Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Voyager 1 fires up thrusters after 37 years An artist concept depicting one of NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft. Humanity's farthest and longest-lived spacecraft are celebrating 40 years in August and September 2017. Credit: Jet Propulsion Laboratory If you tried to start a car that's been sitting in a garage for decades, you might not expect the engine to respond. But a set of thrusters aboard the Voyager 1 spacecraft successfully fired up
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Voyager 1 fires up thrusters after 37 yearsA set of thrusters aboard the Voyager 1 spacecraft successfully fired up Wednesday after 37 years without use. Since 2014, engineers have noticed that the thrusters Voyager 1 has been using to orient the spacecraft, called "attitude control thrusters," have been degrading.
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Viden
Migræne: Ny behandling med antistoffer forebygger anfald For de 640.000 personer i Danmark med migræne er der nu håb forude om en mere effektiv behandling. Migræne Migræne er en kraftig hovedpine med kvalme, lys- og lydfølsomhed. Kilde: Rigmor Jensen, professor Forskere fra King's College London har lavet et forsøg med en ny behandling, der halverede antallet af anfald hos personer med migræne. - Det er stort, fordi det er et fremskridt i forhold til f
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How To Pick A Moonshining Still Site #Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p With a 25 gallon order of Moonshine on the way, Mike and Mark must divide and conquer. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://tw
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Big Think
Understanding the (Really Ridiculous) Core Tenets of the Flat Earth Hypothesis In 1492, Columbus set sail for the New World based on the assumption that Earth was round. Why not? After all, according to historian Jeffrey Burton Russell, “no educated person in the history of Western Civilization from the third century B.C. onward believed that the Earth was flat.” But nearly 500 years later, an American man was planning a voyage based on the exact opposite assumption. Mi
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Big Think
Need Another Use for a Liberal Arts Education? How about Learning to Be a Citizen? We’ve discussed before that Socrates, one of the greatest things to come out of Athens, hated Athenian democracy . While he had many reasons to do so, one of the primary ones was that the typical Athenian had no idea what they were discussing, and were prone to using emotion over reason when making important political decisions . They lacked both the skills for critical thinking and viewing the w
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Big Think
These Soft Robots Have Super Strength, Cost Less Than a Dollar, and Are Built in Minutes Robots have mainly been used to do dangerous, dirty, or repetitive tasks. As such, they have often been hard, metal based, hulking monstrosities. The thing is, we have other sorts of needs for robots too, ones that require a gentler approach. Robots with soft, formable structures have been used to put eggs in a crate and other manual labor tasks. But roboticists hope to move beyond this. As is
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Big Think
To Certain White American Males, a Gun is an Important Symbol The gun debate, like many in the US, seems split straight down the liberal-conservative divide. In reality, there’s a lot of gray area in terms of opinions out there, far more perhaps than the media lets on. And yet, even after a rash of horrific mass shootings, the country seems deadlocked on the issue of gun control, once again. So if there are in fact a number of opinions in both camps, why
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Big Think
Are Blue States Better at Exemplifying Red State Values? The Data Might Surprise You. Anybody watching the news today will hear that Americans are engaged in a great culture war , with fronts ranging from football to what news we watch to questions of whose rights are at risk . As we all know must be true, the blue states are full of liberals who smoke dope, sleep around , and watch Modern Family while the red states are full of bible thumpers who drink Tennessee whiskey, are loya
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Big Think
Were These Well-Known Gender Studies Just Made Up? Nicolas Guéguen is a psychologist who publishes lots of gender studies that seem uniquely appropriate to the internet era. They traffic in catchy, off-kilter social psychology subject matter that practically begs for a click, such as Time’s “ Science Proves It: Men Really Do Find High Heels Sexier .” (Did you just click that headline? Lord knows a lot of people did.) VIDEO ( TECH INSIDER )
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Activists occupy Paris Apple store over EU tax dispute About a hundred activists occupied a two-level Apple store in the centre of Paris, demanding that the US tech giant pay an EU tax bill of $14.5 billion About a hundred activists occupied an Apple store in the French capital Saturday, demanding that the US technology giant pay billions of euros the EU says it owes in back taxes. The members from Attac, a group that seeks alternatives to unbridled
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK warns government agencies not to use Kaspersky software This Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, file photo shows a sign above the headquarters of Kaspersky Lab in Moscow. Britain's cybersecurity agency has told government departments not to use antivirus software from Moscow-based firm Kaspersky Lab, it was reported Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File) Britain's cybersecurity agency has told government departments not to use antivirus software
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Scientific American Content: Global
Some Deep-Sea Ornaments to Brighten a Dark Day [Video] As we in the Northern Hemisphere grapple with our annual shock about just how little sunlight we must cope with this time of the year, the importance of twinkling lights and sparkly baubles to our mental health and well-being increases exponentially. At such a time, a marine ornament from a place where the sun never shines is a welcome distraction. Behold this ctenophore captured by the camer
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NYT > Science
Woman With Transplanted Uterus Gives Birth, the First in the U.S. Dr. Liza Johannesson, a uterus transplant surgeon who left the Swedish team to join Baylor’s group, said the birth in Dallas was particularly important because it showed that success was not limited to the hospital in Gothenburg. Photo The baby’s mother had been born without a uterus. The baby was delivered by a scheduled cesarean section. Credit Baylor University Medical Center, via Associated P
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Big Think
The Periodic Table of All of the Exoplanets Found So Far Exoplanets are hot right now. In the popularity sense. Thermally, they’re also cold and medium. But every since the first one was discovered nearly 26 years ago — or 9,457 days as of this writing — we’ve been fascinated by them. Some people are intrigued by the potential any of them may hold for migration from earth should it become inhabitable. Some wonder if other life on our level could be the
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Big Think
Study: IBM’s Watson Found Cancer Treatments That Doctors Overlooked IBM’s Watson is helping doctors identify treatment options for cancer patients — and it’s even suggesting solutions that humans failed to see. Researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center had the supercomputer Watson for Genomics analyze “large volumes of data,” including past studies, databases, and genetic information, in an attempt to identif
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Big Think
A New Hypothesis Suggests That Parallel Universes Might Interact after All Quantum mechanics is hard to do. The great physicist Richard Feynman once remarked “ It is safe to say that nobody understands quantum mechanics ” and that statement was regarded as correct. The problem isn’t in the math, even an undergraduate can use Schrödinger’s equation , it is in what the math means . We are all familiar with several interpretations of what the math could mean, from cats t
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Big Think
Does Smoking Weed Make People Creative, or Do Creative People Smoke Weed? Does marijuana boost creativity, or are creative people drawn to marijuana more than others? A new study published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition suggests the latter: The results showed that pot smokers (sober at the time) outperformed nonsmokers at one of the two tests researchers used to measure creativity, and that the difference in creativity is most likely due to personality tr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Under pressure: Novel technology to model pressure-induced cellular injuries in the brainBrain injuries -- whether caused by trauma, tumors, hemorrhage or developmental anomalies -- often produce elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn causes cellular injuries in the brain and additional neurological deficits beyond those associated with the initial insult. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying secondary ICP-induced cellular injuries. Researchers have developed a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Location, location, location: Immunization delivery site mattersIn vaccination, a certain subpopulation of dendritic cells is vital to triggering the body's adaptive immune system, report researchers. Their findings have important implications for vaccine delivery, as the usual method, intramuscular injection, is likely not the most effective way to target those dendritic cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common male medical condition linked to vascular diseaseMen who suffer symptoms from varicoceles, enlarged veins in the scrotum, are more likely to develop vascular disease and metabolic disease, such as diabetes, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lung cancers in some African-Americans, European-Americans may have biological differencesDifferences in the genes expressed in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from some African-Americans and European-Americans suggest that there are racial differences in the biology of NSCLC, which could have clinical relevance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skin pigmentation is far more genetically complex than previously thoughtWhile skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is hardly a straightforward, Mendelian trait. By working closely with the KhoeSan, a group of populations indigenous to southern Africa, the researchers have found that the genetics of skin pigmentation become progressively complex as populations reside closer to the equator, with an increasing number of genes -- known and unknown -- invo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune-boosting antibody combination could improve lymphoma survivalCombining two different immunotherapy treatments could dramatically improve lymphoma survival, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
When We're Angry, Dogs Get the Feels Dog lovers may find it obvious that dogs pick up on our emotions. Attending to our emotional expression—in our faces , behavior , or even smell —would help them live intimately by our side. "Dogs get us," we say. End of story. But what about their side of the story? If dogs attend to our emotions—particularly those we wear on our faces—how might dogs feel when they see our different emotions?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly efficient photocatalyst capable of carbon dioxide recyclingA research team from Korea has developed titanium dioxide-based photocatalyst with the highest efficiency in the world that converts carbon dioxide into methane. The result is expected to be applied to technologies to reduce and reuse carbon dioxide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chick embryos provide valuable genetic data for understanding human developmentAn international collaboration of researchers from Japan, Russia, Spain, and Australia has created the first genome-wide set of avian transcription start sites. Their data have been made available through the web-based, open-access, interactive DNA visualization system. The database and their CAGE-based TSS mapping method are expected to greatly facilitate research on the early development of amni
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Harmful effects of being overweight underestimatedThe harmful effects of being overweight have been underestimated, according to a new study that analyzed body mass index (BMI), health and mortality data in around 60,000 parents and their children, to establish how obesity actually influences risk of death.
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Space Photos of the Week: Survey Your Home Galaxy—And Its Neighbors Oh, Saturn. This gorgeous photo of the ringed beauty is the goodbye photo last taken by the Cassini spacecraft. This grand view was the last full planet image the Cassini spacecraft took before speeding towards its death on September 15th. They come from outer space—and in this case, a comet named 45p came from Jupiter’s neighborhood. Jupiter family comets like 45p swing around Jupiter and the Su
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel transcriptomic signature of type 2 diabetic islets identifiedA research team has identified a novel cluster of dysregulated genes in the pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wafer to chip: X-ray imaging for reduced defect rateUsing non-destructive imaging methods, a team of scientists has obtained three-dimensional insights into the interior of crystals. They determine important data about line-shaped defects that largely influence the deformation behavior of crystals. These so-called dislocations impede the production of computer chips. The scientists combine two X-ray methods with a special type of light microscopy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metamaterial with a twistUsing 3-D printers for the microrange, researchers have succeeded in creating a metamaterial from cubic building blocks that responds to compression forces by a rotation. Usually, this can only be achieved by transmission using a crankshaft, for instance. The sophisticated design of bars and ring structures and the underlying mathematics are now presented in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioprocessing technology: Measuring optimally with spheresBio-reactors are the cooking pots of biochemists and bio-technologists, in which pharmaceutical agents, enzymes or nematodes are produced for the purpose of biological pest control. A nutrient solution (such as heat, oxygen, acid or alkali) is used to regulate the pH value and the desired product is formed. The more optimal the conditions are, the greater the yield will be. Researchers have now de
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inspecting rotor blades with thermography and acoustic monitoringWind turbines have a design life of 20 years. The rotor blades must be regularly inspected at least once every four years to verify their structural integrity. This type of work is performed by industrial climbers. But the problem with inspecting offshore installations is that access is only possible when wind and weather conditions permit. This makes it very difficult to plan inspection visits. I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monitoring security glass panes: Smart alarm system recognizes attempted break-insThere is a huge selection of glass break detectors on the market. Although these detectors reliably trigger an alarm when window panes break, they do not register all other ways in which burglars can interfere with a pane. To counter this, researchers have created a new type of alarm system that recognizes any attempt to manipulate the window. It registers temperature changes in real time as well
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remains of historic aircraft foundDEDAVE is an innovative autonomous underwater vehicle developed by researchers. Now the deep-diving robot has had its first chance to prove itself in action as it helped hunt down historic test models of a Canadian interceptor aircraft in Lake Ontario. The mission has been a success, with two of the confirmed eight aircraft models already tracked down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutron spectroscopy: New detector module MultiFLEXX increases count rate tenfoldThe triple axis spectrometer FLEXX at BER II provides a new detector module for user service. It measures many angles and multiple energy transfers simultaneously and thus increases the amount of data measured per hour by about a factor of ten. This enables neutron users to make optimal use of their beam time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To drop carbon dioxide emissions, look to local transportation and housingLocal efforts in the transportation and residential-housing sectors could help the United States meet the greenhouse gas reduction commitment it made as a Paris Climate Accord signatory, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sir Isaac Newton’s Cambridge papers added to UNESCO’s Memory of the World RegisterThe Cambridge papers of Sir Isaac Newton, including early drafts and Newton’s annotated copies of Principia Mathematica -- a work that changed the history of science -- have been added to UNESCO's International Memory of the World Register.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightweight, compact VR glasses made possible by large-area microdisplaysVirtual reality (VR) glasses are increasingly popular, but they have usually been heavy and oversized -- until now. Large-area microdisplays are expected to change that, because they make it possible to produce ergonomic and lightweight VR glasses. The new OLED displays now reach very high frame rates and achieve extremely high resolutions with "extended full HD".
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Ingeniøren
Sådan kan stormflodssikring betale sig selv Umiddelbart virker det måske ikke som en indlysende god idé at bygge et underjordisk parkeringshus ud til stranden i en oversvømmelsestruet by. Men det er præcis, hvad bystyret i den hollandske badeby Katwijk gjorde i 2013. En analyse af digerne langs den hollandske nordsøkyst havde vist, at de eksisterende diger mange steder var utilstrækkelige. Et af stederne var i Katwijk. Løsningen lå lige fo
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Scientific American Content: Global
Chocolate Trees Shower Young with Disease-Fighting Leaves Where chocolate begins: the flower of the cacao tree. Credit: H. Zell Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) In 1809, a German botanist named Heinrich Friedrich Link reported something peculiar about healthy plants: they appeared to have fungi growing in them. What were they doing there? And why had the plant not kicked them out? During the 19 th century, most scientists thought that healthy plants wer
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Popular Science
Plan out the holidays with these smartphone apps The holidays should be a time for families, reflection, peace, and joy—not stressing about how you'll manage the festive dinner or entertain a dozen rowdy kids. To maximize your merriness, and minimize anxiety and frustration, turn to your smartphone. That pocket computer, loaded with a few well-chosen apps, will make sure you have a holiday to remember. Set up a joint family calendar with Apple
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Live Science
Physicists Proved Controlled Nuclear Chain Fission Was Possible, 75 Years Ago This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . Over Christmas vacation in 1938, physicists Lise Meitner and Otto Frisch received puzzling scientific news in a private letter from nuclear chemist Otto Hahn . When bombarding uranium with neutrons, Hahn had made some surprising observations
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medical note system could boost patients' engagement in their health carePatients could benefit if they are invited to co-produce medical notes, called 'OurNotes,' with their doctors, rather than merely reading them. The practice may also benefit doctors by reducing time spent on documentation, suggests a new report.
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cognitive science
Your Brain Is So Easily Fooled A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Live Science
The Freaky Secret Hiding Inside a Scallop's 200 Glittering Eyes Three of the eyes of the Pecten maximus scallop. Credit: Dan-Eric Nilsson, Lund University Gaze into the fleshy maw of the scallop, and lo, the scallop will gaze back — its up to 200 eyes glittering and alien, giving no sign as to what they think of you in their endless hunt for particles of floating food. Scientists have known since at least the 1960s that scallops use mirrors at the backs
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Viden
Stenalderkvinders overarme får elite-roere til at blegne Du ville med stor sandsynlighed tabe, hvis du fik muligheden for at lægge arm med en kvinde, der levede for 7.000 år siden. Kvinder fra den tid havde nemlig større overarme end nutidens, kvindelige elite-roere. Det viser en ny undersøgelse, som forskere på Cambridge University i England har lavet. Undersøgelsen er den første, hvor forhistoriske knogler fra kvinder bliver sammenlignet med knogler
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Scientific American Content: Global
Gravity Signals Could Speedily Warn of Big Quakes and Save Lives Gravity signals that race through the ground at the speed of light could help seismologists get a better handle on the size of large, devastating quakes soon after they hit, a study suggests. The tiny changes in Earth's gravitational field, created when the ground shifts, arrive at seismic-monitoring stations well before seismic waves. “The good thing we can do with these signals is have quic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Judging a 'clean face' for trachomaPart of the control strategy for trachoma -- repeated eye infections caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis -- is facial cleanliness. Now, researchers have shown that properly trained graders can reliably reproduce assessments of facial cleanliness. The findings suggest that measures of facial cleanliness can be added to trachoma surveys in the developing countries where the infection is a
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Chief vet defends support of larger hen cages Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Battery cages for chickens were banned in the EU in 2012 Some cages for hens provide a "necessary defence" against bird flu, the government's chief vet has said. In a tweet, Nigel Gibbens said the larger pens, which replaced so-called battery cages in 2012, have welfare benefits and offer more space. It comes after 10 leading British vets, who believe ca
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The Atlantic
Reckoning With the Legacy of the Nuclear Reactor, 75 Years Later At the time, news of the breakthrough on December 2, 1942, was conveyed only in code: “The Italian navigator has landed in the New World.” Our “Italian navigator” was Enrico Fermi, the physicist who had escaped fascist Italy for America. The “New World” was not a place but a time: the atomic age. On that day 75 years ago, Fermi’s team set off the first controlled and sustained nuclear chain react
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Ingeniøren
Ny udstilling giver et kig under hjelmen på FerrariDer har været fuld speed på den teknologiske udvikling, siden Enzo Ferrari tilbage i 1947 præsenterede første bil bygget i hans eget navn. Udstilling i London viser, hvordan Ferraris modeller har ændret sig over 70 år.
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Big Think
The Upside of Downtime – Manoush Zomorodi – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #127 Subscribe on Google Play , Stitcher , or iTunes Come talk to us on Twitter : @bigthinkagain When was the last time you were bored? I mean really, well and truly, staring at the patterns in the wallpaper bored? Statistics suggest that you’re probably listening to this show on a smartphone. Which means you own a smartphone. Which means it’s probably always close at hand, full of app
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Scientific American Content: Global
Does Silicon Valley Want You to Text and Drive? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. As self-driving cars come closer to being common on American roads, much of the rhetoric promoting them has to do with safety. About 40,000 people die on U.S. roads every year, and driver errors are linked to more than 90 percent of crashes . But many of the biggest adv
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Much Does My Dog Understand? How Much Does My Dog Understand? Many of us have been caught talking to our dogs, but how much of what we say to them do they actually understand? Credit: mlorenzphotography Getty Images Advertisement In my house, dogs are family. They get their own birthday celebrations and, despite my efforts to train them otherwise, they even get to sleep in the bed. I also talk to them, sometimes in praise,
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San Francisco Plan to Adjust Parking Prices Based on Demand Let’s say you have to run an errand, a small-ish one. You’re stopping by your doctor’s office to pick up a prescription; you gotta return a regretted online purchase at the post office. How do you get there? A bunch of tiny factors contribute to your decision, but if you have a car one of the biggest is probably: Can I park? Thousands, maybe millions of people in your city are making small choice
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The Atlantic
Voyeur’s Queasy, Fascinating Exposure Gerald Foos, the story goes, is a man whose life was spent in the shadows, lurking in an attic above the Manor House Motel, where for more than 20 years he observed guests fight, sleep, watch TV, shower, and have sex. After purchasing the motel, Foos had—with the help of his wife—installed special air vents in the ceiling of most rooms, through which he scrutinized his customers, taking copious n
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A Hidden Supercluster Could Solve the Mystery of the Milky Way Glance at the night sky from a clear vantage point, and the thick band of the Milky Way will slash across the sky. But the stars and dust that paint our galaxy’s disk are an unwelcome sight to astronomers who study all the galaxies that lie beyond our own. It’s like a thick stripe of fog across a windshield, a blur that renders our knowledge of the greater universe incomplete. Astronomers call it
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'The Disaster Artist': A Movie About a Movie (and a Phenomenon) That Could Never Exist Today Though no one realized it at the time, the summer of 2003 was an apex moment for Z-grade cinema. That June, Tommy Wiseau released his crackpot rom-dram-com The Room in Los Angeles, giving viewers their first taste of the writer-director-star’s penchant for hammy performances and nonsensical non sequitors (“I did not hit her! Oh, hai, Mark!”). Then, in August, came the long-delayed, semi-awaited D
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Science : NPR
U.N. Body Alarmed Over Mining Waste Disasters Brazilian 76-year-old farmer Jose Pascual walks through a devastated area in Paracatu de Baixo village on October 2016, one year after a mine waste flood destroyed the town. The village was ruined in 2015 by a flood following the collapse of Brazilian mining company Samarco's waste reservoir, killing 19 people. YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty
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The Atlantic
The Lines That Divide America Think of waiting in a long, slow-moving line, like the security lines at an airport. What’s your emotional reaction when you see someone cutting ahead of you, or shifting into a faster-moving line that you are not allowed to join? What if you are pulled aside for extra questioning, for no apparent reason? Lines can bring fairness and order to what might otherwise be a free-for-all. There’s even a
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The Atlantic
The Two Clashing Meanings of 'Free Speech' Little distinguishes democracy in America more sharply from Europe than the primacy—and permissiveness—of our commitment to free speech. Yet ongoing controversies at American universities suggest that free speech is becoming a partisan issue. While conservative students defend the importance of inviting controversial speakers to campus and giving offense, many self-identified liberals are engaged
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Southern Chile iceberg splits from glacier, threatens navigation A large piece detaches from the Grey Glacier in Chile's far southern Patagonia region, as seen on November 28, 2017 in this handout released by Chile's National Forest Corporation (CONAF) The recent calving of a large iceberg from a southern Chilean glacier threatens local ship navigation and could result in flooding for costal communities, experts said. An iceberg measuring some 350 by 380 meter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic, major fishing nations agree no fishing in Arctic, for now Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft in March, 2017, above Greenland, which is among parties to the Arctic Ocean commercial fishing moratorium Arctic and major fishing nations, including China, announced Friday that they have agreed to a moratorium on commercial fishing in Arctic waters before a fishery in the icy region is even feasible. The far north is warming at n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elite US government hacker charged with taking secret information A member of the US National Security Agency's elite hacking team has been charged with illegally removing top secret materials, in an embarrassing breach for the crucial electronic espionage body. The Justice Department said Friday that Nghia Hoang Pho, 67, a 10-year veteran of the NSA's Tailored Access Operations unit, which broke into computer systems, agreed to plead guilty to a single charge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California regulators nix rules limiting carmaker liabilityCalifornia regulators have nixed a plan to let self-driving car manufacturers evade liability for crashes if the vehicle hasn't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications.
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Ingeniøren
Det matematiske græshoppeproblem er genvej til ny viden om kvantefysik Græshopper kan være en plage. Ikke kun for landmænd og Egyptens Farao , men også for matematikere og fysikere. Olga Goulko fra University of Massachusetts i USA og Adrian Kent fra University of Cambridge i England har defineret, beskrevet og løst det matematiske græshoppeproblem i en artikel i Proceedings of the Royal Society A . Problemet er mere end matematisk tidsfordriv, idet det kan være før
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