Science current issue
Enhanced water permeability and tunable ion selectivity in subnanometer carbon nanotube porins Fast water transport through carbon nanotube pores has raised the possibility to use them in the next generation of water treatment technologies. We report that water permeability in 0.8-nanometer-diameter carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs), which confine water down to a single-file chain, exceeds that of biological water transporters and of wider CNT pores by an order of magnitude. Intermolecular hy
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solvedUNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.
2h
Ingeniøren
Skat opfordrer folk til at ignorere sikkerhedsadvarsler Brugere af skat.dk er for få dage siden blevet mødt med en certifikatfejl på Skats hjemmeside. Skat opfordrer brugerne til at ignorere fejlen og stole på siden. Det er problematisk, fordi netop skat har været udsat for mange phishingangreb, mener sikkerhedsekspert. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/skat-opfordrer-folk-at-bryde-sikkerhedsmeddelelser-1079298 Version2
14h

LATEST

Gizmodo
Amazon's Takeover of Whole Foods Begins on Monday With Discounted Baby Kale Photo: Getty The $13.7 billion purchase of Whole Foods only received a green light on Wednesday, but the company has already announced that the deal will be done on Monday, August 28th. In a PR statement that will inspire lovers of $6 asparagus water , Amazon says that it will immediately drop the notoriously high prices at the grocery chain, and Amazon Prime memberships will soon become the stor
10min
The Scientist RSS
Doctors Warn Against Vaginal SeedingA group of Danish obstetricians notes that the procedure carries risks and that there is little evidence supporting its benefits to the infant microbiome.
10min
New on MIT Technology Review
Can Blockchains Set the Web Free?
14min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some plasma instabilities can extinguish themselvesA physicist has for the first time used advanced models to accurately simulate key characteristics of the cyclic behavior of edge-localized modes, a particular type of plasma instability. The findings could help physicists more fully comprehend the behavior of plasma, the hot, charged gas that fuels fusion reactions in doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called tokamaks, and more reliably produce pl
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA detectives crack the case on biothreat look-alikesBiological "detectives" are tracking down biothreats such as the bacteria that causes tularemia ("rabbit fever"), but they constantly face the challenge of avoiding false positives. Sounding the alarm over a bioattack, only to find it's a harmless relative in the same genus, reduces credibility and public trust. New work is narrowing down the confusion over Francisella bacteria, a few species of w
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA formResearchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's Webb Telescope will study our solar system's 'ocean worlds'NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will use its infrared capabilities to study the "ocean worlds" of Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus, adding to observations previously made by NASA's Galileo and Cassini orbiters. The Webb telescope's observations could also help guide future missions to the icy moons.
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toward an early Alzheimer's testResearchers have demonstrated the promise of an early blood test for Alzheimer's disease. The results suggest that Alzheimer's can be detected even before the onset of symptoms in persons at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease.
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human-made fossil methane emission levels larger than previously believedA team of researchers spent seven weeks in Antarctica collecting and studying 2,000-pound samples of glacial ice cores that date back nearly 12,000 years. The ancient air trapped within the ice revealed surprising new data about methane that may help inform today's policymakers as they consider ways to reduce global warming.
20min
Gizmodo
Common Antiseptic Chemical Can Harm Important Cell Function Image: danjo /Flickr There are many bad things to worry about. Be it climate change, diseases, rabid dogs or ticks, life is just chock full of worry. So, here’s another thing: virtually everything in your medicine cabinet. Sorry :( Don’t freak out, because there’s not enough information to know how bad the chemical is, and well, the human lifespan is still around 80 years. But scientists have fou
21min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What the sugar coating on your cells is trying to tell you | Carolyn BertozziYour cells are coated with sugars that store information and speak a secret language. What are they trying to tell us? Your blood type, for one -- and, potentially, that you have cancer. Chemical biologist Carolyn Bertozzi researches how sugars on cancerous cells interact with (and sometimes trick) your immune system. Learn more about how your body detects cancer and how the latest cancer-fighting
21min
Latest Headlines | Science News
On social media, privacy is no longer a personal choiceData from the now-defunct social platform Friendster show that even people not on social media have predictable qualities.
28min
Scientific American Content: Global
Totality in TennesseeExperience a total solar eclipse on a Tennessee farm -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
30min
Gizmodo
Another Government Agency Has Purged References to Climate Change From Its Site Credit: Environmental Data & Governance Initiative Credit: Environmental Data & Governance Initiative Data-tracking watchdog group, Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI), has reported dozens of instances where the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has deleted references to climate change from its site. Advertisement As the name suggests, the NIEHS’ site l
33min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubesAt just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
General patient infections transferred similarly to hospital-acquired infectionsA new study shows that the networks formed by patterns of patient transfers between hospitals in France are very similar among three patient populations: those diagnosed with hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), those with suspected HAIs, and the general patient population.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rapid diagnostic test helps distinguish between severe and uncomplicated malaria in AfricaWorking at a health center in rural Uganda, researchers have demonstrated for the first time the potential of using a low-cost, routinely available rapid diagnostic test to distinguish between severe and uncomplicated malaria in children.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists characterize regulatory DNA sequences responsible for human diseasesScientists have developed an innovative system to identify and characterize the molecular components that control the activities of regulatory DNA sequences in the human genome.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High achievers in competitive courses more likely to cheat on college examsA new study finds that students who are known as “high achievers” and take highly competitive courses are the most likely to cheat on their exams.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Playing the publishing ‘game’: Making the most of reviewers’ commentsReviewer comments on a scientific manuscript may seem critical and personal to authors, but they are generally well thought out and meant to enhance the understandability and integrity of the paper.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why patients with shingles feel painThe immune mechanisms triggered by shingles when it is reactivated, changing the way that sensory neurons work and resulting in herpetic neuralgia, are described by researchers in a new article. The authors say that their discoveries lay a foundation for novel treatments not only to combat acute pain but also to prevent it from becoming chronic, a condition known as post-herpetic neuralgia.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monitoring network traffic more efficientlyResearchers have come up with a new approach to network monitoring that provides great flexibility in data collection while keeping both the circuit complexity of the router and the number of external analytic servers low.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Less REM sleep tied to greater risk of dementiaPeople who get less rapid eye movement (REM) sleep may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study. REM sleep is the sleep stage when dreaming occurs.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Younger mothers are more likely to engage in risky drinking during and after pregnancyPeople tend to adjust behaviors across their lifespans as they adopt new roles – such as marriage or parenting – that are incompatible with prior behaviors. The transition to parenthood appears to be particularly relevant for women, leading to a reduction in alcohol consumption. This study of maternal alcohol use is the first to focus on age at transition to motherhood as a predictor of trajectori
34min
Ars Technica
Judge tosses case brought by Magic: the Gathering judge who wants to be paid Enlarge (credit: game boy band pepino / Flickr ) A federal judge in California has dismissed a proposed class-action labor lawsuit brought in late 2015 by a man who says that he has now worked for more than 20 years as a "judge" in Magic: the Gathering tournaments and demands to be paid. In the court ruling , which was issued Wednesday, US District Judge Edward Davila sided with the defendant, Wi
36min
New Scientist - News
Eat a seasonal diet and your gut microbes may change in syncThe types of gut bacteria in Hadza hunter-gatherers vary with the seasons, suggesting that this may also happen in anyone who eats mainly seasonal produce
38min
New Scientist - News
Twisted carbon nanotubes harness waste energy and put it to workThe “twistron harvester” generates power at the highest rates for energy harvesting yet, so may finally live up to the technique’s century-long promise
38min
New Scientist - News
AI uses bitcoin trail to find and help sex-trafficking victimsThousands of escorts advertise on websites like Backpage, not always by choice. Machine learning can now identify ads posted by traffickers, and locate them
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long, mysterious strips of RNA contribute to low sperm countScientists have found distinctive portions of genetic material -- known as lncRNAs -- that help sperm develop. Male mice lacking a particular lncRNA have low sperm count, suggesting lncRNAs could represent novel infertility drug targets.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fossils reveal how bizarre mammal beat extinctionAnimals that live on islands are among the most at risk from extinction. A remarkable eighty percent of extinctions occurring since 1500AD have been on islands, with inhabitants facing dangers from climate change, sea level rise, invasive species, and human interactions.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The first hard evidence for the 'outside-in' theory of the origin of teethResearchers studying a 400-million-year-old bony fish from Estonia believe that they have found evidence for the origins of teeth. Using advanced synchrotron microtomography on numerous specimens representing different ages has allowed scientists a rare glimpse into the evolution and formation of teeth.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Variation in the recovery of tetrapodsThe end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) occurred about 250 million years ago and represents the Earth's most catastrophic extinction event.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New dinosaur discovery suggests new species roosted together like modern birdsThe Mongolian Desert has been known for decades for its amazing array of dinosaurs,immaculately preserved in incredible detail and in associations that give exceedinglyrare glimpses at behavior in the fossil record.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D scanning methods allow an inside look into fossilized fecesCoprolites are fossilized feces that give evidence of an organism's behavior and often contain food residues, parasite remains and other fossils that provide clues to ancient paleoecological relations.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ice age era bones recovered from underwater caves in MexicoWhen the Panamanian land bridge formed around 3 million years ago, Southern Mexico was in the middle of a great biotic interchange of large animals from North and South America that crossed the continents in both directions.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Elucidating the biology of extinct cave bearsOne of the largest known species of bear, the cave bear (Ursus spelaeus), ranged widely through Eurasia all the way to the Mediterranean in the south and to the Caucasus Mountains and northern Iran in the east during Late Pleistocene times.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The dinosaur museum that visits youThe vast expanses of the Gobi Desert are a prime destination for paleontologists. Since the 1920s, expeditions to the Gobi have unearthed thousands of dinosaur fossils, including the nests and eggs of Oviraptor, the bones of the iconic Velociraptor, and the skeletons of the giant plant-eater Saurolophus. Today, a very different type of behemoth rumbles through rural Mongolia. It's called the Movea
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite for Taiwan launched from CaliforniaAn Earth-observation satellite for Taiwan's National Space Organization has been launched from California.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collapse at salmon farm renews debate about fish farmingA marine net pen holding 305,000 farmed Atlantic salmon collapsed recently, releasing thousands of fish into Puget Sound and renewing concerns that a new proposed salmon farm could harm wild salmon stock and cause other environmental damage.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New virtual model reveals details of declining lung function in miceScientists have developed a new virtual model of mouse lung function that illuminates the relative importance of different factors that contribute to lung changes accompanying chronic inflammation.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solvedScientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3,700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals. The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry -- the study of triangles -- by mo
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunter-gatherers' seasonal gut-microbe diversity loss echoes our permanent oneScientists have examined the seasonal variations in the gut-microbial composition, or microbiota, of the Hadza, one of the world's few remaining traditional hunter-gatherer populations. The findings confirm that the Hadza microbiota is more diverse than, and substantially different from, that of industrialized countries' urban-dwelling denizens.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Phoenicid meteor shower from dead comet arises again after 58 yearsAstronomers have observed the elusive 'Phoenicid meteor shower' and have determined that it was spawned by the now vanished Comet Blanpain. They also found that Comet Blanpain was active, though only weakly, in the early 20th Century. This is the first time that researchers could determine the activity of a comet by observing its associated meteor shower. These results are important for understand
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's oldest Italian wine just discoveredItalian wine residue has been found from the Copper Age, debunking current belief wine growing and wine production in Italy developed during the Middle Bronze Age.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shapeThe advent of farming, especially dairy products, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, according to a recently study from anthropologists.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Manganese in underground drinking water is cause for concernUnderground drinking water sources in parts of the US and three Asian countries may not be as safe as previously thought due to high levels of manganese, especially at shallow depths, according to a new study. Manganese, a metal that is required by the body in tiny amounts, can be toxic at elevated levels, particularly in children.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon: Whole Foods deal to close Monday, vows lower pricesAmazon announced Thursday that its takeover of Whole Foods Market will close next week, as it vowed to cut grocery prices and fully integrate the chain into its retail empire.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists discover that some plasma instabilities can extinguish themselvesPhysicist Fatima Ebrahimi at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has for the first time used advanced models to accurately simulate key characteristics of the cyclic behavior of edge-localized modes (ELMs), a particular type of plasma instability. The findings could help physicists more fully comprehend the behavior of plasma, the hot, charged gas that
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA technologist develops self-calibrating, hybrid space magnetometerThey've flown on high-profile interplanetary and more modest low-Earth-orbiting missions, but in all cases the ubiquitous fluxgate magnetometers that scientists use to measure the intensity of a magnetic field will degrade over time.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA detectives crack the case on biothreat look-alikesBiological "detectives" are tracking down biothreats such as the bacteria that causes tularemia ("rabbit fever"), but they constantly face the challenge of avoiding false positives. Sounding the alarm over a bioattack, only to find it's a harmless relative in the same genus, reduces credibility and public trust. New work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is narrowing down the confusion over Franci
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds heavy rainfall in intensifying Tropical Storm HarveyNASA examined Harvey as it began to intensify and organize and found heavy rainfall in the system. NASA also created an animation that showed Harvey's intensification from a low pressure area into a hurricane.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Telescope will study our solar system's 'ocean worlds'NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will use its infrared capabilities to study the "ocean worlds" of Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus, adding to observations previously made by NASA's Galileo and Cassini orbiters. The Webb telescope's observations could also help guide future missions to the icy moons.
1h
Ars Technica
Apple will build new data center in Iowa, get $200M in tax breaks Enlarge / An Apple data center under construction in Maiden, North Carolina, in 2010. (credit: Jason Miczek/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) Apple is building a $1.375 billion center near Des Moines, Iowa, after having secured more than $200 million in tax credits from local government. The Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA) said today that Apple will soon purchase 2,000 acres of land in Wauk
1h
Science : NPR
Really? Really. How Our Brains Figure Out What Words Mean Based On How They're Said Scientists have identified the brain cells that detect pitch changes in speech, allowing us to understand whether someone is asking a question or making a statement. (Image credit: Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images)
1h
The Scientist RSS
Hunter-gatherer Microbiomes Cycle with the SeasonsThe composition of the gut microbiota varies by time of year and is more diverse than that of industrialized groups.
1h
The Scientist RSS
The Strange and Stranger Case of Wyndham LathemA Northwestern University plague researcher has been charged with a brutal murder. Here's what we know about him.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No batteries required: Energy-harvesting yarns generate electricityScientists have developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted. 'Twistron' yarns have many possible applications, such as harvesting energy from the motion of ocean waves or from temperature fluctuations.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the human brain detects the 'music' of speechResearchers have identified neurons in the human brain that respond to pitch changes in spoken language, which are essential to clearly conveying both meaning and emotion.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA formUT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
1h
Ars Technica
Waymo built a fake city in California to test self-driving cars Enlarge / The fleet is under construction right now and should be on the road in early 2017. (credit: Waymo ) Google used to keep most details about its self-driving car program under wraps. But in the last few months, the self-driving car team— now a separate subsidiary called Waymo —has been making a concerted effort to open up and share key details with high-profile media outlets. In May, Waym
1h
Gizmodo
World's Luckiest Guy Has Incredibly Close Call While Filming a Lightning Storm GIF GIF: YouTube The intense flash of light and booming crack of thunder that follows a lightning strike can be exhilarating, but it’s best to observe both whilke safely inside your home. As Norway’s Daniel Modøl discovered while filming a storm from his deck, those unpredictable lightning bolts can strike anywhere , even 16-feet from where you’re standing. Modøl, who will probably never venture
1h
Popular Science
The gut microbes of modern hunter-gatherers reveal one big problem with your diet Health More fiber might mean more bacteria—and that's a good thing. A team of scientists studied the microbiomes of a unique group of individuals: The Hadza people, a hunter-gatherer community living in Tanzania.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA detectives crack the case on biothreat look-alikesBiological "detectives" are tracking down biothreats such as the bacteria that causes tularemia ("rabbit fever"), but they constantly face the challenge of avoiding false positives.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PPPL physicist discovers that some plasma instabilities can extinguish themselvesPPPL physicist Fatima Ebrahimi has for the first time used advanced models to accurately simulate key characteristics of the cyclic behavior of edge-localized modes, a particular type of plasma instability. The findings could help physicists more fully comprehend the behavior of plasma, the hot, charged gas that fuels fusion reactions in doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called tokamaks, and more
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Webb Telescope will study our solar system's 'ocean worlds'NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will use its infrared capabilities to study the "ocean worlds" of Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus, adding to observations previously made by NASA's Galileo and Cassini orbiters. The Webb telescope's observations could also help guide future missions to the icy moons.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds heavy rainfall in intensifying Tropical Storm HarveyNASA examined Harvey as it began to intensify and organize and found heavy rainfall in the system. NASA also created an animation that showed Harvey's intensification from a low pressure area into a hurricane.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Manipulating a single gene defines a new pathway to anxietyRemoving a single gene from the brains of mice and zebrafish causes these animals to become more anxious than normal. Researchers from University of Utah Health show that eliminating the gene encoding Lef1 disrupts the development of certain nerve cells in the hypothalamus that affect stress and anxiety. These results are the first implication that Lef1 functions in this brain region to mediate be
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic resistance rises in 'lonely' mutating microbesA major study led by the University of Manchester has discovered that so called 'lonely' microbes, those living at low population densities, are more likely to mutate causing higher rates of antibiotic resistance.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
General patient infections transferred similarly to hospital-acquired infectionsA new study shows that the networks formed by patterns of patient transfers between hospitals in France are very similar among three patient populations: those diagnosed with hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), those with suspected HAIs, and the general patient population. The research, published in PLOS Computational Biology, could help inform efforts to reduce the spread of HAIs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hunter-gatherers' seasonal gut-microbe diversity loss echoes our permanent oneA study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine is the first to look at seasonal variations in the gut-microbial composition, or microbiota, of the Hadza, one of the world's few remaining traditional hunter-gatherer populations. The findings confirm that the Hadza microbiota is more diverse than, and substantially different from, that of industrialized countries' urban-dwe
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the human brain detects the 'music' of speechResearchers at UC San Francisco have identified neurons in the human brain that respond to pitch changes in spoken language, which are essential to clearly conveying both meaning and emotion.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new twist toward practical energy harvestingScientists have developed a type of 'yarn,' made from carbon nanotubes that can harvest energy from twisting or stretching motions.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubesAt just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How people discern changes in pitch to extract meaning from languageThe ability for humans to discern changes in pitch as they listen to a speaker is essential for extracting meaning from words, and now researchers have identified a set of neurons responsible for detecting such relative changes in pitch.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Change your diet, change your microbiotaThe microbiota of a group of hunter-gatherers in Tanzania undergo changes in composition depending on seasonal changes in their diets, a new study reveals.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solvedUNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3,700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals. The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry -- the study of triang
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No batteries required: Energy-harvesting yarns generate electricityAn international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted. In a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Science, researchers describe 'twistron' yarns and their possible applications, such as harvesting energy from the motion of oc
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New virtual model reveals details of declining lung function in miceScientists have developed a new virtual model of mouse lung function that illuminates the relative importance of different factors that contribute to lung changes accompanying chronic inflammation. Christopher Massa and his colleagues at Rutgers University, N.J., present the work in PLOS Computational Biology.
1h
Ars Technica
General Mills loses bid to trademark yellow color on Cheerios box Enlarge (credit: David Kravets) US intellectual property regulators are rejecting General Mills' bid to trademark the yellow background color on boxes of Cheerios cereal. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board on Tuesday set aside the cereal maker's two-year quest to trademark "the color yellow appearing as the predominant uniform background color" on boxes of "oat-based breakfast cereal." A contra
1h
Dagens Medicin
Kæmpe oprydning på Aarhus Universitetshospital – fyrer centercheferne Elleve centerchef- og administrationschef-stillinger nedlægges, sekretariater fusioneres, og hospitalsledelsen udvides fra tre til fem direktører. Ny ledelsesstruktur sparer Aarhus Universitetshospital for seks mio. kr. Brutalt, men nødvendigt, siger den øverste ledelse.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Post-Tropical Cyclone Kenneth spinning downFormer Tropical Storm Kenneth continues to maintain gale-force winds but appears to be devoid of any strong thunderstorms in satellite imagery.
1h
NYT > Science
Essay: Tasting the Sweetness of Summer, Berry by BerryBerries clothe seeds and fertilize them when they drop to the ground, and one summer they taught a young woman to savor time.
1h
NYT > Science
Matter: Gut Bacteria Can Fluctuate With the SeasonsThe discovery, in a study of hunter-gatherers in Africa, eventually may help scientists learn how modern diets have affected health.
1h
Gizmodo
Court Orders DreamHost to Turn Over Info on Anti-Trump Site [Updated] Photo: Getty DreamHost must turn over some information about a website hosted on its platform that was used to plan a protest on President Donald Trump’s inauguration day, a DC judge ruled today. The Justice Department, which alleges that the site helped coordinate a riot, initially sought a massive amount of DreamHost data including the IP addresses of the site’s approximately 1.3 million visito
1h
Feed: All Latest
Your Brain Cells Hear the Ups and Downs of LanguageScientists have found groups of neurons that listen for changes in someone’s speaking tone—and turn it into meaning.
1h
Gizmodo
What Present-Day Hunter-Gatherers Can Tell Us About the Bacteria in Our Gut Image: Wikimedia The Hazda is a small group of hunter-gatherers living in the central Rift Valley of Tanzania, one of the few remaining groups of people left in the world who still collect the majority of their diet through foraged foods. Modernity has still managed to touch their lives, of course, but far less than it has for those of us in the post-industrialized West. For this reason, scientis
1h
Science | The Guardian
Mathematical secrets of ancient tablet unlocked after nearly a century of study Dating from 1,000 years before Pythagoras’s theorem, the Babylonian clay tablet is a trigonometric table more accurate than any today, say researchers At least 1,000 years before the Greek mathematician Pythagoras looked at a right angled triangle and worked out that the square of the longest side is always equal to the sum of the squares of the other two, an unknown Babylonian genius took a clay
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even after reforms, few ineffective teachers are identified as ineffective, study findsThe study examined the impact of reforms made to teacher evaluation systems in the wake of a 2009 report that highlighted the failure of US public schools to recognize and act on teacher effectiveness. They found that despite reforms, only a third of teachers perceived by evaluators as ineffective were rated as ineffective. Using surveys and interviews with evaluators in a school district in the N
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Post-Tropical Cyclone Kenneth spinning downFormer Tropical Storm Kenneth continues to maintain gale-force winds but appears to be devoid of any strong thunderstorms in satellite imagery.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Nitty-gritty of Homo naledi’s diet revealed in its teethAncient humanlike species ate something that damaged its teeth.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotic resistance rises in 'lonely' mutating microbesA major study led by The University of Manchester has discovered that so called 'lonely' microbes, those living at low population densities, are more likely to mutate causing higher rates of antibiotic resistance.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hunter-gatherers' seasonal gut-microbe diversity loss echoes our permanent oneMore evidence that our intestinal microbes are profoundly influenced by the foods we eat—or don't: The gut ecosystems of members of a small group of hunter-gatherers inhabiting Tanzania's Rift Valley show a strong cyclicality consistent with the population's seasonally changing diet.
2h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Is The Carspotting Crew's Plan For This Beaten Up 'Stang? Carspotting | Mondays at 10p This Mustang might not be Niko and Pedro's favorite purchase but Carlos is confident he can turn this ride for a big profit. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/carspotting/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarSpottingTV/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: http
2h
New Scientist - News
Will Google’s targeted depression tests really help people?Google has announced plans to offer people searching for the word "depression" a validated questionnaire for the condition. But will finding your results be any help?
2h
Ars Technica
Confederate sub’s weapon killed its own crew, researchers find The Confederate submarine CSS H. L. Hunley bears the distinction of being the first submarine to ever sink an enemy ship. But the Hunley, a work of state-of-the-art engineering for its time, never returned from that mission on February 17, 1864. Instead, after exploding a "torpedo" below the waterline of the Union sloop-of-war USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor, the sub was lost at sea. Just how
2h
Gizmodo
This Probe Might Investigate the Mysterious Ocean of Saturn's Biggest Moon Image: NASA Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is kind of like what you’d expect if Salvador Dali designed a planet. It has methane lakes, electrically charged sand , and allegedly, an ocean hiding under its crust. While the Cassini and Huygens spacecraft have revealed some of these mysteries to us , so many lingering questions about this weirdo moon remain. Recently, a team of researchers at Johns Ho
2h
Gizmodo
Amazon's HDTV Antennas Are Cheaper Than Ever For Football Season AmazonBasics HDTV Antenna , $13 | Amplified Version , $24 Football season is just around the corner, and you can watch a ton of college games, plus local NFL games and Sunday Night football for free with a cheap HDTV antenna. AmazonBasics’ amplified and unamplified leaf-style antennas are both on sale right now, if you don’t already own one. I use the amplified version myself, and it’s great. If
2h
Science current issue
Empowering science advice
2h
Science current issue
News at a glance
2h
Science current issue
Surge in right whale deaths raises alarms
2h
Science current issue
Documents detail gender-related tensions at Salk
2h
Science current issue
The inside story on 20,000 vertebrates
2h
Science current issue
Germany seeks 'big flip in publishing model
2h
Science current issue
Zebrafish larvae could help to personalize cancer treatments
2h
Science current issue
The organoid architect
2h
Science current issue
The mechanics of positioning skin follicles
2h
Science current issue
The complex that conquered the land
2h
Science current issue
Improving on aquaporins
2h
Science current issue
Seasonal change in the gut
2h
Science current issue
A water window on surface chemistry
2h
Science current issue
Actin divides to conquer
2h
Science current issue
Maryam Mirzakhani (1977-2017)
2h
Science current issue
Fostering reproducibility in industry-academia research
2h
Science current issue
Park politics
2h
Science current issue
Einstein's magnum opus
2h
Science current issue
The Emoji Code: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats
2h
Science current issue
China can lead on climate change
2h
Science current issue
Confidence in courts: A delicate balance
2h
Science current issue
Korean physicians' bond defies borders
2h
Science current issue
Invention Ambassadors take on society's challenges
2h
Science current issue
AAAS Annual Election: Preliminary Announcement
2h
Science current issue
Arsenic-contaminated drinking water
2h
Science current issue
Making the most of twists and turns
2h
Science current issue
Tolerogenic T cells need probiotics
2h
Science current issue
Imaging surfaces with water
2h
Science current issue
Mechanics of follicle patterning in skin
2h
Science current issue
Adapting to the right light
2h
Science current issue
For Zika virus, experience counts
2h
Science current issue
Seasonal diets, seasonal microbiota
2h
Science current issue
Brain mechanisms of pitch perception
2h
Science current issue
Dynamic vascular surfaces
2h
Science current issue
Actin helps chromosome segregation in eggs
2h
Science current issue
A virus and its reinforcement
2h
Science current issue
Go with the flow
2h
Science current issue
Tackling the life and death of whirls
2h
Science current issue
Cycling 2D crystal growth
2h
Science current issue
YAP supports dopaminergic neurons
2h
Science current issue
Slicing through both C-C and C-H bonds
2h
Science current issue
Be afraid
2h
Science current issue
Personalized melanoma vaccines
2h
Science current issue
How whales change their tune
2h
Science current issue
Signaling to senescence
2h
Science current issue
Correct perceptions, increase engagement
2h
Science current issue
Tumor suppressor is a thymic booster
2h
Science current issue
Circle the molecules
2h
Science current issue
Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist Mechanical energy harvesters are needed for diverse applications, including self-powered wireless sensors, structural and human health monitoring systems, and the extraction of energy from ocean waves. We report carbon nanotube yarn harvesters that electrochemically convert tensile or torsional mechanical energy into electrical energy without requiring an external bias voltage. Stretching coiled
2h
Science current issue
Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides Current catalytic processes involving carbon-carbon bond activation rely on -unsaturated coupling partners. Exploiting the concept of transfer hydrogenative coupling, we report a ruthenium(0)-catalyzed cycloaddition of benzocyclobutenones that functionalizes two adjacent saturated diol carbon-hydrogen bonds. These regio- and diastereoselective processes enable convergent construction of type II p
2h
Science current issue
The turbulent cascade in five dimensions To the naked eye, turbulent flows exhibit whirls of many different sizes. To each size, or scale, corresponds a fraction of the total energy resulting from a cascade in five dimensions: scale, time, and three-dimensional space. Understanding this process is critical to strategies for modeling geophysical and industrial flows. By tracking the flow regions containing energy in different scales, we
2h
Science current issue
Optical imaging of surface chemistry and dynamics in confinement We imaged the interfacial structure and dynamics of water in a microscopically confined geometry, in three dimensions and on millisecond time scales, with a structurally illuminated wide-field second harmonic microscope. The second harmonic images reported on the orientational order of interfacial water, induced by charge-dipole interactions between water molecules and surface charges. The images
2h
Science current issue
Robust epitaxial growth of two-dimensional heterostructures, multiheterostructures, and superlattices We report a general synthetic strategy for highly robust growth of diverse lateral heterostructures, multiheterostructures, and superlattices from two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals. A reverse flow during the temperature-swing stage in the sequential vapor deposition growth process allowed us to cool the existing 2D crystals to prevent undesired thermal degradation and uncontrolled homogeneous
2h
Science current issue
Intonational speech prosody encoding in the human auditory cortex Speakers of all human languages regularly use intonational pitch to convey linguistic meaning, such as to emphasize a particular word. Listeners extract pitch movements from speech and evaluate the shape of intonation contours independent of each speaker’s pitch range. We used high-density electrocorticography to record neural population activity directly from the brain surface while participants
2h
Science current issue
Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania Although humans have cospeciated with their gut-resident microbes, it is difficult to infer features of our ancestral microbiome. Here, we examine the microbiome profile of 350 stool samples collected longitudinally for more than a year from the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. The data reveal annual cyclic reconfiguration of the microbiome, in which some taxa become undetectable only to reapp
2h
Science current issue
Lactobacillus reuteri induces gut intraepithelial CD4+CD8{alpha}{alpha}+ T cells The small intestine contains CD4 + CD8αα + double-positive intraepithelial lymphocytes (DP IELs), which originate from intestinal CD4 + T cells through down-regulation of the transcription factor Thpok and have regulatory functions. DP IELs are absent in germ-free mice, which suggests that their differentiation depends on microbial factors. We found that DP IEL numbers in mice varied in different
2h
Science current issue
Emergent cellular self-organization and mechanosensation initiate follicle pattern in the avian skin The spacing of hair in mammals and feathers in birds is one of the most apparent morphological features of the skin. This pattern arises when uniform fields of progenitor cells diversify their molecular fate while adopting higher-order structure. Using the nascent skin of the developing chicken embryo as a model system, we find that morphological and molecular symmetries are simultaneously broken
2h
Science current issue
Structure and assembly mechanism of plant C2S2M2-type PSII-LHCII supercomplex In plants, the photosynthetic machinery photosystem II (PSII) consists of a core complex associated with variable numbers of light-harvesting complexes II (LHCIIs). The supercomplex, comprising a dimeric core and two strongly bound and two moderately bound LHCIIs (C 2 S 2 M 2 ), is the dominant form in plants acclimated to limited light. Here we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of two f
2h
Science current issue
New Products
2h
Science current issue
How I found my outreach niche
2h
Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen" Goncharov and Struzhkin present comments on our observation of metallic hydrogen. We show that most of their comments are unfounded and that our observation of a transition to a shiny, high-reflectance phase remains as evidence that hydrogen has transformed to the metallic phase.
2h
Science current issue
Actin protects mammalian eggs against chromosome segregation errors Chromosome segregation is driven by a spindle that is made of microtubules but is generally thought to be independent of actin. Here, we report an unexpected actin-dependent mechanism that drives the accurate alignment and segregation of chromosomes in mammalian eggs. Prominent actin filaments permeated the microtubule spindle in eggs of several mammalian species, including humans. Disrupting act
2h
Science current issue
Comment on "Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen" Dias and Silvera (Research Article, 17 February 2017, p. 715) claim the observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen at 495 gigapascals. We show that neither the claims of the record pressure nor the phase transition to a metallic state are supported by data and that the data contradict the authors’ own unconfirmed previous results.
2h
Science current issue
Organotypic vasculature: From descriptive heterogeneity to functional pathophysiology Blood vessels form one of the body’s largest surfaces, serving as a critical interface between the circulation and the different organ environments. They thereby exert gatekeeper functions on tissue homeostasis and adaptation to pathologic challenge. Vascular control of the tissue microenvironment is indispensable in development, hemostasis, inflammation, and metabolism, as well as in cancer and
2h
Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen" Liu et al . present negative comments on our observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen (MH). Earlier attempts to produce MH were unsuccessful due to diamond failure before the required pressures were achieved. We produced the highest static pressures (495 gigapascals) ever on hydrogen at low temperatures. Here, we respond to their objections.
2h
Science current issue
Comment on "Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen" Dias and Silvera (Research Article, 17 February 2017, p. 715) report on the observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen at 495 gigapascals at 5.5 and 83 kelvin. Here, we show that the claim of metallic behavior is not supported by the presented data, which are scarce, contradictory, and do not prove the presence of hydrogen in the high-pressure cavity.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chromosome mechanics guide nuclear assemblyA protein that crosslinks the DNA to allow proper nuclear envelope reformation.
2h
Viden
3 x virtual reality-briller: Det kan deI disse år konkurrerer tre teknologivirksomheder om at blive førende i virtual reality. Digitalt på P1 ser på, hvad de hver især kan - og ikke kan.
2h
The Atlantic
Why School Still Starts After Labor Day in Michigan For Tracy Horodyski, a teacher in the Kenowa Hills school district in Michigan, a new district schedule has her returning to the classroom on Monday, August 28—her first pre-Labor Day start in more than a decade. But rather than wishing for a longer vacation, the change comes as something of a relief. After more than two months away, Horodyski, an elementary reading and literacy specialist and Mi
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nandan Nilekani back at India's InfosysInfosys cofounder Nandan Nilekani will take over immediately as the company's nonexecutive chairman, the Indian software giant said Thursday, a move to calm investor unrest and steady the share price.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential impacts of planned Andean Amazon dams outweigh benefits, scientists sayScientists investigating the effects of six planned or potential Andean dams on the Amazon river system has found that major negative ecological impacts can be expected both above the dams and throughout the lowland floodplains and the Amazon Delta.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Leprosy turns the immune system against itself, study findsLeprosy hijacks our immune system, turning an important repair mechanism into one that causes potentially irreparable damage to our nerve cells, according to new research that uses zebrafish to study the disease. As such, the disease may share common characteristics with conditions such as multiple sclerosis.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bleats and trills evolved multiple times to aid in 'caller ID'Sheep, giant pandas, mouse lemurs, and fur seals all have something in common when it comes to communication. All of them produce calls with rapid, vibrato-like fundamental frequency modulation -- commonly known as bleats or trills. Now, researchers think they know why that call feature has arisen multiple times over the course of evolution: it improves the ability of listeners to detect call comp
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
As Tolstoy noted (sort of), all unhappy microbiomes are unhappy in their own wayThe bacterial communities that live inside everyone are quite similar and stable when times are good, but when stress enters the equation, those communities can react very differently from person to person.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Origami-inspired robotNew research details how origami structures and bio-inspired design can be used to create a crawling robot.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Martin Aitken obituary My father, Martin Aitken, who has died aged 95, was a scientist who pioneered the application of physics to archaeology. He coined, with the archaeologist Christopher Hawkes , the term archaeometry , helping to make huge advances in dating finds from as early as the Lower Palaeolithic period. He was born in Stamford, Lincolnshire, the younger son of Percy Aitken, an engineer draughtsman, and his
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secret life of dodos, revealedHas any animal suffered greater ignominy than the ill-fated dodo?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Egypt archaeologists uncover tombs dating back to Roman eraEgypt's Antiquities Ministry says that archaeologists have uncovered five tombs from the Roman era, dating back to more than 2,000 years.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hopes soar in Scotland: Edinburgh Zoo panda may be pregnantThe only female giant panda in Britain is believed to be pregnant, Edinburgh Zoo said Thursday.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manganese in underground drinking water is cause for concernUnderground drinking water sources in parts of the U.S. and three Asian countries may not be as safe as previously thought due to high levels of manganese, especially at shallow depths, according to a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside. Manganese, a metal that is required by the body in tiny amounts, can be toxic at elevated levels, particularly in children.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Roy Bentley obituary My father Roy Bentley, who has died aged 87, was a medical physicist whose career spanned almost the entire history of the speciality. The son of Frank, a chartered accountant, and his wife, Stella (nee Barker), who helped out in the family hosiery and glove business, Roy was educated at West Bridgford grammar school, Nottingham, and Birmingham University. His PhD, awarded in 1955, focused on the
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Manganese in underground drinking water is cause for concernUnderground drinking water sources in parts of the US and three Asian countries may not be as safe as previously thought due to high levels of manganese, especially at shallow depths, according to a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside. Manganese, a metal that is required by the body in tiny amounts, can be toxic at elevated levels, particularly in children.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phoenicid meteor shower from dead comet arises again after 58 yearsJapanese astronomers observed the elusive 'Phoenicid meteor shower' and have determined that it was spawned by the now vanished Comet Blanpain. They also found that Comet Blanpain was active, though only weakly, in the early 20th Century. This is the first time that researchers could determine the activity of a comet by observing its associated meteor shower. These results are important for unders
2h
Ars Technica
AT&T’s slow 1.5Mbps Internet in poor neighborhoods sparks complaint to FCC Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Steven Puetzer) AT&T is facing a complaint alleging that it discriminates against poor people by providing fast service in wealthier communities and speeds as low as 1.5Mbps in low-income neighborhoods. The formal complaint filed today with the Federal Communications Commission says that AT&T is violating the Communications Act's prohibition against unjust and unre
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's oldest Italian wine just discovered: Ancient pottery tests positive for wineChemical analysis conducted on ancient pottery could dramatically predate the commencement of winemaking in Italy. A large storage jar from the Copper Age (early 4th millennium BC) tests positive for wine.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Potential impacts of planned Andean Amazon dams outweigh benefits, scientists sayAn international team of scientists investigating the effects of six planned or potential Andean dams on the Amazon river system has found that major negative ecological impacts can be expected both above the dams and throughout the lowland floodplains and the Amazon Delta, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia, and other groups.
2h
Gizmodo
How Will the Game of Thrones TV Show Affect the Books? Image: HBO. Greetings from the future! Welcome to “Postal Apocalypse,” io9's admittedly sporadic mail column by me, editor Rob Bricken. This week I’ve got a lot of Defenders questions (from one curious reader), a lot more Game of Thrones questions (from many curious readers), and I explain why you should only be slightly worried about the Captain Marvel more right now. Book Learning Sean P. S
2h
The Atlantic
Over Georgia, Last Drone Photos Before Regulation Until recently, the country of Georgia remained one of the last nations for drone pilots to fly in relatively unregulated skies. On September 1, Georgia will adopt European-style restrictions on drones, so photographer Amos Chapple , working for Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty, set out to make one last aerial photo tour before the new laws kicked in. Chapple said that most of the countryside sh
2h
The Atlantic
The Enduring Fictions of Princess Diana In June of 2011, to celebrate what would have been the 50th birthday of Princess Diana, Newsweek published a cover story with a title both simple and ominous: “ Diana at 50: If She Were Here Now .” Written by the magazine’s then-editor, Tina Brown, who had been a friend of Diana’s during her short life, the essay was a blend of speculative and fan fictions: Brown imagined Diana having lived beyon
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shapeThe advent of farming, especially dairy products, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, according to a recently published study from anthropologists at UC Davis.
2h
Popular Science
Uranus is probably full of giant diamonds Space Scientists recreated ice planets' diamond rain. Ice giants like Uranus and Neptune may be subject to rain made of diamonds. Now, scientists have mimicked their gem formation in the lab.
2h
Viden
Del værktøj i en klub - og skån miljøetVed at dele værktøj kan du være med at undgå belastning af miljø, fordi ressourcerne udnyttes bedre.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
San Francisco Will Consider a Tax on Robots
2h
Ars Technica
Convicted felon Martin Shkreli finds novel way to be a jerk online (credit: Louis Lanzano/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Martin Shrkeli, the so-called "pharma bro" and former CEO who was recently convicted on securities fraud and wire fraud, has been recently buying up domain names of journalists that appear to have written critically about him. The list includes Rob Beschizza of Boing Boing, Meg Tirrell of CNBC, Maxwell Tani of Business Insider (who reported Tuesd
3h
Ingeniøren
Ny forskning baner vej for ultrasmå antenner og garn til energihøstningUgens videnskabelige artikler bød også på nyt om binære sorte huller og en køreplan for, hvordan 139 lande kan få al deres energi fra sol, vind og vandkraft i 2050.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shapeThe advent of farming, especially dairy products, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, according to a recently published study from anthropologists at UC Davis.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's oldest Italian wine just discoveredResearchers discover Italian wine residue from the Copper Age, debunking current belief wine growing and wine production in Italy developed during the Middle Bronze Age.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU/Biodesign researchers enter race for early Alzheimer's testIn a new study, Paul Coleman and his colleagues demonstrate the promise of an early blood test for Alzheimer's disease. The results suggest that Alzheimer's can be detected even before the onset of symptoms in persons at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding what fuels the 'runaway train' of autoimmune diseaseResearchers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School have discovered that rogue immune cells trigger an 'override' of the body's tolerance to its tissues, launching the vicious cycle of autoimmune disease. Could blocking these rogue cells help treat autoimmune diseases like lupus?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRI scientists characterize regulatory DNA sequences responsible for human diseasesScientists from the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have developed an innovative system to identify and characterize the molecular components that control the activities of regulatory DNA sequences in the human genome.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential impacts of planned Andean Amazon dams outweigh benefits, scientists sayAn international team of scientists investigating the effects of six planned or potential Andean dams on the Amazon river system has found that major negative ecological impacts can be expected both above the dams and throughout the lowland floodplains and the Amazon Delta.
3h
Ars Technica
Engineer whose blog post caused a storm at Uber has filed a Supreme Court brief (credit: flickr / deltamike ) The engineer whose blog post kicked off an internal storm at Uber isn’t done speaking up about her former employer. Ex-Uber engineer Susan Fowler has filed an amicus brief (PDF) with the Supreme Court, weighing in on a case about arbitration and an employee’s rights to file a class-action lawsuit. Fowler’s February 2017 blog post , titled "Reflecting On One Very, Ver
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Dragons, Nukes and Game of ThronesThe reality of nuclear weapons and the fantasy of fire-breathing lizards have parallels, but important differences as well -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
New Scientist - News
Male athletes with higher world rankings are better lookingMale biathletes who achieved a higher world ranking were rated as more attractive, suggesting women have evolved to prefer men with endurance and skill
3h
Futurity.org
Why ineffective teachers rarely get low ratings Less than one third of teachers perceived by school principals to be ineffective are formally rated accordingly, researchers report. As was true in the past, less than 1 percent of teachers are rated unsatisfactory. “Districts and states have invested considerable time and resources to reform teacher evaluation systems,” says coauthor Matthew Kraft, an assistant professor of education at Brown Un
3h
Gizmodo
Tropical Storm Harvey Expected to Bring Catastrophic Flooding to Texas Tropical Storm Harvey as photographed by the GOES-16 satellite at 9:50 am EDT on August 23, 2017. (Image: NOAA/CIRA/RAMMB) Tropical Storm Harvey is continuing to gain strength in the Gulf of Mexico, and meteorologists are now expecting this weather system to assume hurricane status by Friday. Texans are now battening down the hatches in preparation for high winds, extreme rains, and an unusually
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More solar power thanks to titaniumEarth-abundant, cheap metals are promising photocatalytic electrode materials in artificial photosynthesis. A team of scientists now reports that a thin layer of titania beneath hematite nanorods can boost the performance of the photoanode. The nanostructured electrode benefits from two separate effects. This design combining nanostructure with chemical doping may be exemplary for improved 'green'
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enzyme produced in the liver promotes obesity, fatty liver disease and insulin resistanceIn mice that are given a high-fat diet, an increased production of the enzyme DPP4 by the liver promotes an increase in body fat, the development of fatty liver disease and insulin resistance.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Age-related hearing loss, communication breakdown in the clinical settingIt was not uncommon for older adults to report mishearing a physician or nurse in a primary care or hospital setting, according to a study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Young children's sense of self is similar to that of adultsYoung children's sense of self is similar to that of older kids and adults. The results show that our ability to reason about our self-worth as individuals develops early in life.
3h
Ars Technica
Tesla’s fight to sell cars in Michigan takes another step forward Enlarge (credit: Thinkstock / Aurich) Tesla's fight with Michigan over direct-to-consumer car sales took a step forward this week. On Monday, US Magistrate Judge Ellen Carmody ordered Michigan State Senator Joe Hune and State Representative Jason Sheppard to comply with a subpoena related to protectionist legislation passed in the state in 2014. Both sides must now agree on relevant search terms,
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studies explore the potential benefits of red raspberriesParticipants in short-term human trials experienced an improvement in glucose control and increased satiety, while longer-term animal trials revealed promising effects on the gut microbiota after red raspberry intake. The observations from animal and in vitro studies provided insights that support future hypotheses for red raspberry research exploring potential beneficial effects on pathways relat
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Energy Department Study Calls for Boost to Coal and Nuclear PowerThe report dovetails with the president’s promise to revive the ailing mining sector -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Gizmodo
Semi-Autonomous Cars Scare the Shit Out of Me GIF Illustration: Sam Woolley Last month, I was driving down the interstate, somewhere near the southern corner of Virginia, when a thunderstorm opened up above me. Suddenly, a wall of water appeared a hundred yards ahead. In a split second, I had zero visibility, a slick road, and a shitload of anxiety. So I let go of the wheel and felt the car find the lane. It was Volvo’s semi-autonomous drivi
3h
Ars Technica
Creators Update on two-thirds of Windows 10 machines Enlarge / Surface Laptop. (credit: Justin Wolfson) Last month Microsoft removed the throttle that was limiting the rollout of the Creators Update, opening it up to every compatible machine. As a result, penetration of this latest version of Windows has gone from 50 percent to 65 percent, according to the numbers provided by AdDuplex . With the Fall Creators Update due next month, at this point it
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improvised explosive devices inflict much more serious injuries than land minesThe types of close contact injuries inflicted by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are much more serious than those associated with land mines, finds research.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dose of hydrogen peroxide saves fish from toxic algal bloomsMillions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Northeast Strengthens Carbon Goals as Federal Rules FadeNine states announced a proposal to cut power plant emissions 30 percent between 2021 and 2030 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shopping by voice on Amazon or Google device could cost youIn the name of convenience, Amazon and Walmart are pushing people to shop by just talking to a digital assistant.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
San Francisco Will Mull a Robot Tax
3h
Popular Science
Mayweather and McGregor’s 8-ounce boxing gloves have started a science fight Technology It's still unclear just how much the weight of a boxing glove affects the performance and safety of a fighter. Conor McGregor will fight Floyd Mayweather in 8-ounce gloves.
3h
Live Science
Solar Power Dipped Along Great American Solar Eclipse Path (Video)Solar power took a dip in the United States when the total eclipse swept across the country Monday (Aug. 21), as a new video shows.
3h
Live Science
Stunning Satellite Photo Reveals Volcanic Eruption Near AlaskaEruptions from one of the most active volcanic regions in the world sent plumes of ash and steam into the sky this week, as captured in a spectacular image by an Earth-monitoring satellite.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Tolstoy noted (sort of), all unhappy microbiomes are unhappy in their own wayThe bacterial communities that live inside everyone are quite similar and stable when times are good, but when stress enters the equation, those communities can react very differently from person to person.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple gets $208M in tax breaks to build Iowa data centerIowa approved a deal Thursday to give Apple $208 million in state and local tax breaks to build two data storage centers near Des Moines and the promise to create 50 jobs.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists from the MSU adjusted a microalgal technology for wastMembers of the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University proved that under Nordic conditions wastewaters could be treated with the help of microalgae, while algal biomass is suitable for processing into biofuel. The scientists have presented the optimized technique for the removal from wastewater of organic compounds, along with nitrogen and phosphorus in the article, published i
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As Tolstoy noted (sort of), all unhappy microbiomes are unhappy in their own wayThe bacterial communities that live inside everyone are quite similar and stable when times are good, but when stress enters the equation, those communities can react very differently from person to person.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme produced in the liver promotes obesity, fatty liver disease and insulin resistanceIn mice that are given a high-fat diet, an increased production of the enzyme DPP4* by the liver promotes an increase in body fat, the development of fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. These were the findings of a current study by DZD-researchers in Potsdam and Tübingen.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expressionThe sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover how tuberculosis hijacks the immune systemScientists have unlocked a key element in understanding how human lungs fight tuberculosis (TB). They hope their research findings, which were published today in the international peer reviewed journal Immunity, will help pave the way towards new treatment approaches for TB, particularly in an era of increasing antibiotic resistance to TB.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer drug can reactivate HIVPeople living with HIV must take a combination of three or more different drugs every day for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, by following this strict treatment plan, they can suffer from side effects ranging from mild dizziness to life-threatening liver damage. However, if they stop taking the drugs, the virus hiding inside their cells can spontaneously resurface.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leprosy turns the immune system against itself, study findsLeprosy hijacks our immune system, turning an important repair mechanism into one that causes potentially irreparable damage to our nerve cells, according to new research that uses zebrafish to study the disease. As such, the disease may share common characteristics with conditions such as multiple sclerosis.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bleats and trills evolved multiple times to aid in 'caller ID'Sheep, giant pandas, mouse lemurs, and fur seals all have something in common when it comes to communication. All of them produce calls with rapid, vibrato-like fundamental frequency modulation -- commonly known as bleats or trills. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology think they know why that call feature has arisen multiple times over the course of evolution: it improves the ability of
3h
Gizmodo
The World's Largest Radio Telescope Has a Massive Tourist Problem Screengrab: YouTube/ Fraser Cain via FAST In September, China flicked the switch on the world’s largest radio telescope. The unusually large dish in an isolated area of Guizhou province needs radio silence to hone in on potential signs of alien life and distant pulsars, but researchers fear that a huge influx of tourists could be rendering the $180 million dish useless. Now, a choice between a bo
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Everyone's an expert, but a computer program may be able to pick the best onesCombining the intuition of humans with the impartiality of computers could improve decision-making for organizations, eventually leading to lower costs and better profits, according to a team of researchers.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Absurd screeningstilbud til ældre kvinderDet er rystende, at politikere prioriterer ressourser til en absurd og skadelig screening i en tid, hvor sundhedsvæsnet er historisk presset.
3h
Ars Technica
EB Games transforms its used game stocks into a massive lending library Enlarge / Why choose just one to buy when you can just borrow any used title for a low monthly fee? (credit: The Grey Backpack ) With direct downloads and other digital purchases growing in popularity even among console gamers, brick-and-mortar game retailers are looking for new ways to stay relevant well into the future. To that end, GameStop-owned EB Games Australia is conducting an interesting
3h
New Scientist - News
Monkeys can see faces in inanimate things, just like usFrom Jesus appearing on toast to the man in the moon, we can’t help seeing faces where there are none. Now it turns out monkeys do the same thing
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Tropical Storm Harvey Could Heavily Flood TexasThe biggest threat from Harvey is not its strong winds but the heavy rain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Small Quantum-Computing Firm Wants to Supercharge AI Startups
3h
Popular Science
You’re throwing away the healthiest part of the avocado Health New revelations about the green berry everyone has come to love. Chemists just keep finding ways to spur on the avocado evangelists: now they can even be used to create antiviral drugs.
3h
Viden
Er det pengene værd?
3h
Gizmodo
This Bizarre Interstellar Observation Could Unlock the Mysteries of Dark Matter Cool space art (Image: NASA) “I don’t know!” is among the most scientific phrases you can utter. “I don’t know” is the reason you do science, after all. “I don’t know” means more funding, more jobs, more mysteries, and ultimately, more “now I knows.” Astronomers have now uncovered an “I don’t know” that might become an important tool to study even more “I don’t knows.” If that doesn’t make any se
3h
Feed: All Latest
What It Takes to Hold Your Breath for 24 Minutes (Yeah, It’s a Thing)The world record stands at 24 minutes 3 seconds. How much can it improve?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More solar power thanks to titaniumEarth-abundant, cheap metals are promising photocatalytic electrode materials in artificial photosynthesis. A team of Chinese scientists now reports that a thin layer of titania beneath hematite nanorods can boost the performance of the photoanode. As outlined in their report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the nanostructured electrode benefits from two separate effects. This design combining na
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal simplifies synthesis of antibody drugsRice University scientists have developed a method to efficiently modify natural antibodies that can deliver drugs to target cells. Adding a little extra metal is the key.
3h
Live Science
2,000-Year-Old Tombs from Roman Period Found in EgyptA series of tombs dating back about 2,000 years, to the time when the Romans controlled Egypt, has been discovered.
3h
Live Science
Young People Face Stroke Risk with Methamphetamine UseUsing methamphetamines may increase the risk of stroke among young people, according to a new review.
3h
Live Science
Photos: 2,000-Year-Old Tombs Found in Egyptian OasisA series of Egyptian tombs dating back about 2,000 years, to the time when the Romans controlled Egypt, have been discovered at Bir esh-Shaghala in the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt.
3h
Futurity.org
These oxytocin genes may influence number of friends New research links higher expression of two genes that regulate the release of oxytocin with greater friendliness and social skills among young adults. Oxytocin is the paramount social hormone in humans, and is involved in primary social behaviors such as pair-bonding, mating, and child-rearing, as well as more sophisticated behaviors such as empathy, trust, and generosity. Researchers at the Nat
4h
Science | The Guardian
Families deserve a final Grenfell death toll. We mustn’t be slaves to DNA testing | Lucy EasthopeRelying on exact DNA science to identify the fire’s victims could lead to years of cruel uncertainty. We should learn from other disasters, trying new approaches Ten weeks on from the Grenfell fire, 58 victims of its victims have been formally identified . But the number who died is thought to number at least 80 , and could be many more. Some families who lost their loved ones face a wait of month
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly 1 in 4 hospitalized patients has diabetesOne in four patients in a university hospital suffers from diabetes (22 percent), and again as many suffer from prediabetes (24 percent). These were the findings of a current study by researchers in Tübingen of the German Center for Diabetes Research and Helmholtz Zentrum München. Further results of the study: patients with diabetes have prolonged hospital stays and a higher risk of complications.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bleats and trills evolved multiple times to aid in 'caller ID'Sheep, giant pandas, mouse lemurs, capybaras, and fur seals all have something in common when it comes to communication. All of them produce calls with rapid, vibrato-like fundamental frequency modulation—commonly known as bleats or trills. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 24 think they know why that call feature has arisen multiple times over the course of evolution: it imp
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viewers who tweet during presidential debates learn more about political issuesPolitics and Twitter now seem inseparable, especially with politicians tweeting increasingly to connect with their supporters. A team of researchers at the University of Missouri's Political Communication Institute (PCI) have found evidence that social media engagement—or social watching— during last year's presidential debates produced beneficial effects for those engaged on Twitter while watchin
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The spacefaring power of... pee?Space scientists have to take advantage of all the materials available to them on a deep-space mission.
4h
The Atlantic
How to Tell Which Donald Trump Will Deliver a Speech After a raucous rally in Phoenix on Tuesday, filled with blatant dishonesty and attacks on the press and Republican officeholders , Donald Trump was set to speak to the American Legion in Reno, Nevada, on Wednesday. But anyone tuning in expecting to see the president come out with guns blazing was instead treated to a snoozefest: a workmanlike, respectful, even dull speech, appropriate to the occ
4h
The Atlantic
A Court Strikes Down Texas's Voter ID Law For the Fifth Time Texas’s voter ID law has been having a pretty bad time in the courts. On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos found that the state’s new S.B. 5 law, passed in June, is still invalid, because its predecessor law was passed with discriminatory intent. But Judge Ramos went even further than simply striking down the law—implying that renewed federal supervision of Texas voting laws may
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Secret life of the dodo revealedHundreds of years after the dodo died out, new facts are emerging about the life history of the bird.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Illegal dumping during road construction in Ethiopia affects child mortalityResearchers have shown that living near newly built roads in Ethiopia is associated with higher rates of infant mortality. Proximity to new roads has negative health effects because of toxic waste dumped illegally during the construction phase.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough in magnesium batteriesMagnesium batteries are safe -- unlike traditional lithium ion batteries, they are not flammable or subject to exploding -- but until now their ability to store energy has been limited. Researchers have reported a new design for the battery cathode, drastically increasing the storage capacity and upending conventional wisdom that the magnesium-chloride bond must be broken before inserting magnesiu
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is there a better way to create organic bioelectronics?Researchers reported a new fabrication technique for biocompatible neural devices that allow more precise tuning of the electrical performance of neural probes, along with improved properties for drug delivery.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mathematical tools improve theory, prediction in psychiatryRecent years have seen an explosion in the use of mathematical models to integrate insights emerging from studies of the brain and behavior. This approach has been used to develop new theoretical perspectives that can enrich data analysis, which researchers hope will help explain mechanisms behind complex psychiatric diseases and improve treatment for patients.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exploring the ground truth: NASA's twin study investigates metabolitesResearchers are integrating multi-omics data for NASA's Twins Study and comparing all the metabolites in retired twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. Experts saw a number of Scott's metabolites increase in levels when he went to space and when he returned to Earth some of those stayed elevated. By integrating data from other Twins Study investigations, they hope they can determine the cause of th
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover common obesity and diabetes drug reduces rise in brain pressureResearchers have discovered that a drug commonly used to treat patients with either obesity or Type II diabetes could be used as a novel new way to lower brain pressure.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiological crimes investigations: Scientist-detectives put themselves to the testWhen radioactive material is intercepted at the border, officials need scientific support to determine what it is, if it's dangerous to first responders or the public, and if it's illegal to possess.
4h
New Scientist - News
Wonky signals from distant stars could be sign of exocometsAstronomers looking at two stars 800 light years away say they may have found the first comets beyond our solar system
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report better way to create organic bioelectronicsWith increasing scientific and medical interest in communication with the nervous system, demand is growing for biomedical devices that can better record and stimulate the nervous system, as well as deliver drugs and biomolecules in precise dosages.
4h
Ars Technica
Reaction video deemed fair use in YouTuber court battle Ethan and Hila Klein explaining their legal win. After more than a year of battling in court, Ethan and Hila Klein, the YouTubers behind the H3H3 Productions channel, won a lawsuit filed against them by another YouTuber. Matt "Hoss" Hosseinzadeh—MattHossZone on YouTube—sued the pair after they uploaded a video in which the Kleins react to one of Hosseinzadeh's videos and criticize him in the proc
4h
Gizmodo
Watch a Madman Ride a Bike Packed With 1,000 Exploding Rockets GIF Riding a bike without a helmet or other protective gear is already a risky idea. But climbing aboard a custom-built bike packed with 1,000 rockets while you’re protected by nothing but a fireproof slab of foam strapped to your back is risk on a whole other level—even if you’re a semi-pro mad scientist like Colin Furze . Furze has never shied away from fire and explosives when it comes to his
4h
Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: SONOS PLAYBAR, Dyson V6, Kershaw Knives, and More An exclusive deal on Anker’s newest products , the perfect vacuum for pet owners , and a Kershaw knife sale lead off Thursday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Eufy RoboVac 11c + Eufy Genie , $288 with promo code KINJA823 Anker’s been busy! In addition to a new Echo Dot alternative , they also just released an updated version of their
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexplained phase shifts seen during atomic scatteringBy firing a proton beam at atoms, investigators can observe the dynamics resulting from the interactions between the various particles in the system. Researchers have now described how when a hydrogen molecule and a proton collided, they observed unexpected features related to the wave nature of the particles. The work builds on the ongoing exploration into the "few-body problem" in physics, which
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strange state of matter in superconducting crystalNew research shows a rare state of matter in which electrons in a superconducting crystal organize collectively. The findings lay the groundwork for answering one of the most compelling questions in physics: How do correlated electron systems work, and are they related to one another?
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-dimensional quantum encryption performed in real-world city conditions for first timeFor the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New receptor found on scavenger cellsScientists demonstrate how adenovirus invades the immune system of mice.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu vaccine rates for kids may drop when the nasal spray vaccine is unavailableInfluenza vaccination rates in children may have decreased for the 2016-17 influenza season because of a recommendation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that the nasal spray version of the vaccine not be used, according to researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Everyone's an expert, but a computer program may be able to pick the best onesCombining the intuition of humans with the impartiality of computers could improve decision-making for organizations, eventually leading to lower costs and better profits, according to a team of researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists take first snapshots of a molecular propeller that runs at 100 degrees CelsiusScientists have made a crucial new discovery into how a group of ancient microbes that can survive in some of the world's harshest environments, propel themselves forward.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in five women with postpartum mood disorders keep quietA recent study finds that 21 percent of recent mothers experiencing postpartum mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, do not disclose their symptoms to healthcare providers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metal simplifies synthesis of antibody drugsChemists have designed a plug-in metalloprotein to simplify the task of making targeted antibody therapies.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caffeine tempers taste, triggering temptation for sweetsCaffeine, the widely consumed stimulant and igniter of sluggish mornings, has been found to temper taste buds temporarily, making food and drink seem less sweet, according to new research.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illinois researchers develop origami-inspired robotNew research from a team of University of Illinois Mechanical Science and Engineering professors and students, published as an invited paper in Smart Materials and Structures, details how origami structures and bio-inspired design can be used to create a crawling robot.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research examines avocados' potential impact on cognitive health in older adultsConsuming one fresh avocado per day may lead to improved cognitive function in healthy older adults due to increased lutein levels in the brain and eye, according to new research published in the journal Nutrients.
4h
Gizmodo
Popular 'Pickup Artist' Comedian Loses Huge Lawsuit Against YouTubers That Mocked Him Image: YouTube / MattHossZone Matt Hosseinzadeh (a.k.a. Matt Hoss) is easy to mock. The parkour-loving comedian runs a YouTube channel full of misogynistic videos , including “a comedy series about a confident and funny man who picks up women, beds them, and gets into all sorts of crazy trouble.” But when two other YouTubers made a video mocking him and included clips of his fictional pickup arti
4h
Ars Technica
Report: Google’s flagship smartphones launch October 5 Android Police VentureBeat's Evan Blass says he knows the date for the launch of Google's next smartphone, the Pixel 2: October 5. The ever-reliable leaker also says the device will come with a new SoC from Qualcomm, a "Snapdragon 836." Google's second-generation Pixel handsets, powered by Snapdragon 836 SoC's, will be unveiled on October 5th. — Evan Blass (@evleaks) August 24, 2017 The report li
4h
The Atlantic
Saturday Night Live Needs to Ditch the Special Guests It’s easy to understand the reasoning behind Saturday Night Live Weekend Update: Summer Edition , convoluted name aside. SNL ’s September-to-May network schedule keeps it off the air for the whole summer, and as the Trump administration (the program’s biggest ratings booster) rumbles along making news every day, the show doesn’t get any bites at the satirical apple, so to speak. So these half-hou
4h
Popular Science
How to grill meat over an open fire DIY Like pirates used to do. You don't need fancy gear to perfectly grill meat—Americans have been cooking over open flames for centuries. Here's how to do it yourself.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What would happen if we upload our brains to computers? | Robin HansonMeet the "ems" -- machines that emulate human brains and can think, feel and work just like the brains they're copied from. Futurist and social scientist Robin Hanson describes a possible future when ems take over the global economy, running on superfast computers and copying themselves to multitask, leaving humans with only one choice: to retire, forever. Glimpse a strange future as Hanson descri
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monitoring network traffic more efficientlyResearchers at MIT, Cisco Systems, and Barefoot Networks have come up with a new approach to network monitoring that provides great flexibility in data collection while keeping both the circuit complexity of the router and the number of external analytic servers low.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Man-made fossil methane emission levels larger than previously believedA team of researchers led by Vasilii Petrenko, an assistant professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester, spent seven weeks in Antarctica collecting and studying 2,000-pound samples of glacial ice cores that date back nearly 12,000 years. The ancient air trapped within the ice revealed surprising new data about methane that may help inform today's policymakers as th
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows incisionless surgery with MR-HIFU effective in destroying painful bone tumorsDoctors from the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children's National Health System have completed a clinical trial that demonstrates how osteoid osteoma, a benign but painful bone tumor that commonly occurs in children and young adults, can be safely and successfully treated using an incisionless surgery method called magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ult
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More solar power thanks to titaniumEarth-abundant, cheap metals are promising photocatalytic electrode materials in artificial photosynthesis. A team of Chinese scientists now reports that a thin layer of titania beneath hematite nanorods can boost the performance of the photoanode. As outlined in their report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the nanostructured electrode benefits from two separate effects. This design combining na
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explains why patients with shingles feel painThe immune mechanisms triggered by the virus when it is reactivated, changing the way that sensory neurons work and resulting in herpetic neuralgia, are described by researchers affiliated with the University of São Paulo in an article published in the Journal of Neuroscience. The authors say that their discoveries lay a foundation for novel treatments not only to combat acute pain but also to pre
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LGB older adults suffer more chronic health conditions than heterosexuals, study findsA University of Washington study finds that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older adults were found to be in poorer health than heterosexuals, specifically in terms of higher rates of cardiovascular disease, weakened immune system and low back or neck pain. They also were at greater risk of some adverse health behaviors such as smoking and excessive drinking.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anesthesia and surgery during infancy may impact white matter during childhoodGeneral anesthesia and surgery in otherwise healthy infants under the age of one year could be associated with decreases in the amount of white matter in the brain, as well as reductions in the remaining white matter's integrity, according to a new University of Iowa Health Care study published this week in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the Americ
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Age-related hearing loss and communication breakdown in the clinical settingIt was not uncommon for older adults to report mishearing a physician or nurse in a primary care or hospital setting, according to a study published by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young children's sense of self is similar to that of adultsYoung children's sense of self is similar to that of older kids and adults. The results show that our ability to reason about our self-worth as individuals develops early in life.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: System improves sleeping environmentThe Nightingale smart home sleep system is designed to give you a better night of sleep by creating an optimal sleep environment. These are designed to create sound blankets which mask noises that keep you awake at night, depriving you of a good night's sleep.
4h
Live Science
Einstein's Letter Warning of Hitler Goes Up for AuctionA cache of letters written by Einstein to a dear friend is going up for auction today.
4h
Ars Technica
Destiny 2 finally feels like a game I might want to get hooked on Enlarge / The Interceptor is baaaaack. (credit: Bungie) BELLEVUE, Wash.—We're finally close to knowing what Destiny 2 will feel like when it launches on September 6 for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 consoles. Close, but not quite. The online shooter's developers at Bungie hosted a major preview event last week, just down the block from its offices in the Seattle-area city of Bellevue, and the assemb
5h
Feed: All Latest
Stock Photo Companies Randomize Their Watermarks to Foil Google's Thieving AlgorithmWe can give computers vision, but we can take it away too.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New green solvent could help clean our airResearchers have patented an eco-friendly liquid mixture that could help trap harmful pollutants from the air. The non-flammable solvent contains urea and choline salt, a common ingredient in chicken feed.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Panic disorder symptoms may be tied to acid-sensing receptorA pilot study -- the first to evaluate the TDAG8 expression in patients with panic disorder -- reveals significantly increased levels in patients with panic disorder, relative to their healthy control subjects. Researchers found an association with TDAG8 and symptom severity, and observed a relationship between TDAG8 and treatment response in patients who had been treated with antidepressants.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the emotions of others influence our olfactory senseThe emotional facial expression of others influences how positive or negative we perceive an odor. The basis of this effect seems to be the activity of a brain area that is relevant for smelling and is activated even before we perceive an odor.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HIIT releases endorphins in the brainResearchers have revealed that exercise-induced endorphin release in the brain depends on the intensity of the exercise. Endorphin release induced by exercise may be an important mechanism which affects exercise motivation and maintenance of regular physical activity.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy with BMP4 protects against weight gain and insulin resistance in miceThere was no weight gain, despite a higher energy intake, and insulin sensitivity was increased. These are the results from experiments on mice that had elevated levels of the protein BMP4 following gene therapy.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viewers who tweet during presidential debates learn more about political issuesA team of researchers at the University of Missouri's Political Communication Institute have found evidence that social media engagement -- or social watching -- during last year's presidential debates produced beneficial effects for those engaged on Twitter while watching the debates on TV. In a pair of studies, communication experts have found that issue-based tweeting was directly related to gr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Everyone's an expert, but a computer program may be able to pick the best onesCombining the intuition of humans with the impartiality of computers could improve decision-making for organizations, eventually leading to lower costs and better profits, according to a team of researchers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rapid diagnostic test helps distinguish between severe and uncomplicated malaria in AfricaWorking at a health center in rural Uganda, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill demonstrated for the first time the potential of using a low-cost, routinely available rapid diagnostic test to distinguish between severe and uncomplicated malaria in children.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flu vaccine rates for kids may drop when the nasal spray vaccine is unavailableInfluenza vaccination rates in children may have decreased for the 2016-17 influenza season because of a recommendation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that the nasal spray version of the vaccine not be used, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New receptor found on scavenger cellsScientists demonstrate how adenovirus invades the immune system of mice.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The spacefaring power of... pee? (video)Space scientists have to take advantage of all the materials available to them on a deep-space mission. Even human waste can be a valuable resource. Learn how urine has the potential to become everything from hand tools to nutritional supplements in this video from Reactions: https://youtu.be/w6x54zYuqXk.
5h
The Atlantic
Mentorship Cut Short by Suicide Before he started working with Aaron Swartz, the Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig built his professional life around internet law and copyright policy. In the early 2000s, Lessig was at the top of his academic field, then working at Stanford. As an undergraduate student, Swartz, who had met Lessig at a computer conference when he was just 14, convinced the professor to radically change his c
5h
Big Think
Why People Want to Get Rid of Confederate Statues, as Explained by Plato There is a philosophical way of looking at the current arguments to remove Confederate statues, and it's one that dates back to Ancient Greece. Read More
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
How Mushrooms Could Repair Our Crumbling InfrastructureA fungus that grows on concrete and promotes the growth of calcium carbonate could help repair roads and bridges, materials scientists say.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Germany Takes an Ethics Stance on Driverless Cars: Don’t Kill Humans
5h
The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
5h
The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
5h
The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Baby boomer squirrels master tricky timingFemale squirrels who align their reproduction to take advantage of food-rich years and align have more pups that survive to maturity, according to new research.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential treatments for disorders involving MeCP2A team of researchers has developed a strategy that allows them to identify potential treatments that would restore altered levels of MeCP2.
5h
Gizmodo
The Current State of DC Superhero Movies All images: Warner Bros. It’s been a confusing few days for people trying to keep track of what’s going on in Warner Bros.’ movie universe, called the DC Extended Universe (DCEU). So we’ve compiled a list of all the movies currently planned and their statuses. Justice League (And Sequels) Set to be released November 17 of this year, Justice League is in the middle of being finished by Joss Whedon
5h
Live Science
A Titanosaur the Size of a Killer Whale Once Stomped Across AfricaA humongous "wide-necked" dinosaur — one that weighed as much as two cars — stomped across the landscape of prehistoric Africa during the Cretaceous period, a new study finds.
5h
Live Science
China's 'Rejuvenation' Bullet Trains Are the World's FastestChina recently debuted the next generation of the world's fastest bullet trains.
5h
Futurity.org
People hunted sheep in Black Desert 14,500 years ago Bones from wild sheep have turned up in the Black Desert in eastern Jordan. Archeologists hadn’t before identified the species in that area in the Late Pleistocene. Excavations of architecture and associated deposits left by hunter-gatherers revealed the bones. “Our findings illustrate how adaptive humans were nearly 14,500 years ago in a period of climatic change: Wild sheep offered the Natufian
5h
Gizmodo
I Wish All Smart Home Upgrades Were as Easy as This Light Bulb GIF All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo There’s an entire standup routine waiting to be written about how smart home accessories can be incredibly dumb and complicated . But one of the easiest smart home upgrades, smart lighting, has just gotten easy enough for even your parents to install without calling you—if they’re living in Apple’s ecosystem. Smartphone-controlled light bulbs were one of t
5h
Ingeniøren
En kvart milliard på vej til Aalborg som erstatning for aflyst letbaneDa Aalborg Kommunes håb om en letbane blev fjernet fra finansloven i 2015, gik man hurtigt i gang med at finde et nyt projekt, som kunne forbedre byens efterhånden plagede trafiksituation. Nu har man – næsten – fået bevilliget en kvart milliard til en ny busrute, som skal træde i letbanens sted.
5h
The Atlantic
The Defenders Proves Heroes Aren't Enough This story contains spoilers through all eight episodes of The Defenders. The premise of The Defenders was a doozy: Netflix’s four Marvel superheroes, with their various powers, and foibles, and neatly color-coded worlds, would team up to battle an antagonist so powerful and so nefarious that it required their collective might to defeat it. What’s not to like? As The Avengers has proven, the only
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
State Department Science Envoy Explains Why Trump Drove Him to ResignDaniel Kammen decries Trump’s attitude and policies on human rights and sustainability -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly flexible, wearable displaysEngineers have created wearable displays for various applications including fashion, IT, and healthcare. Integrating OLED (organic light-emitting diode) into fabrics, the team developed some of the most highly flexible and reliable technology for wearable displays in the world.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eleven minutes of mindfulness training helps drinkers cut backBrief training in mindfulness strategies could help heavy drinkers start to cut back on alcohol consumption, finds a new study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fantastic beasts and why to 'conserve' themBeliefs in magical creatures can impact the protection of biodiversity and the field of conservation needs to consider them seriously, researchers have warned.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a drug could induce health benefits of exerciseScientists have identified a mechanism that 'switches on' the exercise response in mammals, opening up the possibility that drugs could eventually be developed to produce or enhance the health benefits of physical activity.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survival of soil organisms is a wake-up call for biosecurityTiny creatures in soil that attack plants have the ability to survive for at least three years stored in dry conditions, showed a recent study. Furthermore, they were found to still be able to invade plant roots. The research article provides new insights into the biosecurity threats posed by passenger travel and trade between countries and tests various methods for nematodes detection.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Severity of North Pacific storms at highest point in over 1,200 yearsIce cores from Denali and Mount Logan offer insight into global climate connections and the history on intensifying storms.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists find strange state of matter in superconducting crystalNew research published this week shows a rare state of matter in which electrons in a superconducting crystal organize collectively. The findings lay the groundwork for answering one of the most compelling questions in physics: How do correlated electron systems work, and are they related to one another?
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caffeine tempers taste, triggering temptation for sweetsCaffeine, the widely consumed stimulant and igniter of sluggish mornings, has been found to temper taste buds temporarily, making food and drink seem less sweet, according to new Cornell University research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers report better way to create organic bioelectronicsResearchers with the University of Houston and Pennsylvania State University have reported a new fabrication technique for biocompatible neural devices that allow more precise tuning of the electrical performance of neural probes, along with improved properties for drug delivery.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal simplifies synthesis of antibody drugsRice University chemists have designed a plug-in metalloprotein to simplify the task of making targeted antibody therapies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy with BMP4 protects against weight gain and insulin resistance in miceThere was no weight gain, despite a higher energy intake, and insulin sensitivity was increased. These are the results from experiments on mice that had elevated levels of the protein BMP4 following gene therapy in a study at Sahlgrenska Academy, published in Cell Reports.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This is how belly fat could increase your cancer riskA new Michigan State University study now offers new details showing that a certain protein released from fat in the body can cause a non-cancerous cell to turn into a cancerous one. The federally funded research also found that a lower layer of abdominal fat, when compared to fat just under the skin, is the more likely culprit, releasing even more of this protein and encouraging tumor growth.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIIT releases endorphins in the brainFinnish researchers at the University of Turku have revealed that exercise-induced endorphin release in the brain depends on the intensity of the exercise. Endorphin release induced by exercise may be an important mechanism which affects exercise motivation and maintenance of regular physical activity.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-dimensional quantum encryption performed in real-world city conditions for first timeFor the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city.
5h
Gizmodo
Mysteries of the Dodo Revealed Centuries After Sailors Ate Them All Image: Wikimedia Commons While the flightless dodo has long since died out—because humans ate the shit out of them —its memory lives on in our imagination. So much about the quirky birds—which were endemic only to the island of Mauritius —remains a mystery, but new research has finally provided some insights into the dodo’s reproductive habits and life cycle. A study published today in Scientific
5h
Gizmodo
Save On Anker's Brand New RoboVac, Plus a Free Alexa-Enabled Smart Speaker [Exclusive] Eufy RoboVac 11c + Eufy Genie , $288 with promo code KINJA823 Anker’s been busy! In addition to a new Echo Dot alternative , they also just released an updated version of their uber-popular RoboVac 11 , and you can bundle and save on both today. The RoboVac 11c appears to be the same RoboVac you know and love, but with the addition of Wi-Fi so you can control it with your smartphone or Alexa. Adv
5h
Futurity.org
Could Dragonfly drone find signs of life on Titan? Scientists want to send an insect-like dual-quadcopter to Saturn’s moon, Titan, then fly it from place to place to explore the possibility that life could develop there. “We could take a lander, put it on Titan … at one place and significantly increase our understanding of Titan and similar moons,” says Peter Bedini, Dragonfly project manager at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins Uni
5h
Quanta Magazine
Interspecies Hybrids Play a Vital Role in Evolution In 2006, a hunter shot what he thought was a polar bear in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Closer examination, however, revealed brown patches on its white fur, uncharacteristically long claws and a slightly hunched back. The creature was in fact a hybrid, its mother a polar bear, its father a grizzly. Although this cross was known to be possible — the two species had mated in captivity befo
5h
New Scientist - News
Secret lifestyle of the dodo revealed for the first timeA study of dodo bones has revealed how the legendary birds matured, bred and moulted, and explains discrepancies in sailors’ descriptions of them
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find school board diversity reduces school suspensionsA new study from criminology researchers at Florida State University reveals that a more diverse school board can lead to more equitable school punishment among black, white and Hispanic students.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists take first snapshots of a molecular propeller that runs at 100 degrees CelsiusScientists have made a crucial new discovery into how a group of ancient microbes that can survive in some of the world's harshest environments, propel themselves forward.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reduced performance triggers turnover for nonprofit executivesNonprofit organizations that have declining expenditures—an indication of reduced operations—are more likely to seek new leadership, according to a new study.
5h
Feed: All Latest
SpaceX Will Lose Millions on Its Taiwanese Satellite LaunchWith a contract signed in 2010, Taiwan paid less than half the going rate for a SpaceX launch.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Darwin’s Backyard’ chronicles naturalist’s homespun experimentsIn the new book Darwin’s Backyard, a biologist explores Charles Darwin’s family life, as well as four decades’ worth of his at-home experiments.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Upon prolonged irradiation, human stem cells' defenses are activatedResearchers discovered that ionizing radiation causes a cell cycle delay, which leads to faster repairs of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, with fewer errors. It is unclear what the health implications are, particularly how this affects the risk of developing cancer, but this results could become the basis of further research into double breaks in stem cells and their effect on tumor fo
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physical activity in midlife not linked to cognitive fitness in later years, long-term study showsA study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers that tracked activity levels of 646 adults over 30 years found that, contrary to previous research, exercise in mid-life was not linked to cognitive fitness in later years.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers report breakthrough in magnesium batteriesMagnesium batteries are safe -- unlike traditional lithium ion batteries, they are not flammable or subject to exploding -- but until now their ability to store energy has been limited. Researchers from the University of Houston reported a new design for the battery cathode, drastically increasing the storage capacity and upending conventional wisdom that the magnesium-chloride bond must be broken
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the emotions of others influence our olfactory senseThe emotional facial expression of others influences how positive or negative we perceive an odor. The basis of this effect seems to be the activity of a brain area that is relevant for smelling and is activated even before we perceive an odor. This is what neuropsychologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum found out. They published their findings in the Journal Scientific Reports.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ICU patients who survive ARDS may suffer from prolonged post-intensive care syndromeNew study of 645 ARDS survivors by researchers at Intermountain Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University, and University of Utah, has identified subgroups of ARDS survivors who suffer what's been called post-intensive care syndrome, a collection of symptoms that can linger for years.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researchers find school board diversity reduces school suspensionsA new study from criminology researchers at Florida State University reveals that a more diverse school board can lead to more equitable school punishment among black, white and Hispanic students.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
1 in 5 women with postpartum mood disorders keep quietA recent study finds that 21 percent of recent mothers experiencing postpartum mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, do not disclose their symptoms to healthcare providers.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Panic disorder symptoms may be tied to acid-sensing receptorA pilot study at the University of Cincinnati -- the first to evaluate the TDAG8 expression in patients with panic disorder -- reveals significantly increased levels in patients with panic disorder, relative to their healthy control subjects. Researchers found an association with TDAG8 and symptom severity, and observed a relationship between TDAG8 and treatment response in patients who had been t
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists take first snapshots of a molecular propeller that runs at 100 degrees CelsiusScientists have made a crucial new discovery into how a group of ancient microbes that can survive in some of the world's harshest environments, propel themselves forward.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reduced performance triggers turnover for nonprofit executivesNonprofit organizations that have declining expenditures -- an indication of reduced operations -- are more likely to seek new leadership, according to a new study.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Missed nursing care due to low nurse staffing increases patient mortalityFailure to deliver complete nursing care explains why hospitals with lower registered nursing (RN) staff levels have a higher risk of patient death, a new University of Southampton study has shown.Jane Ball, Principal Research Fellow at the university, who led the study, says the results published in the International Journal of Nursing Studies reveal that care left undone due to lack of time is t
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New green solvent could help clean our airFrench researchers have patented an eco-friendly liquid mixture that could help trap harmful pollutants from the air. The non-flammable solvent contains urea and choline salt, a common ingredient in chicken feed, says Leila Moura of the Unité de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant in France. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illegal dumping during road construction in Ethiopia affects child mortalityResearchers have shown that living near newly built roads in Ethiopia is associated with higher rates of infant mortality. Proximity to new roads has negative health effects because of toxic waste dumped illegally during the construction phase.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Robotic Exoskeletons Show Promise As Tool to Help Kids with Cerebral Palsy Walk EasierCorrecting gait early on may aid mobility -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in magnesium batteries: Nanostructured cathode, understanding of new electrolyte lead to greater efficiencyMagnesium batteries offer promise for safely powering modern life—unlike traditional lithium ion batteries, they are not flammable or subject to exploding—but their ability to store energy has been limited.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-dimensional quantum encryption performed in real-world city conditions for first timeFor the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city. The demonstration showed that it could one day be practical to use high-capacity, free-space quantum communication to create a highly secure link between ground-based networks and satellites, a requirement for creating a global quantum encryption
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Startup launches new app that could shake up conventional video viewingA start-up from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has launched an innovative mobile app that allows viewers to interact with television or video screens. This could spell new opportunities for marketers as Singapore moves towards more digital applications in a SMART Nation.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New green solvent could help clean our airFrench researchers have patented an eco-friendly liquid mixture that could help trap harmful pollutants from the air. The non-flammable solvent contains urea and choline salt, a common ingredient in chicken feed, says Leila Moura of the Unité de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant in France. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters.
6h
Gizmodo
Trump Throws a Meme of Himself Eclipsing Obama Into His Unhinged, Typo-Filled Morning Tweetstorm Photo: Twitter In the midst of his semi-regularly scheduled bonkers morning tweet rant, in which he deleted and re-posted tweets multiple times, Donald Trump mixed things up by throwing in an undank meme. Trump’s morning tweets give the world a sense of what he has been stewing over for the past 24 hours. Based on his posts today, it seems he is concerned about Republican congress members causing
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anticoagulants used for arrhythmia can have different thrombus formation ratesAnticoagulants are recommended for atrial fibrillation due to the high risk of stroke. However, bleeding complications can occur as a side effect. Researchers in Japan examined several types of anticoagulants and found that the rates of thrombus formation are different according to the type of drug. This difference may be related to the risk of side effects, especially intracranial bleeding.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika monkey study suggests worse fetal effects for vaginal versus mosquito transmissionRhesus macaques that were vaginally infected with Zika virus showed higher prevalence of Zika in the reproductive tract than previously seen in macaques that received skin injections of the virus. The findings suggest that vaginal transmission may increase the risk or severity of fetal Zika disease compared to mosquito transmission.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Root behavior changes as woody trees ageComparing nighttime and daytime root extension in several species of Serianthes leads to interesting results.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making better batteries via real-time TEM observationScientists have made a surprising discovery: Making better batteries via real-time TEM observation.
6h
The Atlantic
How Mushrooms Became Magic If you were an American scientist interested in hallucinogens, the 1950s and 1960s were a great time to be working. Drugs like LSD and psilocybin—the active ingredient in magic mushrooms—were legal and researchers could acquire them easily. With federal funding, they ran more than a hundred studies to see if these chemicals could treat psychiatric disorders. That heyday ended in 1970, when Richar
6h
The Atlantic
The Lost Origins of Playing-Card Symbols Playing cards are known and used the world over—and almost every corner of the globe has laid claim to their invention. The Chinese assert the longest pedigree for card playing (the “ game of leaves ” was played as early as the 9th century). The French avow their standardization of the carte à jouer and its ancestor, the tarot. And the British allege the earliest mention of a card game in any aut
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Answers needed on sly grog tradeJames Cook University researchers in Australia have found sophisticated tactics are being used to smuggle illicit alcohol into Indigenous communities - with sly grog traders selling alcohol for up to 11 times its retail price.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals how new behaviors appear and spread among capuchin monkeysOne white-faced capuchin monkey sticks its fingers deep into the eye sockets of another capuchin it's friends with. A capuchin uses her ally's body parts to whack their common enemy. These behaviors become entrenched in the repertoires of the inventors. But in the first case, the behavior spreads to other group members, and in the second case it does not.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Root behavior changes as woody trees ageThe study of plant root behavior has always taken a back seat to the study of above-ground plant parts. But this hidden plant organ is just as important as stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. Recent research from the University of Guam has revealed that the timing of daily root extension is under the influence of the age and size of a plant. The results appear in the current issue of the journal P
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revolutionary approach brings 3-D sound into the living roomComputer vision and sound experts at the University of Surrey have demonstrated 'Media Device Orchestration' - an innovative home audio concept which enables users to enjoy immersive audio experiences by using all available devices in a typical living room.
6h
New Scientist - News
Stressed out GCSE kids need more mental health helpTeaching teens about mental health is welcome amid exam and social pressures, but the wider rise of childhood disorders demands much more, says Sarah Brennan
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making better batteries via real-time TEM observationLithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, which employ sulfur as cathode and metallic lithium as anode materials, have been widely nominated as one of the most promising next-generation electrochemical storage systems due to its low cost and high theoretical capacity. However, dissolution of its lithiated product (lithium polysulfides) into the electrolyte limits the practical application of lithium sulfur
6h
Ars Technica
SpaceX makes it a dozen launches in 2017, passes Russia [Updated] Enlarge / The static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket launch of Formosat-5 is completed last week. (credit: SpaceX) 3:25pm ET : SpaceX is getting good at this. The Falcon 9 rocket made a nominal launch on Thursday from California, and smoothly delivered its Earth-observing payload into orbit. Also, the first stage landed successfully on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean, marking the 15th time Spa
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
Germany Takes a Driverless Car Ethics Stance: Don’t Kill Humans
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU clinical observation finds efficacy rate of over 70 percent in Chinese medicine treatment of chronic renal failureThe School of Chinese Medicine of Hong Kong Baptist University recently conducted a clinical observation on Chinese medicine treatment of chronic renal failure.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Updated assessment of the health risks posed by longer-term consumption of foods contaminated with fipronilBased on currently available information, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment assumes that illegal applications of products containing fipronil have apparently been carried out over an extended period of time. For this reason, the longer term consumption of foods contaminated with fipronil is given due consideration when assessing the risks.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making better batteries via real-time TEM observationSouth Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has made a surprising discovery: Making better batteries via real-time TEM obervation.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revolutionary approach brings 3-D sound into the living roomComputer vision and sound experts at the University of Surrey have demonstrated 'Media Device Orchestration' -- an innovative home audio concept which enables users to enjoy immersive audio experiences by using all available devices in a typical living room.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New imaging technique spots prostate tumors starved of oxygenA new imaging technique uncovers oxygen levels in prostate tumors and could lead to a noninvasive way to determine which tumors are more difficult to treat, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published in Theranostics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop modern Medical Terms to enhance precise Chinese MedicineA novel calendric system, called the Twenty-four Medical Terms, has been proposed as an upgraded version of the traditional Twenty-four Solar Terms which was invented by Chinese ancestors some 3000 years ago. This improved medical calendar is expected to make a significant contribution to the development of precise Chinese Medicine, especially by better realizing the philosophy of 'treating winter
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacterial infection stresses hematopoietic stem cellsIt is becoming clear that immune cells are not the only cells that react to bacterial infection. Researchers from Japan and Switzerland found that bacterial infection also activates hematopoietic stem cells resident in the bone marrow far from the site of infection. This infection significantly reduces the ability of the stem cells to produce blood by forcing them to proliferate. These findings su
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug targets for a rare kidney and liver disease(Osaka, Japan) In a joint international study, researchers from Osaka University have partnered with research groups from the United States and Spain to uncover how mutations in a single gene called PKHD1 lead to symptoms associated with a rare kidney and liver disease, ARPKD (autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease). The findings are expected to lead to novel treatment strategies against th
6h
Dagens Medicin
En tidlig diabetesdiagnose kan forlænge livetScreening for diabetes kan reducere dødeligheden og risikoen for hjertekarsygdomme for personer, der bliver diagnosticeret tidligt med diabetes, viser ny forskning.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Essential Phone on its way to early adoptersEssential, the new smartphone company founded by Android operating system creator Andy Rubin, is planning to ship its first pre-ordered flagship smartphones soon. The general launch date for the Essential Phone remains unknown, despite months of publicity and continued intrigue among Silicon Valley's gadget-loving circles. Recently, Essential's exclusive carrier Sprint announced it will open Phone
6h
Ingeniøren
Sikkerhedsrobot druknede sig selv i indkøbscentrets springvandMidt på sommeren 'druknede' en amerikansk sikkerhedsrobot sig selv i springvandet i et indkøbscenter. Nu giver teknisk direktør for amerikansk robotfirma en forklaring: Robotter har ligesom mennesker brug for hjælp til at finde rundt.
6h
The Atlantic
The U.K.'s Tentative Roadmap Out of Europe Since European Union and United Kingdom representatives reconvened in Brussels last month for Brexit talks, the British negotiating team has faced accusations of being unprepared—an impression that was only fueled by this photo: Barnier and his staff sit down with a huge stack of notes. Davis and his crew have nothing. It's all in their heads? Sort of says it all. pic.twitter.com/wEwtXOYYXx — Joh
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Once thought impossible, scientists demonstrate that liquid water can generate THz waves(Phys.org)—By illuminating a thin film of water with ultrashort laser pulses, physicists have demonstrated that liquid water can generate terahertz (THz) waves, which are currently being researched for applications such as wireless data transmission, industrial quality control, and high-resolution imaging with the capability for penetration.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Medici Effect: Highly flexible, wearable displays born in KAISTA research team led by Professor Kyung Cheol Choi at the School of Electrical Engineering presented wearable displays for various applications including fashion, IT, and healthcare. Integrating OLED (organic light-emitting diode) into fabrics, the team developed the most highly flexible and reliable technology for wearable displays in the world.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematical tools improve theory and prediction in psychiatryRecent years have seen an explosion in the use of mathematical models to integrate insights emerging from studies of the brain and behavior. This approach has been used to develop new theoretical perspectives that can enrich data analysis, which researchers hope will help explain mechanisms behind complex psychiatric diseases and improve treatment for patients. Biological Psychiatry presents a spe
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding how omega-3 dampens inflammatory reactionsBy studying macrophages isolated from mice and humans, researchers found that the omega-3 fatty acids activated the autophagy and specifically affected some proteins that transform the signals from the environment. Furthermore, the researchers found that omega-3 fatty acids dampened many inflammatory mechanisms within the macrophages, but especially reduced what is known as the type 1 interferon r
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC researchers test new technique to help with concussion diagnosisSports-related concussions are a major public health concern and are notoriously difficult to diagnose. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus provides a new tool to help test athletes for recent brain trauma.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Androgen deprivation therapy increases risk of heart failure in men with prostate cancerMen with localized prostate cancer who received androgen deprivation therapy, a hormone treatment, were at significantly higher risk of heart failure than men who did not receive this therapy, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the British Journal of Cancer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover cancer stem cell pathway in endometrial cancerA team of Cleveland Clinic researchers have discovered a key pathway that leads to recurrence and treatment resistance in endometrial cancer, providing the potential for much needed new therapies for women with limited options.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anticoagulants used for arrhythmia can have different thrombus formation ratesAnticoagulants are recommended for atrial fibrillation due to the high risk of stroke. However, bleeding complications can occur as a side effect. Researchers in Japan examined several types of anticoagulants and found that the rates of thrombus formation are different according to the type of drug. This difference may be related to the risk of side effects, especially intracranial bleeding.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Root behavior changes as woody trees ageComparing nighttime and daytime root extension in several species of Serianthes leads to interesting results.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika monkey study suggests worse fetal effects for vaginal versus mosquito transmissionRhesus macaques that were vaginally infected with Zika virus showed higher prevalence of Zika in the reproductive tract than previously seen in macaques that received skin injections of the virus. The findings, published in PLOS Pathogens, suggest that vaginal transmission may increase the risk or severity of fetal Zika disease compared to mosquito transmission.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA research reveals how new behaviors appear and spread among capuchin monkeysA study led by UCLA professor of anthropology Susan Perry reveals that older, sociable capuchins are prone to inventing more new types of social behaviors, many of which seem to function either as tests of friendship or displays against enemies. Other behaviors the researchers observed involved games, new ways to interact with infants and novel forms of sexual interaction.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't multitask while you read thisHow much do all of the distractions in our lives reduce our ability to remember? A new UCLA psychology study found that divided attention does impair memory, but people can still selectively focus on what is most important -- even while they're multitasking.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Answers needed on sly grog tradeJames Cook University researchers in Australia have found sophisticated tactics are being used to smuggle illicit alcohol into Indigenous communities -- with sly grog traders selling alcohol for up to 11 times its retail price.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Life-threatening' Tropical Storm Harvey churns toward TexasTropical Storm Harvey is rapidly gaining strength as it churns toward the southern coast of Texas and is likely to become a hurricane by Friday, US weather officials said.
6h
Science | The Guardian
Life cycle of the mysterious and long-dead dodo revealed by bone study From egg-laying to moulting, a new bone analysis has unpicked the biology of the long-extinct bird Bulbous-beaked, plump and puny-winged, the dodo has been immortalised by humans in art , literature and song . But while the peculiar animals have inspired a panoply of research, not least as to whether they were really bird-brained or as corpulent as portraits implied, much about the dodo’s life ha
6h
Futurity.org
Cognition tends to peak later if you have more degrees A new study suggests that higher levels of education are tied to later ages of peak cognitive functioning. The study, which appears in the journal PLOS ONE , examined relationships between educational attainment, cognitive performance, and learning in order to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school. This chart shows the age at which cognitive performance peaks align with the average a
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Amazon looming, Walmart touts surging online grocery salesWalmart said Thursday that it's delivering online grocery orders from more than 900 stores with "strong results" in the early going, as the company's rivalry with Amazon intensifies following the online giant's acquisition of Whole Foods.
6h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Nordiske tiltag til gavn for elbiler på vej El Elbiler elbil-bredformat.elbil-bredformat
6h
Dagens Medicin
Voksne undlader at reagere på tegn på sygdom hos forældreFire ud af ti danskere ikke har opfordret deres forældre til at gå til lægen, selvom de viser tegn på alvorlig sygdom.
6h
Dagens Medicin
Kræftlæger ønsker pakkeforløb i flere spor Formand for de Danske Multidisciplinære Cancer Grupper mener, at der skal ligge en lægelig vurdering til grund for den rækkefølge, patienterne skal tages i.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung Note 8, then iPhone 8, could remedy stagnant phone salesSamsung is ready to unpack a new Galaxy smartphone Wednesday. Apple is expected to follow suit, with its 10th-anniversary iPhone, next month.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
First tanker crosses northern sea route without ice breakerRising Arctic temperatures are boosting commercial shipping in the region, worrying environmentalists.
6h
Feed: All Latest
All the Ways US Government Cybersecurity Falls FlatA new study shows not only that federal cybersecurity is as dismal that you thought, but why.
6h
Gizmodo
Avengers 4 Set Pictures Tease More Hints About Tony Stark's Future There’s more rumors about whether or not Jesse Eisenberg’s Lex Luthor is in Justice League . Marvel TV has plans for a new female-led TV show. Could Legends of Tomorrow send Jonah hex into space? Plus, new looks at the return of Outlander , pictures from Game of Thrones ’ season finale, and a new Dirk Gently trailer. Behold, Spoilers! Avengers 4 More set photos highlight Tony Stark’s modified che
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Legal ruling: Facebook 'friends' aren't necessarily real friendsFacebook "friends" aren't always real friends - at least legally.
7h
Futurity.org
Scientists aim to ease blindness with video goggles Scientists are still a long way from creating a visual prosthesis that works as well as a real human eye. But, engineers are making steady progress in what was once the realm of science fiction. One of their promising new devices, a bionic vision system based on photovoltaic implants, is awaiting approval for human clinical trials in Europe. A second system, based on in vitro studies of the retin
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, NASA whipped up astronaut waste into rocket fuelIn 1967, scientists found a way to turn human waste into rocket fuel.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Head Trauma in High School Football May Be More Complicated Than We ThoughtThere is still no definitive study on the risks for permanent cognitive impairment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Ars Technica
Monterey Car Week is like Comic Con and the Oscars but with wheels Enlarge / When you have so much eye-candy in one place, this becomes a familiar sight. (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) Although we usually pay for our own travel expenses, for this trip Genesis provided flights to San Francisco and five nights' accommodation in Monterey, California. MONTEREY, Calif.—There are a few big tentpole events on the automotive world's calendar. First come the auto shows of New
7h
The Scientist RSS
Robotic Orthotics Aid Gait in Kids with Cerebral PalsyThe wearable technology, akin to motorized leg braces, help children with physical disabilities extend their knees as they walk.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: No Table MannersAncient bones of the newly described toothless, stout-nosed dolphin Inermorostrum xenops suggest that it slurped its food.
7h
Ingeniøren
Om ti år tilhører hvert andet IDA-medlem Generation ZMed en vækst på 8.000-9.000 medlemmer årligt vil IDA opleve en foryngelseskur de kommende år. Derfor har foreningen fokus på yngste årganges ønsker og behov.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Læger og patienter vil samarbejde mod overbehandlingDet skal være slut med unødige undersøgelser og overflødige kontrolbesøg. Danske Patienter vil i samarbejde med Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber identificere overbehandling og forenkle behandlingsforløb.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Immunterapi rammer ind i de første tilbageslag Tre nye studier med immunterapi har vist negative resultater, men det er en naturlig udvikling, at det lovende terapiområde møder modstand, mener forskere.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory suggests heavy elements created when primordial black holes eat neutron stars from within(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the University of California has come up with a new theory to explain how heavy elements such as metals came to exist. The group explains their theory in a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters—it involves the idea of primordial black holes (PBHs) infesting the centers of neutron stars and eating them from the inside out.
7h
Inside Science
Scientists are Running Out of Space for Climate Data Scientists are Running Out of Space for Climate Data Climate models produce incredible amounts of data. Soon, scientists may have to give some of it up. climate-data _TopNTeaser.gif Early test renderings of a global computational model of Earth's atmosphere Image credits: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio Earth Thursday, August 24, 2017 - 08:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- C
7h
Ingeniøren
Lavere takst over Storebælt vil koste Femerntunnel 70 millioner om åretHvis prisen for at køre over Storebælt bliver sænket med 25 procent, vil det koste den kommende tunnel under Femern Bælt 500 køretøjer hver dag. Tilbagebetalingstiden må derfor forlænges med tre år.
7h
Science-Based Medicine
Statins beat supplementsRed yeast rice supplements have poor quality control and there's no clear evidence they do anything beneficial. So why take it?
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australian prison provides rehab for inmates and animalsAustralian prisoners are caring for animals that have been abandoned, attacked by predators, hit by cars or even seized in a drug bust as part of a rehabilitation programme.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fukushima operator faces $5 bn US suit over 2011 disasterTokyo Electric Power Co Holdings said Thursday it faces another US lawsuit over the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, with the latest one demanding at least $5 billion in compensation.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Introducing 'dark DNA'—the phenomenon that could change how we think about evolutionDNA sequencing technology is helping scientists unravel questions that humans have been asking about animals for centuries. By mapping out animal genomes, we now have a better idea of how the giraffe got its huge neck and why snakes are so long. Genome sequencing allows us to compare and contrast the DNA of different animals and work out how they evolved in their own unique ways.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematical model calculates the collapse of shelf iceAntarctic shelf ice consists of giant floating ice sheets that can span thousands of square kilometres. Pieces break off at their edges, forming icebergs in the ocean. In order to more effectively predict these break-offs, a process known as calving, Julia Christmann from the University of Kaiserslautern (TU) has developed mathematical models in cooperation with the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmh
7h
Dagens Medicin
Læge og iværksæter: »Fravalget af det traditionelle lægefag har åbnet for succes« Sporskifte. Allerede på medicinstudiet udviklede og solgte Martin Vesterby et it-system, som optimerede driften på operationsgangene. Siden er mange flere innovative sundhedsløsninger kommet til, og passionen for det entreprenante har fået ham til at lægge lægefaget på hylden for at kaste sig over iværksætteriet.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Region Syddanmark klar med nye våben mod infektioner på sygehuseneRegion Syddanmark går forrest i kampen mod infektioner på sygehusene og indfører konkrete handleplaner, der skal begrænse antallet af infektioner. Nyt overvågningssystem af infektioner er også på vej til at blive udbredt i regionen.
7h
Feed: All Latest
'Observer' Review: The Mind-Bending Sci-Fi Game Made Me Doubt RealityFeeling like 'Blade Runner' by way of David Cronenberg, Bloober Team's game is a stunning trip into the digital unknown.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Step Inside an Electronic Composer's Studio to See a City of SynthsWe take a tour of Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith's studio, where she makes surreal soundscapes.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Wanna See How Divided the Country Is? Visit the US-Mexico BorderEdoardo Delille and Giulia Piermatiri photographed NGOs helping people crossing the border from Mexico and a paramilitary group trying to stop them.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Illegal dumping during road construction in Ethiopia affects child mortalityResearchers have shown that living near newly built roads in Ethiopia is associated with higher rates of infant mortality. Proximity to new roads has negative health effects because of toxic waste dumped illegally during the construction phase, according to early research by economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Trinity College Dublin (TCD).
7h
Viden
Ny forskning: Drop MobilePay og brug kontanter på loppemarkedetSlet MobilePay fra telefonen og brug kontanter. Du får en bedre pris og køber mindre, hvis du betaler med kontanter, når du går på loppemarked, viser ny forskning.
7h
Live Science
Ghost Town of the American West: Photos of the 19th-Century 'Vulture Gold Mine'Vulture City was a once-thriving gold mining town in the American West. Check out these photos of what remains of the town.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Post-Truth: The Dark Side of the BrainA growing number of politicians are talking nonsense with impunity. False information is proliferating. What’s worse, the human brain loves it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
"Breakthrough" Leukemia Drug Portends "Quantum Leap" In CostA price has not yet been set for the CAR T-cell therapy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Futurity.org
Algorithm warns two years before dementia begins Using artificial intelligence techniques and big data, scientists have developed an algorithm that can recognize the signatures of dementia two years before its onset. The process involves a single amyloid PET scan of the brain of patients at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The algorithm could help doctors determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. Such prognosti
8h
Live Science
Exercise in a Pill? Scientists Move One Step CloserWhat if you could reap the benefits of exercise without moving a muscle?
8h
Gizmodo
'Crying Nazi' Christopher Cantwell Surrenders to Police GIF The “crying Nazi” Christopher Cantwell as we wimpers in a video posted the day after the violence at a neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (GIF from YouTube) White supremacist Christopher Cantwell first went viral as the star of a Vice documentary about the Charlottesville neo-Nazi rally. Then he went viral again as the “crying Nazi” when he posted video of himself tearing up, afraid
8h
Gizmodo
The Perfect Cordless Vacuum For Pet Owners Is Deeply Discounted Today Refurb Dyson V6 Animal , $213 The Dyson V6 cordless vacuum is ideal for cleaning rugs, hardwood floors, car seats, ceilings, shelves...pretty much anything really, and you can get a refurb of the Animal version on Amazon today for $213, one of the best deals we’ve seen. Compared to the standard V6, this model has 75% more brush head power to lift pet hair and other debris out of carpets and furni
8h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningen advarer mod kvotekonger i almen praksisKapitalfonde og pengestærke firmaer vil indtage almen praksis. Sådan vurderer Lægeforeningen konsekvenserne af en ændring af Sundhedsloven, som vil gøre det muligt for læger frit at erhverve op til seks ydernumre.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why we should expect scientists to disagree about antibiotic resistance – and other controversiesOn numerous matters including food, health and the environment, experts are called upon to communicate the implications of scientific evidence for particular choices. It may be tempting to highlight simple messages from complex evidence. But as the recent controversy over advice on antibiotics shows, there is a risk of such messages backfiring when new evidence comes to light. So in these fractiou
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facing disasters: lessons from a Bangladeshi islandThe death toll of Bangladesh's brutal monsoon season keeps growing. Authorities estimate that flooding has killed at least 120 people and affected some 5 million others since mid-July.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanostructured metamaterials identify the chemical nature of tiny moleculesInfrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy plays a central role in materials and life sciences and security detection for the direct analysis of molecular fingerprints, including molecular structures, composition, and environment.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do minorities prefer ads with white people?The marketplace is becoming more inclusive than ever. Today, advertisements that include models from ethnic minorities are commonplace. That wasn't the norm a few decades ago.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Professorer kritiserer Sundhedsplatformen: »Den øverste ledelse stopper vat i ørene«Implementeringen af sundhedsplatformen har været decideret uansvarlig og har efterladt Region Hovedstadens hospitaler i en krisetilstand, skriver professorerne Jes Søgaard og Jørgen Balser i en kronik. »Den øverste ledelse stopper vat i ørene,« skriver de.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computational model of chemical building blocks may help explain the origins of lifeScientists have yet to understand and explain how life's informational molecules – proteins and DNA and RNA – arose from simpler chemicals when life on earth emerged some four billion years ago. Now a research team from the Stony Brook University Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they have the answer. They developed a computat
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How quantum mechanics can change computingIn early July, Google announced that it will expand its commercially available cloud computing services to include quantum computing. A similar service has been available from IBM since May. These aren't services most regular people will have a lot of reason to use yet. But making quantum computers more accessible will help government, academic and corporate research groups around the world contin
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reassessing nomenclature for 'horned turban' snailThe 'horned turban' is well known to people mainly in Japan, Korea, and China as an edible marine snail. The species of Japan and Korea was known as Turbo cornutus Lightfoot, 1786 (Sazae in Japanese; Fig. 1) and the Chinese one as T. chinensis Ozawa & Tomida, 1995 (Nankai-sazae; Fig. 2). The first literature record of T. cornutus was published 250 years ago (Fig. 3) and the name was globally accep
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative carbon nanotube photocatalytic materials for efficient solar energy conversion and hydrogen productionThe unique properties of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) offer significant advantages over organic molecules, semiconducting polymers, and solid-state semiconductors for wide ranging applications. In particular, s-SWCNT are potentially highly effective active absorption layers in thin-film solar cells because the optical absorption bands—that depend on the chiral indices,
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mechanism of photosynthetic water-splitting revealed by an X-ray free electron laserPhotosystem II (PSII) is a huge membrane-protein complex that catalyzes light-induced water-splitting, leading to the generation of protons and molecular oxygen. This reaction converts light-energy from the sun into chemical energy that is required to sustain almost all living activities on Earth. The water-splitting reaction is catalyzed by a Mn4CaO5-cluster embedded within the protein matrix of
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Astronomers Capture Best-Ever Image of Alien StarThe new image reveals the surface and atmosphere of the red supergiant star Antares in unprecedented detail -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helical locomotion in a granular medium by a 'sand robot'Moving within granular media such as sand is a trick that occurs not only in science-fiction movies. The sandfish lizard, which lives in the desert, is also able to perform this task. In order to do so, this lizard behaves as a fish and undulates its body to reach a top speed of two body lengths per second.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost production technology for sophisticated microreactors by surface finishing technique using waterResearchers from Osaka University and Crystal Optics Inc., developed a manufacturing method for nano- and micro-scale structures. This technology has enabled the control of the wettability of a surface by combining advanced surface microstructure and functional surface films.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From flatscreen TVs to your smartphone—the element boron deserves more attentionEach time you watch sport on a flatscreen television, or send a message by touching your smartphone screen, give thanks to an unsung hero of the periodic table: boron.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even after reforms, few ineffective teachers are identified as ineffective, study findsDespite major reforms to evaluation systems designed to help school administrators distinguish between effective and ineffective teachers, a new study finds that less than one third of the teachers perceived as ineffective by principals are formally rated that way.
8h
Feed: All Latest
The Day I Found Out My Life Was Hanging by a ThreadStartup CEO Matt Bencke, 45, thought he’d thrown out his back. Then he went to the ER and received the most sobering news of his life.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Tax the Rich and the Robots? California's Thinking About ItSan Francisco official studying levy on technology that displaces workers
8h
Feed: All Latest
What Is a Robot?Introducing "HardWIRED: Welcome to the Robotic Future," a new video series in which we explore the many fascinating machines that are transforming society.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Elon Musk reveals sleek SpaceX spacesuit for crewed flights in 2018 With a crewed version of its Dragon cargo capsule in development, the SpaceX chief executive reveals the suits set to be worn by the company’s astronauts SpaceX has unveiled a sleek white spacesuit for astronauts on its crewed flights expected to take off next year. Chief executive Elon Musk revealed the suit on Instagram on Wednesday. He said it was not him pictured in the new suit, but a SpaceX
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung eyes reset with new Galaxy NoteSamsung on Wednesday unveiled a new model of its Galaxy Note as it seeks to leave behind the debacle over exploding batteries in the previous generation of the device, and mount a renewed challenge to Apple and its soon-to-come iPhone 8.
9h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt ambitiøst forskningsprogram modtager 100 millioner til forskning i leukæmi og ny behandlingProfessor Kristian Helin står i spidsen for et nyt forskningsprogram, der netop har modtaget 100...
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Netflix, Uber Eats, Trivago – online window-shopping is a feel-good experienceA QUT study has challenged a marketing maxim that too many product offerings such as those offered on aggregate sites cause choice overload and decrease purchases.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plant 'smells' insect foe, initiates defenseIt cannot run away from the fly that does it so much damage, but tall goldenrod can protect itself by first "smelling" its attacker and then initiating its defenses, according to an international team of researchers.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Wanted: Illegal Fish DumpersThe Department of Wildlife is offering a bounty for purveyors of invasive fish -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby boomer squirrels master tricky timingFemale squirrels who align their reproduction to take advantage of food-rich years and align have more pups that survive to maturity, according to new research from UAlberta biologists
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magical creatures help conservationBeliefs in magical creatures can impact the protection of biodiversity, and the field of conservation needs to consider them seriously, researchers have warned.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life in last Ice Age captured in soundscape at famous archaeological siteArchaeologists and composers at the University of York have come together to capture the sounds of the famous limestone gorge, Creswell Crags, to explore its dramatically changing sonic environment.
9h
Science | The Guardian
Clinical trials revolution could change the future of medical research With the stakes in clinical research so high, today sees the launch of a new and much-needed way of reporting clinical trials In tumultuous times, it is easy to miss the fact that science is undergoing a quiet revolution. For several years now, concerns have been peaking in biomedicine about the reliability of published research – that the results of too many studies cannot be reproduced when the
9h
Science | The Guardian
Satellite eye on Earth: July 2017 – in pictures Wildfires in the US and Africa, tropical storms, and Bolivian salt flats are among the images captured by Nasa and the ESA last month Pakistan’s Makran coast meets the Arabian Sea where the dry terrain contrasts sharply with the water. Sometimes coast and water overlap and sediment pours into the sea. Once river water and sediment reach the ocean they are swept along by currents. Inland, the land
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematician: even though you won't win Powerball, you could improve chances of winning alone by the numbers you pickLottery officials have announced the Powerball jackpot has reached its second highest figure in history – $700 million, to be exact.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using real-world data, scientists answer key questions about an atmospheric releaseIn the event of an accidental radiological release from a nuclear power plant reactor or industrial facility, tracing the aerial plume of radiation to its source in a timely manner could be a crucial factor for emergency responders, risk assessors and investigators.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
APL proposes Dragonfly mission to explore potential habitable sites on Saturn's largest moonThe Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory has submitted a proposal to NASA outlining a daring New Frontiers-class mission concept that would use an instrumented, radioisotope-powered dual-quadcopter to explore potential habitable sites where life could be developed on Saturn's largest moon, Titan.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method of isolating tumor cells could improve cancer research and treatmentCells that break away from a cancerous tumor and wander through the body can tell us a lot about the tumor itself, potentially leading to new avenues of research, quicker diagnoses and targeted treatments. The challenge is finding these tumor cells and separating them from the billions of other cells circulating in a person's bloodstream.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The eclipse 2017 umbra viewed from spaceAs millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon's shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Pop drop' study finds more ER visits & higher costs for older disabled patientsFatigue, sadness and poor health among the spouses who take care of disabled elders can mean higher Medicare bills for the patients.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The sun has no influence on the current global temperature increase, study saysIt's becoming warmer on Earth. Temperatures during the period spanning 2001 to 2010, for example, were around 0.2 degrees Celsius higher than the previous decade. No serious scientist doubts that humans play a decisive role here. Nevertheless, other factors also influence the global climate, for example the geometry of Earth's orbit and volcanic eruptions. But what role does the sun play?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cells hack their own genesDNA in all organisms from yeast to humans encodes the genes that make it possible to live and reproduce. But these beneficial genes make up only 2 percent of our DNA. In fact, more than two-thirds of our genome is populated by selfish genes that only care about their own replication – so-called genetic parasites. Scattered throughout the genomes of plants, fungi, and animals, they can jump from on
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The game algorithm that could improve materials designDesigning advanced materials is a complex process, with many potential combinations for precisely placing atoms within a structure. But now, scientists have developed a new tool that helps determine the ideal placements - thanks to an algorithm that identifies the best moves to win computer games, according to a study recently published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.
9h
The Atlantic
The Republican Establishment Stands Behind Trump President Trump’s response to the deadly white-supremacist protests in Charlottesville earlier this month sparked a fierce national backlash, drawing rebukes from elected officials, corporate executives, military leaders, clergy, and—according to a new poll —a majority of Americans. But it appears there’s at least one influential group that Trump can still count on for support: the institutional
9h
Ingeniøren
RML’s hovedsponsor klar med fortsat støtte til raketudviklingenStålvirksomheden Kecon har været en værdifuld støtte for Raketmadsens Rumlaboratorium, og hvis RML lukker, håber sponsoren på en erstatning.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian archaeological find solves 13th-century mysteryRescue archaeology work conducted in the city centre of Yaroslavl prior to installing a new sewer system has turned up an ancient leaden seal from the turn of the 13th century. It once belonged to the spouse of Vladimir Grand-Prince Constantine Vsevolovodich and the mother of the first Grand-Prince of Yaroslavl. Thanks to this find, we finally know the name of the Grand-Duchess—her name was Maria.
9h
Viden
Sådan ændrer blockchain verdenDu har måske ikke hørt om det endnu, men blockchain er en ny teknologi, der kan komme til at ændre verden som for eksempel internettet gjorde det. Og fremtiden er allerede begyndt.
10h
Ingeniøren
Anmassende Windows-opdateringer: Nu har Tyskland sagt fra Tidligere på året kunne brugere gang på gang opleve, at Microsoft sneg opgraderinger til ny OS ind. Men en forbrugerdomstol i Tyskland har nu sagt fra. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/anmasende-windows-opdateringer-nu-har-tyskland-sagt-1079389 Version2
10h
Ingeniøren
Professorer: Sundhedsplatformens ledelse stopper vat i ørene Region Hovedstaden skal stoppe med at nedgøre og ignorere kritikere af Sundhedsplatformen, mener eksperter. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsoekonom-datalog-sundhedsplatformens-ledelse-stopper-vat-oerene-1079392 Version2
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligent flow sensor for demand-controlled ventilationVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Fläkt Woods Oy have developed a flow sensor that enables ventilation to adapt to actual demand, thereby improving indoor air quality and energy efficiency. The flow control utilises a flow sensor, based on ultrasound, which is ideal for use in challenging hospital conditions and schools, for example.
10h
NYT > Science
Parts of National Monument in Utah May Lose Federal ProtectionsInterior Secretary Ryan Zinke is expected to recommend that the Bears Ears monument be reduced in size, setting up a fight with environmentalists and Native Americans.
10h
NYT > Science
Hunting a Killer: Sex, Drugs and the Return of SyphilisOutbreaks of a deadly, sexually transmitted disease confound health officials, whose obstacles include drug shortages, uneducated doctors and gangs.
10h
Ingeniøren
Her er den nye rumdragt til SpaceXSammenlignet med NASAs klassiske rumdragter, så ligner den nye dragt fra SpaceX noget fra Hollywood - og det er ikke et tilfælde. Det var vigtigt for SpaceX, at dragten er både funktionel og flot.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Scientists split over snow leopard statusScientists are divided on whether snow leopards are still endangered species, a BBC investigation finds.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU's future cyber-farms to utilise drones, robots and sensorsBee-based maths is helping teach swarms of drones to find weeds, while robotic mowers keep hedgerows in shape.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby boomer squirrels master tricky timingFemale squirrels who align their reproduction to take advantage of food-rich years and align have more pups that survive to maturity, according to new research from UAlberta biologists
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant 'smells' insect foe, initiates defenseIt cannot run away from the fly that does it so much damage, but tall goldenrod can protect itself by first 'smelling' its attacker and then initiating its defenses, according to an international team of researchers.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop novel 'dot' system to improve cancer detectionSBP researchers advance tumor-imaging nanosystem for enhanced diagnostic imaging.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers closer to understanding how a drug could induce health benefits of exerciseScientists have identified a mechanism that 'switches on' the exercise response in mammals, opening up the possibility that drugs could eventually be developed to produce or enhance the health benefits of physical activity.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concussion, new research suggestsUniversity athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Fond støtter forskning i stamcellebehandling af leukæmi Center på Københavns Universitet får 100 mio. kr. til at teste nye lægemidler og bidrage til udvikling af nye metoder til at behandle patienter med særlige former for leukæmi.
10h
The Atlantic
Trump's Trade Agenda Divides the Nation's Cities Shifting patterns in how American companies sell to the world are opening a new line of conflict between the Trump administration and the nation’s largest metropolitan areas. An important study released last week by the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program found that the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas are diverging from their small and mid-sized counterparts in what they e
10h
The Atlantic
Is a Government Shutdown Inevitable? Republican leaders don’t want a government shutdown. Democrats don’t either, at least not officially. And yet come this fall, or perhaps just in time for Christmas, federal agencies might once again send their nonessential employees home and national parks and museums might close their doors—all because of President Trump’s insistence that Congress fork over about $1.6 billion in seed money for h
10h
The Atlantic
How the U.S. Can Pressure Pakistan President Trump announced Monday a new strategic review for the U.S. presence in Afghanistan. He offered tough words for Pakistan, which supports militants inside Afghanistan, but gave few details of how the U.S. could persuade it to change its ways. On Tuesday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned that U.S. support for Pakistan would be conditioned upon its leaders’ ability to “change their a
10h
The Atlantic
Is This the End of Duterte's Drug War? The tide of public support for Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war may have finally turned. In a special operation last week, police killed more than 80 people in three nights, the highest death toll since Duterte came to office last summer and pledged to eradicate drug traffickers. And he’s kept good on that promise: While official estimates put police killings at about 3,500, human
10h
The Atlantic
Mattis's Mission to Reassure Ukraine “It's not easy making a democracy,” James Mattis, the U.S. secretary of defense, told reporters on Sunday as he prepared to embark on his foreign tour. So far, it has taken him to Iraq, Jordan, Turkey, and , today, Ukraine . Today is also the 26 th anniversary of the country’s independence from the Soviet Union; the occasion will be marked with a military parade, and Mattis will be on hand to exp
11h
The Atlantic
The Case for Sharing All of America's Data on Mosquitoes For decades, agencies around the United States have been collecting data on mosquitoes. Biologists set traps, dissect captured insects, and identify which species they belong to. They’ve done this for millions of mosquitoes, creating an unprecedented trove of information—easily one of the biggest long-term attempts to monitor any group of animals, if not the very biggest. The problem, according t
11h
Ingeniøren
Landmænd tager traktoren for at sikre os retten til at reparere tingene selvLandmænd går forrest i kampen for retten til at reparere og modificere softwaren i egne maskiner, uden at producenten kan afskrive sig ansvaret for produktets holdbarhed.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fantastic beasts and why to conserve themBeliefs in magical creatures can impact the protection of biodiversity and the field of conservation needs to consider them seriously, researchers have warned.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Fra ”cook and look” til mekanistisk fødevarevidenskabProfessor i fødevarekemi Leif Skibsted fra Institut for Fødevarevidenskab på Københavns...
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Her Majesty's police horses kick back in southern FranceAfter years of pounding the pavement in Britain, four-legged veterans of the country's fight against crime are hoofing it across the Channel to kick back under the sun in southwest France.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Death toll from South Asia flooding tops 1,000The death toll from floods sweeping South Asia has climbed above 1,000, officials said Thursday, as rescue teams try to reach millions stranded by the region's worst monsoon disaster in recent years.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's top court says privacy is a fundamental rightIndia's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that citizens have a constitutional right to privacy, a landmark verdict that could have wide-reaching implications for the government's biometric programme which holds data on over one billion people.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Typhoon Hato leaves 16 dead after lashing southern ChinaThe death toll from Severe Typhoon Hato rose to at least 16 Thursday after the storm left a trail of destruction across southern China, blacking out Macau's mega-casinos and battering Hong Kong's skyscrapers.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Brazil opens vast Amazon reserve to miningThe previously-protected area is bigger than Denmark and is thought to be rich in gold.
11h
Viden
VIDEO Kan jeg betale med snegleskaller?Fra byttehandel til bytes. Mennesket har handlet med hinanden i tusinder af år. I begyndelsen byttede man ting, men så fandt man på at lave penge.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Judge allows money laundering charges against Backpage execsCalifornia prosecutors can bring money laundering charges against the creators of a website that prosecutors label an online brothel, a judge ruled Wednesday. But he dismissed other charges months after another judge threw out the entire case as violating free speech and federal protections.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China criticizes US trade probe as protectionismChina's Commerce Ministry on Thursday criticized a U.S. decision to launch a trade probe of Beijing's technology policy as an attack on the global trading system and said it will "resolutely defend" Chinese companies.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Epigenetics may explain how Darwin's finches respond to rapid environmental changeEpigenetics may explain how Darwin's finches respond to rapid environmental changes, according to new research published in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.
12h
Science | The Guardian
We now know what the 'first flower' looked like – but when did it bloom? | Susannah Lydon The fossil record for flowering plants has been a hot topic since Darwin’s day and despite recent breakthroughs remains ‘an abominable mystery’ A recent study proposed a hypothetical “first flower” : a prediction of what the flower of the shared ancestor of all flowering plants (or angiosperms) would have looked like. This prediction was based on evolutionary trees constructed from molecular data
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pheromone genes could dictate colony structure of the red fire antProteins involved in the production and perception of pheromones may determine if red fire ant colonies contain a single queen or multiple queens.
12h
Ingeniøren
KORT: Bremseproblemer med IC3 har ramt hele landetProblemet startede i regionaltrafikken på Vestfyn, men har i løbet af få år spredt sig til togstrækninger landet over. Få overblikket over de seneste tre års 74 indberetninger om bremseproblemer med IC3 fra DSB’s lokomotivførere.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Severity of North Pacific storms at highest point in over 1,200 yearsThe intensification of winter storm activity in Alaska and Northwestern Canada started close to 300 years ago and is unprecedented in magnitude and duration over the past millennium, according to a new study from Dartmouth College.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studies reveal worrisome trend for health of wild dolphinsTwelve years of data on the health of two Atlantic bottlenose dolphin populations paints a grim reality concerning the wellbeing of the Atlantic Ocean. The research, published as two companion review papers July 24 in the scientific journal Diseases in Aquatic Organisms (here and here), compiles findings from Georgia Aquarium, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution at Florida Atlantic University
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survival of soil organisms is a wake-up call for biosecurityTiny creatures in soil that attack plants have shown the ability to survive for at least three years stored in dry conditions in a recent AgResearch study, giving new insights into the biosecurity threats posed by passenger travel and trade between countries. The research article is published in the open access journal Neobiota.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The science of fluoride flipping: A new technique helps researchers study tiny biological processesSo much of what happens inside cells to preserve health or cause disease is so small or time-sensitive that researchers are just now getting glimpses of the complexities unfolding in us every minute of the day. UNC School of Medicine researchers have discovered one such complexity—a previously hidden mode of RNA regulation vital for bacterial defense against toxic fluoride ions.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-resolution modeling assesses impact of cities on river ecosystemsNew mapping methods developed by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory can help urban planners minimize the environmental impacts of cities' water and energy demands on surrounding stream ecologies.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most advanced space weather radar in the world to be built in the ArcticThe most advanced space weather radar in the world is to be built in the Arctic by an international partnership including the UK, thanks to new investment, in the region of £4 to £6m from NERC.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radiological crimes investigation: Scientist-detectives put themselves to the testWhen radioactive material is intercepted at the border, officials need scientific support to determine what it is, if it's dangerous to first responders or the public, and if it's illegal to possess.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's twin study investigates metabolitesYou may think you're just an average Joe, but according to your metabolomics data your body is percolating some expressive information about your daily life.
13h
cognitive science
Your Brain as Math submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
14h
Ingeniøren
Hackere lækker data om fodboldstjerners medicinindtag Data om 25 fodboldspilleres medicinindtag er blevet lækket af Fance Bear. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hackere-laekker-data-fodboldstjerners-medicinindtag-1079377 Version2
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Zipline Expands Drone Delivery of Medical SuppliesAfter its initial testing and launch in Rwanda, a Silicon Valley drone delivery company launches a greater variety of products in a much larger market, Tanzania.
15h
Feed: All Latest
Zipline Launches Medical Supply Drone Deliveries in TanzaniaThe California startup is expanding its service from Rwanda to its much larger neighbor.
15h
The Scientist RSS
Climate Change Language Deleted from NIH SiteThe communications director at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences says news reports of the changes are overblown.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring the ground truth: NASA's twin study investigates metabolitesStanford University School of Medicine Postdoctoral Fellow Tejaswini Mishra, Ph.D., is integrating multi-omics data for NASA's Twins Study and comparing all the metabolites in retired twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. She saw a number of Scott's metabolites increase in levels when he went to space and when he returned to Earth some of those stayed elevated. By integrating data from other Twins
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severity of North Pacific storms at highest point in over 1,200 yearsIce cores from Denali and Mount Logan offer insight into global climate connections and the history on intensifying storms.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survival of soil organisms is a wake-up call for biosecurityTiny creatures in soil that attack plants have the ability to survive for at least three years stored in dry conditions, showed a recent AgResearch study. Furthermore, they were found to still be able to invade plant roots. The research article, published in the open access journal Neobiota, provides new insights into the biosecurity threats posed by passenger travel and trade between countries an
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzees learn rock-paper-scissorsChimpanzees of all ages and all sexes can learn the simple circular relationship between the three different hand signals used in the well-known game rock-paper-scissors.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Average cost of first 2 years of oropharyngeal cancer treatment in Texas is $139,749In Texas, the average cost for the first two years of health care after a diagnosis of oropharyngeal cancer was $139,749.
15h
Ars Technica
Rick Perry’s “baseload” study released, offers a lifeline to coal, nuclear Enlarge / DUNKIRK, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES - 2016/10/09: A NRG owned coal fired energy facility that plans to convert to a natural gas facility. (Photo by John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images ) The US Department of Energy (DOE) released a report late Wednesday night recommending that power markets revise how they value coal and nuclear power. The report also admits that
15h
Gizmodo
Report: Donald Trump Will Order Military to Begin Discriminating Against Trans Troops Within Six Months Photo: AP President Donald J. Trump has decided to advance his bogus ban on trans individuals openly serving in the US military beyond tweeting vague dictates on the matter. Per the Wall Street Journal , Trump is expected to “issue guidance” to the Pentagon and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis which will be somewhat clearer than his original three-part tweetstorm in July, which proclaimed trans pe
15h
Gizmodo
Nikon's D850 Is Stealing Some of the Mirrorless Camera's Best Features Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo DSLR cameras, the big bulky Nikon and Canon cameras you see photographers and your cousin Mimi rocking at weddings, aren’t going to go away any time soon, but mirrorless cameras, like the excellent Sony A9 , have gotten good enough to make the Nikons and Canons of the world scared. So Nikon’s latest full frame professional camera, the D850, borrows some pro experiences f
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon Has Developed an AI Fashion DesignerThe retail giant is taking a characteristically algorithmic approach to fashion.
16h
NYT > Science
Federal Electricity Study Hints at Future Support for CoalThe Energy Department report says the current grid is robust but suggests additional support for the ailing coal and nuclear industries.
16h
Ingeniøren
Seks kompetencer fremtidens ledere skal have i 2025 Fremadrettet vil arbejdsmarkedet opleve store ændringer og helt nye betingelser for arbejdsgiver samt medarbejdere. Det skal ledere kunne navigere i. Her er seks evner ledere skal have i 2030. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/seks-kompetencer-fremtidens-ledere-skal-have-2025-9588 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
16h
Ingeniøren
74 tilfælde af bremseproblemer med IC3 på tre årTogstrækninger over hele landet er berørt af bremseproblemerne med IC3. DSB’s lokomotivførere har siden efteråret 2013 indberettet 74 episoder for landets mest udbredte tog.
17h
Ars Technica
Republicans try comparing tax code to Legend of Zelda, mix up their facts Enlarge / House GOP: “How do you do, fellow kids? Say, have you heard about this Zelda guy?” (credit: NBC ) American Republican legislators have begun aiming their sights on a major policy initiative: the nation's tax code. Any changes will certainly impact the American technology sector, but before getting to that possible impact, there's the matter of the GOP's publicity campaign on the matter.
17h
Ars Technica
Analysis of 187 documents concludes Exxon “misled the public” on climate change Enlarge / Oil processing towers and gas processing infrastructure stand at the Exxon Mobil Corp. (credit: Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A review of 187 ExxonMobil documents , published by two Harvard researchers on Wednesday, has found that the company ”misled the public” on climate change. The documents included internal papers published by journalists at InsideClimate News as well a
18h
The Scientist RSS
Big Gender Gaps in Salk Institute Faculty: ReportAuthored by Salk PIs, the study claims women attract more federal funding, yet have smaller labs and receive less support from the institute.
18h
Blog » Languages » English
Operation Spywire: Marathon Results! What an adrenaline-fueled marathon! Eyewire agents, that was truly one breathtaking, intense, ultra-extreme-max-hardcore chase. Nicely done! And it lasted 12 hours exactly. Congratulations on a job well done, especially for saving the Pinky data set from the hands of RAGE! Random Acts of Generic Evil will have to sit in the corner and think about what they’ve done, no doubt plotting their next da
19h
Feed: All Latest
James Damore Case Could Spawn More Legal Headaches for GoogleFired Google engineer and his lawyer say others claim discrimination for political views
19h
Gizmodo
Well, It's Official: FTC Gives Green Light for Amazon to Buy Whole Foods Photo: AP The Federal Trade Commission, the US government body in charge of consumer protection and investigating anti-competitive marketplace practices, has announced that it will not stand in the way of Amazon’s plan to merge with Whole Foods . In a statement posted to the FTC’s website on Wednesday, acting director Bruce Hoffman wrote the agency had investigated the matter and determined the p
19h

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.