New Scientist - News
A shipwreck has been found from the time of Alexander the Great Ancient wine store? Benjamin Ballard By Joshua Rapp Learn Archaeologists have used drones and an old cold war spy boat to identify three shipwrecks on the Mediterranean seabed. One contains artefacts dating back over 2000 years, hinting at a vast network of trade during the rise of ancient Greek city states like Athens. “If our dates are correct, this is just as Alexander the Great is beginni
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Here's the NSA Agent Who Inexplicably Exposed Critical Secrets A series of leaks has rocked the National Security Agency over the past few years, resulting in digital spy tools strewn across the web that have caused real damage both inside and outside the agency. Many of the breaches have been relatively simple to carry out, often by contractors like the whistleblower Edward Snowden, who employed just a USB drive and some chutzpah. But the most recently reve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D-printed minifactoriesResearchers have developed a biocompatible ink for 3-D printing using living bacteria. This makes it possible to produce biological materials capable of breaking down toxic substances or producing high-purity cellulose for biomedical applications.
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Science | The Guardian
Supermoon: search Sunday's skies for December's 'moon before yule'
The first and last supermoon of the year will rise above the horizon in the east on Sunday and loom larger and brighter than normal as it climbs in the night sky until it sets the next morning. Known in the Farmer’s Almanac as the cold moon, the long night moon, and the moon before yule, the event comes as the December full moon coincides with the body’s close approach to Earth, making it appear
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Science | The Guardian
Share your supermoon photos
The one and only supermoon appearance of 2017 occurs on 3 December, and we’d like to see your pictures as well as read stories about how you captured them. Supermoon: search Sunday's skies for December's 'moon before yule' The phenomenon, which happens when a full moon coincides with the moon being at its closest to earth during orbit , means it could appear roughly 30% larger and brighter than t
31min
Ars Technica
Updating macOS can bring back the nasty “root” security bug
Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham ) The serious and surprising root security bug in macOS High Sierra is back for some users, shortly after Apple declared it fixed. Users who had not installed macOS 10.13.1 and thus were running a prior version of the OS when they received the security update, found that installing 10.13.1 resurfaced the bug, according to a report from Wired . For these users, t
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Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 2. december
Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Alle er med i lodtrækningen om et gavekort på 500 kroner hver dag. Og alle har chancen for at vinde den store pakke til sidst: Et gavekort på 10.000 kroner. Dagens spørgsmål: I 1927 åbnede en automobilhandel i Hillerød. Den blev i år genopført i Den
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New Scientist - News
Why it’s good that NHS England is cutting back on prescriptions
Patients in England are set to lose access to a raft of prescription drugs. If you believe the headlines, this is terrible news, and people stand to miss out on treatments for disorders ranging from pain and depression to osteoarthritis and cancer, because the National Health Service will no longer prescribe the drugs. And more cuts are on the way. In the new year, NHS England is set to annou
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New Scientist - News
Why the internet’s CiCo calorie count diet won’t keep weight off
I’ve earned that snack! Image Source/Alamy Stock Photo By Anthony Warner I have an instinctive distrust of anything with an acronym, so was dismayed to hear that the CiCo diet was spreading like wildfire across social media . Although it might sound like a tech start-up, CiCo stands for Calories in, Calories out and is far from innovative. It is based on the not-entirely-revolutionary princip
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New Scientist - News
Weird magnets could make computers that work 1000 times faster
Faster speed needed Saulius Lukse/Getty By Sophia Chen The effort to make ever-faster computer processors may be facing a looming problem – but there is a solution. Historically, we have achieved faster processing speeds by cramming more transistors onto silicon chips. But silicon is limited by Moore’s Law, which says that the number of transistors ought to roughly double every two years. We
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reading information aloud to yourself improves memory of materials
You are more likely to remember something if you read it out loud, a study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vulnerability identified for subtypes of glioblastoma
Glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, typically fails to respond to treatment or rapidly becomes drug resistant. Researchers have now identified a strategy that pinpoints a genetically distinct subpopulation of patients with glioblastoma that is particularly sensitive to drugs like cilengitide that target a specific cell adhesion receptor.
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Popular Science
Can we make a flu vaccine that lasts for life?
Getting your flu shot every single year is a real pain in the arm . Sure, it helps protect you and everyone around you. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that flu vaccines prevented 5.1 million cases of the disease during the 2015 to 2016 flu season alone. But few of us actually look forward to the hassle of taking time from work or school to get poked by needles. Wouldn’t it be great if w
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The other Dodo: Extinct bird that used its wings as clubs
Image copyright Julian Hume Image caption Two male Rodrigues solitaires fight over a female in the background using club-like wings The extinct Dodo had a little-known relative on another island. This fascinating bird ultimately suffered the same fate as its iconic cousin, but we can reconstruct some of its biology thanks to the writings of a French explorer who studied it during his travels of t
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Scientific American Content: Global
Republican Voters Not in Denial About Climate
Climate 60-Second Science Republican Voters Not in Denial About Climate An analysis of voter opinions finds that half of Republican voters think climate change is happening, and would support regulating CO2 as a pollutant. Christopher Intagliata reports. Representative Lamar Smith of Texas, the Republican who heads the House science committee, has long been skeptical of global warming. He has acc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D-printed prosthetic implants could improve treatment for hearing loss
Researchers using CT scans and 3-D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a new study. The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer
Researchers refine and run the first in vivo tests that use fluorescent nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. The ability to pinpoint them with submillimeter accuracy could improve early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diet success may depend on your DNA
We can add one more thing to the list of traits affected by genetics: how our bodies respond to a particular diet. Research in animal models with different genetics shows that one diet really doesn't fit all, and what works for some may not be best for others, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish oil component preconditions vision cells to survive future injury or disease
Scientists discovered that a component of fish oil not only protects cells critical to vision from potentially lethal initial insults, but also from those that occur in the future. The study showed that the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, and its derivatives 'precondition' photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to survive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Southern Ocean drives massive bloom of tiny phytoplankton
Scientists have uncovered the ocean conditions that support a massive summertime bloom of algae that spans 16 percent of the global ocean. Known as the Great Calcite Belt, this dense group of a microscopic phytoplankton, coccolithophores, can be seen in satellite images as turquoise swirls in the dark blue water of the Southern Ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How saturated fatty acids damage cells
Researchers have developed a new microscopy technique that allows for the direct tracking of fatty acids after they've been absorbed into living cells. What they found using this technique could have significant impact on both the understanding and treatment of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Placenta consumption offers few benefits for new moms, small study shows
Consuming encapsulated placentas has little to no effect on postpartum mood and maternal bonding; detectable changes shown in hormones.
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Apple's MacOS High Sierra Update Reintroduces "Root" Bug For Some Users
When a company like Apple rushes out a software patch for a critical security bug, it deserves praise for protecting its customers quickly. Except, perhaps, when that patch is so rushed that it's nearly as buggy as the code it was designed to fix. Earlier this week, Apple scrambled to push out a software update for macOS High Sierra, to sew up a glaring hole in the operating system's security mea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bottle gourd genome provides insight on evolutionary history, relationships of cucurbits
Researchers have produced the first high-quality genome sequence for the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) and a reconstructed genome of the most recent Cucurbitaceae ancestor.
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What Firefox's Quantum Browser Means for a More Open Web
We welcome a special guest to the show this week: Mozilla’s VP of product for the Firefox browser, Nick Nguyen. Nick is the leader of the team that just released Firefox Quantum, a lighter and more efficient version of the Firefox browser. It’s been making waves as the first serious competitor to Chrome that’s come along in years, and it notably puts user privacy at the fore. Nick talks to us abo
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Popular Science
UE Blast and Megablast review: One step closer to a perfect portable Alexa speaker
When it comes to Bluetooth audio, Ultimate Ears has a rather excellent reputation for making rugged, waterproof speakers with loud, clear sound. The Megablast (and the smaller Blast) uphold that tradition for UE, while also integrating Amazon’s smart assistant, Alexa. What is it? The Blast and Megablast are cylindrical Bluetooth speakers roughly the size of a tall boy or an Arizona iced tea can.
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals Of December 1, 2017
Gift-buying season is in full swing, but there’s no reason to bust your budget. We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Ca
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Gizmodo
And Here's Another PayPal Phishing Scam You'll Want to Avoid
Photo: Getty The holidays are upon us, and so it is to remind ourselves once again of just how much cyber criminals enjoy playing on the very fears of consumer fraud they elicit. If the last thing you want interrupting your time with friends and loved ones is a slew of fraudulent bank charges, you’ll need to keep your wits about you. As you read this, an illicit campaign is underway to deceive Pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Placenta consumption offers few benefits for new moms
IMAGE: UNLV researchers Daniel Benyshek and Sharon Young found that consuming encapsulated placentas has little to no effect on postpartum mood and maternal bonding; detectable changes shown in hormones. view more Credit: UNLV Photo Services A groundbreaking study by UNLV researchers shows that taking placenta capsules has little to no effect on postpartum mood, maternal bonding, or fatigue,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical note system could boost patients' engagement in their health care
Encouraging patients to help write and add notes to their personal medical charts -- a task typically handled only by medical professionals -- may help patients feel more involved with their own care and improve relationships with their doctors, a new study has found. In research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine , doctors at UCLA Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineering electron pathways in 2-D-topological insulators
IMAGE: Schematic representation of the electronic behavior in the device described in the article. The arrows represent quantum channels where electrons propagate. Eectrons are allowed to change direction only at the... view more Credit: CIC nanoGUNE For decades, insulating materials were thought to be "boring" materials from an electronics point of view, since electrons are immobile and cann
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From Alaska to Amazonia: First global maps of traits that drive vegetation growth
Detailed global maps of key traits in higher plants have been made available for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphene nano 'tweezers' can grab individual biomolecules
Researchers have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene -- tiny electronic 'tweezers' that can grab biomolecules floating in water with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do we see similarities across languages? Human brain may be responsible
For years, researchers have been interested in the similarities seen across human languages. New research suggests that those similarities may stem from the brain's preference for efficient information processing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dropping out of high school linked to child abuse
Children who have been victims of violence are more likely to drop out of high school before graduation than their peers, according to a new study. One in five people in the United States drop out of high school before graduation, which decreases their lifetime earning potential by 20 percent. More than 30 percent of the survey sample were victims of violence before the age of 16.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultrasound imaging needle to transform heart surgery
Heart tissue can be imaged in real-time during keyhole procedures using a new optical ultrasound needle. The revolutionary technology has been successfully used for minimally invasive heart surgery in pigs, giving an unprecedented, high-resolution view of soft tissues up to 2.5 cm in front of the instrument, inside the body.
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Science : NPR
The Soybean Is King, Yet Remains Invisible
Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images For more than a century, corn has been the most widely planted crop in the country and a symbol of sm
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Gizmodo
This Japanese Artist Paints With Microsoft Excel Instead of a Brush
GIF GIF: YouTube Starting a new hobby usually requires a hefty investment in both time and equipment, but when 77-year-old Tatsuo Horiuchi retired and wanted to take up painting, he passed on the pricey brushes, paint, and canvases, and decided to use an app already installed on his Windows PC: Microsoft Excel . Relying on the business software’s ability to generate colorful graphs used to illust
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Science : NPR
Complexity Of Touring With Rosewood Instruments May Soon Be Eased
A rosewood-body guitar, ca. 2004. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Cindy Ord/Getty Images A rosewood-body guitar, ca. 2004. Cindy Ord/Getty Images At a meeting in Geneva today, the treaty organization that shook the music industry with new trade regulations on rosewood took formal action to clarify and potentially ease some of the regulations. Rosewood is a prized "tonewood" use
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The Scientist RSS
The Scientists 2017 Gift Guide
‘Tis the season to be sciencey.
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The Scientist RSS
The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe
An exploration of the genetics of earlobe attachment is just the latest collaborative research project to come out of the personal genetic testing company.
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Live Science
New Migraine Drugs May Stop Headaches Before They Start
People with frequent — sometimes daily — migraines may benefit from a new class of medications intended to prevent these severe headaches before they start, two new studies suggest. Both of the studies tested "long-acting" drugs that were administered as injections once a month, to once every three months. The drugs — called fremanezumab and erenumab — appeared to be effective at preventing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New imaging study reveals how saturated fatty acids damage cells
IMAGE: Saturated fatty acids build lipids that form 'frozen islands' (blue) in cell membrane (green). view more Credit: Nicoletta Barolini, Columbia University In our increasingly health-conscious society, a new fad diet seems to pop up every few years. Atkins, Zone, Ketogenic, Vegetarian, Vegan, South Beach, Raw - with so many choices and scientific evidence to back each, it's hard to know w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most glaucoma patients don't ask about medication costs
December 1, 2017 - Less than one-third of patients with glaucoma talk to their doctor about the costs of medications needed to control their disease, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science , the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. High costs are an important barrier to regular use of glaucoma medicatio
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The Atlantic
Why So Many Adults Love Young-Adult Literature
This article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). In part one, we explore why adults gravitate towards books written for children and teenagers. In part two, we hear from best-selling YA author John Green about his latest protagonist and the stigma surrounding mental illness. Young-adult literature typ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women with Parkinson's disease less likely than men to have caregivers
PHILADELPHIA--Female Parkinson's disease patients are much less likely than male patients to have caregivers, despite the fact that caregivers report greater strain in caring for male patients. The findings come from a large study reported today in Neurology by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. According to the researchers, the disparity between fem
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Ars Technica
Range Rover’s first hybrid SUVs are almost here, and we’ve driven one
reader comments 13 The new plug-in hybrid Range Rover Sport P400e It's a Range Rover, so it keeps its off-road skills. Although the P400e is still a preproduction prototype, we got a chance to drive one for a few miles at this year's LA Auto Show. You get up to 31 miles of pure electric range on a full charge. With a full tank of gas and driving in hybrid mode, expect at least 400 miles before ha
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Ars Technica
Doom VFR review: A rip-and-tear delight… but only on the right VR setup
Enlarge / In screenshot mode, Doom VFR looks a lot like normal Doom . id Software/Bethesda reader comments 0 Game details Developer: id Software Publisher : Bethesda Platform : PSVR, HTC Vive Release Date: December 1, 2017 ESRB Rating: M for Mature Price : $30 Links: Steam | Official website The first time I ever tested a modern VR headset, I played Doom . My 2013 PAX West demo came courtesy of O
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type 1 diabetes as common in adults as children, but many adults misdiagnosed
Type 1 diabetes is not predominantly a 'disease of childhood' as previously believed, but is similarly prevalent in adults, new research shows.
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Gizmodo
Redbox's Crafty Workaround for Stocking Disney Movies Backfires With Lawsuit
Photo: AP Not only is Redbox still around, it kicked off a big expansion this year. And on Thursday, The Walt Disney Company filed a lawsuit against the kiosk DVD rental company for its practice of reselling digital download codes that come with Disney DVDs. If the house of the mouse succeeds in court, Redbox is in a lot of trouble. Disney hasn’t been particularly friendly with rental and streami
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Ars Technica
Russian sites call HIV a myth, Western conspiracy—an epidemic is now exploding
Enlarge / KAZAN, RUSSIA - NOVEMBER 8, 2016: A technician testing blood samples at a laboratory at the Republic of Tatarstan Centre for Prevention and Control of AIDS and Infectious Diseases. reader comments 48 An explosive epidemic of HIV/AIDs has gripped Russia in recent years, partly with the strength of anti-Western conspiracy theories online that promote the idea that the virus is simply a my
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Live Science
Could Genetic Testing Companies Violate Your Privacy?
Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer is calling on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate the privacy policies of at-home DNA testing companies. These companies, which include 23andMe, AncestryDNA and MyHeritageDNA, promise consumers the opportunity to find out more about their ancestry and genetic health risks with a simple cheek swab and mail-in kit. However, the security and privacy of the
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Ars Technica
After 37 years, Voyager 1 has fired up its trajectory thrusters
Enlarge / The Voyager team is able to use a set of four backup thrusters, dormant since 1980. They are located on the back side of the spacecraft in this orientation. NASA/JPL-Caltech reader comments 134 At present, the Voyager 1 spacecraft is 21 billion kilometers from Earth, or about 141 times the distance between the Earth and Sun. It has, in fact, moved beyond our Solar System into interstell
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Ars Technica
Google raters at Leapforce settle legal complaints over abuse, wages owed
Enlarge / Is there any justice in this vast sea of cubicles? Disney reader comments 0 After months of high-profile mistakes and employee legal actions, the data quality assurance company Leapforce has been acquired by its rival, Appen . For years, Leapforce was one of the biggest "work at home" employers in Silicon Valley, providing task work to thousands of people worldwide. Called "raters," the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young people in sub-Saharan Africa integral to shaping future HIV/AIDS policy
Professor Piot's comments were made at the launch of a new policy paper published by LSHTM and the charity Sentebale to support governments, policy makers and NGOs in combatting the continuing high levels of HIV among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, including those infected from birth and those infected sexually. While great progress has been made in tackling the HIV epidemic in recent years,
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Gizmodo
This $35 Echo Dot/Smart Plug Bundle Is Everything You Need to Control a Christmas Tree With Your Voice
Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. In addition to yesterday’s smart lighting bundles , Amazon is currently throwing in a TP-Link Smart Plug for $5 when you purchase an already-discounted Echo Dot for $30 . You’ll have to add both products to your cart manually, but you
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sperm RNA may serve as biomarkers of future health, researchers find
Human sperm may hold the potential to serve as biomarkers of the future health of newborn infants, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The microbiological art of making a better sausage
Fermented sausages can vary in taste quality depending on whether the fermentations begin 'spontaneously,' or using a commercial starter culture. A team of investigators found that commercial starter culture produced sausages with higher acidity, and inferior taste, as compared with spontaneous fermentation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To proliferate or not to proliferate? A cellular spring replies
The epithelium is subjected to multiple types of mechanical stretch. Researchers have discovered that the proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, which contribute to the tightness of the epithelium, perceive these physical signals and activate cellular responses accordingly. These results reveal a novel process by which mechanical forces can regulate the structure of epithelia, their dynamic equilibrium and the e
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Live Science
Hard to Swallow: Shark Suffocates on Porcupine Fish
There was no winner in a deadly clash between a shark and a porcupine fish. Credit: Lauren Arthur A hungry shark that tried to swallow a spiny porcupine fish suffocated on its supper, as the prickly mouthful got hooked halfway into the shark's gullet and blocked the predator's gills. The unfortunate porcupine fish did not survive the encounter, either. The deadly clash took place on Apr
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Under pressure: Novel technology to model pressure-induced cellular injuries in the brain
IMAGE: Housed inside a commercial cell culture incubator (A) are separate Plexiglas pressure chambers (B). Pressure is generated via compressed breathing air with 5% CO2that is controlled by a dual stage... view more Credit: Reprinted from Journal of Neuroscience Methods , Smith, Michael and Eskandari, Ramin. A novel technology to model pressure-induced cellular injuries in the brain. 293 (2018)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From Alaska to Amazonia: First global maps of traits that drive vegetation growth
Detailed global maps of key traits in higher plants have been made available for the first time, thanks to work led by researchers from the University of Minnesota's (UMN) College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS). Based on measurements of 45,000 individual plants from 3,680 species, and using high-tech statistical mapping protocols, the team created global maps of plant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford study links common male medical condition and vascular disease
Men who suffer symptoms from varicoceles, enlarged veins in the scrotum, are more likely to develop vascular disease and metabolic disease, such as diabetes, according to a study by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. Michael Eisenberg, MD, assistant professor of urology, and his team mined data from thousands of medical insurance records to see whether the condition, previously l
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Gizmodo
The New Animal Crossing Stinks
All Images: Nintendo/Screenshot Moderately motion sick and stuck on a Connecticut-bound bus this Thanksgiving Eve, I downloaded the pick-me-up I was certain my brain required: Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp . And crossed the animals did, over a shaky cellular connection and onto my iPhone as the bus lurched into stop-and-go traffic uptown. With a single thrilling tap I launched the app, and at once
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Belowground fungal interactions with trees help explain non-native plant invasions
The invasion of nonnative plants above-ground is strongly related to what type of mycorrhizal fungi are dominant below-ground in forest ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to determine before surgery which prostate tumors pose a lethal threat
A team of researchers reports success in a small-scale test of a new analytical method to improve the early detection of potentially lethal prostate cancer. Based on diagnostic biopsy samples, the method promises to more accurately parse men who need surgery from those who do not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers validate five new genes responsible for ALS
New experiments validate the identification of five new genes linked to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) -- also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The new study results were validated through five different methods.
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Gizmodo
Why Basement Biohackers Might Need to Start Fearing the FDA
The ingredients for CRISPRing a human, sold by The Odin. Image Courtesy Josiah Zayner Last week, the Food and Drug Administration issued a stern warning to biohackers in America: Undertaking DIY gene therapy, it warned, is risky, and selling the supplies to do it is flat-out against the law. “FDA is aware that gene therapy products intended for self-administration and ‘do it yourself’ kits to pro
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New on MIT Technology Review
Ambient AI Is About to Devour the Software Industry
The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene regulation: Risk-free gene reactivation
Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, while avoiding the risk of damaging the DNA.
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The Atlantic
U2's Political, Unstoppable, Grating Cheerfulness
MechaHitler and HiddleSwift, meet RefuJesus. In one of the passages on U2’s Songs of Experience , during which the band tamps down its cheerful noisemaking and lets some anxiety show for a few measures, Bono breaks the gloom with a yelp: “Will you be our sanctuary / Ref-you-jeez-us!” Wait, who? RefuJesus might be the Statue of Liberty, welcoming the tired and huddled. Or it could be the West as a
12h
NYT > Science
Fewer People Are Contracting H.I.V., State Says
In 2016, 2,881 people were newly diagnosed with the virus in New York, compared to 3,163 the year before. Men who have sex with other men accounted for 1,804 new infections in 2015. In 2016 the number fell to 1,580. The data released on Friday did not make clear what had happened among certain subsets of the population, for example whether the rate of transmission among black or Hispanic gay men
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein associated with ALS points to possible targets for therapeutic intervention
Scientists may have found possible targets for therapeutic interventions in the fight against Lou Gehrig's disease. A research team conducted the first single-molecule study of folding in the protein superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), an antioxidant whose misfolding is linked to the neurodegenerative disease ALS. They found that it has much more complex folding than previously thought.
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Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: November 2017
November seems to have flown by! But it was not without its accomplishments. Besides completing 30 cells, we finished the monthly Scythe Marathon in a very respectable 10 hours 37 minutes, and HQ released the shiny new Activity Tracker alongside some site improvements! As we start to wrap up 2017, who knows what the next month will bring? We’re certainly looking forward to Eyewire’s 5th anniversa
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New 3-D printed materials harness the power of bacteria
A new type of 3-D printing ink has a special ingredient: live bacteria. Materials made with this “living ink” could help clean up environmental pollution, harvest energy via photosynthesis or help make medical supplies, researchers report online December 1 in Science Advances . This study “shows for the first time that 3-D printed bacteria can make useful materials,” says Anne Meyer, a biologist
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Live Science
The Worst Theoretical Prediction in the History of Physics
The universe has evolved from a smooth state to one containing a vast amount of structure. Initially, gravity drove the growth of these structures, but later it had to compete with the repulsive force of dark energy. Credit: MPE/V.Springel When it comes to scientifically mysterious concepts that begin with the word "dark," dark matter attracts most of the public attention. Dark energy, however,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-printed minifactories
There will soon be nothing that cannot be produced with 3D printing. However, the materials used for this process are still "dead matter" such as plastics or metals. A group of ETH researchers led by Professor André Studart, Head of the Laboratory for Complex Materials, has now introduced a new 3D printing platform that works using living matter. The research-ers developed a bacteria-contai
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Location, location, location: Immunization delivery site matters
In vaccination, a certain subpopulation of dendritic cells is vital to triggering the body's adaptive immune system, report researchers at The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), Yale University and Astra-Zeneca. Their findings have important implications for vaccine delivery, as the usual method, intramuscular injection, is likely not the most effective way to target those dendritic cells. Vaccines train
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uranium to replace plastic? Chemistry breakthrough could pave the way for new materials
Uranium can perform reactions that previously no one thought possible, which could transform the way industry makes bulk chemicals, polymers, and the precursors to new drugs and plastics, according to new findings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What’s the largest terrestrial organism?
The Giant Sequoya? Nope. The African elephant? Not even close. The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) December 1 Soils Matter blog post shares that the largest land organism is—a fungus!
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skepticism takes many forms
Not every kind of science skepticism is the same. For example, skepticism about climate change is linked to political ideology, whereas skepticism about vaccinations consistently correlates with religious beliefs. In contrast, skepticism about genetically modified foods is not fuelled by religious or political ideology. These are some of the major findings of a new research study among North Ameri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops
Scientists have identified a common set of genes that enable different drought-resistant plants to survive in semi-arid conditions, which could play a significant role in bioengineering and creating energy crops that are tolerant to water deficits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop graphene nano 'tweezers' that can grab individual biomolecules
The University of Minnesota team produced a microchip containing a large array of graphene electronic tweezers. Fluorescence images show DNA molecules and polystyrene nanoparticles trapped on the chip. Credit: Barik et al., University of Minnesota Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene—
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bottle gourd genome provides insight on evolutionary history, relationships of cucurbits
Lagenaria siceraria. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 Researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and collaborators in China and France have produced the first high-quality genome sequence for the bottle gourd ( Lagenaria siceraria ) and a reconstructed genome of the most recent Cucurbitaceae ancestor. The research was supported under an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report: US agency holding nuke bombs grapples with oversight
In this May 9, 2017, file photo, signs are posted by the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Richland, Wash. By conducting some of the most high-tech research in the world, maintaining the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons and cleaning up after decades of bomb-making, the Department of Energy has its share of management challenges. A report released this week outlines some of those challenges while pr
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Science | The Guardian
Kidney disease patients should keep taking their medicines | Letters
Diet alone is not usually enough to reduce chemicals like potassium or phosphate that can build up in your body, so medicines to help do this are important, writes Fiona Loud , director of policy at Kidney Care UK We are concerned that the headline on your article ( Kidney drug ‘may do more harm than good’, say experts , 25 November) is misleading and could result in kidney patients stopping takin
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Live Science
Discovery: Why Strange, Chalky Swirls Cover the Southern Ocean
An image shows the pale-blue swirls of the Great Calcite Belt. Credit: NASA Behold the Great Calcite Belt, ring around the Southern Ocean, coverer of 16 percent of all the global seas, and shiny bloom of microscopic phytoplankton so large it's best seen from space. Organisms called coccolithophores — tiny, single-celled photosynthesizers that are neither plants nor bacteria — dominate those
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop graphene nano 'tweezers' that can grab individual biomolecules
IMAGE: Atomically sharp edges of electrically driven graphene can act as 'tweezers' that rapidly trap biomolecules from the surrounding solution. view more Credit: In-Ho Lee, University of Minnesota Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene--tiny electronic "tweezers" that can grab
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bottle gourd genome provides insight on evolutionary history, relationships of cucurbits
Researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and collaborators in China and France have produced the first high-quality genome sequence for the bottle gourd ( Lagenaria siceraria ) and a reconstructed genome of the most recent Cucurbitaceae ancestor. The research was supported under an agreement (58-0210-3-012) with USAID as a part of th
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do we see similarities across languages? Human brain may be responsible
An estimated 7,099 languages are spoken throughout the world today. Almost a third of them are endangered -- spoken by dwindling numbers -- while just 23 languages represent more than half of the global population. For years, researchers have been interested in the similarities seen across human languages. A new study led by University of Arizona researcher Masha Fedzechkina suggests that some
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Scientific American Content: Global
"Living Ink" Laced with Microbes Makes Molecules on Demand
“Living ink” sounds like fantasy from a Harry Potter novel. But it is actually how scientists describe a new 3-D gel laced with bacteria that turn out molecules helpful in wound healing and water cleanup. The material can be customized for different uses by adding a variety of bacteria, and sprayed out of the nozzle of a 3-D printer into many useful shapes. Although bacteria can cause infecti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D-printed minifactories: Researchers print 'living materials' with bacteria-loaded inks
3-D printing with an ink that is containing living bacteria. Credit: Bara Krautz /scienceanimated.com There will soon be nothing that cannot be produced with 3D printing. However, the materials used for this process are still "dead matter" such as plastics or metals. A group of ETH researchers led by Professor André Studart, Head of the Laboratory for Complex Materials, has now introduced a new 3
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gift Guide: Choosing a streaming device without overpaying
This Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, file photo shows an Amazon Fire TV streaming device displayed with its remote. The device plugs into the back or side of a television set to stream Netflix and other video. Although Amazon has gotten better about promoting rival services, Fire TV is best seen as a companion to Amazon's $99-a-year Prime loyalty program. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) Why watch vid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal regulator gives OK for bitcoin futures to trade
Credit: CC0 Public Domain A federal regulator gave the go ahead on Friday to the CME Group to start trading bitcoin futures later month, the first time the digital currency will be traded on a Wall Street exchange and subject to federal oversight. The CME Group, which owns the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, will start trading bitcoin futures Dec. 18, the company said. The Commodities Futures Tradin
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New on MIT Technology Review
Lenses Are Being Reinvented, and Cameras Will Never Be the Same
Lenses are almost as old as civilization itself. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Babylonians all developed lenses made from polished quartz and used them for simple magnification. Later, 17th-century scientists combined lenses to make telescopes and microscopes, instruments that changed our view of the universe and our position within it. Now lenses are being reinvented by the process of photo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Webb telescope emerges from Chamber A
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, or Webb, emerged from Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston on Dec. 1 to prepare for its upcoming move to California.
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The Atlantic
How the Index Card Cataloged the World
Like every graduate student, I once holed up in the library cramming for my doctoral oral exams. This ritual hazing starts with a long reading list. Come exam day, the scholar must prove mastery of a field, whether it’s Islamic art or German history. The student sits before a panel of professors, answering questions drawn from the book list. More From Our Partners Dog Poo, an Environmental Traged
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The Atlantic
What to Do When a Patient Has a 'Do Not Resuscitate' Tattoo
Earlier this May, Gregory Holt had just finished doing the morning rounds at Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital, when he got a call about a new patient in the emergency room. He went down with seven colleagues to find an unconscious 70-year-old man with breathing problems and signs of septic shock. He was alone and had no identification. His blood was full of alcohol, and its pressure was dropping
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The Scientist RSS
Foundation Medicines Cancer Gene Test Gains FDA and CMS Approval
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services propose covering the test with Medicare.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exceptionally preserved eggs and embryos reveal the life history of a pterosaur
IMAGE: This is a life reconstruction of Hamipterus tianshanensis . view more Credit: Image by ZHAO Chuang The pterosaur record is generally poor, and pterosaur eggs are even rarer. Only a handful of isolated occurrences of eggs and embryos have been reported so far. Three-dimensionally preserved eggs include one from Argentina and five reported from the Turpan-Hami Basin, Xinjiang, no
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems
How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turbulence in astrophysical plasmas
Researchers provides better explanations of the turbulent behavior of plasmas in space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Kids and screen time: Signs your child might be addicted
It's a familiar sight in the majority of young families: young children bent over a screen for hours, texting or gaming, lost in a digital world.
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Viden
Facebook vil forhindre selvmord i hele verden - bortset fra Europa
Størstedelen af Facebooks brugere er på nuværende tidspunkt formentlig klar over, at tech-virksomheden forsøger at lære dig at kende så godt som overhovedet muligt. Forklaringen er, at Facebook bedre kan målrette annoncer mod dig, hvis virksomheden har en præcis personlighedsprofil på dig. Men nu vil Zuckerberg og co. bruge de massive datamængder til at forhindre selvmord. Facebook-brugerne har a
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Popular Science
Everything your biology teacher told you about earlobes is wrong
Most of us learned in high school biology that genetics can sometimes be incredibly simple. Some physical traits are the result of an easy equation containing a pair of parents' genes . One trait—blue eyes, for example—results from recessive genes, but only if no dominant gene—the one to thank for brown eyes—shows up to take a stand. Parents each pass on two genes for eye color, or so your teache
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Gizmodo
Hopefully You Only Need to Use This Ring-Revealing iPhone Case Once
GIF When you shell out $40 for an iPhone case, you probably expect to use it for the life of your phone. But will you really want to keep using the RokShok , a transforming iPhone case that hides a pop-up engagement ring, after you’ve popped the question? Among the many terrible, terrible things we all have to wade through on social media, it’s become abundantly clear that people love sharing the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The microbiological art of making a better sausage
Washington, DC - December 1, 2017 - Fermented sausages can vary in taste quality depending on whether the fermentations begin "spontaneously", or using a commercial starter culture. A team of Italian investigators found that commercial starter culture produced sausages with higher acidity, and inferior taste, as compared with spontaneous fermentation. The research is published December 1 in Appli
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Ars Technica
Water remains wet, Netflix renews its mega-hit Stranger Things for S3
reader comments 0 Will! He's alive and kinda sorta well. (As practically a new character this season, Noah Schnapp has been excellent early on. He wears the anxiety and uncertainty of Will's past on his face at all times.) Netflix This image may trigger certain sects of Stranger Things 2 fans. Netflix There's an emergency in the (scientific lab's) emergency room. Netflix Honestly, just let these
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The Atlantic
Should Women Be Paid for Donating Their Breast Milk?
When Ariyah Georges was born 15 weeks early, she weighed only one pound, 12 ounces. Her mother, Jovan, knew how important breastfeeding was, especially for micro-preemies like Ariyah, so she began pumping milk to feed her through a tube. But two days later, Jovan felt dizzy and feverish—104 degrees, in fact. She had a blood infection and was close to full septic shock. “I almost croaked,” Jovan s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers present list of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko ingredients
Left: The surface of Rosetta’s comet. As the comet approaches the Sun, frozen gases evaporate from below the surface, dragging tiny particles of dust along with them. Right: These dust grains can be captured and examined using the COSIMA instrument. Targets such as this one measuring only a few centimeters act as dust collectors. They retain dust particles of up to 100 microns in size. Credit: ES
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Live Science
The Tastiest Sausages Bring Their Own Microbes to the Party
Scientists in Italy have crafted a recipe for tastier sausage — and the secret ingredient is the microbes found in meat, according to a new study. Many types of sausages are made with the aid of bacterial fermentation , a process in which microbes convert the sugars in food into other compounds such as acids, gases and alcohols, giving the meat its unique flavor. In the new study, resea
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Congressional Assault on Graduate Education
Modestly salaried, willingly overworked, and gifted with a penchant for detecting campus seminars with free food, graduate students serve as the bedrock of research at higher education institutions. However, within the coming week, the Senate may vote on a bill that could devastate graduate research in the United States. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act , which has already passed the House of Representa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The microbiological art of making a better sausage
Fermented sausages can vary in taste quality depending on whether the fermentations begin "spontaneously", or using a commercial starter culture. A team of Italian investigators found that commercial starter culture produced sausages with higher acidity, and inferior taste, as compared with spontaneous fermentation. The research is published December 1 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology ,
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Scientific American Content: Global
Global Powers Strike Deal to Research Before Fishing Arctic Seas​
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Delegations from the United States, Russia, and China and other countries struck a deal on Thursday to refrain from commercial fishing in the high Arctic seas, one of world's fastest-warming places, until scientists can determine what fish are there and whether they can be harvested sustainably. Once signed by the governments of all the parties, the agreement will prote
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sperm RNA may serve as biomarkers of future health, Wayne State researchers find
DETROIT - Human sperm may hold the potential to serve as biomarkers of the future health of newborn infants, according to a new study by a Wayne State University School of Medicine research team. Published in the peer-reviewed journal Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine , the study, "Sperm RNA elements as markers of health," from the lab of Stephen A. Krawetz, Ph.D., the Charlotte B. Failing
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Flying Green Not As Simple As It Seems
BRIEF: Flying Green Not As Simple As It Seems The most modern aircraft and most direct route are not always the most environmentally friendly options for air travel. Airport-traffic.jpg Image credits: ERIK SALARD via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Earth Friday, December 1, 2017 - 12:30 Kimberly Hickok, Contributor (Inside Science) -- For many, the holiday season means it’s time to catch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links child abuse, high school dropout
DURHAM, N.C. -- Children who have been victims of violence are more likely to drop out of high school before graduation than their peers, according to a new study co-authored by a Duke scholar. Girls who had experienced childhood violence were 24 percent more likely to drop out, while boys who had experienced violence were 26 percent more likely to drop out than their peers. One in five people in
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Ars Technica
Life, but not as we know it
Adapted from an image created by Dennis Sun, Mezarque Design reader comments 37 To the best of our ability to tell, everything on Earth shares a few common features. It encodes information in DNA using four bases, A, T, C, and G. Sets of three consecutive bases are used to code for a single amino acid, and most organisms use a set of 20 amino acids to build proteins. These features appear everywh
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The Atlantic
The Disaster Artist Is a Hilarious Tribute to a Singular Work of Art
“What do you think?” asks Tommy Wiseau (James Franco), the pale, peculiarly dressed, raven-haired man of ambiguous age and accent at the center of the movie The Disaster Artist . “Am I villain?” The friend he’s asking, Greg Sestero (Dave Franco), has been roped into co-starring in Wiseau’s directorial debut film The Room , and might be forgiven for answering in the affirmative. Wiseau certainly h
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The Atlantic
The Great Recession Is Still With Us
A decade after it started, the Great Recession has faded into memory. Corporate earnings and the stock market have fully recovered, with the financial sector thriving . The labor market has fully recovered, with middle-class earnings growing and the economy flirting with full employment . The government, at the state , local, and federal levels, has recovered too, and the economy is growing close
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops
The team used ORNL's Titan supercomputer to compare the genomes of Kalanchoë fedtschenkoi (back row) and Phalaenopsis equestris , or orchid (front row), as well as Ananas comosus , or pineapple. Credit: Jason Richards/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Deptartment of Energy Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have identified a common set of genes that enable diff
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Gizmodo
Feast Your Eyes on Some of the Year’s Best Wildlife Photography
This image, called “Salmon Run,” was the winner of the Dynamic Ecosystems category. (Image: Zoe Davies/British Ecological Society) The British Ecological Society has announced the winners of its annual photo competition, and it features fantastic photos of fearsome predators pouncing on prey, a freakishly rare ocelot, and a crafty chameleon doing what a chameleon does best. This year’s competitio
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Gravity signals rapidly show true size of giant quakes
Image copyright Reuters Image caption The 2011 Tohoku earthquake was initially estimated to be 7.9 magnitude Researchers have developed a new approach to estimate the true size of very large earthquakes. At present, scientists use seismic waves from a rupture to work out the scale of the event. But a new analysis of the Tohoku earthquake in Japan in 2011 shows that changes in gravity can give mor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to determine before surgery which prostate tumors pose a lethal threat
IMAGE: Rendering of the human prostate gland, roughly the size and shape of a walnut, bisected by the urethra. The locations of each of an individual's 13 biopsy cores are indicated.... view more Credit: Krasnitz lab, CSHL Cold Spring Harbor, NY - The facts about prostate cancer can be confusing. It's the third most common cancer type among Americans - 161,000 men will be diagnosed th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drought-resistant plant genes could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec.1, 2017 - Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have identified a common set of genes that enable different drought-resistant plants to survive in semi-arid conditions, which could play a significant role in bioengineering and creating energy crops that are tolerant to water deficits. Plants thrive in drylands by keeping their s
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Ars Technica
Chrome to stop third-party software injections because they make it crash
Enlarge / This will hurt... a lot. reader comments 36 To boost the stability of Chrome, Google has announced that it's going to start blocking third-party software from being injected into the browser. Third-party software such as anti-virus scanners and video driver utilities often injects libraries into running processes to do things like inspect network traffic, or add custom menu options to m
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Science : NPR
Health Risks To Farmworkers Increase As Workforce Ages
Researchers point to a number of causes for dwindling farmworkers: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by smugglers; well-paying construction jobs and a growing middle-class in Mexico that doesn't want to pick vegetables for Americans. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images Researchers point to a number of causes for dwindling farmwo
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Warmer World Will Dent the Productivity of Factories
The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Ingeniøren
Her producerer danske ingeniører togsignaler til Norge
Kom med direktør Peter Sonne på rundtur hos Bombardier, som på Avedøre Holme i udkanten af København producerer signalanlæg og reservedele til jernbanen med eksisterende teknologi. En af de store ordrer går i disse år til Norge, som fornyer sine signaler med dansk teknologi, selv om også normændene skal skifte det den ERTMS-standard, som lige nu volder så mange kvaler i Danmark.
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Scientific American Content: Global
5 Ways the Tax Bills Affect Health Policy
Having failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, Congress is now working on a tax overhaul. But it turns out the tax bills in the House and Senate also aim to reshape health care. Here are five big ways the tax bill could affect health policy: 1. Repeal the requirement for most people to have health insurance or pay a tax penalty. Republicans tried and failed to end the so
15h
Live Science
Addicted to Your Phone? It Could Throw Off Your Brain Chemistry
It's hard to escape screens; there is a roughly 100 percent chance you are looking at one right now. And though the long-term effects of screen time are still being studied, the effects of excessive internet and smartphone use are well-documented. "Pathological" internet use has been linked to depression in teens , and it may even shrink gray matter . Now, a small new study suggests that fo
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Live Science
Hanukkah: History & Traditions
Hanukkah, the "Festival of Lights," is a Jewish holiday lasting eight days. It is typically celebrated in late fall or early winter. It begins at sundown on the 25th of Kislev, the ninth month of the Jewish year. In 2017, Hanukkah begins on Dec. 12 and continues until Dec. 20. Although it is one of the most popular, Hanukkah is not one of the important religious or cultural holidays among J
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Big Think
Bitcoin Consumes More Energy than 159 Individual Countries
This map doesn't deal with the phenomenal rise in value of Bitcoin, nor the cryptocurrency's coming crash, which some financial experts say is as inevitable as that of any pyramid scheme. But it does provide another angle on the digital currency, which has shot up in value from $1,000 to more than $10,000 within this year. The growth of Bitcoin has also led to an exponential increase in 'Bitc
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Ars Technica
Celebrate 50 years of Apollo with us as our new series blasts off
reader comments 0 Our short series teaser. Click here for transcript . For a few brief years between 1968 and 1972, humans left the Earth and visited the Moon. The flights took the combined efforts of nearly half a million people working across the world and cost about $160 billion in inflation-adjusted 2015 dollars. The result of that work and money were the Apollo landings—six successful lunar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GPM Satellite observes Tropical Cyclone Dahlia and landslide potential
This landslide potential map was created based on rainfall estimates from near real-time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data. The map shows that heavy rainfall during the past week resulted in an area of potential landslides on the slopes of southern Java. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce On Nov. 29 Tropical Cyclone Dahlia became the first tropical cyclone of the 2017-2018 Southwest I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uranium to replace plastic? Chemistry breakthrough could pave the way for new materials
Uranium can perform reactions that previously no one thought possible, which could transform the way industry makes bulk chemicals, polymers, and the precursors to new drugs and plastics, according to new findings from The University of Manchester. Writing in the journal Nature Communications , the chemists have discovered that uranium can perform reactions that used to be the preserve of transit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Ockhi strengthening off southwestern coast of India
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ockhi, it measured cloud top temperatures that showed strongest storms were off the coast of southwestern India. Infrared data showed Ockhi intensifing into a typhoon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mosquitoes more likely to transmit dengue virus in hot weather
A TEM micrograph showing Dengue virus virions (the cluster of dark dots near the center). Image: CDC Dengue virus grows and spreads in mosquitoes faster at higher temperatures, but slows when temperatures are lower or fluctuate, suggesting that local weather conditions could have a big influence on dengue fever outbreaks. The findings, published today in open-access journal Frontiers in Microbiol
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Latest Headlines | Science News
We still don’t know where the first interstellar asteroid came from
ISO: A home for a stray space rock. Astronomers are tracking the motions of stars to figure out which one sent an alien asteroid speeding past Earth in October — but they may never find the rock’s true origins. Officially named ‘Oumuamua, the asteroid was spotted by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii on October 18 ( SN: 11/25/17, p. 14 ). Its inbound speed of about 25.5 kilometers per second an
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Gizmodo
ThinkGeek's Got More NES and SNES Classics to Sell You... If You Win a Contest
Despite Nintendo promising to bring back the NES Classic Edition next year, and to manufacture enough SNES Classic Editions to meet demand, both consoles are still hard to come by ahead of the looming Christmas deadline. ThinkGeek has managed to get its hands on a bunch of both consoles, but the retailer says it will only sell you one if you’re lucky enough to win a lottery . Unlike previous Thin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Belowground fungal interactions with trees help explain non-native plant invasions
Mycorrhizal fungi are a type of fungi that help trees feed on minerals in the soil and, in turn, feed off sugars in tree roots. New research by a US Forest Service scientist and partners suggests that the type of mycorrhizal fungi dominant in a forest influences vulnerability to non-native plant invasion. Credit: Melanie Taylor, U.S. Forest Service New research published by a team of scientists f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uranium to replace plastic? Chemistry breakthrough could pave the way for new materials
Uranium can perform reactions that previously no one thought possible, which could transform the way industry makes bulk chemicals, polymers, and the precursors to new drugs and plastics, according to new findings from The University of Manchester. Writing in the journal Nature Communications , the chemists have discovered that uranium can perform reactions that used to be the preserve of transit
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stephanie Faubion, M.D., talks genitourinary syndrome of menopause
ROCHESTER, Minn. - A new article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reviews options for women going through genitourinary syndrome of menopause - an encompassing term for vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia and urinary tract infections brought on by low estrogen levels after menopause. "It's a common problem that affects at least 50 percent of postmenopausal women; yet, only about 7 percent are receivi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's GPM Satellite observes Tropical Cyclone Dahlia and landslide potential
IMAGE: This landslide potential map was created based on rainfall estimates from near real-time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data. The map shows that heavy rainfall during the past week resulted in... view more Credit: Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce On Nov. 29 Tropical Cyclone Dahlia became the first tropical cyclone of the 2017-2018 Southwest Indian Ocean season. The G
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Ockhi strengthening off southwestern coast of India
IMAGE: The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Ockhi on Nov. 30 at 3:17 p.m. EST (20:17 UTC) and showed coldest cloud tops and strongest storms... view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ockhi, it measured cloud top temperatures that showed strongest storms were off the coast of southwestern In
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fewer urinary tract infections seen postoperatively at ACS NSQIP®-participating hospitals
CHICAGO (December 1, 2017): A new study of procedure-specific trends in postoperative complications finds that most of 10 types of operations have improved rates of surgical site and bladder infections since 2008. However, the researchers did identify an area for prompt quality improvement for another operation, pancreatectomy, for which surgical site infections (SSIs) have significantly increase
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cognitive science
Brain Scans Reveal Why Rewards and Punishments Don’t Seem to Work on Teenagers. One aspect of risk behavior in adolescents appears to be an apparent inability to match their behavior to the likely rewards (or punishments) that might follow.
A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robot learning improves student engagement
Online students who use the innovative robots feel more engaged and connected to the instructor and students in the classroom, the first-ever study of a pioneering robot-learning course shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Risk-free gene reactivation
A depiction of the double helical structure of DNA. Its four coding units (A, T, C, G) are color-coded in pink, orange, purple and yellow. Credit: NHGRI Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists propose efficiency 'rules' for enhancing use of new gene editing technology
Human embryonic kidney cells glow green after repair of a CRISPR-induced DNA break with a PCR fragment encoding a fluorescent protein and homology arms with 33 nucleotides. Credit: Alexandre Paix Johns Hopkins scientists have developed a streamlined method and accompanying efficiency "rules" for introducing new DNA sequences into cells after using the gene-cutting tool known as CRISPR. The scient
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Quanta Magazine
Secret Link Uncovered Between Pure Math and Physics
Mathematics is full of weird number systems that most people have never heard of and would have trouble even conceptualizing. But rational numbers are familiar. They’re the counting numbers and the fractions — all the numbers you’ve known since elementary school. But in mathematics, the simplest things are often the hardest to understand. They’re simple like a sheer wall, without crannies or ledg
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Gizmodo
What Do the AI Chips in New Smartphones Actually Do?
Image: Huawei Artificial intelligence is coming to your phone. The iPhone X has a Neural Engine as part of its A11 Bionic chip; the Huawei Kiri 970 chip has what’s called a Neural Processing Unit or NPU on it; and the Pixel 2 has a secret AI-powered imaging chip that just got activated. So what exactly are these next-gen chips designed to do? As mobile chipsets have grown smaller and more sophist
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Inside Science
Snowflake Photographer
Snowflake Photographer The science and technology of taking pictures of tiny snowflakes in the early 1900s. Snowflake Photographer Video of Snowflake Photographer Earth Friday, December 1, 2017 - 11:30 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Snowflakes. They are beautiful and fragile -- and very difficult to photograph. But that didn’t stop one scientist from trying. Can you imagine how
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Ars Technica
“Safe Mode” lets you explore Soma’s horror without risk of death
In "Safe Mode," you only have to worry about the philosophical implications of this horrible Soma monsters, not the risk of death. reader comments 38 Developer Frictional Games has announced a new "Safe Mode" for 2015's Soma , intended to keep the title's horror atmosphere while removing the risk of in-game death. Much like previous player-created mods like "Wuss Mode," Safe Mode will leave the g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN makes global bid to end 'rampant' pollution
Nearly half of nine million deaths in 2015 due to pollution were in India and China Environment ministers from about 100 countries gather in Nairobi next week to issue a clarion call against air, land and water pollution blamed for some nine million deaths in 2015. Ministers under the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA) will finalise a global declaration vowing to combat "rampant pollution" as a growi
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cognitive science
Study finds reading information aloud to yourself improves memory
A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Belowground fungal interactions with trees help explain non-native plant invasions
IMAGE: Mycorrhizal fungi are a type of fungi that help trees feed on minerals in the soil and, in turn, feed off sugars in tree roots. New research by a US... view more Credit: Melanie Taylor, U.S. Forest Service New research published by a team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service and Purdue University suggests that tiny soil fungi that help and are helped by trees may influence a fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTHealth scientists help explain how dietary fat affects stem cell differentiation
IMAGE: Shedding new light on stem cell differentiation at UTHealth from the left are Ilya Levental, Ph.D.; Joseph Lorent, Ph.D.; Allison D. Skinkle; and Kandice Levental, Ph.D. view more Credit: Maricruz Kwon, UTHealth You are what you eat when it comes to fat, report scientists from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) in the journal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene regulation: Risk-free gene reactivation
Chemical modification of DNA subunits contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now deciphered a new pathway can reactivate genes that have been silenced in this way, while avoiding the risk of damaging the DNA. In multicellular organisms, every cell contains the complete complement of genetic information characteristic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kids and screen time: Signs your child might be addicted
ANN ARBOR--It's a familiar sight in the majority of young families: young children bent over a screen for hours, texting or gaming, lost in a digital world. Many parents worry, how much screen time is too much? But a recent study found that may be the wrong question. The findings suggest that how children use the devices, not how much time they spend on them, is the strongest predictor of emotion
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mosquitoes more likely to transmit dengue virus in hot weather
Dengue virus grows and spreads in mosquitoes faster at higher temperatures, but slows when temperatures are lower or fluctuate, suggesting that local weather conditions could have a big influence on dengue fever outbreaks. The findings, published today in open-access journal Frontiers in Microbiology , could help people prevent outbreaks during warm periods by reducing their exposure to mosquitoe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chick embryos provide valuable genetic data for understanding human development
Representative images of chicken embryos used for RNA preparation and subsequent CAGE sequencing. Top panels show embryos in the first day of embryonic development (21 days in total), equivalent to the first five weeks of human gestation (first three weeks of human post-fertilization development). Bottom panels show embryos from the establishment of circulatory system to about a week before hatch
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African protected area saving endangered megafauna
One of Africa's last remaining wilderness areas is in good shape and could potentially support 50,000 elephants and 1000 lions, a study has found. Niassa National Reserve is Mozambique's largest protected area and has large populations of threatened species, but it's one of the least biologically explored places on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain is still 'connected' during non-REM sleep
When we sleep, our organism goes through different phases of sleep, however the brain remains interconnected during non-REM sleep, which was thought not to happen. This finding has also made it possible to analyze the scientific basis of consciousness, an increasingly important field of neuroscience.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Get comfortable with being uncomfortable | Luvvie Ajayi
Luvvie Ajayi isn't afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. "Your silence serves no one," says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker. In this bright, uplifting talk, Ajayi shares three questions to ask yourself if you're teetering on the edge of speaking up or quieting down -- and encourages all of us to get a littl
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Gizmodo
Use This Tool to See If Your Name Was Used to Support Net Neutrality Repeal
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. (Photo: Getty) So far, the FCC has refused to cooperate with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s investigation into identity theft during the commenting period on net neutrality repeal. So Schneiderman is using the internet to find the evidence and he needs help. On November 21st, Schneiderman wrote an open letter to the FCC that claimed the process for considerin
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Popular Science
Turkey poop could help save us from ourselves
Israeli scientists have found a new use for turkey leftovers. But don’t pull those Thanksgiving scraps out of the freezer just yet, because it’s not what you think. It’s not about the meat — it’s about the poop . Researchers believe turkey and other poultry waste hold promise as a renewable fuel for heat and electricity. “Poultry litter might be a notorious source of pollution, yet has the potent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robot learning improves student engagement
Remote students participating via robots, above, feel more engaged and connected than students participating via traditional videoconferencing, below, a new MSU study finds. Credit: Michigan State University The first-ever study of Michigan State University's pioneering robot-learning course shows that online students who use the innovative robots feel more engaged and connected to the instructor
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Ars Technica
Google bans Android developers from adding lock screen ads
Enlarge / Examples of some lockscreen ads, which totally replace the stock lockscreen. here , here , and here , Google is cracking down on one of the most annoying ad types on Android. As first spotted by Android Police , the Google Play Developer monetization rules have been updated to ban lock screen ads. Here's the new section : Lockscreen Monetization Unless the exclusive purpose of the app i
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Gizmodo
Binary Star System May Actually Be a Pair of Orbiting Supermassive Black Holes
Image: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Washington/T.Dorn-Wallenstein et al.; Optical: NASA/ESA/J. Dalcanton, et al. & R. Gendler Oops! Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, sits a measly 2.5 million light years away from Earth. Like the Milky Way, it’s a spiral galaxy packed with stars. Some of those stars orbit one another. That’s all good—but scientists have come to the realization that a part
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Ars Technica
Comcast to customers: Just trust us about changed net neutrality pledges
reader comments 0 Comcast is defending its changed net neutrality pledges in the face of criticism from Internet users. The deletion of a net neutrality promise immediately after the Federal Communications Commission started repealing its net neutrality rules is just a "language" change, the company says. Comcast is telling customers that it still has no plans to institute paid prioritization—whi
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Blog » Languages » English
A Visit from St. Grim
Twas the night before Grim-mas and all through the house, Not a creature was stirring except for my mouse Time was a-ticking and I knew I should rest, But I’d now been afflicted with OMCS! The evening grew dim while my screen remained bright, I kept telling myself I should stop for the night! I on my desktop, with the cat in my lap, Who had just settled down for a long winter’s nap. Then out on t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on turbulence in astrophysical plasmas
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Plasmas, gas-like collections of ions and electrons, make up an estimated 99 percent of the visible matter in the universe, including the sun, the stars, and the gaseous medium that permeates the space in between. Most of these plasmas, including the solar wind that constantly flows out from the sun and sweeps through the solar system, exist in a turbulent state. How this turb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harmful effects of being overweight underestimated
The harmful effects of being overweight have been underestimated, according to a new study that analysed body mass index (BMI), health and mortality data in around 60,000 parents and their children, to establish how obesity actually influences risk of death. The University of Bristol study is published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [Friday 1 December]. Previous studies have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To drop CO2 emissions, look to local transportation and housing
Worldwide, the United States is one of the biggest greenhouse gas emitters. The Obama administration began efforts to drop those numbers by increasing vehicle fuel economy standards in 2011 and with its Clean Power Plan proposals in 2015. But even if implemented as planned, which is uncertain given the current Administration's energy-policy agenda, that two-pronged approach would still fall sho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems
IMAGE: Via a cannula introduced into the infarction area, the cells loaded with magnetic nanoparticles are injected into the damaged heart muscle tissue of the mouse. view more Credit: © Photo: Dr. Annika Ottersbach/Uni Bonn How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When Listeria monocytogenes goes to sleep....
A serious infection of dietary origin that is caused by the Listeria monocytogenes bacterium, listeriosis is associated with severe clinical symptoms and a high mortality rate in individuals whose immune system is weakened. INRA scientists, working in collaboration with their colleagues at the Institut Pasteur, have demonstrated the novel capacity of L. monocytogenes to generate dormant intracellu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jawbone loss predates rheumatoid arthritis
IMAGE: In the above x-ray image, the white dotted line indicate the normal jawbone level at a molar site in the lower jaw. The individual has periodontitis and has therefore lost... view more Credit: Pernilla Lundberg and Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist Jawbone loss caused by periodontitis predates the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. This according to research from Umeå University in Sweden presen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution: In the beginning there was the sponge
Which group of animals evolved first? This problem has become a bone of contention among biologists. An international research team is now confident that the definitive answer is at hand: Sponges appeared before comb jellies. Which came first - the sponges or the comb jellies? The consensus view among taxonomists has long been that the sponges (Porifera) represent the oldest surviving animal ph
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality for bacteria
IMAGE: Individual cells are digitally guided along pre-specified trajectories of fluorescent gene expression. 48 Escherichia coli cells are arranged vertically in the image. Time moves on towards the right. Each row... view more Credit: Remy Chait Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutron spectroscopy: New detector module MultiFLEXX increases count rate tenfold
Beam time at a neutron instrument is valuable - users generally have only a few days for their measurements. Often, scientists travel from other countries or even continents for an experiment. Naturally, they want to make the most of these days for their research. Therefore, an HZB team at the triple axis spectrometer FLEXX has developed the new detector module MultiFLEXX: It allows beam time to
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Legal Drugs Harm and Illegal Drugs Help
During the 1970s, the U.S. began what has now become known as the “war on drugs,” a reaction to the counterculture and drug-fueled climate of the 1960s. To the government’s dismay, these policies did nothing to quell the use of illicit drugs; rather, it opened a huge market for the illegal development, distribution and importation of psychoactive and hallucinogenic substances like marijuana, coca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From Alaska to Amazonia—first global maps of traits that drive vegetation growth
Credit: University of Minnesota Detailed global maps of key traits in higher plants have been made available for the first time, thanks to work led by researchers from the University of Minnesota's (UMN) College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS). Based on measurements of 45,000 individual plants from 3,680 species, and using high-tech statistical mapping protocols, the te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New findings—Burglars have one of four personalities, and they're finally getting caught
Bryanna Fox, PhD, assistant professor of criminology at USF. Credit: University of South Florida Law enforcement agencies across the country are solving an average of 85 percent more burglaries after adopting a new profiling system. The statistics-based program designed at the University of South Florida in Tampa indicates that the manner in which a burglary is committed is linked to the type of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One fish, two fish—using a new MBARI-designed camera system to count rockfish
A two-camera prototype of the benthic observation system on a research vessel in Monterey Bay. Credit: Chad Kecy © 2017 MBARI Over 90 species of rockfish are caught commercially off the West Coast of the United States, but some deep-water species have been severely affected by overfishing. To help these threatened populations recover, fisheries scientists need to know how many fish are out there
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mercury toxicity in the Peruvian Amazon
Credit: Duke University This last year our team has actively been working on a project to evaluate the impact of a dietary intervention on mercury toxicity in the Peruvian Amazon. Our progress is the natural product not only of a committed team with passionate mentors, but also the diversity of academic backgrounds represented. True to the Bass Connections model, we proudly bring together the nat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How will climate change affect Arctic caribou and reindeer?
Barren-ground caribou in autumn near Kugluktuk, Nuanvut. Credit: Mathieu Dumond/Umingmak Productions This spring, I spent close to two weeks flying over central Nunavut, peering out the window of a small plane at the rolling tundra below, looking for and counting caribou to monitor their numbers. The Qamanirjuaq barren-ground herd were arriving on their tundra calving grounds to give birth after
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The Atlantic
Social Apps Are Now a Commodity
I am very old. As in, my age begins with a four, a profoundly uncool number for an age to start with. Which is to say, too old to use Snapchat, the image-messaging social-network app. Founded in 2011, it’s most popular among young people, who spurned Facebook and even Instagram for it. Why? For one part, it’s because we olds are on Facebook and even Instagram. But for another part, it’s just beca
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cognitive science
Will this artificial intelligence system keep your kindergarten toddlers safe?: "Chinese team say their algorithm can analyse a live video stream and detect abnormal behaviour such as punching or slapping"
A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Science : NPR
A Tax That Would Hurt Science's Most Valuable — And Vulnerable
NicoElNino/Getty Images/iStockphoto NicoElNino/Getty Images/iStockphoto As the tax bill moves through Congress, an issue has risen that hits dangerously close to U.S. efforts in science. The problem focuses on a provision that would tax graduate students for tuition waivers that universities set up long ago. These waivers were meant to foster advanced education in the sciences and elsewhere. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robot learning improves student engagement
IMAGE: Robot-learning could be the wave of the future for online classes. view more Credit: Michigan State University EAST LANSING, Mich. - The first-ever study of Michigan State University's pioneering robot-learning course shows that online students who use the innovative robots feel more engaged and connected to the instructor and students in the classroom. Stationed around the class,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Model of galaxy and star cluster formation is rectified
When galaxy clusters and globular star clusters form, a phenomenon called "violent relaxation" occurs. After interacting intensely, the thousands or even millions of bodies reach a state of relative gravitational equilibrium and a fairly long-lasting spatial distribution. A new study developed by Brazilian researchers and published in The Astrophysical Journal argues that astrophysicists' under
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University scientists in search of fast algorithms for discrete optimization
Lobachevsky University scientists are implementing a research project "Algorithmic, Complex and Structural Problems of Graph Theory and Discrete Optimization". At the head of the research team is Vadim Lozin, leading researcher of the UNN Institute of Information Technologies, Mathematics and Mechanics, professor of the Mathematics Institute at the University of Warwick (UK). Many important pract
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Futurity.org
Does the right diet depend on your genes?
One diet may not suit everybody, new research suggests. “Dietary advice, whether it comes from the United States government or some other organization, tends to be based on the theory that there is going to be one diet that will help everyone,” says David Threadgill, with the Texas A&M College of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and senior author of the study that
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Gizmodo
Scientists Added Two New Letters to DNA's Code
Image: Vincent P /Flickr If you’ve taken a science class, you’re likely aware that DNA is the body’s instruction manual. But its language is only written in four letters: A, T, C, and G. Those who paid extra close attention will remember that RNA, the photocopy of the instructions that the cell actually uses, replaces the Ts with the letter U. Back in 2014, scientists at the Scripps Research Inst
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The Atlantic
2017 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar
Time once more for one of my favorite holiday traditions, the 10th annual Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. Every day until Monday, December 25, this page will present one new incredible image of our universe from NASA's Hubble telescope. Be sure to bookmark this calendar and come back every day until the 25th, or follow on Twitter ( @ TheAtlPhoto ), Facebook , or Tumblr for daily updates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could robo-taxis kill public transportation?
Credit: Pexels When driverless cars become mainstream—which could happen sooner than you're expecting—it will change everything. In mid-November, transportation thought-leaders gathered at Columbia University to discuss the future of mobility in the fall symposium of the American Geographical Society. Hosted by the Earth Institute, the event painted a hopeful picture of the world in 2050: Hyperlo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insight into how dog and man hunted side by side, over 8 000 years ago
Credit: Shutterstock Ancient carvings recently discovered in caves in the Saudi desert are the first to show dogs on leads. Rock art just discovered shows hunting dogs bringing down prey and others standing by the sides of men, ready to be loosed from leads. The carvings are believed to be from the Holocene period, which came just after the end of the Paleolithic ice age, says Dr Michael Petragli
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Scientific American Content: Global
Brain Organoids Get Cancer, Too, Opening a New Frontier in Personalized Medicine
NEW YORK — In 30 years as an oncologist, Dr. Howard Fine estimates he has treated some 20,000 patients with glioblastomas , the most deadly form of brain cancer, “and almost all of them are dead.” Of the 100 new glioblastoma patients he saw last month, “five years from now, only three will be alive,” he said. During a conversation this month in his office at Weill Cornell Medicine in New Yo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain is still 'connected' during non-REM sleep
When we sleep, our organism goes through different phases of sleep, however the brain remains interconnected during non-REM sleep, which was thought not to happen. The finding by a European team of researchers has also made it possible to analyse the scientific basis of consciousness, an increasingly important field of neuroscience. Sleep is composed of various cycles in which there are differe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New laser technology could reduce accidents on icy roads
Researchers have proposed an innovative new solution to dealing with dangerous icy roads in winter, putting forward an improved, safer method.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does physician age influence the likelihood of patient complaints?
Older ophthalmologists were less likely than younger colleagues to be associated with patient complaints, a new study has discovered.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disaster zones could soon be salvaged by teams of smart devices – here's how
Drones being used to find survivors after an earthquake in Ecuador in 2016. Credit: Fotos593 We will remember 2017 as an appalling year for natural disasters. The US has endured its most expensive hurricane season, amounting to over $200 billion (£151 billion) of damage. Mexico City experienced a terrible earthquake that killed over 200 people, while severe tropical storms forced tens of thousand
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How many undiscovered creatures are there in the ocean?
Credit: Shutterstock "The oceans cover 70% of the surface of our planet, and yet they are still the least explored," says Sir David Attenborough in the opening sequence of the recent BBC documentary series Blue Planet II . "Hidden beneath the waves, there are creatures beyond our imagination." Yet while the programme reveals the wonders of many of these species, an incredible number more have nev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to produce the purest argon ever
ARIA’s modules are being leak-tested at CERN before travelling to Sardinia, Italy. The top, bottom and one standard column module have now been lined up horizontally to test their alignment. Credit: J. Ordan/CERN CERN is taking part in a project, called ARIA, for the construction of a 350-metre-tall distillation tower that will be used to purify liquid argon (LAr) for scientific and, in a second
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Gizmodo
Amazon Wants to Protect You From Falling Drones by Making Them Self-Destruct
It was almost two years ago to the day when Amazon released a cheeky video detailing its plans to conquer the skies with a fleet of package-delivering drones. We’re still waiting for these unmanned aircraft to replace standard trucks and delivery personnel, but it’s clear Amazon hasn’t abandoned the idea. Earlier this week, Amazon was granted a patent for technology that could enable its future d
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Gizmodo
Use These Search Tricks to Take Control of Your Gmail Inbox
Gmail is one those things that I could never live without, but that’s also made my life a lot more annoying. I gave up on inbox zero years ago (I’d be happy with inbox 1,000 at this point) and I get dozens of useless, spammy emails every day, making it all the more difficult to find any important messages that are less than a week old. If you’re like me but you want to get better at managing your
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New on MIT Technology Review
Biohackers Disregard FDA Warning on DIY Gene Therapy
Despite a warning from the federal government about do-it-yourself gene therapy, two companies say they’ll continue offering DNA-altering materials to the public. The companies, The Odin and Ascendance Biomedical, both recently posted videos online of people self-administering DNA molecules their labs had produced. Following wide distribution of the videos, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery could bring better efficiency to a new class of solar cells
Physics professor Seung-Hun Lee, left, and chemical engineering professor Joshua Choi are tweaking out the molecular details of HOIPs. Credit: Dan Addison, University Communications Since the 2009 discovery of a highly energy-efficient class of solar cell materials known as HOIPs – hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites – researchers have been working to understand exactly how these promising mater
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens get more sleep when school starts later
A later school start time could mean teens are more likely to get adequate amounts of sleep, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Poop pill' capsule research paves the way for simpler C. difficile treatment
A clinical trial has shown Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) is effective in treating clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections whether delivered by colonoscopy or by swallowing capsules. The finding could revolutionize and broaden the use of FMT, which restores the healthy balance of bacteria living in the intestine by transferring a healthy donor's stool to the gut of a person with C. diff
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study suggests a way to stop HIV in its tracks
When HIV-1 infects an immune cell, the virus travels to the nucleus so quickly there's not enough time to set off the cell's alarm system. Researchers have discovered the protein that helps the virus travel so fast. Without this protein, the virus became stranded in the cytoplasm, where it was detected by the viral defense system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weight loss and risk of death: Rheumatoid arthritis findings may have wider implications
Results suggest that the findings from previous studies regarding lower weight being associated with higher mortality may not be directly related to RA and instead reflect a more generalized phenomenon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oral microbiota indicates link between periodontal disease, esophageal cancer
An analysis of bacteria present in the mouth showed that some types of bacteria that lead to periodontal disease were associated with higher risk of esophageal cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic link found between the immune system and lymphoma
People who inherit genetic changes which alter the function of their immune system are at increased risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma, a major new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists propose efficiency 'rules' for enhancing use of new gene editing technology
Scientists have developed a streamlined method and accompanying efficiency 'rules' for introducing new DNA sequences into cells after using the gene-cutting tool known as CRISPR. The scientists say the method, which they based on tests with mouse embryos and thousands of human cells, could improve consistency and efficiency of genome editing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cannabis linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults
Cannabis use in youth is linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults, finds new research.
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Gizmodo
Finally Cut the Cord With This One-Day Dyson V6 Deal
Refurb Dyson V6 Motorhead | $184 | Amazon Dyson dominated the nominations in our favorite vacuum Co-Op, and you can pick up a refurbished Dyson V6 Motorhead from Amazon’s Gold Box for $184. I got the Animal version of this vacuum a few months ago, and it’s seriously life changing. I use it for floors, for my furniture, and even just for dusting. You’d be hard pressed to find any Dyson vacuum for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Topological insulators are among this year's top achievements in photonics
Optics & Photonics News recognised a recent study on three-dimensional topological insulators as one of the most promising advances in photonics this year. These structures are capable of controlling light without any losses caused by absorption and material defects, which shows a great potential for applications in optical computers, communication networks, antennas and lasers. Topological insul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chick embryos provide valuable genetic data for understanding human development
IMAGE: Representative images of chicken embryos used for RNA preparation and subsequent CAGE sequencing. Top panels show embryos in the first day of embryonic development (21 days in total), equivalent to... view more Credit: Professor Guojun Sheng Early developmental research on human embryos is impossible due to ethical considerations, and is technically difficult to perform in other mammal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein associated with ALS points to possible targets for therapeutic intervention
IMAGE: Michael Woodside, University of Alberta biophysicist, and his team may have found possible targets for therapeutic interventions in the fight against Lou Gehrig's disease. view more Credit: John Ulan Scientists at the University of Alberta may have found possible targets for therapeutic interventions in the fight against Lou Gehrig's disease. Biophysicist Michael Woodside and his re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qubits put into reverse
Filip Malinowski pointing at a chip similar to the one which the NBI-scientists used in their experiments in order to put qubits into reverse. Credit: Ola Jakup Joensen A group of scientists at the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI), University of Copenhagen, has figured out how to make spin qubits perform controlled backward rotations. This has never been shown before – and the journal Physical Review L
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NYT > Science
5 Takeaways From The Times’s ClimateTECH Conference
Government to business: You need us Not everyone bought in to that line of thought. Rahm Emanuel, the Democratic mayor of Chicago, made a very different prediction. “All the companies that thought the last eight years were too over-regulated, in eight years they’re going to be begging for regulation,” he said. “You cannot create the Wild West on energy.” Agriculture is ripe for innovation The fut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biophysicists unravel exact folding of a single gene
The way genes are folded determines their activity in our body. Leiden University biophysicists are now the first to unravel this structure molecule-by-molecule. Publication on December 1st in Nature's Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why Britain's coastline is crumbling
Example of a "wedge" rockfall at Telscombe, East Sussex. Credit: University of Sussex Britain is changing shape. More than 50 per cent of the coastline is made of cliffs and while In some places erosion is just a centimetre or two each year, in others an average of 89 centimetres of the chalk face is falling into the sea every year. In June 2017 a ten-metre section of the cliff at Seaford Head in
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Futurity.org
Computer model mimics sudden cardiac arrest
A powerful new computer model replicates biological activity in the heart that precedes sudden cardiac arrest. The advance will help researchers better study the rare but often fatal sequence of events. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when an arrhythmia—an irregular heartbeat—disrupts normal electrical activity in the heart and stops it from pumping. “For the first time, we have come up with a metho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrothermal vent experiments bring Enceladus to Earth
Saturn’s moon Enceladus has an ocean beneath the ice, and at the interface between the ocean and the rocky core, hydrothermal vents could be breeding grounds for prebiotic chemistry. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Laboratory experiments on Earth can now simulate the conditions under which life might emerge on Saturn's moon Enceladus, as well as other icy alien worlds, according to new r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mental health disorder therapeutic modalities modified for the GMS
Mental health disorders can affect physical and psychological behaviors. The people of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) have a high risk of mental health disorders, such as depression, stress, and substance abuse because the people in this region are sometimes trafficked for forced sex work and various forms of forced labor. In these situations, the victims often endure violence and abuse from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly efficient photocatalyst capable of carbon dioxide recycling
IMAGE: This is Professor Su-Il In from the Department of Energy Science and Engineering view more Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has succeeded in developing a titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based high efficiency photocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide to methane using a simple reduction method. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African protected area saving endangered megafauna
One of Africa's last remaining wilderness areas is in good shape and could potentially support 50,000 elephants and 1000 lions, a University of Queensland-led study has found. Niassa National Reserve is Mozambique's largest protected area and has large populations of threatened species, but it's one of the least biologically explored places on Earth. UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Science
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New on MIT Technology Review
Wine Robots Are Rolling Into Europe’s Swankiest Vineyards
The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The NFL’s Quarterback Middle Class Is Dying | Very Smart Brothas The Problem(s) With Joyner
Deadspin The NFL’s Quarterback Middle Class Is Dying | Very Smart Brothas The Problem(s) With Joyner Lucas’ ‘I’m Not Racist,’ Explained | Splinter 2018 Will Be The Bad Year | The Muse For All Its Pleasures, I, Tonya Can’t Skate Around Its Cruel Streak | Earther These Maps Show Our Dramatically Changing View of Earth’s Interior |
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Ingeniøren
Som at pendle i en veteranbil: Minister afviser kritik af nye togsignaler
Transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) afviser enhver kritik af, at den 23 milliarder kroner dyre udskiftning af samtlige danske togsignaler er besluttet på et forkert grundlag. En række eksperter argumenterer ellers for, at de danske signaler ikke generelt er nedslidte eller giver anledning til flere fejl end signaler i udlandet. De mange fejl på signalerne har været hovedårsagen til, at Banedan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An orbital dance may help preserve oceans on icy worlds
Composite, enhanced-color image of Pluto (lower right) and its largest moon Charon (upper left) taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft on July 14, 2015. Pluto and Charon are shown with approximately correct relative sizes, but their true separation is not to scale. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI Heat generated by the gravitational pull of moons formed from massive collisions could extend the lifetimes
17h
Inside Science
3-D Printing To Combat Hearing Loss
3-D Printing To Combat Hearing Loss A new technique prints tiny middle ear bones for a perfect fit. Prosthetic-Ear-Implant.jpg A 3-D printed prosthesis implant. Image credits: Radiological Society of North America Rights information: May use with credit. Human Friday, December 1, 2017 - 09:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Deep inside each ear, three bones the size of rice grai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theoretical analysis uncovers new mechanisms in plasma turbulence
Magnetic reconnection is a complicated phenomenon that Nuno Loureiro, an associate professor of nuclear science and engineering and of physics at MIT, has been studying in detail for more than a decade. To explain the process, he gives a well-studied example: “If you watch a video of a solar flare” as it arches outward and then collapses back onto the sun’s surface, “that’s magnetic reconnection
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Futurity.org
To stop racist comments, call them out
Confronting people who make racist statements may make them to reflect on their behavior and try to avoid repeating such statements, new research suggests. “Confronting people is hard, and unless people know it will be effective, they won’t do it.” “We found that participants who were confronted felt bad about their behavior, ruminated more, showed an enduring prejudice reduction,” says Diana San
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The Scientist RSS
Ten-Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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The Scientist RSS
Neslihan Taş Studies Permafrost Microbes as Theyre Roused by a Warming Climate
The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher's work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change-and the global effects of those changes.
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The Scientist RSS
Optical Cell Sorting
Researchers are using light and new image processing tools for label-free cell characterization.
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The Scientist RSS
Kung Fu Shrimp
Watch a mantis shrimp punch its prey into submission using its specialized hammers.
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The Scientist RSS
Whipping Boys
See whip spiders use their curious antenniform legs to spar in the lab.
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The Scientist RSS
In Situ Hybridization Explained
Profilee Joe Gall, of the Carnegie Institute, describes the process, which he developed in the 1960s.
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The Scientist RSS
Beckman Coulter: Interview with Borries Demeler, University of Texas
How the Optima AUC changed Dr. Demeler's lab... for the better.
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The Scientist RSS
BioLegend: Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Protocol
See BioLegend's ChIP protocol in fast forward!
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Gizmodo
This Surreal Shot of Jupiter’s Clouds Is Exactly What We Need Right Now
Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran Just look at this incredibly detailed photo of Jupiter’s clouds as captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. It’s an otherworldly distraction to keep our minds off all the crap that’s happening here on Earth, at least for a little while. Juno snapped this photo on October 27th when it was just 11,747 miles (18,906 km) from the tops of Jupit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monopole current offers way to control magnets
In work published in Physical Review Letter s, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered interesting new magnetic properties of a type of materials known as "quantum spin ice." These materials demonstrate interesting properties as they behave as "frustrated magnets"--systems that can settle into various magnetic states because of their special geometry. One important property of these materi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens get more sleep when school starts later
A later school start time could mean teens are more likely to get adequate amounts of sleep, according to Penn State researchers. In a national study of urban teenagers, researchers found that high school start times after 8:30 a.m. increased the likelihood that teens obtained the minimum recommended amount of sleep, benefiting their overall health and well being. "Teens starting school at 8:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Barrow researchers validate five new genes responsible for ALS
Barrow Neurological Institute researchers have completed additional experiments that validate the identification of five new genes linked to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) - also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The new study results, validated through five different methods, were published in a full length manuscript in Acta Neuropathologica , validating earlier findings in the project. ALS i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Missing DNA fragments hold clue to predicting childhood leukaemia relapse
Australian researchers have developed a new risk scoring system for children with leukaemia based on missing DNA fragments or 'microdeletions'. The risk score will allow doctors to better predict the chance of relapse of a subgroup of kids currently hidden in a lower risk group. The finding was published today in the British Journal of Haematology . The international study, led by Australian
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Windows of opportunity: Solar cell with improved transparency
IMAGE: Concept of the visual transparency improvement of the semi-transparent solar cells by considering the human luminosity curve. view more Credit: ©2017 TETSU TATSUMA, INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE, THE UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO Tokyo - Roof-mounted solar panels are an increasingly common sight in many places. As a source of cheap, clean electricity, their advantages are obvious. However, mos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight loss and risk of death: Rheumatoid arthritis findings may have wider implications
Researchers call it the obesity paradox: the phenomenon, observed in studies of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other chronic conditions, where patients who are obese have a lower risk of death than those who weigh less. But most of these studies focused on patients who have RA for many years, and involved relatively little follow-up prior to death. Researchers from Brigham and Women'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comparing the amount of energy needed by two species of Galapagos tortoises to flip back over once overturned
Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Portugal and France has conducted a study of the amount of energy required by the two main types of tortoises that reside on the Galapagos Islands—the domed and the saddleback—to flip themselves right side up when they overturn. In their paper published in Scientific Reports , the group describes analyzing shel
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Ingeniøren
Kom med ud at sejle på Finlands første elfærge
Ingeniøren udgives af Mediehuset Ingeniøren A/S . Powered by Drupal. Ingeniøren leverer nyheder om teknologi og naturvidenskab for fagfolk og interesserede; artikler, blogs, debat, infografik, video. Kalvebod Brygge 33 , 1550 København V - Danmark Tlf. 33 26 53 00
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Ingeniøren
Elektriske færger indtager Finland
Det kan virke besnærende at udskifte de gamle og udtjente diesel­motorer i landets færger med batteripakker og elektriske motorer. Præcis som med elbiler bliver anskaffelsesprisen måske højere, fordi batterier er dyre, og der skal bygges ladestationer i havnen. På den anden side er elmotorer langt billigere at servicere, og der er penge at spare på indkøb af brændstof. Den tyske teknologigigant S
18h
Dagens Medicin
#detkuhaværetmig-læger til møde med minister om Svendborg-sagen
Tre læger bag #detkuhaværetmig-kampagnen mødtes med sundhedsministeren for at tale om Svendborg-sagen. Lægernes mål var at fortælle om den kliniske hverdag.
18h
Viden
Flere får tandsygdomme på grund af medicin
Al medicin kan have bivirkninger. Men det er nok ikke alle, der tænker over, at astmamedicinen eller antidepressiverne kan give tandproblemer. En undersøgelse gennemført af Tandlægeforeningen tidligere på året viser, at to ud af tre danske tandlæger rapporterer om et stigende antal af patienter med tandsygdomme på grund af medicin de sidste ti år. Gode råd mod mundtørhed Oprethold en god mundhygi
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiment shows that arrow of time is a relative concept, not an absolute one
J Schematic of the experimental setup. (A) Heat flows from the hot to the cold spin (at thermal contact) when both are initially uncorrelated. This corresponds to the standard thermodynamic arrow of time. For initially quantum correlated spins, heat is spontaneously transferred from the cold to the hot spin. The arrow of time is here reversed. (B) View of the magnetometer used in our NMR experime
18h
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'The Shape of Water': How Guillermo del Toro Designed His Latest Monster
Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro is a virtuoso maker of monsters—from the Pale Man of Pan’s Labyrinth to Pacific Rim ’s Kaiju, they’re wondrous yet terrifying. But the star of his new film, The Shape of Water , is no mere beast, del Toro says: “He’s a leading man.” The Cold War fairy tale depicts a doomed romance between a captive fish-man and a mute janitor (Sally Hawkins). Del Toro collaborated wit
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Super Likeable: Tinder's New Feature Can Show Who You'll Swipe Right On
The rules of Tinder are pretty simple: You swipe right, or you swipe left. You like someone's profile (right), or you don't (left). Occasionally, you might send a Super Like—the digital version of showing up at someone's doorstep, bouquet of flowers in hand, blasting "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None the Richer out of a boombox—but otherwise, there's not much nuance. The Tinderverse exists in black and
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests a way to stop HIV in its tracks
MAYWOOD, IL. - When HIV-1 infects an immune cell, the virus travels to the nucleus so quickly there's not enough time to set off the cell's alarm system. Now, a Loyola University Chicago study has discovered the protein that helps the virus travel so fast. Researchers found that without this protein, the virus became stranded in the cytoplasm, where it was detected by the viral defense system. (T
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Poop pill' capsule research paves the way for simpler C. difficile treatment
IMAGE: Filling the gelatin capsule with fecal bacteria to create a fecal transplant oral capsule. view more Credit: Cumming School of Medicine An Alberta-led clinical trial has shown Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) is effective in treating clostridium difficile ( C. difficile ) infections whether delivered by colonoscopy or by swallowing capsules. The finding, published today in the J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
URI engineering project brings joy to amputees in Colombia
Corvah Akoiwala, left, demonstrating a new prosthetic arm to Joysi, a Colombian boy who lost his forearm in an accident. Colombian student Carlos Roa is on right. Credit: Silke Scholz The boy looked at his new arm and grinned. How does that big thing work? What's with the wires? Circuit boards? Corvah Akoiwala leaned across the table and pressed a button. The fingers balled into a fist, then burs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher tests new methods to anchor wind turbines
Xeufei "Sophie" Wang, a research associate in the Department of Civil Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, used this centrifuge to help test the effectiveness of a new 'hybrid monopile' technology for anchoring wind turbines in Lake Erie. Credit: Case Western Reserve University There are lots of moving parts to bringing the world's first freshwater wind turbines to Lake Erie by 2018, b
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New Scientist - News
Hummingbirds have massive hearts to power their hovering flight
plainpicture/Minden Pictures/Glenn Bartley/BIA By Aylin Woodward How well a bird flies depends on how big its heart is. The best flyers, like hummingbirds that dexterously hover in front of flowers, have the largest hearts. But unexpectedly, soaring and gliding turns out to be almost as much work as flapping wings. Previous research had suggested this, because sustained flight requires more a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inspecting rotor blades with thermography and acoustic monitoring
Industrial climbers abseiling down a rotor blade. Credit: Seilpartner GmbH Wind turbines have a design life of 20 years. The rotor blades must be regularly inspected at least once every four years to verify their structural integrity. This type of work is performed by industrial climbers. But the problem with inspecting offshore installations is that access is only possible when wind and weather
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global study reveals major set net risk to rare, treasured NZ penguin
Yellow-eyed penguin that died as bycatch in a net set for school shark and rig attached. Credit: University of Otago A new review whose authors include University of Otago scientists highlights the serious risk fishing nets pose to the survival of New Zealand's iconic hoiho/yellow-eyed penguin, and calls for urgent Government action to improve the species' chances of survival. In findings publish
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
QU research team innovates ways to synthesize new nanocatalysts
A research team from the Gas Processing Center (GPC) at Qatar University College of Engineering (QU-CENG) synthesized new nanocatalysts and improved existing ones via modern preparation techniques. The team used bulk and surface sensitive analytical tools to fully characterize the nanocatalysts. Catalysts are materials employed to reduce the energy required for chemical reactions and accelerate t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant West Antarctic iceberg disintegrates
Animation showing satellite images of the disintegration of the ice berg that calved off Pine Island Glacier in September 2017. Credit: British Antarctic Survey An animation of the giant iceberg that calved off the Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica just over two months ago shows an unexpected break up. Satellite images revealed a 100-square-mile iceberg calving from Antarctica's Pine Island
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightweight, compact VR glasses made possible by large-area microdisplays
Thanks to a cleverly designed system concept and modern design methodology, the new OLED microdisplay achieves a resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels. Credit: Claudia Jacquemin VR glasses are increasingly popular, but they have usually been heavy and oversized – until now. Large-area microdisplays are expected to change that, because they make it possible to produce ergonomic and lightweight VR glass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study explores how gender defines the gym
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Getting to the gym is hard enough, but when it comes to working out, the stereotypes about men and women you pack along with your water bottle can be far more difficult to overcome than any treadmill or barbell. "Geographers often look at neighbourhood environments when we look at physical activity. We often think about built environments in terms of how streets are desi
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Dagens Medicin
Radikale: Venstres tilbud var bare bedre
Stephanie Lose har gode politiske ledelsesevner, og så gav hun Radikale det bedste tilbud ved at tilbyde formandsposten for sundhedsudvalget. Derfor pegede Radikale på hende, siger Karin Friis Bach (RV).
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Deep Sea Fangs
Scientists are taking a close look at fish skeletons for inspiration to solve engineering problems.
19h
Dana Foundation
Sticker Design Votes are In!
We received an overwhelming amount of creative designs from all over the world for our Sticker Design Contest. Thanks to everyone who participated! After careful consideration, we narrowed down the entries to five finalists and asked everyone online to select their favorite. That voting has now closed, and we are tallying scores and consulting our judges. First, second, and third place winners wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer drug leads to 'drastic decrease' in HIV infection in lung cancer patient
The first evidence that a cancer drug may be able to eradicate HIV-infected cells in humans has now been revealed by researchers. They report that while treating an HIV-infected lung cancer patient with the cancer drug nivolumab, they observed a 'drastic and persistent decrease' in the reservoirs of cells in the body where the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is able to hide away from attack by
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designer molecule points to treatment for diseases caused by DNA repeats
Using a molecule designed to overcome a roadblock formed by a common type of genetic flaw, researchers have made progress towards novel molecular treatments for Friedreich's ataxia -- a rare but fatal disorder -- in the laboratory dish and in animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring optimally with spheres
With the miniaturized radio transmission inside the sphere, the measured data is transmitted live to a base station. Credit: Fraunhofer ENAS Bio-reactors are the cooking pots of biochemists and bio-technologists, in which pharmaceutical agents, enzymes or nematodes are produced for the purpose of biological pest control. A nutrient solution (such as heat, oxygen, acid or alkali) is used to regula
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematical model mimics melanoma
Mathematical model mimics melanoma. Left: melanoma cells grown in culture with normal cells form clusters that resemble proto-tumors. Right: Simulations using a modified version of the Widom-Rowlinson model replicate patterns of melanoma cell growth seen in laboratory experiments by controlling the exclusion area -- the amount of space required -- around two types of simulated cells as they grow
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Futurity.org
Test aims to detect tumors with tiny, light-up tubes
Researchers have refined and, for the first time, run in vivo tests of a method that may allow nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. The new results suggest that antibody-nanotube probes could potentially detect tumors with as few as 100 ovarian cancer cells… Their ability to pinpoint tumors with submillimeter accuracy could eventually improve early detection and treatment
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers look to the fruit fly to understand the human brain
The Drosophila brain with various olfactory neurons labeled by different-colored fluorescent markers. Credit: Quake Lab The human nervous system is like a complex circuit board. When wires cross or circuits malfunction, conditions such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder can arise. For a long time, scientists have been working to zoom in and identify how brain circuits form so they can learn to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence index tracks emerging field
A Stanford-led AI index reveals a dramatic increase in AI startups and investment as well as significant improvements in the technology’s ability to mimic human performance. Credit: Tricia Seibold Since the term "artificial intelligence" (AI) was first used in print in 1956, the one-time science fiction fantasy has progressed to the very real prospect of driverless cars, smartphones that recogniz
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Popular Science
We spend most of the year eating really, really old apples. Why do they taste so good?
By all rights, we shouldn’t be eating apples in the dead of winter. Every bite you take from that juicy Honeycrisp is an affront to Mother Nature. We are defying her will and her seasons. It’s fantastic. You probably don’t often consider how miraculous it is that you’re able to enjoy almost any kind of apple at any time of year, but it’s a gosh-darn scientific marvel. During the off seasons, you’
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins scientists propose efficiency 'rules' for enhancing use of new gene editing technology
IMAGE: Human embryonic kidney cells glow green after repair of a CRISPR-induced DNA break with a PCR fragment encoding a fluorescent protein and homology arms with 33 nucleotides. view more Credit: Alexandre Paix Johns Hopkins scientists have developed a streamlined method and accompanying efficiency "rules" for introducing new DNA sequences into cells after using the gene-cutting tool known
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Futurity.org
Young people with disabilities face ‘penalty’ with police
New research finds that people with disabilities—including emotional, physical, cognitive, or sensory disabilities—were nearly 44 percent more likely to be arrested by age 28, while those without disabilities had a lower probability of arrest, at 30 percent. “For people with disabilities, particularly men of color, the experience of arrest is extraordinarily common.” This “disability penalty” was
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space technology to drive autonomous ships
ESA will improve satellite-based ship identification and tracking in partnership with the European Maritime Safety Agency and exactEarth to meet the requirements of users, particularly those of government agencies such as coastal administrations. Credit: European Space Agency ESA Director General Jan Wörner signed a Memorandum of Intent with Rolls-Royce today, as the two entities agree to investi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The mysterious star MWC349
An infrared 3-color image of the region of star formation which includes the mysterious maser star MWC349 (the very bright star at the right). New spectroscopic results find that the star is probably not physically associated with a nearby star whose age (assuming it was a binary companion) had been used to constrain the age of MWC349 itself. As a result, MWC349 might be a very young massive star
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Google, Amazon Find Not Everyone Is Ready for Artificial Intelligence
Executives at ascendant tech titans like Amazon and Google tend to look down on their predecessor IBM. The fading giant of Armonk, New York, once sustained itself inventing and selling cutting-edge technology, but now leans heavily on consulting. Renting out people to help other companies with tech projects is a messier and less scalable business than selling computing power on a distant cloud se
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists build hydrogen sensor readable with the naked eye
According to many scientists, the proposed hydrogen economy, positioning hydrogen as the most important carrier of sustainably generated energy, is an inevitable development. Unfortunately, the use of hydrogen entails certain risks, because it is flammable and difficult to detect. Reliable sensors to indicate the presence of hydrogen are therefore a vital element in the future hydrogen economy. S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New interactive technology makes rare cell types visible
Researchers from the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) and the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) have presented an interactive technique in the scientific journal Nature Communications for the identification of rare cell types in large samples. Professor Frits Koning of LUMC says, "You can find a needle in a haystack." In order to learn about how certain diseases occur, researchers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Origami' lattices with nano-scale surface ornaments
Credit: Delft University of Technology Inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers at TU Delft are developing an alternative to 3-D printing that gives the final products many more functionalities than what is possible with 3-D printing. Such functionalities could, for instance, be used in medical implants or devices incorporating flexible electronics. In their publication
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Futurity.org
Gravitational wave tests to probe for primordial black holes
Scientists could use gravitational wave experiments to test the existence of primordial black holes, researchers report. These black holes are gravity wells formed just moments after the Big Bang that some scientists have posited could be an explanation for dark matter. “We know very well that black holes can be formed by the collapse of large stars, or as we have seen recently, the merger of two
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Gizmodo
Call of Duty: WWII Is Just $38 Today, If You Hurry [Update: $33 With Prime]
Call of Duty: WWII | $38 | Amazon Call of Duty: WWII is a terrific shooter that harkens back to the series’ roots, and even though it’s not even a month old, you can get it from Amazon today for just $38 on PS4 and Xbox One , which is a better deal than we saw at any point on Black Friday or Cyber Monday. It might be worth that price just for the zombies mode. Just remember that this is a Gold Bo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cuprate materials have fluctuating stripes that may be linked to high-temperature superconductivity
An animation based on computer simulations shows stripes of electron charge (white atoms) and spin (red and blue atoms) in a copper-based superconducting material. The stripes are zones where electrons either pile up, creating bands of negative charge, or align their spins (arrows) in a particular pattern to create bands of magnetism. A computational study by researchers at SLAC and Stanford show
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unraveling the surprising ecology of dust
A dust storm approaches Phoenix. Credit: ALAN STARK/FLICKR High in the snowfields atop the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, things are not as pristine as they used to be. Dust from the desert Southwest is sailing into the Rockies in increasing quantities and settling onto the snow that covers the peaks, often streaking the white surface with shades of red and brown. The amount of dust that settles on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intra-row weeding possible with vision systems
Researchers of Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse horticulture, developed weeding machines which are able to do intra-row weeding. Our experts in robotics were responsible for the detection of weed based on camera images. This development brings great advantage in weed control on the field, improving crop size and quality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New early signals to quantify the magnitude of strong earthquakes
Observation and origin of the elastogravity signal preceding direct seismic waves. The map shows the location of the seismometers (triangles) detecting the prompt signals just after the beginning of the Tohoku earthquake (Japan, 11 March 2011, magnitude 9.1), indicated by the black star. We focus here on one of the stations (MDJ), located in north-east China, 1280km away from the Tohoku earthquak
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secure information transmission over 500m fiber links based on quantum technologies
Experimental system of quantum secure direct communication over optical fibers. Credit: ©Science China Press Quantum secret communication realizes secure information transmission-based on quantum principles. At present, the most developed quantum secret communication schemes are-based on quantum key distribution. In these schemes, the quantum function is limited to realize secret key generation a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sensor measures calcium concentrations deep inside tissue
Calcium waves -- a new sensor converts light to sound to visualize calcium fluxes in the body. Credit: B. van Rossum, G. Westmeyer / Technical University of Munich Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able
20h
Ingeniøren
Fredagspodcast: Batterifærger, webtracking og ny havvindmølle
I denne uges udgave af Transformator handler det blandt andet om elfærger. For mens elbiler for længst blevet hverdag på vejene, ser vi efterhånden også flere og flere elektriske færger i vore farvande, især her i Norden og især på korte ture. Der er el-færger i Finland og i Norge, og herhjemme er der også snart elektriske modeller klar til den hurtige tur mellem Helsingør og Helsingborg. Man kan
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate-friendly architecture thanks to natural folding mechanisms
Movable components in buildings such as blinds, the structure of which is based on cones of coniferous wood, which open or close in the event of dryness due to the different swelling behaviour of their fabric. Credit: C. Zollfrank/ TUM A research team from Technical University Munich, University of Freiburg, and University of Stuttgart has reported on the design of mobile building components such
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists visualize structure of key DNA repair component with near-atomic resolution
Three-dimensional structure of the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 complex, a homolog of human ATR-ATRIP. The genomes of eukaryotic cells are under continuous assault by external and internal factors. All cells have elaborate mechanisms to maintain their genomes and the ATR kinase is a master regulator of genomic stability. The two Mec1-Ddc2 monomers directly contact head-to-head through the upper catalytic core
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remains of historic aircraft found
The “Raise the Arrow” team gathers for a photo behind the AUV. Credit: Fraunhofer IOSB-AST DEDAVE is an innovative autonomous underwater vehicle developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Now the deep-diving robot has had its first chance to prove itself in action as it helped hunt down historic test models of a Canadian interceptor aircraft in Lake Ontario. The mission has been a s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
70Gb/s optical intra-connects in data centers based on band-limited devices
IMAGE: Experimental setup for 70 Gb/s data transmission link. view more Credit: ©Science China Press With the ever development of optical data-center intra-connects, the realization of high-capacity and low-cost optical communication links among severs in data centers has been more and more popular in the industry. Recently, a research result, completed by the researchers from Peking University,
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister: Fælles indsats skal sikre lægedækning i hele landet
God lægedækning i hele landet kræver en samlet indsats fra regioner, kommuner og Folketing, sagde sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby på et samråd om den aktuelle lægemangel i Region Sjælland.
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Viden
Bilgigant: Vi har flåde af robot-taxaer klar i 2019
Førerløse biler bevæger sig med hastige skridt fra idé til virkelighed. Googles bildivision, Waymo, er allerede begyndt at køre uden fører bag rattet i Arizona med ambitionen om snart at lancere en flåde af taxaer uden chauffør. Læs også: Milepæl: Googles førerløse biler klar til at køre med passagerer Men snart får de konkurrence fra en af de gamle bil-dinosaurer, General Motors (GM). Fremtiden
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'Fire Emblem Warriors': After Twenty Years, 'Musou' Games May Finally Be Ready For Their Moment
The battlefield is turning on a narrow point, and I am a whirlwind of swords, the center of a raucous, violent symphony. Nameless soldiers crowd around me in the hundreds; allies in blue, and enemies in red. Mounted cavalry charges a closed-off outpost as I cut through a nearby mage. Then I charge, my legendary hero taking down ten, twenty, fifty enemy soldiers with every wild strike. I burst int
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Science-Based Medicine
Science-Based Satire: Alternative Medical Adverse Events on the Rise
Isn’t it ridiculous that proponents of so-called alternative medicine rarely ever own up to the risks. Nothing in medicine is risk free. Nothing! But believers in pseudomedicine from acupuncture to Z Wave technology want to have their alkaline electric zucchini cake and eat it too. Last time I wrote about a bogus energy healer who has scored a spot on the TLC schedule and some false legitimacy th
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Collision illuminates the mysterious makeup of neutron stars
On astrophysicists’ charts of star stuff, there’s a substance that still merits the label “here be dragons.” That poorly understood material is found inside neutron stars — the collapsed remnants of once-mighty stars — and is now being mapped out, as scientists better characterize the weird matter. The detection of two colliding neutron stars , announced in October ( SN: 11/11/17, p. 6 ), has acc
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Scientific American Content: Global
East of Siberia: A Spoon-Billed Curiosity
This Spoon-billed sandpiper was born somewhere in the Arctic of northeastern Russia, in the spring of 1988, a diminutive fluff camouflaged among the tundra vegetation. A few months later she flew south for her first winter, aiming instinctively for the intertidal mudflats of Southeast Asia. About two thousand miles into her journey—still in Russia—she found herself on a wide, sandy beach wash
20h
Ingeniøren
Største Nordsø-investering nogensinde: Tyrafelt ombygges for 21 mia. kroner
Maersk Oil har sammen med Dansk Undergrunds Consortium (DUC) godkendt en investering på cirka 21 milliarder kroner til den fulde genopbygning af Danmarks største gasfelt, Tyra. Det skriver Mærsk Oil i en pressemeddelelse. Investeringen er den største olie- og gas-projektinvestering, der nogensinde er foretaget i den danske Nordsø, og den skal gøre det muligt for Tyra at fortsætte driften i mindst
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists are seeking new strategies to fight multiple sclerosis
James Davis used to be an avid outdoorsman. He surfed, hiked, skateboarded and rock climbed. Today, the 48-year-old from Albuquerque barely gets out of bed. He has the most severe form of multiple sclerosis, known as primary progressive MS, a worsening disease that destroys the central nervous system. Diagnosed in May 2011, Davis relied on a wheelchair within six months. He can no longer get up t
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Live Science
Armored 'Pinecone' Fish's Insides Revealed in Spooky Scan
This pinecone fish, Cleidopus, might be my new favorite fish to scan - look at that armor! #scanalfishes Thanks to @calacademy Fish Collections for the specimen! pic.twitter.com/z7wfAkEUxI — Matt Kolmann, PhD (@KolmannMA) November 21, 2017 From the outside, the pinecone fish is a colorful yet fearsome beast. On the inside, it's downright spooky. A new scan of a fish of the genus
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Scientific American Content: Global
El Niño Might Speed Up Climate Change
Every two to seven years, abnormally warm water in the Pacific Ocean causes an atmospheric disturbance called El Niño. It often makes extreme weather worse in various places around the world: greater floods, tougher droughts, more wildfires. Now scientists have new evidence indicating El Niño conditions might also add extra carbon dioxide to the atmosphere as well as lessen the ability of trees t
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Viden
Ramt af smittefarlig sygdom - sådan bliver du reddet hjem
Du er ude at rejse. Du bliver syg. Måske dødeligt syg. Og måske syg af en meget smitsom sygdom. Heldigvis er det danske beredskab klar til at redde dig sikkert hjem - uden, at du smitter nogen på vejen. DR Viden har været med til en beredskabsøvelse. Her fik vi lov at være testperson med en luftbåren sygdom. Turen fra udlandet og hjem til Danmark. Øvelsen vist i videoen startede dog først i flyet
21h
Ingeniøren
Advents-krimi skal tiltrække it-folk til Politiet
Rigspolitiets center for cyberkriminalitet – NC3 – vil her i december køre en serie af capture the flag -øvelser i håbet om at lokke flere it-talenter til Rigspolitiet. Konkurrencen skal talenter opmærksomme på mulighederne for en karriere inden for bekæmpelse af it-kriminalitet – og i det hele taget sætte fokus på it-sikkerhed; for det er et voksende problem, lyder det i en meddelelse fra Rigspo
21h
Ingeniøren
Nye akseltællere kan fjerne hver fjerde signalfejl
På langt, langt hovedparten af de danske skinner holder en teknologi, der kun har gennemgået få ændringer i de seneste 100 år, øje med, hvor togene befinder sig. Den bliver udskiftet som en del af signalprojektet, selv om det sagtens kunne ske, uden at Danmark samtidig går over til den moderne, men endnu ufærdige ERTMS-standard. Teknologien, der går under fagudtrykket sporisolationer, sender strø
21h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Én virksomhed dominerer på dagens liste
På dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, ledere, specialister, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-virksomhed-dominerer-paa-dagens-liste-11410 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
21h
Dagens Medicin
Jesper Brink Svendsen er nyt medlem af Lægeforeningens bestyrelse
Yngre Lægers repræsentantskab har valgt Jesper Brink Svendsen som nyt medlem af Lægeforeningens bestyrelse. Han afløser Mads Skipper.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Serious health risks from Lebanon waste burning: report
Smoke billows from a burning garbage dump on the northern entrance to the Lebanese capital, Beirut, on October 26, 2015 The open burning of waste in Lebanon poses serious health risks, Human Rights Watch warned in a report released on Friday, blaming decades-old, across the board government failure. The New York-based watchdog said the crisis, which escalated in 2015 when waste management largely
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese drone maker denies giving data to government
The Chinese company that is the world's biggest maker of commercial drones is denying claims in a U.S. government document circulated online that it gives Beijing information about American law enforcement and utility companies. DJI Ltd. denied suggestions in the document , posted on technology news websites, that it shared information about U.S. utility companies and other " critical infrastruct
22h
Ingeniøren
Ultralet kunstig muskel kan løfte 1000 gange sin egen vægt
Forskere fra MIT og Harvard har udviklet en kunstig muskel, der kan løfte 1000 gange sin egen vægt. Det er samtidig muligt at fremstille denne form for bløde robotter på bare 10 minutter for mindre end én dollar. Det skriver New Scientist . Strukturen for den kunstige muskel er inspireret af origami. Den baserer sig på, at et blødt og bøjeligt materiale fyldes med luft eller væske. Når luften sug
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Unesco adds Sir Isaac Newton's papers to world register
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The papers of mathematician and physicist Isaac Newton (1643 - 1727) have been added to a global database Details of Sir Isaac Newton's spending on stockings and shoelaces are among the scientist's papers which have been added to a global database of historically important documents. The Cambridge University collection has been added to Unesco's Internat
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic link found between the immune system and lymphoma
People who inherit genetic changes which alter the function of their immune system are at increased risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma, a major new study reports. Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, identified six new genetic changes that increase the risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma - one of the most common cancers in young adults. Many of the DNA changes seemed to affect
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-printed prosthetic implants could improve treatment for hearing loss
IMAGE: This is a size comparison between 3-D printed prosthesis implant and a penny. view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Researchers using CT scans and 3-D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society o
22h
Ingeniøren
Banedanmark: »Udviklingen går kun én vej«
Det er nødvendigt at udskifte de danske togsignaler. Det fastholder Banedanmark, efter at flere kilder i Ingeniøren siger, at Banedanmarks udlægning af de eksisterende signalers tilstand ikke er korrekt. Det gamle ATC-system kan med en øget vedligeholdelsesindsats og et minimum af udskiftning af de ældste signalanlæg holde flere år endnu, vurderer flere kilder. Det står i skarp kontrast til det g
22h
Science : NPR
How Birth Order Relates To Job Success
New social science research explores the relationship between who becomes a CEO and family birth order. First-born sons are far more likely to be represented among the ranks of CEOs.
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The Atlantic
The Never-Ending Foreclosure
GLENDORA, California—In retrospect, refinancing their home was a bad idea. But the Santillan family never thought that it would lead them to foreclosure, or that they’d spend years bouncing among hotels and living in their car. The parents, Karina and Juan, never thought it would force three of their four children to leave the schools they’d been attending and take classes online, or require them
22h
Dagens Medicin
Mads Skipper bliver ledende overlæge på Regionshospitalet Viborg
I dag 1. dec. tiltræder Mads Skipper stillingen som ledende overlæge i Børn og Unge på Regionshospitalet Viborg.
22h
Dagens Medicin
Dorte Stigaard stopper som koncerndirektør i Region Nordjylland
Regionsdirektør Svend Særkjær vil efter nytår indtil videre overtage Dorte Stigaards referencer og særlige ansvarsområder.
22h
Ingeniøren
Morgendagens sunde frikadelle får et strejf af rug og ærter
Måske har du selv prøvet at tilsætte gulerødder eller havregryn til frikadellefarsen for at strække på farsen og gøre den lidt sundere. Det kan være den rette vej til større sundhed og måske ligefrem et vægttab. Et nyt dansk fødevareprojekt viser nemlig, at plantefibre fra ærter og rug tilsat farsen til færdiglavede frikadeller øger mæthedsfornemmelsen ganske betragteligt. I snit rapporterede del
23h
Dagens Medicin
Norsk professor får international pris fra Rigshospitalet
Rigshospitalets internationale KFJ-pris 2017 går til den norske professor Tom Eirik Mollnes, som forsker i, hvordan immumforsveret kan gå til angreb på egen krop og bl.a. forårsage hjertekarsygdom.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong quake jolts sparsely populated Iran, dozens injured
A magnitude 6.1 earthquake injured dozens of people after it jolted a sparsely populated area in Iran's southeast, media reported Friday. The U.S. Geological Survey put the magnitude at 6. Iranian media said most of the 42 injuries were minor and happened when people rushed to seek shelter. The quake also damaged scores of buildings in remote mountainous villages near the epicenter, the town
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make breakthrough in fatal cat disease
A new clinical trial has resulted in a critical veterinary breakthrough - cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in remission following treatment with a novel antiviral drug. This fatal viral disease previously had no effective treatment or cure. Researchers from Kansas State University and the University of California, Davis, published their study results in the Journal of Feline Medicine
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Zero tolerance' plan eyed for plastic pollution
A plan for zero tolerance of plastic pollution of the oceans may be agreed by nations at a UN environment summit. Governments are being asked to move towards a legal treaty banning plastic waste from entering the sea. At the moment ships are prohibited from dumping plastic overboard but there's no international law against plastics flooding into the sea from the land. Experts say ocean plastics a
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Science | The Guardian
It's a sex robot, but not as you know it: exploring the frontiers of erotic technology
In an old church somewhere in South London, senior computing lecturer Dr Kate Devlin lies down on top of a sleeping bag and submits to a hug from a robot. But it doesn’t look how you’d imagine a robot to look: it has no face, no hands, and none of the porny characteristics common to sex robots we see in the mainstream media . It’s a pile of plastic inflatable tubes on top of a sleeping bag, which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrasound imaging needle to transform heart surgery
The sharp inner needle (schematic and inset photo) used to puncture the cardiac septumto gain access to the left atrium can be safely recessed within a blunt outer needle cannula. After puncturing, the dilator sheath is advanced over the needle intothe left atrium. The probe includes two optical fibers positioned within the inner needle for pulse-echo ultrasound imaging: one for transmission (Tx)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrasound imaging needle to transform heart surgery
IMAGE: Two-dimensional all-optical ultrasound imaging (B-Mode) acquired during the manual translation of the needle tip across a distance of 4 cm. As the needle tip progressed from the high right atrium to... view more Credit: Finlay et al. Heart tissue can be imaged in real-time during keyhole procedures using a new optical ultrasound needle developed by researchers at UCL and Queen M
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Ingeniøren
VR-entusiasmen har ramt en betonvæg - men er ikke død
Både 2016 og 2017 har været skuffende år for virtual reality fans. Prisen på high-end VR headsets er stadig stor, og de færreste hjem har en gaming computer stående, der kan køre de nyeste spiloplevelser i de virtuelle verdener. Alligevel mener den nordamerikanske medieanalytiker Carter Rogers ikke, at man skal erklære teknologien for hverken død eller som en gimmick. »Virtual reality gør det fak
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Ingeniøren
Microsoft-ingeniør forventer fleksibilitet: Jeg kan frit nørde til kl. 2 om natten og møde kl. 12
Med sine 33 år og en ingeniøruddannelse i bagagen er Jesper Jakobsen et nogenlunde gennemsnitligt bud på et af de eftertragtede it-talenter, som danske it-virksomheder sukker efter. Hans eksamenbevis fra DTU er to år gammelt. Han har siden da – med titel som teknisk evangelist – arbejdet for Microsoft Danmark som en ud af omkring 40 nyuddannede it-folk under it-gigantens særlige MACH-program (Mic
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Ingeniøren
Leder: Stop nu med at lukke lort ud
16. august skulle de første bade­gæster være hoppet i det nyetablerede havnebad Sandkaj ved Nordhavn i København. Men man opgav at sende folk i vandet, da det var forurenet med – ja, undskyld udtrykket – lort. Det viste sig nemlig, at spildevandsledninger fra flere af de nybyggede etageejendomme var koblet til hovedledningen for regnvand og dermed ledt direkte i havnen. Man tror ikke sine egne ør
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Science | The Guardian
Country diary: a vertical timeline is clearly visible in the cliffs
I walk past the arcades and beach cafes. The smell of vinegar on chips is sharp in my nose and makes my mouth water but I haven’t come to Walton on the Naze for seaside snacks. Higher ground is visible beyond the beach, partly shrouded in mist, and I strike out towards it. Finds from the Red Crag including Glycimeris with a whelk drill hole. Photograph: Emma Mitchell Along this part of the coast,
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Science : NPR
The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats
Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption AFP/AFP/Getty Images Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images The Empire State building, pizza and Broadway are just a few things synonymous with New York City — and then there's the rats. Like many other major metropolitan areas, New York
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds reading information aloud to yourself improves memory
You are more likely to remember something if you read it out loud, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. A recent Waterloo study found that speaking text aloud helps to get words into long-term memory. Dubbed the "production effect," the study determined that it is the dual action of speaking and hearing oneself that has the most beneficial impact on memory. "This study confirms that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BGRF and SILS scientists analyze viability of shRNA therapy for Huntington's Disease
IMAGE: Mechanism of TFEB at the PGC1-a promoter. The PGC1a promoter contains a CLEAR-box that is known to be bound by TFEB, a transcription factor induced during autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis.... view more Credit: Translational Neuroscience Friday, December 1, 2017, London, UK: Researchers from the Biogerontology Research Foundation , Department of Molecular Neuroscience at the Swamm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lung cancers in some African-Americans and European-Americans may have biological differences
Bottom Line: Differences in the genes expressed in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from some African-Americans and European-Americans suggest that there are racial differences in the biology of NSCLC, which could have clinical relevance. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Clinical Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author: Bríd M. Ryan, Ph
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oral microbiota indicates link between periodontal disease and esophageal cancer
To interview Jiyoung Ahn, contact Julia Gunther at julia.gunther@aacr.org or 215-446-6896. Bottom Line: An analysis of bacteria present in the mouth showed that some types of bacteria that lead to periodontal disease were associated with higher risk of esophageal cancer. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers ID bacteria tied to esophageal cancer
Researchers at NYU Langone Health's Perlmutter Cancer Center report that at least three kinds of bacteria in the mouths of Americans may heighten or lower their risk of developing esophageal cancer. Publishing online Dec. 1 in the journal Cancer Research , an analysis of data from two national studies involving more than 120,000 patients finds a 21 percent increased cancer risk tied to the presen
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The Scientist RSS
Passing the Torch
Looking back, looking forward
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The Scientist RSS
Speaking of Science
Tktktktktktk tktktk tk tktktk
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The Scientist RSS
Insects Neural Learning and Memory Center Discovered in Crustaceans
Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.
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The Scientist RSS
Robotic Birds Help Decode Avian Deception
Magpie-larks trick rivals with solo 'duets' to defend territory.
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The Scientist RSS
Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas
Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.
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The Scientist RSS
Meet the Arachnid That May Add a New Chapter to the Book on Sensory Biology
The whip spider senses the world in weird and wonderful ways.
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Make Knockout Stem Cell Lines in One Step
Combining gene editing and stem-cell induction improves efficiency of functional genetic analyses.
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Identify Obesity-Diabetes Link
Exosomes produced by macrophages in fatty tissue influence insulin sensitivity in distant cell types, a study finds.
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The Scientist RSS
Support Cells Gain Stem Cell-Like Properties after Nerve Injury
When peripheral nerves are severed, Schwann cells at the injury site begin to proliferate and exhibit stem cell-like gene expression patterns.
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The Scientist RSS
Immune System Targets Diverse Viruses Using the Same Small Peptide
A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.
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The Scientist RSS
Captivated by Chromosomes
Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.
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The Scientist RSS
Neslihan Taş Digging Microbes
Research Scientist, Climate and Ecosystems Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Age: 37
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The Scientist RSS
The Power of Light
Techniques for label-free cell sorting
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The Scientist RSS
Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience
Jane Austen can teach us a lot about how our brains handle uncertainty.
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The Scientist RSS
Meet the Press, 1967
Fifty years ago, Arthur Kornberg announced to reporters that his team had synthesized functional DNA.
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The Scientist RSS
2017 Top 10 Innovations
From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year's best new products shine on many levels.
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The Scientist RSS
Search for Life on the Red Planet
Growing evidence points to a once-habitable world-and recent findings suggest that life could exist on Mars today.
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The Scientist RSS
New Techniques Detail Embryos First Hours and Days
New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: Combo Method of Stem Cell Generation
Simultaneous exposure to reprogramming and gene-editing plasmids efficiently produces edited pluripotent colonies.
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The Scientist RSS
How Embryos Take Control of Their Own Development
The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.
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The Scientist RSS
The Hazards of Life on Mars
High levels of radiation, among other health risks, challenge the future colonation of the Red Planet.
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The Scientist RSS
Exosomes and Insulin Resistance
Circulating microRNAs may help explain how excess fat can lead to insulin resistance in distant cells.
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The Scientist RSS
Australian Magpie-Lark Duet
The birds sing together to help defend their territory.
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The Scientist RSS
Philanthropic Funding Makes Waves in Basic Science
Private funders are starting to support big projects, and they're rewriting the playbook on fueling scientific research.
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Ingeniøren
Til foråret skal alle jobansøgere kunne forsvinde med et klik
Et udskrevet CV vil fra maj 2018 være til fare for danske firmaers bundlinje. Det samme vil et USB-stik med data om en jobsøger. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Forklaringen er, at persondataforordningen, som træder i kraft til maj 2018, stiller nye krav til håndteringen af personlige oplysninger. HR-medarbejdere, headhuntere og andre rekrutteringsansvarlige kommer derfor til at opleve st
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Ingeniøren
Nye signaler til 23 milliarder bygger på skrupforkert skrøne
Når Danmark som det første land i verden investerer 23 milliarder kroner i et spritnyt signalsystem til jernbanen, bygger det på en skrøne med meget begrænset hold i virkeligheden. Igen og igen har både Banedanmark, skiftende transportministre og politiske flertal gentaget, at de nuværende signaler ikke kan klare opgaven længere, og at vi derfor er nødt til at have et nyt landsdækkende signalsyst
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Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 1. december
Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: Hvilken branche havde den tyske elektroingeniør Arthur Scherbius oprindelig i tankerne, da han i 1918 tog patent på sin krypteringsmaskine, der blev kendt som Enigma. Klik her for at besvare Dagens låge præsenteres af RTX RTX er et
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Live Science
The North Pole: Location, Weather, Exploration … and Santa
The "North Pole" has multiple meanings; it can indicate the geographically northernmost point on Earth or to the spot where compasses point. And, most enchantingly, it can refer to Santa's headquarters. The North Pole has inspired human imagination, scientific exploration and political conflict for decades. Where is the North Pole? The Geographic North Pole is the northernmost point on
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blowing in the stellar wind: Scientists reduce the chances of life on exoplanets in so-called habitable zones
A new article describes the detrimental impact of stellar wind on the atmosphere of exoplanets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anti-aging protein could be targeted to rejuvenate immune cells
An anti-aging protein called SIRT1, commonly known for being activated by red wine, has been shown to protect against age-related diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. A study now reveals that it could also be targeted to rejuvenate cells in the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeted treatment could prevent spread of pancreatic cancer, heart damage
A new targeted treatment could benefit patients with certain pancreatic tumors by preventing spread of the cancer and protecting their heart from damage -- a direct result of the tumor. Higher levels of serotonin among other tumor secretions can cause injury to the valves of the heart over time, leading to cardiac impairment -- a condition referred to as cardiac carcinoid disease -- in these patie
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Excessive screen time linked to suicide risk
Excessive time on electronic devices is linked to a higher risk of depression and suicide among teenagers, especially girls, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain activity mapped to improve prosthetic design
High-tech prosthetics allow amputees to engage more fully in everyday life, even to compete in sporting events. Researchers have demonstrated how brain activity is used to identify different terrains -- level ground and stairs, for example -- a key step in developing prosthetics that allow the user's prosthesis to automatically adjust to changing ground conditions in real time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What gives poetry its aesthetic appeal? New research has well-versed answer
New psychology research points to the factors that explain why we find particular poems aesthetically pleasing -- results that enhance our understanding of 'why we like what we like.'
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Scientific American Content: Global
Tech Honcho Wants Innovation for the Bottom Billion
“I think it’s really important for us to use this magical power of invention and innovation to change the lives of people who really needed their lives changed.” Nathan Myhrvold , co-founder of the technology development company Intellectual Ventures. He was formerly Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft. He spoke at the World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco October 28th.
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Science | The Guardian
Pterosaurs: record haul of egg fossils from ancient flying reptile found in China
A discovery in northwestern China of hundreds of fossilized pterosaur eggs is providing fresh understanding of the flying reptiles that lived alongside the dinosaurs, including evidence that their babies were born flightless and needed parental care. Scientists said on Thursday they unearthed 215 eggs of the fish-eating Hamipterus tianshanensis – a species whose adults had a crest atop an elongat
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Ingeniøren
Nyt metamateriale bryder med mekanikkens love
Det specialdesignede metamateriale kan finde anvendelse til proteser og danne basis for at styre kræfter og mekaniske bølger rundt om udsatte steder.
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Popular Science
Apple Watch accessories that are worth your time Since buying an Apple Watch a few months ago, I've been searching and trying out all sorts of accessories to protect, charge, and show off my shiny new toy. Below, the Apple Watch add-ons that were worthwhile. This Nomad silicone sports strap is waterproof, made of a antimicrobial material, and is compatible with all 42mm Apple Watches. $42 . If you're looking for a cheaper silicone replacement b
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