Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient whales were predators not gentle giantsAncient whales had extremely sharp predator teeth similar to lions, Australian scientists said Wednesday in a discovery they believe debunks theories the mammals used their teeth to filter feed like today's gentle giants.
1h
Viden
Forskningsprojekt: Sluk mobilen - og bliv en bedre studerendeTelefonen skal ligge i tasken, når underviserne på Erhversakademi Aarhus træder ind i lokalet. Resultatet er mere fokuserede elever.
3h
Ingeniøren
Krypto-nøgler bag nettets centrale adresse-bog bliver opdateret for første gang Netværksoperatører, der ikke opdaterer, bliver effektivt smidt af internettet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/icann-opdaterer-dns-systemets-krypto-noegler-foerste-gang-kontakt-din-internetudbyder Version2
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Dagens Medicin
Svenske myndigheder lukker Lars Søndergårds tilsynssagDen kontroversielle danske psykiater Lars Søndergaard har ikke brudt regler og retningslinjer for god psykiatrisk behandling ved det svenske behandlingscenter Capio Maria. Det vurderer det svenske tilsyn IVO.
16min
Science | The Guardian
What Makes a Psychopath? review – first-hand insights, but too few answers This was a responsible look at a troubling subject, even if Ian Brady’s inclusion felt like a gimmick. Plus, Celebrity Island with Bear Grylls For some unknowable reason, last night’s Horizon: What Makes a Psychopath? – an investigation into people who score highly for personality traits such as grandiosity, superficiality, lying, being easily bored, having short attention spans and an inability
16min
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Plastics: a villainous material? Or a victim of its own success? – Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis delves into the world of plastics to find out exactly how and why they became so widespread, and what can now be done to curtail the ever-present problems they can cause
19min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Gifted' high-tech takes spotlight at Berlin's IFA fairThe gadgets on display at Berlin's mega consumer electronics fair this week may not look radically different, but they are smarter than ever before and designed to meet our every need—often before we've even thought of it ourselves.
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US looking into whether Uber bribed foreign officialsThe US Justice Department is investigating whether Uber broke American laws against bribing foreign officials to promote business interests, the company confirmed Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some birds better than others at adjusting to habitat degradationBefore habitat degradation from impacts like grazing begins to cause population declines, the first response by wildlife usually comes in the form of behavioral changes—for example, switching their diets in response to changes in food availability. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at the diets of seed-eating birds in a South American desert and finds that while some c
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cassini hints at young age for Saturn's ringsNew data gathered by the Cassini probe suggests Saturn's icy bands formed relatively recently.
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Ingeniøren
IOS 11 sætter AR og machine-learning i øjenhøjde Med nye frameworks til både machine learning og AR låser Apple for alvor op for iPhonens computerkraft. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ios-11-saetter-ar-machine-learning-oejenhoejde-1079519 Version2
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Science | The Guardian
Traces of 6,000-year-old wine discovered in Sicilian cave Residue in terracotta jars suggests drink was being made and consumed on the island in the fourth millennium BC Researchers have discovered traces of what could be the world’s oldest wine at the bottom of terracotta jars in a cave in Sicily, showing that the fermented drink was being made and consumed in Italy more than 6,000 years ago. Previously scientists had believed winemaking developed in I
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Gizmodo
NYPD: Whoops, Turns Out Our New Windows Phones Are Now Worthless NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio, and NYPD Deputy Commissioner of Information Technology Jessica Tisch. Photo: AP It’s been roughly two years since Microsoft released a new Windows Phone, and it looks like the company has basically decided its awful, single-digit market share warrants a reimagined approach which might not come for some time. So it’s a little strange the NYPD, which is so much larger and
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shared custody equals less stress for childrenChildren who live full time with one parent are more likely to feel stressed than children in shared custody situations. The benefit holds regardless of the level of conflict between the parents or between parent and child. These are the results of a new study from Stockholm University's Demography Unit.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some birds better than others at adjusting to habitat degradationBefore habitat degradation begins to cause population declines, the first response by wildlife usually comes in the form of behavioral changes -- for example, switching their diets in response to changes in food availability. A new study looks at the diets of seed-eating birds in a South American desert and finds that while some can switch between seed types when grazing alters local plant communi
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Potential Carbon Capture Game Changer Nears CompletionIf it works as expected, the Net Power natural gas demonstration plant will capture carbon at nearly no cost.
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Live Science
Having a Baby: Stages of PregnancyPregnancy lasts about 40 weeks and is divided into three stages, or trimesters, each with unique symptoms and changes in the mother's body and in fetal development.
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Live Science
Who Invented the Bicycle?The bicycle has a complicated past fraught with controversy and misinformation.
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Gizmodo
Security Researchers Discover Spammer List of Over 711 Million Email Accounts Photo: AP An unknown hacker has gathered up to 711 million email accounts stored on an “open and accessible” server in the Netherlands, ZDNet reported . The server contains passwords to both email addresses and servers which are apparently being used to send large amounts of spam through legitimate accounts, thereby bypassing filters. A Paris-based researcher using the pseudonym Benkow first brou
3h
Ingeniøren
DN: Regeringen overlader kysternes fremtid til ejerne af første rækkeRegeringens foreslåede ændring af Kystbeskyttelsesloven går alt for vidt, mener Danmarks Naturfredningsforening, mens forslaget deler vandene blandt eksperter.
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Live Science
Marco Polo: Facts, Biography & TravelsThe travels of Marco Polo from Venice to Asia opened up a whole new world to Europeans.
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Gizmodo
Up To 500,000 Cars Could Be Totaled From Hurricane Harvey Damage HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: Stranded vehicles sit where they got stuck in high water from Hurricane Harvey on Dairy Ashford Drive, August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey made landfall shortly after 11 p.m. Friday, just north of Port Aransas as a Category 4 storm and is being reported as the strongest hurricane to hit the United States since Wilma in 2005. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images) An
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Gizmodo
Kalashnikov's Ominous New Police 'Shield' Looks Like Something Out of a Soylent Green Reboot Photo: AP Kalashnikov Concern, the Russian arms manufacturer best known for its eponymous line of rifles used by militaries and militants alike the world over, has developed a new riot control vehicle which looks like something straight out of a dystopian hellscape, but is unfortunately extremely real. The vehicle, dubbed the “Shchit” or Shield in English, vaguely resembles a bulldozer except wit
5h
Feed: All Latest
Ford and Domino's Use Self-Driving Cars to Deliver Pizza in Ann ArborA tasty, vital effort to understand how people interact with driverless technology.
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cognitive science
Breakfast, Brains and Entropy submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular, early lifestyle changes key to reducing type 2 diabetes & cardiovascular diseaseRegular and early one-to-one educational sessions on healthy diet and lifestyle could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in young South Asians, a new research published today in BMC Medicine suggests.
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Gizmodo
The Slot Melania Trump Rocks Flawless Emergency Aid Look En Route to Texas | The Root The 5 Types of The Slot Melania Trump Rocks Flawless Emergency Aid Look En Route to Texas | The Root The 5 Types of ‘Becky’ | Splinter Look At This ABC News Journalist Being a Fucking Narc in the Middle of a Hurricane | Deadspin Why Your Team Sucks 2017: Oakland(ish) Raiders |
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Gizmodo
Put Merino and Sheepskin in All Your Shoes Left: Superfeet merinoGREY Insoles | Right: Blundstone Sheepskin Footbeds I just bought my 4th pair of Allbirds Wool Runners because I can’t stop snatching up their limited edition colorways, but if you want to add the benefits of merino to the shoes you already own, there’s an answer for that too. Superfeet makes some of our favorite sandals , and they’re getting dangerously close to making shoe
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Climate Change Might Shrink FishWarmer water boosts fishes' demand for oxygen—and their bodies may shrink in response. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Futurity.org
People on Twitter during presidential debates learned more Being on Twitter during last year’s presidential debates seems to have paid off, new research shows. “…greater engagement with Twitter while debate watching actually enhances learning…” In a pair of studies, communication experts have found that issue-based tweeting was directly related to greater knowledge acquisition, and social watching actually helps viewers solidify their beliefs around thei
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Otters learn by copying each otherOtters can learn how to solve puzzles by watching and copying each other, new research shows.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights new link between gene fusion and bladder and brain cancerA study by the University of Warwick sheds new light on gene fusion in bladder and brain cancer.Researchers have found that a previously overlooked part of a specific gene fusion has a worsening effect on cancer cells. They have also found that preventing cell 'signalling' from this particular fusion may not be an effective route for future cancer treatment research.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a common genetic variant linked to muscle pains in statin usersResearchers have found that people who have two identical copies of a common form of the LILRB5 gene have an increased risk of muscle aches and pains, which could be confused with statin intolerance. They also found that people who had one or two copies of a variant form of this gene are protected from muscle aches, and so if they develop muscle aches after being prescribed statins, this is probab
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Century-old seal pelts reveal changes in Ross Sea ecosystemScientists sampled a pile of frozen pelts left in a hut by Antarctic explorers for Weddell seal tissue from a century ago, at the very start of human activities in Antarctica. By using sophisticated isotope analysis to compare samples from modern and century-old seals, they were able to investigate human impacts on the Antarctic ecosystem.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell culture system could offer cancer breakthroughA new cell culture system that provides a tool for preclinical cancer drug development and screening has been developed by researchers in the USA.The team, led by scientists from Princeton University, N.J., created a microfluidic cell culture device that allows the direct, real-time observation of the development of drug resistance in cancer cells.
7h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Prehistoric Puzzle of How Plesiosaurs Swam Through the OceansAs dinosaurs ruled the Earth, these Loch Ness monster-like creatures prowled the oceans with an unusual swimming technique, scientists believe.
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Science | The Guardian
Australian scientists dispute Darwin's theory about whale's teeth Finding debunks long-held idea that teeth of prehistoric animals were shaped to allow water to sieve through them Australian researchers have produced new evidence disputing a popular theory of whale evolution proffered by scientists from Charles Darwin onwards about the development of baleen, the hair-like strands used to filter krill out of the water and down the gullet of the largest mammals o
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Ars Technica
Sonic Mania PC version launches with Denuvo, online requirement Enlarge / Maybe Sonic and his friends are looking at an incoming, Denuvo-related crapstorm headed their way. (credit: Sega ) I had high hopes of returning to Sonic Mania and slapping an Ars Approved sticker on my early-August review once its PC version launched. I figured, by then, the console editions would have received patches to a few noticeable glitches and a tidy PC port would seal the deal
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Century-old seal pelts reveal changes in Ross Sea ecosystemWhen scientists at McMurdo Station in Antarctica have time off from their field work, they often pay a visit to three nearby wooden huts built in the early 1900s by Antarctic explorers Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott. That's what UC Santa Cruz biologists Daniel Costa and Luis Huckstadt were doing on a day off from studying Weddell seals when they realized that a pile of frozen pelts in o
7h
Inside Science
Inbred Mouse Dads Have More Daughters Inbred Mouse Dads Have More Daughters Researchers used to think only moms manipulated the sex of their babies. Turns out dads do it too. Captive-White-Footed-Mouse-cropped.jpg Image credits: Charles Homler via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Creature Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 19:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Should you have a son, or a daughter? If your goal
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Gizmodo
A New Fear the Walking Dead Preview Is Heavy on Drama, Light on Zombies Image: Richard Foreman Jr/AMC A new, three-minute preview for the second half of Fear the Walking Dead season three was just released, and there’s no doubt about it: things do not look good for any of the characters. However, that discomfort and uncertainty doesn’t look like it’s coming from zombies. It’s coming from the uneasily alliance formed between the Nation and the Ranch. Which, admittedly
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Otters learn by copying each otherOtters can learn how to solve puzzles by watching and copying each other, new research shows.
7h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Tests of Fortitude What We’re Following Harvey’s Fallout: As rain continues to fall on the Gulf Coast, early estimates say that Hurricane Harvey (now a tropical storm) and its lingering aftermath have cost billions in damages , though the extreme flooding caused by the storm makes its impact even harder to assess than usual. At least seven people have died in the disaster. The Gulf Coast is particularly vulnerable
8h
Ars Technica
Horrifying Blade Runner short film serves as prequel to 2049 2036: Nexus Dawn , directed by Luke Scott, shows us a key moment in history between the original Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049 . With Blade Runner 2049 hitting theaters October 6, you might be wondering what's been going on in the 30 years since the last film ended. The original Blade Runner ended ambiguously in 2017 when Deckard fled Los Angeles with the replicant Rachael. Now you can watch
8h
The Atlantic
Hurricane Harvey Is the Rainiest Atlantic Hurricane Ever Measured On Sunday morning, David Novak woke up and looked at the news. The evening before, Hurricane Harvey had stalled out over Houston; now it sent one band of rain after another smacking into the city. Streams were entering flood stage, interstates were underwater, and images of biblical flooding had begun to stream out of the country’s fourth-largest city. Since 2014, Novak has been the director of t
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Gizmodo
Add A Potential Bribery Investigation to The List of Things Uber’s New CEO Has to Worry About Image: Getty “I’m in it to get my hands dirty,” Uber’s new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told Bloomberg on Tuesday. Lucky for Khosrowshahi, he could have a foreign bribery scandal on his hands. Sounds plenty dirty to me. According to the Wall Street Journal , Uber is cooperating with the Department of Justice on a preliminary investigation into whether the ride-sharing company violated the Foreign Corrup
8h
Big Think
Science Is Catching Up to the Buddha Does happiness require a rebellion against evolution? Read More
8h
Live Science
How Fast Do You Walk? Your Answer Could Predict Your Risk of Heart Disease DeathA simple question — how fast do you walk? — may help researchers determine who has a higher risk of death from heart disease.
8h
Live Science
AI Could Predict Alzheimer's Disease Two Years in AdvanceAn artificial-intelligence-driven algorithm can recognize the early signs of dementia in brain scans, and may accurately predict who will develop Alzheimer’s disease up to two years in advance, a new study finds.
8h
The Atlantic
Harvey Exposes Trump's Empathy Deficit Crises, and especially natural disasters, create a special kind of challenge for any politician, but especially for a president. There’s very little that a national leader can do in the early days of a disaster; much of the initial response is organized ahead of time or devolved to state and local authorities. While later on, White House muscle can be important, the first days are a time when the
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Science : NPR
Trump's Texas Visit Highlights Federal Response Effort The president said he waited to visit until he could do so "without causing disruption." He sidestepped Houston and instead stopped in Corpus Christi, where Harvey made landfall, and then in Austin. (Image credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Linguistic Clues Led The FBI To Identify The Unabomber? Manhunt: UNABOMBER | Tuesdays at 10p on Discovery and Discovery GO Agent Fitzgerald works to match Ted Kaczynski's language and ideas to the Unabomber's Manifesto. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/manhunt Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/Discovery From:
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Live Science
Fire Ants Make Themselves into Rafts to Float to Safety in HoustonWhen floods hit, fire ants float to safety on rafts made out of their own bodies.
8h
Big Think
You Can't Sweat Out Toxins. That Doesn't Mean Sweating Isn't Good For You. Sweating is your body's way of regulating internal temperature. It's not a cleansing program. Read More
8h
Popular Science
Female orgasms aren't all that mysterious Health A new study suggests it's pretty easy to figure out. A new study surveyed over 1,000 women about their sexual preferences, and it turns out they’re pretty consistent.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘Texas Can Handle Anything’ Today in 5 Lines President Trump traveled to Corpus Christi and Austin, Texas, to meet with officials leading Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. During his visit, Trump praised the disaster response, adding that “Texas can handle anything.” During a news conference, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner confirmed the death of Houston Police Sergeant Steve Perez, who drowned after his patrol car was caught
9h
Gizmodo
Scientists Bust Up Black Hole Theory Using World's Most Powerful X-Ray Machine Image: Randy Montoya/Sandia Should you find yourself inside a black hole, you will die. Should you find yourself near a black hole, you will also die. Aside from the fact that these massive, light-trapping monsters are impossible to reach on human timescales, there are simply not many ways to measure the plasma surrounding them without dying or destroying the experiment. Scientists have to make d
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark findings to be presented by Brigham and Women's experts at ESC Congress 2017Beginning Saturday, Aug. 26, Brigham and Women's Hospital cardiologists and researchers will be presenting at the ESC Congress 2017, organized by the European Society of Cardiology.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are consumers ready to give augmented reality a try?You might have gotten a taste of "augmented reality," the blending of the virtual and physical worlds, as you chased on-screen monsters at real-world landmarks in last year's gaming sensation, "Pokemon Go."
9h
The Atlantic
Trump's Business Dealings Come Back to Haunt Him Donald Trump the man has always been indistinguishable from Donald Trump the business, and since winning the election last November, both have been indistinguishable from Donald Trump the president. That creates a range of problems, from the legal to the ethical to the logistical. In the latest instance, the porous boundary between Trump’s business and political lives is a new front in the invest
10h
Feed: All Latest
Before and After Photos Capture Devastating Flooding in HoustonAaron Cohen watched from a high-rise as Hurricane Harvey dropped 30 inches of rain in 48 hours.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Engineers Turn a Laser Beam into a Stream of LiquidLight usually passes straight through water and so can’t generate a stream of fluid, right? Not anymore.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid Harvey chaos, fears of alligators escaping captivityAs flood waters in Texas rose to unprecedented heights Tuesday, so did fears that hundreds of captive alligators may get loose and swim into populated areas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian Kalashnikov arms maker presents riot control vehicleRussia's Kalashnikov company, the maker of the prolific assault rifle, has presented a new product: a formidable crowd control vehicle.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whale gets entangled in cruise ship anchor for half a dayA humpback whale became entangled in an anchor line on a small cruise ship in southeast Alaska, getting stuck for roughly 12 hours while federal authorities and the boat's crew worked to free it.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists map genomic atlas of your inner fish gutScientists have discovered a network of genes and genetic regulatory elements in the lining of the intestines that has stayed remarkably the same from fishes to humans. Many of these genes are linked to human illnesses, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes and obesity.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmetic surgery may help patients quit smokingIf you're a smoker considering cosmetic surgery, your plastic surgeon will likely require you to stop smoking for at least two weeks before your procedure. A long-term follow-up study finds that many patients receiving these instructions will quit smoking, or at least smoke less, in the years after cosmetic surgery, reports the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official m
10h
Popular Science
Where will all the water from Hurricane Harvey go? Environment It will leave very, very slowly. Houston is now covered in water. Where will it all go?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Lunar mission captures solar eclipse as seen from the moonDuring the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, captured an image of the Moon's shadow over a large region of the United States, centered just north of Nashville, Tennessee.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's IMERG shows rainfall accumulation along Harvey's trackAs Harvey continues to dump catastrophic rains over southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana, NASA has been tallying rainfall accumulations in the storm's wake.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a 34-inch curved Dell Ultrasharp Monitor for $619.99 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , the Dealmaster is back! The top item today is a Dell UltraSharp monitor! The U3415w is a massive, 34-inch curved monitor with a 21:9 aspect ratio and a resolution of 3440x1440. This beast is normally $999.99, but today it's $619.99. Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs. Feature
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Science : NPR
Trump's Proposed Budget Cuts Could Undermine Harvey Relief Efforts President Trump pledged to rebuild Houston and Texas bigger and better than ever. However, earlier this month, he rescinded an Obama executive order that required flood-damaged property to be rebuilt higher and stronger. Trump also has proposed eliminating federal flood mapping and the federal government's top disaster agency.
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Science : NPR
Warren Buffett Backs Nuclear Fuel Bank In Kazakhstan An unusual bank will open Tuesday in Kazakhstan. The deposits will be nuclear fuel, low-enriched uranium. The customers withdrawing low-enriched uranium will be nations which lack enrichment facilities. The idea is to convince such nations not to build their own. Warren Buffett is among the bank's founders.
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Science : NPR
Fishermen Caught With 6,600 Sharks In Galápagos, Now Headed To Prison The dead sharks, mostly endangered hammerheads, were part of a 300-ton haul of fish found on a Chinese boat off the Galápagos Islands. An Ecuadorean judge fined and jailed the crew up to four years. (Image credit: Galapagos National Park via AP)
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Gizmodo
Rest Easy, George R.R. Martin, a Computer Program Has Written The Winds of Winter For You Image: HBO Looks like George R.R. Martin can take a breather. An engineer set up a neural network using all of the books in the A Song of Ice and Fire series to write part of the next installment, The Winds of Winter . It may not make a lot of sense—or any sense, really—but hell, neither did that whole Sansa and Arya murder fake-out. Full-stack software engineer Zack Thoutt created a recurrent ne
10h
Ars Technica
Crowdsourced gaming of Google Translate dubs Kim Jong Un “Mr. Squidward” Enlarge / Something was lost in translation. And something was gained. (credit: Sean Gallagher) Google Translate—the Web and mobile tool that performs machine-learning-based translation of over 100 languages—has a small problem: to some degree, it depends on the kindness of strangers, both directly and indirectly. And that dependence can be gamed for amusing (or enraging) result, as we discovered
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's IMERG shows rainfall accumulation along Harvey's trackAs Harvey continues to dump catastrophic rains over southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana, NASA has been tallying rainfall accumulations in the storm's wake.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two-stage approach to risk-reducing mastectomy improves results for women with large breastsFor women undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy to prevent breast cancer, reconstruction can be challenging in those with larger breasts. A two-stage approach--with initial breast reduction and 'pre-shaping' followed by mastectomy and reconstruction--appears to be a safer procedure with better cosmetic results, reports the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical
10h
The Atlantic
Bran Stark and the Problem of Omniscience This post contains spoilers through Season 7, Episode 7 of Game of Thrones . “None of you were there to see what happened! None of you knows the truth!” So protested Lord Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish in Sunday’s Game of Thrones season finale, after his onetime ally Sansa Stark ambushed him with accusations of murder and treason in front of an audience of knights and lords. “You held a knife to hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Texas storm Harvey breaks historic rainfall recordHurricane Harvey has set what forecasters believe is a new rainfall record for the continental United States, officials said Tuesday.
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Gizmodo
How to Become a Full-Blown Privacy Fanatic With Purism's Librem Laptop Image: Dell Cameron/Gizmodo Concerns over online privacy and security are increasingly changing the way consumers spend their money and behave online. According to a Pew Research study conducted one year ago, 86 percent of internet users have now taken at least some steps to conceal their digital footprints, though many say they would like to do more, if only they knew how. If you want to go beyo
10h
Feed: All Latest
North Korea's Japan Missile Flyover Calls Donald Trump's BluffDonald Trump's scorched-earth rhetoric pushes North Korea closer to the brink—and, maybe, the US closer to the negotiating table.
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Gizmodo
Add a Bit of Color and Magnetic Ferrofluid Becomes the Stuff of Nightmares GIF We haven’t found too many practical uses for ferrofluid —a mix of oil and iron particles that appears to morph and change shape when exposed to magnets—aside from fun desktop toys. So now that we’ve discovered it becomes a nightmarish-looking blob creature when you mix in a little color, maybe it’s time to just stop making this stuff? I’m probably not going to sleep tonight after watching the
11h
Popular Science
This troubling tennis trend is keeping players out of the U.S. Open Health A more stressful game. The best tennis players in the world are playing the U.S. Open this week. But the men’s entry list has some gaping holes.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why we need to end the era of orphanages | Tara WinklerCould it be wrong to help children in need by starting an orphanage? In this eye-opening talk about the bad consequences of good intentions, Tara Winkler speaks out against the spread of orphanages in developing countries, caused in part by foreign donors, and details the harm done to children when they are separated from their families and left to grow up in institutions.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists map genomic atlas of your inner fish gutDuke scientists have discovered a network of genes and genetic regulatory elements in the lining of the gut that has been conserved from fishes to humans. Many of these genes are linked to human illnesses, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes, and obesity. The findings support the use of zebrafish for studying how ancient genetic information -- distilled over 420 million years of evolutio
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Gizmodo
People Stopped Going to Best Buy So Now Best Buy Will Come to You Photo: Getty If you’ve always dreamt of a trained Best Buy employee entering your home and telling you which electronic products you need, you are in luck, my friend. Starting this fall, you can beckon a Best Buy salesperson to your house, where they’ll try to sell you Best Buy products at no extra cost. Wish granted! The new program is already in the works, having been tested by Best Buy in five
11h
NYT > Science
Alan Root, Oft-Bitten Wildlife Filmmaker, Dies at 80Mr. Root, often working with his first wife, Joan, came up with inventive ways to capture striking images of African animals and their ecosystems.
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Live Science
Flooding Could Free 350 Gators at Texas SanctuaryRising floodwaters in southeast Texas could spell big trouble for an alligator sanctuary in Beaumont that houses more than 350 American alligators on its property.
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Gizmodo
Harvey Just Broke the Record for Wettest Tropical Storm in US History Water from Addicks Reservoir flows into neighborhoods as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise August, 29, 2017, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) The National Weather Service is reporting 49.32 inches of total rainfall at a site southeast of Houston, which now marks the greatest accumulation of rainfall ever recorded in the contiguous United States on account of a single tropical sto
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
How gut bacteria may affect anxietyMicrobes may tamper with the production of tiny molecules in brain regions that help control anxiety.
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Gizmodo
How To Make a Tiny Popsicle Stick Violin to Play When Your Friends Start Whining GIF It took Antonio Stradivari months to create one of his instrumental masterpieces, but you can make yourself a tiny wooden violin in just a few hours using popsicle sticks, toothpicks, coffee stirrers, and string. It can’t be used to play Mozart, but you can still pretend to play it whenever your friends start complaining about their inconsequential life problems. You’ll need to be handy with
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Lunar mission captures solar eclipse as seen from the moonLRO captured an image of the Moon's shadow over a large region of the United States, centered just north of Nashville, Tennessee.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children of unintended pregnancies may experience depressive symptoms in early adulthoodChildren from unintended pregnancies tend to experience more depressive symptoms in early adulthood than children from intended pregnancies, however there's little evidence of a causal relationship.Jessica Su, an assistant professor in UB's Department of Sociology, says the association between fertility intentions and depressive symptoms is more likely due to the mother's socioeconomic background
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Ars Technica
Microsoft was leading the world in AR; now it’s at risk of being left behind The HoloLens headset. (credit: Microsoft) Stop me if you think you've heard this one before: a Redmond-based software company is an early player in a brand-new market, then finds itself displaced and left behind after late-coming competitors bring to market similar products in a way that captures the mainstream audience. We saw this with smartphones: Microsoft's various Windows Mobile offerings b
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Feed: All Latest
Bungie's 'Destiny' Characters Were Born to Be CosplayedThe videogame developer takes costuming needs into consideration when designing characters for its popular series.
11h
The Atlantic
Why the Gulf Coast Is Uniquely Vulnerable to Disasters In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, the nation has once again seen a Gulf Coast city flooded, its residents in peril. A new book of essays, due to be published next January, Environmental Disaster in the Gulf South , provides important social context for the many “natural” disasters that have plagued the region for 200 years. The book’s editor, Cindy Ermus, a professor at the University of Lethbridg
11h
Gizmodo
PSA: There's a New Version of Cards Against Humanity, and You Can Buy It Right Now Cards Against Humanity 2.0 , $25 Cards Against Humanity just released the 2.0 version of their base game box, complete with 150 new cards, and it’s currently in stock on Amazon . That probably won’t be the case for long. Just don’t blame us for any discomfort if you play this with your parents.
11h
The Atlantic
Yes, That's a Huge Floating Mass of Live Fire Ants in Texas When there is flooding along the Gulf Coast, there are fire ants. The invasive ants congregate into living rafts, drifting through water until they reach solid ground again. It’s a time-honed survival strategy. But when there is Hurricane Harvey- level flooding , there are not just small rafts but huge, dense mats of fire ants. “Holy crap. I have never, in my entire career as an ant researcher, s
12h
Ars Technica
Why the US and Japan didn’t shoot down latest North Korean missile Enlarge / Pedestrians walk in front of a huge screen displaying a map of Japan (R) and the Korean Peninsula, in Tokyo on August 29, 2017, following a North Korean missile test that passed over Japan. (credit: AFP via Getty Images) At 6am local time on August 29, a ballistic missile was launched from near Pyongyang in North Korea. Flying 2,700 kilometers (about 1,700 miles), the missile arced over
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Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on killer robots: on the loose | EditorialLethal autonomous weapons are a reality, but the campaign to prevent their use is ours to win The first meeting of the UN-backed group of experts , intended to start work on getting a ban on lethal autonomous weapons, was supposed to wrap up at the end of last week. But only days before it was due to start it was cancelled: funding shortfalls were blamed. A lack of will feels the more likely expla
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cognitive science
Top 5 Best Smart Drugs (Nootropics) for Cognitive Enhancement 2017 submitted by /u/BestSmartdrugs [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR
How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug The blood thinner warfarin, which prevents blood clots, owes its existence to some cows who got very sick after eating spoiled hay — and to a chemist who spent years trying to figure out why. (Image credit: Avi Ofer for NPR)
12h
Science : NPR
Sea Shepherd Says This Year It Won't Send Ships To Disrupt Japanese Whalers The U.S.-based environmental activist group says it will not send ships because Japan has improved technology to avoid the vessels and has toughened its anti-terrorism laws. (Image credit: Greg Wood /AFP/Getty Images)
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows nurses' scrubs become contaminated with bacteria in hospitalsClothing worn by healthcare providers can become contaminated with bacteria, however having nurses wear scrubs with antimicrobial properties did not prevent this bacterial contamination from occurring, according to a study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
12h
Ars Technica
Man in jail 2 years for refusing to decrypt drives. Will he ever get out? Enlarge (credit: Yuri Samoilov ) A now-fired Philadelphia cop has been behind bars for almost two years for refusing to decrypt hard drives that authorities found at his residence as part of a federal child-porn investigation. On Thursday, his lawyers are set to ask a federal judge to release him while he appeals the reason for his confinement to the Supreme Court. If the justices take the case,
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Text messages as public records emerges as new Montana issueMontana government leaders plan to create rules for when and how to preserve text messages after a news organization's public-records request exposed the lack of a policy to retain the messages that have become a regular communication method for state business.
12h
Live Science
Californians Might Vote on 'Magic Mushroom' Legalization in 2018Californians might vote on whether to decriminalize use of hallucinogenic mushrooms as early as 2018.
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Futurity.org
Training benefits families of kids with limited speech New research provides the first scientific evidence that an online training program can improve communication in families with children with complex communication challenges. Sarah Douglas, a former special education teacher and principal investigator on the project, developed the training to fill a gap. While online training exists for parents of children with autism, none had been created for t
12h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Helen Piwnica-Worms (U. Texas) 2: Translating Cell Cycle Principles to Targeted Cancer Therapies Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial mediators of the cell cycle. Part 1: Frogs, Clams, Yeast & Human Cancer: Historical Perspective on Cell Cycle Regulation: Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial media
12h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Helen Piwnica-Worms (U. Texas) 1: A Historical Perspective on Cell Cycle Regulation Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial mediators of the cell cycle. Part 1: Frogs, Clams, Yeast & Human Cancer: Historical Perspective on Cell Cycle Regulation: Helen Piwnica-Worms provides a historical perspective on cell cycle regulation and outlines important experiments that revealed crucial media
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reveal link between PCOS, type 2 diabetesWomen who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and are diagnosed at an earlier age with the condition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The nationwide study is the first to show a connection between T2D development and PCOS.
12h
New Scientist - News
One of Europa’s plumes may not exist, making hunt for life hardJupiter’s icy moon is a promising place to find alien microbes, but hopes that they could be blasted into space by watery plumes may have diminished
12h
New Scientist - News
Photos of skinny women affect people’s minds in just 15 minutesFor the first time, researchers have shown in a randomised trial that looking at pictures of skinny models is enough to change a person’s body ideals
12h
Gizmodo
All the New and Returning Shows Coming to TV This Fall It’s that time again. The new TV season is upon us, and as usual there are a bevy of returning shows and premieres to fill our evenings. With a list that daunting, we’ve taken it upon ourselves to gather together all the information you will need to make smart decisions about all the time you’re about to spend watching TV. Image: FX Returning Shows American Horror Story: Cult Premieres: September
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Best Buy rolls out consulting service at people's homesBest Buy is rolling out a free service next month where salespeople will sit with customers at their own homes to help make recommendations on TVs, streaming services and more.
12h
The Atlantic
Trump Won't Tell Americans How Many Troops He Is Risking This month, the U.S. military has engaged opposing forces in Iraq , Syria , Somalia , Yemen , and Afghanistan , where President Trump intends to send more troops in coming weeks. Trump campaigned on the promise that he would seize power from globalist usurpers in Washington, D.C., and return it to the people, spending their tax dollars rebuilding America rather than investing blood and treasure i
12h
The Atlantic
Why So Few Violent Offenders Are Let Out on Parole In recent years, national discussions of criminal-justice reform have largely revolved around non-violent drug-related convictions—as illustrated by the hundreds of federal inmates that Barack Obama granted clemency to at the end of his second term. In a sense, these offenders are low-hanging fruit: They are arguably the most politically palatable inmate demographic, and many lawmakers can champi
12h
The Atlantic
Ivy League Scholars Urge Students: 'Think for Yourself' Fifteen highly accomplished scholars who teach at Yale, Princeton, and Harvard published a letter Monday with advice for young people who are headed off to college: Though it will require self-discipline and perhaps even courage, “Think for yourself.” The “vice of conformism” is a temptation for all faculty and students, they argue, due to a climate rife with group think, where it is “all-too-eas
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lebanon gets first animal protection lawLebanese President Michel Aoun on Tuesday signed the country's first animal welfare bill into law, guaranteeing that domestic and wild animals will be legally protected from abuse.
12h
The Scientist RSS
Science Labs Offer Help to Texas ResearchersSparked by a tweet from a Philadelphia scientist, the March for Science-Houston has launched a database of facilities offering to host reagents and researchers.
12h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Advised to Remove Climate Change LanguageThe Department of Energy requested that scientists reword grant proposals to be more in line with the White House's agenda on climate research.
12h
Gizmodo
Scientists Think They Know Why the Caspian Sea Is Shrinking Image: Globe Master 3D/Wikimedia Commons The Caspian Sea is about as strange as a body of water gets. Its surface still sits 27.5 meters (90 feet) below sea level, and water doesn’t flow out of it—it’s isolated from the oceans, and relies on a series of Asian rivers to maintain its levels. A team of researchers from universities around the world calculated the major factors adding to changes in t
12h
Popular Science
The invisible engine that made Hurricane Harvey worse Environment Tides of change. Yes, climate change made Harvey worse. Here's how.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delivery without drivers: Domino's, Ford team up for testNo ring of the doorbell, just a text. No tip for the driver? No problem in this test, where Domino's and Ford are teaming up to see if customers will warm to the idea of pizza delivered by driverless cars.
12h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Hints of Trigonometry on a 3,700-Year-Old Babylonian TabletScholars have debated for decades the purpose of 60 numbers written on a small clay tablet. Two Australian mathematicians believe they have figured it out.
13h
Gizmodo
Add Some William Painter Sunglasses To Your Collection During This One-Day Sale William Painter and House of Harlow sunglasses Gold Box Class up your sunglasses selection with Amazon’s one-day sale on William Painter and House of Harlow shades . William Painter boasts styles with titanium frames, scratch-resistant polarized lenses, and a lifetime warranty. Plus, a few of the styles have hidden bottle openers on the arms. Note : a couple styles have different lens options (so
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal judge reviews $151 million chemical spill settlementA revised class-action settlement plan is back before a federal judge deciding how to pay victims of a chemical spill that left people without tap water for up to 9 days.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why does rubbing a balloon on your hair make it stick?For centuries, scientists have tried to understand triboelectric charging, commonly known as static electricity.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UConn chemist synthesizes pure grapheneUConn chemist Doug Adamson has patented a one-of-a-kind process for exfoliating graphenel in its pure (unoxidized) form, as well as manufacturing innovative graphene nanocomposites that have potential uses in a variety of applications, including desalination of brackish water.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why does rubbing a balloon on your hair make it stick?New research led by Case Western Reserve University indicates that tiny holes and cracks in a material -- changes in the microstructure -- can control how the material becomes electrically charged through friction.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover new immunotherapy combination effective at killing cancer cellsResearchers at the University of Calgary recently discovered an immunotherapy that uses existing cancer drugs in a whole new way. 'What we found is a combination of cancer therapies that complement each other in helping the immune system clear the cancer,' says Doug Mahoney, PhD. 'Our results suggest that we've been looking at these cancer drugs the wrong way -- as tumour-targeting drugs -- instea
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Senegalese 'miracle grain' could see Sahel prosper: TEDA Senegalese chef is one step closer to turning an ancient grain found in his country—gluten-free and bursting with nutrients and amino acids—into the next trendy superfood.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On Katrina anniversary, New Orleans braces for HarveyNew Orleans on Tuesday marked 12 years since Hurricane Katrina slammed into the US Gulf Coast, as the low-lying coastal city braced for a potentially-devastating new impact by Harvey later this week.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Sanvu strengthen to a tropical stormTropical Depression Sanvu has strengthened into a tropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm's cloud tops using infrared light.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists move graphene closer to transistor applicationsScientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory were able to successfully manipulate the electronic structure of graphene, which may enable the fabrication of graphene transistors— faster and more reliable than existing silicon-based transistors.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expanding the reach of therapeutic antibodiesA group of researchers has developed an approach to efficiently produce antibodies that can bind to two different target molecules simultaneously, a long-desired innovation in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The details will be published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
13h
The Atlantic
Photos: Pet Rescues in Harvey's Wake As the floodwater continues to rise in southeastern Texas, residents have been trying to reach safety for days now—many of them bringing along their beloved furry companions. The dogs and cats of displaced flood victims are being cared for by owners, neighbors, and first responders across the region, finding medical attention and safety in shelters, and remaining close to their owners.
13h
Science | The Guardian
Sport doping study revealing wider usage published after 'scandalous' delay Almost six-year wrangle delays release of anonymous surveys done after elite athletics events in 2011, in which 57% of competitors doing admitted doping compared to under 4% in Wada results A controversial study suggesting that doping in sport is far more prevalent than was found to be by conventional testing has finally been published after years of wrangling. The research, based on anonymous su
13h
Big Think
Researchers Discover How Animals First Appeared on Earth Australian scientists discover how complex life first appeared on Earth - one of the "greatest mysteries of science". Read More
13h
Gizmodo
YouTube Moved the Red Thing and Life Will Never Be the Same GIF Gif: YouTube As they say: Life comes at you fast. Yesterday, you were looking at a YouTube logo with the red thing on the right side, highlighting the word “Tube.” Today, it’s on the left side, sporting a play icon. It’s a small update to the design of a popular website, you might say. But will any of us ever be the same? How could we be? The world has changed. Current events aside, we’re now
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ames Laboratory scientists move graphene closer to transistor applicationsScientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory were able to successfully manipulate the electronic structure of graphene, which may enable the fabrication of graphene transistors -- faster and more reliable than existing silicon-based transistors.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Sanvu strengthen to a tropical stormTropical Depression Sanvu has strengthened into a tropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm's cloud tops using infrared light.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drought response in global crops may be as complex as day and nightResearchers have identified a set of genes that help control early drought response in a popular global crop. The pioneering study, conducted by Dartmouth College, the University of Wyoming, and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, separates itself from previous research by focusing on the entire day-night cycle and by analyzing both genetic and physiological changes.
13h
The Atlantic
Does Harvey Represent a New Normal for Hurricanes? Even though rain is still falling in Houston, history has already been made: Hurricane Harvey is almost certainly the largest U.S. flooding rainstorm ever . In its rapid intensification and its powerful downpours, it presents many of the symptoms of human-caused climate change , though scientists caution that it will take months for them to distinguish the full effects of global warming on the st
13h
The Atlantic
How China Sees North Korea As President Donald Trump trades threats with North Korea, China is staying idle. Through assertive military exercises and statements, Beijing has warned repeatedly that it could defend North Korea if it is attacked by the United States. Yet at the same time, a series of shifts in China’s military posture near the North Korean border suggest a military increasingly willing to send forceful signal
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where's the line? Managing extreme speech on social mediaExtreme speech on social media—foul language, threats and overtly sexist and racist language—has been in the spotlight. While such language is not new, recent increases of extreme and offensive posts on social media have led to politicians, celebrities and pundits calling for social media platforms to do more in curbing such speech, opening new debates about free speech in the digital age. Now, a
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Gizmodo
Scientists Made Music From the Human Microbiome, and It’s Seriously Cool Image: Wikimedia There are many mysteries of human biology. Among those perhaps least considered, what do our bodies sound like? This was the question on the mind of the founders of Biota Beats, a collective of biologists and biology enthusiasts making music that explores the sound of the human microbiome. David Kong, an MIT synthetic biologist, community organizer and musician, presented Biota B
13h
The Scientist RSS
FDA Goes After Two Stem Cell ClinicsThe agency raided one that was using a stem cell-smallpox vaccine combo, and sent a warning to another to obey best practices.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochemists simulate a protein-folding chaperone's functional danceUsing a combination of computational and experimental techniques, a research team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by molecular biologist Lila Gierasch has demystified the pathway of interdomain communication in a family of proteins known as Hsp70s - a top target of dozens of research laboratories trying to develop new anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics and treatments for Alzheimer's and
13h
Viden
Klimaforandringer betyder mere og voldsommere nedbørEr klimaforandringerne skyld i tropiske orkaner som Harvey? Måske ikke direkte, men ændringer i klimaet har betydning, forklarer DR's klimakorrespondent Jesper Theilgaard.
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In vivo loss-of-function screens identify KPNB1 as a new druggable oncogene in epithelial ovarian cancer [Genetics]Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a deadly cancer, and its prognosis has not been changed significantly during several decades. To seek new therapeutic targets for EOC, we performed an in vivo dropout screen in human tumor xenografts using a pooled shRNA library targeting thousands of druggable genes. Then, in follow-up...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphoantigen-induced conformational change of butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) and its implication on V{gamma}9V{delta}2 T cell activation [Immunology and Inflammation]Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells respond to microbial infections as well as certain types of tumors. The key initiators of Vγ9Vδ2 activation are small, pyrophosphate-containing molecules called phosphoantigens (pAgs) that are present in infected cells or accumulate intracellularly in certain tumor cells. Recent studies demonstrate that initiation of the Vγ9Vδ2 T...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiplex, quantitative cellular analysis in large tissue volumes with clearing-enhanced 3D microscopy (Ce3D) [Immunology and Inflammation]Organ homeostasis, cellular differentiation, signal relay, and in situ function all depend on the spatial organization of cells in complex tissues. For this reason, comprehensive, high-resolution mapping of cell positioning, phenotypic identity, and functional state in the context of macroscale tissue structure is critical to a deeper understanding of diverse...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antitumor effect of Batf2 through IL-12 p40 up-regulation in tumor-associated macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]The development of effective treatments against cancers is urgently needed, and the accumulation of CD8+ T cells within tumors is especially important for cancer prognosis. Although their mechanisms are still largely unknown, growing evidence has indicated that innate immune cells have important effects on cancer progression through the production of...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
De novo mutations in inhibitors of Wnt, BMP, and Ras/ERK signaling pathways in non-syndromic midline craniosynostosis [Medical Sciences]Non-syndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) is a frequent congenital malformation in which one or more cranial sutures fuse prematurely. Mutations causing rare syndromic craniosynostoses in humans and engineered mouse models commonly increase signaling of the Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), or Ras/ERK pathways, converging on shared nuclear targets that promote bone formation....
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Immunogenicity and structures of a rationally designed prefusion MERS-CoV spike antigen [Microbiology]Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a lineage C betacoronavirus that since its emergence in 2012 has caused outbreaks in human populations with case-fatality rates of ∼36%. As in other coronaviruses, the spike (S) glycoprotein of MERS-CoV mediates receptor recognition and membrane fusion and is the primary target of...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Recruitment of CRISPR-Cas systems by Tn7-like transposons [Microbiology]A survey of bacterial and archaeal genomes shows that many Tn7-like transposons contain minimal type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems that consist of fused cas8f and cas5f, cas7f, and cas6f genes and a short CRISPR array. Several small groups of Tn7-like transposons encompass similarly truncated type I-B CRISPR-Cas. This minimal gene complement...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
KCNE1 and KCNE3 modulate KCNQ1 channels by affecting different gating transitions [Physiology]KCNE β-subunits assemble with and modulate the properties of voltage-gated K+ channels. In the heart, KCNE1 associates with the α-subunit KCNQ1 to generate the slowly activating, voltage-dependent potassium current (IKs) in the heart that controls the repolarization phase of cardiac action potentials. By contrast, in epithelial cells from the colon,...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A protein complex regulates RNA processing of intronic heterochromatin-containing genes in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]In several eukaryotic organisms, heterochromatin (HC) in the introns of genes can regulate RNA processing, including polyadenylation, but the mechanism underlying this regulation is poorly understood. By promoting distal polyadenylation, the bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domain-containing and RNA recognition motif-containing protein ASI1 and the H3K9me2-binding protein EDM2 are required for the...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Signaling from the plasma-membrane localized plant immune receptor RPM1 requires self-association of the full-length protein [Plant Biology]Plants evolved intracellular immune receptors that belong to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family to recognize the presence of pathogen-derived effector proteins. NLRs possess an N-terminal Toll-like/IL-1 receptor (TIR) or a non-TIR domain [some of which contain coiled coils (CCs)], a central nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) domain, and a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR)....
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Separate mesocortical and mesolimbic pathways encode effort and reward learning signals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Optimal decision making mandates organisms learn the relevant features of choice options. Likewise, knowing how much effort we should expend can assume paramount importance. A mesolimbic network supports reward learning, but it is unclear whether other choice features, such as effort learning, rely on this same network. Using computational fMRI,...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Genome tree analysis suggests alternate fungal evolutionary histories Genome tree of life for fungi. Spanning every ecosystem, fungi comprise one of the largest and most diverse groups of organisms on Earth. Researchers have traditionally established kinship among fungi by scrutinizing a small set of highly conserved genes and constructing so-called...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Children’s preferences for less diverse greenspaces do not disprove biophilia [Social Sciences]Hand et al. (1) make a most useful contribution to the debate on the role of urban greenspaces in providing well-being benefits for children. Their discussion of the increasing disconnection between people and nature as a result of urbanization is valuable in a context of a nonsustainable humanity. However, we...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Fattorini et al.: Children’s selected avoidance of wild greenspace is driven by more than cultural factors [Social Sciences]We welcome the response by Fattorini et al. (1), which opens up discussion on the many possible factors influencing how children use their local environments. Fattorini et al. argue that our study (2) fails to test the biophilia hypothesis by leaving untested a possible cultural influence for children to prefer...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Balancing public safety and individual rights in street policing [Economic Sciences]Whether viewed from the desk of a police chief, a city mayor, or a citizen in a deprived, high-crime community, maintaining the balance between police effectiveness and fair policing is complicated and difficult to achieve, let alone to sustain over the long term. However, it is at the heart of...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lucky kindlin: A cloverleaf at the integrin tail [Biochemistry]In a paper published in PNAS, Li et al. (1) solve the long-awaited crystal structure of kindlin-2, which plays a central role in integrin activation, clustering, and signaling (2, 3). Integrins are a large family of heterodimeric adhesion molecules composed of α- and β-subunits and expressed on almost all cells....
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exotic birds provide unique insight into species invasions [Ecology]For most readers, their exposure to invasive species will come from media accounts of “killer” algae in the Mediterranean Sea, Burmese pythons prowling through Florida’s Everglades, or mosquitoes vectoring Zika virus in Brazil. What these observers typically miss, however, are the thousands of species that each year are moved and...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR): A mediator of social development [Neuroscience]One of the great challenges facing developmental neuroscience is to understand how complex social interactions can shape brain development during ontogeny to affect adult functioning in social and behavioral contexts (1). Some of the most vexing behavioral problems, such as autism spectrum disorder that involves impaired social interactions, including verbal...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reducing posttreatment relapse in cleft lip palatal expansion using an inȷectable estrogen-nanodiamond hydrogel [Engineering]Patients with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP), who undergo numerous medical interventions from infancy, can suffer from lifelong debilitation caused by underdeveloped maxillae. Conventional treatment approaches use maxillary expansion techniques to develop normal speech, achieve functional occlusion for nutrition intake, and improve esthetics. However, as patients with CLP congenitally lack...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural and functional studies of pyruvate carboxylase regulation by cyclic di-AMP in lactic acid bacteria [Biochemistry]Cyclic di-3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a broadly conserved bacterial second messenger that has been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes. Our earlier studies showed that c-di-AMP regulates central metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes by inhibiting its pyruvate carboxylase (LmPC), a biotin-dependent enzyme with biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT)...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fission yeast myosin Myo2 is down-regulated in actin affinity by light chain phosphorylation [Biochemistry]Studies in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have provided the basis for the most advanced models of the dynamics of the cytokinetic contractile ring. Myo2, a class-II myosin, is the major source of tension in the contractile ring, but how Myo2 is anchored and regulated to produce force is poorly understood....
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinetic and high-throughput profiling of epigenetic interactions by 3D-carbene chip-based surface plasmon resonance imaging technology [Biochemistry]Chemical modifications on histones and DNA/RNA constitute a fundamental mechanism for epigenetic regulation. These modifications often function as docking marks to recruit or stabilize cognate “reader” proteins. So far, a platform for quantitative and high-throughput profiling of the epigenetic interactome is urgently needed but still lacking. Here, we report a...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Elucidating crosstalk mechanisms between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation [Biochemistry]Proteins can be modified by multiple posttranslational modifications (PTMs), creating a PTM code that controls the function of proteins in space and time. Unraveling this complex PTM code is one of the great challenges in molecular biology. Here, using mass spectrometry-based assays, we focus on the most common PTMs—phosphorylation and...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Two transmembrane dimers of the bovine papillomavirus E5 oncoprotein clamp the PDGF {beta} receptor in an active dimeric conformation [Biochemistry]The dimeric 44-residue E5 protein of bovine papillomavirus is the smallest known naturally occurring oncoprotein. This transmembrane protein binds to the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR), causing dimerization and activation of the receptor. Here, we use Rosetta membrane modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mathematical model reveals role of nucleotide signaling in airway surface liquid homeostasis and its dysregulation in cystic fibrosis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Mucociliary clearance is composed of three components (i.e., mucin secretion, airway surface hydration, and ciliary-activity) which function coordinately to clear inhaled microbes and other foreign particles from airway surfaces. Airway surface hydration is maintained by water fluxes driven predominantly by active chloride and sodium ion transport. The ion channels that...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genomic evidence reveals a radiation of placental mammals uninterrupted by the KPg boundary [Evolution]The timing of the diversification of placental mammals relative to the Cretaceous–Paleogene (KPg) boundary mass extinction remains highly controversial. In particular, there have been seemingly irreconcilable differences in the dating of the early placental radiation not only between fossil-based and molecular datasets but also among molecular datasets. To help resolve...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Feedback amplification loop drives malignant growth in epithelial tissues [Genetics]Interactions between cells bearing oncogenic mutations and the surrounding microenvironment, and cooperation between clonally distinct cell populations, can contribute to the growth and malignancy of epithelial tumors. The genetic techniques available in Drosophila have contributed to identify important roles of the TNF-α ligand Eiger and mitogenic molecules in mediating these...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Knee osteoarthritis has doubled in prevalence since the mid-20th century [Anthropology]Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is believed to be highly prevalent today because of recent increases in life expectancy and body mass index (BMI), but this assumption has not been tested using long-term historical or evolutionary data. We analyzed long-term trends in knee OA prevalence in the United States using cadaver-derived skeletons...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modular tissue engineering for the vascularization of subcutaneously transplanted pancreatic islets [Applied Biological Sciences]The transplantation of pancreatic islets, following the Edmonton Protocol, is a promising treatment for type I diabetics. However, the need for multiple donors to achieve insulin independence reflects the large loss of islets that occurs when islets are infused into the portal vein. Finding a less hostile transplantation site that...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fluctuation spectra and force generation in nonequilibrium systems [Applied Physical Sciences]Many biological systems are appropriately viewed as passive inclusions immersed in an active bath: from proteins on active membranes to microscopic swimmers confined by boundaries. The nonequilibrium forces exerted by the active bath on the inclusions or boundaries often regulate function, and such forces may also be exploited in artificial...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hydrodynamics of microbial filter feeding [Applied Physical Sciences]Microbial filter feeders are an important group of grazers, significant to the microbial loop, aquatic food webs, and biogeochemical cycling. Our understanding of microbial filter feeding is poor, and, importantly, it is unknown what force microbial filter feeders must generate to process adequate amounts of water. Also, the trade-off in...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis of kindlin-mediated integrin recognition and activation [Biochemistry]Kindlins and talins are integrin-binding proteins that are critically involved in integrin activation, an essential process for many fundamental cellular activities including cell-matrix adhesion, migration, and proliferation. As FERM-domain–containing proteins, talins and kindlins, respectively, bind different regions of β-integrin cytoplasmic tails. However, compared with the extensively studied
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conformational dynamics of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase on ligand binding revealed by H/D exchange MS [Biochemistry]The enzyme 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXPS) is a key enzyme in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and is a target for the development of antibiotics, herbicides, and antimalarial drugs. DXPS catalyzes the formation of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP), a branch point metabolite in isoprenoid biosynthesis, and is also used in the biosynthesis...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inverted-region electron transfer as a mechanism for enhancing photosynthetic solar energy conversion efficiency [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In all photosynthetic organisms, light energy is used to drive electrons from a donor chlorophyll species via a series of acceptors across a biological membrane. These light-induced electron-transfer processes display a remarkably high quantum efficiency, indicating a near-complete inhibition of unproductive charge recombination reactions. It has been suggested that unproductive...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Angular reconstitution-based 3D reconstructions of nanomolecular structures from superresolution light-microscopy images [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Superresolution light microscopy allows the imaging of labeled supramolecular assemblies at a resolution surpassing the classical diffraction limit. A serious limitation of the superresolution approach is sample heterogeneity and the stochastic character of the labeling procedure. To increase the reproducibility and the resolution of the superresolution results, we apply multivariate...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Alignment of the protein substrate hairpin along the SecA two-helix finger primes protein transport in Escherichia coli [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A conserved hairpin-like structure comprised of a signal peptide and early mature region initiates protein transport across the SecY or Sec61α channel in Bacteria or Archaea and Eukarya, respectively. When and how this initiator substrate hairpin forms remains a mystery. Here, we have used the bacterial SecA ATPase motor protein...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Critical structural fluctuations of proteins upon thermal unfolding challenge the Lindemann criterion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Internal subnanosecond timescale motions are key for the function of proteins, and are coupled to the surrounding solvent environment. These fast fluctuations guide protein conformational changes, yet their role for protein stability, and for unfolding, remains elusive. Here, in analogy with the Lindemann criterion for the melting of solids, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A p53-dependent response limits the viability of mammalian haploid cells [Cell Biology]The recent development of haploid cell lines has facilitated forward genetic screenings in mammalian cells. These lines include near-haploid human cell lines isolated from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (KBM7 and HAP1), as well as haploid embryonic stem cells derived from several organisms. In all cases, haploidy was shown...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Oxidation of alkyl benzenes by a flavin photooxidation catalyst on nanostructured metal-oxide films [Chemistry]We describe here a surface-bound, oxide-based procedure for the photooxidation of a family of aromatic hydrocarbons by a phosphate-bearing flavin mononucleotide (FMN) photocatalyst on high surface area metal-oxide films.
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate matching drives spread rate but not establishment success in recent unintentional bird introductions [Ecology]Understanding factors driving successful invasions is one of the cornerstones of invasion biology. Bird invasions have been frequently used as study models, and the foundation of current knowledge largely relies on species purposefully introduced during the 19th and early 20th centuries in countries colonized by Europeans. However, the profile of...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assessing benefits, costs, and disparate racial impacts of confrontational proactive policing [Economic Sciences]Effective policing in a democratic society must balance the sometime conflicting objectives of public safety and community trust. This paper uses a formal model of optimal policing to explore how society might reasonably resolve the tension between these two objectives as well as evaluate disparate racial impacts. We do so...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Climate policymakers and assessments must get serious about climate engineering [Environmental Sciences]Climate engineering (CE)—the intentional, global-scale modification of the environment to help offset the effects of elevated greenhouse gases—appears able to reduce climate-change risks beyond what’s possible with mitigation and adaptation alone. Furthermore, the large-scale use of CE is probably essential for achieving prudent climate-change limits, including the Paris target of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of co-occurring competition and facilitation in plant spacing hydrodynamics in water-limited environments [Environmental Sciences]Plant performance (i.e., fecundity, growth, survival) depends on an individual’s access to space and resources. At the community level, plant performance is reflected in observable vegetation patterning (i.e., spacing distance, density) often controlled by limiting resources. Resource availability is, in turn, strongly dependent on plant patterning mediated by competitive and...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A model explaining the matrilateral bias in alloparental investment [Evolution]Maternal grandmothers invest more in childcare than paternal grandmothers. This bias is large where the expression of preferences is unconstrained by residential and lineage norms, and is detectable even where marriage removes women from their natal families. We maintain that the standard evolutionary explanation, paternity uncertainty, is incomplete, and present...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A genome Tree of Life for the Fungi kingdom [Evolution]Fungi belong to one of the largest and most diverse kingdoms of living organisms. The evolutionary kinship within a fungal population has so far been inferred mostly from the gene-information–based trees (“gene trees”), constructed commonly based on the degree of differences of proteins or DNA sequences of a small number...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Next step in the ongoing arms race between myxoma virus and wild rabbits in Australia is a novel disease phenotype [Evolution]In host–pathogen arms races, increases in host resistance prompt counteradaptation by pathogens, but the nature of that counteradaptation is seldom directly observed outside of laboratory models. The best-documented field example is the coevolution of myxoma virus (MYXV) in European rabbits. To understand how MYXV in Australia has continued to evolve...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanical constraint from growing jaw facilitates mammalian dental diversity [Evolution]Much of the basic information about individual organ development comes from studies using model species. Whereas conservation of gene regulatory networks across higher taxa supports generalizations made from a limited number of species, generality of mechanistic inferences remains to be tested in tissue culture systems. Here, using mammalian tooth explants...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Optimized strategy for in vivo Cas9-activation in Drosophila [Genetics]While several large-scale resources are available for in vivo loss-of-function studies in Drosophila, an analogous resource for overexpressing genes from their endogenous loci does not exist. We describe a strategy for generating such a resource using Cas9 transcriptional activators (CRISPRa). First, we compare a panel of CRISPRa approaches and demonstrate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Accurate RNA consensus sequencing for high-fidelity detection of transcriptional mutagenesis-induced epimutations [Genetics]Transcriptional mutagenesis (TM) due to misincorporation during RNA transcription can result in mutant RNAs, or epimutations, that generate proteins with altered properties. TM has long been hypothesized to play a role in aging, cancer, and viral and bacterial evolution. However, inadequate methodologies have limited progress in elucidating a causal association....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Obesity-associated gene TMEM18 has a role in the central control of appetite and body weight regulation [Medical Sciences]An intergenic region of human chromosome 2 (2p25.3) harbors genetic variants which are among those most strongly and reproducibly associated with obesity. The gene closest to these variants is TMEM18, although the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects remain entirely unknown. Tmem18 expression in the murine hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Vibrio cholerae type 6 secretion system effector trafficking in target bacterial cells [Microbiology]The type 6 secretion system (T6SS) is used by many Gram-negative bacterial species to deliver toxic effector proteins into nearby bacteria prey cells to kill or inhibit their growth. VgrG proteins are core conserved secretion substrates of the T6SS and one subset of T6SS effectors consists of VgrG proteins with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Organotypic models of type III interferon-mediated protection from Zika virus infections at the maternal-fetal interface [Microbiology]Protecting the fetus from the hematogenous spread of viruses requires multifaceted layers of protection and relies heavily on trophoblasts, the fetal-derived cells that comprise the placental barrier. We showed previously that trophoblasts isolated from full-term placentas resist infection by diverse viruses, including Zika virus (ZIKV), and transfer this resistance to...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase [Microbiology]Staphylococcus aureus is highly adapted to its host and has evolved many strategies to resist opsonization and phagocytosis. Even after uptake by neutrophils, S. aureus shows resistance to killing, which suggests the presence of phagosomal immune evasion molecules. With the aid of secretome phage display, we identified a highly conserved...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Voltage-gated calcium flux mediates Escherichia coli mechanosensation [Microbiology]Electrically excitable cells harness voltage-coupled calcium influx to transmit intracellular signals, typically studied in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Despite intense study in higher organisms, investigations of voltage and calcium signaling in bacteria have lagged due to their small size and a lack of sensitive tools. Only recently were bacteria shown to...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stochastic feeding dynamics arise from the need for information and energy [Neuroscience]Animals regulate their food intake in response to the available level of food. Recent observations of feeding dynamics in small animals showed feeding patterns of bursts and pauses, but their function is unknown. Here, we present a data-driven decision-theoretical model of feeding in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our central assumption is that...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bidirectional manipulation of mTOR signaling disrupts socially mediated vocal learning in juvenile songbirds [Neuroscience]Early life experiences can have long-lasting behavioral consequences because they are encoded when the brain is most malleable. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade modulates experience-dependent synaptic plasticity, among other processes. mTOR has been almost exclusively examined in adult rodent learning models, but may be especially important in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
BDNF-TrkB controls cocaine-induced dendritic spines in rodent nucleus accumbens dissociated from increases in addictive behaviors [Neuroscience]Chronic cocaine use is associated with prominent morphological changes in nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh) neurons, including increases in dendritic spine density along with enhanced motivation for cocaine, but a functional relationship between these morphological and behavioral phenomena has not been shown. Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Amplification of local changes along the timescale processing hierarchy [Neuroscience]Small changes in word choice can lead to dramatically different interpretations of narratives. How does the brain accumulate and integrate such local changes to construct unique neural representations for different stories? In this study, we created two distinct narratives by changing only a few words in each sentence (e.g., “he”...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Friction law and hysteresis in granular materials [Physics]The macroscopic friction of particulate materials often weakens as the flow rate is increased, leading to potentially disastrous intermittent phenomena including earthquakes and landslides. We theoretically and numerically study this phenomenon in simple granular materials. We show that velocity weakening, corresponding to a nonmonotonic behavior in the friction law, μ(I),...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in aggregation states of light-harvesting complexes as a mechanism for modulating energy transfer in desert crust cyanobacteria [Plant Biology]In this paper we propose an energy dissipation mechanism that is completely reliant on changes in the aggregation state of the phycobilisome light-harvesting antenna components. All photosynthetic organisms regulate the efficiency of excitation energy transfer (EET) to fit light energy supply to biochemical demands. Not many do this to the...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neuroplasticity of selective attention: Research foundations and preliminary evidence for a gene by intervention interaction [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]This article reviews the trajectory of our research program on selective attention, which has moved from basic research on the neural processes underlying selective attention to translational studies using selective attention as a neurobiological target for evidence-based interventions. We use this background to present a promising preliminary investigation of how...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Oxytocin-enforced norm compliance reduces xenophobic outgroup rejection [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Never before have individuals had to adapt to social environments defined by such magnitudes of ethnic diversity and cultural differentiation. However, neurobiological evidence informing about strategies to reduce xenophobic sentiment and foster altruistic cooperation with outsiders is scarce. In a series of experiments settled in the context of the current...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Superior colliculus encodes visual saliency before the primary visual cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Models of visual attention postulate the existence of a bottom-up saliency map that is formed early in the visual processing stream. Although studies have reported evidence of a saliency map in various cortical brain areas, determining the contribution of phylogenetically older pathways is crucial to understanding its origin. Here, we...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prefrontal cortex modulates posterior alpha oscillations during top-down guided visual perception [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Conscious visual perception is proposed to arise from the selective synchronization of functionally specialized but widely distributed cortical areas. It has been suggested that different frequency bands index distinct canonical computations. Here, we probed visual perception on a fine-grained temporal scale to study the oscillatory dynamics supporting prefrontal-dependent sensory processing....
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Geography of intergenerational mobility and child development [Social Sciences]Recent research by Chetty and colleagues finds that children’s chances of upward mobility are affected by the communities in which they grow up [Chetty R, Hendren N (2016) Working paper 23002]. However, the developmental pathways through which communities of origin translate into future economic gain are not well understood. In...
13h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Disaggregating sorghum yield reductions under warming scenarios exposes narrow genetic diversity in US breeding programs [Sustainability Science]Historical adaptation of sorghum production to arid and semiarid conditions has provided promise regarding its sustained productivity under future warming scenarios. Using Kansas field-trial sorghum data collected from 1985 to 2014 and spanning 408 hybrid cultivars, we show that sorghum productivity under increasing warming scenarios breaks down. Through extensive regression...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Impact of catch shares on diversification of fishers’ income and risk [Sustainability Science]Many fishers diversify their income by participating in multiple fisheries, which has been shown to significantly reduce year-to-year variation in income. The ability of fishers to diversify has become increasingly constrained in the last few decades, and catch share programs could further reduce diversification as a result of consolidation. This...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Temperature increase reduces global yields of major crops in four independent estimates [Sustainability Science]Wheat, rice, maize, and soybean provide two-thirds of human caloric intake. Assessing the impact of global temperature increase on production of these crops is therefore critical to maintaining global food supply, but different studies have yielded different results. Here, we investigated the impacts of temperature on yields of the four...
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The Atlantic
Basket of Deplorables Riffs on Trump's America The first sentence of Basket of Deplorables announces, “You can’t see me right now. Then again, I can’t see you either.” You can take the narrator, Georgina, literally: A recent head injury has left her blind, and adrift at a buzzing election-night party at a Tribeca loft where she feels increasingly alienated from the intellectuals, musicians, and n+1 editors in her social circle. But her statem
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Feed: All Latest
How Climate Change Fueled Hurricane HarveyThe Gulf is warmer and the winds are changing. Which is why researchers expect more high-pressure anomalies like Hurricane Harvey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clamping down on causality by probing laser cavitiesSince the realization of the first laser cavity countless questions have been asked for which laser light has provided the answer. Numerous questions have also been posed in an effort to improve on our abilities to produce lasers with various performance specifications and wavelengths. A question that was not asked until recently is - what happens if you shine a laser beam through another laser ca
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Science : NPR
Trump In Texas To Inspect Storm Damage The president said he waited to visit until he could do so "without causing disruption." He sidestepped Houston and instead stopped in Corpus Christi, where Harvey made landfall, and then in Austin. (Image credit: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
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Live Science
Truck- and Plane-Size Pterosaurs Once Flew Over DinosaursThe fossilized remains of two pterosaurs — winged reptiles that flew sky high during the dinosaur age — suggest that the beasts were closely related to the gigantic Quetzalcoatlus northropi, the largest pterosaur on record, new research finds.
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Ars Technica
Net neutrality comment deadline is tomorrow; 21.9 million comments in so far Enlarge / Protestors object to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to eliminate net neutrality rules before Pai's appearance at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC on May 5, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla ) You have until midnight Eastern Time tomorrow night (Wednesday) to file comments on the Federal Communications Commission plan to deregulate broadband service and roll
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Gizmodo
After Years of Sabotaging Whalers, This Radical Anti-Whaling Group Is Ending Its Patrols Japanese whaling ship Nisshin Maru with a captured minke whale on deck. (Image: Sea Shepherd) For the past 12 years, the anti-whaling organization Sea Shepherd has doggedly tracked and harassed Japanese whalers who it claims are working illegally in the Southern Ocean. Now, the group made famous by the documentary-style TV series Whale Wars says it’s halting its sea-based patrols, claiming it can
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Partnering with soil microbes essential to plant and animal lifeSoils can be extraordinarily biodiverse and differ widely in the kinds of microbial communities that inhabit them. As our understanding of what governs these differences grows, we can make better choices to protect and regenerate our soils' biodiversity. And without a vibrant soil microbial community, humans would not be able to depend on soil for food and other ecosystem services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Racial attitudes of a region can influence decisions by police, researchers sayWhen more white people in a community hold African-Americans in greater suspicion, that prevailing view may influence police behavior in ways that drive the outsize use of lethal force against African-Americans by cops, a recent study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expanding the reach of therapeutic antibodiesA group of researchers has developed an approach to efficiently produce antibodies that can bind to two different target molecules simultaneously, a long-desired innovation in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The details will be published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA team passes major technological milestone for characterizing exoplanetsNASA researchers say they have passed a major milestone in their quest to mature more powerful tools for directly detecting and analyzing the atmospheres of giant planets outside the solar system—one of the observational goals of NASA's proposed Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope, also known as WFIRST.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some Apple 'spaceship' neighbors say life has been hellAt the end of Nightingale Avenue, a tall yellow brick facade now blocks the view of the Santa Cruz Mountains to the south. Residents call it the "prison wall."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photosynthesis discovery could help design more efficient artificial solar cellsA natural process that occurs during photosynthesis could lead to the design of more efficient artificial solar cells, according to researchers at Georgia State University.
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Gizmodo
Google's Got a Plan to Put Its Splashy AR Powers on Millions of Android Phones GIF Image: Google This isn’t hyperbole. Between Apple’s ARKit and the new ARCore tool announced by Google , a viable form of augmented reality, the ability to witness an computer-augmented version of our world, is about to come to a whole lot of phones, and will be available on every Android and iOS phones going forward. That sci-fi future shitty movies in the 90s promised us is perilously close.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women largely unaware of minimally invasive treatment for uterine fibroidsUS women are largely unaware of uterine fibroid embolization, a minimally invasive treatment for uterine fibroids that is less painful, preserves the uterus and allows women to get back to their lives sooner than surgical options, according to results from a new nationwide poll released today by the Society of Interventional Radiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bahamian songbirds disappeared during last glacial-interglacial transitionTwo species of songbirds that once made a home in the Bahamas likely became extinct on the islands because of rising sea levels and a warmer, wetter climate, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Florida, Gainesville. The study, which was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a historical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weightlessness affects health of cosmonauts at molecular levelIt is widely known that space conditions influence metabolism, thermoregulation, heart biorhythms, muscle tone and other physiological aspects. However, the molecular mechanisms which drive the physiological changes caused by space flights remain unknown.Scientists analyzed the effect of space conditions on the protein composition in blood samples of 18 Russian cosmonauts. The results indicated ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rise of male individuals in stingless bees colonies leads to queen's deathStingless bees belong to Hymenoptera order, composed of social insect whose queens are capable of choosing the sex of their offspring. Only females are born from fertilized eggs, while males boast only maternal genetic material. However, queens might mate with males with whom they share a sex determination gene: in such cases, half the colony will be comprised of not-working males, as opposed to w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photosynthesis discovery could help design more efficient artificial solar cellsA natural process that occurs during photosynthesis could lead to the design of more efficient artificial solar cells, according to researchers at Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thorough analysis reveals immune system dynamics after immunotherapyBy combining new system-biological analyses and advanced data analysis, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have been able to monitor the maturation process of the immune system of leukemia patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation. The technique, which reveals complex interactions between cells and proteins, can be used for other diseases to generate new knowledge about the regulatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drought response in global crops may be as complex as day and nightResearchers identify a set of genes that help control early drought response in a popular global crop by focusing on the entire day-night cycle and by analyzing genetic and physiological changes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bowel cancer study reveals impact of mutations on protein networksFor the first time, scientists have completed a detailed study of many of the proteins in bowel cancer cells. Scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute investigated the role proteins play in predicting how common mutations affect proteins in the cancer cells and also whether such proteins are important in predicting the cancer's response to treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unraveling Alzheimer's: New study documents how brain cells go badScientists have known that abnormal protein deposits and swarms of activated immune cells accumulate in brains of people with Alzheimer's. Now researchers have untangled how these proteins and inflammation interact in lab experiments to reveal how therapies might reverse the disease process.
14h
The Atlantic
How a Disaster’s Economic Impacts Are Calculated Tropical storm Harvey had not stopped raining on Texas before the first estimates emerged as to how many billions of dollars in damages would result from the storm. Initial estimates from insurance companies like Hannover Re put the number at $3 billion. In a note to clients, JP Morgan estimated that the insurance industry could lose $10 to 20 billion from Harvey, making it one of the top 10 cost
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The eyes have itOur bodies, with all their different features and variations, are the result of well-orchestrated processes that dictate what and how cells develop into the organs and tissues that comprise our anatomy. Much of the information is genetic—the result of DNA—and biochemical signals also play a role. Yet another, and still somewhat mysterious, mechanism for embryonic development exists in the tiny mec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research strengthens link between mental health and retirement savingsThe question of how mental health status affects decisions regarding retirement savings is becoming a pressing issue in the United States. Key factors contributing to this issue include the tenuous state of the Social Security system, greater use of defined-contribution pension plans by employers, longer lifespans, and the rise of depression and other mental health issues in older Americans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA watching Harvey from satellites and the International Space StationNASA has a lot of resources providing information on Tropical Storm Harvey as it continues to drop tremendous, flooding rainfall on Texas and Louisiana. Satellites like NASA's Aqua satellite and platforms like aircraft and the International Space Station continue to provide various kinds of data on the storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collaborative effort proves silicon-based solar cells can reach nearly 36% efficiencyCollaboration between researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM), and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) shows the high potential of silicon-based multijunction solar cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers validate UV light's use in improving semiconductorsA discovery by two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) could aid the development of next-generation semiconductor devices.
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Ars Technica
How NASA’s Johnson Space Center is riding out the hurricane Enlarge / An ISS control room at Johnson Space Center. Surrounded by rising floodwaters, a skeleton crew at NASA’s Johnson Space Center is keeping the lights on for the International Space Station. About 125 people are riding out Harvey’s devastating flood on-site at Johnson Space Center, or JSC. Those on-site include the ISS Mission Control team, the support team for the James Webb Space Telesco
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Popular Science
Choose the right VR gear for you DIY VR to your face! Sure, virtual reality sounds fun. But how do all the VR headsets on the market differ, and which one will suit you best of all? Here's what you need to know.
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Gizmodo
4K Movies on the New Apple TV Will Probably Cost Way Too Much Image: Gizmodo Apple is gearing up for its annual product announcement in September where it will reportedly debut a more expensive iPhone and a new 4K Apple TV. Apple wants to be able to tell customers that they can get 4K movies for a slightly less-extortionate price than its competitors are offering, but movie studios hate this idea and both sides are out of their minds. Apple is furiously neg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New analysis identifies where commercial customers might benefit from energy storageCommercial electricity customers who are subject to high demand charges may be able to reduce overall costs by using battery energy storage to manage demand, according to research by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use brewery waste to grow yeast needed for beer makingScientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a new process to turn spent brewery grains into a valuable product that can grow beer yeast.
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Dagens Medicin
Hjertesvigtpatienter kan have forhøjet tryk i lungearterierne Hjertesvigtspatienter med bevaret pumpefunktion kan have forhøjet tryk i lungearterierne, viser nyt studie, som Tor Biering-Sørensen har præsenteret på ESC-kongressen.
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Dagens Medicin
Flere yngre danskere får atrieflimmer Et dansk registerstudie med data fra 1995-2012 dokumenterer, at flere yngre får atrieflimmer. Studiet blev fremlagt af Mia Nielsen Christiansen på årets ESC-kongres.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny scanningskombination kan optimere udredning af brystsmertepatienter Mathias Sørgaard har på ESC-kongressen fremlagt resultater, der tyder på, at man kan forbedre udredningen af patienter med brystsmerter ved at kombinere CT-angiografi med en CT-perfusionsscanning.
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Dagens Medicin
Grisemodel tester for blodpropper i lungerne En ny model med ægte blodpropper i grise skal bruges til at teste medicinske og mekaniske metoder til at behandling af blodpropper i lungerne i studie, som Jacob Schultz har fremlagt på ESC-kongressen.
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Dagens Medicin
Ingen fordel ved behandling af hjertepatienter i ambulance Det giver ingen fordel at behandle hjertepatienter med blodfortyndende medicin i ambulancen frem for at vente til de kommer frem til hospitalet, viser ny forskning.
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Dagens Medicin
Pradaxa virker bedre end warfarin til behandling af patienter efter ballonudvidelseNy forskning peger på, at behandling med warfarin til patienter efter ballonudvidelse ikke er den bedst mulige løsning. Sammenlignet med warfarin reducerer Pradaxa risikoen for blødning med næsten 50 pct. og har samme sikkerhedsprofil.
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Dagens Medicin
Selv lille indtag af frugt og grønt er sundt Nyt, stort studie viser, at selv et lille, dagligt indtag af frugt, grøntsager, bønner og linser sænker risikoen for hjerte-kar-sygdomme og dødsfald.
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Dagens Medicin
Kulhydrater, ikke fedt, slår ihjelNy forskning peger på, at højt indtag af kulhydrater, ikke fedt, er forbundet med øget risiko for at dø.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New process converts biomass waste into useful electronic devicesNorthern China's roadsides are peppered with deciduous phoenix trees, producing an abundance of fallen leaves in autumn. These leaves are generally burned in the colder season, exacerbating the country's air pollution problem. Investigators in Shandong, China, recently discovered a new method to convert this organic waste matter into a porous carbon material that can be used to produce high-tech e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolutionary ecology could benefit beekeepers battling diseasesSome commercial beekeeping practices may harm honeybees more than help them, scientists warn in a paper published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Autonomous Pizza Delivery Experiment That Isn’t Autonomous At All
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Gizmodo
Here's What Happened the Last Time the White Walkers Invaded Westeros Image: HBO. Still via Youtube The stage has been set for Game of Thrones’ final season, as a terribly divided Westeros faces an invasion by the White Walkers... but this won’t be the first time they’ve tried to eradicate humanity. Here’s everything we know about the first war between humans and the Walkers—and what it can tell us about the war to come next season. Westeros Before the Long Night I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatmentIndia is a second largest producer of leather, and being so, leather production and dyeing significantly contribute to pollution of water resources in India. Consistent dyeing of leather is difficult due to the unique nature of the raw material (matrix of collagen fibers), thus leather dyeing and finishing involves numerous wet chemical treatments having huge environmental impacts. Considering thi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Potential Tropical Cyclone 10 soaks Mid-AtlanticNOAA's GOES East satellite provided an image of Potential Tropical Cyclone 10 as it continued moving north along the U.S. East Coast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lasers zap decontaminates from soilThere might be a new and improved way to rid contaminated soil of toxins and pollutants: zap it with lasers. By directly breaking down pollutants, researchers say, high-powered lasers can now be more efficient and cheaper than conventional decontamination techniques.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NREL updates baseline cost and performance data for electricity generation technologiesThe Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released the 2017 Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), updating a key source of reliable electricity generation technology cost and performance data used to support and inform electric sector analysis in the United States. Now in its third year, the ATB documents technology-specific information on a broad spectrum of electricity
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Scientific American Content: Global
Honoring a Pioneering Woman in PhysicsLise Meitner solved the problem of nuclear fission—and while she never got the Nobel, she is the only woman outside of mythology to have an element named after her -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Mysterious Chemical Cloud Sickens Scores at British BeachesA mysterious chemical cloud descended on beaches in England on Sunday (Aug. 27), according to news reports, and authorities are still puzzling over what caused it and why it sickened more than 100 people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extreme exposureResearchers unravel the negative effects of pesticide exposure on birth outcomes, such as weight, gestation and abnormalities.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A milestone in aquatic toxicologyThe public release of first generation annotations for the fathead minnow genome was published today in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where's the line? Managing extreme speech on social mediaA new study from the University of Missouri School of Journalism shows that while people tend to dislike extreme speech on social media, there is less support for outright censorship. Instead, people believe sites need to do a better job promoting healthy discourse online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity prevention guidelines are not followed for preschool childrenIn a study of nearly 400 preschool children, only one child adhered to obesity prevention guidelines over the course of a single day at child care and at home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exclusion from school can trigger long-term psychiatric illnessExcluding children from school may lead to long-term psychiatric problems and psychological distress, a study of thousands of children has shown.
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: 4K TV, Dremel Gold Box, One-Day Sunglass Sale, and More William Painter sunglasses , a one-day Dremel sale , and a fantastic 4K TV lead off Tuesday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals TCL 55" 4K P-Series TV , $600 with code TCLONKTLA TCL’s P-series TV line is already one of the best deals in home entertainment , and today, you can save even more on the 55" model
15h
The Atlantic
The Trump Administration's Evolving Rhetoric on North Korea The White House’s response Tuesday to North Korea’s latest missile test was, in a way, measured. “The world has received North Korea’s latest message loud and clear: this regime has signaled its contempt for its neighbors, for all members of the United Nations, and for minimum standards of acceptable international behavior,” President Trump said in a statement. “Threatening and destabilizing acti
15h
The Atlantic
How St. Louis Workers Won and Then Lost a Minimum-Wage Hike Bettie Douglas has worked at a McDonald's in St. Louis for 10 years. For the last three months, she's made $10 per hour. On Monday, when she got to work, she was working for $7.90 per hour. Douglas didn’t get demoted, she isn’t in trouble with her bosses, and she didn’t change jobs. What changed is that a new Missouri law went into effect Monday, capping the minimum wage across the state at $7.70
15h
Ars Technica
Absolver hides its depth and beauty amid obtuse design Enlarge / Even how to progress from one place to the next isn't well explained... Absolver is a game that wants to be very, very many things. I'm just not sure all of those things mesh together very well. At times, Absolver is a numbers-and-technique-heavy martial arts game. Other times, it's a serendipitous multiplayer get-together, like Journey . At others still , Absolver is an obtuse single-p
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Futurity.org
Tiny DNA capsules smuggle molecules into cells A team of scientists has designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track. “It’s really a molecular platform,” says Yamuna Krishnan, a professor in chemistry at the University of Chicago and coau
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Popular Science
The FDA says ecstasy is a ‘breakthrough’ drug for PTSD patients Health It's a big step forward for a controversial treatment. Using MDMA—along with psychotherapy—could help millions of Americans who struggle with PTSD, especially those who don't see results with traditional routes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lively tunes boost sales in crowded storesIf a store is crowded, people tend to buy more if the sound system is playing a fast-paced song rather than a ballad. That's what a team of researchers found in a field experiment across a chain of grocery convenience stores in Northern Europe.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New findings on the past and future of sea ice cover in the ArcticTemperatures in the Arctic are currently climbing two to three times faster than the global average. The result - and, thanks to feedback effects, also the cause - is dwindling sea ice. In a study published in the actual volume of Nature Communications, geo- and climate researchers at the Alfred-Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar- and Marine Research (AWI) show that, in the course of ou
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of crab with unusual outgrowths has its name written in the starsA new species of crab with star-shaped tubercles all over its body has been collected from red coral beds during a survey at a small seamount by Peng-Chia-Yu Island, Taiwan. It has also been found in the Philippines. It is described in the open access journal ZooKeys.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMass Amherst biochemists simulate a protein-folding chaperone's functional danceUsing a combination of computational and experimental techniques, a research team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by molecular biologist Lila Gierasch has demystified the pathway of interdomain communication in a family of proteins known as Hsp70s -- a top target of dozens of research laboratories trying to develop new anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics and treatments for Alzheimer's an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-tech electronics made from autumn leavesNorthern China's roadsides are peppered with deciduous phoenix trees, producing an abundance of fallen leaves in autumn. These leaves are generally burned in the colder season, exacerbating the country's air pollution problem. Investigators in Shandong, China, recently discovered a new method to convert this organic waste matter into a porous carbon material that can be used to produce high-tech e
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Gizmodo
Amazon’s Echoes Can Finally Sync Together to Play Music Like a Sonos Image: Amazon It seems the smart speakers war is heating up, and Amazon is looking to stay out ahead of the pack. Starting today, Amazon is finally adding a feature for Alexa-enabled devices that will let you group multiple speakers together so you can synchronize your music across various rooms. Currently, the feature works with streaming platforms including Amazon Music, TuneIn, iHeartRadio and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Caspian Sea evaporating as temperatures rise, study findsEarth's largest inland body of water has been slowly evaporating for the past two decades due to rising temperatures associated with climate change, a new study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New member of NAS reveals how animals select good microbes, reject harmful onesMargaret McFall-Ngai, professor and director of the Pacific Biosciences Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, is the only woman at UH who is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). In her inaugural article published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, commemorating her induction into one o
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Gizmodo
This Is the Hellscape America Would Have Become If Obama Was Re-Elected in 2012 GIF Remember 2012? It was an election year that pitted former Republican governor Mitt Romney against the incumbent, President Barack Obama. But Rick Santorum threw his hat in the ring early on with a disturbing ad about what the world would look like if Obama was re-elected. Good thing that didn’t happen, right? Yes, the futuristic world of 2014, as imagined by Rick Santorum, is a terrifying one
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research in ancient forests show link between climate change and wildfiresPortland State researchers studying centuries-old trees in South America have found a tight correlation between wildfires and a warm weather fluctuation that has become more frequent in recent decades - and will continue to be more frequent as the climate warms.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A bed & breakfast in L.A. reveals the lifestyle of a secretive fly speciesFor nearly 30 years, Dr. Brian Brown knew about a mysterious unidentified phorid fly species, whose females would often be spotted flying above mushrooms, while the males were nowhere to be found.
15h
Live Science
Pleistocene Epoch: Facts About the Last Ice AgeThe Pleistocene Epoch began about 2.6 million years ago and lasted until about 11,700 years ago.
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Live Science
Elon Musk's Neuralink Gets $27 Million to Merge Humans and MachinesThe Tesla and SpaceX CEO believes the only way to keep pace with artificial intelligence is to upgrade human intelligence.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential Tropical Cyclone 10 soaks Mid-AtlanticNOAA's GOES East satellite provided an image of Potential Tropical Cyclone 10 as it continued moving north along the US East Coast.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolutionary ecology could benefit beekeepers battling diseasesA review paper draws on scientific studies to recommend ways to reduce honeybee disease impacts, such as limiting the mixing of bees between colonies and supporting natural bee behaviors that provide disease resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL analysis identifies where commercial customers might benefit from energy storageCommercial electricity customers who are subject to high demand charges may be able to reduce overall costs by using battery energy storage to manage demand, according to research by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers validate UV light's use in improving semiconductorsA discovery by two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory could aid the development of next-generation semiconductor devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds hormone therapy improves sleep quality for recently menopausal womenA new study published in Menopause: The Journal of The North American Menopause Society has found that low-dose hormone therapy may be effective in easing sleep issues in this population.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL, Swiss scientists power past solar efficiency recordsCollaboration between researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology, and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne shows the high potential of silicon-based multijunction solar cells.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lasers zap decontaminates from soilThere might be a new and improved way to rid contaminated soil of toxins and pollutants: zap it with lasers. By directly breaking down pollutants, researchers say, high-powered lasers can now be more efficient and cheaper than conventional decontamination techniques. They have shown how such a laser system could work, describing the proof-of-principle results this week in the Journal of Applied Ph
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Woolly rhino neck ribs provide clues about their decline and eventual extinctionResearchers from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden examined woolly rhino and modern rhino neck vertebrae from several European and American museum collections and noticed that the remains of woolly rhinos from the North Sea often possess a 'cervical' (neck) rib—in contrast to modern rhinos.
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Gizmodo
Harvey's Floodwaters Could Pose Serious Health Hazards Photo: Getty Extreme rainfall and flooding from Hurricane Harvey has left thousands in Houston and surrounding communities stranded. Some parts of the city have experienced over 40 inches of rain , and forecasters say that number is expected to rise over the coming days. Currently, the storm has repositioned itself in the Gulf of Mexico , where it will collect more moisture before striking land a
15h
Popular Science
12,000 tons of food waste transformed a barren landscape into something surprising From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News This isn't an excuse to litter. Twenty years ago, an orange juice company disposed of 12,000 metric tons of peels and pulp in a barren section of a Costa Rican national park.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An alternative to wolf control to save endangered caribouWhat happens when invasive and native species are eaten by the same predator? If the invasive species is abundant, the native species can go extinct because predator numbers are propped up by the invading species. This process is called "apparent competition" because on the surface it "appears" that the invading and native prey directly compete with each other, but really the shared predator links
15h
Feed: All Latest
Google Joins the Augmented Reality Party with ARCoreAlong with the developer toolkit, Google's launching an experimental browser to let anyone make AR-capable websites.
15h
Feed: All Latest
YouTube's Redesign Makes It Easier to Watch All the VideosEven vertical video!
15h
Gizmodo
To Offset Sexism in Tech, These Female Cofounders Invented a Fake Male Partner: Keith Mann Mennequins. (Photo: AP) LA-based entrepreneurs Penelope Gazin and Kate Dwyer wanted to create Witchsy, an online marketplace for their feminist-centered, darkly comic fashion accessories. But along with the usual woes that come with getting a startup off the ground, they had another problem: men. Talking to Fast Company , the duo discussed the phallus-shaped hurdles that stood between them and th
15h
Ars Technica
Uber to stop tracking customers after ride is over Enlarge (credit: David Ramos/Getty Images) Uber is turning off a surveillance feature that enabled the ride-hailing company to track customers even after their rides had ended. The company last year began tracking customers from the time they requested a ride until five minutes after it was over. The surveillance strategy, Uber said at the time, would allow Uber to analyze whether people were bei
15h
Latest Headlines | Science News
How science has fed stereotypes about womenA new book, Inferior, shows how biased research branded women as inferior and aims to set the record straight.
15h
Ars Technica
Google’s ARCore brings augmented reality to millions of Android devices Google Google is taking a second swing at augmented reality with a new SDK called "ARCore." The SDK is available for download today (Google should have a blog post here ) along with a set of ARCore demos . After experimenting with Project Tango, an AR initiative launched in 2014 that loaded a smartphone up with custom sensors, Google's AR reboot brings most of that functionality to regular old An
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designing novel biologic agents to target colorectal cancerNew biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies and immunotherapies in clinical development, designed to target metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) and stimulate the immune system to destroy tumor cells are a significant advance in treatment over conventional chemotherapy.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altered bacterial communities in the gut could be an indicator for Parkinson's diseaseBy the time Parkinson's disease manifests as the typical motor dysfunctions, portions of the brain have already been irreversibly destroyed. In search of an early portent of the disease, researchers of the University of Luxembourg, may now have found one in the gut: they have shown that the bacterial community in the gut of Parkinson's patients differs from that of healthy people even at a very ea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clamping down on causality by probing laser cavitiesBy monitoring the optical response of an externally probed laser cavity before and after gain clamping, a University of Central Florida and Yale collaboration reveals the underlying mechanisms driving the cavity's responses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't be salty -- tiny tubes desalinate water one molecule at a timeNortheastern University researchers have discovered that carbon nanotubes are nearly perfect for salt filtration, which could help make widespread desalinization a reality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First atlas of B-cell clones in body forms new foundation for infectious disease researchA new 'anatomic atlas' of how B cells -- the immune system's producer of antibodies -- link up to form networks has been charted by researchers. This map will be an important resource for researchers and clinicians studying infectious diseases, the microbiome, vaccine responses, and tissue-specific immunity.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows slow walking pace is good predictor of heart-related deathsStudy suggests that middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-speed video study reveals the nature of the cobra waveA small team of researchers from multiple institutions in France has learned more about the properties of the "cobra wave" by building structures from popsicle sticks and filming wave progressions with a high-speed camera. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Jean-Philippe Boucher, Christophe Clanet, David Quéré and Frédéric Chevy describe the series of experiments they
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Google’s New Software Could Bring Slick AR to Android Phones
15h
Ars Technica
Carbon-neutral synthetic fuel: A dream for car makers facing tighter standards Enlarge / This is Soletair's synthetic fuel production pilot plant, which the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology says is "designed for decentralized production, fits into a shipping container, and can be extended modularly." (Photo: VTT) (credit: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/ Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) ) In a white paper released this month, German auto parts maker Bosch argue
15h
The Atlantic
How Friends Become Closer “Friendships don’t just happen,” says William Rawlins, a professor of interpersonal communication at Ohio University. “They don’t drop from the sky.” Like any relationship, friendships take effort and work. But they’re often the last to receive that effort after people expend their energy on work, family, and romance. And as I’ve written before , as time goes on, friendships often face more hurdl
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Science | The Guardian
Fears over e-cigarettes leading to smoking for young people unfounded – study Largest ever such survey of British 11- to 16-year-olds reveals experimentation with vaping devices does not translate into regular use and smoking rates still in decline Young people who try e-cigarettes are not more likely to take up smoking as a result, according to a substantial new study. Public health experts have been divided over e-cigarettes. Some believe they will help millions quit the
16h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Fun, fierce and fantastical African art | Wanuri KahiuWe're so used to narratives out of Africa being about war, poverty and devastation, says TED Fellow Wanuri Kahiu. Where's the fun? Introducing "AfroBubbleGum" -- African art that's vibrant, lighthearted and without a political agenda. Rethink the value of all that is unserious as Kahiu explains why we need art that captures the full range of human experiences to tell the stories of Africa.
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Ingeniøren
Nordhavn er snart fyldt: Her skal København vokse fremoverMange store byggeprojekter er lig med store mængder overskudsjord i København. Nu undersøger kommunen fem nye steder, hvor hovedstaden kan udvide sit areal og forbedre stormflodsbeskyttelsen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HPV vaccination rates especially low among childhood cancer survivorsThe rate of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination in the United States is increasing, but remains lower than ideal. A new study suggests that survivors of childhood cancer receive the HPV vaccine at an even lower rate than their peers without cancer -- 24 percent versus 40 percent. Nearly three-quarters of study participants reported that their healthcare provider did not proactively recommend v
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New species of crab with unusual outgrowths has its name written in the starsA new 'star crab' has been collected from red coral beds in Taiwan and reefs in the Philippines. This astonishing creature is distinct with its carapace and chelipeds covered in pointy protrusions, which become rounder and mushroom-shaped with age to resemble star-like outgrowths and granules. Scientists Dr. Peter Ng and Dr. Ming-Shiou Jeng describe the new species and report another rare crab spo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pinpointing the origins of autismThe origins of autism remain mysterious. What areas of the brain are involved, and when do the first signs appear? New findings published in Biological Psychiatry brings us closer to understanding the pathology of autism, and the point at which it begins to take shape in the human brain. Such knowledge will allow earlier interventions in the future and better outcomes for autistic children.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research strengthens link between mental health and retirement savingsThe question of how mental health status affects decisions regarding retirement savings is becoming a pressing issue in the United States. Key factors contributing to this issue include the tenuous state of the Social Security system, greater use of defined-contribution pension plans by employers, longer lifespans, and the rise of depression and other mental health issues in older Americans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When it comes to antennas, size mattersIn a paper published online in Nature Communications, Nian Sun, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Northeastern, and his colleagues describe a new approach to designing antennas. The discovery enables researchers to construct antennas that are up to a thousand times smaller than currently available antennas, Sun said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA watching Harvey from satellites and the International Space StationNASA has a lot of resources providing information on Tropical Storm Harvey as it continues to drop tremendous, flooding rainfall on Texas and Louisiana. Satellites like NASA's Aqua satellite and platforms like aircraft and the International Space Station continue to provide various kinds of data on the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meta-analysis suggests PCSK9 inhibitors do not increase short-term risk of type 2 diabetesPCSK9 inhibitors do not increase short-term risk of type 2 diabetes, suggests a meta-analysis in more than 68,000 patients presented at ESC Congress today.
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Futurity.org
Older lesbian and bi women face more chronic health trouble Lesbian and bisexual older women are more likely than heterosexual older women to suffer chronic health conditions, experience sleep problems, and drink excessively, a new study finds. In general, lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) older adults have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, weakened immune systems, and low back or neck pain. They are also at greater risk of some adverse health behavi
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Quanta Magazine
The Oldest Mini-Brains Have Lifelike Young Cells When it became possible to remove a tumor from a patient and study it in a dish, the field of oncology was transformed. Sergiu Paşca, a neuroscientist at Stanford University, wants psychiatry to experience the same kind of revolution. Yet the brain presents an even greater challenge than cancer. Without the option of simply cutting out pieces of a person’s healthy cerebral cortex the way physicia
16h
The Atlantic
The Latest on Hurricane Harvey It’s still raining in Houston. By the time the deluge tapers off—by Wednesday morning, forecasters hope—some areas in the region will have been soaked with 50 inches of rain since Hurricane Harvey made landfall on Friday. The magnitude of the flooding in Texas is almost incomprehensible, even for a disaster that the National Weather Service warned was “unprecedented,” “unknown,” and “beyond anyth
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Smelly clue to bird navigation skillsBirds rely on smell to find their bearings when land is out of sight, according to a study.
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Futurity.org
Team discovers how bacterium runs on methanol from leaves New research identifies the genes that a bacterium needs to live on methanol. The work could offer chemists clues to making small carbon molecules into larger ones–something bacteria learned long ago. “Plant leaves are a natural source of methanol, which is produced as a waste product during plant cell wall biosynthesis,” explains Julia Vorholt, professor of microbiology at ETH Zurich. Much like
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Gizmodo
Largest Ichthyosaurus Fossil Ever Discovered Contains an Unexpected Gift Artistic impression of Ichthyosaurus with embryo. (Image: Joschua Knuppe) An unstudied ichthyosaur fossil dating back to the Jurassic period is now the largest on record—a remarkably well-preserved specimen that also contains the remnants of a developing fetus. The female ichthyosaur, who was pregnant when she died some 200 million years ago, measured over 11 feet long (3.5 meters), according to
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Gizmodo
Against All Odds, Medusa's Hair Looks Absolutely Amazing in the Newest Inhumans Trailer Image: Marvel By now, you’ve seen it. That stiff, lifeless red menace that’s come to symbolize basically everything there is to be concerned about regarding Marvel and ABC’s upcoming Inhumans tv series. I’m talking, of course, about Medusa’s hair . Here’s the crazy thing, though: in the show’s latest trailer? It. Looks. Good. It would be entirely understandable if you made it through the bulk of
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Viden
EU-Kommissionen foreslår stop for fiskeri af den truede ålForslag om forbud mod at fiske efter den stærkt truede ål i Østersøen støttes af miljøgrupper.
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Viden
Professor: Borgmestrer og bygherrer forhindrer ideel klimasikringVi kan ikke bygge lavtliggende steder og samtidig undgå oversvømmelser. Men hvorfor bliver man så ved med at bygge der?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts release US policy roadmap to reduce antibiotics used in food animalsLeading physicians, veterinarians and other experts outline key steps for policymakers, food companies and food purchasers, and medical groups to help tackle the antibiotic resistance crisis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sense of smell is key factor in bird navigation, new study showsHow do birds navigate over long distances? This complex question has been the subject of debate and controversy among scientists for decades, with Earth's magnetic field and the bird's own sense of smell among the factors said to play a part.Now, researchers from the universities of Oxford, Barcelona and Pisa have shown in a new experiment that olfaction -- or sense of smell -- is almost certainly
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lively tunes boost sales in crowded storesIf a store is crowded, people tend to buy more if the sound system is playing a fast-paced song rather than a ballad. That's what a team of researchers found in a field experiment across a chain of grocery convenience stores in Northern Europe.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caspian Sea evaporating as temperatures rise, study findsEarth's largest inland body of water has been slowly evaporating for the past two decades due to rising temperatures associated with climate change, a new study finds. Water levels in the Caspian Sea dropped nearly 7 centimeters (3 inches) per year from 1996 to 2015, or nearly 1.5 meters (5 feet) total, according to the new study. The current Caspian Sea level is only about 1 meter (3 feet) above
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severity of psoriasis linked to increased risk of deathThe more the surface area of the body is covered by psoriasis, the greater the risk of death for the patient suffering from the condition, according to a new analysis by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Patients with psoriasis on 10 percent or more of their body are at almost double the risk of death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New diagnostics tool, the Xpert Ultra assay, improves detection of mycobacterium tuberculosisResearchers have demonstrated a new, improved version of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, a test for Rifampicin-resistance (RIF-R). The Xpert 'Ultra' assay overcomes the shortcomings of the current Xpert assay to significantly improve tuberculosis detection, especially in patients with pauci-bacillary disease. The new Xpert Ultra assay also provides a more reliable detection of Rifampicin resistance (RIF-
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Gizmodo
Uber Backs Off on Some of Its Invasive User Tracking Image: Getty Uber likes tracking things — competitors , cops , you . But now the company is trying to clean up its reputation by giving users a little bit of their privacy back. Uber plans to eliminate a feature that lets it track users for up to five minutes after their ride ends, Uber security chief Joe Sullivan told Reuters today. The change will reportedly roll out to iPhone users this week,
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Gizmodo
This TCL 55" P-Series TV Deal Will Make You Want to Do a Touchdown Dance TCL 55" 4K P-Series TV , $600 with code TCLONKTLA TCL’s P-series TV line is already one of the best deals in home entertainment , and today, you can save even more on the 55" model with promo code TCLONKTLA. That brings the set down to $600 , which is $200 more than the equivalent TCL S-series deal that we posted last week. That extra money though gets you an upgrade to Dolby Vision HDR
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique gives brewers data to improve fermentation controlBrewing researchers at NC State University have developed a new technique that allows them to monitor yeast behavior during fermentation, providing brewers with information they can use to better control the brewing time and quality of future batches of beer.
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The Atlantic
Why Netflix Is Releasing So Many New Shows in 2018 Since first moving into original programming in 2012, Netflix has gone from a fringe curiosity to a major player in film and TV, actually living up to the mantle of “disruptor” that so many tech companies try to claim. But even by that standard, the last few months have been a whirlwind, with Netflix making several of its biggest acquisitions yet: securing a deal with the juggernaut TV producer S
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New on MIT Technology Review
Beware the Botnet of Apps
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Ars Technica
What Ford’s pizza delivery experiment says about its autonomy strategy Enlarge / Domino's Pizza and Ford Motor Co. are launching an industry-first collaboration to understand the role that self-driving vehicles can play in pizza delivery. (credit: Ford) Ford has teamed up with Domino's Pizza to test automated delivery of pizzas, the Detroit News reports. Customers who participate in the test will get a text message telling them that their pizza is ready. From there,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harvey brings out 'hidden capacity in civil society' to respond, says resilience expertHurricane Harvey has caused widespread damage in Houston and across Texas and Louisiana, as historic flooding reportedly may force 30,000 people from their homes and leave 450,000 people seeking federal aid.
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Gizmodo
What Does Tim Cook Eat for Breakfast? Image: AP Tim Cook—a man who is totally, definitely running for president soon —is not like you or me. Besides vast wealth and power, the Apple executive seems trapped in a kernel panic of identical talking points, all of which The New York Times’ Andrew Ross Sorkin allowed him to rehash this morning in a Dealbook piece loudly titled “ Apple’s Tim Cook Barnstorms for ‘Moral Responsibility .’” The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetic stimulation of the brain improved awareness of subject's own cognitive abilitiesResearchers at Aalto University and the University of Helsinki have succeeded for the first time ever in affecting metacognition of a tactile working memory task by combining neural pathway imaging and magnetic stimulation of the brain.Understanding brain function might help in the development of new treatments for neuropsychiatric illnesses in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obese people lack cells with satiety hormonesIndividuals with severe overweight have an inhibited sense of satiation -- they release fewer satiety hormones than people of normal weight. The reason: the responsible cells in the gastrointestinal tract of obese people are severely reduced. This report by Swiss doctors is in the journal Scientific Reports. Surgical weight-loss procedures can repair this disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tears in tiny bone cells called osteocytes appear an important step to better bonesThe force gravity and physical activity put on our bones causes tiny tears in the membranes of the tiny cells that enable us to make or break down bone, scientists say.While that may sound bad, it's actually a key piece of how the force we put on our bones helps keep them strong, they report in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pathway's power to boost, halt tumors may be promising cancer therapy targetA protein, called inositol-requiring enzyme 1 -- IRE1 -- may serve as a key driver in a series of molecular interactions that can both promote and, paradoxically, inhibit tumors in certain types of cancers, such as non-melanoma skin cancers, according to a team of molecular biologists. They add that this pathway's dual power may make it a tempting target for future research on the design of new ty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NTU scientists use brewery waste to grow yeast needed for beer makingScientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a new process to turn spent brewery grains into a valuable product that can grow beer yeast.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How parents, siblings can become teachers for special needs childrenParents and siblings of children with limited speech who took an innovative training program created by a Michigan State University scholar significantly improved their ability to communicate with the special needs youth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare-metals in the Himalayas: The potential world-class treasureThe Himalayan granitic belts extend more than 1000 km and they are unique components of the Tibetan plateau. Recently, researchers in Nanjing University and Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese and Academy of Science found the common rare-metal (Be, Nb-Ta and Sn) mineralization containing in the Himalayan leucogranite belts. This study shows additional enormous potential for the rare-metal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Federal preemption of taxes on state and local sugar-sweetened beverages is not warrantedFederal and state government can alter or hinder state and local activity through a legal mechanism called preemption -- when a higher level of government blocks the action of a lower level of government. A new study evaluates whether it could it be used to block taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages.
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Futurity.org
Protein that enables and kills cancer could be new target A protein called inositol-requiring enzyme 1, or IRE1, may play a key role in a series of molecular interactions that can both promote and, paradoxically, inhibit tumors in certain types of cancers, such as non-melanoma skin cancers. “…by manipulating IRE1 we can potentially drive tumor cells to self-terminate…” Researchers say that this pathway’s dual power may make it a tempting target for futu
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Futurity.org
Can this new painkiller evade the flaws of opioids? Scientists have discovered what they say is a powerful pain reliever that acts on a previously unknown pain pathway. The synthetic compound, known as UKH-1114, is as effective at relieving neuropathic pain in injured mice as a drug widely used for pain relief called gabapentin, but it works at a much lower dose, with longer duration of action. “We started out just working on fundamental chemistry
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthesizing pure graphene, a 'miracle material'Formed deep within the earth, stronger than steel, and thinner than a human hair. These comparisons aren't describing a new super hero. They're describing graphene, a substance that some experts have called "the most amazing and versatile" known to mankind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecules chilled below Doppler limitA team of researchers working at the Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, has found a way to chill molecules much closer to absolute zero. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the team describes the two-step technique they used to achieve the feat and offer some ideas on how it might be used by others in the near future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What teeth can reveal about the secret lives of our ancestorsOld tools and bones can reveal a lot about our ancestors. But when it comes to what was going on inside their bodies – such as what they ate and how healthy they were – nothing can really beat a well-preserved row of teeth.
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Gizmodo
Harvey Is Back Out to Sea But Not Finished Yet Image: NOAA Harvey inflicted catastrophic damage this past weekend, decimating the Texas coast as a Category 4 Hurricane, dumping feet of rain and bringing massive floods. But it’s still a Tropical Storm, and it is not finished yet. Harvey’s center has headed back out to the Gulf of Mexico, where additional moisture is causing thunderstorms to build yet again. Meteorologists predict that the stor
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Science | The Guardian
If Donald Trump won't tackle climate change, then Chicago will | Rahm Emanuel Across the US, towns and metropolises like mine are united to meet the Paris climate agreement’s targets and protect our residents and businesses While the Trump administration is dropping the mantle of leadership on climate change, American cities from coast to coast are picking it up . From small towns to metropolises and from the coasts to the heartland, Republican and Democratic mayors are un
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Science : NPR
What Does It Take To See Gentrification Before It Happens? The great hope of urban advocates is to democratize data, allowing residents to see more clearly how a neighborhood is changing — but knowledge of those changes may accelerate them, says Adam Frank. (Image credit: Jay Lazarin/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the face of climate change can our engineers keep the trains running on time?An unprecedented study titled, 'Lifecycle Assessments of Railway Bridge Transitions Exposed to Extreme Events,' published in Frontiers in Built Environment, benchmarks the costs and carbon emissions for the life cycle of eight mitigation measures for maintaining the railroad bridges in the face of climate change and reviews these methods for their effectiveness in three types of extreme environmen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new method to estimate total organic carbon contentOne key property to evaluate the prospects of any shale oil or gas is its total organic carbon (TOC) richness. This study investigates different TOC estimation techniques and validates the reliability of each, aiming to provide a best estimation approach for local and global applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inattentive kids show worse grades in later lifeResearchers found that inattentiveness in childhood was linked to worse academic performance up to 10 years later in children with and without ADHD, even when they accounted for the children's intellectual ability. The results highlight the long-term effects that childhood inattention can have on academic performance, and suggest that parents and teachers should address inattentiveness in childhoo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cartilage degeneration algorithm predicts progression of osteoarthritisA novel cartilage degeneration algorithm can predict the progression of osteoarthritis in individual patients, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. The new algorithm could greatly facilitate clinical decision-making in the treatment of osteoarthritis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatmentIndia is a second largest producer of leather, and being so, leather production and dyeing significantly contribute to pollution of water resources in India. Consistent dyeing of leather is difficult due to the unique nature of the raw material (matrix of collagen fibers), thus leather dyeing and finishing involves numerous wet chemical treatments having huge environmental impacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doping in sports: Official tests fail to pick up majority of casesDoping is remarkably widespread among elite athletes, and remains largely unchecked despite the use of sophisticated biological testing methods. This is according to Rolf Ulrich of the University of Tübingen in Germany and Harrison G. Pope of Harvard Medical School in the US who are lead authors of a study in Springer's journal Sports Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How new blood vessels sproutIBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A bed & breakfast in L.A. reveals the lifestyle of a secretive fly speciesFor nearly 30 years, Dr. Brian Brown knew about a mysterious unidentified phorid fly species, whose females were often spotted around mushrooms, while the males were nowhere to be found. Only recently, did this common, yet secretive, fly have its lifestyle finally figured out after Los Angeles Bed & Breakfast owners Patsy Carter and Lisa Carter-Davis gave the entomologist an unexpected call. The s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decoding the unique chromosomal complexities of alpine daisies, dandelions and thistlesField work, particularly in the mountains, can present numerous sources of stress in the form of challenging working conditions, red tape and plants not growing where or when you expected. This stress can be somewhat lessened when the country you are working in has some of the best wine and cheese in the entire world. During my field work as a Kew MSc student in the French Alps this summer, we con
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Science | The Guardian
Why are the crucial questions about Hurricane Harvey not being asked? | George Monbiot This is a manmade climate-related disaster. To ignore this ensures our greatest challenge goes unanswered and helps push the world towards catastrophe • Tropical storm Harvey – live updates It is not only Donald Trump’s government that censors the discussion of climate change ; it is the entire body of polite opinion. This is why, though the links are clear and obvious, most reports on Hurricane
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Dagens Medicin
Aalborg Universitetshospital opretter nyt center til patienter med bindevævssygdommeAalborg Universitetshospital opretter et tværfagligt center, der skal sikre bindevævspatienterne en mere sammenhængende behandling.
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Dagens Medicin
Socialdemokratiet: Sundhedsvæsenet har brug for 12 måneder uden produktionskrav Sundhedsvæsenet er nu så presset, at det er i orden at afskaffe produktivitetskravet, selv om en afløser endnu ikke er på plads, siger Socialdemokratiets sundhedsordfører Flemming Møller Mortensen, der ellers har ment det modsatte indtil for nyligt.
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Ars Technica
An appreciation of Game of Thrones‘ White Walkers from a zombie diehard Enlarge / As someone who left The Walking Dead (TV) behind, I'd like to see Rick and company take on this dude. (credit: HBO ) Warning : This post contains mild spoilers for season seven of Game of Thrones It’s hard to reinvent the zombie given these creatures have had near-infinite variations in the decades since George Romero took the undead mainstream. There’s no real incentive to drastically
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New on MIT Technology Review
The FDA Is Cracking Down on Sketchy Stem Cell Clinics
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In Vietnam, poverty and poor development, not just floods, kill the most marginalisedFlooding and landslides in northwest Vietnam have caused widespread devastation since the start of August. The disaster crippled the provinces of Son La, Dien Bien, Yen Bai and Lai Chau, situated within one of the most disadvantaged regions of the country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why climate change mattersWe humans have tried to dominate this planet and the earth has served as the basis for the material wealth enjoyed by many in the developed world. As our population has grown dramatically over the past hundred years, the planet's ability to handle all of our needs has come under stress. I firmly believe that with ingenuity, technology, management and care, we can develop a renewable resource-based
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Ingeniøren
Nautilus bliver scannet for skjulte rumPolitiet får i dag hjælp af Skat til at scanne ubåden Nautilus for at finde eventuelle hulrum, som politiets efterforskere endnu ikke har opdaget. Der er dog ingen konkrete mistanker om, at muligt bevismateriale skulle være skjult.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sense of smell is key factor in bird navigationHow do birds navigate over long distances? This complex question has been the subject of debate and controversy among scientists for decades, with Earth's magnetic field and the bird's own sense of smell among the factors said to play a part.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Numeric modelling of nonpoint pollutions in the Chinese Bohai SeaNumerical modelling combined with the adjoint method is implemented to simulate the dynamic process of total nitrogen (TN). Both the nonpoint source terms (ST) and initial value (IV) are inverted through the assimilation of observation. The results show that the ST inversion is essential and the joint IV and ST inversion largely improves the simulation result. These findings are not specific to th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bone-derived hormone reverses age-related memory loss in miceResearchers at Columbia University Medical Center reversed age-related memory loss in mice by boosting blood levels of osteocalcin, a hormone produced by bone cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique to aid IVF embryo selectionAustralian researchers have successfully developed an advanced new imaging technique, which can help assess the quality of early-stage embryos.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug breakthrough for mosquito virus outbreaksScientists have discovered a way that could help treat severe inflammation from an infectious mosquito-borne disease during outbreaks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New member of NAS reveals how animals select good microbes, reject harmful onesIn her inaugural article published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, commemorating her induction into one of the country's most distinguished scientific groups, Margaret McFall-Ngai from University of Hawai'i and a team of researchers reveal a newly discovered mechanism by which organisms select beneficial microbes and reject harmful ones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Response to natural disasters like Harvey could be helped with game theoryThe devastation by Hurricane Harvey continues, with the National Weather Service calling the event unprecedented, thus making the response even more complicated.
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Futurity.org
How parents can help kids build study skills at home Kids who read and write at home—whether for school or for fun—are building long-term study and executive function skills, a new study suggests. While home literacy activities have already been associated with higher test scores, the new study shows these activities also provide students with tools for lifetime success. “Academic success is an all-hands-on-deck enterprise … Teacher, parent, and st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Women paid less for same contribution to work, and sexism is to blame – studyWomen are being paid less to do the same job as men, judging by the productivity of male and female employees. Our study found that women are paid 16% less for making a contribution of the same value to their employer.
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New Scientist - News
Texas may be just as vulnerable when next big hurricane hitsHouston is battling unprecedented floods from Hurricane Harvey – and yet Texas’s plans to protect itself from floods remain stalled
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Ingeniøren
Tyskland om selvkørende bilulykker: Systemet skal vælge den løsning, der skader færrest menneskerPersonskader skal undgås for enhver pris, men lader det sig ikke gøre, skal selvkørende biler vælge den løsning, hvor færrest muligt kommer til skade. Sådan lyder 1 ud af 20 nye retningslinjer i Tysklands første regelsæt for selvkørende biler.
17h
Gizmodo
Star Wars: Episode IX May Return to a Familiar Planet More details about the timeframe of Justice League have been revealed. Melissa Benoist discusses Kara Zor-El’s struggles in Supergirl season three. Get a look at the titles for all 13 episodes of The Punisher. Plus, new looks at It , Star Wars: The Last Jedi , and Thor: Ragnarok , as well as new clips from Preacher and Rick & Morty . Spoilers now! Star Wars: Episode IX While appearing on the
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: This Is Not a PenisScientists encountered a marine worm strikingly reminiscent of a human phallus, along with other bizarre creatures, while exploring deep seas off of the Australian coast this summer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harbor sediment core samples offer historic evidence of ancient Rome's plumbingA small team of researchers from France and the U.K. has found evidence of lead pipe construction by the early Romans in soil samples taken from harbors near ancient Rome. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines their study, which included extracting core samples from Ostia and Portus harbors and analyzing them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New X-ray laser technique reveals magnetic skyrmion fluctuationsA new way of operating the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has enabled researchers to detect and measure fluctuations in magnetic structures being considered for new data storage and computing technologies.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doping in sports: Official tests fail to pick up majority of casesA new scientific study has found that doping is far more common in professional sport than the rates suggested by blood and urine tests of the athletes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State research in ancient forests show link between climate change and wildfiresPortland State researchers studying centuries-old trees in South America have found a tight correlation between wildfires and a warm weather fluctuation that has become more frequent in recent decades -- and will continue to be more frequent as the climate warms.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The outsized role of soil microbesThree scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term carbon storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Isolating mercury to protect food chainsMercury gets a bad rap, and rightly so. It is incredibly toxic to many organisms, and it accumulates in the food chain. That means animals at the top of the food chain, including us humans, often get the highest doses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From the crime scene to the courtroom—the journey of a DNA sampleThe O.J. Simpson murder trial in 1995 introduced DNA forensics to the public. The case collapsed, partly because the defence lawyers cast doubt on the validity of the evidence thanks to the inappropriate way the samples were handled.
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The Scientist RSS
Quantitating Glycans for Biomarker DiscoveryTechniques for comparing the relative abundances of glycans and glycoproteins in clinical samples
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet tester sociale robotter til langtidsindlagte børnI en testperiode får langtidsindlagte børn på Rigshospitalet mulighed for at være med i klasselokalet via en social robot. Håbet er at gøre det nemmere for børnene at vende tilbage til hverdagen efter sygdom.
18h
Popular Science
The terrifying way fire ants take advantage of hurricane floods Science The islands of stinging insects are just the beginning. Texans escaping Hurricane Harvey’s floodwaters must watch for floating fire ants. These ants evolved to take advantage of the habitat created by floods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers seek to catch Alzheimer's early by peeking into the eyesMark Wolff wanted to know. To him, the thought of suffering through Alzheimer's disease the way his father did—without knowing, and without his family knowing, what he was up against until late in its progression— is worse than learning, even while he's still perfectly healthy, that a possible precursor of the disease has gained a toehold.
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Viden
Studerende sætter Hyperloop-hastighedsrekordTyske studerende tog førstepræmien, da de i en konkurrence fik deres Hyperloop-kapsel om på 324 km/t.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor sleep is associated with ischemic heart disease and strokePoor sleep is associated with ischemic heart disease and stroke, according to research presented today at ESC Congress. The observational study in nearly 13,000 people revealed different patterns of sleep disturbance between the two conditions, with ischemic heart disease being linked to shorter sleep and brief moments of waking up.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flood-damaged documents, books may be salvageable with electron beam technologyDocuments, books and similar items soaked and muddied in the potentially sewage-laden flood waters produced by Hurricane Harvey may be salvageable with the use of electronic beam technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The outsized role of soil microbesMany complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Common use of antibiotics in cells grown for research could distort testsWhen growing cells in the lab, researchers routinely add antibiotics to prevent contamination. But a new study by UC San Francisco researchers raises a red flag against this standard practice, finding that it can induce unintentional genetic changes in the cells and distort test results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercomputing the weather with 'Thor'The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center here acquired a supercomputer that is the latest step in a long-running weather prediction arms race.
18h
Ingeniøren
Medicinsk gennembrud? Anti-inflammatorisk medicin gavner mange hjerte- og kræftpatienterHøj dosis af stoffet canakinumab mindsker risiko for nye hjerteanfald og halverer antallet af dødsfald blandt kræftpatienter, viser amerikansk forskning.
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Dagens Medicin
Svend Hartling efter beskyldning om vat i ørene: Vi tager bekymringer meget alvorligt Ledelsen i Region Hovedstaden tager kritikken af Sundhedsplatformen meget alvorligt, forsikrer koncerndirektør Svend Hartling oven på sidste uges hårde kritik fra to professorer. »Vi har fra ledelsens side stor respekt for deres kritik og bekymring,« siger han.
18h
Dagens Medicin
Større dødelighed ved operation på det bankende hjerteFlere hjertepatienter overlever ved brug af hjerte-lungemaskine under åben hjertekirurgi, end når operationen sker på det bankende hjerte.
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Feed: All Latest
How Can a Cat Survive a High-Rise Fall? Physics!Cats falling from super-high heights have a greater chance of survival than low-rise falls. That depends on two things: air resistance and apparent weight.
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Feed: All Latest
Netflix's 20th Anniversary Is Nice, But It Doesn't MatterThe mail-order DVD company turned streaming behemoth turns 20 today, but its watershed moments go far beyond 8/29/97.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Will AI Enable the Third Stage of Life on Earth?In an excerpt from his new book, an MIT physicist explores the next stage of human evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tripling the efficiency of solar-based hydrogen fuel generation with metallic nanostructures that slow down lightHydrogen gas, an important synthetic feedstock, is poised to play a key role in renewable energy technology; however, its credentials are undermined because most is currently sourced from fossil fuels, such as natural gas. A KAUST team has now found a more sustainable route to hydrogen fuel production using chaotic, light-trapping materials that mimic natural photosynthetic water splitting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snakebite map for pets launchedAs the weather warms up, veterinarians are preparing for snakebite season with an interactive map to record when and where pets are bitten. The SnakeMap Project aims to better predict, prevent, diagnose and treat snakebite in animals as well as people.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Penis WormScientists encountered a marine worm strikingly reminiscent of a human phallus, along with other bizarre creatures, while exploring deep seas off of the Australian coast this summer.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Poisonous progressThe arguments nearly a century ago over the use of leaded petrol.
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Gizmodo
Tear Through Your Home Improvement Checklist With a Pair of One-Day Dremel Deals Dremel Ultra-Saw , $97 | Dremel Cordless Micro Tool , $62 You might not need to use a Dremel all that often, but it’s one of those things everyone should keep in their tool box, if only for sanding wood and carving jack-o-lanterns , and this compact battery-operated model is marked down to $62 today on Amazon , the best price ever. There are cheaper corded models out there, but this thing is smal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Miniaturized mass spectrometer for Mars exploration has massive potentialBYU researchers have created a miniaturized, portable version of a tool now capable of analyzing Mars' atmosphere—and that's just one of its myriad possible uses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bendable crystals tie current thinking in knotsQueensland researchers have shown that single crystals, typically thought of as brittle and inelastic, are flexible enough to be bent repeatedly and even tied in a knot.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny nanopackages built out of DNA help scientists peek at how neurons workA team of scientists from the University of Chicago designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique, detailed Aug. 21 in Nature Nanotechnology, gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bahamian songbirds disappeared during last glacial-interglacial transitionTwo species of songbirds that once made a home in the Bahamas likely became extinct on the islands because of rising sea levels and a warmer, wetter climate, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Florida, Gainesville. The study, which was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a historical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The world protests as Amazon forests are opened to miningThe Amazon, often described as the "lungs of the Earth", is the largest rainforest in the world. Its extraordinary biodiversity and sheer scale has made it a globally significant resource in the fight against climate change.
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Futurity.org
‘Universal cassette’ modifies antibodies for drug delivery Scientists have developed a method to efficiently modify natural antibodies that can deliver drugs to target cells using a rare metal. “The beauty of this catalyst is that it binds to the constant region of the antibody, so it should be broadly general for all human antibodies…” Chemist Zachary Ball and graduate student Jun Ohata discovered that rhodium, a rare transition metal, can be a useful e
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Viden
Forskningsprojekt: Alle kvinder er enten bi- eller homoseksuelleDet er konklusionen på en undersøgelse foretaget på University of Essex i England. Dansk kønsforsker stiller sig kritisk.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autoimmune diseases increase cardiovascular and mortality riskResearchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and IDIAP Jordi Gol have just published an article showing that autoimmune diseases significantly increase cardiovascular risk as well as overall mortality. This is particularly pronounced in people suffering rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, it has been seen that inflammatory bowel diseases, s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An alternative to wolf control to save endangered caribouThe iconic woodland caribou across North America face increasing predation pressures from wolves. A short-term solution to caribou conservation would be to kill wolves. But a new government policy looks at reducing the invasive species moose numbers propping up the wolf population. In a recent study published in the journal PeerJ, researchers evaluate the effects of this policy on the caribou popu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Woolly rhino neck ribs provide clues about their decline and eventual extinctionA study, published in the open access journal PeerJ, reports on the incidence of abnormal cervical (neck) vertebrae in woolly rhinos, which strongly suggests a vulnerable condition in the species. Given the considerable birth defects that are associated with this condition, the researchers argue it is very possible that developmental abnormalities contributed towards the eventual extinction of the
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Scientific American Content: Global
James Webb Space Telescope Surrounded by Rising FloodwatersIsolated in a giant thermal vacuum chamber, NASA’s $8.6 billion next-generation observatory is riding out the worst of Hurricane Harvey -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's next Mars mission to investigate interior of Red PlanetPreparation of NASA's next spacecraft to Mars, InSight, has ramped up this summer, on course for launch next May from Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California—the first interplanetary launch in history from America's West Coast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strength of global stratospheric circulation measured for first timeWhen commercial airplanes break through the clouds to reach cruising altitude, they have typically arrived in the stratosphere, the second layer of Earth's atmosphere. The air up there is dry and clear, and much calmer than the turbulent atmosphere we experience on the ground.
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New Scientist - News
Australia plans random drug tests for people receiving welfareThe Australian government is planning to trial random drug tests for welfare recipients, but similar policies have had little benefit in New Zealand and the US
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Ars Technica
The 2017 S60 Polestar is a most intriguing car Jonathan Gitlin The Volvo S60 Polestar is unlike every other Volvo we've driven recently. For one thing, it's not a brand-new model; the regular S60 it's based on first appeared in 2010. For another, it's an extremely eye-catching—some might say retina-searing—shade of blue; this car sticks out like the proverbial sore thumb. Third, it was, for some time, the fastest four-door production car to l
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Science | The Guardian
Stop calling food addictive | Kima CargillBut our processed foods are full of highly engineered additives. Let’s call them drugs. And these really are addictive Many of my colleagues – researchers who study overeating – now routinely use the term food addiction, and advocate for its recognition as a psychiatric diagnosis . It’s true that rats, monkeys and humans show addiction-like behaviour when exposed to highly palatable, calorie-dense
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Bones reveal what it was like to grow up dodoScientists take a first look at the inside of dodo bones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticle emissions rise 30 percent when flex-fuel cars switch from bio to fossilWhen ethanol prices at the pump rise for whatever reason, it becomes economically advantageous for drivers of dual-fuel vehicles to fill up with gasoline. However, the health of the entire population pays a high price. Substitution of gasoline for ethanol leads to a 30 percent increase in the atmospheric concentration of ultrafine particles with a diameter of less than 50 nanometers.
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How Students Built the World's Fastest HyperloopTeams from around the world showed there's no wrong way to build futuristic transportation.
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Harvey Shows Progress on Emergency Communications Since KatrinaAs Hurricane Harvey wreaks havoc on Southeast Texas, crucial cellular networks remain largely stable, reflecting progress since Katrina.
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Inside an Epic Hotel Room Hacking SpreeA vulnerability in hotel keycard locks was a security disaster—and a huge opportunity for one burglar.
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Feed: All Latest
How To Stop Using Up All of Your Mobile Data Each MonthIt's time to make some changes.
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Ingeniøren
Hyperloop sætter ny fartrekord, men når stadig ikke magnettog til sokkeholderneStuderendes test-kapsel nåede søndag en hastighed på 324 km/t på Hyperloop-testbanen i Californien. Kapslen kan imidlertid ikke medbringe passagerer, og er stadig langsommere end de hurtigste magnettog.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Visualizing Sex as a SpectrumInfographic reveals the startling complexity of sex determination -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
North Korea fires ballistic missile over Japan for first timeNorth Korea has succeeded in firing a ballistic missile over Japan into the Pacific Ocean, bringing it closer to a possible attack on the US
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grid-based continual analysis of molecular interior for drug discovery, QSAR and QSPRA series of grid-based computational technologies for in silico virtual screening and molecular design of new drugs is proposed. The technologies are based on original CoMIn (Continual Molecular Interior analysis) software.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create single-crystal perovskite solar cellsPhotovoltaic conversion is regarded as the ultimate solution to the growing demand for energy, yet traditional silicon-based solar cells are expensive to produce, and production itself involves intensive energy consumption. Emerging hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells based on perovskite CH3NH3PbI3, on the other hand, are not only inexpensive to process but also flexible, and thus are widely purs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team flips the switch on ferroelectricsMany next-generation electronic and electro-mechanical device technologies hinge on the development of ferroelectric materials. The unusual crystal structures of these materials have regions in their lattices, called domains, that behave like molecular switches. The alignment of a domain can be toggled by an electric field, which changes the position of atoms in the crystal and switches the polari
20h
Ingeniøren
Analyse: Nu er der en (lille) chance for miljørigtige bilafgifterI et årti har der været politisk flertal for at omlægge registreringsafgiften, så den belønner miljørigtige og sikre biler. Men løsningen kunne der ikke findes enighed om. Regeringens udspil om billigere biler åbner måske en ny vej.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New neutron holography technique opens a window for obtaining clear 3-D atomic imagesPeople usually associate holograms with futuristic 3-D display technologies, but in reality, holographic technologies are now being used to study materials at the atomic level. X-rays, a high-energy form of light, are often used to study atomic structure. However, X-rays are only sensitive to the number of electrons associated with an atom. This limits the use of X-rays for studying materials made
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Scientific American Content: Global
Newfound Material on the Moon Could Offer Clues to Our Planet's Early YearsA spacecraft has uncovered in lunar soil some traces of Earth’s ancient atmosphere that werekey to the development of complex life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Why fentanyl could become the UK's most dangerous drug The painkiller and anaesthetic is 50 times more potent than morphine, is powerfully addictive, fatal even in tiny amounts, and has become a huge part of America’s opioid crisis Fentanyl is starting to hit the headlines in the UK. The drug is not so well-known this side of the Atlantic but, if experiences in America are anything to go by, that will change. Sadly, fentanyl is a problem that is unli
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Keep on marching for science education Scientists might have made a difference, had they protested against laws that now threaten what can be taught in our classrooms, argues Brandon Haught. Nature 548 501 doi: 10.1038/548501a
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Live Science
As Flooding from Harvey Intensifies, Astronauts Tweet Well Wishes to HoustonAstronauts currently on the International Space Station have been sending well wishes to their colleagues on the ground as heavy rainfall and flooding from tropical storm Harvey continue.
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Ingeniøren
Dansk maskinlæring kan eftersøge mennesker, skibe og ting på havet med droner Ny software skal lede efter genstande på havet. Det kan bruges til eftersøgning samt genkende skibe og stoppe fup med radio-identifikation. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dansk-maskinlaering-kan-eftersoege-mennesker-skibe-ting-paa-havet-med-droner-1079443 Version2
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Live Science
Harvey vs. Katrina: How Do These Monster Storms Compare?How does Harvey compare to 2005's Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest storms to ever strike the U.S.?
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Live Science
Crushed Crystal Reveals a Spookier Entanglement StateA new quantum state has been demonstrated in a pressure exposed to crushingly high pressures, which could pave the way for new forms of electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment options for type 2 diabetesResearchers believe they now have a considerable amount of evidence, much of it new, that in contrast to the current strategies for attacking type 2 diabetes, the recognition that it involves dormant microbes, chronic inflammatory processes and coagulopathies, offer new opportunities for treatment.
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The Atlantic
The Digitally Entangled Lives of Two Christopher Cantwells Last week, Vice News’s documentary on the violent rallies in Charlottesville introduced the world to Christopher Cantwell, the heavily armed white nationalist who served as the video’s star. His shaved head, foul mouth, abhorrent views, and extensive arsenal distilled for many the most frightening elements of a resurgent white-supremacist movement. While much of the world met Cantwell for the fir
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The Atlantic
The Lost Dream of a Superhighway to Honor the Confederacy As cities around the country tear down, hide, or reconsider monuments to Confederate leaders such as Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, Arlington, Virginia, has decided to rename one of its most recognizable thoroughfares, a stretch of road that passes the Pentagon and Arlington National Cemetery. * For almost a century, the road has been called the Jefferson Davis Highway, in honor of a man wh
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Dagens Medicin
Produktivitetskravet kan være væk om fire månederEn kursændring fra Socialdemokratiet betyder, at der nu ser ud til at være flertal for at droppe kravet om årlige produktivitetsforbedringer i sundhedsvæsenet på to pct. om året allerede fra nytår.
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Dagens Medicin
Psykiatrisk sygdom giver højere dødelighed efter en blodprop i hjertetDansk forskning tyder på, at psykiatrisk sygdom i sig selv er skyld i dårligere prognose efter blodprop i hjertet.
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