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Researchers 'dismantle' mindfulness intervention to see how each component works IMAGE: In a new study researchers broke out the ingredients to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to improve understanding of how each works. view more Credit: Willoughby Britton/Brown University PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- As health interventions based on mindfulness have grown in popularity, some of the field's leading researchers have become concerned that the evidence base for suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pigeons can discriminate both space and time New research at the University of Iowa shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time -- and seem to use a region of the brain different from humans and primates to do so. The finding adds to growing recognition in the scientific community that lower-order animal species -- such as birds, reptiles, and fish -- are capable of high-level, abstract decision-making. Credi
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Transportminister forklarer »virkelighedens« ansvar for signalproblemer Det er virkeligheden, der har ansvaret. Sådan lød forklaringen fra transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA), da den fremmødte presse gerne ville have ministerens bud på, hvem der har ansvaret for, at Danmarks største jernbaneprojekt igen bliver forsinket, denne gang helt til 2030. Det skete, da ministeren sammen med resten af forligskredsen bag projektet præsenterede den nye plan for to uger siden.
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NYT > Science
Hunt Elephants to Save Them? Some Countries See No Other Choice Yet many experts also believe that the proceeds from hunting are all that prevents many poor communities from turning against local wildlife. “While the noise in the press is all about morals and entitled white men killing innocent animals to hang obnoxiously on their wall — all of which I agree with — this actually has very little to do with pragmatic conservation,” said Brian Child, an ecologis
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Live Science
Brainy Birds: Pigeons Can Understand Distance and Time New research shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time — and seem to use a region of the brain different from humans and primates to do so. Credit: Kathryn Gamble Pigeons are such a common sight on city sidewalks around the world that most people don't spare them a second glance. But these urban birds aren't just experts at adapting to metropolitan life — they'
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google’s New AI Smile Detector Shows How Embracing Race and Gender Can Reduce Bias As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data about production rates from half a million Chinese manufacturing plants from 1998 to 2007. The research, published in the Journal… Read more As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data ab
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers generate electricity from low-cost biomaterialMobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer simulations reveal roots of drug resistance IMAGE: Bacterial efflux pumps, such as the P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM pump shown here, are one of the dominant molecular mechanisms available to Gram-negative pathogens for removing toxins, including antibiotics. Inactivation of... view more Credit: LANL LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 4, 2017--New supercomputer simulations have revealed the role of transport proteins called efflux pumps in creating dru
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parental attention can reduce risk of drug abuse in adolescence Parents who require children to follow rules and keep a constant eye on their activities, endeavoring to know where they are, who they are with and what they are doing, run less risk of facing problems when their children enter adolescence, such as abuse of alcohol and other drugs. The likelihood of such problems becomes smaller still when, in addition to using rules and keeping a close eye on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests gorillas can develop food cleaning behavior spontaneouslyResearchers have suggested that gorillas are capable of learning food cleaning behaviors without having to witness it in others first.
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The Atlantic
Has the Google of South Korea Found a Way to Save Struggling News Outlets? Walk into the headquarters of South Korea’s biggest search engine, Naver, and you could be in Silicon Valley. Like Google and Facebook, the company has an affection for bean bags and primary colors. There are oversized toys in the shape of emoji from Naver’s messaging app, Line. A green wall is lined with ferns, and there’s an immaculately designed library. Also like Google and Facebook, Naver ha
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Viden
Hvorfor kan man ikke få hjælp fra Facebook? Her er deres svar DRs teknologiprogram So ein Ding har gennem de seneste fem uger fulgt Stine Frederiksen i hendes forsøg på at få sin Facebook-konto tilbage, efter den er blevet stjålet og overtaget af hackere. Læs også: Derfor hjælper Facebook dig ikke, hvis din konto bliver stjålet På trods af at Stine Frederiksen har fulgt Facebooks anvisninger og bl.a har uploadet en kopi af sit kørekort flere gange, har hun
39min
Live Science
Man's Unusual 'Do Not Resuscitate' Tattoo Sparks Ethics Debate A man's "do not resuscitate" tattoo sparked an ethical debate about his treatment. Credit: The New England Journal of Medicine ©2017. It's not often that a sentiment expressed in a tattoo would influence people's medical care, but that's what happened to a man in Florida who had the words "do not resuscitate" tattooed across his chest. The 70-year-old man arrived at the hospital unconscious
42min
The Scientist RSS
Book Excerpt from Jane on the BrainIn chapter 3, 'The Sense of Sensibility,' author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen's most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body's stress response system.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research suggests gorillas can develop food cleaning behaviour spontaneously Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers from the University of Birmingham, University of Tubingen and University of St. Andrews have suggested that gorillas are capable of learning food cleaning behaviours without having to witness it in others first. Though the authors acknowledge that general purpose social learning between individuals can help to increase the behaviour in frequency, their study
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research bolsters possibility of plate tectonics on Europa IMAGE: Previous studies had hinted that something like subduction may have been happening on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A new study provides geophysical evidence that it could indeed be happening on the... view more Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute WASHINGTON D.C. -- A recent study provides new evidence that the icy shell of Jupiter's moon Europa may have plate tectonics similar to those
47min
NYT > Science
Global Health: ‘Opiophobia’ Has Left Africa in Agony Early Opposition In a telephone interview from Scotland, Dr. Merriman, sometimes called Uganda’s “mother of palliative care,” described the early days of mixing morphine powder imported from Europe in buckets with water boiled on the kitchen stove. Once cool, it was poured into empty mineral water bottles scrounged from tourist hotels. She also recalled early opposition from older doctors who equ
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NYT > Science
London Mayor Seeks Revival of Public Drinking Fountains The mayor, according to a news release from his office, “has asked City Hall officers to examine the feasibility of a pilot community water refill scheme or other interventions.” And he “supports boroughs in identifying suitable locations for water fountains and bottle-refill stations during the planning in new or redeveloped public spaces, such as town centers, shopping malls, parks and squares.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook Wants to Get Kids Hooked While They’re Still Young As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data about production rates from half a million Chinese manufacturing plants from 1998 to 2007. The research, published in the Journal… Read more As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data ab
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Popular Science
How to deal with a boss who denies reality ‘Tis the season for holiday parties at the office . While they’re great for building workplace camaraderie and team spirit, when was the last time a colleague—perhaps fueled by too much alcohol —said something so ridiculous that it made your jaw drop? Perhaps a desk mate went into something political, claiming that George Bush is behind 9/11 or that Barack Obama is a Muslim from Kenya ? Or maybe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Durotomy: Common complication of spinal surgery, and an important factor in some malpractice casesIncidental durotomy -- small tears of the outer membrane of the spinal cord -- are a common occurrence in spinal surgery, and may lead to litigation. Most malpractice cases associated with dural tear end in a ruling in favor of the surgeon, reports a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yelp reviewers take a dimmer view of nursing homes than the fedsYelp reviewers give nursing homes significantly less favorable ratings than those found on the federal website, Nursing Home Compare, run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, new research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amniotic fluid is a rich source of stem cells that can now be harvestedAmniotic fluid, the protective liquid surrounding an unborn baby, is discarded as medical waste during caesarean section deliveries. However, there is increasing evidence that this fluid is a source of valuable biological material, including stem cells with the potential for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. A team of scientists and clinicians has now developed a multi-step method, in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists track sharks by picking up DNA fragments from the seaTraces of DNA in the sea can be used to monitor shark populations, marine ecologists have shown. Current methods of baiting, hooking and filming sharks, rays and other large fish are invasive and costly and require teams of scientists spending much time at sea, they say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ideal size for computer memoryUltraprecise simulation of a computer storage technology known as CBRAM reveals its optimal geometry: an insulator roughly ten atoms thick sandwiched between two electrodes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism-linked gene stunts developing dendrites IMAGE: E6AP overexpression reduces the complexity of dendritic arborization. view more Credit: Man et al., JNeurosci (2017) Increased expression of a gene linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) leads to a remodeling of dendrites during brain development, according to a new study conducted in cultured neurons and an ASD mouse model published in JNeurosci . The research identifies a series
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise changes gut microbial composition independent of diet, team reports IMAGE: Jacob Allen, left, Jeffrey Woods and their colleagues found that exercise alters the microbial composition of the gut in potentially beneficial ways. view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Two studies - one in mice and the other in human subjects - offer the first definitive evidence that exercise alone can change the composition of microbes in the gut. The stu
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Popular Science
Gifts to save the planet The planet is getting hotter , autumn is dead , there are mosquitos everywhere , hurricanes are getting worse ... you get the idea. Everyone loves giving gifts for the holidays, but the best gift we can give to one another right now is a leg up in the fight against climate change and other pending ecological doom. On that cheery note, here are some environmentally friendly gifts to help your love
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise in the kangaroo family treeIronically, it is jumping genes that indicate the need for a reorganization of the kangaroos' phylogenetic tree. According to a new study, the swamp wallaby is more closely related to the remaining wallaby species and the large red and grey kangaroos and wallaroos than previously assumed. This study was the first to examine the relationships within the kangaroo genus Macropus on the basis of retro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative probe visualises tumorsGliomas are a type of brain tumor characterized by a poor prognosis. In order to improve this prognosis, as much of the tumor as possible must be removed safely during the neurosurgical operation. However, especially in the case of slow-growing, low-grade gliomas, it is often difficult to distinguish diseased tissue from healthy tissue. Now researchers have trialed a technique designed to make low
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to form bioactive spider silk for medical useTechnology hasn't quite mastered the spider's ability to form silk proteins into structures. But a new technique has been developed that can form silk structures without relying on chemicals that compromise their usefulness in medical applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New easy-to-use tool can help determine Alzheimer's risk, similar to pediatric growth curvesA simple new tool that tracks cognitive performance in adults aims to help physicians identify people who may be on the path to Alzheimer's disease or another form of dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New nanowires are just a few atoms thickSubnanometer-scale channels in 2-D materials could point toward future electronics and solar cells, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computerized biology, or how to control a population of cells with a computerResearchers explain computer control of cellular processes. Hybrid experimental platforms combining microscopes and software are enabling researchers to interface living cells with control algorithms in real time. The research illustrates that these solutions make it possible to create new and easily reprogrammable behaviors of cell populations. This external control of living tissue would then be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women are naturally more fit than men, study showsWomen can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Central California is losing $3.7 billion in crop yield every year From 2011 to 2014, the state of California experienced the worst drought in its recorded history. With that drought came a shortage of agricultural water supplies—in a state that produces nearly half of the fruits, nuts, and vegetables grown in the United States. Though the area has since seen a slight rebound, the central California region is still experiencing a significant loss of agricultural
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Second stealthy destroyer heads out to sea for first time The U.S. Navy's biggest, most expensive and most technologically advanced destroyer arrived at its homeport on Thursday after a nearly four-month transit that included some hiccups, such as a high-profile breakdown in the ...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Community health center funding cliff could cause more than 100,000 jobs to be lostIf the Community Health Center Fund is not restored, millions of patients served by community health centers may lose access to crucial health care and up to 161,000 jobs could be lost in communities across the nation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers measure the spin rates of bodies thought to be either planets or tiny 'failed' stars Image of the planetary-mass companion VHS 1256-1257 b (bottom right) and its host star (center). Credit: Gauza, B. et al 2015, MNRAS , 452, 1677-1683 Taking a picture of an exoplanet—a planet in a solar system beyond our sun—is no easy task. The light of a planet's parent star far outshines the light from the planet itself, making the planet difficult to see. While taking a picture of a small roc
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The Atlantic
We Might Absorb Billions of Viruses Every Day The viruses, Jeremy Barr realized, were in the wrong place. Barr and his colleagues at San Diego State University had grown a layer of gut cells in a dish, much like those that line the surface of our own twisting intestines. The cells formed such tight connections with each other that bacteria couldn’t sneak past them. Even a dye couldn’t get through. The layer was meant to be impermeable, until
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cells rebuild after mitosisNew research has revealed how cells rebuild their nucleus and organize their genome when they divide, a discovery which could have major implications for understanding cancer and degeneration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crucial tropical forest conservation targets in Borneo revealed by flying laboratoryAbout 40 percent of northern Malaysian Borneo's carbon stocks exist in forests that are not designated for maximum protections, according to new research. What's more, they discovered that Sabah could double carbon stocks by allowing previously logged forests to regenerate, a process that they estimate would take about a century.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Europe Is Struggling Keep Local Talent for Its Homegrown Tech Scene As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data about production rates from half a million Chinese manufacturing plants from 1998 to 2007. The research, published in the Journal… Read more As the mercury rises, industrial facilities will become less efficient. That’s the finding of a new study, which crunched data ab
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Live Science
It Bleeds. It Breathes. It's a Lifelike Artificial Human Corpse! Medical schools have historically used human cadavers to train students in anatomy and medical procedures, a tradition that dates back hundreds of years. However, a unique type of medical model provides a remarkably human alternative to working with preserved corpses. SynDaver synthetic humans are anatomically accurate medical models fabricated by the company SynDaver Labs. All of the body'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pigeons can discriminate both space and time IMAGE: New research at the University of Iowa shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time -- and seem to use a region of the brain different... view more Credit: Kathryn Gamble Pigeons aren't so bird-brained after all. New research at the University of Iowa shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time--and seem to use a differen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In mongoose society, immigrants are a bonus -- when given time to settle in Researchers studying wild dwarf mongooses have provided insight into what happens when immigrants join a new group. The study in Current Biology on December 4 shows that, initially, recent immigrants rarely serve as lookout, which means they provide little information to help the rest of the group. Even when they do act cooperatively, their new groupmates tend to ignore what they have to offer. B
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Subtle cues can dictate the fate of stem cells IMAGE: Inhibition of GSK3 is critical for maintaining embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity (left panel, ESCs are differentiating without inhibition of GSK3; right panel, nice self-renewing ESCs when GSK3 is inhibited).... view more Credit: Xi Chen/Ying Lab/USC If you've seen one GSK3 molecule, do not assume that you have seen them all. A new study in Developmental Cell reveals important diffe
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New Scientist - News
Destruction of war-torn Syria brought to London by AI Most of Raqqa is now uninhabitable BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty By Timothy Revell Can you imagine what it is like living in Raqqa, Syria? Only a few years ago, it was filled with impressive buildings both old and new, and was home to more than 200,000 people. Now, around 80 per cent of the city has been left uninhabitable, according to the UN. A combination of civil war and the battle against Islamic S
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New Scientist - News
World’s richest science prize hands out $22 million for research Morgan Freeman hosted the Breakthrough Awards on Sunday Steve Jennings/Getty By Valerie Jamieson in Palo Alto, California Science’s richest prizes, the Breakthrough Awards, were presented at a star-studded ceremony in California last night. Seven prizes, each worth $3 million, were awarded to a total of 34 scientists and mathematicians in three categories — fundamental physics, life sciences
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New Scientist - News
Macho, macho monkey: female monkeys gaze more at masculine faces Take a good long look Rosenfield, Semple et al By Alice Klein Female monkeys spend more time staring at males with strong masculine facial features. But it’s not clear why their gaze lingers like this. Face structure often varies between male and female members of a species. In humans, men tend to have heavier brows, squarer jaws, deeper-set eyes and thinner lips than women. Some researchers
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Viden
Google strammer reglerne for Android-apps' snagen 75 procent af Android-apps indsamler private data - ofte uden brugeren ved det. Sådan lød konklusionen i en rapport offenliggjort i sidste uge af Yale University Privacy Lab og den franske non-profit sikkerhedsorganisation Exodus Privacy. Om det er den rapport, der nu får Google til at reagere, er uklart. I hvert fald oplyser Google nu på deres sikkerhedsblog , at der fra 1. februar 2018 træder n
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? This traffic teaser will drive you to distraction In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Five cars are driving round a roundabout. In order, the drivers are Akira, Basho, Chie, Daichi and Etsu. The cars have licence plates numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, but not necessarily in that order. Each driver can see only the licence plate of the car in front of them and the car behind them, but not of the car they are driving. All th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature's toughest substances decoded An illustration shows a model platelet-matrix composite in the foreground and nacre, one of nature's toughest materials, in the background. Rice University researchers have developed computer simulations to decode natural materials to guide research into synthetic multifunctional composites. Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University How a material breaks may be the most important pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research bolsters possibility of plate tectonics on Europa Previous studies had hinted that something like subduction may have been happening on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A new study provides geophysical evidence that it could indeed be happening on the moon's icy shell. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute A Brown University study provides new evidence that the icy shell of Jupiter's moon Europa may have plate tectonics similar to those on Earth. The p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees a mix of Tropical Cyclone Ockhi and dust stormsNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arabian Sea on Dec. 4 and found Tropical Cyclone Ockhi moving north as desert dust pushed into the region north of the storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals how cells rebuild after mitosis Illustration of nuclear F-actin working to reshape the nucleus and organize the genome. Credit: Claudia Stocker VividBiology When cells divide, they need to rebuild their nucleus and organise their genome. New collaborative research from the University of Bristol demonstrates how cells achieve this through the unexpected deployment of filamentous actin (F-actin) to the nucleus. The research, publ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds Tropical Depression Dahlia's center devoid of rainfall On Dec 4 at 1441 UTC (9:41 a.m. EST), the GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Depression Dahlia's rainfall and found the circulation center devoid of precipitation. Light rainfall near 0.1 inches per hour was falling east of the center (light blue). Credit: NRL/NASA/JAXA Tropical Depression Dahlia was weakening into a remnant low pressure area when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subtle cues can dictate the fate of stem cells Inhibition of GSK3 is critical for maintaining embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity (left panel, ESCs are differentiating without inhibition of GSK3; right panel, nice self-renewing ESCs when GSK3 is inhibited). Credit: Xi Chen/Ying Lab/USC If you've seen one GSK3 molecule, do not assume that you have seen them all. A new study in Developmental Cell reveals important differences in two similar form
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In mongoose society, immigrants are a bonus—when given time to settle in Dwarf mongoose sentinels on guard duty. Credit: Shannon Benson Researchers studying wild dwarf mongooses have provided insight into what happens when immigrants join a new group. The study in Current Biology on December 4 shows that, initially, recent immigrants rarely serve as lookout, which means they provide little information to help the rest of the group. Even when they do act cooperatively,
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The Scientist RSS
Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of AgeT-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature's toughest substances decoded IMAGE: An illustration shows a model platelet-matrix composite in the foreground and nacre, one of nature's toughest materials, in the background. Rice University researchers have developed computer simulations to decode natural... view more Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University How a material breaks may be the most important property to consider when designing layered
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NYT > Science
Q&A: The Mystery of a Scorpion’s Glow Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. Why do scorpions glow under black light? What might the evolutionary advantage be? A. Certain molecules in one layer of the cuticle, the tough but somewhat flexible part of a scorpion’s exoskeleton, absorb the longer wavelengths of ultraviolet light and emit it in different wavelengths that are visible at night as a blue-green glow . Several theories have been adv
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Two Hidden Cancer Causes: Diabetes and Obesity The study, in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, found considerable differences in the proportions of cancer cases attributable to B.M.I. on the one hand and to diabetes on the other. For example, high B.M.I. was associated with about twice as many cases of colorectal cancer as diabetes, and nearly three times as many cases of breast and endometrial cancers. Diabetes was not associated with k
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding the climate impact of natural atmospheric particlesScientists have quantified the relationship between natural sources of particles in the atmosphere and climate change. Their research shows that the cooling effect of natural atmospheric particles is greater during warmer years and could therefore slightly reduce the amount that temperatures rise as a result of climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain researchers gain greater understanding of how we generate internal experiencesOur mental life is rich with an enormous number of internal experiences. We can vividly recall an episode from childhood as well as what we did just five minutes ago. We can imagine and plan in detail our next vacation. How does the brain achieve this magic? In a new study researchers showed that internal experiences, such as recalling personal memories, are associated with the simultaneous activi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medium-sized carnivores most at risk from environmental changeIn a surprise ecological finding, researchers discover medium-sized carnivores spend the most time looking for food, making them vulnerable to change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possibility of plate tectonics on Jupiter's moon Europa bolsteredJupiter's moon Europa could have subduction zones, a new study shows, which could supply chemical food for life to a subsurface ocean.
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New Scientist - News
Focus on liberty and purity may change anti-vax parents’ minds Not everyone believes in vaccination Max Whittaker/New York Times/Redux/eyevine By Mallory Locklear Vaccines save lives, so why do some parents prefer not to get their children vaccinated against deadly diseases? It seems the ideas of purity and liberty have a big influence. Avnika Amin at Emory University, Georgia, and her team surveyed more than 1000 adults in the US who had at least one ch
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New Scientist - News
Moon’s explosive birth drove iron deep into Earth’s core By Jesse Emspak Leftovers from the moon’s formation may have tunnelled to the Earth’s core, and make up far more of our planet than we once thought. According to earlier estimates about 0.5 per cent of our planet’s mass came from swallowing parts of planetesimals, 1000-kilometres across, just after the “Big Splash” that formed the moon. Now, simulations by researchers at the Southwest Researc
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New Scientist - News
Pole-to-pole highway transports heat beneath Europa’s icy crust Alien microbes could be pushed around by convection currents underneath Europa’s icy crust NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute By John Wenz From surface to seafloor, there’s a lot going on on Europa. New evidence points to a great deal of activity just below the ice shell of this ocean world. Europa is the second innermost of Jupiter’s massive Galilean moons and believed to be one of the most pro
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New Scientist - News
Want to be the boss? How to signal your leadership potential Natural-born leader plainpicture/Cavan Images By Helen Thomson We can tell who’s likely to become a leader before we’re even aware of it, assessing a person’s behaviour and body language without realising that we’re doing it. When a group of people who don’t know each other meet for the first time, leaders and followers naturally emerge – it helps us solve many social challenges. We use a var
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds Tropical Depression Dahlia's center devoid of rainfall IMAGE: On Dec 4 at 1441 UTC (9:41 a.m. EST), the GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Depression Dahlia's rainfall and found the circulation center devoid of precipitation. Light rainfall near 0.1... view more Credit: Credits: NRL/NASA/JAXA Tropical Depression Dahlia was weakening into a remnant low pressure area when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite or GPM analyzed t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals how cells rebuild after mitosis IMAGE: Illustration of nuclear F-actin working to reshape the nucleus and organize the genome. view more Credit: Claudia Stocker VividBiology When cells divide, they need to rebuild their nucleus and organise their genome. New collaborative research from the University of Bristol demonstrates how cells achieve this through the unexpected deployment of filamentous actin (F-actin) t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher than global average of European companies investment into research and development European Union firms have significantly increased their investments in research and development (R&D), rising above the world's average growth rate. While the world's top 2500 companies in terms of investment into R&D increased this investment by 5.8% over 2016, companies with headquarters in the EU did so by 7%, with growth driven mainly by the ICT, health and automotive sectors. That is one o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new role for an old protein in breast cancer IMAGE: Myosin VI in human cells. view more Credit: University of Kent Scientists led by Dr Chris Toseland of the University's School of Biosciences studied a protein called Myosin VI, a molecular motor which acts as a courier to transport other proteins within our cells. Myosin VI is highly present in many cancers yet the role is unclear. Dr Toseland's study to understand the role of Myosin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds artwork is worth 35 percent less when created by 'tortured' artists Key Takeaway: The value of a painting that is created by an artist during a period of bereavement can experience a drop in value of up to 35 percent compared to the artist's other work. CATONSVILLE, MD, Dec. 4, 2017 - The term 'tortured artists' has been used to describe some of history's greatest painters, from Vincent Van Gogh and Henri de Tolousse-Lautrec to Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees a mix of Tropical Cyclone Ockhi and dust storms IMAGE: NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ockhi on Dec. 4 at 1:20 a.m. EST (0620 UTC) and dust storms that were blowing over the Arabian Sea.... view more Credit: Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arabian Sea on Dec. 4 and found Tropical Cyclone Ockhi moving north as desert dust pushed into the region north of th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Serious risk of mental health crisis in Yemen, say expertsYemenis face serious mental health risks, but the issue is being neglected. In a new study released today, the researchers reveal how serious the risk to mental health is in Yemen. Yet, mental health services in Yemen are few, and there is little research on the effects of the war on the mental health of the population. The paper also analyzes the long-term costs of failing to respond.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research bolsters possibility of plate tectonics on Europa IMAGE: Previous studies had hinted that something like subduction may have been happening on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A new study provides geophysical evidence that it could indeed be happening on the... view more Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- A Brown University study provides new evidence that the icy shell of Jupiter's moon Europa may have pla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Durotomy: A common complication of spinal surgery -- and an important factor in some malpractice cases December 4, 2017 - Incidental durotomy--small tears of the outer membrane of the spinal cord--are a common occurrence in spinal surgery, and may lead to litigation. Most malpractice cases associated with dural tear end in a ruling in favor of the surgeon, reports a study in the journal Spine , published by Wolters Kluwer . But certain types of durotomy cases are more likely to be resolved in fa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study finds artwork is worth 35 percent less when created by 'tortured' artists Credit: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences The term 'tortured artists' has been used to describe some of history's greatest painters, from Vincent Van Gogh and Henri de Tolousse-Lautrec to Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock. They are credited with creating some of the world's most recognized works of art despite lives that were often characterized by great emotional unre
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climatesIt's no secret that globalization, aided by climate change, is helping invasive species gain a foothold across the planet. What came as something of a surprise to researchers was just how mutable these invaders are.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes identified that distinguish mammals from other animalsWhat distinguishes Homo sapiens from other living beings? And the group of mammals? What makes them different? Researchers analysed the already-sequenced genomes of 68 mammals and identified 6,000 families of genes that are only found in these animals. These are genes with no homologues outside mammals, in other words, they are not present in other hairless species. In humans, it is estimated that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When the nose doesn't know: Can loss of smell be repaired?Researchers are examining the behavior of stem cells within the context of aging and loss of smell. They report mechanisms to regenerate adult stem cells in mice to restore smell cells: it mimics induced pluripotency, but is simpler, involving only two Yamanaka factors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traumatic stress interacts with bipolar disorder genetic risk to increase odds of suicide attemptGenetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder can increase the risk for suicide attempt, but only among those who also have experienced traumatic stress, reports a new study.
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Science : NPR
Can Celebrity Scientists Change The Way People Think About Science And Religion? kavunchik/Getty Images/iStockphoto kavunchik/Getty Images/iStockphoto Stephen Jay Gould famously described the relationship between science and religion as one of " non-overlapping magisteria ," with science restricted to facts and theories about the empirical universe, and religion to questions of moral meaning and value. This is one way to understand the relationship between science and religio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN assembly starts drafting plan for 'pollution-free planet' One in six global deaths is caused by pollution Humans are poisoning their environment and themselves at an alarming rate, with pollution of the oceans, soil and air now the biggest killer, a UN conference heard Monday. Urging rapid and united action from governments, businesses and individual consumers, envoys underlined that nine million people are now killed by pollution every year—one in six
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Scientific American Content: Global
Universe's Baby Picture Wins $3 Million Astrophysicists who captured an image of the Big Bang’s afterglow—and confirmed the standard model of cosmology—won a US$3-million Breakthrough Prize on 3 December. The team behind NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) provided key evidence backing the theory that the cosmos is composed mainly of dark energy and dark matter, with a small serving of ordinary matter. “It is a w
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Scientific American Content: Global
Jellyfish, Sexbots and the Solipsism Problem What’s the difference between science and philosophy? Scientists address questions that can in principle be answered by means of objective, empirical investigation. Philosophers wrestle with questions that cannot be empirically resolved and hence remain matters of taste, not truth. Here is a classic philosophical question: What creatures and/or things are capable of consciousness? That is, wh
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Science : NPR
Fishermen Fear Damage From Wind Farms Along The Eastern Seaboard Scallop fishermen discard their bycatch near Montauk, N.Y. These waters are some of the most productive fishing grounds on the Eastern Seaboard. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption toggle caption Jon Kalish for NPR Scallop fishermen discard their bycatch near Montauk, N.Y. These waters are some of the most productive fishing grounds on the Eastern Seaboard. Jon Kalish for NPR Fishermen are worried ab
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Online risks are routine for teens, most bounce backTeens routinely encounter online risks, such as sexual solicitations, cyberbullying and explicit material, but research shows that the negative effects of such exposure appear to be temporary, vanishing for most teens in less than a week. A new study found that typical teens seem to be resilient and cope with most online risks, moving beyond the temporary negative impacts quickly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Right-handed or left-handed? Hand preference during gestationAre you born or do you become right-handed or left-handed? A study shows that hand preference is already well defined at the 18th gestational week. The predictive capacity of the method used seems a good starting point for the early recognition of pathologies characterized by cerebral asymmetries, such as depression, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advances to brain-interface technology provide clearer insight into visual systemEngineers and cognitive neuroscientists have demonstrated that a new high-density EEG can capture the brain's neural activity at a higher spatial resolution than ever before. This next-generation brain-interface technology is the first noninvasive, high-resolution system of its kind, providing higher density and coverage than any existing system. It has the potential to revolutionize future clinic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers 'dismantle' mindfulness intervention to see how each component worksBecause mindfulness-based interventions blend multiple practices, researchers can't always figure out how each one works, so they created a rigorously controlled study to isolate each of them and confirm that they do what is claimed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicians' experiences with family and friends impact breast cancer screening Results of a national survey of more than 800 physicians suggest that their experiences with patients, family members and friends with breast cancer are linked with their recommendations for routine mammograms. Specifically, physicians who reported knowing at least one patient, family member or friend with a poor breast cancer prognosis and who had not been screened were more likely to recommend
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IU, Regenstrief study finds surrogate decision makers experience psychological distress IMAGE: Alexia Torke, MD is Indiana University Center for Aging Research associate director, Regenstrief Institute investigator and IU School of Medicine associate professor of medicine. She is also the associate division... view more Credit: Regenstrief Institute INDIANAPOLIS - Nearly half of the 13 million older adults hospitalized annually in the United States are unable to make their own m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives If you were to visit a marine biology lab at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), you might find strange-looking worms squirming in petri dishes, their elongated bodies expanding and contracting. You may also be surprised to find that you have quite a lot in common with these humble creatures. Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaborati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predatory journals: Researchers propose solutions to stop the 'corruption of science'The team of researchers behind a recent landmark study on predatory journals has now outlined the first concrete steps that stakeholders can take to combat the growing influence of these journals. Their recommendations focus on educating researchers, auditing publications, changing incentives at the institution and funder levels and applying pressure to stakeholders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New nanowires are just a few atoms thick "Two-dimensional materials" -- materials deposited in layers that are only a few atoms thick -- are promising for both high-performance electronics and flexible, transparent electronics that could be layered onto physical surfaces to make computing ubiquitous. The best-known 2-D material is graphene, which is a form of carbon, but recently researchers have been investigating other 2-D materials,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding the climate impact of natural atmospheric particles An international team of scientists, led by the University of Leeds, has quantified the relationship between natural sources of particles in the atmosphere and climate change. Their study, published today in Nature Geoscience , shows that the cooling effect of natural atmospheric particles is greater during warmer years and could therefore slightly reduce the amount that temperatures rise as a re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain researchers gain greater understanding of how we generate internal experiences Our mental life is rich with an enormous number of internal experiences. The diversity of these experiences is astonishing. We can vividly recall an episode from childhood as well as what we did just five minutes ago. We can imagine and plan in detail our next vacation. We can be moved to tears by the story of an absolute stranger or even of a fictitious character. How does the brain achieve this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Alzheimer's animal model more closely mimics human disease IMAGE: Upper panel: Tau clumps in new AD mouse model, either in the cell body as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) or in dystrophic axons surrounding A-beta plaques as neuritic plaque tau. Lower... view more Credit: The lab of Virginia Lee, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA - By injecting human Alzheimer's disease brain extracts of pathological tau protein
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does overlapping surgery increase complication risk after hip surgery? Bottom Line: The practice of a single surgeon supervising two surgeries in different operating rooms at the same time was associated with increased risk for complications after hip surgery, although the practice of overlapping surgery was uncommon. Why The Research Is Interesting: Overlapping surgery has come under scrutiny recently with questions raised about the quality of the practice and issu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study helps explain how the brain keeps time Timing is critical for playing a musical instrument, swinging a baseball bat, and many other activities. Neuroscientists have come up with several models of how the brain achieves its exquisite control over timing, the most prominent being that there is a centralized clock, or pacemaker, somewhere in the brain that keeps time for the entire brain. However, a new study from MIT researchers provide
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medium-sized carnivores most at risk from environmental change In a surprise ecological finding, researchers discover medium-sized carnivores spend the most time looking for food, making them vulnerable to change. Mammalian predators (commonly called carnivores) spend a significant part of their day foraging for food, and the more time they spend, the more energy they use. This makes predators that spend a long time foraging more vulnerable to changes in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thyroid hormone therapy heals lung fibrosis in animal study New Haven, Conn. -- Thyroid hormone therapy significantly resolves fibrosis, or scarring, in the lungs of mice, increasing their survival from disease, a Yale-led study shows. These provide a novel insight into the development of pulmonary fibrosis and could lead to alternative treatment for this serious condition, according to the researchers. The study was published in Nature Medicine . A type
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climates It's no secret that globalization, aided by climate change, is helping invasive species gain a foothold across the planet. What came as something of a surprise to Virginia Tech researchers was just how mutable these invaders are. The scientists discovered that invasive plant species are not only highly adaptive, they are essentially able to change in order to thrive on new continents and in diffe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer IMAGE: UI researchers loaded nanoparticles with two cancer drugs and injected them into lab mice with type II endometrial cancer. The super-lethal nanoparticles reduced tumor growth and extended survival rates. In... view more Credit: Image courtesy of Kareem Ebeid/UI College of Pharmacy. Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherap
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bat Cave Solves Mystery of Deadly SARS Virus After a detective hunt across China, researchers chasing the origin of the deadly SARS virus have finally found their smoking gun. In a remote cave in Yunnan province, virologists have identified a single population of horseshoe bats that harbours virus strains with all the genetic building blocks of the one that jumped to humans in 2002, killing almost 800 people around the world. The killer
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Ingeniøren
Ny militærdrone kan flyve med skyhøj hastighed på mach 0,8Forskere fra MIT har skabt en lynhurtig raketdrone til det amerikanske luftvåben. Med en maksimal hastighed lige under 1.000 km/t kan militærdronen blive en af de hurtigste på markedet.
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Feed: All Latest
The Science of Sensory Deprivation Tanks in *Stranger Things* Maybe you have watched Stranger Things but maybe you haven't. I've seen it, and I thought it was great—and not just because there's lots of science in it. Don't worry, I'm not going to talk about multiple universes or quantum tunneling. Instead I am going to talk about salt. Small spoiler alert (but not really a spoiler): In season 1, the Stranger Things kids need to build a makeshift sensory dep
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brigitte Macron fetes first panda born in France Named "godmother" to France's first panda cub in August, French First Lady Brigitte Macron helped baptise her fluffy charge on Monday in one of her most high-profile outings since her husband's election. The male cub was the first ever born in France where its mother has been on loan from China since 2012, as part of Beijing's "panda diplomacy" efforts. The 64-year-old French first lady cooed o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Online risks are routine for teens, most bounce back Pamela Wisniewski, an assistant professor in engineering at UCF, studies teens and their online lives. Credit: UCF, College of Engineering Teens routinely encounter online risks, such as sexual solicitations, cyberbullying and explicit material, but research shows that the negative effects of such exposure appear to be temporary, vanishing for most teens in less than a week. A new study from the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flying laboratory reveals crucial tropical forest conservation targets in Borneo Maps show the density of aboveground carbon stocks in the Sabah state of Malaysia on the island of Borneo. Mapping forest carbon is an important step in identifying areas for conservation, but is tremendously difficult to accomplish without airborne and satellite technology. Credit: Greg Asner/Carnegie Airborne Observatory. About 40 percent of northern Malaysian Borneo's carbon stocks exist in fo
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Futurity.org
Discussing death doesn’t harm doctor-patient bond Talking through bad news can be good for the doctor-patient relationship, research shows. The researchers cite an example of a difficult question from an actual conversation in an oncologist’s office: “Have you had thoughts about stopping the chemotherapy and focusing more on comfort and quality of life?” Patients who took part in honest discussions, including questions like that one from their d
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why I'm done trying to be "man enough" | Justin BaldoniJustin Baldoni wants to start a dialogue with men about redefining masculinity -- to figure out ways to be not just good men but good humans. In a warm, personal talk, he shares his effort to reconcile who he is with who the world tells him a man should be. And he has a challenge for men: "See if you can use the same qualities that you feel make you a man to go deeper," Baldoni says. "Your strengt
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Viden
På vej til bedre behandling: 11 nye kræftgener opdaget Lungekræft skyldes - ligesom alle andre former for kræft - at der sker en række uheldige ændringer - også kaldet mutationer - i nogle af kroppens celler. Men i omkring en tredjedel af patienterne ved man ikke hvilke gener, der faktisk er ændret. Det gør det svært for lægerne af vælge den bedste behandling. Læs også: Danskerne vil kende risikoen for arvelige sygdomme Men Kasper Lage, lektor ved Ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online risks are routine for teens, most bounce back Teens routinely encounter online risks, such as sexual solicitations, cyberbullying and explicit material, but research shows that the negative effects of such exposure appear to be temporary, vanishing for most teens in less than a week. A new study from the University of Central Florida, Pennsylvania State and Ohio State found that typical teens seem to be resilient and cope with most online ri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the UK smoking ban increased wellbeing Married women with children have benefited the most from the UK public smoking ban according to Lancaster University researchers in the UK. According to the World Health Organisation, smoking is directly linked to 6 million deaths every year worldwide leading to diseases like cancer, chest infections, strokes and heart attacks. Smoking has been forbidden in enclosed public spaces like pubs and re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Medium-sized carnivores most at risk from environmental change Credit: CC0 Public Domain In a surprise ecological finding, researchers discover medium-sized carnivores spend the most time looking for food, making them vulnerable to change. Mammalian predators (commonly called carnivores) spend a significant part of their day foraging for food, and the more time they spend, the more energy they use. This makes predators that spend a long time foraging more vu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climates Velvetleaf represents one of the many invasive plant species that was tested by Dan Atwater and Jacob Barney. Credit: Virginia Tech It's no secret that globalization, aided by climate change, is helping invasive species gain a foothold across the planet. What came as something of a surprise to Virginia Tech researchers was just how mutable these invaders are. The scientists discovered that invasi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predatory journals: Researchers propose solutions to stop the 'corruption of science' Dr. David Moher and his team from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa are proposing concrete solutions to fight predatory journals. Credit: The Ottawa Hospital The team of researchers behind a landmark study on predatory journals has now outlined the first concrete steps that stakeholders can take to combat the growing influence of these journals. Their pioneering work is published i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humidity switches molecular diode off and on Credit: Leiden Institute of Physics An international group of scientists from Leiden, Delft, Bern and Chuo has developed the first switchable molecular diode, which can be turned on and off through humidity. It also functions as a humidity sensor at the nanoscale. The study has been published in Nature Nanotechnology . In 2016, Feringa, Stoddard and Sauvage received the Nobel Prize for developing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subnanometer-scale channels in 2-D materials could point toward future electronics, solar cells Formation of 1D channels. a, Schematic of the patterning process guided by misfit dislocations (marked as ‘T’) at the MoS2–WSe2 lateral heterojunction. b,c, Atomic-resolution ADF-STEM images overlaid with their εxx strain maps (see Fig. 2 for more details) identifying the periodic dislocations at the interface of MoS2 and WSe2 (b) and the 1D channels created by chemically driven migration of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collisions after moon formation remodeled early Earth Artistic rendering of a large collision on the early Earth. Credit: SwRI/Marchi. Southwest Research Institute scientists recently modeled the protracted period of bombardment following the Moon's formation, when leftover planetesimals pounded the Earth. Based on these simulations, scientists theorize that moon-sized objects delivered more mass to the Earth than previously thought. Early in its ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding the climate impact of natural atmospheric particles Credit: CC0 Public Domain An international team of scientists, led by the University of Leeds, has quantified the relationship between natural sources of particles in the atmosphere and climate change. Their study, published today in Nature Geoscience , shows that the cooling effect of natural atmospheric particles is greater during warmer years and could therefore slightly reduce the amount that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer UI researchers loaded nanoparticles with two cancer drugs and injected them into lab mice with type II endometrial cancer. The super-lethal nanoparticles reduced tumor growth and extended survival rates. In this photo, tiny green nanoparticles attack red tumor cells. The violet areas represent tumor cell nuclei. Credit: Kareem Ebeid/UI College of Pharmacy. Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded wit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chance record of an annual mass emergence of enigmatic mantis-flies The studied mantis-fly species Ditaxis biseriata through the eclosions stages going through the eclosion stages. From right to left: the immature becomes stationary before starting the process of extracting adult wings and legs from the pupal case. Credit: James Dorey Being neither mantids nor flies, the peculiar mantis-flies are in fact predatory lacewings which use their mantis-like forelegs to
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Futurity.org
Does mindfulness work? ‘Dismantle’ it to find out A new approach to studying mindfulness-based interventions can help ensure that scientific evidence backs the claimed benefits of the practices—and potentially make them more effective. “This is the first step to an evidence-based personalized medicine approach to mindfulness.” One problem with mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) is that they sometimes blend practices, which makes it difficult
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Successful implantation of heart pump with power cable behind the earPhysicians have successfully implanted a left ventricular assist device with an internal power cable tunneled through the neck to the head in a patient who was ineligible for a cardiac transplantation, destination therapy (DT) trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chance record of an annual mass emergence of enigmatic mantis-fliesBeing neither mantids nor flies, the peculiar mantis-flies are in fact predatory lacewings which use their mantis-like forelegs to catch prey. While most mantis-flies are known to feed on spider eggs in their immature stages, the larval lifestyle of one subfamily has remained a mystery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better mastery of heat flow leads to next-generation thermal cloaks Ever heard of the invisibility cloak? It manipulates how light travels along the cloak to conceal an object placed behind it. Similarly, the thermal cloak is designed to hide heated objects from infrared detectors without distorting the temperature outside the cloak. Materials for such cloaks would need to offer zero thermal conductivity to help camouflage the heat. Now, Liujun Xu and colleagues
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Ingeniøren
Kønsforsker ville »forvente en del sexchikane« i ingeniørvirksomhederMandsdominerede brancher har flest sager om seksuelle krænkelser, viser internationale undersøgelser, men herhjemme mangler vi brugbare tal om omfanget. Skal problemet løses, kræver det mere viden – og så skal arbejdsgiveren pålægges et større ansvar, mener forsker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swarm-based simulation strategy proves significantly shorterWhen the maths cannot be done by hand, physicists modelling complex systems, like the dynamics of biological molecules in the body, need to use computer simulations. Such complicated systems require a period of time before being measured, as they settle into a balanced state. The question is: how long do computer simulations need to run to be accurate? Speeding up processing time to elucidate high
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beetles' bright colors used for camouflage instead of warning off predators Yale-NUS College Postdoctoral Fellow Eunice Tan has discovered that the bright colour patterns of beetles are not a warning signal to predators as previously believed, but actually a form of camouflage, turning an old assumption on its head. Dr Tan, along with four collaborators from Australia and Spain, examined 51 species of Australian leaf beetles in their natural habitats, and discovered that
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The Atlantic
Maybe Einstein Was Wrong About This Of the many catchy quotes attributed to Albert Einstein, this may produce perhaps the most anxiety among the scientists who have come after him: “A person who has not made his great contribution to science before the age of 30 will never do so.” The exact origins of the oft-cited statement are murky, so it’s difficult to determine whether the great theoretical physicist said it in seriousness or
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The Atlantic
Saleh's Death in Yemen Sends a Message to Other Dictators Ali Abdullah Saleh once described ruling Yemen as “dancing over the heads of snakes.” The former president’s reported death Monday, at the hands of Houthi rebels who were his allies just a few days ago, shows not only the perils of that balancing act, but also the political shifts in a country wracked by civil war since 2015. More importantly, perhaps, is that it shows how difficult it will be to
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Futurity.org
For better biofuel, ‘sew’ best bits of bacteria together New research stitches together the best parts of several different bacteria to synthesize a new biofuel product that matches current engines better than previously produced biofuels. “My lab is interested in developing microbial biosynthetic processes to make biofuels, chemicals, and materials with tailored structures and properties,” says Fuzhong Zhang, associate professor at the School of Engin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New gene-based model suggests, for microbes, it's not who you are but what you do Credit: CC0 Public Domain Amazing diversity hides beneath the surface of the ocean where tiny microbes work busily; transforming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into oxygen, converting sunlight into energy, and breaking down nitrogen gas to serve as food. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researcher Victoria Coles and her team have developed a new tool that advances our u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of a mechanism for determining the direction of collective cell migrationThe phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Researcher have found that when the activity of a molecule called ERK MAP kinase is propagated to neighboring cells, the cells migrate in the opposite direction of ERK propagation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of key molecules involved in severe malariaMedical researchers have found that proteins called RIFIN expressed on erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum help the parasite to suppress the host immune response, causing severe malaria. These findings are expected to contribute to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutic drugs against malaria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Refrigeration technology to maintain cold-stored mouse sperm viability for 10 daysA research team has succeeded in developing a refrigeration preservation technology that maintains the fertilization functionality of mouse sperm for 10 days. Previously, the maximum freezing period was limited to three days, but by extending the preservation period by over three times that amount, it is now possible to send sperm of genetically modified mice to research organizations around the w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The function of many proteins remains uncertain: Blind spots on protein maps quantifiedWhile researchers already know what the DNA-blueprints look like for most proteins, they do not know what many of these proteins actually do in the body. An interdisciplinary team composed of experimental and computational scientists has now systematically quantified and characterized the extent of this knowledge gap. An unprecedented effort has been directed towards predicting more specifically h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bronze Age artifacts used meteoric ironThough meteorites had already been recognized as one source of iron objects, the scientific community couldn't determine whether they accounted for most or simply a few Bronze Age iron artifacts. Scientists have now demonstrated that iron used during the Bronze Age is always meteoric and he explained how this practice was abandoned during the Iron Age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutron stars on the brink of collapseThe exact characteristics of Neutron stars, the densest objects in the Universe, are still unknown. Scientists have managed to narrow down the size of neutron stars with the aid of computer simulations. The calculations based on data from the LIGO and Virgo observatories suggest that the neutron star radius must be at least 10.7 km.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sustainable solvent platform for photon upconversion increases solar utilization efficiencyScientists have developed a new low-cost, environmentally friendly photon upconversion platform that achieves high thermal stability using deep eutectic solvents. Deep eutectic solvents are an emerging class of solvents that are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to ionic liquids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher risk of dying due to heart cell damage without any symptoms occurs during or after non-heart surgeryOne in seven patients 65 or older undergoing non-heart surgery experienced heart cell damage during or after surgery, known as perioperative myocardial injury (PMI). Deaths of patients with PMI were six times higher in the 30 days following surgery compared to patients without PMI.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana use may not aid patients in opioid addiction treatmentNew research finds that frequent marijuana use seems to strengthen the relationship between pain and depression and anxiety, not ease it.
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Big Think
Ghosts Are Universal, But What You See is Influenced By What You Already Believe The mythologist Joseph Campbell once wrote that Buddhists don’t dream of Christ. His point is simple: if your identity is bound up in a certain set of beliefs, you’re likely not going to be unconsciously invaded by a different figure from another set, especially if you’ve never had contact with that system. Campbell jotted down this idea this well before the Internet, when people of various r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preemies' dads more stressed than moms after NICU CHICAGO --- For the first time, scientists have measured the stress levels of fathers of premature babies during the tense transition between the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and home and discovered fathers are more stressed than moms, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. Fathers and mothers of these very low birth weight babies had high levels of the stress hormone cortisol in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation: 50 years of heart transplantation progress IMAGE: The world's first human heart transplant was performed at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town by the South African surgeon, Christiaan Barnard. This is the first photograph of the surgical... view more Credit: Credit: David K.C. Cooper New York, Dec. 4, 2017 - This month marks the 50th anniversary of the world's firrst human heart transplant performed at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Programmable drug delivery platform combats diseased cells at genetic level A new drug delivery system that uses a synthetic-biological hybrid nanocapsule could provide a smart technology for targeted treatment of a variety of serious diseases at the genetic level. The hybrid offers a way to correct diseased cells at the genetic level - while at the same time leaving healthy cells alone - to increase the effectiveness of treatments and reduce unwanted side effects. "Ther
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report from NIA-sponsored conference asks: What don't we know about bladder control? IMAGE: Founded in 1942, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a nationwide, not-for-profit society of geriatrics healthcare professionals that has -- for 75 years -- worked to improve the health, independence,... view more Credit: (C) 2017, American Geriatrics Society Nearly 40 percent of older women and up to 35 percent of older men live with distressing urinary symptoms, including difficulty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the nose doesn't know: Can loss of smell be repaired? IMAGE: On the left: minimal development after transplant. Right: transplanted cells generated all cell types of the nasal tissue. view more Credit: Jim Schwob and Brian Lin in Cell Stem Cell BOSTON (December 4, 2017)--Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine, led by Dr. James E. Schwob, are examining the behavior of adult stem cells within the context of aging and, specifically, the sen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes identified that distinguish mammals from other animalsWhat distinguishes Homo sapiens from other living beings? And the group of mammals? What makes them different? Researchers analyzed the already sequenced genomes of 68 mammals and identified 6,000 families of genes that are only found in these animals. These are genes with no homologues outside mammals, in other words, they are not present in other hairless species. In humans, it is estimated that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flying laboratory reveals crucial tropical forest conservation targets in Borneo IMAGE: Maps show the density of aboveground carbon stocks in the Sabah state of Malaysia on the island of Borneo. Mapping forest carbon is an important step in identifying areas for... view more Credit: Greg Asner/Carnegie Airborne Observatory. Washington, DC -- About 40 percent of northern Malaysian Borneo's carbon stocks exist in forests that are not designated for maximum protections, acco
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Stress Hormones Soar in Whales Trapped by Fishing Lines Because hormone levels take several hours to rise after a stressful event, Dr. Rolland said that tests on five animals that died quickly when hit by ships showed stress levels similar to those in healthy animals. This has been a disastrous year for the North Atlantic right whale, whose population now hovers below 450. Sixteen or 17 animals have died since the beginning of the summer and only five
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NYT > Science
Krefeld Journal: The German Amateurs Who Discovered ‘Insect Armageddon’ That a group composed not just of biology Ph.D.s but also chemists, electrical engineers, a schoolteacher and a physicist, among others, would be the ones to do such groundbreaking research did not surprise Dave Goulson, a bee expert at the University of Sussex, and co-author of a scientific article based on the group’s research and published this fall. Photo The all-volunteer society shocked the
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Ingeniøren
IDA: Bygninger og transport er langt fra den rette kurs mod et fossiluafhængigt samfund Elektrificering af transporten og energibesparelser i bygninger er afgørende elementer, hvis vi vil skabe et samfund uafhængigt af fossile energikilder. Og på trods af et mål om at nå netop dertil i 2050 står Danmark stort set stille på begge områder. Det viser Ingeniørforeningen IDAs nye status over omstillingen, der læner sig op ad foreningens 'Energi Vision 2050'-scenarie fra 2015. Danmark ska
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mindfulness meditation can offset the worry of waitingResearch has shown all the techniques we employ to reduce the stress of worry don't work. Now an expert has found something that can help: 'mindfulness' meditation. That is, focusing on the present using meditation. The research has found that mindfulness is a sort of antidote to the 'curse' of waiting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How can humans keep the upper hand on artificial intelligence?Researchers have shown how human operators can maintain control over a system comprising several agents that are guided by artificial intelligence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better mastery of heat flow leads to next-generation thermal cloaksThe idea of a thermal cloak, which is designed to hide heated objects without distorting the temperature outside, has long since fascinated scientists. Materials for such cloaks would need to offer zero thermal conductivity to help camouflage the heat. Now, scientists have explored a new mechanism for designing such materials. These findings could have implications for manipulating the transfer of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swarm-based simulation strategy proves significantly shorterHow long do computer simulations need to run to be accurate? Speeding up processing time to elucidate highly complex study systems like the dynamics of biological molecules has been a common challenge. Now, scientists have developed a practical solution to the problem of saving time when using computer simulations that require bringing a complex system into a steady state of equilibrium and measur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beetles' bright colors used for camouflage instead of warning off predatorsBiologists have discovered that the bright color patterns of beetles are not a warning signal to predators as previously believed, but actually a form of camouflage, turning an old assumption on its head.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhoodA new study suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping hands guide robots as they learnResearchers help humans and robots collaborate by enabling real-time interactions that modify a robot's path to its goal. The study will help robots make the transition from structured factory floors to interactive tasks like rehabilitation, surgery and training programs in which environments are less predictable.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzleWhile young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others, their parents are generally unaffected. Researchers were surprised when they found that intestinal worms, so-called Helminths (Toxocara Canis) from animals, actually have an influence on allergy- and asthma risk in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gene-based model suggests, for microbes, it's not who you are but what you doA new model simulates the impact of microbial activities on the chemistry in the North Atlantic and suggests that the evolution of a metabolic function rather than the evolution of an individual species shapes the ocean as we know it. It is the first model that actually predicts genes and transcription throughout the ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomer's map reveals location of mysterious fast-moving gasThe most detailed map ever of clouds of high-velocity gas in the universe around us has now been developed by scientsits. The map covers the entire sky and shows curious clouds of neutral hydrogen gas that are moving at a different speed to the normal rotation of the Milky Way.
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The Atlantic
The Consumerist Church of Fitness Classes You pay a regular tithe to support the community. In public, you wear symbols that identify you as one of the faithful. When you gather with other adherents, it’s often in small, close rooms. Breathing gets heavy; bodies sweat. If anyone speaks, it is to moan, or occasionally to shout in triumph. Exercise classes often function just as much like a church as they do like a gym: They gather people
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A monkey and a virus: One million years together IMAGE: A monkey and a virus: one million years together. view more Credit: Image courtesy of the MIPT press office The introduction of sequencing and genome comparison tools marked the beginning of a new era in animal systematics, enabling researchers to achieve greater accuracy in establishing genetic relatedness, which is not always reflected in morphology. By comparing genetic information,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances to brain-interface technology provide clearer insight into visual system Carnegie Mellon University engineers and cognitive neuroscientists have demonstrated that a new high-density EEG can capture the brain's neural activity at a higher spatial resolution than ever before. This next generation brain-interface technology is the first non-invasive, high-resolution system of its kind, providing higher density and coverage than any existing system. It has the potential t
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Futurity.org
9 signs your child may be addicted to screens How young children use screen devices, rather than how much time they spend using the devices, may be the strongest predictor of emotional or social problems connected with screen addiction, new research suggests. “Our study has demonstrated that there is more to it than number of hours…” This held true after researchers controlled for screen time in a new study of young children and screen use.
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Ingeniøren
Nordea lukkede it-konsulents særdeles aktive Bitcoin-konto: Nu lægger han sag an Norske Sturle Sunde har købt og solgt bitcoins i mange år og har tjent og har tjent over en million kroner på dette. Han er dermed en af Norges største vekselerere af bitcoins, viser en oversigt fra den norske politiefterforskningsenhed Kripos. Ifølge Nordea har der i år været op til 1.400 transaktioner om måneden gennem hans konto, som alle har med køb og salg af bitcoin at gøre, skriver Dagens
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earthquakes in the Himalaya are bigger than in the Alps because tectonic plates collide fasterEarthquakes that happen in densely populated mountainous regions, such as the Himalaya, spell bigger earthquakes because of a fast tectonic-plate collision, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Submarine volcanoes add to ocean soundscapeMost volcanoes erupt beneath the ocean, but scientists know little about them compared to what they know about volcanoes that eject their lava on dry land.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurons have the right shape for deep learningResearchers unveiled an algorithm that simulates how deep learning could work in our brains. The network shows that certain mammalian neurons have the shape and electrical properties that are well-suited for deep learning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Next generation solvent contributes to next generation biofuel production from biomassCompared to first-generation biofuels produced from foodstuffs, production of second-generation biofuels for daily use is an urgent issue. In this study, a novel carboxylate-type liquid zwitterion was developed as a solvent of biomass, which could dissolve cellulose with very low toxicity to microorganisms. Use of this novel solvent enables significant reduction of energy cost for ethanol producti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computerized biology, or how to control a population of cells with a computerResearchers have published articles about computer control of cellular processes. Hybrid experimental platforms combining microscopes and software are enabling researchers to interface living cells with control algorithms in real time. The two articles illustrate that these solutions make it possible to create new and easily reprogrammable behaviours of cell populations. This external control of l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earthquakes in the Himalaya bigger than in the Alps because tectonic plates collide faster Oxford, December 4, 2017 - Earthquakes that happen in densely populated mountainous regions, such as the Himalaya, spell bigger earthquakes because of a fast tectonic-plate collision, according to a new study in Earth and Planetary Science Letters . Researchers from Geophysical Fluid Dynamics - ETH Zürich in Switzerland, say their findings give people a more complete view of the risk of earthquak
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle IMAGE: Cecilie Svanes underlines that asthma is a dangerous disease if one cannot afford effective treatment. view more Credit: Photo: Evind Sennetset Researchers at the University of Bergen (UiB) in Norway were surprised when they found that intestinal worms, so-called Helminths (Toxocara Canis) from animals, actually have an influence on allergy- and asthma risk in humans. Their results s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traumatic stress and genetic risk of bipolar disorder found to increase suicide attempts Washington, DC, December 4, 2017 - Genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder can increase the risk for suicide attempt, but only among those who also have experienced traumatic stress, reports a study published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) . Suicide in 2015 was the second leading cause of death among teens ages 15-1
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Right-handed or left-handed? Are you born or do you become right-handed or left-handed? A study led by Valentina Parma, researcher at the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA of Trieste, and Professor Umberto Castiello of the University of Padua, just published on Scientific Reports, shows that hand preference is already well defined at the 18th week of gestation. Analysing the characteristics of several foetal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent scientists find new cultivation system to battle parasite causing diarrhea IMAGE: This is a side of Cryptosporidium parasite. view more Credit: University of Kent A research team at the University of Kent has established the first long-term cultivation system at a laboratory scale for the parasite Cryptosporidium , one of the world's worst and most common causes of diarrhoea and death from diarrhoea. Cryptosporidium causes the diarrhoeal disease Cryptosporidiosis,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Popular blood pressure medicine linked with increased risk of skin cancer Recently published research from The University of Southern Denmark and the Danish Cancer Society shows a connection between one of the most common medications for hypertension and skin cancer. Once again, Danish researchers set their sights on antihypertensive medicine containing hydrochlorothiazide, in relation to an increased risk for skin cancer. The researchers have previously demonstrat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helping hands guide robots as they learn Like toddlers, robots can use a little help as they learn to function in the physical world. That's the purpose of a Rice University program that gently guides robots toward the most helpful, human-like ways to collaborate on tasks. Rice engineer Marcia O'Malley and graduate student Dylan Losey have refined their method to train robots by applying gentle physical feedback to machines while they p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in
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New on MIT Technology Review
It Already Makes Financial Sense to Buy an Electric Car The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple, Google at Chinese internet fest shows lure of market Apple's CEO Tim Cook delivers a speech at the opening ceremony of the Fourth World Internet Conference in Wuzhen town in Tongxiang, East China's Zhejiang province, Sunday Dec. 03, 2017. (Chinatopix Via AP) The high-profile attendance of the leaders of Apple and Google at a Chinese conference promoting Beijing's vision of a censored internet highlights the dilemma for Western tech companies trying
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook launches parent-controlled Messenger app for kids This photo provided by Facebook demonstrates Facebook's new Messenger app for kids on an iPhone. Facebook is launching the messaging app for children to chat with their parents and with friends approved by their parents. The free app is aimed at kids under 13, who can't yet have their own accounts under Facebook's rules, though they often do. (Courtesy of Facebook via AP) Facebook is coming for y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprise in the kangaroo family tree – an outsider is a close relative, after all The swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor) is more closely related to the remaining wallaby species and the large red and grey kangaroos and wallaroos than previously assumed. Credit: Queensland University of Technology, Matthew Phillips Ironically, it is jumping genes that indicate the need for a reorganization of the kangaroos' phylogenetic tree. According to a new study by a Senckenberg scientist, p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study proposes greater sharing of data between farmers and archaeologistsA Bristol-led study suggests that developments in precision farming could yield data of great use to archaeological research, and that archaeological data could be valuable for modern farming systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers refine method to instruct robots to collaborate through demonstration Rice University researchers led by graduate student Dylan Losey want to help humans and robots collaborate by enabling interactive tasks like rehabilitation, surgery and training programs in which environments are less predictable. In early studies, Losey and colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, used gentle feedback to train a robot arm to manipulate a coffee cup in real time. Cr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists track sharks picking DNA fragments from the sea Credit: University of Salford Marine ecologists have shown that traces of DNA in the sea can be used to monitor shark populations. Current methods of baiting, hooking and filming sharks, rays and other large fish are invasive and costly and require teams of scientists spending much time at sea. Now, a U.K. study, published today in Scientific Reports , has shown it is possible to monitor these
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquakes in the Himalayas are bigger than in the Alps because tectonic plates collide faster The north face of Mount Everest seen from the path to the base camp in Tibet Autonomous Region, China. Credit: Luca Galuzzi/Wikipedia. Earthquakes that happen in densely populated mountainous regions, such as the Himalaya, spell bigger earthquakes because of a fast tectonic-plate collision, according to a new study. Researchers from Geophysical Fluid Dynamics - ETH Zürich in Switzerland, say thei
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Dagens Medicin
Afdelingslæge på Rigshospitalet: Vi har droppet Sundhedsplatformen i flere sammenhænge og bruger papir igenSundhedsplatformen giver lægerne problemer, når det kommer til registrering og bestillinger på Rigshospitalet. Det fortæller afdelingslæge, der i flere sammenhænge må bruge papir og fax i stedet.
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Dagens Medicin
Prøvesvar forsvinder i SundhedsplatformenPrøvesvar kommer aldrig frem til lægerne, men forsvinder i Sundhedsplatformen. Region Hovedstaden har nu nedsat en task force, der skal finde en løsning på problemet.
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Live Science
Jesus' Secret Revelations? Copy of Forbidden Teachings Found in Egypt A page from the Coptic translation of the First Apocalypse of James from the Coptic Museum in Cairo, Egypt. Credit: Nag Hammadi Library/Oxford University The oldest known copy of a text claiming to be Jesus' teachings to his brother James has been discovered in an ancient Egyptian trash dump, scattered among piles of fifth-century papyrus, ancient tax receipts and bills of sale for wagons and d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research team quantifies blind spots on the protein maps The DNA of every organism holds the blueprints for building all the proteins it needs for its metabolic processes. While researchers already know what the blueprints look like for most proteins, they do not know what many of these proteins actually do in the body. An interdisciplinary team composed of experimental and computational scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LC
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beetles' bright colors used for camouflage instead of warning off predators Yale-NUS College Postdoctoral Fellow Eunice Tan has discovered that the bright colour patterns of beetles are not a warning signal to predators as previously believed, but actually a form of camouflage, turning an old assumption on its head. Dr Tan, along with four collaborators from Australia and Spain, examined 51 species of Australian leaf beetles in their natural habitats, and discovered that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clear leads to fully transparent devices IMAGE: A fully transparent thin-film transistor consisting of a molybdenum sulphide (MoS2) monolayer; hafnium dioxide (HfO2), which is used for coating; and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) contacts. view more Credit: © 2017 WILEY-VCH See-through electronic devices, such as transparent displays, smart windows and concealed circuits require completely translucent components if users are to digitall
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Refrigeration technology to maintain cold-stored mouse sperm viability for 10 days A Japanese research team from Kumamoto University has succeeded in developing a refrigeration preservation technology that maintains the fertilization functionality of mouse sperm for 10 days. Previously, the maximum freezing period was limited to three days, but by extending the preservation period by over three times that amount, it is now possible to send sperm of genetically modified mice to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bronze Age artifacts used meteoric iron You may already be surprised to hear there are iron objects dating back to the Bronze Age, but their meteorite origin is even more astonishing. Though meteorites had already been recognized as one source of this metal, the scientific community couldn't determine whether they accounted for most or simply a few Bronze Age iron artifacts. Albert Jambon, as part of his work at the Institut de minéral
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chance record of an annual mass emergence of enigmatic mantis-flies Being neither mantids nor flies, the peculiar mantis-flies are in fact predatory lacewings which use their mantis-like forelegs to catch prey. While most mantis-flies are known to feed on spider eggs in their immature stages, the larval lifestyle of one subfamily--the Drepanicinae--has remained a mystery. That is until James Dorey , an accomplished insect photographer and student of entomology at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Swarm-based simulation strategy proves significantly shorter When the maths cannot be done by hand, physicists modelling complex systems, like the dynamics of biological molecules in the body, need to use computer simulations. Such complicated systems require a period of time before being measured, as they settle into a balanced state. The question is: how long do computer simulations need to run to be accurate? Speeding up processing time to elucidate hig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Successful implantation of heart pump with power cable behind the ear, a Japan first! IMAGE: The first patient who received an implantation of a heart pump with a power cable behind the neck. view more Credit: Osaka University In March 2017, the Cardiovascular Surgery Group at Osaka University successfully implanted a left ventricular assist device with an internal power cable tunneled through the neck to the head in a patient who was ineligible for a cardiac transplantation, dest
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of key molecules involved in severe malaria Malaria *1 is one of three major infectious diseases *2 affecting approximately 300 million people every year, accounting for about 500,000 deaths, but effective vaccine development has not been successful. Among malaria parasites infecting humans, Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) *3 causes especially severe disease. In addition, acquired immunity to malaria is inefficient, even after repeat
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The Atlantic
Egypt's War on Books There was once a time when school children would hang out at the Al-Karama library in Cairo’s bustling, impoverished Dar El Salam neighborhood. They sought escape from the polluted drudgery of slum life, or just a safe space to finish their homework. But for almost a year now, the library’s decrepit maroon garage door has been rolled shut: In December 2016, Egyptian security forces raided the lib
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Archaeopteryx that wasn't Credit: Oliver Rauhut Paleontologists at LMU correct a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil "Archaeopteryx" to be discovered is actually a predatory dinosaur belonging to the anchiornithid family, which was previously known only from finds made in China. Even 150 million years after its first appearance on our planet, Archaeopteryx is still good for surprises. The so-called Urvogel has att
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bronze Age artifacts used meteoric iron You may already be surprised to hear there are iron objects dating back to the Bronze Age, but their meteorite origin is even more astonishing. Though meteorites had already been recognized as one source of this metal, the scientific community couldn't determine whether they accounted for most or simply a few Bronze Age iron artifacts. Albert Jambon, as part of his work at the Institut de minéral
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood flow altered in brains of preterm newborns vs. full-term infantsCerebral blood flow of key regions of newborns' brains is altered in very premature infants and may provide an early warning sign of disturbed brain maturation well before such injury is visible on conventional imaging, according to a prospective, observational study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grasshopper problem yields insight into quantum theory Some of the optimal lawn shapes, which depend on the distance the grasshopper jumps. Beyond the critical regime, the best configurations are disconnected. Diagram credit: Goulko et al. The Royal Society. Credit: Pixabay. (Phys.org)—Like many mathematical puzzles, the grasshopper problem is simple to state but difficult to solve: A grasshopper lands at a random point on a lawn of area 1, then jump
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Ingeniøren
Budget på 23 milliarder: Skal Danmark trække i nødbremsen til nye togsignaler? Lad os indlede med en undskyldning til læserne: Vi har i overskriften stillet et spørgsmål, som vi ikke kommer til at svare på. Og alle de mellemregninger, vi i stedet bringer, kommer til at sluge mere end et kort toiletbesøg at scrolle igennem. Hvis du køber præmissen, lover vi til gengæld, at når du kommer til bunden af denne artikel, har du hørt en del argumenter for og imod at holde fast i da
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Science | The Guardian
Coin-laden pot and rare pendant among British Museum’s record haul A glorious jewel made from hundreds of tiny pieces of garnet set in gold to form geometric and animal shapes lay for 1,400 years on the breast of an unknown woman until her Norfolk grave was rediscovered by a first year university student. The item is among the record number of treasure finds reported by the British Museum for the year 2016. The pendant and other jewels and coins buried with the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better mastery of heat flow leads to next-generation thermal cloaks Ever heard of the invisibility cloak? It manipulates how light travels along the cloak to conceal an object placed behind it. Similarly, the thermal cloak is designed to hide heated objects from infrared detectors without distorting the temperature outside the cloak. Materials for such cloaks would need to offer zero thermal conductivity to help camouflage the heat. Now, Liujun Xu and colleagues
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows a technique to offset the worry of waiting RIVERSIDE, Calif. ( http://www. ucr. edu ) - Popular music and clichés aren't the only evidence that the waiting is the hardest part. Research backs it up as well; waiting for potentially bad news can be at least as difficult as receiving the news. try lots of things to mitigate the suffering that comes with waiting for exam scores, hospital test results, or the outcome of a job interview. They
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How can humans keep the upper hand on artificial intelligence? IMAGE: The researchers from right to left: Rachid Guerraoui, Alexandre Maurer, El Mahdi El Mhamdi, from the Distributed Programming Laboratory, EPFL. view more Credit: ©Alain Herzog/EPFL In artificial intelligence (AI), machines carry out specific actions, observe the outcome, adapt their behavior accordingly, observe the new outcome, adapt their behavior once again, and so on, learning from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of a mechanism for determining the direction of collective cell migration The phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Until now the mechanism by which each cell takes part in ordered collective movement, in particular what kind of information is used by cells to determine the direction of collective cell movements, has not been well understood. Professors Kazuhiro A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutron stars on the brink of collapseThe exact characteristics of Neutron stars, the densest objects in the universe, are still unknown. An international team of scientists including HITS astrophysicist Dr. Andreas Bauswein has managed to narrow down the size of neutron stars with the aid of computer simulations. The calculations based on data from the LIGO and Virgo observatories suggest that the neutron star radius must be at least
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women are naturally more fit than men Women can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. Quick oxygen uptake places less strain on the body's cells and is considered an important measure of aerobic fitness. "The findings are contrary to the popular assumption that men's bodies are more naturally athletic," said Thomas Beltrame, lead author on the study
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New immunotherapy targets misshapen protein in rare childhood brain cancer = Children with an extremely deadly form of brain cancer might benefit from a new treatment that aims to direct an immune response against an abnormally shaped protein found exclusively on cancer cells, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers. The focus of the study, published online December 4, 2017 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine , is diffuse intrinsic pontine gliom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMMS scientists identify gene associated with metastatic melanoma WORCESTER, MA - A study by Craig J. Ceol, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has revealed a protein active during early embryo development called GDF6 plays a primary role in metastatic melanoma. Published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Dr. Ceol, first author Arvind Venkatesan, a PhD candidate at UMMS, and colleagues, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomer's map reveals location of mysterious fast-moving gas An Australian scientist has created the most detailed map ever of clouds of high-velocity gas in the Universe around us. The map covers the entire sky and shows curious clouds of neutral hydrogen gas that are moving at a different speed to the normal rotation of the Milky Way. It was created by astronomer Dr Tobias Westmeier, from The University of Western Australia node of the International Cent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life could be likelier on icy planets than rocky ones Europa and Enceladus, as imaged by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft. Credit: NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute In the hunt for extra-terrestrial life, scientists tend to take what is known as the "low-hanging fruit approach." This consists of looking for conditions similar to what we experience here on Earth, which include at oxygen, organic molecules, and plenty of liquid water. Interestingl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calcium compound breaks 'like repels like' rule Distinct aromatic alkylation mechanisms. (A) Electrophilic aromatic substitution: F-C alkylation of benzene via Wheland intermediate. (B) Nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron-poor arenes via Meisenheimer or σH-adduct intermediates. (C) Direct nucleophilic aromatic substitution of benzene. Credit: (c) Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aao5923 (Phys.org)—A combined team of chemists fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows genetic differences between uptown and downtown rats living in Manhattan Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from Fordham University and Providence College, both in the U.S., has found that there are small but discernible genetic differences between rats living uptown versus downtown on the island of Manhattan. In their paper published in the journal Molecular Ecology , the group describes trapping rats from one end of the island to the ot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How identity data is turning toxic for big companies We want your data. Credit: gualtiero boffi / Shutterstock.com Google might be in trouble for collecting the personal data of its users, but many companies have a growing incentive to rid their hands of the data that users entrust them with. This is because of growing costs of holding onto it. A major cause is the rising number of cyber attacks where hackers steal the identity information held by
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Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: Rey May Break the Force's Status Quo As the release date for Star Wars: The Last Jedi approaches at ludicrous speed, stories on the creation of the movie—and teases about what might happen in it, or even after it—are beginning to pile up on all sides of the information superhighway. Don't know what to listen to or who to believe? Dear friends, just trust in the Force and keep reading. Rey May Break the Force's Status Quo The Source:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yelp reviewers take a dimmer view of nursing homes than the feds The stars are not aligned when it comes to online reviews of nursing homes. A new study by the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology shows that Yelp reviewers give nursing homes significantly less favorable ratings than those found on the federal website, Nursing Home Compare, run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. "Consumers view the quality of nursing homes as poorer than the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gene-based model suggests, for microbes, it's not who you are but what you do CAMBRIDGE, MD (Dec. 1, 2017)--Amazing diversity hides beneath the surface of the ocean where tiny microbes work busily; transforming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into oxygen, converting sunlight into energy, and breaking down nitrogen gas to serve as food. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researcher Victoria Coles and her team have developed a new tool that advances o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With the right tools, we can mine cities Cities like Melbourne are a store for such huge amounts of resources that they could be used as urban mines. Credit: Donaldytong (own work)/Wikimedia From 1900 to 2010, the amount of materials accumulated in buildings and infrastructure across the world increased 23-fold . We are depleting our resources at unprecedented rates . Instead of extracting dwindling raw materials from nature at ever-inc
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Futurity.org
Genomes and patient transfers reveal superbug’s spread Using data from a 2008 outbreak of one of the most feared “superbugs” and modern genetic sequencing techniques, a team successfully modeled and predicted the way the organism spread among dozens of health care facilities. The approach can tell if the bug is spreading within a hospital, nursing home, or long-term acute care hospital, or if a new patient transferred from another facility brought it
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Futurity.org
DNA tests say Yetis are actually these animals People have reported sightings of Yeti or the Abominable Snowman—a mysterious, ape-like creature that looms large in the mythology of Nepal and Tibet—for centuries. Some have spotted footprints. Generation after generation have passed down stories. Now, a new DNA study of purported Yeti samples offers insight into their origins and suggests it may all be a myth after all. Researchers analyzed nin
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Horseshoe BatFactors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The way we were—climate and human evolution A view of the Turkwel River before it flows into Lake Turkana. Lake Turkana is the largest desert lake on Earth. Credit: Kevin Uno It has been an extraordinary year of explorations and discoveries at the Earth Institute. During the month of December, as 2017 draws to a close, we will be sharing stories that highlight some of the outstanding work of our researchers. The story of human evolution is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal asteroid Psyche is all set for an early visit from NASA Credit: NASA/JPL Three times further away from the sun than the Earth lies an enormous lump of metal. Around 252km in diameter, the metallic "M-class" asteroid 16 Psyche is the target of NASA's next mission to the belt of giant rocks that encircles the inner solar system. And the space agency now plans to visit it much sooner than originally planned. Not only has the launch has been brought forwa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clear leads to fully transparent devices iA fully transparent thin-film transistor consisting of a molybdenum sulphide (MoS2) monolayer; hafnium dioxide (HfO2), which is used for coating; and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) contacts. Credit: 2017 WILEY-VCH Large-area, two-dimensional semiconductors wired through transparent oxide conductors produce high-performance see-through electronics. See-through electronic devices, such as transpa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flying chariots and exotic birds—how 17th century dreamers planned to reach the moon Credit: kdshutterman/Shutterstock.com People have been dreaming about space travel for hundreds of years, long before the arrival of the spectacular technologies behind space exploration today – mighty engines roaring fire and thunder, shiny metal shapes gliding in the vastness of the universe. We've only travelled into space in the last century, but humanity's desire to reach the moon is far fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers determine optimal geometry for CBRAM computer storage Atomic-scale computer simulation of a CBRAM cell subjected to 1mV voltage: electron trajectories (blue and red lines); copper atoms (grey); silicon and oxygen atoms (orange). Credit: Mathieu Luisier / ETH Zurich CBRAM (conductive bridging random access memory) could play a fundamental role in memory in the future by storing data in a non-volatile (i.e., near-permanent) way. To reduce the size and
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Popular Science
This year's flu season looks like a bad one—and it could be coming early When it comes to flu season, the only thing we can be absolutely certain of is this: it will happen every year. We are notoriously bad at predicting pretty much everything about influenza, including the timing and severity of the season, so we rely on small clues to try to get ahead of the virus. And so far, this year’s hints are pointing to particularly nasty—and early—flu season. So get your sh
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Dagens Medicin
Syddanmark og SDU vil uddanne læger i EsbjergSydvestjysk Sygehus og Syddansk Universitet foreslår, at der oprettes en kandidatuddannelse i medicin i Esbjerg for at tiltrække læger, inden de er færdiguddannet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurons have the right shape for deep learning IMAGE: This is an illustration of a multi-compartment neural network model for deep learning. Left: Reconstruction of pyramidal neurons from mouse primary visual cortex. Right: Illustration of simplified pyramidal neuron models.... view more Credit: CIFAR Deep learning has brought about machines that can 'see' the world more like humans can, and recognize language. And while deep learni
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Submarine volcanoes add to ocean soundscape IMAGE: A steam plume rises from Bogoslof volcano as hot lava heats the seawater during an eruption in August 2017. view more Credit: Photo by Dave Withrow (NOAA/Fisheries) WASHINGTON, D.C., December 4, 2017 -- Most volcanoes erupt beneath the ocean, but scientists know little about them compared to what they know about volcanoes that eject their lava on dry land. Gabrielle Tepp of the Alask
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble sees galaxy cluster warping space and time Much like the eclectic group of space rebels in the upcoming film Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing innumerable galaxies flung ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Undersea topography generates hot spots of ocean mixing A view of Antarctica, as seen by the researchers from the deck of the Antarctic Research Support Vessel Laurence Gould. Credit: Andrew Thompson/Caltech Using underwater robots in the waters surrounding Antarctica, scientists at Caltech have shown that the intersection of strong currents with the slope of landmasses rising from the ocean floor makes a significant contribution to the mixing of diff
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomer's map reveals location of mysterious fast-moving gas Credit: University of Western Australia An Australian scientist has created the most detailed map ever of clouds of high-velocity gas in the universe around us. The map covers the entire sky and shows curious clouds of neutral hydrogen gas that are moving at a different speed to the normal rotation of the Milky Way. It was created by astronomer Dr Tobias Westmeier, from The University of Western
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sporting sector may be key to reducing violence against women The use of gender-neutral language in sports could help in the fight on violence against women. Credit: Swinburne University of Technology A roundtable led by academics and sporting professionals has explored the relationship between sporting codes and violence against women. The roundtable conference was the first part of a project by researchers from Swinburne and La Trobe University to promote
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A quest to find 'the best' may bring out the worst in shoppers Credit: CC0 Public Domain If it feels like holiday shopping brings out the worst in people—you might be right. Consumers looking for the "best"—in terms of value, quality, fit, or any other measure—are more likely to engage in immoral behavior , according to new research by Kelly Goldsmith, associate professor of marketing at Vanderbilt's Owen Graduate School of Management. The search for an op
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crop gene discovery gets to the root of food security Credit: University of Queensland Researchers from The University of Queensland have discovered that a key gene which controls flowering time in wheat and barley crops also directs the plant's root growth. Project leader Dr Lee Hickey from the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI) said the discovery was a major breakthrough in understanding the genetics of root developmen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Voyagers in popular culture Each Voyager spacecraft carries a copy of the Golden Record, which has been featured in several works of science fiction. The record's protective cover, with instructions for playing its contents, is shown at left. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Whether you're traveling across cities, continents or even oceans this holiday season, there is no long-haul flight quite like that of the Voyagers. This year,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research explores how corporate law undermines financial stability Credit: University of Warwick With the effects of the 2007 credit crunch still being felt around the world, a new book by Dr Andreas Kokkinis, Assistant Professor in the University of Warwick's School of Law, explores whether traditional models of corporate governance fail to promote financial stability. Corporate Law and Financial Instability (Routledge, 2018) explores the tension between corpor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why remote Antarctica is so important in a warming world Much of the continent’s ice is slowly sliding towards the sea. Credit: R Bindschadler / wiki Ever since the ancient Greeks speculated a continent must exist in the south polar regions to balance those in the north , Antarctica has been popularly described as remote and extreme. Over the past two centuries, these factors have combined to create, in the human psyche, an almost mythical land – an id
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A rapid transition of the world's energy systems This historic image of an oil field in Pennsylvania (USA) symbolizes the change from a coal-based industry to a largely petroleum-fueled industry at the turn of the 20th century. This transformation also led to profound social changes. Credit: Deutsches Museum, Archive: BN25643 The world is changing but not quite fast enough. The warming of the Earth, caused by rising greenhouse gas emissions, ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A microlensing event seen from three positions in space A graphic of the current orbital position of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers observed a microlensing event from three different locations in space - Spitzer, the Earth, and the Kepler K-2 satellite - and used them to measure for the first time, in principle without ambiguity, the mass and location of a microlensing body 77 Jupiter-masses in size. Credit: NASA/Spitzer Space Telescope The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The function of many proteins remains unclear The DNA of every organism holds the blueprints for building all the proteins it needs for its metabolic processes. While researchers already know what the blueprints look like for most proteins, they do not know what many of these proteins actually do in the body. An interdisciplinary team composed of experimental and computational scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LC
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cell-derived drug delivery systems Schematic demonstrating the production of CDNs. CDNs can be produced “on-demand” in larger quantities within a shorter time frame than isolating the same amount of exosomes. Credit: National University of Singapore NUS pharmaceutical scientists have developed a cost-effective method to produce cell-derived nanovesicles (CDNs) for bio-inspired drug delivery applications. Drug Delivery Systems (DDS
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New setup for image recognition AI lets a program think on its feet Artificial intelligence is getting some better perspective. Like a person who can read someone else’s penmanship without studying lots of handwriting samples, next-gen image recognition AI can more easily identify familiar sights in new situations. Made from a new type of virtual building block called capsules , these programs may cut down the enormous amount of data needed to train current image
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Submarine volcanoes add to ocean soundscape A steam plume rises from Bogoslof volcano as hot lava heats the seawater during an eruption in August 2017. Credit: Dave Withrow (NOAA/Fisheries) Most volcanoes erupt beneath the ocean, but scientists know little about them compared to what they know about volcanoes that eject their lava on dry land. Gabrielle Tepp of the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the U.S. Geological Survey thinks that with
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cognitive science
Another accolade for Engati... now listed as a top 5 platforms - this time from our friends in Indonesia - Engati also supports Bahasa and already has paying customers in the country. What are you waiting for - lets Engati at www.engati.com A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
6h
Dagens Medicin
Populær blodtryksmedicin forbundet med øget risiko for hudkræftEn ny undersøgelse viser sammenhæng mellem et af de hyppigst brugte midler mod forhøjet blodtryk og kræft i huden.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Could Intelligent Machines of the Future Own the Rights to Their Own Creations? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Intellectual property may be the legal term for creations, including literary or artistic, but there is something inherently human about it as well. It has long been taken that only human beings are capable of being intelligent in its fullest form, and the concept o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Jupiter bluesThe Juno spacecraft captured this image when the spacecraft was only 11,747 miles (18,906 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter's clouds—that's roughly as far as the distance between New York City and Perth, Australia. The color-enhanced image, which captures a cloud system in Jupiter's northern hemisphere, was taken on Oct. 24, 2017 at 10:24 a.m. PDT (1:24 p.m. EDT) when Juno was at a latitude of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring the ideological antecedents of science acceptance and rejection Not every kind of science scepticism is the same. For example, scepticism about climate change is linked to political ideology, whereas scepticism about vaccinations consistently correlates with religious beliefs. In contrast, scepticism about genetically modified foods is not fuelled by religious or political ideology. These are some of the major findings of a new research study conducted by UvA
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals insights into the nature of protoplanetary disc around HD 169142 ZIMPOL/SPHERE PDI observations of HD 169142 in VBB. Credit: Bertrang et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—A new study based on observations conducted via the Zurich imaging polarimeter (ZIMPOL) reveals insights into the nature of a protoplanetary disc surrounding the star HD 169142. The research, presented in a paper published November 24 on arXiv.org, uncovers sub-structures and offsets in the dust distribu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the smallest damage at the surface of semiconductor crystals develops into large defects When processing semiconductor wafers, small surface defects may lead to large defects inside and to steps on large surface areas. Credit: Figure: D. Hänschke/KIT Using non-destructive imaging methods, a team of scientists at KIT obtains three-dimensional insights into the interior of crystals. They determine important data about line-shaped defects that largely influence the deformation behavior
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Science | The Guardian
'Would you be willing?': words to turn a conversation around (and those to avoid) I t’s not what you say, it’s how you say it – isn’t it? According to language analysts, we may have this wrong. ‘‘We are pushed and pulled around by language far more than we realise,” says Elizabeth Stokoe , professor of social interaction at Loughborough University. Stokoe and her colleagues have analysed thousands of hours of recorded conversations, from customer services to mediation hotlines
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Feed: All Latest
How Two Guys and an Internet Forum Built a Kickass Computer The China trip was only supposed to last 10 days. For Konstantinos Karatsevidis, the 23-year-old CEO of a new gadget maker called Eve, it was just a quick check-in to make sure production was rolling smoothly on his latest product. Karatsevidis and the rest of the nine-person Eve team have spent the last few years building the V, a laptop-tablet hybrid in the mold of the Microsoft Surface, workin
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The 'supermoon' celestial wonder seen across the UKSkywatchers have enjoyed spectacular views of the Moon appearing larger and brighter in the sky.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Shape-Shifting Metals Could Generate Electricity from Wasted Heat Half a decade ago a scientist, an engineer and a businessman met in a Dublin backyard to conduct an experiment. They heated water in an electric tea maker, then poured it into a bisected segment of pipe. At the bottom of the half-pipe lay a length of wire, and one of the men held a ruler next to it. As the hot water gushed through the pipe, the wire shortened by several centimeters; when they pou
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New solvent contributes to next-generation biofuel production from biomass After dissolving plant biomass by the novel solvent, carboxylate-type liquid zwitterion, hydrolysis and fermentation were consecutively carried out in one reaction pot for conversion into ethanol. Credit: Kanazawa University Compared to first-generation biofuels produced from food crops, production of second-generation biofuels for daily use is an urgent issue. In this study, researchers develope
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable solvent platform for photon upconversion increases solar utilization efficiency Deep eutectic solvents used as the medium of sensitizer and emitter chromophores (left) and the photon upconverter developed (right). The sample converts low-intensity (a few mW) green light into clear blue emission and demonstrates high thermal stability during exposure to a burner flame for 1 min. Credit: Yoichi Murakami The conversion of solar energy into electricity is currently restricted by
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Live Science
The Biggest Myth About the 'Bee Apocalypse' In 2006, an ominous term entered the public lexicon: colony collapse disorder. The mysterious, somewhat vague word describes instances where entire colonies of honeybees abruptly disappear, leaving behind their queens. Colony collapse disorder (CCD) has since fueled claims of an ongoing " bee apocalypse ," which summarizes the perilous plight of our pollinator pals. But despite panicked cla
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Live Science
Lava Gulps Down GoPro Camera, Which Records the Entire, Fiery Affair VIDEO The internet is awash with extreme videos, but footage of lava barreling toward and then melting the lens of a GoPro camera may be one of the hottest (literally) recordings online. The fiery affair happened on Aug. 10, 2016, when Kilauea EcoGuides tours owner and lead guide Erik Storm took a group of tourists from San Francisco to Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, according to Nati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineering electron pathways in 2-D topological insulators Schematic representation of the electronic behavior in the device described in the article. The arrows represent quantum channels where electrons propagate. Eectrons are allowed to change direction only at the central area, resulting under certain conditions in constructive interference. Credit: CIC nanoGUNE In a recent article published in Physical Review Letters a research collaborative has rep
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Live Science
Is Einstein's 'Theory of Happiness' as Successful as General Relativity? This autographed photo of Albert Einstein with his tongue out was sold at auction for $125,000. Credit: Arthur Sasse/Nate D. Sanders Auctions In 1915, Albert Einstein published his General Theory of Relativity , arguing that the universe consists of a fundamental fabric: spacetime. Moreover, he said, this fabric is warped by massive objects. The resulting bending and curving explains what we pe
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Ingeniøren
Kaos med nyt journalsystem i Aarhus: Ældre må vente unødigt længe på hjemmepleje Et nyt digitalt journalsystem i Aarhus er årsag til »kaos« og en pukkel af sager med borgernes anmodning om hjemmepleje eller hjemmehjælp, som ikke bliver behandlet rettidigt. Det skriver Aarhus Stiftstidende. Systemet Columna Cura fra Systematic har Version2 tidligere omtalt for at være forsinket, så 7.000 hjemmesygeplejersker, social- og sundhedsassistenter og andre brugere under forvaltningen
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #29: Chatbot erstatter advokat og fikser din skilsmisse Robotter og kunstig intelligens online er blevet vores trofaste samtalepartnere. Du kan få nyheder, bestille en bog, få vejrudsigt, købe en pizza eller blive skilt. Servicen Do Not Pay kan sågar hjælpe dig med at undgå at betale p-bøder. Chatbots er det nye sort. De kan være simple programmerede robotter, og de kan være neurale netværk, som lærer mere og mere om dig og dine vaner. De vil på godt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How dormant listeria hides in cells Listeria monocytogenes (in red) infecting tissue cells. Credit: Institut Pasteur A serious infection of dietary origin that is caused by the Listeria monocytogenes bacterium, listeriosis is associated with severe clinical symptoms and a high mortality rate in individuals with weakened immune systems. INRA scientists, working in collaboration with their colleagues at the Institut Pasteur, have dem
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Ingeniøren
VW-direktør: »Jeg blev instrueret i at lyve« En tidligere direktør i Volkswagen hævder, at han blev instrueret i at lyve over for en embedsmand i Californiens miljømyndighed. Det skriver Bloomberg Technology . Oliver Schmidt, daværende juridiske direktør i Volkswagens amerikanske miljøafdeling (U.S. Engineering and Environment Office), skrev i et brev til dommeren, at han, da han mødtes med embedsmanden Alberto Ayala, havde fået udstukket »
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In a first, Galileo’s gravity experiment is re-created in space Galileo’s most famous experiment has taken a trip to outer space. The result? Einstein was right yet again. The experiment confirms a tenet of Einstein’s theory of gravity with greater precision than ever before. According to science lore, Galileo dropped two balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to show that they fell at the same rate no matter their composition. Although it seems unlikely that G
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems Via a cannula introduced into the infarction area, the cells loaded with magnetic nanoparticles are injected into the damaged heart muscle tissue of the mouse. Credit: Dr. Annika Ottersbach/Uni Bonn How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bonn reports an innovative method: Mus
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Norsk firma jagter danske fagfolk og fond søger direktør På dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-norsk-firma-jagter-danske-fagfolk-fond-soeger-direktoer-11444 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly efficient photocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide to methane (a) The figure shows the color change of the photocatalyst developed by the research team. It shows that the reduced titanium dioxide absorbs light more towards the right and the color gets darker.(b) A graph comparing the methane production efficiencies of the photocatalysts developed by the research team and the existing photocatalysts. The methane production efficiency of the photocatalyst (0.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop semi-transparent solar cell for possible window coating Concept of the visual transparency improvement of the semi-transparent solar cells by considering the human luminosity curve. Credit: University of Tokyo Researchers at The University of Tokyo have developed a semi-transparent solar cell. Instead of conventional silicon, the cell uses the organic-inorganic hybrid material perovskite to generate electricity. This material efficiently absorbs blue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality for bacteria Individual cells are digitally guided along pre-specified trajectories of fluorescent gene expression. 48 Escherichia coli cells are arranged vertically in the image. Time moves on towards the right. Each row therefore presents fluorescent gene expression of an individual cell over time, controlled by the researchers' computer program. Credit: Remy Chait Scientists at the Institute of Science and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Model of galaxy and star cluster formation corrected This is a long-exposure image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope of massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744. It shows some of the faintest and youngest galaxies detected in space. Credit: NASA/ESA/STScI When galaxy clusters and globular star clusters form, a phenomenon called "violent relaxation" occurs. After interacting intensely, the thousands or even millions of bodies reach a state of relative gra
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Ingeniøren
Sådan knækker Vestas kurven for støj fra større vindmøllerVIDEO: Støj fra vindmøller vokser nu ikke længere med størrelsen. Vestas forklarer hvordan.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher risk of dying due to heart cell damage without any symptoms occurs during or after non-heart surgery DALLAS, December 4, 2017 -- Surgery that doesn't involve the heart may cause damage to the heart in people with known or at high risk of developing heart disease and was associated with an increased risk of death, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation . Heart cell damage during or after non-heart surgery, known as perioperative myocardial injury (PMI)
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The Atlantic
America’s Lost Einsteins Consider two American children, one rich and one poor, both brilliant. The rich one is much more likely to become an inventor, creating products that help improve America’s quality of life. The poor child probably will not. That’s the conclusion of a new study by the Equality of Opportunity project, a team of researchers led by the Stanford economist Raj Chetty. Chetty and his team look at who be
9h
Dagens Medicin
Biosimilar til bryst- og mavekræft får godkendelse i USAFDA godkender første biosimilar til behandling af visse typer bryst- og mavekræft.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Schoolgirl invents low-cost lead detecting deviceGitanjali Rao's device uses carbon nanotubes to detect the presence of lead in water.
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Ingeniøren
Sådan gendanner du tabte familiebilleder med gratis værktøj Forleden fik jeg en henvendelse fra en ven, hvis søsters familie var havnet i digital ulykke. Problemet var en ekstern Iomega-disk af ældre dato. Den var blevet brugt til lagring af familiebilleder i tidens løb. Det vil sige billeder af børnene, da de var mindre og den slags. Nu var disken stået af og billederne lå kun på den. Følgende er en nogenlunde nøjagtig (enkelte detaljer fortaber sig i hu
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Science | The Guardian
Supermoon skies: your best photographs We asked you to share photos as parts of the world experienced the only supermoon of 2017 . Here are some of our favourite images Continue reading...
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Dagens Medicin
FDA godkender lægemiddel mod hjerteanfaldAmgen's lægemiddel Repatha er godkendt til forebyggelse af hjerteanfald i USA.
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Science : NPR
New Drugs Could Prevent Migraine Headaches For Some People Simone Golob/Getty Images Simone Golob/Getty Images People who experience frequent migraines may soon have access to a new class of drugs. In a pair of large studies, two drugs that tweak brain circuits involved in migraine each showed they could reduce the frequency of attacks without causing side effects, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine . "They offer the first migraine
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Science-Based Medicine
Move over, Christopher Shaw, there’s a new antivaccine scientist in town If there’s one thing about antivaccine activists, it’s that they rely on bad science (and the shameless misinterpretation of valid science) to give the impression that there is solid scientific evidence behind their pseudoscientific claims. I’ve discussed examples—and deconstructed them, explaining why they didn’t show what the investigators claim they showed—more times than I can remember, most
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The Neurocritic
Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 1: Aaron Hernandez Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such as boxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations of tau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are
11h
Ingeniøren
Læserne har en løsning: Katapult til elektriske passagerfly? Seattle-firmaet Zunum er i gang med at udvikle et elfly, der med 12 passagerer om bord skal kunne flyve 300 km på ren eldrift. Måske endda 1.100 km med hjælp fra en turbine- baseret række­viddeforlænger. Det fik ing.dk’s debattører til at udforske mulighederne. Eller de bad om at få lidt teknologisk realitetssans ind i diskussionen. For er det overhovedet muligt at transportere passagerer med ele
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venezuela creating digital currency amid financing crisis Over the past year, the Venezuelan bolivar has plummeted 95.5 percent against the dollar on the black market Venezuela is creating a digital currency to combat a financial blockade by the United States, President Nicolas Maduro announced Sunday. The Petro will be backed by Venezuela's oil and gas reserves and its gold and diamond holdings, the president said in his weekly television program. "Thi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea turtles' sad fate: from restaurant menus to plastic 'soup' Growing mounds of plastic in the oceans and on beaches are often fatal for sea turtles Gently, Kenzo the sea turtle is lowered onto a beach where a scattering of bottle caps, candy wrappers, yoghurt cups and discarded flipflops scar an otherwise idyllic setting. As its human handlers step aside, Kenzo struggles out of the harness, pushes hard with its flippers on the sand, and slides into small w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia competition inquiry targets Facebook, Google Australian regulators are to look at the impact of digital platforms like Google and Facebook on competition in media and advertising markets Digital platforms like Facebook and Google will be at the centre of an Australian inquiry announced Monday examining their impact on competition in media and advertising markets. Like elsewhere in the world, traditional sources of circulation and advertisin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graduate students argue against taxing tuition waivers Shawn Rhoads is photographed at Georgetown University in Washington, Friday, Dec. 1, 2017. Good grades and hard work earned Rhoads a scholarship and a modest stipend to pursue a PhD program in neuroscience at Georgetown University in the nation's capital. But if the House Republican tax bill becomes law, Rhoads will see his tax bill balloon and will struggle to make ends meet. (AP Photo/Carolyn K
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook opens new London hub, creating 800 jobs "The UK's flourishing entrepreneurial ecosystem and international reputation for engineering excellence makes it one of the best places in the world to build a tech company," said Nicola Mendelsohn, Facebook's vice president for Europe Social media titan Facebook will open a new office in London on Monday that is set to be its biggest engineering hub outside America, the company has announced. Th
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cognitive science
How a Human-Machine Mind-Meld Could Make Robots Smarter: "Kindred AI is teaching robots new tasks using human virtual-reality 'pilots.' The ultimate goal is to create a new kind of artificial intelligence." A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Ingeniøren
Automatisering kan koste 375 millioner jobbetOp mod en tredjedel af arbejdsstyrken i Tyskland og USA kan blive tvunget til at finde nyt arbejde i 2030.
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cognitive science
How a Human-Machine Machine Mind-Meld Could Make Robots Smarter: "Kindred AI is teaching robots new tasks using human virtual-reality 'pilots.' The ultimate goal is to create a new kind of artificial intelligence." A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
11h
cognitive science
Decoding images, movie clips, dreams, action intentions with brain scans and machine-learning algorithms [short animated review of the research] A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? This traffic teaser will drive you to distraction Hi guzzlers, Key to ignition. Brain in gear. Now drive: Five cars are driving round a roundabout. In order, the drivers are Akira, Basho, Chie, Daichi and Etsu. The cars have licence plates numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, but not necessarily in that order. Each driver can see only the licence plate of the car in front of them and the car behind them, but not of the car they are driving. All the driver
12h
cognitive science
The Benefits of Omega 3's On the Brain: Can Fish Oil Help Depression? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
12h
Ingeniøren
Tre uventede udfordringer ved at få ny chef Når din virksomhed ansætter en ny leder, vil du ofte opleve en række klassiske udfordringer. Eksempelvis kan det være, at du og din chefs personligheder går hinanden på klingen, eller at din nye chef forventer du møder endnu tidligere på arbejde. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Jobfinder hjælper dig med at løse et udvalg af typiske uenigheder med en ny leder. Manglende forståelse for dit
12h
cognitive science
Metaphysics of metamorphosis: The swarming, ever-changing character of the living world challenges our deepest assumptions about the nature of reality A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marijuana use may not aid patients in opioid addiction treatment IMAGE: Research by Wilson, WSU College of Nursing, shows that frequent marijuana use seems to strengthen the relationship between pain and depression and anxiety. view more Credit: Washington State University SPOKANE, Wash. - Many patients who are being treated for opioid addiction in a medication-assisted treatment clinic use marijuana to help manage their pain and mood symptoms. But new r
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Patients only use about half of opioids prescribed after hysterectomy ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Doctors may be prescribing nearly twice the number of opioids than what the average patient needs after a hysterectomy, a new study suggests. Researchers at the University of Michigan tracked opioid use in roughly 100 women two weeks after undergoing a hysterectomy for benign reasons. Women were commonly prescribed about 40 hydrocodone pills, but on average, had nearly 22 lefto
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Next generation solvent contributes to next generation biofuel production from biomass IMAGE: After dissolving plant biomass by the novel solvent, carboxylate-type liquid zwitterion, hydrolysis and fermentation were consecutively carried out in one reaction pot for conversion into ethanol. view more Credit: Kanazawa University [Background] The first-generation biofuel, industrialized, ethanol, is produced from foodstuffs like maize, and thus poses great concern about a po
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood flow altered in brains of preterm newborns vs. full-term infants IMAGE: This figure represents the cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps, corresponding anatomical image aligned to the CBF map, and the regions of interest examined. The scale indicates the quantitative value... view more Credit: Credit: M. Bouyssi-Kobar, et al., The Journal of Pediatrics . WASHINGTON - (Dec. 4, 2017) - Cerebral blood flow (CBF) of key regions of newborns' brains is altered in
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New easy-to-use tool can help determine Alzheimer's risk, similar to pediatric growth curves A simple new tool that tracks cognitive performance in adults aims to help physicians identify people who may be on the path to Alzheimer disease or another form of dementia. The tool, called the QuoCo (cognitive quotient), is published in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal ) . "Similar to 'growth charts' used in pediatrics, the QuoCo cognitive charts allow physicians to plot cognitive
14h
Science | The Guardian
US military agency invests $100m in genetic extinction technologies A US military agency is investing $100m in genetic extinction technologies which could wipe out malarial mosquitoes, invasive rodents or other species, emails released under freedom of information rules show. The documents suggest that the US’s secretive Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa), has become the world’s largest funder of “gene drive” research , and will raise tensions ahea
14h
Scientific American Content: Global
Yeti Claims Don't Bear Up The Yeti. Also known as the abominable snowman . It’s a legendary primate some people believe exists in the Himalayas and adjacent freezing lands. But what do you get when you use modern DNA techniques to analyze bodily samples allegedly left by yetis? Well, eight times out of nine, you wind up with the genetic signature of your non-abominable neighborhood bear. These unmysterious results are
14h
Ingeniøren
Softwarerobotter holder styr på løbske CPR-numre i Esbjerg Kommune Virksomheden Formpipes såkaldte Kvalitetskontrol er en regelmotor, der kontinuerligt skanner en organisations filer for at spotte følsom data på afveje. Hovedtanken er at gøre det muligt for virksomheder at afværge data-sjusk, der under den kommende persondataforordning kan give klækkelige bøder, men samtidig gøre det muligt at bruge og dele data. Det har man fx gjort i Esbjerg Kommune, hvor 30 s
15h
Ingeniøren
Styrelses kritik af energikonsulenter hviler på tvivlsom statistik Når Energistyrelsen hvert år bedømmer kvaliteten af danske energikonsulenters arbejde, sker det på baggrund af en undersøgelse, som næppe kan kaldes repræsentativ, og som kan favorisere deltagere, der er utilfredse med deres energimærkning. Det konkluderer professor Tom Engsted, der er økonomiprofessor ved Aarhus Universitet. For når styrelsen årligt kritiserer energikonsulenter for, at de ikke u
15h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 4. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: I 1927 åbnede en automobilhandel i Hillerød. Den blev i år genopført i Den Gamle By i Aarhus. Men hvor mange biler var der alt i alt i D
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
What is a 'supermoon'?Tom Kerrs from the Royal Observatory explains the phenomenon that causes the moon to look larger and brighter.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sustainable solvent platform for photon upconversion increases solar utilization efficiency IMAGE: Deep eutectic solvents used as the medium of sensitizer and emitter chromophores (left) and the photon upconverter developed (right). The sample converts low-intensity (a few mW) green light into clear... view more Credit: Yoichi Murakami The conversion of solar energy into electricity is currently restricted by a concept known as the Shockley-Quesser limit. This limitation allows only
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Futurity.org
This combo may cause odd patches on Earth’s core Mysterious patches on Earth’s core that dampen seismic waves could be the result of ancient seawater chemically reacting with iron under extreme conditions. These thin patches of dense rock have confounded scientists for decades. They are located about 1,800 miles (2,900 kilometers) beneath Earth’s surface just above the core-mantle boundary that separates the planet’s molten metal heart from its
17h
Futurity.org
This quality predicts which poetry we enjoy New psychology research points to the factors that explain why we find particular poems aesthetically pleasing—results that enhance our understanding of “why we like what we like.” “People disagree on what they like, of course,” explains Amy Belfi, a postdoctoral fellow in New York University’s department of psychology at the time of the study and the study’s lead author. “While it may seem obvio
18h
Science | The Guardian
Researchers share $22m Breakthrough prize as science gets rock star treatment The most glitzy event on the scientific calendar took place on Sunday night when the Breakthrough Foundation gave away $22m (£16.3m) in prizes to dozens of physicists, biologists and mathematicians at a ceremony in Silicon Valley. The winners this year include five researchers who won $3m (£2.2m) each for their work on cell biology, plant science and neurodegenerative diseases, two mathematicians
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
Inflating the Universe with Prize-Winning Cosmologist David Spergel Inflating the Universe with Prize-Winning Cosmologist David Spergel This year’s Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics was awarded to the team behind NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, or WMAP, a space telescope that launched in 2001 to map the cosmic microwave background—the earliest, oldest light we can detect from the universe’s infancy. The WMAP team will split the $3 million awa
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NYT > Science
Retro Report: In a Deadly Obsession, Food Is the Enemy The demons that plagued Ms. Carpenter led to extreme dieting . As is typical with anorexics, no amount of weight loss was enough for her. Fans at her live performances were shocked by what they saw. The 145 pounds once on her 5-foot-4-inch frame had dropped to 91 pounds in 1975. By September 1982, she was down to 77 pounds. That was when she was admitted to Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan with a
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Science | The Guardian
Supermoon trilogy begins – in pictures A series of three supermoons will start on the 3rd December 2017, continuing on the 1st and 31st of January 2018. The lunar phenomenon occurs when a full moon is at its closest point to earth so it appears larger than usual Your best pictures of the supermoon Continue reading...
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