have relieved symptoms of Rett syndrome in a mouse model with a small molecule that works like the dimmer switch in an electrical circuit.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The breaking point: What happens around the edge of a crack?What, exactly, happens right around the edge of the crack, in the area in which those large stresses are concentrated? A new study explains that the processes that take place in this region are universal -- they occur in the same way in different materials and under different conditions.
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Ars Technica

Here’s a way to silence Trump on Twitter: Buy the microblogging service Enlarge (credit: gofundme.com/buytwitter ) Anybody who knows that Donald Trump is president of the United States probably knows that his Twitter feed is his mouthpiece to the world. He criticizes global leaders, threatens war, berates the media, and, well, you name it. It's no understatement to suggest that the nation's 45th chief executive has assumed the Twitter Presidency. Now there is a movem
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Futurity.org

How the ‘building blocks’ of muscles work together Researchers have examined closely how sarcomeres, the basic building blocks within all skeletal and cardiac muscles, work together using a new technique. Their findings could advance research into a wide range of muscle malfunctions as simple as a slight strain after exercise or as serious as heart failure and muscular dystrophy. Sarcomeres are the smallest unit within a muscle in which all the m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-Income extraverts spend more on status than introverted peersThe types of goods and services that low-income individuals buy may depend, at least in part, on their personality traits, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate game changerNew research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

You and some 'cavemen' get a genetic checkupEvolution has weeded out genetic variants associated with diseases for millennia and propagated variants that protect against ailments, a comparative genetics study shows. But in the last 500 to 1,000 years that trend appears to have changed. Is the apparent reversal in genetic health underpinnings real? Or an odd coincidence in the early data set of this very new research field?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More education linked to better cognitive functioning later in lifeNew research from the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed the performance of around 196,000 Lumosity subscribers to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school on cognition, finding that more education is linked to better cognitive functioning later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extensive arsenic contamination found in groundwater beneath Pakistan's Indus plainResearchers report widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater beneath the Indus Plain in Pakistan, posing a significant health hazard to the estimated 50 million to 60 million people who depend on that resource for drinking water. Regularly drinking water that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giving cancer-killing viruses a boostScientists have found a compound that helped a tumor-targeting virus kill liver cancer more effectively while sparing healthy cells, which could someday translate to a viable treatment approach in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds link between malnutrition, alcoholism and tuberculosis in IndiaA new study reveals a striking link between malnutrition, heavy alcohol use and tuberculosis in southern India.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arsenic risk in Pakistan much greater than expectedArsenic-contaminated groundwater may threaten the health of 50 to 60 million people in Pakistan. This is shown by an Eawag-led study in which data from 1,200 groundwater samples was analyzed and combined with hydrological parameters to generate a hazard map. This reveals for the first time the full extent of the risks to which the population of Pakistan is exposed. In addition, there is growing ev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover common obesity and diabetes drug reduces rise in brain pressureResearch led by the University of Birmingham, published today in Science Translational Medicine, has discovered that a drug commonly used to treat patients with either obesity or type 2 diabetes could be used as a novel new way to lower brain pressure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Confederate submarine crew killed by their own weaponA powerful shockwave from the H.L. Hunley's own weapon killed the crew of the Confederate combat submarine as it sunk a Union ship. This finding comes from a four-year research project that involved repeatedly setting blasts near a scale model, shooting authentic weapons at historically accurate iron plate and many calculations on human respiration and the transmission of blast energy by Rachel La
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New fly fossil sheds light on the explosive radiation of flies during the Cenozoic EraThe first unambiguous fossil from the botfly family adds to the few known fossils of a major clade of flies (Calyptratae), shedding light on their rapid radiation during the Cenozoic Era, according to a study published Aug. 23, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Pierfilippo Cerrito from Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The crew of the Civil War submarine HL Hunley likely died from airblast injuriesThe crew of the Civil War submarine HL Hunley likely died from airblast injuries, according to a study published Aug. 23, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Rachel Lance from Duke University, USA and colleagues.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Oldest ice, censorship row and Yemen’s cholera emergency The week in science: 18–24 August 2017. Nature 548 376 doi: 10.1038/548376a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How machine learning could help to improve climate forecasts Mixing artificial intelligence with climate science helps researchers to identify previously unknown atmospheric processes and rank climate models. Nature 548 379 doi: 10.1038/548379a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Creeping earth could hold secret to deadly landslides Scientists investigate why mountain slopes can slip slowly for years and then suddenly speed up, with potentially fatal effects. Nature 548 384 doi: 10.1038/548384a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Scientists solve mystery of US Civil War submarine Blast from Hunley ’s own torpedo probably killed its crew instantly. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22447
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Ars Technica

Fall Creators Update hitting the home straight with focus on stabilization Enlarge (credit: Gordon Plant ) The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, aka version 1709, is due to be finished next month. Accordingly, the builds released to the Windows Insider Program are now heading toward stabilization, with bug-fixing the priority. This has a somewhat greater significance than was the case for prior Windows 10 updates because of the "Skip Ahead" scheme Microsoft introduced a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Nano-hashtags' could provide definite proof of Majorana particlesAn advanced quantum chip will be able to provide definitive proof of the mysterious Majorana particles and a crucial step towards their use as a building block for future quantum computers, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Methane from tundra, ocean floor didn't spike during previous natural warming periodThe last ice age transition to a warmer climate some 11,500 years ago did not include massive methane flux from marine sediments or the tundra, new research suggests. Instead, the likely source of rising levels of atmospheric methane was from tropical wetlands, authors of the new study say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First X-rays detected from mystery supernovasScientists appear to have found the first X-rays coming from type Ia supernovae.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Putting it to the testA rapid portable screening test for liver cancer has been created that doesn't involve sending a specimen to a blood lab and cuts the wait time for results from two weeks to two minutes. This inexpensive test can be administered wherever the patient is, which will be valuable for developing nations with little access to hospitals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood test for colitis screening using infrared technology could reduce dependence on colonoscopy, study findsA fast, simple blood test for ulcerative colitis using infrared spectroscopy could provide a cheaper, less invasive alternative for screening compared to colonoscopy, which is now the predominant test, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wing shape helps swifts glide through storms, study suggestsThey are among nature's best fliers, spending most of their time in flight. Now scientists have shed new light on how swifts can glide with ease, whatever the weather.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding how omega-3 dampens inflammatory reactionsOmega-3 fatty acids, which we primarily get through eating fatty fish, have long been thought to be good for our health. Many dietary studies have suggested that high intake is associated with a reduced risk of various disorders. Clinical trials have also shown beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in patients taking omega-3 supplements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Confederate submarine crew killed by their own weaponThe H.L. Hunley, the first combat submarine to sink an enemy ship, also instantly killed its own eight-man crew with the powerful explosive torpedo it carried, according to new research from a Duke University Ph.D. in biomedical engineering.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arsenic risk in Pakistan much greater than expectedIn many parts of the densely populated plains along the Indus River and its tributaries, arsenic concentrations in groundwater supplies exceed the WHO guideline of 10 μg/litre. Very high concentrations, above 200 μg/litre, are found mainly in the south; the highest measured in this study was 500 μg/litre.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Alarmingly high' levels of arsenic in Pakistan's ground waterUp to 60 million Pakistanis are at risk from the deadly chemical, according to a new water analysis.
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Gizmodo

The Surprising Way a Confederate Submarine Crew Died at the Hands of Its Own Weapon An oil painting by Conrad Wise Chapman, “Submarine Torpedo Boat H.L. Hunley, Dec. 6, 1863.” During the latter stages of the American Civil War, the H.L. Hunley made history by becoming the first combat submarine to sink an enemy ship. The Confederate crew never returned from its mission, sparking a mystery that’s lasted for over 130 years. An exhaustive new analysis suggests these pioneering subm
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Viden

Millioner tons ulovlig skrot handles internationaltKøb og smid væk-samfundet har et affaldsproblem, der har skabt en lyssky industri for ulovlig handel med skrot.
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Viden

Bitcoin-parlør: Lær det basale
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Futurity.org

Why many Americans still don’t grasp smoking risks Despite recognizing that smoking can lead to life-threatening diseases, many Americans still underestimate the risks. “Smoking is outlawed in public places in the US, and the number of people smoking has declined over decades,” says lead author Jon Krosnick, a professor of communication and political science at Stanford University. “Yet people continue to initiate the habit of smoking, and many s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advanced Practice Nurses Improve Health Care for Nursing Home ResidentsTo improve health care for the nation's aging population, researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri are studying how advanced practice nurses (APRNs) can improve nursing home care by serving as leaders of health care teams in nursing homes. Findings suggest that APRN-led health care teams reduce hospitalizations related to falls, dehydration and other health iss
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Who Do You Think Really Won This Race? Kye Or Scott? | Street Outlaws: New Orleans Street Outlaws: New Orleans | Mondays at 9/8c The drama between Kye and Scott continues as one camera angle shows Kye jumping, but another shows The Shocker treeing Joe Doe. Full episodes streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-new-orleans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New fly fossil sheds light on the explosive radiation of flies during the Cenozoic EraThe first unambiguous fossil from the botfly family adds to the few known fossils of a major clade of flies (Calyptratae), shedding light on their rapid radiation during the Cenozoic Era, according to a study published August 23, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Pierfilippo Cerrito from Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major leap towards data storage at the molecular levelScientists have now demonstrated that storing data with a class of molecules known as single-molecule magnets is more feasible than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than expected hidden beneath Andean PlateauSeismologists investigating how Earth forms new continental crust have compiled more than 20 years of seismic data from a wide swath of South America's Andean Plateau and determined that processes there have produced far more continental rock than previously believed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personality drives purchasing of luxury goodsPeople who are extraverted and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Use of brain-computer interface, virtual avatar could help people with gait disabilitiesResearchers have shown for the first time that the use of a brain-computer interface augmented with a virtual walking avatar can control gait, suggesting the protocol may help patients recover the ability to walk after stroke, some spinal cord injuries and certain other gait disabilities.
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Ars Technica

AT&T brings 500Mbps home Internet to cities outside its territory (credit: Brad Smith ) Major home Internet providers in the US don't typically expand into each other's territory, but this week, AT&T said it is launching high-speed Internet in parts of New York City and other major metro areas outside of its traditional wireline footprint. The new service is for apartment and condominium buildings, so don't expect to get it if you live in a single-family house.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Creeping Earth Could Hold Secret to Deadly LandslidesScientists investigate why mountain slopes can slip slowly for years and then suddenly speed up, with potentially fatal effects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

There Are 11,518 Robert Lees in America On Tuesday, one Robert Lee was punished for the actions of another. When ESPN decided to remove the sports broadcaster Robert Lee from covering the first University of Virginia football game of the season, it was, per the network’s own statement “simply because of the coincidence of his name.” UVA, and its home of Charlottesville, have been embroiled in turmoil over the removal of a statue of Rob
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Gizmodo

This Wallet Holds a Ton of Cards, But Stays Skinny With a Built-In Money Clip Preorder Slide Wallet , ~$64 Some wallets do cards well. Others excel at cash. Basically none are good for coins. But Slide is remarkably adept at all three. Cash : Slide actually has a metal money clip built right into the fold, which keeps your bills secure without the bulk that comes with a full-width cash pocket. Advertisement Cards : You get three card slots, all of which can hold four cards
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Ars Technica

Patent-licensing company loses its $30M verdict against Sprint Enlarge / A sign hanging inside a San Francisco Sprint store. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images) A patent-licensing entity that sued the five largest cell phone carriers has seen its biggest victory slip away. Prism won a $30 million verdict against Sprint in 2015 , when a jury found that Sprint violated US Patents No. 8,127,345 and 8,387,155 , both of which describe methods o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Depression Harvey's rebirthNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures of newly reborn Tropical Depression Harvey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists 'excited' by observations suggesting formation scenariosPhysicists have described how observations of gravitational waves limit the possible explanations for the formation of black holes outside of our galaxy; either they are spinning more slowly than black holes in our own galaxy or they spin rapidly but are 'tumbled around' with spins randomly oriented to their orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data mining finds more than expected beneath Andean PlateauSeismologists investigating how Earth forms new continental crust have compiled more than 20 years of seismic data from a wide swath of South America's Andean Plateau and determined that processes there have produced far more continental rock than previously believed.
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NYT > Science

What ‘Clean Coal’ Is — and Isn’tPresident Trump’s comments about “clean coal” in Phoenix betrayed a common confusion about the term.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Methane from tundra, ocean floor didn't spike during previous natural warming periodA new study published this week in the journal Nature suggests that the last ice age transition to a warmer climate some 11,500 years ago did not include massive methane flux from marine sediments or the tundra. Instead, the likely source of rising levels of atmospheric methane was from tropical wetlands, authors of the new study say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Nano-hashtags' could provide definite proof of Majorana particlesIn Nature today an international team of researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Delft University of Technology and the University of California - Santa Barbara presents an advanced quantum chip that will be able to provide definitive proof of the mysterious Majorana particles and a crucial step towards their use as a building block for future quantum computers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major leap towards data storage at the molecular levelNow scientists at the University of Manchester have proved that storing data with a class of molecules known as single-molecule magnets is more feasible than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black holes: Scientists 'excited' by observations suggesting formation scenariosPhysicists have described how observations of gravitational waves limit the possible explanations for the formation of black holes outside of our galaxy; either they are spinning more slowly than black holes in our own galaxy or they spin rapidly but are 'tumbled around' with spins randomly oriented to their orbit.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Black holes: Scientists 'excited' by observations suggesting formation scenariosPhysicists have described how observations of gravitational waves limit the possible explanations for the formation of black holes outside of our galaxy; either they are spinning more slowly than black holes in our own galaxy or they spin rapidly but are 'tumbled around' with spins randomly oriented to their orbit.
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Gizmodo

Jessica Jones' Best Putdowns on Her Teammates in The Defenders Image: Netflix One of the most enjoyable things about The Defenders wasn’t just seeing years of Netflix plans come together in a four-hero adventure—it was the return Marvel’s unrivalled queen of snark, Jessica Jones, ready and more than willing to dunk on her fellow superheroes. And boy howdy, did she dunk. By the end of Defenders Jessica might have warmed up to her teammates enough that she’s i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What causes algal blooms to become toxic?The disastrous 2015-16 Dungeness crab season, delayed and shortened by an unprecedented bloom of toxic algae, is a bitter memory for the West Coast fishing industry. The culprit was domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by marine algae and discovered in 1987 as the cause of amnesic shellfish poisoning.
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Feed: All Latest

More Evidence Exxon Misled the Public About Climate Change“Read all of these documents and make up your own mind.”
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Relaunches iOS App: Featuring Full Magazine Download and Archive Washington, D.C. (August 23, 2017)-- The Atlantic has launched a premium iOS app that represents a new and improved way of experiencing its journalism on the go, with greater access to current and archived writing, video, and photos. The Atlantic partnered exclusively with Lickability , a leading New York app development studio, on a design that prioritizes user experience, ease of navigation, an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How muscles work: New insightMuscle malfunctions may be as simple as a slight strain after exercise or as serious as heart failure and muscular dystrophy. A new technique now makes it possible to look much more closely at how sarcomeres, the basic building blocks within all skeletal and cardiac muscles, work together. It's a discovery that should advance research into a wide range of muscle malfunctions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancerA new study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Altered mitochondria associated with increased autism riskMitochondria, the tiny structures inside our cells that generate energy, may play a key role in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A provocative new study suggests that variations in mitochondrial DNA originating during ancient human migrations may play an important role in predisposition to ASD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cognitive-behavioral therapy particularly efficient in treating ADHS in adultsCognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group training was shown to achieve the same results as neurofeedback training in treating attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both methods led to a comparable decrease in symptoms. CBT, however, proved to be generally more efficient, concluded new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The toes tell the taleThough modern horses now have a single toe, their earliest ancestors had three on their front legs, and four on the back. Scientists are shedding new light on what drove those changes, and in a new study show that the dual pressures of increasing body weight and shrinking side toes prompted early horses' middle toes to become dramatically stronger and better able to resist forces.
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Gizmodo

State Department Science Envoy Resigns With Letter Containing Hidden Message The President and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt (Image: AP) It is no secret that the screaming Twitter man in charge of the United States and scientists do not get along. Everyone knows this. As if scientists weren’t angry enough from Trump’s rejecting evidence-based facts, they also happen to be human beings, human beings who do not like the fact that the President of the United States finds it
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New on MIT Technology Review

Scientists Are Defining Quantum-Computing Terms Because Everyone Is Confused
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cognitive science

A new paper in Psychological Science explores the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of behavioral "nudge" interventions. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Blog » Languages » English

Operation Spywire: Congrats Team Motorcycle! Vroom vrooooooom! Only the best for today’s discerning international spy. Looks like Eyewire prefers two wheels over four. Enjoy the new Harley, and of course, your bonuses! Artwork by Daniela Gamba
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Live Science

'My Eyes Feel Funny': Google Searches for Symptoms Spike After EclipseAfter Monday's solar eclipse, many watchers were worried that viewing the event had hurt their eyes or caused other symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Data mining finds more than expected beneath Andean PlateauSeismologists investigating how Earth forms new continental crust have compiled more than 20 years of seismic data from a wide swath of South America's Andean Plateau and determined that processes there have produced far more continental rock than previously believed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Depression Harvey's rebirthNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures of newly reborn Tropical Depression Harvey.
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Science | The Guardian

Antares: astronomers capture best ever image of a star’s surface and atmosphere Pictures of red supergiant Antares, 550 light years from Earth, are the most detailed images even taken of a star other than the sun Astronomers have produced the most detailed ever images of a star other than the sun . The red supergiant, called Antares, is known as the heart of the Scorpius constellation because of its rosy hue, discernible to the naked eye, and location in the body of the astr
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Gizmodo

Gravitational Waves Reveal the Unexpectedly Weird Behavior of Distant Black Holes Image: NASA, Henze/Wikimedia Commons Last year’s gravitational wave discovery may have felt like the end of an era—a momentous occasion in which a precise experiment finally ended a hundred-year search to confirm a baffling prediction made by Albert Einstein. The discovery, instead, spawned an entirely new field of astronomy, and the results are finally starting to trickle in. And you can probabl
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Scientific American Content: Global

Strange Dead Star Could Be Remnant of Mini-SupernovaStudies of the white dwarf LP 40-365 could reveal new details about mysterious stellar explosions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Major leap towards data storage at the molecular levelFrom smartphones to supercomputers, the growing need for smaller and more energy efficient devices has made higher density data storage one of the most important technological quests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Nano-hashtags' could provide definite proof of Majorana particlesIn Nature today an international team of researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Delft University of Technology and the University of California - Santa Barbara presents an advanced quantum chip that will be able to provide definitive proof of the mysterious Majorana particles. These particles, first demonstrated in 2012, are their own antiparticle at one and the same time. The chip,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

#HappyBirthday! Hashtag turns 10The hashtag, the symbol attached to keywords to tag topics online, on Wednesday celebrates 10 years making social media just a bit more navigable.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Methane from tundra, ocean floor didn't spike during previous natural warming periodScientists concerned that global warming may release huge stores of methane from reservoirs beneath Arctic tundra and deposits of marine hydrates - a theory known as the "clathrate gun" hypothesis - have turned to geologic history to search for evidence of significant methane release during past warming events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding Caribbean mammal extinctions of the past spurs renewed focus on conservationPaleontologists report they have clear evidence that the arrival of humans and subsequent human activity throughout the islands of the Caribbean were likely the primary causes of the extinction of native mammal species there. The evidence, they say, highlights the need for urgent human intervention to protect the native mammal species still inhabiting the region.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How 139 countries could be powered by 100 percent wind, water, and solar energy by 2050The latest roadmap to a 100 percent renewable energy future outlines infrastructure changes that 139 countries can make to be entirely powered by wind, water, and sunlight by 2050 after electrification of all energy sectors. Such a transition could mean less worldwide energy consumption due to the efficiency of clean, renewable electricity; and a net increase of over 24 million long-term jobs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change is luring Kodiak bears away from their iconic salmon streamsKodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon -- their iconic prey -- due to climate change, according to a new study.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

US science envoy resigns in protest at Trump policies Energy researcher Daniel Kammen faults US president’s positions on climate change and energy and his failure to condemn white supremacists. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22510
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Gizmodo

Here's How Much the Note 8 Costs Since Samsung Didn't Say [Update: Samsung Said] As expected, today Samsung announced the Galaxy Note 8 , its follow up to the catastrophic Galaxy Note 7. It looks pretty sweet! The company was noticeably mum about pricing at the launch extravaganza, and told us nothing of price in briefings leading up to the event. Why? Well, it might have to do with that price tag. This phone might be incredible, but you better check with your financial plann
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Judge: Bears near US-Canada border merit endangered statusAnimals and plants can be considered endangered even if they are not on the brink of extinction, a judge ruled in overturning the U.S. government's re-classification of a small population of grizzly bears living in the forests of Montana and Idaho near the Canada border.
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Futurity.org

Giant waves explain shifting iron clouds on brown dwarfs Researchers have a new model for explaining how clouds move and change shape in brown dwarfs. The work points to giant waves that cause large-scale movement of particles in their atmosphere. Brown dwarfs, dim objects less massive than the sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds—specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. Scientists recently r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Putting it to the testUniversity of Utah researchers led by chemical engineering and chemistry professor Marc Porter and U surgeon and professor Courtney Scaife have developed a rapid portable screening test for liver cancer that doesn't involve sending a specimen to a blood lab and cuts the wait time for results from two weeks to two minutes. This inexpensive test can be administered wherever the patient is, which wil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancerCU Cancer Center study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX unveils peek at sleek new spacesuitSpaceX's chief executive Elon Musk gave a sneak peek Wednesday at the California-based company's futuristic new spacesuit.
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Gizmodo

The Romans Could Have Been Poisoned by Something Deadlier Than Lead Photo: Getty There are very few absolutely true things in this life, but one of them is you shouldn’t drink lead. Historians have long believed that ancient Romans learned this the hard way—it’s been said that lead used in water pipes and cooking materials could have poisoned Romans and contributed to their downfall. Now, new research has complicated this age-old mystery, suggesting the real culp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change is luring Kodiak bears away from their iconic salmon streamsKodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon-their iconic prey-due to climate change, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding Caribbean mammal extinctions of the past spurs renewed focus on conservationA Johns Hopkins paleontologist and her collaborative team of scientists report they have clear evidence that the arrival of humans and subsequent human activity throughout the islands of the Caribbean were likely the primary causes of the extinction of native mammal species there. The evidence, they say, highlights the need for urgent human intervention to protect the native mammal species still i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-term study aims to understand prairie ecology after farmland is forsakenAcross the U.S., farmers have abandoned millions of acres of land due to economics and hindrances such as dropping water tables that make irrigation of crops impossible. Since 2001, a longstanding study at the University of Kansas has improved researchers' grasp of how to restore native prairie grassland on these abandoned lands and how restoration is influenced by agricultural inputs such as nitr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How 139 countries could be powered by 100 percent wind, water, and solar energy by 2050The latest roadmap to a 100% renewable energy future from Stanford's Mark Z. Jacobson and 26 colleagues is the most specific global vision yet, outlining infrastructure changes that 139 countries can make to be entirely powered by wind, water, and sunlight by 2050 after electrification of all energy sectors. Such a transition could mean less worldwide energy consumption due to the efficiency of cl
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Science | The Guardian

How the horse became the only living animal with a single toe The ancient ancestors of horses had four toes on their front feet and three on their back – but modern horses have just one. A new study could explain why They can reach speeds of more than 40km an hour, clear hurdles more than eight feet high and even pirouette – and they manage it all with just one toe on each foot. Now researchers say they have unpicked how and why horses ended up with their u
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Science | The Guardian

Should you use ‘vaginal seeding’ if your baby is born by caesarean?Some parents are embracing the emerging process of replenishing newborns with lost bacteria – but doctors are warning against it There has been an emerging trend among mothers who have a caesarean section for “vaginal seeding”, a process that exposes newborn babies to the micro-organisms they would normally encounter during vaginal birth. This week, though, Danish obstetricians writing in the inte
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New understanding of how muscles workMuscle malfunctions may be as simple as a slight strain after exercise or as serious as heart failure and muscular dystrophy. A new technique developed at McGill University now makes it possible to look much more closely at how sarcomeres, the basic building blocks within all skeletal and cardiac muscles, work together. It's a discovery that should advance research into a wide range of muscle malf
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personality drives purchasing of luxury goodsPeople who are extraverted and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new UCL research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemists get step closer to replicating nature with assembly of new 3-D structuresA team of New York University chemists has created a series of three-dimensional structures that take a step closer to resembling those found in nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How 139 countries could be powered by 100 percent wind, water, and solar energy by 2050The latest roadmap to a 100 percent renewable energy future from Stanford's Mark Z. Jacobson outlines infrastructure changes that 139 countries can make to be entirely powered by wind, water, and sunlight by 2050 after electrification of all energy sectors. Such a transition could mean less worldwide energy consumption due to the efficiency of clean, renewable electricity; and a net increase of ov
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Gizmodo

The Tick Brilliantly Deconstructs Our Modern-Day Superhero Obsession GIF All images: Amazon I thought I knew what to expect after seeing the pilot and, months later, the second episode of Amazon’s re-imagined Tick TV show. But, having now seen the initial six chapters of the series’ first season, the show still amazed me with how cleverly it cuts into the hyperdense muscle of superhero genre conventions. The Tick wields more than enough strength to wrestle your lo
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Scientific American Content: Global

Martian Weather Kicks into High Gear at NightSundown sparks blustery snowstorms in the Red Planet’s lower atmosphere -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Lithium in tap water seems to both raise and lower dementia riskA study has found that high levels of lithium in drinking water is linked to a lower dementia risk – but medium levels are linked to a raised risk
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Invasive rhododendrons damage woodland environmentNew study shows invasive rhododendrons damage woodland environment but are not poisoning the soil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Personality drives purchasing of luxury goodsPeople who are extraverted and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new UCL research.
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Live Science

Climate Change Is Causing Fish to ShrinkWarmer oceans mean fish require more oxygen, but their gills are not growing at the same rate as their metabolism, which is causing their body size to diminish.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Are the Wheels Coming Off Apple’s Driverless-Car Plans?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists get step closer to replicating nature with assembly of new 3-D structuresA team of New York University chemists has created a series of three-dimensional structures that take a step closer to resembling those found in nature. The work offers insights into how enzymes are properly assembled, or folded, which could enhance our understanding of a range of diseases that result from these misfolded proteins.
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Gizmodo

Former CIA Director Assures Us He Did Not Just Tweet His Password, Reminds Us to Drink Our Ovaltine Screencap: Twitter It sure looked like Michael Hayden, the former head of the Central Intelligence Agency, accidentally tweeted his password Wednesday morning. But rest assured, Hayden says he did not just pull a Sean Spicer . “Certainly not a password. Can you pocket tweet?” Hayden told Gizmodo over email, adding in a follow up: “But, as someone suggested, it does decode to ‘be sure to drink you
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Hyper-Caffeinated Coffee, Custom-Fit Shirts, NCAA Tailgating Chairs, and More Anker’s PowerCore Elite battery pack , Amazon’s top-selling miter saw , and coffee that will probably kill you lead off Wednesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker PowerCore II , $33 with code ANK20AH3 Anker’s PowerCore line has reigned as our readers’ favorite USB battery pack for over a year, and its long a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Myanmar's startups map past, shape future with virtual realityGasps echo across the hall as the Myanmar school kids trial virtual reality goggles, marveling at a device that allows some of Asia's poorest people to walk on the moon or dive beneath the waves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test for colitis screening using infrared technology could reduce dependence on colonoscopyA fast, simple blood test for ulcerative colitis using infrared spectroscopy could provide a cheaper, less invasive alternative for screening compared to colonoscopy, which is now the predominant test, according to a study between the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery fuels hope for Rett syndrome treatmentVanderbilt University researchers have relieved symptoms of Rett syndrome in a mouse model with a small molecule that works like the dimmer switch in an electrical circuit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change is luring Kodiak bears away from their iconic salmon streamsKodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon-their iconic prey-due to climate change, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UA integrative medicine residency program flourishesFaculty at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and their collaborators successfully demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of an online approach to train more family medicine residents in integrative medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Selecting most effective materials for dental pulp tissue engineeringTo regenerate dental pulp tissue after emptying of a tooth's root canals researchers compared the effectiveness of 3-D scaffolds made of natural or customized synthetic materials containing pulpal stem cells and dentin-derived growth factors.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Machine Learning Could Help to Improve Climate ForecastsMixing artificial intelligence with climate science helps researchers to identify previously unknown atmospheric processes and rank climate models -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Focus for independent retailers _ make shopping easy and funWhen sporting goods retailer evo ships ski boots ahead of the winter season, some will be delivered to the company's competitors—who will then help evo customers be sure the boots are a good fit.
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Ars Technica

Bungie prioritizing “simulation” over frame rate for console Destiny 2 Our own Mark Walton plays Destiny 2 at 4K and 60fps on PC. Here at Ars, we spend a lot of time talking about how developers deal with the trade-offs between resolution, frame rate, graphical detail, and simulation complexity they face at the top end of modern console and PC hardware. Quite often, the first-blush "wow factor" of more pixels and higher frame rates wins out in this constant balancin
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Popular Science

Here's what you need to know about the Samsung Note8 smartphone Technology It packs dual cameras, animated messages, and a split-screen option for multitasking. The Note line endures. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Exxon Acknowledged Climate Change Internally But Still Spread Denialist Propaganda AP A Harvard study released Tuesday analyzed 40 years worth of documents from Exxon Mobil, concluding that the fossil fuel titan has, since 1979, internally acknowledged that carbon emissions are responsible for climate change, even as it has spent thousands over the years publicly denying the global consensus. As internal findings from peer-reviewed research grew more and more conclusive of huma
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The Atlantic

How Student Internships Saved a Chicago School CHICAGO—One May morning, 22 stories above Chicago’s Wabash Avenue, Aurice Blanton ignored the stunning spring view of Lake Michigan. He had work to do. He toggled his computer between a budget spreadsheet and his color-coded schedule, double-checking figures for an upcoming meeting with his supervisor at CNA Insurance. Blanton, a high-school senior, was interning for the firm’s information-techno
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The Atlantic

Inside Waymo's Secret World for Training Self-Driving Cars I n a corner of Alphabet’s campus, there is a team working on a piece of software that may be the key to self-driving cars. No journalist has ever seen it in action until now. They call it Carcraft, after the popular game World of Warcraft. The software’s creator, a shaggy-haired, baby-faced young engineer named James Stout, is sitting next to me in the headphones-on quiet of the open-plan office
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The Atlantic

ESPN's Robert Lee Blunder—and the Backlash It Provoked On Tuesday, ESPN announced that its management had pulled an Asian American announcer named Robert Lee from an assignment covering the season’s first home football game at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Instead, Lee would be sent to Pittsburgh. According to a statement on Tuesday, the network made the call “because of the coincidence of his name.” “It’s a shame that this is even a
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Viden

En 10-årig forklarer: BlockchainBlockchain-teknologi er hypet som aldrig før. Men hvad går det egentlig ud på?
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Arctic radar to probe 'space weather'The UK contributes to a sophisticated new radar to map the Sun's impacts on Earth's high atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Rare' Byzantine mosaic revealed in Jerusalem's Old CityIsraeli archaeologists on Wednesday unveiled a 1,500-year-old portion of mosaic floor bearing the names of Byzantine Emperor Justinian and a senior Orthodox priest.
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Ars Technica

Ariel—makers of the Atom—have a hybrid hypercar in the works Ariel Motor Company If you watch Top Gear , you'll know the Ariel Motor Company. It's the British maker of the Atom, a mid-engined assortment of scaffolding that was dreamt up as a modern answer to the Lotus/Caterham Seven—the same car that gave Jeremy Clarkson an epiglottis full of bees . Ariel also makes the Nomad, an off-road version of the Atom that featured in Matt Le Blanc's Top Gear debut.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Are the Wheels Coming Off of Apple’s Driverless Car Plans?
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New on MIT Technology Review

Bitcoin Transactions Aren’t as Anonymous as Everyone HopedWeb merchants routinely leak data about purchases. And that can make it straightforward to link individuals with their Bitcoin purchases, say cybersecurity researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of brain-computer interface, virtual avatar could help people with gait disabilitiesResearchers from the University of Houston have shown for the first time that the use of a brain-computer interface augmented with a virtual walking avatar can control gait, suggesting the protocol may help patients recover the ability to walk after stroke, some spinal cord injuries and certain other gait disabilities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UChicago scientists detect first X-rays from mystery supernovasA team of scientists, including scholars from the University of Chicago, appear to have found the first X-rays coming from type Ia supernovae. Their findings are published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A pair of medical magnets shows promise as a new tool for creating an anastomosisAn experimental device that employs a pair of magnets offers surgeons a new safe and simple alternative to standard methods for creating an anastomosis for the first time in nearly 50 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding Caribbean mammal extinctions of the past spurs renewed focus on conservationA Johns Hopkins paleontologist and her collaborative team of scientists report they have clear evidence that the arrival of humans and subsequent human activity throughout the islands of the Caribbean were likely the primary causes of the extinction of native mammal species there. The evidence, they say, highlights the need for urgent human intervention to protect the native mammal species still i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Altered mitochondria associated with increased autism riskMitochondria, the tiny structures inside our cells that generate energy, may play a key role in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A provocative new study by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP)'s pioneering mitochondrial medicine team suggests that variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) originating during ancient human migrations may be an important contributor to ASD predisposition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dakota pipeline company sues environmental groupsThe operator of a controversial US oil pipeline, which was the focus of months of protests by Native American tribes, on Tuesday sued several environmental groups, claiming they spread false information and incite violence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

S.Africa's first online rhino horn auction sparks angerSouth Africa's first online auction of rhino horn opened Wednesday, despite conservation groups protesting that the legal, domestic sale would encourage poachers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch woman convicted for Facebook threat of prime ministerA Dutch court has sentenced a 47-year-old woman to 40 hours of community service for threatening the country's prime minister in a Facebook post.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comparing food allergies: Animals and humans may have more in common than you thinkNot only people, but mammals like cats, dogs and horses suffer from symptoms and problems of food intolerance and allergies. Scientists have now condensed the knowledge about human and animal food allergies and intolerance into a new European position paper. It highlights the strong similarities in symptoms and triggers of adverse food reactions and stresses the need for more comparative studies o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How sleep apnea may contribute to normal-tension glaucoma riskPeople with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), a disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of paused and shallow breathing during sleep, are approximately ten times more likely to develop glaucoma.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Labor market effects of trade liberalizationEconomists have long touted the benefits of free trade between individuals and countries as a pillar of human progress and a foundational principle of global society. While most experts argue that free trade is beneficial overall, others are increasingly concerned about the immediate costs to workers in import-competing industries who could lose their jobs. Trade-related unrest in the labor market
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Up from the ashes: Samsung unveils successor to Note 7 phoneSamsung is trying to move past last year's disastrous Galaxy Note 7 launch with a successor sporting a dual-lens camera, animated messages, expanded note-taking—and lower battery capacity.
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Ars Technica

Samsung makes the Galaxy Note8 Official Enlarge NEW YORK CITY—We're live from New York , where Samsung has taken the wraps off its new flagship device, the Galaxy Note8. Samsung changed everything about the Galaxy S line earlier this year, and those changes are all making the jump to the bigger Note model. You get an extra-tall display with on-screen navigation buttons and slim bezels. The fingerprint reader has been moved to the back,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists detect first X-rays from mystery supernovasExploding stars lit the way for our understanding of the universe, but researchers are still in the dark about many of their features.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds wind shear weakening Hurricane KennethHurricane Kenneth was quickly weakening early on Aug. 22 as a result of vertical wind shear. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that the strongest storms associated with the hurricane were pushed away from the center.
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The Atlantic

Trump's Vacation Is Over How many people, given the prerogative to travel wherever they wanted and the use of a fully staffed jet to do it, would head to Phoenix, Arizona, in the dog days of August? But then Donald Trump often prefers to turn up the heat, and his rally Tuesday night was no different. In remarks that veered between the carefully composed and the spontaneously concocted, Trump called for national unity eve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activityThe development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A more complete picture of the nano worldAerosol particles are among the many materials whose chemical and mechanical properties cannot be fully measured until scientists develop a better method of studying materials at the microscale as well as the much smaller nanoscale (1 nm is one-billionth of a meter). Scientists have now developed such a method and utilized it to perform noninvasive chemical imaging of a variety of materials, as we
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 99 percent of the microbes inside us are unknown to scienceA survey of DNA fragments circulating in the blood suggests the microbes living within us are vastly more diverse than previously known. In fact, 99 percent of that DNA has never been seen before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New world record with strongest resistive magnetNew 41.4-Tesla instrument paves way for breakthroughs in physics and materials research.
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Gizmodo

How to Back Up Your Files Now That CrashPlan Isn't an Option Image credit: massmatt/ Flickr Today, one of the best cloud backup services, CrashPlan, announced it was ending support for consumers. CrashPlan for Home will be put to rest on October 23, 2018. While the option to sign up for or renew your CrashPlan for Home subscription is gone, current CrashPlan for Home users will receive an extra 60 days of backup service gratis. With one of the best cloud b
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Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 Is a Beast of a SmartphoneForget the Galaxy Note 7 disaster. Samsung shoved All The Things into the Note 8 and made it work.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Labor market effects of trade liberalizationA new study on the Brazilian labor market found that workers in regions with industries facing increased competition from imports experienced a steady decrease in earnings over time in comparison to other regions.
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Gizmodo

Samsung Note 8: The Return of the Original Jumbo Phone All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo It might seem strange that the most recent Samsung flagship phablet you could actually buy is the Galaxy Note 5, which debuted way back in August 2015. But the Note 6 never existed (Samsung skipped that number when jumping to the Note 7), and despite multiple unsuccessful attempts to fix its exploding batteries, the Note 7 was killed and pulled from stores last
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Science : NPR

To Infinity And Beyond: Celebrating 40 Years Of The Voyager Mission The Farthest: Voyager In Space , airing Wednesday on PBS, celebrates a technological and intellectual achievement rarely matched in history — one that has forever changed us, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: NASA)
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Viden

Computerspil: Fri leg og big businessEuropas største spilmesse er et slaraffenland for spil- og teknologiinteresserede, men der er også stort fokus på forretning og ny teknologi.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This ancient sea worm sported a crowd of ‘claws’ around its mouthA newly discovered species of arrow worm that lived over half a billion years ago had about twice as many head spines as its modern kin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A song's structure can be linked to its popularityThink of your favourite pop song. Can you explain why you like it so much? It might remind you of a memorable event, or move you in a way that makes you feel happy or sad. A new study, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, has uncovered a simple, measurable explanation that can determine your preference for one song over another. It has linked the harmonic structure
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New guidelines point way toward more effectively addressing hypertension in kids, teensThe first new national guidelines since 2004 on identifying and treating high blood pressure in children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years old) have now been published. The report offers a series of evidence-based recommendations for pediatricians derived from a comprehensive review of nearly 15,000 medical studies published since 2004.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antipsychotics common for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesAntipsychotic medication is frequently being prescribed to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, often without a psychiatric diagnosis, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychotic disorders and obesity: New report shows big waistlines are to blameA number of factors, including obesity, shorten the lifespan for those with schizophrenia by 20 years and by 10 years for those with bipolar disorder compared to the general population. In the first study to compare long-term weight gain across psychotic disorders, researchers show that expanding waistlines and the way body fat is distributed are largely to blame.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High levels of 'good' cholesterol linked to excessive mortalityIn striking contrast to the general perception, researchers have shown in a new study that people with extremely high levels of HDL -- the 'good' cholesterol -- in their blood have a more than 65 percent higher mortality rate than people with normal HDL levels. The researchers say the results should lead to a change in the way 'good' cholesterol is perceived.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lego proteins revealedLego-like assemblies should have formed relatively frequently during evolution, suggest researchers. Could this assembly method be common, or even easy to reproduce? Their answer may have implications for both biological research and nanoscience.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A lyrical bridge between past, present and future | David WhyteWith his signature charm and searching insight, David Whyte meditates on the frontiers of the past, present and future, sharing two poems inspired by his niece's hike along El Camino de Santiago de Compostela in Spain.
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Futurity.org

Gut bacteria chemicals keep old animals young. Us, too? A class of chemicals, called indoles, made by intestinal bacteria help worms, flies, and mice stay mobile and resilient longer in their lives, report researchers. “This is a direct avenue to a drug that could make people live better for longer,” says senior author Daniel Kalman, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. “…people are living longer; but
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Popular Science

Scientists are solving the mystery of Earth’s thermostat " data-lgsrc="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/large_16x9/public/images/2017/08/earth.jpg?itok=5-g8DlqJ&fc=50,50" data-50src="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/50_16x9/public/images/2017/08/earth.jpg?itok=-shbz2DH&fc=50,50" data-150src="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/150_16x9/public/images/2017/08/earth.jpg?itok=EDp4Gdc9&fc=50,50" data-med
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peas that like it hot: Genetic map reveals heat tolerance traits in peasFarmers across the world produce between 10 and 13 million tons of field pea every year. That makes it a top legume crop, just behind dry beans and chickpeas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical Storm Kevin battered by wind shear on satellite imagerySatellite imagery revealed that wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures have taken their toll on the once hurricane Kenneth. Kenneth has now weakened to a tropical storm and continues to be torn apart as seen in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA infrared image shows Harvey's remnants affecting YucatanNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the remnants of former Tropical Storm Harvey as it was affecting Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Aqua Satellite spots Typhoon Hato's Landfall in ChinaNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Hato just hours after it made landfall in southeastern China. Hato made landfall in mainland China around 0300 UTC on Aug. 23 (11 p.m. EDT on Aug. 22). China's weather service reported Hato's landfall occurred in the city of Zhuhai, in Guangdong province.
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Science | The Guardian

Conservationists slam 'hateful' survey promoting wasp killing Big Wasp Survey encourages volunteers to build homemade traps and send dead wasps to entomologists to monitor populations Drowning wasps in beer in the name of science may seem a socially acceptable way to exterminate a seasonal pest. But a citizen science survey “harnessing the public’s dislike of wasps” has been criticised for its “hateful language” and for unnecessarily killing rare insects. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Aqua Satellite spots Typhoon Hato's Landfall in ChinaNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Hato just hours after it made landfall in southeastern China.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidelines point way toward more effectively addressing hypertension in kids, teensThe first new national guidelines since 2004 on identifying and treating high blood pressure in children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years old) have been published by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which convened a panel of experts to produce the new recommendations. The AAP report, offers a series of evidence-based recommendations for pediatricians derived from a comprehensive review of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA infrared image shows Typhoon Hato in South China SeaNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the Typhoon Hato as it continued to move toward China. Hato is strengthening as it heads toward landfall.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smokers in clinical studies who say they've quit often haven'tA new US study has found that a high proportion of smokers enrolled in stop-smoking programs during a hospital stay report having quit when in fact they have not. The findings mean that in these kinds of study it is vital to check claims of having quit using an objective measure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic map reveals heat tolerance traits in peasAs the global climate changes and temperatures continue to rise, heat stress is becoming a major limiting factor for pea cultivation. A new study indicates that pea plants with some specific traits -- such as longer flowering time and higher pod numbers -- may be more resistant to heat stress. The researchers also gained new insights into the genetics of heat tolerance in pea.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parenting style reduces kids' distress in warResearchers have found that maternal authoritativeness and warmth helps to protect against psychological distress and mental health symptoms in children exposed to war. The results suggest that combining emotional support and warmth with discipline and openness to negotiation could be an effective way to protect children from emotional trauma following violent conflict.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Liquid nutrition may benefit children with Crohn's diseaseAn analysis of published studies indicates that exclusive enteral nutrition -- when individuals receive only liquid nutrition -- may be an effective treatment for children with Crohn's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study showsThe vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef -- regarded as climate change refuges -- has been highlighted in a new study. The study of Eastern Australian reefs revealed coral species would likely shift their distribution southward in response to climate change.
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Popular Science

How to charge your devices the right way DIY Give those batteries long, healthy lives. The batteries in your phone and laptop have a finite lifespan, which you can extend by treating them right. Here's how to make sure they last as long as possible.
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Gizmodo

Wait, Competitive Hot Air Ballooning Actually Looks Like Fun? GIF Unless you’re afraid of heights, few would call a ride aboard a hot air balloon a thrilling experience. But did you know there’s such a thing as competitive hot air ballooning ? It might not be as exciting as air-to-air combat in fighter jets, but can you think of a sport that has a better view? Before you jump to any conclusions, the answer is no; competitive air ballooning doesn’t involve t
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New on MIT Technology Review

Walmart and Google Are Taking On Amazon with AI
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's the blueprint for a global fireball observatory – and why we need oneBright shooting stars are one of nature's great wonders. Like the one in the main image, which was visible from Devon in the south-west of England in June, these fireballs are caused by space rocks hitting Earth's atmosphere. The friction forces them to slow down, producing a tremendous amount of heat at the same time. If the rock is big enough, a fragment will survive this fiery transition and fa
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The Atlantic

So, Eclipse Boomtowns, How’d It Go? In making preparations for Monday’s total solar eclipse, tourism managers in St. Joseph, Missouri, didn’t know what to expect beyond the cosmic obvious. Would they be overwhelmed with out-of-towners? Even just a couple days before the event, they didn’t know. The estimates they’d heard indicated that as few as 50,000 people or as many as 500,000 might show up—quite a range for a town whose roads
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How fish recognize toxic preyPredator animals have long been known to avoid devouring brightly colored and patterned prey, and now an international study has revealed more about how they recognize toxic species. Researchers examined sea slugs, or nudibranchs, which had bright color patterns to warn predators they contained toxic defenses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into the world of trypanosomesSuch detailed images of the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness inside a host are unique so far: They illustrate the manifold ways in which the parasites move inside a tsetse fly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children with fragile X syndrome have a bias toward threatening emotionAnxiety occurs at high rates in children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Children with co-occurring anxiety tend to fare worse, but it can be hard to identify in infants. A new study reports that infants and children with FXS show bias toward threatening emotion, rather than positive emotion, a pattern highly linked with anxiety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treating arthritis with algaeResearchers are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. When chemically modified, this 'alginate' reduces oxidative stress, has an anti-inflammatory effect in cell culture tests and suppresses the immune reaction against cartilage cells, thereby combating the causes of arthritis. The research is, h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A song's structure can be linked to its popularityMusic can elicit strong emotions, which can be hard to describe. A new study has found that a simple change in harmonic structure can contribute to our preference for certain songs. Analyzing the chords of over 500 pop songs between 1958 and 1991, the study reveals a link between those showing higher 'harmonic surprise' (chords that do not usually follow each other) and their popularity in the Bil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Shapeshifter' that regulates blood clotting is visually captured for the first timeIt has not been possible to witness exactly how von Willebrand factor senses and harnesses mechanical forces in our blood vessels -- until now. Medical researchers have revealed exactly how VWF stops bleeding from cuts and bruises. Cutting-edge fluorescence imaging and microfluidic tools allowed them to capture images of individual VWF molecules elongating and relaxing in response to blood flow.
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Gizmodo

This Discounted Coffee Has Over Six Times the Caffeine of Red Bull 1 Pound Insomnia Coffee, $17 - Whole Bean | Ground If you’ve consumed so much coffee in your life that you’re now desensitized to the caffeine, Insomnia Coffee might be the solution best option other than getting more sleep. Insomnia claims to be the world’s strongest coffee blend, boasting 702mg of caffeine per 12 ounce cup. For comparison, a 12 ounce Red Bull has about 115mg, so...yeah, Insomni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical Storm Kenneth battered by wind shear on satellite imagerySatellite imagery revealed that wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures have taken their toll on the once hurricane Kenneth. Kenneth has now weakened to a tropical storm and continues to be torn apart as seen in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is MRI needed in children with a sports-related concussion?A new study reviewed more than five years of records of pediatric patients treated for sports concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among children, to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed structural changes to the brain that may be related to persistent symptoms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smokers in clinical studies who say they've quit often haven'tA new US study published by the scientific journal Addiction has found that a high proportion of smokers enrolled in stop-smoking programs during a hospital stay report having quit when in fact they have not. The findings mean that in these kinds of study it is vital to check claims of having quit using an objective measure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forensic team reveals 19th century killer's faceThe face of a 19th century killer has been recreated using forensic techniques and is on display in a new exhibition.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Diet Soda and Dementia: What You Need to KnowA recent study found that drinking even one diet soda a day may triple your risk for developing dementia. But there's a lot more to the story. Nutrition Diva explains -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Headless Body Identified as Missing Journalist Who Was Allegedly Killed by Submarine Designer Photo: AP On Wednesday morning, Copenhagen police confirmed that a torso found by a cyclist was a DNA match for the missing journalist Kim Wall. Wall had been missing since August 10th and was last seen on board the DIY submarine built by eccentric inventor Peter Madsen. Earlier this week, Madsen admitted to police that Wall had died in an “accident” on his submarine before it sank. The story of
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Ingeniøren

Navneskifte skal hive prestigefyldt forskningscenter op af økonomisk dødvandeIsær erhvervssektoren svigter European Spallation Source, så man er nødt til at gøre forskningscentret mere kendt, mener både Danmark og Sverige.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-assembling protein complexes could provide scaffolding for nanostructuresWhen hemoglobin undergoes just one mutation, these protein complexes stick to one another, stacking like Lego blocks to form long, stiff filaments. These filaments, in turn, elongate the red blood cells found in sickle-cell disease. For over 50 years, this has been the only known textbook example in which a mutation causes such filaments to form. According to Dr. Emmanuel Levy and his group in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wing shape helps swifts glide through stormsThey are among nature's best fliers, spending most of their time in flight … now scientists have shed new light on how swifts can glide with ease, whatever the weather. A new study suggests that the aerodynamics of swifts' wings enable them to adapt effortlessly to sudden changes in wind speed and direction.
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Dagens Medicin

Rigshospitalet viser ny fløj til børn, unge og fødende Ny hospitalsfløj på Rigshospitalet bliver formet som to hænder
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Live Science

Ancient 'Strange-Face' Dolphin Used Its Snout to Vacuum Up FoodAn ancient dolphin with strange snout used it to vacuum up food from the seafloor, new findings suggest.
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Feed: All Latest

Trump’s 'America First' Policies Won't Work in SpaceOpinion: The president's National Space Council should prioritize diplomacy.
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Gizmodo

Mind-Bogglingly Detailed Image of a Nearby Star Introduces an Unexpected Mystery Image: ESO/K. Ohnaka There are few downsides to new observations, but confusion might be one of them. New stellar images bring mysteries that will take more time and effort to understand. That’s offset by how freaking detailed scientists can start producing these pictures, and of course, scientists like hearing that there’s more work to do. A team using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer ( V
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lockheed Martin powers up next Orion spacecraft for first timeEngineers at Lockheed Martin and NASA breathed life into the next Orion crew module when they powered up the spacecraft for the first time at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Designed for human spaceflight, this Orion will be the first to fly more than 40,000 miles beyond the Moon during its nearly three-week Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), a feat that hasn't been possible before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

So-called 'bright girl effect' does not last into adulthood, study findsThe notion that young females limit their own progress based on what they believe about their intelligence -- called the 'bright girl effect' -- does not persist into adulthood, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Best ever image of a star's surface, atmosphereUsing ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer astronomers have constructed the most detailed image ever of a star -- the red supergiant star Antares. They have also made the first map of the velocities of material in the atmosphere of a star other than the sun, revealing unexpected turbulence in Antares's huge extended atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Big and strong may not last as long, according to profWomen are considerably less exhausted after natural, dynamic muscle exercises than men of similar age and athletic ability, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clear link between heavy vitamin B intake and lung cancerB vitamins are among the most popular supplements on the market in the United States. Some, like B6 and B12, are marketed and sold as products that can boost your energy. But a new study shows that using too much vitamin B6 and B12 dramatically increases lung cancer in men, particularly those who smoke.
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Big Think

Your Video Gaming Skills Could Earn Big Bucks in This Industry Looking for Workers Video gaming skills could be valuable in a rapidly growing industry with a deficit of qualified people, finds new study. Read More
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Gizmodo

This Is What It Looks Like to Cheat Death at 250 Miles Per Hour GIF Image source: YouTube Does the thrill of accelerating a dragster to speeds of almost 300 miles per hour outweigh the tremendous risks involved with the sport? It’s hard to imagine David Tremayne wanting to climb behind the steering wheel again after he lost control of this dragster at speeds few of us will ever experience on four wheels. An onboard camera caught the accident after Tremayne ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning plant waste into carbon fiber for cars, planesUsing plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin, a component of plant cell walls. That leftover lignin isn't good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Countries in Europe with the richest biodiversity do not always receive more fundingA recent study, published in the journal Conservation Biology, reveals that the investments and resources allotted for conservation only partially tally with the levels of biodiversity in the European Union. Thus, countries such as Portugal, Slovakia, Greece and the Czech Republic receive less funding than they would be entitled to as per their biodiversity.
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Futurity.org

Web pages load twice as fast on mobile with ‘Vroom’ Researchers have created software that could dramatically speed up internet access for mobile devices. The researchers’ new Vroom software prototype works by optimizing the end-to-end interaction between mobile devices and web servers. They tested the software on 100 popular news and sports websites, and they found that Vroom cut in half the median load time on landing pages—from 10 seconds to 5.
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Futurity.org

Science hasn’t seen 99% of the microbes in your body A new survey of DNA fragments circulating in human blood suggests our bodies contain vastly more diverse microbes than anyone previously understood. In fact, 99 percent of that DNA is new to science. “We found the gamut,” says Stephen Quake, a professor of bioengineering and applied physics at Stanford University, a member of Stanford Bio-X, and the paper’s senior author. “We found things that ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Linking mental health and the gut microbiomeBetter understanding the gastrointestinal microbiome may help psychiatrists treat mental health disorders such as depression, highlights a review in Frontiers in Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New prospects on the spread of tumorsScientists of Technische Universität Dresden, the University of Applied Sciences HTW Dresden and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research Heidelberg have gained new prospects on the invasion mechanism of malignant tumours using mathematical models and computer simulations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing infant mortality in NigeriaA doctor in Nigeria and a professor at Michigan State University have teamed up to reduce infant mortality in the African nation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antipsychotics common for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilitiesAntipsychotic medication is frequently being prescribed to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, often without a psychiatric diagnosis, a new study conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The breaking pointWhat, exactly, happens right around the edge of the crack, in the area in which those large stresses are concentrated? Professor Eran Bouchbinder of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Chemical Physics Department, explains that the processes that take place in this region are universal -- they occur in the same way in different materials and under different conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lego proteins revealedAccording to Dr. Emmanuel Levy and his group in the Weizmann Institute of Science's Structural Biology Department, Lego-like assemblies should have formed relatively frequently during evolution. Could this assembly method be common, or even easy to reproduce? Their answer, which was recently published in Nature, may have implications for both biological research and nanoscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activityThe development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into the world of trypanosomesSuch detailed images of the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness inside a host are unique so far: They illustrate the manifold ways in which the parasites move inside a tsetse fly. A research team from the University of Würzburg's Biocenter has presented the images.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International eye cancer research project to improve future therapiesA new international research project, involving the University of Liverpool's leading eye cancer research group, has identified specific subtypes of ocular melanoma that will help develop improved management strategies and therapies in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of homeless finds women at disadvantage for accessing disability benefitsA recent study of homeless adults finds that women are at a significant disadvantage compared to men when it comes to accessing disability benefits. The study also finds that medical records are key to accessing disability benefits, which poses a problem for many homeless adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wing shape helps swifts glide through storms, study suggestsThey are among nature's best fliers, spending most of their time in flight ... now scientists have shed new light on how swifts can glide with ease, whatever the weather.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comparing food allergies: Animals and humans may have more in common than you thinkNot only people, but mammals like cats, dogs and horses suffer from symptoms and problems of food intolerance and allergies. The Messerli Research Institute of Vetmeduni and Meduni Vienna, now condensed the knowledge about human and animal food allergies and intolerance into a new European position paper. It highlights the strong similarities in symptoms and triggers of adverse food reactions and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Shapeshifter' that regulates blood clotting is visually captured for the first timeIt has not been possible to witness exactly how von Willebrand factor senses and harnesses mechanical forces in our blood vessels -- until now. A team in the Boston Children's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the HMS Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology has revealed exactly how VWF stops bleeding from cuts and bruises. Cutting-edge fluorescence imaging and mi
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Gizmodo

Why the FDA Can't Fix the Opioid Crisis Opana was a painkiller twice as strong as Oxycontin. Like most opioids sold in the US it was easy to snort, until one day it wasn’t: Its manufacturers, Endo Pharmaceuticals, rigged it with crush-resistant technology in 2012. Within months the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana’s history was underway—addicts had taken to injecting it. The non-snortable Opana was an abuse-deterrent formulation, or ‘AD
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potionMosquitoes have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method whereby the pests gorge themselves on insecticides laced with a concoction that mimics the sweet-smelling scents and aromas that they find irresistible. It could bolster efforts to suppress malaria, Zika and other mosquito-borne disea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spinning plant waste into carbon fiber for cars, planesUsing plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin. That leftover lignin isn't good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' revealsThe world's shortest race by distance -- a fraction of the width of a human hair -- was a huge success for scientists working at the nanoscale. It spurred interest in molecular machines and led to a surprising new discovery, reports the team that entered a nano-sized 'monster truck.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancerNew technology uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Canadian children's nutrition suffers during school hoursCanadian children don't eat enough vegetables, fruit and dairy products during school hours, causing them to fall short of several daily dietary recommendations on school days, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprising new feature defines placental mammals as a groupBy performing detailed dissections and corresponding examinations of embryological development, researchers show that the muscles that control the unique mammalian perineal structures follow a surprisingly ancient pattern.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wild sheep grazed in the Black Desert 14,500 years agoExcavations of architecture and associated deposits left by hunter-gatherers in the Black Desert in eastern Jordan have revealed bones from wild sheep -- a species previously not identified in this area in the Late Pleistocene. According to archaeologists, the discovery is further evidence that the region often seen as a 'marginal zone' was capable of supporting a variety of resources, including a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Supermarkets could trick you into buying fewer caloriesSupermarkets could help their customers consume fewer calories by making small changes to the recipes of own-brand food products to reduce the calories contained in the product, without notifying consumers explicitly, according to a new study. So-called 'silent' product reformulation may be a promising strategy by which food retailers could contribute to lower calorie intake in the population, res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What being stuck between two cultures can do to a person's psycheWhat is the recipe for long-term happiness? One crucial ingredient cited by many people is closeness in their social relationships. Very happy people have strong and fulfilling relationships. But if we feel rejected by those who are closest to us – our family and friends – it can sour our attempts to master the recipe for happiness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius is so importantIf you read or listen to almost any article about climate change, it's likely the story refers in some way to the "2 degrees Celsius limit." The story often mentions greatly increased risks if the climate exceeds 2°C and even "catastrophic" impacts to our world if we warm more than the target.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mayweather will beat McGregor, neuroscience predictsIn Las Vegas, on August 26, the unbeaten American boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr and the immensely popular Irishman Conor McGregor will face off in a boxing ring, where only striking with hands while standing is allowed. It would be just another boxing match, albeit a huge one, except that McGregor is not even a boxer. Instead, he holds the lightweight and welterweight titles in mixed martial arts (MMA
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers crack solvent mixtures puzzleChemists working at the University of Amsterdam's (UvA) Sustainable Chemistry research priority area have collaborated with the Solvay Lab of the Future in Bordeaux to develop a practical toolbox for predicting the solubility of small molecules in different solvents. These tools are available open-access and free of charge, and can enhance solvent selection and formulations of many industrial prod
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transactional marriages were once as common as marriage based on loveThat love and marriage "go together like a horse and carriage" is very much a modern notion. In the past, most marriages were based on material interests, and couples had to make the best of them, says LMU ethnologist Dr. Annegret Braun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hyperentanglement across roof tops paves the way toward a global quantum Internet(Phys.org)—For the first time, physicists have demonstrated that hyperentangled photons can be transmitted in free space, which they showed by sending many thousands of these photons between the rooftops of two buildings in Vienna. Hyperentanglement means that the photons are simultaneously entangled in at least two different properties—in this experiment, the researchers combined two two-dimensio
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Ars Technica

Satellites that can image Earth at night, and through clouds, near launch Enlarge / A rendering of ICEYE’s SAR micro satellite deployed in space. (credit: ICEYE) The biggest thing in aerospace these days is the trend toward small things, from small satellites to small satellite launch vehicles like those under development by Rocket Lab, Virgin Galactic, and Vector Space Systems. Now a new microsatellite company, ICEYE, says it is moving forward with development and dep
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Gizmodo

11 Things You Can Do in Android Oreo That You Couldn't Before Android Oreo is rolling out now. (Image: Google) Android Oreo has at last been fully baked, and given a name, and is now rolling out to those of you with a Pixel, Pixel XL, Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, or Pixel C; Google says a bunch of other handsets will get Oreo by the end of the year too. So what can you look forward to? Here are the new tricks you’ll be able to play around with when your update arriv
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New Scientist - News

Elon Musk shows off first photo of SpaceX space suitSpaceX is planning to launch humans into orbit on board its Dragon capsule, and has designed new space suits for its passengers to wear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dreading that team-building exercise?A new study led by the University of East Anglia for the What Works Centre for Wellbeing reveals that shared activities in our workplaces can improve wellbeing and performance by improving the 'social atmosphere'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch activists in legal battle to urge action on pollutionEnvironmentalists went to court Wednesday to demand that the Dutch government take urgent action to improve air quality, arguing that authorities haven't done enough to meet European Union-mandated targets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why you should care about China's VPN crackdownInternet censors have a new target. The Chinese and Russian governments recently announced plans to block the use of "virtual private networks" (VPNs), which are a key tool for people trying to avoid internet restrictions and surveillance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A song's structure can be linked to its popularityMusic can elicit strong emotions, which can be hard to describe. A new study has found that a simple change in harmonic structure can contribute to our preference for certain songs. Analyzing the chords of over 500 pop songs between 1958 and 1991, the study reveals a link between those showing higher 'harmonic surprise' (chords that do not usually follow each other) and their popularity in the Bil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers link high levels of 'good' cholesterol with excessive mortalityIn striking contrast to the general perception, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown in a new study that people with extremely high levels of HDL -- the 'good' cholesterol -- in their blood have a more than 65 percent higher mortality rate than people with normal HDL levels. The researchers say the results should lead to a change in the way 'good' cholesterol is perceived.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Countries in Europe with the richest biodiversity do not always receive more fundingA recent study, published in the journal Conservation Biology, reveals that the investments and resources allotted for conservation only partially tally with the levels of biodiversity in the European Union. Thus, countries such as Portugal, Slovakia, Greece and the Czech Republic receive less funding than they would be entitled to as per their biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Special focus issue of Bioanalysis explores bioanalytical outsourcing strategiesBioanalysis, a leading MEDLINE-indexed journal for bioanalysts, has published a special focus issue on 'Outsourcing Strategies in Bioanalysis.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Development of screening tests for endocrine-disrupting chemicalsA new article published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry looks under the hood of how US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientists develop and validate testing methods that support regulatory decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nutlin-3, a p53-Mdm2 antagonist for nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatmentNasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a form of head and neck cancer that is highly prevalent among men in the populations of Southern China and Southeast Asia. This review will discuss the potential use of Nutlin-3 as a p53-activating drug and the future directions of its clinical research for NPC treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating arthritis with algaeResearchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. When chemically modified, this 'alginate' reduces oxidative stress, has an anti-inflammatory effect in cell culture tests and suppresses the immune reaction against cartilage cell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children with fragile X syndrome have a bias toward threatening emotionAnxiety occurs at high rates in children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Children with co-occurring anxiety tend to fare worse, but it can be hard to identify in infants. A new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that infants and children with FXS show bias toward threatening emotion, rather than
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liquid nutrition may benefit children with Crohn's diseaseAn analysis of published studies indicates that exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) -- when individuals receive only liquid nutrition -- may be an effective treatment for children with Crohn's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A more complete picture of the nano worldAerosol particles, says Xiaoji Xu, assistant professor of chemistry at Lehigh University, are among the many materials whose chemical and mechanical properties cannot be fully measured until scientists develop a better method of studying materials at the microscale as well as the much smaller nanoscale (1 nm is one-billionth of a meter). Xu has developed such a method and utilized it to perform no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psychotic disorders and obesity: New report shows big waistlines are to blameA number of factors, including obesity, shorten the lifespan for those with schizophrenia by 20 years and by 10 years for those with bipolar disorder compared to the general population. In the first study to compare long-term weight gain across psychotic disorders, researchers from FAU show that expanding waistlines and the way body fat is distributed are largely to blame.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peas that like it hotAs the global climate changes and temperatures continue to rise, heat stress is becoming a major limiting factor for pea cultivation. A new study indicates that pea plants with some specific traits -- such as longer flowering time and higher pod numbers -- may be more resistant to heat stress. The researchers also gained new insights into the genetics of heat tolerance in pea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parenting style reduces kids' distress in warResearchers in Israel have found that maternal authoritativeness and warmth helps to protect against psychological distress and mental health symptoms in children exposed to war. The results suggest that combining emotional support and warmth with discipline and openness to negotiation could be an effective way to protect children from emotional trauma following violent conflict.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover how fish recognize toxic preyPredator animals have long been known to avoid devouring brightly coloured and patterned prey, and now an international study has revealed more about how they recognise toxic species.University of Queensland Visual Ecology Lab member Dr Karen Cheney, of the School of Biological Sciences, said researchers examined sea slugs, or nudibranchs, which had bright color patterns to warn predators they con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study showsThe vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef -- regarded as climate change refuges -- has been highlighted in a new study.University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Brigitte Sommer said the study of Eastern Australian reefs revealed coral species would likely shift their distribution southward in response to climate change
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA infrared image shows Harvey's remnants affecting YucatanNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the remnants of former Tropical Storm Harvey as it was affecting Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA infrared image shows Typhoon Hato in South China SeaNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the Typhoon Hato as it continued to move toward China. Hato is strengthening as it heads toward landfall.
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Gizmodo

Apple's Self-Driving Car Is Now a Dinky Self-Driving Bus Photo: Getty It shouldn’t come as a huge surprise that Apple’s once ambitious self-driving car project is no longer ambitious. The New York Times reports that the company has relegated research for autonomous vehicles to a software system that will power a self-driving shuttle in between its new spaceship campus and its old offices. So much for reinventing the automobile experience. This is not t
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Ars Technica

Elon Musk posts first photo of SpaceX’s new spacesuit Enlarge / Wear this to ride in a Dragon spacecraft. (credit: SpaceX) Early Wednesday morning, SpaceX founder Elon Musk posted a photo of the spacesuit that will be used by astronauts flying aboard the company's Dragon spacecraft, perhaps as early as next year. It is white and looks futuristic. In his Instagram post , Musk added that this suit was not a mock-up but rather a fully functional unit.
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Quanta Magazine

A Physicist Who Models ISIS and the Alt-Right Neil Johnson used to study electrons as a buttoned-up professor of physics at the University of Oxford. Then, a decade ago, he decamped to the University of Miami — a young institution that he sees as unconstrained by rigid traditions or barriers between disciplines — and branched out. In recent years, the 55-year-old physicist has published research on financial markets, crowds, superconductivit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's how we can stop driverless cars from being hackedOnce hackers get into your internet-connected car, they could disable the air bags, brakes, door locks and even steal the vehicle. That's the finding of researchers who recently uncovered a flaw in the way the different components of a connected car talk to each other. Their work follows several demonstrations of researchers remotely hacking into and taking control of cars, including one that led
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds new light on evolutionary forces that drove horses to evolve a single toeIf you want to understand the history of modern horses, start with their toes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hype and cash are muddying public understanding of quantum computingIt's no surprise that quantum computing has become a media obsession. A functional and useful quantum computer would represent one of the century's most profound technical achievements.
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Gizmodo

Another Iconic Cosmic Marvel Hero Could Appear in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 A familiar face is confirmed for Avengers 4 . David Harbour says the Hellboy reboot isn’t an origin story. Could there be an extra, secret hero joining Justice League ? Plus, Rian Johnson offers a tiny Last Jedi tease and a classic Transformers look appears on the Bumblee set. To me, my Spoilers! Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 On a recent Facebook Q & A , James Gunn revealed Marvel is conside
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Ingeniøren

Kæmpe kabel til havmøllepark trækkes nu i landHavvindmølleparken Kriegers Flak er ved at blive koblet på fastlandet gennem et 43,5 kilometer langt kabel. Mølleparken på 600 MW skal stå færdig i 2022.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Finally, There’s a Halfway Compelling Consumer Drone Delivery Service
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Feed: All Latest

Airbus' Vahana Flying Car Uses Laser Sensors to Pick out Landing SpotsA new partnership with Near Earth Autonomy brings flying car dreams closer than ever.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research pair suggest global warming almost completely naturalAustralian biologist Jennifer Marohasy and computer scientist John Abbot have published a paper in the journal GeoResJ outlining their study of climate change using neural network technology—their results show that the climate changes the world is now experiencing are almost completely natural. Marohasy offers an additional explanation and outline of their work on her blog. Also, alt-right news si
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research finds deep evolutionary origins of a unique mammalian anatomical patternBy performing detailed dissections and corresponding examinations of embryological development, researchers at Midwestern University, led by Margaret Hall, Ph.D. and Jeffrey Plochocki, Ph.D., show that the muscles that control the unique mammalian perineal structures follow a surprisingly ancient pattern.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using compost to preserve forests in MadagascarResearch by an EPFL PhD student has found a way to boost Madagascar's corn crop yields up to five times while decreasing deforestation at the same time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To aid utilities, researchers seek ancient floods near Tennessee RiverWith funding from energy utilities, a team of researchers at The University of Alabama are collaborating with peers across the Southeast to understand the frequency and possible size of floods along the Tennessee River that pre-date reliable weather and streamflow records.
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Ars Technica

Uber drivers have made more than $50M in the first month of tipping Enlarge (credit: Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Uber is making additional changes to its driver-side app by allowing drivers to set more destinations and offering "long trip notifications" to tell a driver when a rider is requesting a ride that's 45 minutes or longer. The company will also stop penalizing drivers who turn down trips. Previously, when a driver turned down potenti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New use of blood cleaning device saves high-risk patients with liver failureUniversity of Maryland School of Medicine researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

So-called 'bright girl effect' does not last into adulthood, study findsThe notion that young females limit their own progress based on what they believe about their intelligence -- called the 'bright girl effect' -- does not persist into adulthood, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Omega-3 intake reduces cardiac death risk according to comprehensive new studyResults from a new study showed that in 14 randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) of 71,899 people, consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3s reduced the risk of cardiac death by a statistically-significant average of 8 percent. This is the first published meta-analysis to include cardiac death (also known as 'coronary mortality') as a primary endpoint, and the most comprehensive review of the evidence to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big and strong may not last as long, according to UBC professorIn a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus, researchers in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences have found that women are considerably less exhausted after natural, dynamic muscle exercises than men of similar age and athletic ability.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds wind shear weakening Hurricane KennethHurricane Kenneth was quickly weakening early on Aug. 22 as a result of vertical wind shear. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that the strongest storms associated with the hurricane were pushed away from the center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

National Maglab achieves new world record with strongest resistive magnetNew 41.4-Tesla instrument paves way for breakthroughs in physics and materials research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powerful typhoon kills at least 3 in MacauA powerful typhoon caused at least three deaths Wednesday in Macau, according to local authorities in the Chinese gambling enclave.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' revealsThe world's shortest race by distance—a fraction of the width of a human hair—was run on gold and silver tracks, and took a whopping 30 hours. Given that the vehicles were invisible to the naked eye, your typical racing fan might have missed it. But the April "nanorace" was a huge success for scientists working at the nanoscale. It spurred interest in molecular machines and led to a surprising new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracking the mobile-market code could create food-desert oasisWith perishable inventory and slim profit margins, the grocery business is notoriously tough. The mobile grocery business is even tougher. Two entities – one for-profit and the other not—that in recent years ran mobile groceries in the Kansas City area have shut down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What blackout? How solar-reliant power grids passed the eclipse testThe total solar eclipse that captivated the United States this week was more than just a celestial spectacle (and a reminder to take care of your eyes). It was also a valuable lesson in how to manage electricity grids when a crucial generation source – solar power, in this case – goes temporarily offline.
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Gizmodo

Elon Musk Unveils SpaceX's Sleek New Space Suit SpaceX works in mysterious ways, but today, Elon Musk decided to gift fans with the first-ever look at SpaceX’s space suits. In just a few hours, fans have collectively lost their chill, and it’s not entirely unwarranted: the white-and-black aesthetic is sleek and sophisticated, like if Daft Punk went to Wimbledon. The suits will be worn by NASA astronauts inside SpaceX’s Dragon Capsule , which w
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The Atlantic

The Most Shortsighted Attack on Free Speech in Modern U.S. History When free-speech advocates point out that the First Amendment protects even hate speech, as the attorney Ken White recently observed , they are often met with extreme hypotheticals. For example: “So, the day that Nazis march in the streets, armed, carrying the swastika flag, Sieg-Heiling, calling out abuse of Jews and blacks, some of their number assaulting and even killing people, you'll still d
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The Atlantic

Can Anything Stop Rural Decline? TOCHIKUBO, Japan—The children had moved to the big city, never to return. So their parents, both over 70, live out their days in this small town in the mountains, gazing at the rice paddies below, wondering what will become of the house they built, the garden they tended, the town they love. “I don’t expect them to come back,” Kensaku Fueki, 73, told me, about his three daughters, all married and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study calculates how much poo increases crop growth and reduces pollutionThe old saying 'waste not, want not' applies to many situations in life, but maybe unexpectedly, it's also pertinent when we're talking about poo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat waves scorch unsuspecting citiesEvery summer, residents of the desert Southwest brace for extreme heat. But this year, heat waves have impacted areas from Seattle to Slovenia that are unaccustomed to dealing with uncommonly high temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian children's nutrition suffers during school hoursCanadian children don't eat enough vegetables, fruit and dairy products during school hours, causing them to fall short of several daily dietary recommendations on school days, a new UBC study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than 99 percent of the microbes inside us are unknown to scienceA survey of DNA fragments circulating in the blood suggests the microbes living within us are vastly more diverse than previously known. In fact, 99 percent of that DNA has never been seen before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When 'man's best friend' feels more hate than love for an ownerEveryone thinks that dogs worship their owners – viewing them as gods of some sort. While that may be true in the majority of cases, it isn't always so. As a veterinarian who has focused on animal behavior and the human/canine bond for 30 years, I can confirm that sometimes, no matter what, a dog and his person just aren't going to get along.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New biological identity of inhaled nanoparticles revealedNano-enabled consumer products surround people every day, from personal care, cosmetics, clothing and electronics, to food and beverage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smashing the avocado production bottleneckA method of supplying 500 times more avocado plants to industry than is currently possible has been invented by University of Queensland researchers.
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Viden

GRAFIK Sådan virker bitcoinFå styr på de grundlæggende ting ved kryptovaluta og bitcoin.
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The Atlantic

The Classic-Rock Ecstasy of The War on Drugs The War on Drugs has one of those band names that isn’t supposed to mean anything. But listen to the Philadelphia band’s wonderful fourth album, A Deeper Understanding, and, you may, in fact, think about drugs—and more specifically, clichés surrounding drugs and rock-and-roll history. Bandleader Adam Granduciel is a student of that history, and his music often poses questions few rock fans may ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are blue whales finding new "microphone channel" to communicate in?For the past two decades, scientists have documented a gradual lowering of the frequency of blue whale calls and they haven't been sure why – or even whether the phenomenon is intentional.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the low-paid and unemployed lack an adequate income for a healthy lifeThe Newstart Allowance received by people looking for work falls well below the minimum income required to achieve a basic standard of living, UNSW research has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A more complete picture of the nano worldThey may be tiny and invisible, says Xiaoji Xu, but the aerosol particles suspended in gases play a role in cloud formation and environmental pollution and can be detrimental to human health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clear it – but will they come? Native plants need re-seeding after rhododendron removal, study findsNative plants need a helping hand if they are to recover from invasive rhododendron, Scottish ecologists have discovered. A new study in the Journal of Applied Ecology reveals that – even at sites cleared of rhododendron 30 years ago – much native flora has still not returned. As a result, rhododendron eradication programmes may need to be supplemented by reseeding for the original plant community
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Futurity.org

App keeps ‘shoulder surfers’ from spying your password Researchers have created a smartphone application to combat “shoulder-surfing”—when someone else looks over your shoulder as you enter your phone’s password or other private digits, potentially even gleaning vital financial or personal information. Every ATM or smartphone user can attest to the discomfort of having a stranger standing close enough to observe a financial transaction—and potentiall
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Brand New PyjamasAs it matures, this chromatophore-clad pyjama squid (Sepioloidea lineolata) hatchling will learn to use the color-changing cells that adorn its body to alter its appearance.
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Ingeniøren

Transportministeren vil udvide 51 kilometer østjysk motorvejVVM-undersøgelser af udvidelse på strækningerne mellem Hornstrup og Skanderborg Syd samt Aarhus Syd og Aarhus Nord får afsat 48 millioner kroner i regeringens finanslovsudspil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study links an individual's psychological basis for enforcing group hierarchies to national indicatorsIt's a question that social scientists have struggled with for years: Why do some groups enjoy privileged status in a society while others are left behind?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Megamovie video captures eclipse coast-to-coastLast evening, the Eclipse Megamovie project posted a preview of the photos of the total solar eclipse submitted by a cast of some 1,500 volunteers spread out along the path of totality.
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The Atlantic

'Link in Bio' Keeps Instagram Nice If you use Instagram, you have seen an exhortation from a friend or colleague to check out some article or event. These calls to action inevitably end, “Link in Bio.” That’s shorthand, of course, for the single link that Instagram allows users to drop into their profiles. Because other links can’t be added to posts, that single link is an endorsement: It must be the one URL in the world that you
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Dagens Medicin

England vil rekruttere markant flere udenlandske praksis lægerNHS England vil udvide et internationalt rekrutteringsprogram og nu rekruttere hele 2.000 udenlandske praksis læger.
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Futurity.org

DNA ‘signposts’ direct gene shutoff in plants Biologists have identified small sequences in plant DNA that act as “signposts” for shutting off gene activity, directing the placement of proteins that silence gene expression. Manipulating these short DNA fragments offers the potential to grow plants with enhanced activation of certain traits, such as fruiting or seed production. The finding may also have implications for understanding gene reg
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Viden

Prisen på bitcoin eksplodererRigtig valuta eller blot en lottokupon? Værdien af de virtuelle bitcoins er eksploderet. Og en 14-årig amerikaner er blevet millionær på internetpengene.
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The 7 Best Sci-Fi Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From 'E.T.' to 'Ex Machina'Looking to stream some of the best sci-fi movies around? This list has got you covered. Settle in for some aliens and androids.
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Feed: All Latest

Twitter Has Great Ideas For Movies—Will Hollywood Listen?Can a viral fancasting phenomenon realistically change the industry’s status quo?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers outline a new way to define and classify how groups of animals hunt togetherAnimals as different as lions, piranha, killer whales and ants have something in common: they have all evolved the ability to hunt in groups. Group hunting is one of the most fascinating behaviours in the animal kingdom, with an enormous diversity of different behaviours that animals use to capture prey. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell have realized that strat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Return of the sun at Antarctica's Concordia research stationFor some, the sun disappeared behind the moon in yesterday's eclipse for a few minutes, but the 13 people living in Antarctica's Concordia research station had to cope without sunlight for much longer. This sunset picture is beautiful on its own, but imagine if you hadn't seen the sun in over four months.
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New Scientist - News

Exclusive: We may have detected a new kind of gravitational waveRumours are swirling of a new kind of gravitational wave, created by colliding neutrons stars, rather than black holes. Now Hubble has joined the hunt
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Science-Based Medicine

The Promise of CRISPRCRISPR is the latest rock-star medical technology that promises to revolutionize medicine. Let's take a look at the hype and the reality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study showsThe vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef - regarded as climate change refuges – has been highlighted in a new study.
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Science | The Guardian

Bridget Allchin obituaryPrehistorian and expert in South Asian archaeology who blazed a trail for women in the field and whose publications stretched from Afghanistan to Sri Lanka The prehistorian Bridget Allchin, who has died aged 90, was one of the first women to establish herself as a field expert in the male-dominated discipline of South Asian archaeology. She played a leading role in launching the intensive field-wa
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Gizmodo

Amazon's Most Popular Miter Saw Is Down To $100 For the First Time. Just Don't Lose a Finger. Hitachi 15A 10" Miter Saw , $100 I freely admit that not everybody needs a miter saw. In fact, most people probably shouldn’t own one. But if you’re in the market, Amazon’s top seller is marked down to $100 today in Amazon’s Gold Box, the lowest price ever. In addition to the #1 seller designation, the Hitachi C10FCH2 also carries a 4.5 star review average from over 1,500 customers, so there
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The toes tell the taleThough modern horses now have a single toe, their earliest ancestors had three on their front legs, and four on the back. Harvard scientists are shedding new light on what drove those changes, and in a new study show that the dual pressures of increasing body weight and shrinking side toes prompted early horses' middle toes to become dramatically stronger and better able to resist forces.
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Gizmodo

White Supremacists Celebrate President Trump's Rally in Phoenix (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) President Trump held a rally on Tuesday night in Phoenix, whipping the crowd into a frenzy and denouncing the media between chants of “lock her up.” Trump even said the word “Antifa” for the first time in public, a reference to the anti-fascist groups that have formed to fight against neo-Nazis and Nazi sympathizers. And there was one group that got his message loud and cl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticle ink produces glowing holograms with simple inkjet printerResearchers at ITMO University unveiled a new approach for printing luminescent structures based on nanoparticle ink. The unique optical properties of the ink were achieved by means of europium-doped zirconia. Particles of this material have proven to be useful for manufacturing glowing holographic coatings with a high degree of protection. Importantly, the new approach enables the fabrication of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover how fish recognise toxic preyPredator animals have long been known to avoid devouring brightly coloured and patterned prey, and now an international study has revealed more about how they recognise toxic species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How continents were recycledPlate tectonics shape the Earth's dynamic surface. But when did these dynamics first emerge? And will the present-day continents last forever?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds hydrate gun hypothesis unlikelyClathrate (hydrate) gun hypothesis stirred quite the controversy when it was posed in 2003. It stated that methane hydrates—frozen water cages containing methane gas found below the ocean floor—can melt due to increasing ocean temperatures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create magnetic RAMMIPT researchers teamed up with collaborators for a successful demonstration of magnetoelectric random access memory (MELRAM). A transition to magnetoelectric memory could enable substantial energy savings, as well as the instantaneous startup of devices. Their paper was published in Applied Physics Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolving perspectives on abrupt seasonal changes of the general circulationIt is not unusual that two similar scientific ideas on a particular phenomenon may echo each other across a long time span, unknown to the authors. Such an unintentional duet over history illustrates the amazing beauty of science by clearly showing that progress is not necessarily a linear process, but it is often accumulative.
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The Atlantic

UVA's Troubling Past Just 10 days after violent clashes tore across Charlottesville, Virginia, college students there headed to their first day of classes of the fall semester. Many of the University of Virginia’s nearly 17,000 undergraduates arrived with a purpose: to recover their school from white supremacists who had put a national spotlight on their town. This recovery has been described in terms of reclamation:
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Seeing one picture at a time helps kids learn words from booksA small study found that children were better able to pick up vocabulary from books that show only one picture at a time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Saturn-lit TethysCassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Do Kids Have a Fundamental Sense of Fairness?Experiments show that this quality often emerges by the age of 12 months -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

When is the next solar eclipse near you?Find out when you can next witness a solar eclipse in your country with our eclipse calculator.
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Feed: All Latest

This Vegan Vlogger Harassment Scandal Exposes YouNow's Ugly UnderbellyThe Vegan Cheetah is a YouNow vlogger who revels in being a bully. Now, one of his harassment targets is taking him to court.
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Feed: All Latest

To Protect Genetic Privacy, Encrypt Your DNASharing your DNA with science could help cure disease. But once it's out there, you can't get it back. Encryption can at least keep it safe.
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Feed: All Latest

One-Time Allies Sour on Joining Trump Tech TeamObama welcomed a new generation of techies to the White House. Now, some fear such gains may be erased under Trump.
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Feed: All Latest

Amazon Mechanical Turk Workers Have Had EnoughWorkers on Amazon Mechanical Turk have long felt ignored and underpaid. A new platform hopes to give them a better home—and could change the future of crowd work.
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Science | The Guardian

Be your own therapist? Fine – if you’re up to the job | Mark BrownSelf-help can be brilliant for those who are at least part of the way there, but we should be wary of any suggestion that it could replace therapy Feeling that you are not coping is horrible, like trying to untangle shackles around you that instead pull tighter with every movement. We are supposed to be able to look after ourselves. Our culture lionises fighters; decision takers; people who know t
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Feed: All Latest

The Cloud Computing Era Could Be Nearing Its EndCloud computing's big, distant data centers can't support VR and self-driving cars—but "edge computing" can.
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New Scientist - News

Magic mushroom chemical may be a hallucinogenic insect repellentThese fungi influence our brains by producing a compound called psilocybin, but the origin of this chemical may have little to do with discovering fundamental truth
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New Scientist - News

First underwater entanglement could lead to unhackable commsA Chinese experiment suggests submarines could use quantum communication to send messages secured by the laws of physics
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Feed: All Latest

How Facebook, Apple, and Google Will Hasten the Next Era of TVFacebook, Apple, and Google are about to steal Hollywood's mojo.
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Feed: All Latest

Wolfram Alpha's Creator Runs a Summer Camp, TooA Gen Z-er spends 12 days at camp learning from the creator of Wolfram Alpha and 42 future billionaires.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Is the Power Grid Getting More Vulnerable to Cyber Attacks?Rising computerization opens doors for increasingly aggressive adversaries, but defenses are better than many might think -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Anders Beich foreslår patienter at flytte for at få førtidspension Praktiserende læge Anders Beich føler sig magtesløs, når han vurderer patienter til førtidspension, mens kommunen mener noget andet. Nu opfordrer han patienterne til at flytte kommune.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny fødselstrend kan gøre mere skade end gavnDanske læger og forskere maner til besindighed angående vaginal seeding i forbindelse med kejsersnit, viser ny kommentarartikel.
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Science | The Guardian

Why are we constantly thinking? The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Why are we constantly thinking? Why is it so difficult to stop ? Anthony Davies, Burton upon Trent Continue reading...
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Viden

Skrottede apparater fejler intetTest af apparater fra genbrugspladsernes elektronik-kirkegårde bestyrker miljøforskeres mistanke: Vi kyler masser af ting ud, som stadig fungerer fint.
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Ingeniøren

Forskere skaber diamantregn i laboratorietI flere årtier har der været diskuteret, hvorvidt iskæmperne Neptun og Uranus kunne have naturligt forekommende diamantregn. Forskere har nu forsøgt at genskabe forholdene og har succesfuldt skabt små diamanter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Best ever image of a star's surface and atmosphereUsing ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer astronomers have constructed the most detailed image ever of a star -- the red supergiant star Antares. They have also made the first map of the velocities of material in the atmosphere of a star other than the sun, revealing unexpected turbulence in Antares's huge extended atmosphere. The results were published in the journal Nature.
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New Scientist - News

Wiping out a population of animals might help the speciesMass deaths might not be all bad, because local die-offs could help to ensure the survival of the species as a whole
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The Atlantic

How Therapy Can Cure Overeating Melissa Rivera always turned off the cameras before she binged. Newly married to a husband who traveled frequently, the 23-year-old med student, who had recently moved six hours from her friends and family, comforted herself with food. “I’d get this whole pizza that I would eat myself,” she says. Each time, she turned off the house’s security system so her husband wouldn’t see the coping mechanis
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Ingeniøren

Minister og vindmølleindustri i bitter talkrigStriden handler om beregningerne bag regeringens forslag til en overgangsordning for støtte til landvind i 2018 og 2019.
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Dagens Medicin

Nær sammenhæng i sundhedshus skaber mening for patienter og fagpersoner Det er et godt for patienten med flere sundhedsfagligheder på samme sted, mener praktiserende læge Søren Olsson, der har klinik i Sundheds- og Kvartershuset i Aalborg Øst.
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Ingeniøren

Tilskud til sol og vind i USA betaler sig: Færre dødsfald og lavere sundhedsudgifterNy analyse viser, at amerikanernes tilskud til energiproduktion med sol og vind er en rigtig god forretning, hvis der ses på sundhed og miljø. Men det kunne være endnu bedre, hvis tilskuddet blev tilpasset de enkelte stater.
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Live Science

Stunning Photo Shows Total Solar Eclipse's March Across Oregon SkyA newly released composite photo of the total solar eclipse shows the entire celestial event as it unfolded over Oregon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research finds deep evolutionary origins of a unique mammalian anatomical patternBy performing detailed dissections and corresponding examinations of embryological development, researchers at Midwestern University, led by Margaret Hall, Ph.D. and Jeffrey Plochocki, Ph.D., show that the muscles that control the unique mammalian perineal structures follow a surprisingly ancient pattern.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fatal attractions for disease-carrying mosquitoesISCA Technologies, a California-based biotech firm, is working on several innovations to stop outbreaks of malaria-spreading mosquitos before they occur by using pheromones and other naturally occurring attractants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' revealsThe world's shortest race by distance -- a fraction of the width of a human hair -- was a huge success for scientists working at the nanoscale. It spurred interest in molecular machines and led to a surprising new discovery, reports the team that entered a nano-sized 'monster truck.' The researchers present their nanocar at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spinning plant waste into carbon fiber for cars, planesUsing plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin. That leftover lignin isn't good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potionMosquitoes have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method whereby the pests gorge themselves on insecticides laced with a concoction that mimics the sweet-smelling scents and aromas that they find irresistible. It could bolster efforts to suppress malaria, Zika and other mosquito-borne disea
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Dagens Medicin

Fire yngre læger fristes af at starte praksis i hjemkommune Et nyt sundhedshus i det gamle Fredericia Sygehus frister en gruppe af fire-fem yngre læger med rødder i Fredericia Kommune. Fredericia Kommune og Region Syddanmark står klar med så meget støtte som muligt, for at det kan lykkes.
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The Atlantic

FDR's Message to Charlottesville—and to Donald Trump Last week, “Charlottesville” became shorthand for racism, violence and a president’s moral blindness. But for a long time, the college town was remembered for a very different moment, when a president facing fascist aggression showed moral clarity. The last time the world paid so much attention to Charlottesville, it was the summer of 1940, and Europe was on fire. In a few short months Hitler had
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The Atlantic

A Prehistoric Toothless Dolphin That Ate by Vacuuming Up Squid The skull came from the Wando River, which today runs past Charleston, South Carolina to the ocean. Thirty million years ago, it was all under the sea. Ancient dolphins and whales swam over what would become Charleston's cobblestone streets. For millions of years, megalodons also swam in this sea, leaving behind shark teeth bigger than your hand. And it was divers looking for megalodon teeth who
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Ingeniøren

DMI: Klimaatlas skal kunne forudsige ekstremt vejrI sidste uge annoncerede regeringen, at DMI skal udvikle et klimaatlas. Værktøjet skal ifølge DMI udgøre det samlede, centrale datasæt for klimatilpasning. Om projektet kan leve op til forhåbningerne er endnu uvist, men der er enighed om behovet.
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Ingeniøren

Energi, forsyning og miljø: Flere store firmaer søger ingeniører Der er behov for ingeniører inden for byggeri og anlæg, stærkstrøm, maskiner, produktion og projektledelse m.m. Find jobbet for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/energi-forsyning-miljoe-flere-store-firmaer-soeger-ingenioerer-9580 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Live Science

Dazzling Lightning Flashes Captured in Solar Eclipse's ShadowLighting from a storm on Aug. 21 is visible within the eclipse's shadow over North America.
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Science : NPR

Los Angeles Tests Whether Lighter Color Streets Will Lower The Temperature Los Angeles is piloting a project called "Cool Pavement." The city is putting a light grey coating on top of some neighborhood streets in an effort to lower the air temperature.
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Science : NPR

The Battle Over Oil And Gas Development In Colorado A deadly home explosion in Colorado is renewing fights over how close oil and gas development should be to expanding suburbs. One town is trying to figure out for itself how close is too close.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

17.6 million Americans live close to active oil or gas wellsAn estimated 17.6 million Americans live within one mile of an active oil or gas well, according to a study published today (August 23), in Environmental Health Perspectives, a peer-reviewed journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study, by researchers at PSE Healthy Energy, a nonprofit research institute; the University of California, Berkeley; and Harvey
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The Atlantic

Striking an Impossible Balance in Turkey ANKARA—Before Jim Mattis, the U.S. defense secretary, set off on a trip to strengthen ties with America’s allies in the Middle East and Europe, the Pentagon released a statement saying he would “look for ways to help Turkey address its legitimate security concerns,” including the fight against the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), an outlawed terrorist organization that Turkish officials view as th
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The Atlantic

The Awkward, Necessary U.S.-Turkey Relationship Secretary of Defense James Mattis has a difficult task ahead. In a visit to Turkey Wednesday, he will step into the thicket of competing interests that characterizes one of America's most important military partnerships. At the center of the difficulty is American efforts in Syria, which rely fundamentally on a collection of local forces among whom are actors Turkey considers terrorists. The Trum
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Ingeniøren

Nyt initiativ vil nedbryde data-muren mellem sundheds-it-systemer Alexandra Instituttet vil sammen med to private spillere skabe prototype til bedre udveksling af sundhedsdata mellem regioner og kommuner. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/prototype-med-mikrotjenester-skal-give-bedre-adgang-sundhedsdata-1079314 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Rambøll-direktør: Projektarbejde opfylder de unges krav om indflydelseLysten til at sætte sin faglighed i spil er det væsentligste karaktertræk hos de nyuddannede ingeniører hos Rambøll. De unge vil tages med på råd, og det lægger projektorganisationen automatisk op til, mener adm.dir. Ib Enevoldsen.
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New Scientist - News

‘Alien megastructure’ star may host Saturn-like exoplanetRather than being caused by extraterrestrial construction, the bizarre dimming of Tabby’s star could instead be due to a closely orbiting, ringed planet
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Science | The Guardian

This merger would threaten food supplies around the world. Who will stop it? | Hannah LownsbroughIf the Bayer-Monsanto merger is approved, the concentration of agricultural control could have major consequences for farming families and communities • Hannah Lownsbrough is executive director of consumer group SumOfUs It’s the worst corporate merger you’ve probably never heard of, and one that could spell disaster for our global farming system. Bayer recently started the clock for the European U
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Dagens Medicin

Region Midtjylland gentager lægevagt-kampagneRegion Midtjylland gentager succesen med en lægevagt-kampagne, der skal få regionen borgerne til at bruge deres egen læge frem for lægevagten til ikke-akutte henvendelser.
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Dagens Medicin

Sjællandske sygehuse er klar til Sundhedsplatformen Sygehuse og psykiatrien i Region Sjælland har vurderet deres parathed i forhold til at tage Sundhedsplatformen i brug. Vi er parate, lyder svaret.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart dives into voice-activated shopping with GoogleWalmart is diving into voice-activated shopping. But unlike online leader Amazon, it's not doing it alone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ExxonMobil 'double speak' on climate laid bareExxonMobil knowingly misled the public for decades about the danger climate change poses to a warming world and the company's long-term viability, according to a peer-reviewed study, released on Wednesday, of research and statements by the US oil giant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming Arctic spurs battles for riches, shipping routesFrom a distance, the northern shores of Baffin Island in the Arctic appear barren—a craggy world of snow-capped peaks and glaciers surrounded by a sea of floating ice even in the midst of summer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toothless, dwarf dolphin, a case study in evolutionScientists on Wednesday unveiled an extinct species of toothless, whiskered and objectively cute mini-dolphin that plied Earth's oceans some 30 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automated safety systems are preventing car crashesSafety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to significantly reduce crashes, according to two studies released Wednesday.
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Ingeniøren

Letvægtsrobot til 40.000 kroner begejstrer dansk robotforskerRettet: En London-baseret iværksættervirksomhed er på vej med en letvægtsrobot, der vejer otte kg og koster under en tredjedel af de billigste robotarme fra Universal Robots. Dansk professor er begejstret og ser det som et tegn på, at robotteknologi er på vej ned under den magiske 50.000 kroners-...
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Science | The Guardian

Being human in the age of artificial intelligence - Science Weekly podcast Ian Sample speaks with Prof Max Tegmark about the advance of AI, the future of life on Earth, and what happens if and when a ‘superintelligence’ arrives Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 2014, a new research and outreach organisation was born in Boston. Calling itself The Future of Life Institute , its fou
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Being human in the age of artificial intelligence - Science Weekly podcastIan Sample speaks with Prof Max Tegmark about the advance of AI, the future of life on Earth, and what happens if and when a ‘superintelligence’ arrives
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Ingeniøren

Sådan scraper du data og tekst fra websider Det er nemt at hive data og tekst ud af websider. Her bruger vi Java-biblioteket Jsoup sammen med Chrome-browseren. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/vi-scraper-med-jsoup-chrome-selectors-1079279 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Sikkerhedsfirma: Robotter er for nemme at hacke til fysiske angreb Robotter fra blandt andet Universal Robots er blevet kritiseret for at være for nemme at hacke til fysiske angreb eller til overvågning, mener sikkerhedsvirksomhed. Se video med en nuttet robot, som dolker en tomat. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedsfirma-robotter-nemme-at-hacke-fysiske-angreb-1079323 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Københavns Politi: »Dna-match mellem torso og Kim Wall«Den torso, som mandag aften blev fundet ved Amager, tilhører ifølge Københavns Politi den forsvundne journalist Kim Wall.
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Science | The Guardian

Baby boomers' drink and drug misuse needs urgent action, warn experts By 2020, the number of over-50s receiving treatment for substance misuse problems is expected to double in Europe and treble in the US, say researchers Urgent action is needed to tackle drink and drug misuse among baby boomers, experts have warned, with a growing body of data from around the world suggesting that substance misuse is increasing among those in their mid-50s and older. The call foll
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancerNew technology being developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Sunnybrook Research Institute is using artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

17.6 million Americans live close to active oil and gas (and fracking) wellsAn estimated 17.6 million Americans live within one mile of an active oil or gas well, according to a study published today in Environmental Health Perspectives, a peer-reviewed journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study, by researchers at PSE Healthy Energy, a nonprofit research institute, is the first peer-reviewed nationwide measurement of the number
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Gizmodo

Maybe Leave Dogs Out of This Anti-Vaccine Nonsense Photo: AP Vaccines are good. Dogs are good—in fact, very very good, aren’t you girl? Unfortunately, some bad owners who have bought into scientifically unsupported anti-vaccine propaganda have begun choosing not to vaccinate their dogs, fearing that choosing to properly inoculate their canines will give them dog autism, the Daily Beast reported . Dog autism, of course, is not really a thing. “We
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New on MIT Technology Review

Sickle-Cell Patients See Hope in CRISPRThe disease may be among the first to be treated with the novel gene-editing tool.
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Ingeniøren

Raketmadsens Støtteforening vil opløse sig selv: Drømmen er bristetBestyrelsen indkalder til ekstraordinær generalforsamling med henblik på at lukke foreningen. Det sker efter en melding fra Raketmadsens Rumlaboratorium, der overvejer fremtiden.
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Ingeniøren

Få flere venner på jobbet – det styrker virksomheden Gevinsten ved et fremragende arbejdsmiljø er tydelig for de fleste. Men hvordan skaber firmaer rammer, der afføder venskabelige kolleger og toppræstationer? https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/faa-flere-venner-paa-jobbet-styrker-firmaet-9559 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo

DJI Will Turn Off Your Spark Drone if You Don't Update Firmware by September 1st Photo: AP Chinese manufacturer DJI has announced that owners of its Spark drone have until September 1st to update their firmware to the latest version or be totally locked out. Per Quartz , the decision to essentially hold users’ devices hostage came after reports of the drones randomly falling out of the sky, which users think was due to an issue with Spark’s battery firmware. In a press releas
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Gizmodo

Time & Vine Is a Magical Comic About Teachers Drinking Wine Because Life Is Hard Image: IDW If you spend enough time in the American school system (doesn’t matter whether it’s public, private, or otherwise), you’re bound to meet or at least hear about that teacher. You know, the one everyone suspects of slipping more than a little booze into their coffee as they make their way into the classroom? Most stories about these teachers are just that, stories and rumors dreamed up b
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Live Science

Facts About IronProperties, sources and uses of the element iron.
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Live Science

Depression: Causes, Symptoms and TreatmentsWhat's behind perpetually lousy moods.
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Live Science

The Maya: History, Culture & ReligionThe Maya civilization stretched throughout Central America and reached its peak during the first millennium A.D.
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Ars Technica

Feds drop demand for 1.3 million IP addresses that visited anti-Trump site Enlarge / Police officers wearing tactical gear form a barrier with riot shields to prevent the movement of protestors after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States on January 20, 2017 in Washington D.C. Hundreds of thousands of people combined to celebrate and protest. (credit: Mark Makela/Getty Images) The US Department of Justice is backing down on its reque
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Gizmodo

Finally, Lamborghini Has Made a Phone Exclusively for Assholes Image: Screengrab via Tonino Lamborghini Here’s the perfect gift for the special someone in your life who can’t afford a Lamborghini, but likes to dress and accessorize like they can: a $2,450 “Alpha-One” premium smartphone. Per the Verge , this ridiculous money-hole-posing-as-a-phone clocks in with “the most luxurious technology”—roughly similar specifications to a high-end smartphone that costs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supermarkets could trick you into buying fewer caloriesSupermarkets could help their customers consume fewer calories by making small changes to the recipes of own-brand food products to reduce the calories contained in the product, without notifying consumers explicitly, according to a study published in the open-access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. So-called 'silent' product reformulation may be a promising str
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Nice Eclipse Photo, Though It Surely Falls Short of the Real ThingThe light and dark created when the moon blocks the sun create great confusion for human vision — and for the machines we make.
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Gizmodo

Our Cup Runneth Over With the Best Insulated Tumblers Left to right: MiiR 16 , Corkcicle Waterman 16 , Takeya 20 , Camelbak 20 , Otterbox 20 , Pelican 22 We talk a lot about poorly-supported product categories around here, but the insulated tumbler market is definitely not one of them. The sheer number of entries into the insulated drinking vessel space was a running joke at Outdoor Retailer this year, so today we’re going to try to make sense of yo
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Ars Technica

Bethesda’s big VR games now have release dates, and they’re all in 2017 Nice box art. (credit: id Software) Bethesda had previously announced that it would release not one, not two, but three VR versions of its biggest franchises by the end of this year. Rather than disappoint headset hopefuls with a last-minute delay, the company has gone ahead and announced firm release dates for all three. Mark your calendars, real or virtual: Doom VFR will land on both the HTC Vi
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Battle Plans What We’re Following Afghanistan Strategy: President Trump unveiled his plan to extend the war in Afghanistan without a timeline for withdrawing U.S. troops. (Read his complete address here .) The plan departs from Trump’s previous calls to withdraw from the war , but as James Fallows writes, it’s remarkably similar to the strategies offered by his predecessors . It also doesn’t include a clear d
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Ars Technica

Another staged body cam leads to 43 more dropped Baltimore prosecutions Enlarge (credit: carlballou/Getty Images ) A Baltimore Police Department officer has "self-reported" a staged body cam video. This brings the number of fabricated body cam videos rocking the agency to at least three. In this most recent instance alone, 43 cases are being dropped or not prosecuted, the state's top prosecutor, Marilyn Mosby, said. In all, more than 100 cases have been dropped or wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wild sheep grazed in the Black Desert 14,500 years agoExcavations of architecture and associated deposits left by hunter-gatherers in the Black Desert in eastern Jordan have revealed bones from wild sheep -- a species previously not identified in this area in the Late Pleistocene. According to the team of University of Copenhagen archaeologists, who led the excavations, the discovery is further evidence that the region often seen as a 'marginal zone'
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Gizmodo

Why Energy Companies Are Accusing Greenpeace of Breaking Organized Crime Laws Photo: Getty Operators of the Dakota Access Pipeline filed a lawsuit against the environmental activist group Greenpeace on Tuesday that accuses the group of violating federal racketeering laws. The suit outlines sweeping claims of collusion between Greenpeace and numerous other organizations and individuals. It paints a picture that wouldn’t be out of place in an Alex Jones fever dream. In a 187
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wild sheep grazed in the Black Desert 14,500 years agoExcavations of architecture and associated deposits left by hunter-gatherers in the Black Desert in eastern Jordan have revealed bones from wild sheep - a species previously not identified in this area in the Late Pleistocene. According to the team of University of Copenhagen archaeologists, who led the excavations, the discovery is further evidence that the region often seen as a 'marginal zone'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Updated analysis finds newer type of LDL-C reducing drugs still not cost-effectiveAn updated analysis of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering drugs, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, finds they are not cost-effective at current prices and that even greater price reductions than previously estimated may be needed to meet cost-effectiveness thresholds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medicaid patients continue high prescription opioid use after overdoseDespite receiving medical attention for an overdose, patients in Pennsylvania Medicaid continued to have persistently high prescription opioid use, with only slight increases in use of medication-assisted treatment
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Futurity.org

Do ‘food words’ offer a new way to predict obesity? Reduced activity in the brain’s “self-regulation” system may be an important early predictor of adult obesity, according to a small study. Researchers used functional MRI scans on 36 teenagers to measure neural responses to food cues. Participants who were lean but considered at increased risk for adult obesity because of family history had less neural activity in the brain’s self-regulation and
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Gizmodo

Bizarre Toothless Dwarf Dolphins Once Sucked Squid Off the Ancient Seafloor Artist’s depiction of Inermorostrum xenops, an extinct toothless dwarf dolphin species. (Robert W. Boessenecker) Scientists have uncovered the fossilized remains of an unusual species of dolphin that lived 30 million years ago in what is now South Carolina. These extinct aquatic mammals measured just three feet in length, they featured short snouts, and perhaps strangest of all, they had no teeth
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Gizmodo

Everything We Know Right Now About The Destroyer Collision In The Strait Of Malacca For the second time in just over two months, a U.S. Navy destroyer collided with a merchant ship in the Pacific region, resulting in casualties. The USS John S. McCain and the tanker Alnic MC collided in the early morning hours of August 21 east of the Strait of Malacca and not far from Singapore. How did this happen? More importantly, how does it keep happening? Here’s what we can assess so far.
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Opposing Coaches And Players Console Little League Pitcher After Walk-Off | Jezebel Designe Deadspin Opposing Coaches And Players Console Little League Pitcher After Walk-Off | Jezebel Designer Brands Want Nothing to Do With Bargain-Bin Louise Linton | Splinter The Charged, Complicated Racial Dynamics of Cardi B’s ‘Bodak Yellow’ Video | The Root Hillary Is Not Your White Savior |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Steroids not effective for chest infections in non-asthmatic adultsOral steroids should not be used for treating acute lower respiratory tract infection (or 'chest infections') in adults who don't have asthma or other chronic lung disease, as they do not reduce the duration or severity of symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with autism spectrum disorder show neural responses of anxiety on seeing social touchPeople with strong signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show neural signs of anxiety when they see social touch and report unpleasant feelings about social touch by comparison to people with weak signs of ASD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blue light emitted by screens damages our sleep, study suggestsThe short-wavelength blue light, emitted by the screens we watch, damages the duration, and even more so, the quality of our sleep. The study also found that watching screens that emit red light does not cause damage, and sleep after exposure to it was similar to normal sleep.
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Feed: All Latest

Don't Watch This New 'Blade Runner 2049' TrailerSeriously. Skip it. You can thank us later for this dynamite piece of advice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover a deadly 'addiction' in esophageal cancerScientists have discovered a new way of attacking esophageal cancer cells that could make use of an existing drug in a new approach to treatment. Their study discovered a genetic weakness or 'Achilles' heel' in esophageal cancer cells that makes them particularly sensitive to a drug called ibrutinib which is already used to treat blood cancer.
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Gizmodo

Breitbart's Editor-in-Chief Was Tricked by an Absurdly Fake Steve Bannon Email Account Photo: Getty Using a very fake Steve Bannon email account, an email prankster has apparently tricked the editor of far-right news site Breitbart.com into providing a bizarre peek into his disturbing id. The UK-based prankster, who goes by the handle @SINON_REBORN, previously fooled White House staffers into arguing with fake versions of their coworkers by imitating their names with phony email ad
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Feed: All Latest

Verizon's New 'Unlimited' Data Plan Compared to Other CarriersNow that Verizon has changed its unlimited data plan, it's time to see how everyone's all-you-can-eat plan stacks up.
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Science : NPR

Dakota Access Pipeline Owner Sues Greenpeace For 'Criminal Activity' Energy Transfer Partners alleges Greenpeace and other "eco-terrorist groups" tried to block its pipeline with "campaigns of misinformation." Greenpeace says the suit is a bid to "silence free speech." (Image credit: Michael Buholzer/AFP/Getty Images)
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Live Science

The Solar Eclipse Had a Spooky Effect on NatureFrom flowers that closed prematurely to hundreds of thousands of farmed salmon on the loose, the eclipse had a strange impact on nature yesterday.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Rallying Arizona Today in 5 Lines President Trump will hold a campaign rally in Phoenix, Arizona, at 7 p.m. MT. Navy Commander Admiral Scott H. Swift said divers have found remains of some of the 10 missing U.S. sailors from the USS John S. McCain, the Navy warship that collided with an oil tanker on Monday. The Treasury Department sanctioned 16 Chinese and Russian individuals and entities for allegedly aiding No
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Gizmodo

Justice Department Drops Request for IP Addresses of 1.3 Million Visitors to Anti-Trump Site Photo: Getty The US Department of Justice is rescinding its request for IP logs that would have revealed visitors to a website used to plan a protest during Donald Trump’s inauguration. DreamHost , the web hosting provider that was hit with the request, has been fighting back against what it characterized as an over-broad warrant that would have forced the company to hand over “ all information a
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Science : NPR

Scientists Hope To Farm The Biofuel Of The Future In The Pacific Ocean International research labs are using seaweed to make biofuel, but little progress has been made in the U.S. Now scientists in California are developing a prototype to enable vast open-ocean farming. (Image credit: Courtesy of David Ginsburg/Wrigley Institute)
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Ars Technica

How the feds stopped a Porsche-driving trademark fraudster Enlarge (credit: eightfivezero ) The mastermind of a years-long fraudulent trademark scam that federal authorities dubbed as " one of the more sophisticated, elaborate, and premeditated operations " they had ever seen has been sentenced to eight years in prison after pleading guilty to fraud. In addition, on Monday, a federal judge in Los Angeles also sentenced Artashes Darbinyan to pay more than
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Feed: All Latest

Follow Eclipse Hunters on the Pilgrimage to TotalityRachel Bujalski documents the people who drove hundreds of miles and countless hours to see the eclipse.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

This Man's Battle Against Leukemia Has A New Weapon: His Own Immune System First In Human | Thursdays at 9p The doctors of Building 10 administer clinical trials decades in the making. But they claim it's the patients who are the real heroes in this scenario. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/first-in-human/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook
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The Scientist RSS

Diversity Lacking in US Academia: StudySTEM faculties at public universities have an underrepresentation of African Americans, Hispanics, and women, but there are signs of change.
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Live Science

I Used Solar Eclipse Glasses, So Why Do My Eyes Feel Funny?After viewing the solar eclipse yesterday, some watchers reported that their eyes felt funny, even though they wore certified eclipse glasses.
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Gizmodo

Um, You Can Now Buy the Paleo Diet in a Bottle for Babies Screenshot: Serenity Kids The Paleo diet may well turn out to be the fad diet our decade is remembered for—never mind that it probably has very little to do with how our Stone Age ancestors actually ate . Now someone has dressed up the diet and bottled it—literally—so that Paleo dieters everywhere can also feed the paleo diet to their offspring. A company named Serenity Kids plans to launch this
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New on MIT Technology Review

Little Electric Planes Today, Tomorrow ... Slightly Bigger Ones
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Big Think

Who Is the Alt-Right? Researchers Build a Psychological Profile Among other things, researchers found that there are two subgroups of the Alt-Right, but that the more economically motivated members may buy into White Supremacy over time. Read More
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The Atlantic

Trump and the Pakistan Problem “We can no longer be silent about Pakistan’s safe havens for terrorist organizations, the Taliban, and other groups that pose a threat to the region and beyond,” said President Trump in a Monday night speech outlining his new strategy for the war in Afghanistan. With those words, he gave perhaps the strongest public criticism by a U.S. president of Pakistan’s policy in that war, but also echoed a
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Gizmodo

I Don’t Know If This Is the iPhone 8, But I Want It GIF Gif source: Weibo An intriguing video appeared on the Chinese social network Weibo today. It shows a man wearing one rubber glove feeding an Apple-branded device into a machine and then touching the Apple logo with his ungloved index finger. When he does, code scampers across a display at his work station. Is this our first peek at the new TouchID sensor on the iPhone? I don’t know. Do I want
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Ars Technica

New Godzilla movie promises a radically different direction for the original kaiju The first trailer for the anime Godzilla: Monster Planet , coming to you on Netflix later this year. A new Godzilla flick from Toho Studios is always cause for celebration, but Godzilla: Monster Planet is a next-level treat for kaiju and science fiction fans. The first in a planned three-movie anime series, Monster Planet takes the Big G in a bold new direction: the deep future. The tireless fans
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Gizmodo

Rare Mop-Topped Monkey Spotted in Brazil for First Time in Over 80 Years The fifth Beatle, or a bald-faced Vanzolini saki? (Image Courtesy Christina Selby) It’s been 81 years since anyone has seen a Vanzolini’s bald-faced saki in the wild. On a recent expedition to the Juruá River in the Amazon basin, a group of scientists managed to capture the first photographs ever taken of this elusive primate in its natural habitat—and whoa does it ever look weird. As reported in
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Gizmodo

AccuWeather Is Tracking You Even When You Don't Give It Permission [Updated] Photo: Getty AccuWeather sneakily got access to your location data, even when you turn off location access to its app. But after getting called out by a security researcher, the company is going to knock it off. Security researcher Will Strafach discovered that Accuweather’s iOS app partners with a service called Reveal Mobile, which uses an iPhone’s wi-fi connection to track its precise location
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Big Think

Should We Tolerate the Intolerant? Karl Popper's 'paradox of tolerance' has been reemerging, for good reason. Read More
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Big Think

Hallucinations Are More Common Than We Think Once the realm of psychotic disorders, we now know that hallucinations are widespread. Read More
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Ars Technica

Jury awards $417M to woman who says she got cancer from talc in baby powder Enlarge / Bottles of Johnson's baby powder in a London supermarket. (credit: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images) A Los Angeles jury awarded a woman a $417 million verdict yesterday. The jury found that Johnson & Johnson failed to adequately warn users of the cancer risks of the talc in its baby powder. The jury's 9-3 vote to hold J&J liable for not warning Eva Echeverria about cancer risks i
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cognitive science

The Philosophy of Personal Identity - what is it that links your past self to your present and future self? submitted by /u/Smart_by_Design [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR

In Alaska, One Man Fights To Save Oil Fund As Reserves Dry Up For 40 years, Alaska has been putting its oil money into a giant savings account. But now the oil — and the money — are drying up.
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Science : NPR

California's Forests Continue To Die After Years Of Drought California's record drought is officially over. But trees are still dying across the state because they were so badly weakened by years without water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tricking the eye to defeat shoulder surfing attacksResearchers have developed the first application to combat 'shoulder-surfing' of PINS and passwords: a hybrid-image keyboard that appears one way to the close-up user and differently at a distance. The technology blends one image of a keyboard configuration with high spatial frequency and a completely different one with low spatial frequency. Experiments showed it was effective for mobile phones a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mouse model of human immune system inadequate for stem cell studiesA type of mouse widely used to assess how the human immune system responds to transplanted stem cells does not reflect what is likely to occur in patients, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Clear link between heavy vitamin B intake and lung cancerB vitamins are among the most popular supplements on the market in the United States. Some, like B6 and B12, are marketed and sold as products that can boost your energy. But a new study shows that using too much vitamin B6 and B12 dramatically increases lung cancer in men, particularly those who smoke.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-income patients more likely to take blood pressure medication when doctor involves them in conversationLow-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. Low-income black patients were least likely to take their medication when social issues weren't discussed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does a mother's pre-pregnancy weight determine her child's metabolism?The link between a mother's body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy and the metabolic traits of her children is likely mediated by shared genetics and familial lifestyle rather than effects on the fetus during gestation, according to new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Like adults, children show bias in attributing mental states to othersYoung children are more likely to attribute mental states to characters that belong to the same group as them relative to characters that belong to an outside group, according to new findings. The study shows that 5- and 6-year-olds were more likely to describe interactions between two characters in terms of what they were thinking and feeling when the characters had the same gender or geographic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting hold of quantum dot biosensorsHarnessing the nano-tractor-beam like abilities of optical tweezers, researchers have developed an all-silicon nanoantenna to trap individual quantum dots suspended in a microfluidic chamber.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST study suggests frailty makes elderly more likely to die in home firesA new study by NIST shows scientifically for the first time that an individual's ability to respond quickly to a residential fire determines who dies and who gets injured. Home fire deaths, the NIST researchers state, are more likely among those they define as frail populations--persons who are not in robust health and primarily age 65 and older--while nonfatal injuries occur more often in adults
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Popular Science

People who hear voices in their head can also pick up on hidden speech Science The secret to both might lie in how our brains experience the world Psychologists have long wondered why some even psychologically healthy people hear voices. A new study sheds some light on the cause.
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The Scientist RSS

More Than 300,000 Atlantic Salmon Spill into PacificA fish farm blamed the 'exceptionally high tides' resulting from yesterday's solar eclipse for net failure. Authorities have authorized limitless takes of the invaders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-powered paper-based 'SPEDs' may lead to new medical-diagnostic toolsA new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses -- powered only by the user's touch -- and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Firing of neurons changes the cells that insulate themThrough their pattern of firing, neurons influence the behavior of the cells that upon maturation will provide insulation of neuronal axons, according to a new study. The findings suggest the existence of a complex and nuanced interplay between neurons and the non-neuronal cells that support and protect them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suffering exam-result stress? Relieve the strain with one simple piece of adviceAdopting a ‘this too shall pass’ attitude and mentally projecting themselves into the future could help teenagers deal with stressful situations, suggests new research.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What moral decisions should driverless cars make? | Iyad RahwanShould your driverless car kill you if it means saving five pedestrians? In this primer on the social dilemmas of driverless cars, Iyad Rahwan explores how the technology will challenge our morality and explains his work collecting data from real people on the ethical trade-offs we're willing (and not willing) to make.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Thorium-Salt Reactor Has Fired Up for the First Time in Four Decades
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Gizmodo

Add the Complete Cowboy Bebop Series To Your Blu-ray Collection For $22 Cowboy Bebop: The Complete Series , $22 Even if you aren’t usually into anime, it’s worth giving Cowboy Bebop a try for just $22. And if you have seen it, the Blu-ray’s worth it for the extras alone .
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Live Science

On Ray Bradbury's Birthday, Revisit His Rejected Planetarium ScriptMuseum experts criticized Ray Bradbury's rejected planetarium script, written in 1981 for the National Air and Space Museum, for its unscientific and overly poetic language.
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Gizmodo

These Bears Decided to Stop Eating Salmon Thanks to Climate Change Image: Christoph Strässler /Flickr You may be familiar with the Big Buck Hunter bonus level where you pump a few dozen rounds into salmon flopping out of the river while grizzlies look on. This is not an especially good bonus level (I prefer the one with the basketballs or the electric eels), but it would be much worse if you needed to shoot elderberries. The level might need an incredibly boring
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook losing teens to Instagram-Snapchat: forecastFacebook use in the US will slow as teens and young adults opt for smartphone image-sharing services Instagram and Snapchat, according to an eMarketer forecast released on Tuesday.
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Ars Technica

Woman: My Uber driver went wrong way, I said something, he pushed me out Enlarge (credit: Adam Berry / Getty Images News ) A California woman has sued Uber, alleging that her driver pushed her out of the moving car following her demand to be let out when the driver refused to take the most direct route to her destination. The lawsuit—which was filed in Ventura County Superior Court on Monday—is strikingly similar to other lawsuits that have been filed against the comp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-powered paper-based 'SPEDs' may lead to new medical-diagnostic toolsA new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses - powered only by the user's touch - and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand.
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Gizmodo

Remember When Google Tango Seemed Like a Sick Idea? All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo Every time a new platform comes out, the gadget world runs headfirst into a vicious Catch-22: How do you get people to adopt new technology when there isn’t any content, and if there isn’t anyone using the tech, how do you convince developers to make content for that platform? Recently, we’ve seen this situation unfold for VR headsets like the HTC Vive and Oculu
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Science : NPR

The Sugar Story: A Spoonful Of Addiction Makes The Profits Go Up? Americans are facing down a decades-long sugar habit. (Image credit: Al Barry/Three Lions/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tricking the eye to defeat shoulder surfing attacksResearchers have developed the first application to combat 'shoulder-surfing' of PINS and passwords: a hybrid-image keyboard that appears one way to the close-up user and differently at a distance. The technology blends one image of a keyboard configuration with high spatial frequency and a completely different one with low spatial frequency. Experiments showed it was effective for mobile phones a
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Live Science

Does Talcum Powder Cause Ovarian Cancer?Recent court cases have highlighted the possible link between using talcum powder for feminine hygiene, and an increased risk of ovarian cancer. But is the link real?
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Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get a Dell Inspiron Core i7 laptop with 512GB SSD for $579 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we've got a number of new deals to share today. You can get a Dell Inspiron 15 5000 notebook, complete with Core i7 processor, 512GB SSD, and 8GB RAM for just $579. That laptop typically starts at $899, so it's a good price on a great all-purpose machine. Check out the rest of the deals below, too. Ars Technica may earn compensation fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble's twisted galaxyGravity governs the movements of the cosmos. It draws flocks of galaxies together to form small groups and more massive galaxy clusters, and brings duos so close that they begin to tug at one another. This latter scenario can have extreme consequences, with members of interacting pairs of galaxies often being dramatically distorted, torn apart, or driven to smash into one another, abandoning their
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saturn-lit TethysCassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Large asteroid to safely pass Earth on Sept. 1Asteroid Florence, a large near-Earth asteroid, will pass safely by Earth on Sept. 1, 2017, at a distance of about 4.4 million miles, (7.0 million kilometers, or about 18 Earth-Moon distances).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brown dwarf weather forecasts improvedDim objects called brown dwarfs, less massive than the Sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds -- specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. Scientists recently realized these giant clouds can move and thicken or thin surprisingly rapidly, in less than an Earth day, but did not understand why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence predicts dementia before onset of symptomsImagine if doctors could determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. Such prognostic capabilities would give patients and their families time to plan and manage treatment and care. Thanks to artificial intelligence research, this kind of predictive power could soon be available to clinicians everywhere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satellite photos reveal gigantic outburst floodsResearchers have studied satellite photographs of Lake Catalina, an ice-dammed lake in East Greenland -- and were truly amazed: Unnoticed by science as well as people living in the area, the lake has been the source of four major outburst floods over the last 50 years -- each representing an astounding mass of energy, equaling up to 240 Hiroshima-bombs, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personifying places can boost travel intentionsPeople who see animals as people and assign human traits to non-human objects are more likely to travel to destinations that are presented as being human-like, according to research. A study has found that writing about a destination as if it were human could boost its appeal as a travel destination.
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NYT > Science

Vows: He Promised Her the Moon and Stars. They Married on Eclipse Day.Kelly Turek and Chris Dutton, self-described “science fiction nerds,” spent the first few minutes of a bright future together in total darkness.
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Gizmodo

The 2017 Solar Eclipse: The Kotaku Review Have you ever looked directly at the Sun only to find it wasn’t there? That’s the question asked by The 2017 Solar Eclipse , the ultimate can’t-miss entertainment experience of the year. Unless you missed it. After years of anticipation, The 2017 Solar Eclipse finally arrived on Monday, perfectly hitting its scheduled launch date. No delays here! I went in unsure what to expect. I walked away a b
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Ars Technica

Driver’s license facial recognition tech leads to 4,000 New York arrests Enlarge (credit: zmeel/Getty Images ) The state of New York says its driver's license facial recognition technology has led to the arrest of 4,000 people in connection to identify theft or fraud crimes. This number is likely to skyrocket in the wake of the state doubling the number of measurement points for photographs. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that, overall, New York has identified more than 21,00
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New Scientist - News

Why aren’t we testing whether planes can survive a drone crash?It is time to fire a drone into a jet engine to properly assess the safety threat they pose to airliners, says Paul Marks
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Live Science

Eclipse Watchers' Plane Crashes on Return TripA small plane carrying four people who were returning from an eclipse-watching trip crashed just short of an airport in northern California.
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Inside Science

Why It Could Be Time for Sex-Specific Drugs Why It Could Be Time for Sex-Specific Drugs New research gives weight to the arguments for male and female versions of medicines. Sex-specific-drugs_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Jan-Peter Kasper/ FSU Human Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 14:15 Benjamin Plackett, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Basic biochemical differences between males and females are so substantial that modern society would be bett
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-powered paper-based 'SPEDs' may lead to new medical-diagnostic toolsA new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses -- powered only by the user's touch -- and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Targeted forest regeneration: A blueprint for conserving tropical biological diversity?Targeted forest regeneration among the largest and closest forest fragments in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil can dramatically reduce extinction rates of bird species over time, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common antiseptic ingredients de-energize cells and impair hormone responseQuaternary ammonium compounds, or 'quats,' used as antimicrobial agents in common household products inhibit mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, as well as estrogenic functions in cells, a new in vitro study indicates. Quats are used as antiseptics in toothpastes, mouthwashes, lozenges, nasal sprays, eye drops, shampoos, lotions, intravaginal spermicidal sponges and household cleaners, to n
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Feed: All Latest

Bizarre Sea Creature Could Teach Humans to Do the LocomotionThe gelatinous salp pulses at its own frequency, but they live together as a long chain—somehow, moving efficiently as a whole.
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Ars Technica

Unable to get a domain, racist Daily Stormer retreats to the Dark Web (credit: Wikipedia ) Ever since Charlottesville, the neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer has been struggling to stay on the Internet. The site's editor, Andrew Anglin, wrote a vulgar post disparaging Heather Heyer after she was killed in the Charlottesville car attack. Activists pressured technology companies to drop the site, and one by one they complied. The site cycled through a sequence of different
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