MOST POPULAR

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity prevented in mice fed high-fat dietResearchers activated the Hedgehog protein pathway in the fat cells of mice. After eight weeks of eating a high-fat diet, mice that had been engineered with genes to activate the pathway didn't gain weight, but control animals whose Hedgehog pathways were not activated became obese.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transgender youth avoid health care due to discomfort with doctors Close to half of transgender young Canadians aren't accessing health care when they need it, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. The study also found that increasing confidence in health-care providers is important for improving the physical and mental health of transgender youth. Researchers analyzed data from 923 youth ages 14-25 who responded to a countrywide tran
16h
Ingeniøren
Ny vaccinefabrik gør Bavarian Nordic uafhængig af underleverandører I begyndelsen af 2018 går biotekvirksomheden Bavarian Nordic i gang med byggeriet af en ny vaccinefabrik, som vil 20-doble selskabets nuværende fyldekapacitet. Efter planen skal den stå klar i 2021. Mere end en halv milliard kroner er der sat af til byggeriet, som bliver en udvidelse af fabrikken i Kvistgård i Nordsjælland. Hovedformålet med byggeriet er at skabe det bedst mulige udgangspunkt for
12h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poll: At least one-fourth of Asian Americans report workplace, housing discrimination Boston, MA --This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination. Click here
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First DNA sequence from a single mitochondriaDNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This knowledge will help to better illuminate the underlying mechanisms of many disorders that start with accumulated mutations in individual mitochondria and provide clues about how patients might respond to specific therapies.
5min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTA researchers show that sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact IMAGE: M. Ann McFadyen, UTA associate professor of strategic management, and James Campbell Quick, the John and Judy Goolsby-Jacqualyn A. Fouse Endowed Chair in UTA's Goolsby Leadership Academy, revisited sexual harassment... view more Credit: UT Arlington Two University of Texas at Arlington researchers have revisited workplace sexual harassment issues after the initial study was done nearly
5min
The Scientist RSS
Dengue Vaccine Program Halted Over Safety IssuesThe drug may worsen future infections for people who haven't already been exposed to the virus.
9min
The Scientist RSS
Clinical Trials Reporting for Pharma-Sponsored Trials Shows ImprovementThe Good Pharma Scorecard finds some big pharmaceutical companies are meeting legal standards for disclosing results-but many studies still go unreported.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dahl's toad-headed turtle threatened by fragmented habitat, shrinking populations BOGOTÁ, Colombia (December 5, 2017)-- A recent study published in Conservation Genetics by researchers from the Universidad de los Andes, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), and the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) shows that the Dahl's Toad-headed Turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli), a rare reptile found only in Colombia, is threatened with extinction due to alarmingl
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dahl's toad-headed turtle threatened by fragmented habitat, shrinking populations Credit: Germán Forero-Medina/WCS-TSA A recent study published in Conservation Genetics by researchers from the Universidad de los Andes, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), and the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) shows that the Dahl's Toad-headed Turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli), a rare reptile found only in Colombia, is threatened with extinction due to alarmingly sma
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing' Phase separation in a synthetic membrane. Credit: Caitlin Cornell/University of Washington Cells—the building blocks of our bodies—are encapsulated by membranes. The same goes for the specialized compartments within our cells. These membranes are extremely thin, oily films, containing proteins and fatty molecules called lipids. For decades, scientists have argued about how cell membranes organize
35min
The Atlantic
The Microbes Making Themselves at Home on the Space Station While dozens of people have lived there over the years—including six right now —the International Space Station is unlike any other home. Its residents sleep zipped into bags tethered to the wall so they don’t float away. They pee into a plastic hose that suctions urine into a processor and then turns it into drinking water. Their showers require squeezing globs of water out of pouches. But just
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Catalyzing carbon dioxide: System can transform CO2 into CO for use in industry Ball-and-stick model of carbon dioxide. Credit: Wikipedia On any given day, more than 2 million pounds of carbon dioxide are pumped into the atmosphere from factories, emissions from cars and trucks and the burning of coal and natural gas to generate electricity. For many, it's a cause for environmental concern, but for Haotian Wang, it's the perfect raw material. A Fellow at the Rowland Instit
40min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue Cas9-expressing mosquito strains pave the way toward gene drives SEM image of genome-edited adult female mosquito. Left compound eye is split up, and there are three maxillary palps instead of the normal two. Image courtesy of Michelle Bui and Alexander Knyshov (University of California, Riverside, CA). Previous efforts to use genome editing to thwart the ability of mosquito vectors
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Still Bay and Howiesons Poort sites (South Africa) are consistent with the risk hypothesis [Social Sciences] Still Bay and Howiesons Poort sites (South Africa) are consistent with the risk hypothesis Dwight W. Read a , 1 a Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles , CA 90095 d’Errico et al.’s ( 1 ) conclusion that cultural differences between the Still Bay (SB) and the Howiesons Poort (HP) sites in South Africa (SA) are not accounted for by the risk hypothesis ( 2 ) is premature.
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Read: Middle Stone Age cultural variability and the risk hypothesis [Social Sciences] Reply to Read: Middle Stone Age cultural variability and the risk hypothesis Francesco d’Errico a , b , 1 and William E. Banks a , c a CNRS, UMR 5199–De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel: Culture, Environnement et Anthropologie, Université de Bordeaux , 33615 Pessac Cedex, France; b Senter for Fremragende Forskning (SFF) Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour, University of Bergen , 5020 Bergen, Norway; c Bi
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transcription start site-associated small RNAs in the PTEN gene [Biological Sciences] Transcription start site-associated small RNAs in the PTEN gene The PTEN gene is inactivated in various cancers. PTEN has a pseudogene in the human genome, PTENpg1 , which up-regulates PTEN expression by acting as a miRNA sponge. Interestingly, one of the antisense RNAs from the PTENpg1 locus, PTENpg1 asRNA α, is found to epigenetically down-regulate PTEN transcription by recruitment of EZH2 and
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Liu et al.: Yin and yang of PTEN regulation [Biological Sciences] Reply to Liu et al.: Yin and yang of PTEN regulation Per Johnsson a , Nicholas Lister b , Galina Shevchenko c , d , James Walshe e , Sandro F. Ataide e , and Kevin V. Morris c , d , 1 a Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Karolinska Institutet , 171 65 Stockholm, Sweden; b The University of New South Wales , Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Sydney
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Differential effects of global and local climate data in assessing environmental drivers of epidemic outbreaks [Ecology] Differential effects of global and local climate data in assessing environmental drivers of epidemic outbreaks Timothy Brook a , 1 a Department of History, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z1 This Commentary is the response of a China historian to the paper by the team of biologists headed by Huidong Tian ( 1 ) on the differential effects of using long-term or short-ter
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Shifts in time and space interact as climate warms [Ecology] Shifts in time and space interact as climate warms Michael C. Singer a , b , 1 a Biological and Marine Sciences, Plymouth University , Plymouth PL4 8AA, United Kingdom; b Station d’Ecologie Théorique et Expérimentale, UMR 5321, CNRS, Univ. Paul Sabatier , F-09200 Moulis, France Beetles found on Mediterranean shores in cold periods turned up in Finland in mild interglacials ( 1 ). Paleontologists
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The power of negative [theoretical] results [Evolution] The power of negative [theoretical] results Günter P. Wagner a , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University , New Haven, CT 06520 In PNAS, Paul Nelson and Joanna Masel present a theoretical result showing that aging in multicellular organisms is inevitable ( 1 ). The argument is as simple as it is powerful. Cellular senescence is a well-known consequence of the second law
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dabbling with Piezo2 for mechanosensation [Physiology] Dabbling with Piezo2 for mechanosensation Ruhma Syeda a , 1 a Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center , Dallas, TX 75235 Nature has devised various strategies for sensing food so species can coexist and exploit different types of prey. Sharks can detect amino acids in blood as low as 1 ppb, while hawks and buzzards scan the Earth from a height of ∼10,000 feet l
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Equilibration of energy in slow-fast systems [Applied Mathematics] Equilibration of energy in slow–fast systems Kushal Shah a , Dmitry Turaev b , c , Vassili Gelfreich d , and Vered Rom-Kedar e , 1 a Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research , Bhopal 462066, India; b Department of Mathematics, Imperial College , London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom; c Lobachevsky University of Nizhny , Novgorod 603950
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate [Sustainability Science] Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate Andrew Bevan a , 1 , Sue Colledge a , Dorian Fuller a , Ralph Fyfe b , Stephen Shennan a , and Chris Stevens a a Institute of Archaeology, University College London , London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom; b School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth , Plymouth PL4 8AA,
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
EMT programs promote basal mammary stem cell and tumor-initiating cell stemness by inducing primary ciliogenesis and Hedgehog signaling [Cell Biology] EMT programs promote basal mammary stem cell and tumor-initiating cell stemness by inducing primary ciliogenesis and Hedgehog signaling Vincent J. Guen a , b , Tony E. Chavarria a , b , c , Cornelia Kröger c , Xin Ye c , Robert A. Weinberg a , b , c , 1 , and Jacqueline A. Lees a , b , 1 a The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambrid
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Germline Cas9 expression yields highly efficient genome engineering in a major worldwide disease vector, Aedes aegypti [Genetics] Germline Cas9 expression yields highly efficient genome engineering in a major worldwide disease vector, Aedes aegypti Ming Li a , b , 1 , Michelle Bui a , b , 1 , Ting Yang a , b , 1 , Christian S. Bowman a , b , Bradley J. White a , b , 2 , and Omar S. Akbari a , b , 1 , 3 a Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521; b Center for Disease Vector Research, Institute
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tracking the genome-wide outcomes of a transposable element burst over decades of amplification [Genetics] Tracking the genome-wide outcomes of a transposable element burst over decades of amplification Lu Lu a , b , 1 , Jinfeng Chen a , b , c , 1 , Sofia M. C. Robb a , b , c , Yutaka Okumoto d , Jason E. Stajich b , c , and Susan R. Wessler a , b , 2 a Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside CA 92521; b Institute for Integrative Genome Biology, University of Calif
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Histone methyltransferase MMSET promotes AID-mediated DNA breaks at the donor switch region during class switch recombination [Immunology and Inflammation] Histone methyltransferase MMSET promotes AID-mediated DNA breaks at the donor switch region during class switch recombination Hai Vu Nguyen a , b , c , Junchao Dong b , c , Rohit A. Panchakshari b , c , Vipul Kumar b , c , Frederick W. Alt b , c , 1 , and Jean-Christophe Bories a , 1 a UMR1126 Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Atypical activation of dendritic cells by Plasmodium falciparum [Immunology and Inflammation] Atypical activation of dendritic cells by Plasmodium falciparum Anton Götz a , b , 1 , Mei San Tang a , Maureen C. Ty a , Charles Arama c , Aissata Ongoiba c , Didier Doumtabe c , Boubacar Traore c , Peter D. Crompton b , P’ng Loke a , and Ana Rodriguez a , 1 a Department of Microbiology, New York University School of Medicine , New York, NY 10016; b Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Malaria Infectio
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Anti-SIRP{alpha} antibody immunotherapy enhances neutrophil and macrophage antitumor activity [Immunology and Inflammation] Anti-SIRPα antibody immunotherapy enhances neutrophil and macrophage antitumor activity Nan Guo Ring a , b , 1 , Dietmar Herndler-Brandstetter b , 1 , Kipp Weiskopf a , 1 , Liang Shan b , Jens-Peter Volkmer a , Benson M. George a , Melanie Lietzenmayer b , Kelly M. McKenna a , Tejaswitha J. Naik a , Aaron McCarty a , Yunjiang Zheng b , Aaron M. Ring b , 1 , Richard A. Flavell b , c , 1 , 2 , and
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transcriptome-wide characterization of human cytomegalovirus in natural infection and experimental latency [Microbiology] Transcriptome-wide characterization of human cytomegalovirus in natural infection and experimental latency Shu Cheng a , 1 , Katie Caviness a , b , 2 , Jason Buehler a , Megan Smithey c , d , Janko Nikolich-Žugich a , c , d , and Felicia Goodrum a , b , c , d , 1 a BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona , Tucson, AZ 85721; b Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in Genetics, University of Arizona , T
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Origin, evolution, and global transmission of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ST8 [Microbiology] Origin, evolution, and global transmission of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ST8 Lena Strauß a , Marc Stegger b , c , Patrick Eberechi Akpaka d , Abraham Alabi e , f , Sebastien Breurec g , h , Geoffrey Coombs i , j , Beverly Egyir k , Anders Rhod Larsen b , Frederic Laurent l , Stefan Monecke m , n , Georg Peters o , Robert Skov b , p , Birgit Strommenger q , François Vandenesch l , Fr
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular basis of selective resistance of the bumblebee BiNav1 sodium channel to tau-fluvalinate [Agricultural Sciences] Molecular basis of selective resistance of the bumblebee BiNa v 1 sodium channel to tau-fluvalinate Shaoying Wu a , b , Yoshiko Nomura b , c , d , Yuzhe Du b , c , d , 1 , Boris S. Zhorov e , f , g , and Ke Dong b , c , d , 2 a College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University , Zhengzhou, Henan, 450002, China; b Department of Entomology, Michigan State University , East Lansing, MI 4882
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinship structures create persistent channels for language transmission [Anthropology] Kinship structures create persistent channels for language transmission J. Stephen Lansing a , b , c , 1 , 2 , Cheryl Abundo b , d , 1 , Guy S. Jacobs b , Elsa G. Guillot e , f , Stefan Thurner a , b , g , h , i , Sean S. Downey j , Lock Yue Chew b , d , Tanmoy Bhattacharya a , k , Ning Ning Chung b , d , Herawati Sudoyo l , m , n , and Murray P. Cox o a Santa Fe Institute , Santa Fe, NM 87501; b
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Building a better past with the help of agent-based modeling [Anthropology] Opinion: Building a better past with the help of agent-based modeling J. Daniel Rogers a , 1 and Wendy H. Cegielski b a Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013; b School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 With a few exceptions, the distant past is an anonymous land occupied by people
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamics of a rolling robot [Applied Mathematics] Dynamics of a rolling robot K. I. Ilin a , H. K. Moffatt b , 1 , and V. A. Vladimirov a , c a Department of Mathematics, University of York , Heslington, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom; b Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom; c Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Sultan Qaboos University , Muscat 123, Oman Cont
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Beating the curse of dimension with accurate statistics for the Fokker-Planck equation in complex turbulent systems [Applied Mathematics] Beating the curse of dimension with accurate statistics for the Fokker–Planck equation in complex turbulent systems Nan Chen a , b , 1 and Andrew J. Majda a , b , c , 1 a Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012; b Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Active turbulence in a gas of self-assembled spinners [Applied Physical Sciences] Active turbulence in a gas of self-assembled spinners Gašper Kokot a , Shibananda Das b , c , Roland G. Winkler b , c , Gerhard Gompper b , c , 1 , Igor S. Aranson a , d , and Alexey Snezhko a , 1 a Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory , Argonne, IL 60439; b Institute of Complex Systems, Forschungszentrum Jülich , 52425 Jülich, Germany; c Institute for Advanced Simulation, Fors
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamics and control of gold-encapped gallium arsenide nanowires imaged by 4D electron microscopy [Applied Physical Sciences] Dynamics and control of gold-encapped gallium arsenide nanowires imaged by 4D electron microscopy Bin Chen a , 1 , Xuewen Fu a , Jau Tang a , 1 , Mykhaylo Lysevych b , Hark Hoe Tan c , Chennupati Jagadish c , and Ahmed H. Zewail a , 2 a Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza-cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis [Biochemistry] Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis Dillon P. Cogan a , Graham A. Hudson b , Zhengan Zhang b , Taras V. Pogorelov b , c , d , e , f , Wilfred A. van der Donk a , b , g , h , Douglas A. Mitchell b , g , i , and Satish K. Nair a , c , g , 1 a Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois , Urbana, IL 61801; b Department of Chemistr
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence for rRNA 2'-O-methylation plasticity: Control of intrinsic translational capabilities of human ribosomes [Biochemistry] Evidence for rRNA 2′-O-methylation plasticity: Control of intrinsic translational capabilities of human ribosomes Jenny Erales a , b , Virginie Marchand c , Baptiste Panthu b , d , e , Sandra Gillot f , Stéphane Belin a , b , 1 , Sandra E. Ghayad a , b , 2 , Maxime Garcia a , b , Florian Laforêts a , b , Virginie Marcel a , b , Agnès Baudin-Baillieu f , Pierre Bertin f , Yohann Couté g , Annie Ad
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metal transporter Slc39a10 regulates susceptibility to inflammatory stimuli by controlling macrophage survival [Biochemistry] Metal transporter Slc39a10 regulates susceptibility to inflammatory stimuli by controlling macrophage survival Hong Gao a , 1 , Lu Zhao a , 1 , Hao Wang a , b , c , Enjun Xie a , b , Xinhui Wang a , Qian Wu a , Yingying Yu a , Xuyan He a , Hongbin Ji d , Lothar Rink e , Junxia Min a , b , 2 , and Fudi Wang a , b , c , 2 a Department of Nutrition, Nutrition Discovery Innovation Center, Institute o
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cholesterol-binding site of the influenza M2 protein in lipid bilayers from solid-state NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Cholesterol-binding site of the influenza M2 protein in lipid bilayers from solid-state NMR Matthew R. Elkins a , Jonathan K. Williams a , Martin D. Gelenter a , Peng Dai a , Byungsu Kwon a , Ivan V. Sergeyev b , Bradley L. Pentelute a , and Mei Hong a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; b Bruker Biospin , Billerica, MA 01821 Edited by Micha
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Catch bond drives stator mechanosensitivity in the bacterial flagellar motor [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Catch bond drives stator mechanosensitivity in the bacterial flagellar motor Ashley L Nord a , Emilie Gachon a , Ruben Perez-Carrasco b , Jasmine A. Nirody c , Alessandro Barducci a , Richard M. Berry d , and Francesco Pedaci a , 1 a Centre de Biochimie Structurale (CBS), INSERM, CNRS, Université de Montpellier , 34090 Montpellier, France; b Department of Mathematics, University College London ,
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinesin-dependent mechanism for controlling triglyceride secretion from the liver [Cell Biology] Kinesin-dependent mechanism for controlling triglyceride secretion from the liver Priyanka Rai a , Mukesh Kumar a , Geetika Sharma b , Pradeep Barak a , Saumitra Das b , Siddhesh S. Kamat c , d , and Roop Mallik a , 1 a Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research , Mumbai 400005, India; b Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Science , Bang
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Model-driven engineering of supramolecular buffering by multivalency [Chemistry] Model-driven engineering of supramolecular buffering by multivalency Tim F. E. Paffen a , b , Abraham J. P. Teunissen a , b , Tom F. A. de Greef a , c , 1 , and E. W. Meijer a , b , 1 a Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology , 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands; b Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology , 5600 MB
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Wetter subtropics in a warmer world: Contrasting past and future hydrological cycles [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Wetter subtropics in a warmer world: Contrasting past and future hydrological cycles Natalie J. Burls a , b , 1 and Alexey V. Fedorov b a Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, & Earth Sciences, Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University , Fairfax, VA 22030; b Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University , New Haven, CT 06511 Edited by Jeffrey P. Severinghaus, Scripps
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple pathways in pressure-induced phase transition of coesite [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Multiple pathways in pressure-induced phase transition of coesite Wei Liu a , Xuebang Wu a , Yunfeng Liang a , b , 1 , Changsong Liu a , Caetano R. Miranda c , and Sandro Scandolo d a Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Hefei 230031, People's Republic of China; b Center for Engineering, Research into Artifacts, The University of Tok
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Scale-dependent climatic drivers of human epidemics in ancient China [Ecology] Scale-dependent climatic drivers of human epidemics in ancient China Huidong Tian a , 1 , Chuan Yan a , 1 , Lei Xu a , b , Ulf Büntgen c , d , e , f , Nils C. Stenseth b , 2 , and Zhibin Zhang a , 2 a State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents in Agriculture, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100101, China; b Centre for Ecological and Evolu
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phenological shifts conserve thermal niches in North American birds and reshape expectations for climate-driven range shifts [Ecology] Phenological shifts conserve thermal niches in North American birds and reshape expectations for climate-driven range shifts Jacob B. Socolar a , 1 , Peter N. Epanchin b , Steven R. Beissinger c , d , and Morgan W. Tingley a a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut , Storrs, CT 06269; b Office of Global Climate Change, US Agency for International Development , W
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fishnet model for failure probability tail of nacre-like imbricated lamellar materials [Engineering] Fishnet model for failure probability tail of nacre-like imbricated lamellar materials Wen Luo a and Zdeněk P. Bažant a , b , c , 1 a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University , Evanston, IL 60208; b Department of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University , Evanston, IL 60208; c Department of Materials Science, Northwestern University , Evanston, IL 60208 Contributed by Zdeně
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intercellular competition and the inevitability of multicellular aging [Evolution] Intercellular competition and the inevitability of multicellular aging Paul Nelson a , 1 and Joanna Masel a a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona , Tucson, AZ 85721 Edited by Raghavendra Gadagkar, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, and approved October 6, 2017 (received for review November 14, 2016) Significance We lay out the first general model of t
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Drosophila protein phosphatases 2A B' Wdb and Wrd regulate meiotic centromere localization and function of the MEI-S332 Shugoshin [Genetics] Drosophila protein phosphatases 2A B′ Wdb and Wrd regulate meiotic centromere localization and function of the MEI-S332 Shugoshin Belinda S. Pinto a , 1 and Terry L. Orr-Weaver a , b , 2 a Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research , Cambridge, MA 02142; b Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02142 Contributed by Terry L. Orr-Weaver, October 24, 2017 (sent
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cancer cells induce interleukin-22 production from memory CD4+ T cells via interleukin-1 to promote tumor growth [Immunology and Inflammation]IL-22 has been identified as a cancer-promoting cytokine that is secreted by infiltrating immune cells in several cancer models. We hypothesized that IL-22 regulation would occur at the interface between cancer cells and immune cells. Breast and lung cancer cells of murine and human origin induced IL-22 production from memory...
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SNX8 mediates IFN{gamma}-triggered noncanonical signaling pathway and host defense against Listeria monocytogenes [Immunology and Inflammation] SNX8 mediates IFNγ-triggered noncanonical signaling pathway and host defense against Listeria monocytogenes Jin Wei a , b , Wei Guo a , b , Huan Lian a , b , Qing Yang a , b , Heng Lin a , b , Shu Li a , b , 1 , and Hong-Bing Shu a , b , 1 a Medical Research Institute, Wuhan University , Wuhan, China, 430071; b College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University , Wuhan, China, 430071 Edited by George R.
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Burkholderia cenocepacia integrates cis-2-dodecenoic acid and cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate signals to control virulence [Microbiology] Burkholderia cenocepacia integrates cis -2-dodecenoic acid and cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate signals to control virulence Chunxi Yang a , b , c , d , 1 , Chaoyu Cui a , b , c , 1 , Qiumian Ye a , b , Jinhong Kan e , Shuna Fu a , b , Shihao Song a , b , Yutong Huang a , b , Fei He c , Lian-Hui Zhang a , c , Yantao Jia f , Yong-Gui Gao d , Caroline S. Harwood b , g , 2 , and Yinyue Deng a
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Retrograde inhibition by a specific subset of interpeduncular {alpha}5 nicotinic neurons regulates nicotine preference [Neuroscience] Retrograde inhibition by a specific subset of interpeduncular α5 nicotinic neurons regulates nicotine preference Jessica L. Ables a , b , c , Andreas Görlich a , 1 , Beatriz Antolin-Fontes a , 2 , Cuidong Wang a , Sylvia M. Lipford a , Michael H. Riad a , Jing Ren d , e , 3 , Fei Hu d , e , 4 , Minmin Luo d , e , Paul J. Kenny c , Nathaniel Heintz a , f , 5 , and Ines Ibañez-Tallon a , 5 a Labora
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Amyloid polymorphisms constitute distinct clouds of conformational variants in different etiological subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience] Amyloid polymorphisms constitute distinct clouds of conformational variants in different etiological subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease Jay Rasmussen a , b , c , 1 , Jasmin Mahler a , c , 1 , Natalie Beschorner a , c , 1 , Stephan A. Kaeser a , b , Lisa M. Häsler a , b , Frank Baumann a , b , Sofie Nyström d , Erik Portelius e , f , Kaj Blennow e , f , Tammaryn Lashley g , Nick C. Fox h , Diego Sepu
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Solving visual correspondence between the two eyes via domain-based population encoding in nonhuman primates [Neuroscience] Solving visual correspondence between the two eyes via domain-based population encoding in nonhuman primates Gang Chen a , b , c , d , e , 1 , Haidong D. Lu f , Hisashi Tanigawa a , g , and Anna W. Roe a , b , c , d , e , h a Interdisciplinary Institute of Neuroscience and Technology, Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University , Hangzhou 310029, China; b College of Biomedical Engine
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coexpression of NOS2 and COX2 accelerates tumor growth and reduces survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer [Pharmacology] Coexpression of NOS2 and COX2 accelerates tumor growth and reduces survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer Debashree Basudhar a , 1 , Sharon A. Glynn a , b , 1 , Madison Greer a , Veena Somasundaram a , Jae Hong No a , David A. Scheiblin c , Pablo Garrido b , William F. Heinz c , Aideen E. Ryan d , Jonathan M. Weiss a , Robert Y. S. Cheng a , Lisa A. Ridnour a , Stephen J. Lockett c
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal [Physics] Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal Ricard Alert a , b , 1 , Pietro Tierno a , b , c , and Jaume Casademunt a , b a Departament de Física de la Matèria Condensada, Universitat de Barcelona , 08028 Barcelona, Spain; b Universitat de Barcelona Institute of Complex Systems (UBICS), Universitat de Barcelona , 08028 Barcelona, Spain; c Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (IN 2 UB)
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular basis of tactile specialization in the duck bill [Physiology] Molecular basis of tactile specialization in the duck bill Eve R. Schneider a , 1 , Evan O. Anderson a , 1 , Marco Mastrotto a , b , c , Jon D. Matson a , Vincent P. Schulz d , Patrick G. Gallagher d , e , Robert H. LaMotte b , f , Elena O. Gracheva a , b , c , 2 , and Sviatoslav N. Bagriantsev a , 2 a Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maternal prolactin during late pregnancy is important in generating nurturing behavior in the offspring [Physiology] Maternal prolactin during late pregnancy is important in generating nurturing behavior in the offspring Taku James Sairenji a , 1 , Jun Ikezawa a , 1 , 2 , Ryosuke Kaneko b , Shinnosuke Masuda a , Kaoru Uchida c , Yurie Takanashi a , Hiroko Masuda a , Tomoko Sairenji d , Izuki Amano a , Yusuke Takatsuru a , Kazutoshi Sayama e , Kaisa Haglund f , Ivan Dikic g , Noriyuki Koibuchi a , and Noriaki Sh
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High postural costs and anaerobic metabolism during swimming support the hypothesis of a U-shaped metabolism-speed curve in fishes [Physiology] High postural costs and anaerobic metabolism during swimming support the hypothesis of a U-shaped metabolism–speed curve in fishes Valentina Di Santo a , 1 , Christopher P. Kenaley b , and George V. Lauder a a Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; b Department of Biology, Boston College , Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 Edited by Neil H. Shubin, The University of Chicag
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nature and origins of the lexicon in 6-mo-olds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Nature and origins of the lexicon in 6-mo-olds Elika Bergelson a , b , 1 and Richard N. Aslin b , c a Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708; b Brain & Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627; c Haskins Laboratories , New Haven, CT 06511 Edited by Patricia K. Kuhl, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, and approved September 28, 2017 (received for r
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Parallel epigenetic modifications induced by hatchery rearing in a Pacific salmon [Sustainability Science] Parallel epigenetic modifications induced by hatchery rearing in a Pacific salmon Jérémy Le Luyer a , b , 1 , 2 , Martin Laporte a , 1 , Terry D. Beacham c , Karia H. Kaukinen c , Ruth E. Withler c , Jong S. Leong d , e , Eric B. Rondeau d , e , Ben F. Koop d , e , and Louis Bernatchez a a Département de Biologie, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes, Université Laval , Québec, QC, Ca
44min
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Sculley et al., Eighty years of food-web response to interannual variation in discharge recorded in river diatom frustules from an ocean sediment core [SI Correction]ECOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Eighty years of food-web response to interannual variation in discharge recorded in river diatom frustules from an ocean sediment core,” by John B. Sculley, Rex L. Lowe, Charles A. Nittrouer, Tina M. Drexler, and Mary E. Power, which was first published September 5, 2017;...
44min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The secret language of letter design | Martina FlorLook at the letters around you: on street signs, stores, restaurant menus, the covers of books. Whether you realize it or not, the letters are speaking to you, telling you something beyond the literal text -- that whatever they represent is modern or finely crafted or fantastical or zany. Learn to decode this secret language with lettering designer Martina Flor as she explains how altering the sha
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight loss and risk of death: Rheumatoid arthritis findings may have wider implicationsResearchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated the effect of rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis on weight change and how this subsequently affects mortality risk. Their results suggest that the findings from previous studies regarding lower weight being associated with higher mortality may not be directly related to RA and instead reflect a more generalized phenomenon.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing'Scientists show for the first time that the complex distribution of molecules within a membrane of a living yeast cell arises through demixing.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First insight into which patients repeatedly miss GP appointmentsThe largest ever analysis of NHS patients who fail to attend reveals that the most important indicator of which patients will miss multiple appointments is socio-economic deprivation. A fifth of people are regularly missing appointments with those aged 16-30 and over 90 the most likely to fail to attend.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lemur study highlights role of diet in shaping gut microbiomeA study of the bacteria in the guts of three lemur species offers new insights into the role of diet in shaping these microbial ecosystems -- and how these microbes may relate to primate health.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zooming in on enzyme that repairs DNA damage from UV raysA research team is using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study an enzyme found in plants, bacteria and some animals that repairs DNA damage caused by the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light rays.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Girls will be boys: Sex reversal in dragon lizardsOne of Australia's iconic lizard species is hiding a secret -- female central bearded dragon embryos temporarily grow the lizard equivalent of a penis during development. Researchers made the discovery while investigating what happens to the body and genitalia of male dragons that reverse their sex at high temperature treatment.
51min
Live Science
John Mayer's Emergency Surgery: How Common Is Appendicitis? John Mayer performing on Aug. 23 in Wantagh, New York. Credit: Kevin Mazur/Getty Singer-songwriter John Mayer went to the hospital this morning (Dec. 5) for an emergency appendectomy, or surgery to remove his appendix. Dead & Company, the band Mayer is currently touring with, announced the musician's surgery on Twitter. "Early this morning, Tuesday, December 5th, John Mayer was admitted into the
53min
The Atlantic
How Politicians Can Use Big Data to Win Elections Politicians have been redrawing districts to benefit their own political parties—a tactic known as Gerrymandering—since the 1970s. But recently, technology has enabled politicians to choose their voters more strategically than ever before. In the video above, The Atlantic writer Vann R. Newkirk II explains how big data can help win elections—and why Pennsylvania and Maryland have already faced la
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds IMAGE: Dr. Ming-Hui Zou, director of the Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine at Georgia State University and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Medicine view more Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA--Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight f
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45P IMAGE: Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková is captured using a telescope on December 22 from Farm Tivoli in Namibia, Africa. view more Credit: Credits: Gerald Rhemann When comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. The results help fill in crucial detail
1h
Science : NPR
Ask The FCC From late night TV to your Twitter feed, the Federal Communications Commission’s vote on net neutrality is a hot topic. The FCC has been reversing and revising a number of regulations , bringing a new level of attention to a federal body that’s usually not the subject of so much public debate. We’ll start off with current FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr. We want you to call us at (855) 236-1212 and
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithm repairs corrupted digital images in one stepComputer scientists have designed a new algorithm that incorporates artificial neural networks to simultaneously apply a wide range of fixes to corrupted digital images. The researchers tested their algorithm by taking high-quality, uncorrupted images, purposely introducing severe degradations, then using the algorithm to repair the damage. In many cases, the algorithm outperformed competitors' te
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hybrid electrolyte enhances supercapacitance in vertical graphene nanosheetsSupercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets that are larger and positioned closer together. Using VGNs as the material for supercapacitor electrodes offers advantages that can be enhanced depending on how the material is grown, treated and prepared to work with electrolytes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Estrogens and changes in heart physiology linkedScientists have created zebrafish mutants in four different receptors -- found inside or on the surface of cells -- that respond to estrogens, and they have used the mutants to help unravel a novel mechanism of estrogen action on heart physiology. Broader use of the mutants may have significant implications for studies of estrogenic environmental endocrine disruptors.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dark fiber: Using sensors beneath our feet to tell us about earthquakes, water, and other geophysical dataScientists have shown for the first time that dark fiber -- the vast network of unused fiber-optic cables installed throughout the country and the world -- can be used as sensors for detecting earthquakes, the presence of groundwater, changes in permafrost conditions, and a variety of other subsurface activity.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parenting behaviors linked to suicide among adolescentsA fresh look at a federally sponsored 2012 national study shows a significant link between parent's behaviors and thoughts of suicide among adolescents.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Qualcomm Is Building Awesome Windows PCs Out of Smartphone Parts There was a time when every gadget did something completely different. Your phone was fast and lasted three days in your pocket, but it could only do a few things. Your computer was massively capable, but so big you couldn't lug it anywhere. Everything had a purpose, and they rarely overlapped. But now? Now it's different. You can watch movies, play games, and do Very Serious Work on any number o
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Staring into a baby’s eyes puts her brain waves and yours in sync When you lock eyes with a baby, it’s hard to look away. For one thing, babies are fun to look at. They’re so tiny and cute and interesting. For another, babies love to stare back. I remember my babies staring at me so hard, with their eyebrows raised and unblinking eyes wide open. They would have killed in a staring contest. This mutual adoration of staring may be for a good reason. When a baby a
1h
The Atlantic
Rome’s Colosseum Was Once a Wild, Tangled Garden When the botanist Richard Deakin examined Rome’s Colosseum in the 1850s, he found 420 species of plant growing among the ruins. There were plants common in Italy: cypresses and hollies, capers, knapweed and thistle, plants “of the leguminous pea tribe,” and 56 varieties of grass. But some of the rarer flowers growing there were a botanical mystery. They were found nowhere else in Europe. To expla
1h
Inside Science
How To Build Better Rockets By Crumpling Beer Cans How To Build Better Rockets By Crumpling Beer Cans New study on how cans crumple sheds light on general mechanical properties of metal cylinders. Drinks.jpg Image credits: Skitterphoto via Pixabay Rights information: Picture is CC0 Physics Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Knowing more about how a metal tube crumples might improve the design of eve
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good news from trio of phase one Zika vaccine trials ST. LOUIS -- In early results published in The Lancet , researchers report that an investigational Zika vaccine was well-tolerated and stimulated potentially protective immune responses in three phase 1 clinical trials, one of which was conducted at Saint Louis University. More than 90 percent of study volunteers in the 3 trials who received the investigational vaccine demonstrated an immune resp
1h
Big Think
This One Simple Move Can Make You 30% More Popular Two Japanese researchers recently found themselves wondering what they could do to be more popular, or anyone really. Previous research found that a bowing female figure was perceived as more attractive . They wondered if nodding might have a similar effect. So, they investigated how those who nod often are perceived, as compared with those who are more prone to shaking their head. Turns out, n
1h
Big Think
UNESCO Preserves the Works of One of the Greatest Minds in Human History The UNESCO International Memory of the World Register has recently added another batch of genius to its collection of documents: the papers, diaries, books, and notes of Sir Isaac Newton, thereby helping to preserve for all time the works of one of the greatest minds in human history. Wait, who added what? The UNESCO Memory of the World Program is a programmed dedicated to the preservation of and
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women who attempt suicide exhibit different protein levels years after the attemptWomen with a history of suicide attempts exhibit different levels of a specific protein in their bloodstream than those with no history of suicide attempts, according to new research.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trace elements of lithium in drinking water linked to longer life in Alzheimer's patientsTrace elements of lithium in drinking water may slow death rates from Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. Rates of diabetes and obesity, which are important risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, also decrease if there is a particular amount of lithium in the water, says the study.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazon floodplain trees emit as much methane as all Earth’s oceans combinedNew research solves mystery of missing methane source in the Amazon Rainforest.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
How freezing a soap bubble turns it into a ‘snow globe’ In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS, a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catalyzing carbon dioxide On any given day, more than 2 million pounds of carbon dioxide are pumped into the atmosphere from factories, emissions from cars and trucks and the burning of coal and natural gas to generate electricity. For many, it's a cause for environmental concern, but for Haotian Wang, it's the perfect raw material. A Fellow at the Rowland Institute at Harvard, Wang and his research team have develope
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lithium in water associated with slower rate of Alzheimer's disease deaths Rates of diabetes and obesity, which are important risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, also decrease if there is a particular amount of lithium in the water, says the study, published recently in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease . Postdoctoral fellow Val Fajardo and Rebecca MacPherson, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences, collected statistics on various lithium levels in
1h
Live Science
Cats Are As Brainy As Bears But Fall Short of Dogs It's a bad news/good news situation for Fluffy: Cats don't have as many neurons as dogs, suggesting they just aren't as cognitively capable. On the other hand, they've got as many neurons as brown bears. Those are the results of a new study that counted neurons in the brains of eight animals in the order Carnivora, a diverse group of mammals whose members' diets usually (though not alwa
1h
Feed: All Latest
If Quentin Tarantino Makes a 'Star Trek' Movie, It's Gonna Need a Few Things Look, the news is hardly ever “normal” anymore. If we all got a CNN alert in the middle of the night that militarized guppies had taken over the southern tip of Florida, it probably wouldn’t even warrant sitting up in bed. That said, hearing that Quentin Tarantino has reportedly successfully pitched a new Star Trek movie that J.J. Abrams might produce is still a record-skip, halt-the-dancefloor m
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bad News for the Highly Intelligent There are advantages to being smart. People who do well on standardized tests of intelligence—IQ tests—tend to be more successful in the classroom and the workplace. Although the reasons are not fully understood, they also tend to live longer , healthier lives, and are less likely to experience negative life events such as bankruptcy. Now there’s some bad news for people in the right tail of
1h
Popular Science
Watch the weird videos used to train AI what different actions look like Consider the verb “removing.” As a human, you understand the different ways that word can be used—and you know that visually, a scene is going to look different depending on what is being removed from what. Pulling a piece of honeycomb from a larger chunk looks different from a tarp being pulled away from a field, or a screen protector being separated from a smartphone. But you get it: in all tho
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When contact sports cause concussion injuries, who comes out ahead?Concussions are common injuries among contact sport athletes. While most athletes experience full recovery within a few weeks and can return to their sport, according to a new study, female athletes tend to experience a higher concussion injury rate than male athletes.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm repairs corrupted digital images in one step IMAGE: TOP: The research team artificially degraded a stock image, deliberately introducing blur, noise and other imperfections. BOTTOM: The research team's new image repair algorithm automatically returned the image to near-original... view more Credit: Don Cochran, Kodak Lossless True Color Image Suite From phone camera snapshots to lifesaving medical scans, digital images play an important
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Working memory positively associated with higher physical endurance, better cognitive functionA positive relationship has been found between the brain network associated with working memory -- the ability to store and process information relevant to the task at hand -- and healthy traits such as higher physical endurance and better cognitive function.
2h
The Scientist RSS
December 2017 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
2h
The Scientist RSS
December 2017 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Phishing Schemes Are Using HTTPS Encrypted Sites to Seem Legit A massive effort to encrypt web traffic over the last few years has made green padlocks and "https" addresses increasingly common ; more than half the web now uses internet encryption protocols to keep data protected from prying eyes as it travels back and forth between sites and browsers. But as with any sweeping reform, the progress also comes with some new opportunities for fraud. And phishers
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Will Artificial Ovaries Mean No More Menopause? During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—there are hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts to explore the potential of such a technique, researchers say they used tissue engineering to construct artificial rat ovaries able to supply fe
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women who attempt suicide exhibit different protein levels years after the attempt BINGHAMTON, NY - Women with a history of suicide attempts exhibit different levels of a specific protein in their bloodstream than those with no history of suicide attempts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Graduate student Anastacia Kudinova and Brandon E. Gibb, professor of psychology and director of clinical training at Binghamton University,
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing' IMAGE: This is phase separation in a synthetic membrane. view more Credit: Caitlin Cornell/University of Washington Dec. 5, 2017 Living cell membranes can self-sort their components by 'demixing' Cells -- the building blocks of our bodies -- are encapsulated by membranes. The same goes for the specialized compartments within our cells. These membranes are extremely thin, oily fi
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Europe Is Struggling to Keep Local Talent for Its Homegrown Tech Scene A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
2h
Inside Science
Blistering Summers Look 10 Times More Common if You Measure Heat as Humans Feel it Blistering Summers Look 10 Times More Common if You Measure Heat as Humans Feel it Considering humidity as well as temperature emphasizes humanity's impact on the climate. clock.jpg Image credits: Your Best Digs via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Climate change is alarming enough if you only consider tempe
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seaweed could hold key to environmentally friendly sunscreenA compound found in seaweed could protect human skin from the damaging impact of the sun without causing harm to marine ecosystems.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein-folding simulations sped upProteins are huge molecules whose function depends on how they fold into intricate structures. To understand how these molecules work, researchers use computer modeling to calculate how proteins fold. Now, a new algorithm can accelerate those vital simulations, enabling them to model phenomena that were previously out of reach. The results can eventually help scientists better understand and treat
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New process could be key to understanding complex rearrangements in genomeBiologists have successfully harnessed new technology to develop an approach that could allow for rapid and precise identification of the CGRs involved in disease, cancer and disorder development, which is critical for diagnosis and treatment.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conflicting views on social media balanced by an algorithmResearchers have designed an algorithm that is able to balance the information exposure so that social media users can be exposed to information from both sides of the discussion.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shut-off switch for lymphomaSafety switches that automatically stop the device for example before it overheats are built into many electrical appliances. Cells are also equipped with such 'emergency stop' functions. They make sure that a defective cell doesn't become a tumor cell. A team has now discovered such a switch in T cells. These results can help to find new therapies against T cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma triggered b
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Colored sunscreen protects skin from damage caused by visible lightIn article, a study performed by a group of researchers elucidates action mechanism of visible light on skin and questions typical use of sunscreen. Most common sunscreens affect D vitamin absorption and fail to block visible light -- which, while not as damaging as UV rays, accounts for 45 percent of the solar radiation. The group patented skin-colored sunscreen which can block visible light.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a nationally recommended diet can improve the environmentChanging your diet can improve both your health and the environment. A new study shows that European dietary recommendations on reducing animal products can reduce environmental impacts in most high-income nations.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New robots can see into their futureResearchers have developed a robotic learning technology that enables robots to imagine the future of their actions so they can figure out how to manipulate objects they have never encountered before. In the future, this technology could help self-driving cars anticipate future events on the road and produce more intelligent robotic assistants in homes, but the initial prototype focuses on learnin
2h
Big Think
The Incredible Effect Black Teachers Have on Black Students Students of color perform better in school when they have at least one teacher of the same race, suggests a growing body of research . A recent study explored this phenomenon by analyzing the racial disparities among American schoolchildren and their teachers in various parts of the country, and sought to understand how young adults become teachers in the first place. The researchers—Constanc
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnant women with PTSD have higher levels of stress hormone cortisolA woman's emotional and physical health during pregnancy impacts a developing fetus, research shows. However, less is known about the effect of past stressors and posttraumatic stress disorder on an expectant woman.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New quick, portable test for iron, Vitamin A deficiency could save livesEngineers and nutritionists have created a swift solution for a challenging global health problem: a low-cost, rapid test to detect iron and vitamin A deficiencies at the point of care.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experiment demonstrates quantum mechanical effects from biological systemUsing green fluorescent proteins obtained from Escherichia coli, researchers have demonstrated quantum mechanical effects from a biological system.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beyond wind speed: A new measure for predicting hurricane impactsWhat if there was a better way to forecast and communicate hurricanes' damaging economic impacts, before they happen? Civil engineers have developed an innovative new approach to assessing the resiliency of coastal communities to hurricanes. They've created a 'multi-hazard hurricane impact level model,' which estimates economic damages to be caused by storms, before they happen.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible new way to treat parasitic infections discoveredA chemical that suppresses the lethal form of a parasitic infection caused by roundworms that affects up to 100 million people and usually causes only mild symptoms has now been identified by researchers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Binge eating linked to weight-loss challengesOverweight or obese patients who binge eat while trying to lose weight drop half as much as those who don't binge eat or those who do and subsequently stop, according to researchers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Augmented-reality technology could help treat 'lazy eye'When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or 'lazy eye.' New research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce this visual discrepancy as they go about everyday activities.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How height happens: Hundreds of genetic 'switches' that affect heightHundreds of genetic 'switches' have been discovered that have an influence on height and performed functional tests that demonstrated precisely how one such switch alters the function of a key gene involved in height differences.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Towards a continuous atom laserEver since its invention, the laser has been an invaluable tool in physics. It is expected that an atom laser -- with the light waves replaced by the quantum waves of atoms -- could have similarly important applications, for example in constructing ultra-precise clocks. A research team has now made important progress towards the creation of the first continuous atom laser.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weight management program can put type 2 diabetes into remissionType 2 diabetes can be reversed following an intensive weight management program, according a randomized trial in adults who have had the condition for up to 6 years. Almost half of participants achieved and maintained diabetes remission at one year without antidiabetic medications.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France to question Airbnb executives over payment system In a statement sent to AFP, Airbnb said it made nearly 90 percent of its payments in France via bank transfer The French government has summoned the managers of Airbnb to demand answers over a payment system suspected of facilitating tax avoidance. Speaking in parliament on Tuesday, Budget Minister Gerald Darmanin said he had become aware of the "possibility" of (fiscal) "optimisation or even com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hybrid electrolyte enhances supercapacitance in vertical graphene nanosheets Credit: AlexanderAlUS/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets (VGNs) that are larger and positioned closer together. VGNs are 3-D networks of carbon nanomaterial that grow in rows of vertical sheets, providing a large surface area for greater charge stor
2h
Popular Science
Puzzle gifts for your friend who likes a challenge Puzzles make great gifts for the crossword-loving, Sudoku-doing crowd. They also make great gifts for the people on your list you, uh, really don't know at all. They also make great gifts for the people with bad opinions you're staying with this holiday season. Puzzles take a decent amount of time to finish, and are much more therapeutic than talking about politics. Everybody will feel a great se
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In multiple myeloma, high levels of enzyme ADAR1 are associated with reduced survival IMAGE: Human myeloma cells grown in a bone marrow-like microenvironment. view more Credit: UC San Diego Health Multiple myeloma is the second most common blood cancer in the United States. Thirty to 50 percent of multiple myeloma patients have extra copies of the gene that encodes the enzyme ADAR1. Using a database of multiple myeloma patient samples and information, researchers at University
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hybrid electrolyte enhances supercapacitance in vertical graphene nanosheets WASHINGTON, D.C., December 5, 2017 -- Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets (VGNs) that are larger and positioned closer together. VGNs are 3-D networks of carbon nanomaterial that grow in rows of vertical sheets, providing a large surface area for greater charge storage cap
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seismologists worried by tremors in DR Congo A series of tremors on December 5, 2017, suggests the basin of Lake Kivu, pictured here, "has become seismologically active" says an expert Seismologists in Democratic Republic of Congo on Tuesday voiced concern after four light earthquakes were felt in the east of the country. Four tremors, each higher than four on the Richter scale, have been recorded in less than week, with the latest overnigh
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In first, 3-D printed objects connect to WiFi without electronicsEngineers have developed the first 3-D printed plastic objects that can connect to other devices via WiFi without using any electronics, including a laundry bottle that can detect when soap is running low and automatically order more.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers 3-D print a 'living tattoo'Engineers have devised a 3-D printing technique that uses a new kind of ink made from genetically programmed living cells. The cells are engineered to light up in response to a variety of stimuli. When mixed with a slurry of hydrogel and nutrients, the cells can be printed, layer by layer, to form three-dimensional, interactive structures and devices.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two Super-Earths around red dwarf K2-18New research has revealed that a little-known exoplanet called K2-18b could well be a scaled-up version of Earth. Just as exciting, the same researchers also discovered for the first time that the planet has a neighbor.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers connect severity of 'kissing disease' to T-cell populationAcute infectious mononucleosis (AIM), also known as mono or the 'kissing disease,' is caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV). In a new paper, researchers connect the onset and severity of mono to T-cells that react to both EBV and the influenza A virus, which causes the flu. The study represents one of the first reported links between how a person's immune system responds to infection and receptor
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chipsResearchers have successfully measured some of the quantum properties of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors. This work in the field of spintronics could one day lead to chips that are not only smaller but that also generate less heat.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Restless sleep may be an early sign of Parkinson's diseasePatients with the RBD sleep behavior disorder lack dopamine and have a form of inflammation of the brain, researchers have found. This means that they are at risk of developing Parkinson's disease or dementia when they grow older.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combination strategy could hold promise for ovarian cancerMice with ovarian cancer that received drugs to reactivate dormant genes along with other drugs that activate the immune system had a greater reduction of tumor burden and significantly longer survival than those that received any of the drugs alone, report investigators.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Once they start composting, people find other ways to be 'green'Composting food scraps can prompt people to make other earth-friendly choices, new research has found. When one California city started a composting program to keep food waste out of its landfill, residents began to pay more attention to other environmentally sound practices, such as taking shorter showers.
3h
Popular Science
Preventing deforestation might be expensive, but it will cost us more if we don't Forests don’t get a lot of credit in the fight against climate change. Left alone, they soak up a huge volume of carbon from the atmosphere. They are what scientists call a “carbon sink.” But, when people burn down forests to clear land for farming or grazing, those trees become a liability, bleeding their vast stores of carbon into the atmosphere. Right now, countries are putting more money towa
3h
Viden
Voldeligt og ekstremistisk YouTube-indhold skal fjernes af 10.000 mand YouTube opjusterer fra næste år indsatsen mod voldeligt og ekstremistisk indhold markant. Ifølge videotjenestens direktør vil man ansætte en lang række nye folk, så der i 2018 vil være over 10.000 personer på tværs af Googles services, der arbejder med at fjerne indhold, som strider mod firmaets regler. Nogle af de nye kræfter skal desuden bruges til at styrke den computer-algoritme, der allerede
3h
Viden
Iværksættere vil lave internet - hvor du ejer dine data Iværksættervirksomheden Blockstack beskriver deres produkt som en ny slags internet, der lader dig at bruge apps uden at opgive dine data, sikkerhed eller frihed. Det er et radikalt opgør med den måde tingene fungerer på i dag, hvor både vores data og vores sikkerhed er overladt til virksomheder som Facebook og Google, der udbyder de services, vi benytter os af til daglig. I sidste uge rejste vir
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Storytellers promoted cooperation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religionStorytelling promoted cooperation in hunter-gatherers prior to the advent of organized religion.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Variation within species is critical aspect of biodiversityConcerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smaller branches pack the fastest, biggest fire-spreading punchThe diameter of the branches that are burning is the biggest single factor behind which ones will form embers the most quickly and how much fire-starting energy they'll pack, preliminary findings of a new study indicate.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's DiseaseA new study reveals that hyperbaric oxygen treatments may alleviate symptoms experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most people in favor of screening for spinal muscular atrophyResearch indicates that most people are in the UK are in favor of newborn screening for the potentially deadly condition spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hearing different accents at home impacts language processing in infantsInfants raised in homes where they hear a single language, but spoken with different accents, recognize words dramatically differently at about 12 months of age than their age-matched peers exposed to little variation in accent, according to an expert in language development. The findings point to the importance of considering the effects of multiple accents when studying speech development and su
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Four-fold jump in deaths in opioid-driven hospitalizationsDeath rates for those hospitalized for opioid-related conditions in the U.S. have quadrupled since 2000, new research has found. Worst toll seen among patients who were low-income, white, under age 65 and on Medicare, and the severity of opioid misuse leading to hospitalization has increased.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual reality users must learn to use what they seeWhen most people put on a virtual reality headset, they still treat what they see like it's happening on any run-of-the-mill TV screen, research finds.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Closing in on pathways involved in ALS diseaseSymptoms of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, may be subtle at first but develop into more obvious muscle weakness and paralysis. Recently, a researcher identified a potential target for therapeutics that may help to lessen the severity and progression of ALS. Researchers suggest that this same enzyme pathway also could help in the recovery of patients who have suffered strokes and other di
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humidity switches molecular diode off and onMolecular electronics is a growing research area where scientists study electrical properties of the molecules with a chemically programmed function. Molecules can function as diodes, switches and transistors, all with a typical length of few nanometers. An international group of scientists has developed the first switchable molecular diode.
3h
The Atlantic
Imagining the Jellyfish Apocalypse I n my mid-20s, I spent three months living in Broome, a coastal township in Western Australia famous for its moonrises, pink beaches, and pearl farms. Each morning during what is known locally as “the buildup” (the hot, muggy weeks heralding the wet season), I would stuff a towel in a bag and trudge out to where the red pindan soil—distinctive to the Kimberley region—marbles powdery dunes, longi
3h
Blog » Languages » English
Carl Sagan vs Neil deGrasse Tyson Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson are some of today’s most well known and loved scientists. Sagan was an American astronomer who is best known for his work as a science popularizer and communicator. He wrote many popular science books including The Dragons of Eden, Broca’s Brain, and Pale Blue Dot, as well as Sci-Fi novel “Contact” He also co-wrote and narrated the award-winning 1980 television
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dish CEO Charlie Ergen steps aside to focus on wireless The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook CEO to take a month of parental leave in December The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiment demonstrates quantum mechanical effects from biological systems Featured in the cuvette on the left, green fluorescent proteins are responsible for bioluminescence in jellyfish. Credit: Northwestern University Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA gets a final look at Tropical Cyclone Ockhi's rainfall On Dec. 4, GPM found rain falling at a rate of over 62 mm (2.44 inches) per hour in storms northeast of the center. On the western side storms rainfall was occurring at a rate of over 60 mm (2.27 inches) per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce Tropical Cyclone Ockhi is quickly weakening in the Arabian Sea and is expected to dissipate on Dec. 6 when it makes landfall in northwestern India. The Glo
3h
Live Science
Mathematicians Awarded $3 Million for Cracking Century-Old Problem Two mathematicians have each earned the (massive but countable) sum of $3 million for a proof that could one day help scientists understand extra dimensions. Christopher Hacon, a mathematician at the University of Utah, and James McKernan, a physicist at the University of California at San Diego, won this year's Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics for proving a long-standing conjecture about
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers show how insect food choice can be manipulated Image shows mouthparts in wild type flies (left). Pharyngeal taste neurons marked by green fluorescent proteins are shown in three different pharyngeal taste organs in the distal (red), middle (blue), and proximal (purple) parts of the pharynx. Credit: Dahanukar lab, UC Riverside. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found a way to access and manipulate taste neurons in the
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene experts set to tackle pest control Experts are to investigate how genetic techniques could be applied to help control pest species. The team is evaluating how a technology called gene drive could be used to spread an infertility gene in rats and mice. The technique could provide a more humane method of controlling vermin populations. A similar approach is already being tested in mosquitoes. The researchers are interested in whet
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA gets a final look at Tropical Cyclone Ockhi's rainfall IMAGE: On Dec. 4, GPM found rain falling at a rate of over 62 mm (2.44 inches) per hour in storms northeast of the center. On the western side storms rainfall... view more Credit: Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce Tropical Cyclone Ockhi is quickly weakening in the Arabian Sea and is expected to dissipate on Dec. 6 when it makes landfall in northwestern India. The Global Precipitation Measu
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surgeons remove cancerous lymph nodes through hidden scar procedure A team of surgeons at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, led by Hyunsuk Suh, MD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, have performed the first robot-assisted radical neck dissection in the United States using the bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) , a surgery that involves removing all of the lymph nodes on one side of the neck. The resul
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Entangling biological systems Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. Kumar and his team have, for the first time, created quantum entanglement from a biological system. This finding could advance scientists'
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New quick, portable test for iron, vitamin A deficiency could save lives ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell University engineers and nutritionists have created a swift solution for a challenging global health problem: a low-cost, rapid test to detect iron and vitamin A deficiencies at the point of care. "Vitamin A and iron deficiency affect more than one-third of the world's population. Problems resulting from these deficiencies - such as blindness, anemia and death, particularly
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance discoveredThe bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease an antibiotic's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus, another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa. The findings point to the possibility of new antibiotics employing these factors to enhance antibiotic susceptibility.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preschool program helps boost skills necessary for academic achievementChildren growing up in poverty face many challenges, but a preschool program that aims to improve social and emotional skills may help increase their focus and improve learning in the classroom, according to researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Goldwater rule? Should psychiatrists be allowed to publicly comment on mental health of public figures?The rationale for the Goldwater Rule -- which prohibits psychiatrists from publicly commenting on the mental health of public figures they have not examined in person -- does not hold up to current scientific scrutiny, a new analysis finds.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Student-led protests for inclusive campuses are more likely at selective universities Some universities are more likely than others to experience student activism like the "I, Too, Am Harvard" campaign in 2014, a new study finds. That student-led campaign at Harvard publicized the hurtful experiences routinely faced on campus by students from marginalized populations, meaning gender and ethnic minorities. A new study led by a researcher from Southern Methodist University, Dallas
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In first, 3-D printed objects connect to WiFi without electronics Imagine a bottle of laundry detergent that can sense when you're running low on soap -- and automatically connect to the internet to place an order for more. University of Washington researchers are the first to make this a reality by 3-D printing plastic objects and sensors that can collect useful data and communicate with other WiFi-connected devices entirely on their own. With CAD models that
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seaweed could hold key to environmentally friendly sunscreen A compound found in seaweed could protect human skin from the damaging impact of the sun without causing harm to marine ecosystems. The use of sunscreens is advocated to prevent sun damage, but most formulations contain synthetic UV radiation filters that can make their way in to water systems. Many of these are not ecocompatible and may harm fragile marine life including coral, fish and microorg
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers examine role of gene variation linked to major depressive disorder IMAGE: Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers reports on all aspects of genetic testing, including molecular and biochemical based tests and varied clinical situations; ethical, legal, social, and economic aspects of genetic... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, Dec. 5, 2017-A new study assessed the effects of a SLC6A15 gene variant on resting-state brain
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers 3-D print a 'living tattoo' IMAGE: MIT engineers have devised a 3-D printing technique that uses a new kind of ink made from genetically programmed living cells. view more Credit: Courtesy of the researchers MIT engineers have devised a 3-D printing technique that uses a new kind of ink made from genetically programmed living cells. The cells are engineered to light up in response to a variety of stimuli. When mixed
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year A new analysis of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) in men shows that infection with one HPV type strongly increases the risk of reinfection with the same type. In fact, men who are infected with the type responsible for most HPV-related cancers are 20 times more likely to be reinfected within one year. This increased risk suggests that infection confers no natural immunity against HPV, as is of
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists shed light on a tumor-suppressive protein in metastases ?A new study conducted at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology in Belgium has labeled the protein Caveolin-1 as a high-potential pursuit in the fight against cancer. Many research projects have already implicated this protein in both tumor-promotive and suppressive functions, but its exact role remained elusive. By examining macrophages at the sites of metastases, the scientists have now d
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds link between fragile X syndrome gene and dysregulated tissue growth IMAGE: This artistic image consists of eight Drosophila intestine samples dyed in different colors and arranged in a floral pattern. view more Credit: Arthur Luhur, Indiana University BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Researchers at Indiana University have found a previously undetected link between the gene that causes fragile X syndrome and increased tissue growth. The link could reveal a key
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing isn't believing: Penn biologists show how to shut off hunger 'alarm system' Imagine you're in a restaurant, hungry, anxious and a bit irritable awaiting your food order to arrive at the table. The server exits the kitchen with a tray full of steaming plates and a flood of relief washes over you. But the server ferries the food right past you to another table, and the unpleasant sensation of hunger returns -- at least until you take the first bite of your very own meal. W
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New weakness found in most common childhood malignant brain tumor A new weakness found in medulloblastoma, the most common form of childhood brain tumour, could lead to more personalised medicine and improved treatment for some patients, according to an early study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), funded by the Medical Research Council and Brain Tumour Research. Current treatments for medulloblastoma include a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show how insect food choice can be manipulated IMAGE: Image shows mouthparts in wild type flies (left). Pharyngeal taste neurons marked by green fluorescent proteins are shown in three different pharyngeal taste organs in the distal (red), middle (blue),... view more Credit: Dahanukar lab, UC Riverside. RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found a way to access and manipulate taste neurons
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene experts set to tackle pest control Experts are to investigate how genetic techniques could be applied to help control pest species. The team is evaluating how a technology called gene drive could be used to spread an infertility gene in rats and mice. The technique could provide a more humane method of controlling vermin populations. A similar approach is already being tested in mosquitoes. The researchers are interested in wh
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create successful mass production system for bioengineered livers IMAGE: In this image, color-coded liver cells are shown in the mini liver buds bioengineered entirely with induced human pluripotent stem cells. The colors denote the liver tissues are self-organizing correctly... view more Credit: Cincinnati Children's/Yokohama City University CINCINNATI - Researchers report creating a biologically accurate mass-production platform that overcomes major b
4h
Science | The Guardian
Radical diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, new study shows A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications , including blindness and foot amputations , heart and kidney diseas
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity Populations of alewife ( Alosa pseudoharengus ) differ in gape size and other feeding traits, causing differences in plankton communities in different lakes. Credit: David Post Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences. Many species play import
4h
Science : NPR
What Would Enrico Fermi Think Of Science Today? Dr. Enrico Fermi was the leader of the group of scientists who succeeded in initiating the first man-made nuclear chain reaction. AP hide caption toggle caption AP Dr. Enrico Fermi was the leader of the group of scientists who succeeded in initiating the first man-made nuclear chain reaction. AP David N. Schwartz is the author of The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Ferm
4h
New Scientist - News
The usual way of hunting dark matter may be all wrong Floating through a dark matter wind ixstudio / Alamy By Leah Crane Dark matter particles might be even smaller than we thought they were, and even better at interacting with normal matter. If that’s the case, we’ve been hurting our chances at spotting them by burying our detectors kilometres underground. Nobody is quite sure what dark matter is. The most popular theory says it is probably mad
4h
New Scientist - News
Lizards re-evolved eggs after thousands of years of live births By Michael Le Page Laurie Campbell/naturepl.com Which came first, the lizard or the egg? In the case of at least one lizard, we have an answer: the live-bearing lizard came first and only later evolved the ability to lay eggs. It’s a rare example of a species re-evolving a complex trait that had been lost. The common lizard is just that. It is found across a broad swathe of Eurasia, from Irel
4h
New Scientist - News
Artificial ovary may fine-tune treatment for menopause symptoms A smarter way to relieve symptoms? Clarissa Leahy/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou What’s the best way to relieve the symptoms of menopause ? An artificial ovary may be the answer. Many women experiencing menopause struggle with weight gain and a loss of bone density. Hormonal replacement therapies can help, but getting the doses wrong can raise the risk of heart disease or breast cancer. Emmanuel O
4h
New Scientist - News
Sumatran tigers fall 17 per cent and have just two strongholds A male Sumatran tiger in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park Matthew Scott Luskin By Aylin Woodward Sumatran tigers are running out of places to live. Their population fell by 16.6 per cent between 2000 and 2012, and the remaining tigers are trapped in shrinking forests. “We’re really at a tipping point in terms of how much habitat is left that tigers need for their long-term survival,” says
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
WASP-18b has smothering stratosphere without waterScientists have found evidence that the oversized planet WASP-18b is wrapped in a smothering stratosphere loaded with carbon monoxide and devoid of water.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased risk of atrial fibrillation with congenital heart diseasePatients with congenital heart disease are up to 85 times more likely to suffer from atrial fibrillation as adults. The researchers behind a study are now advocating more frequent screenings of the most vulnerable groups.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New spin to solving mystery of stellar companionsScientists are investigating the nature of planetary-mass bodies that orbit stars, finding new clues to their origins.
4h
Science | The Guardian
Grow your own: the race to create body parts in the lab Two years ago, Hassan’s father was faced with questions that he had no good answers for. “Why do I have this disease?” his seven-year-old son asked him. “Why do I have to live this life?” Hassan was born with a rare genetic skin condition, called epidermolysis bullosa, that causes fragile, blistering skin. His first blister appeared when he was a week old, but soon after his family fled their nat
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity IMAGE: Varieties of evening primrose ( Oenothera biennis ) show variation in leaf chemistry, leading to differences in the insect communities in different fields. view more Credit: Nash Turley Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnant women with PTSD have higher levels of stress hormone cortisol ANN ARBOR -- Research has shown that a woman's emotional and physical health during pregnancy impacts a developing fetus. However, less is known about the effect of past stressors and posttraumatic stress disorder on an expectant woman. To that end, researchers at the University of Michigan measured the stress hormone cortisol in pregnant women from early pregnancy to when their baby was 6 weeks
4h
Quanta Magazine
What Bacteria Can Tell Us About Human Evolution It is human nature to want to know where we came from. Individually, we investigate our family lineages to discover ancestors lost to history. Collectively, scientists examine data from a vast array of sources, ranging from ancient fossils to current genomes, to determine where humanity itself originated, and how we came to be who and where we are as a species today. In the past decade, studies i
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How height happens It's been understood for decades that a host of factors - everything from pre- and post-natal health, nutrition, and genetics - play a role in determining height, but efforts to untangle the complex web of factors that contribute to height have long been stymied. That picture, however, is becoming clearer, thanks to the work of Harvard scientists. Led by Associate Professor of Human Evolutionary
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Augmented-reality technology could help treat 'lazy eye' When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or "lazy eye." Amblyopia is common and it is typically treated by forcing the less dominant eye to adapt, either through lab-based training or wearing an eyepatch. But new research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two Super-Earths around red dwarf K2-18 New research using data collected by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has revealed that a little-known exoplanet called K2-18b could well be a scaled-up version of Earth. Just as exciting, the same researchers also discovered for the first time that the planet has a neighbor. "Being able to measure the mass and density of K2-18b was tremendous, but to discover a new exoplanet was l
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Student-led protests for inclusive campuses are more likely at selective universities Some universities are more likely than others to experience student activism like the "I, Too, Am Harvard" campaign in 2014, a new study finds. That student-led campaign at Harvard publicized the hurtful experiences routinely faced on campus by students from marginalized populations, meaning gender and ethnic minorities. A new study led by a researcher from Southern Methodist University, Dallas,
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Big, Bad Botnet of Things Is on the Prowl A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's heaviest bony fish identified and correctly namedJapanese fish experts have identified and clarified the biological name of the world's heaviest bony fish ever caught. The 2,300 kilogram whopper is a Mola alexandrini bump-head sunfish, and not, as originally thought, a member of the more commonly known Mola mola ocean sunfish species.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meteorite analysis shows reduced salt is key in Earth's new recipeScientists have found the halogen levels in the meteorites that formed the Earth billions of years ago are much lower than previously thought.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Which sequences make DNA unwrap and breathe?Accessing DNA wrapped into basic units of packaging depends on the underlying sequence of the building blocks. Like Christmas presents, some nucleosomes are easier to unwrap than others before genes are expressed. Scientists now demonstrate the role of the DNA sequence in making it possible for packaged DNA to open up and allow genes to be read and expressed.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wing structure vital in producing a range of tones in bush-cricket mating callsThe structure of the sound generators in the wings of male bush-crickets is critical for producing tonality within the long-range mating calls that attract distant females, a major new study has shown.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-rate and long-life lithium-ion battery with improved low-temperature performance through a prelithiation strategyWhen it is cold in winter, cars tend to have starting problems. This is not much better with electric cars, which inevitably lose capacity of their rechargeable lithium-ion batteries at freezing temperatures. Now scientists have offered a strategy to avoid plunging battery kinetics. They have designed a battery system with a cold-enduring hard-carbon anode and a powerful lithium-rich cathode, with
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity prevented in mice fed high-fat diet IMAGE: Washington University researchers activated the Hedgehog protein pathway in the fat cells of mice. After eight weeks of eating a high-fat diet, mice that had been engineered with genes to... view more Credit: Washington University School of Medicine Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a way to prevent fat cells from growing larger, a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSW researchers identify possible new way to treat parasitic infections IMAGE: This image shows David Mangelsdorf (left) and Steven Kliewer. view more Credit: UT Southwestern Medical Center UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a chemical that suppresses the lethal form of a parasitic infection caused by roundworms that affects up to 100 million people and usually causes only mild symptoms. "The approach we used could be applied generally
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers link binge eating and weight-loss challenges Someone who binge eats consumes an objectively large amount of food while feeling a loss of control over eating. When episodes occur weekly for several months, the action moves into the realm of binge-eating disorder. So how does this type of eating affect people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity who are actively working to lose weight? According to new findings from the University of Pennsylvania
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New process could be key to understanding complex rearrangements in genome IMAGE: This is a complex gemonic rearrangement (CGR) between yeast chromosomes II and III, involving deletions, duplications and triplications. view more Credit: The Mirkin Lab at Tufts University MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. (Dec. 5, 2017) -- Understanding complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs), the culprit in the development of many types of cancer and genetic disorders, has always been a cha
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Goldwater Rule 'gagging' psychiatrists no longer relevant, analysis finds The rationale for the Goldwater Rule -- which prohibits psychiatrists from publicly commenting on the mental health of public figures they have not examined in person -- does not hold up to current scientific scrutiny, a new analysis finds. Perspectives on Psychological Science is publishing the analysis, which concludes that the Goldwater Rule is not well-supported scientifically and is outdated
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beyond wind speed: A new measure for predicting hurricane impacts Six major hurricanes that engulfed the Atlantic Basin in 2017 were a devastating reminder of the vulnerability of coastal communities, where more than half the U.S. population resides. What if there was a better way to forecast and communicate these storms' damaging economic impacts, before they happen? Colorado State University civil engineers have developed an innovative new approach to assessi
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Link found between estrogens and changes in heart physiology IMAGE: This is Daniel Gorelick. view more Credit: UAB BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Estrogens are powerful hormones important for the formation and function of the nervous, reproductive and cardiovascular systems. Xenoestrogens are environmental chemicals -- both industrial pollutants and natural compounds -- that mimic estrogens and may be toxic for human health. An important model to study xenoest
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nursing homes can prevent infections through performance improvement collaboratives Arlington, VA, December 5, 2017 -- Each year, 150,000 U.S. nursing home residents will receive a urinary catheter--half of whom will develop a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). While 70 percent of facilities report having an infection preventionist (IP) on staff, many nursing home IPs often have limited time to advance their training on infection control. But as a new assessmen
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most people in favor of screening for spinal muscular atrophy IMAGE: Dr, Felicity Boardman, University of Warwick. view more Credit: Dr Felicity Boardman Spinal muscular atrophy is a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide Approximately 1 in 40 of the general population are genetic carriers of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) Currently no screening programme for SMA in UK Research from the University of Warwick indicates that most people are in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that hyperbaric oxygen treatments may ameliorate symptoms experienced by patients with Alzheimer's disease. "This revolutionary treatment for Alzheimer's disease uses a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, which has been shown in the past to be extremely effective in treating wounds that were slow to heal," says Prof. Uri Ashery of TAU's Sagol School of Neuroscience
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create unique bioengineered organoids for modeling colorectal cancer IMAGE: Tissue Engineering, Part A brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 5,2017--A new study describes a unique bioengineered tissue construct, or organoid, into which colorectal cancer cel
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NTU's Sumatran tiger study sounds warning bells over long-term deforestation A new joint study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has warned about the extinction of Sumatran tigers in Sumatra, Indonesia, due to destroyed habitats. The scientists found that while tiger population densities have increased in well-protected forests in Sumatra, 17 percent of the tigers' habitats were deforested from 2000 to 2012 to make way for oil palm plantat
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein-folding simulations sped up IMAGE: Structural model of Alzheimer Amyloid A-beta 1-42 peptide fibril derived from an experimental structure (PDB: 2MXU). The fibrillar aggregates act as cell-toxins at the onset and the progression of Alzheimer's... view more Credit: Emanuel Peter WASHINGTON, D.C., December 5, 2017 - Proteins, the ubiquitous workhorses of biochemistry, are huge molecules whose function depends on how they
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tigers cling to survival in Sumatra's increasingly fragmented forests IMAGE: Another tiger poses for a camera trap in Sumatra. view more Credit: Matthew Luskin A research expedition tracked endangered tigers through the Sumatran jungles for a year and found tigers are clinging to survival in low density populations. Their findings have renewed fears about the possible extinction of the elusive predators. Tigers on the neighboring islands of Java, Ba
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Storytellers promoted cooperation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religionStorytelling promoted cooperation in hunter-gatherers prior to the advent of organized religion, a new UCL study reveals.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Implementation of newborn screening for congenital heart disease associated with decrease in infant cardiac deaths Bottom Line: Statewide implementation of mandatory policies to screen newborns for the most serious congenital heart defects was associated with an estimated decrease in infant cardiac deaths. Why The Research Is Interesting: Congenital heart disease accounted for 6 percent of U.S. infant deaths from 1999 to 2006. In 2011, critical congenital heart disease was added to the U.S. Recommended Unif
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines FDA's expedited programs & development time of new drugs to treat serious diseases Bottom Line: Drugs reviewed by the FDA in programs intended to speed drug development were approved nearly a year quicker than drugs reviewed by the FDA through normal processes. Why The Research Is Interesting: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has four programs to speed the development and review of drugs treating serious diseases. Clinical development times for drugs in these progr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab-engineered ovaries superior to hormone drugs in animal model WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - December 5, 2017 - New research in rats suggests the possibility of bioengineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a safer, more natural hormone replacement therapy for women. A team from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine found that the engineered ovaries were more effective than hormone therapy drugs at improving bone and uterine health and body compo
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the doctor's away When you are hospitalized and the regular doctor is out sick, on vacation or at a scientific conference, you are increasingly likely to receive treatment not from the doctor's colleague or another hospital staff physician but by an outsider hired to fill in like a substitute school teacher. The growing trend--a multi-billion-dollar industry--is fueled by physician staffing shortages and shifting
5h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Sometimes Seeing More Endangered Tigers Isn’t a Good Sign Though no one knows exactly how many Sumatran tigers remain, estimates range from about 400 to 500, down from 1,000 in 1978. The animals are only on Sumatra, where their rain forest habitat is quickly being replaced by rubber and palm oil plantations. Tigers are particularly vulnerable to habitat fragmentation because they require expansive territories for hunting.The researchers estimated the Su
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The brain benefits of deep sleep -- and how to get more of it | Dan GartenbergThere's nothing quite like a good night's sleep. What if technology could help us get more out of it? Dan Gartenberg is working on tech that stimulates deep sleep, the most regenerative stage which (among other wonderful things) might help us consolidate our memories and form our personalities. Find out more about how playing sounds that mirror brain waves during this stage might lead to deeper sl
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel approach to concrete protection slows deterioration in harsh conditions The material works by absorbing water that exists within the concrete to form crystals . Credit: Brunel University Using crystallising admixture and wax-based curing agents significantly improves the performance of concrete in harsh conditions, a new study from Brunel University London suggests. Researchers discovered that concrete facing a harsh environment – for example heavy rainfall or high w
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One dead as firefighters battle California blaze A firefighter battles a wildfire as it burns along a hillside near homes in Santa Paula, California that has forced thousands to flee the area Firefighters were battling a wind-whipped brush fire in southern California on Tuesday that has left at least one person dead and destroyed more than 150 homes and businesses. The Ventura County Fire Department said over 27,000 people had been told to evac
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic tool that can doom a species under UN review For some, a new cutting-edge technology called gene drive is the silver bullet able to wipe out invasive species decimating island wildlife, and eradicate the malaria-bearing mosquitos that killed nearly half a million people last year, mostly in Africa. Others fear that the genetic engineering process is a one-way ticket to ecological mayhem, or suspect health and conservation aims are masking i
5h
Live Science
Scientists Used Fake Hallucinations to Probe the Minds of People With Psychosis Some people hallucinate, hear voices and lose touch with the world around them — but seem to get on with their lives just fine. Others have similar experiences, but they are so debilitating that these people have difficulty getting through their days without clinical help. Why the difference? The answer may lie in how people interpret their own psychoses, a new study from England suggests.
5h
Popular Science
It’s time for the HQ live trivia app to fix—or kill—its chat feature Last night, more than 350,000 people logged into a trivia app called HQ to try and answer 12 consecutive questions in hopes of winning a piece of an $8,500 prize pool (I got eliminated on question eight). The app revolves around a live, interactive game show that happens twice every weekday and once each weekend day. The audience for it has grown explosively in recent weeks, garnering good and ba
5h
Futurity.org
This vitamin may cut asthma airway inflammation Asthma patients taking a kind of vitamin E called gamma tocopherol had less inflammation of the airways, research finds. The study points to a new way to control asthma’s chronic symptoms. The shortness of breath that the nearly 26 million Americans who suffer from asthma experience is usually the result of inflammation of the airways. People with asthma typically use albuterol for acute attacks
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance Electron micrographs of S. aureus . Credit: Conlon Lab, UNC School of Medicine Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have found that a bacterium can become much more or less susceptible to an antibiotic depending on the specific bacterial community in its midst. The scientists found specifically that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: How Xanax works Dentists rely on composite materials to perform restorative procedures, such as filling cavities. Yet these materials, like tooth enamel, can be vulnerable to the growth of plaque, the sticky biofilm that leads to tooth decay.
5h
Feed: All Latest
The Wide-Eyed Robot Teaching Deaf Children to Communicate This kid doesn’t know it, but he’s kind of a big deal. Sitting in his mother’s lap, he looks at a mohawked robotic head, which periodically turns left to look at a computer screen with its big blue eyes. And the infant takes the cue, glancing at the screen, where a human avatar signs a nursery rhyme. This boy is doing something remarkable on two levels. For one, he’s practicing a pivotal skill fo
5h
Live Science
Smile (or Not): Photos Can Be Animated to Show Expressions Unless you're touring Hogwarts or an old haunted mansion, you expect portraits and photos to stay still. Well, thanks to the latest in digital-animation technologies, that may no longer be the case. With the help of an actor and some high-tech motion-capture techniques, computer scientists can now take a still photo of a person's face and animate it. The photos can be animated to express emo
5h
The Atlantic
The Desirability of Storytellers Once upon a time, the sun and moon argued about who would light up the sky. They fought, as anthropomorphic celestial bodies are meant to do, but after the moon proves to be as strong as the sun, they decide to take shifts. The sun would brighten the day, while the moon would illuminate the night. This is one of several stories told by the Agta, a group of hunter-gatherers from the Philippines. T
5h
The Atlantic
John Conyers Won't Seek Reelection Democratic Representative John Conyers of Michigan said on Tuesday that he is “retiring today,” an announcement that follows allegations by former aides that he sexually harassed them and calls for his resignation from top Democrats in Congress. “I am in the process of putting my retirement plans together,” Conyers said on a Detroit radio program, endorsing his son, John Conyers III, to replace h
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When contact sports cause concussion injuries, who comes out ahead? ROSEMONT, Ill. (Dec. 5, 2017)--Concussions are common injuries among contact sport athletes. While most athletes experience full recovery within a few weeks and can return to their sport, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons , female athletes tend to experience a higher concussion injury rate than male athletes. Additi
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preschool program helps boost skills necessary for academic achievement Children growing up in poverty face many challenges, but a preschool program that aims to improve social and emotional skills may help increase their focus and improve learning in the classroom, according to researchers. Researchers observed two groups of children from preschool through third grade. One group participated in the Head Start REDI (Research-based, Developmentally Informed) program a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance IMAGE: These are electron micrographs of S. aureus . view more Credit: Conlon Lab, UNC School of Medicine CHAPEL HILL NC - Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have found that a bacterium can become much more or less susceptible to an antibiotic depending on the specific bacterial community in its midst. The scientists found specifically that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can p
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Xanax works (video) IMAGE: Whether or not you have anxiety, you've probably heard of Xanax. But what's in this popular and widely prescribed drug, and how does it work? This new video from Reactions... view more Credit: The American Chemical Society WASHINGTON, Dec. 5, 2017 -- Whether or not you have anxiety, you've probably heard of Xanax. But what's in this popular and widely prescribed drug, and how does it
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How can colleges better predict when a person's radical beliefs will turn to violence? IMAGE: Violence and Gender is the only peer-reviewed journal focusing on the understanding, prediction, and prevention of acts of violence. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, Dec. 4, 2017 - In a new study researchers reviewed numerous cases of extremist violence or terrorism and the published literature to develop a set of tools for colleges to use to asses
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storytellers promoted cooperation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religion Camp elder telling stories. Credit: Daniel Smith Storytelling promoted co-operation in hunter-gatherers prior to the advent of organised religion, a new UCL study reveals. The research shows that hunter-gatherer storytellers were essential in promoting co-operative and egalitarian values before comparable mechanisms evolved in larger agricultural societies, such as moralising high-gods. Storytell
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tigers cling to survival in Sumatra's increasingly fragmented forests Another tiger poses for a camera trap in Sumatra. Credit: Matthew Luskin A research expedition tracked endangered tigers through the Sumatran jungles for a year and found tigers are clinging to survival in low density populations. Their findings have renewed fears about the possible extinction of the elusive predators. Tigers on the neighboring islands of Java, Bali, and Singapore went extinct in
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
By modeling biological molecules over longer timescales, a new algorithm can help better understand diseases Structural model of Alzheimer Amyloid A-beta 1-42 peptide fibril derived from an experimental structure (PDB: 2MXU). The fibrillar aggregates act as cell-toxins at the onset and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Credit: Emanuel Peter Proteins, the ubiquitous workhorses of biochemistry, are huge molecules whose function depends on how they fold into intricate structures. To understand how th
5h
Dana Foundation
Neurotechnology and the Military “Every generation has been trying to figure out how to use brain-related technology to improve security,” from caffeine to computer enhancement, bioethicist Jonathan Moreno , Ph.D., said at the Capitol Hill briefing “Neurotechnology and the Military” last week. Moreno and neuroscientist Leigh Hochberg , M.D., Ph.D., had teamed up to give a similar presentation at a luncheon six years ago, and on
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
London's iconic black cabs go electric The new electric TX eCity taxi took a spin near Buckingham Palace. London's first electric-powered black cabs hit the streets on Tuesday, the British capital's iconic taxis getting a facelift for the modern age that should help cut pollution in the city. The new-look cabs will meet the strict new emissions regulations required for all new London taxis from 2018. They are replacing the old diese
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers successfully measure some of the quantum properties of electrons in 2-D semiconductors A group of spintronics researchers at EPFL is using new materials to reveal more of the many capabilities of electrons. The field of spintronics seeks to tap the quantum properties of "spin," the term often used to describe one of the fundamental properties of elementary particles - in this case, electrons. This is among the most cutting-edge areas of research in electronics today. Researchers wo
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Another Big, Bad Botnet of Things Is on the Prowl A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Superior hydrogen catalyst just grows that wayA printing process uses natural forces to grow an inexpensive catalyst to replace platinum to lower the cost of hydrogen-powered cars, report researchers.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wing structure vital in producing a range of tones in bush-cricket mating calls An image of the wing of a bush-cricket specimen showing the file of stridulatory teeth. Credit: Benedict Chivers, School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln The structure of the sound generators in the wings of male bush-crickets is critical for producing tonality within the long-range mating calls that attract distant females, a major new study has shown. Scientists investigated bush-cricket
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Once they start composting, people find other ways to be 'green' Composting food scraps can prompt people to make other earth-friendly choices, new research has found. When one California city started a composting program to keep food waste out of its landfill, residents began to pay more attention to other environmentally sound practices, such as taking shorter showers, according to a study led by Nicole Sintov, an assistant professor of behavior , decision m
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which sequences make DNA unwrap and breathe? Credit: NIH Accessing DNA wrapped into basic units of packaging, called nucleosomes, depends on the underlying sequence of DNA building blocks, or base pairs. Like Christmas presents, some nucleosomes are easier to unwrap than others. This is because what makes the double helix stiffer or softer, straight or bent - in other words, what determines its elasticity - is the actual base pair sequence.
5h
Live Science
Hairy, Blue Tarantulas Found Hiding in Hole-Filled Tree Stump This previously unknown species of tarantula is black and blue all over. Credit: Andrew Snyder One dark night in the Guyanarainforest, herpetologist Andrew Snyder serendipitously shined his flashlight on "a small glint of brilliant, cobalt blue" sticking out of a rotting stump. At first, Snyder thought the glint was coming from the eyes of a spider, which usually shine blue under bright lig
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's heaviest bony fish identified and correctly named Credit: Springer Japanese fish experts have identified and clarified the biological name of the world's heaviest bony fish ever caught. The 2,300 kilogram whopper is a Mola alexandrini bump-head sunfish, and not, as originally thought, a member of the more commonly known Mola mola ocean sunfish species. The study was led by Etsuro Sawai of Hiroshima University and is published in Ichthyological R
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Girls will be boys: Sex reversal in dragon lizards Central bearded dragon. Credit: Professor Arthur Georges One of Australia's iconic lizard species is hiding a secret - female central bearded dragon embryos temporarily grow the lizard equivalent of a penis during development. Researchers at The University of Queensland, the University of Canberra and CSIRO made the discovery while investigating what happens to the body and genitalia of male drag
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University scientists create a neurochip for replacing damaged areas of the brain Lobachevsky University researchers are working to create a neurochip capable of transmitting a signal to healthy brain cells. The neurochip can be used in devices intended to replace damaged parts of the brain. First experiments have been conducted to transmit signals from an artificial neuron to living cells of the brain slice, demonstrating the possibility of interfacing between them. Today, th
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army-developed Zika vaccine induces strong immune response in three phase 1 studies IMAGE: WRAIR scientists working at bench preparing Army-developed Zika Purified Inactivated Virus (ZPIV) vaccine candidate. view more Credit: WRAIR/Jonathan Thompson/DA Civilian SILVER SPRING, MD - Three Phase 1 human clinical trials evaluating an Army-developed Zika purified inactivated virus (ZPIV) vaccine have shown it was safe and well-tolerated in healthy adults and induced a robust immu
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Once they start composting, people find other ways to be 'green' IMAGE: Sintov's work found that composting appeared to lead to other 'green' behaviors, such as taking shorter showers view more Credit: Ohio State COLUMBUS, Ohio - Composting food scraps can prompt people to make other earth-friendly choices, new research has found. When one California city started a composting program to keep food waste out of its landfill, residents began to pay more a
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hearing different accents at home impacts language processing in infants IMAGE: Infants raised in homes where they hear a single language, but spoken with different accents, recognize words dramatically differently at about 12 months of age than their age-matched peers exposed... view more Credit: By sheldonl [CC0 or CC0], via Wikimedia Commons BUFFALO, N.Y. - Infants raised in homes where they hear a single language, but spoken with different accents, recognize w
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination strategy could hold promise for ovarian cancer Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers demonstrated that mice with ovarian cancer that received drugs to reactivate dormant genes along with other drugs that activate the immune system had a greater reduction of tumor burden and significantly longer survival than those that received any of the drugs alone. The study already spurred a clinical trial in ovarian cancer patients. The investig
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Restless sleep may be an early sign of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers from Aarhus University have discovered that patients with the RBD sleep behavior disorder lack dopamine and have a form of inflammation of the brain. This means that they are at risk of developing Parkinson's disease or dementia when they grow older.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wing structure vital in producing a range of tones in bush-cricket mating callsThe structure of the sound generators in the wings of male bush-crickets is critical for producing tonality within the long-range mating calls that attract distant females, a major new study has shown.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colored sunscreen protects skin from damage caused by visible light There is something wrong with people's exposure to sunlight. Despite rising worldwide consumption of sunscreens, the number of cases of skin cancer continues to grow. One of the reasons may be the action of visible light, which is also harmful to skin and is not blocked by conventional sunscreens. This is the conclusion drawn by a team at the Center for Research on Redox Processes in Biomedicin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chipsEPFL researchers have successfully measured some of the quantum properties of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors. This work in the field of spintronics could one day lead to chips that are not only smaller but that also generate less heat.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lemur study highlights role of diet in shaping gut microbiome IMAGE: These are ringtail lemurs ( Lemur catta ). view more Credit: David Haring, Duke Lemur Center A study of the bacteria in the guts of three lemur species offers new insights into the role of diet in shaping these microbial ecosystems - and how these microbes may relate to primate health. "We wanted to know which microbes were present and what they were doing," says Erin McKenney, a p
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WASP-18b has smothering stratosphere without water IMAGE: A NASA-led team of scientists determined that WASP-18b, a 'hot Jupiter' located 325 light-years from Earth, has a stratosphere that's loaded with carbon monoxide, or CO, but has no signs... view more Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center A NASA-led team has found evidence that the oversized planet WASP-18b is wrapped in a smothering stratosphere loaded with carbon monoxide and d
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conflicting views on social media balanced by an algorithm IMAGE: Fracking has two circles of users talking among themselves, strengthening their conflicting campaigns. The third word cloud represents the words used by the selected influential users. view more Credit: Kiran Garimella, Aalto University Social media has become an important news source for a majority of adults. A common complaint is that social media help create echo chambers in which p
6h
Science : NPR
The Ground Beneath Our Feet During a major soil catastrophe — the Dust Bowl — President Franklin Roosevelt told state governors , “The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” Still, we treat our soil like dirt. By growing food and storing carbon dioxide and water, the loam and peat that coats the earth sustains us all. In return, we till it, treat it with chemicals and generally walk all over it. Without healthy soi
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to reduced allergy riskHigh levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in children’s blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years, new research shows.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggestsUnder 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder, new research has found.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Alzheimer's animal model more closely mimics human diseaseMaking an AD mouse model that incorporates both A-beta and tau pathologies in a more AD-relevant context has been greatly sought after but difficult to accomplish. Now, researchers have done that and it's a big step for AD research, which will allow for new therapies to be tested in a more realistic context.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New test provides accurate measure of DNA damage from chemical compoundsA new biomarker test can help predict, with up to 90 percent certainty, which chemical compounds can cause DNA damage that could lead to cancer.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene associated with metastatic melanoma identifiedA protein active during early embryo development called GDF6 plays a primary role in metastatic melanoma, researchers have discovered.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers successfully use distributed acoustic sensing for seismic monitoring Shan Dou (from left), Jonathan Ajo-Franklin, and Nate Lindsey were on a Berkeley Lab team that used fiber optic cables for detecting earthquakes and other subsurface activity. Credit: Berkeley Lab Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown for the first time that dark fiber - the vast network of unused fiber-optic cables installed thro
6h
Futurity.org
Electrodes and air pumps create ‘virtual cocktails’ An interactive drinking device called Vocktail allows users to customize a “virtual cocktail” that researchers say smells, tastes, and looks like the real thing. Vocktail digitally simulates distinct tastes, smells, and colors to create new virtual flavors or augment existing flavors in order to achieve the ideal concoction, without physically mixing beverages and ingredients. Vocktail consists o
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ember research: Smaller branches pack the fastest, biggest fire-spreading punch Ember research. Credit: Oregon State University As the West tallies the damages from the 2017 wildfire season, researchers at Oregon State University are trying to learn more about how embers form and about the blaze-starting potential they carry. Preliminary findings indicate the diameter of the branches that are burning is the biggest single factor behind which ones will form embers the most qu
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop low energy, cost-effective wastewater purification system Researchers from NUS Faculty of Engineering have come up with a novel wastewater purification system that can remove up to 99 per cent of hard-to-treat organic compounds found in industrial wastewater. Credit: National University of Singapore A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has come up with a novel approach to treat industrial wastewater using electricity as a
6h
Ingeniøren
Nobelpriseufori dominerer regeringens nye forsknings- og innovationsstrategiKOMMENTAR: Uden argumenter for hvorfor antallet af nobelpriser er vigtigt, er første punkt i regeringens længe ventede forsknings- og innovationsstrategi, at Danmark skal have mere af den forskning, som kan udløse netop nobelpriser.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika vaccine induces robust immune responses in three phase 1 trialsHealthy adults mounted strong immune responses after receiving an investigational whole inactivated Zika virus vaccine, according to interim analyses of three Phase 1, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologists revise chronology of the last hunter-gatherers in the Near EastThe 15,000-year-old 'Natufian Culture' could live comfortably in the steppe zone of present-day eastern Jordan, new research by a team of scientists and archaeologists suggests. This was previously thought to be either uninhabitable or only sparsely populated.
6h
The Atlantic
Surgical Patients May Be Feeling Pain—and (Mostly) Forgetting It In June 2007, in a small room that leads into the operating theater, a middle-aged woman lies on a metal trolley. She is here for a hysterectomy, though no one mentions this. She has a cannula taped to the back of her left hand through which her anesthesiologist—a craggy, compact man, handsome, with dark hair graying at the temples and deep-set eyes—will shortly administer a milky drug called pro
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which sequences make DNA unwrap and breathe? Accessing DNA wrapped into basic units of packaging, called nucleosomes, depends on the underlying sequence of DNA building blocks, or base pairs. Like Christmas presents, some nucleosomes are easier to unwrap than others. This is because what makes the double helix stiffer or softer, straight or bent - in other words, what determines its elasticity - is the actual base pair sequence. In a new st
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to reduced allergy risk New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden reveals that high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in children's blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years. The study is published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology . Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common and often debut in childhood. Today we know that disease r
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working in the cold When it is cold in winter, cars tend to have starting problems. This is not much better with electric cars, which inevitably lose capacity of their rechargeable lithium-ion batteries at freezing temperatures. Now, Chinese scientists have offered a strategy to avoid plunging battery kinetics. In a study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , they designed a battery system with a cold-endurin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shut-off switch for lymphoma IMAGE: With their current study, Prof. Jürgen Ruland (right) and Dr. Tim Wartewig found a new starting point for therapies against lymphoma. view more Credit: Andreas Heddergott / Technical University of Munich Safety switches that automatically stop the device for example before it overheats are built into many electrical appliances. Cells are also equipped with such "emergency stop" funct
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meteorite analysis shows reduced salt is key in Earth's new recipe IMAGE: This is a halite crystal from the Oxford Museum of Natural History. view more Credit: Peter Barry Scientists have found the halogen levels in the meteorites that formed the Earth billions of years ago are much lower than previously thought. The research was carried out by international team of researchers, led by the Universities of Manchester and Oxford, and has recently been
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers connect severity of 'kissing disease' to T-cell population Washington, DC - December 5, 2017 - Acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM), also known as mono or the "kissing disease," is caused by the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV). In a paper published this week in mBio , researchers connect the onset and severity of mono to T-cells that react to both EBV and the influenza A virus, which causes the flu. The study represents one of the first reported links between h
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Astronaut Paolo Nespoli in BEAM The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Moon at roughly five miles per second, Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017, in Manchester Township, York County, Pennsylvania.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students' early test scores don't predict academic growth over time For years, parents and policymakers have looked to test scores to gauge the effectiveness of school districts and teachers. New research from Stanford Graduate School of Education Professor Sean Reardon provides a different measure: students' academic progress over a period of years. Reardon examined test scores for students in third through eighth grade at 11,000 school districts across the coun
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteorite analysis shows reduced salt is key in Earth's new recipe Credit: University of Manchester Scientists have found the halogen levels in the meteorites that formed the Earth billions of years ago are much lower than previously thought. The research was carried out by international team of researchers, led by the Universities of Manchester and Oxford, and has been published in Nature . Halogens such as Chlorine, Bromine and Iodine, form naturally occurri
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic sea ice loss could dry out California Extent of Arctic sea ice in September 2016 versus the 1981-2010 average minimum extent (gold line). Through satellite images, researchers have observed a steep decline in the average extent of Arctic sea ice for every month of the year. Credit: NASA Arctic sea ice loss of the magnitude expected in the next few decades could impact California's rainfall and exacerbate future droughts, according to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superior hydrogen catalyst just grows that way These inorganic “flowers,” color added, were created by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Stanley Chou and University of California, Merced colleague Vincent Tung in a spray-printing process that uses molybdenum disulfide to create a “flowering” hydrogen catalyst far cheaper than platinum and reasonably close in efficiency. Credit: Sandia National Laboratories Replacing your everyday gas gu
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Knowing a transgender person could influence one's political stance, study finds Gender-neutral restroom sign via Flickr As more people come to personally know a transgender person or even see depictions of transgender characters in the media, it likely will have a positive effect on public support for transgender rights, according to a study that includes two University of Kansas political scientists. "The real implication overall is that for those who advocate for increasin
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lighting the world—electrification strategies for Sub-Saharan Africa Overall system configuration (left); mini-grid technology choice (middle); stand-alone technology choice (right) for low and high diesel prices and fro 5 tiers of electricity consumption. Credit: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) This study combines geospatial information systems (GIS) tools and energy system modelling in an Open Source Spatial Electrification Toolkit (OnSSET), to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lemur study highlights role of diet in shaping gut microbiome Ringtail lemurs. Credit: David Haring, Duke Lemur Center A study of the bacteria in the guts of three lemur species offers new insights into the role of diet in shaping these microbial ecosystems – and how these microbes may relate to primate health. "We wanted to know which microbes were present and what they were doing," says Erin McKenney, a postdoctoral researcher at North Carolina State Univ
6h
Feed: All Latest
Instagram's New Story Highlights Save Your Disappearing Videos Forever If you're ever in the mood for a minor existential crisis, go through your Instagram profile and try to decipher what it says about you. Are you an insatiable foodie, traversing the world to find the best bite? Are you always on-trend, always well-lit, always wearing the very latest? Do you have kids? Do you selfie? On a platform that encourages every post to be perfect and beautiful for maximum
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Melting Ice Could Cause More California Droughts Loss of ice cover in the Arctic could spur more droughts in California, according to a new study by federal researchers. The study , published today in Nature Communications , finds that sea-ice loss in the Arctic could trigger atmospheric effects that drive precipitation away from California. The research was led by atmospheric scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It
6h
The Atlantic
'I Will Die in Yemen' From the first time I met Ali Abdullah Saleh, at his sprawling palace in the hills above Aden, I could tell he was a force to be reckoned with—but one that would never be fully understood. Saleh famously likened leading Yemen to “dancing on the heads of snakes,” and indeed, his career resembled an intricate ballet in which it was never quite clear where the dancer would put his feet next. Outward
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking electron waves provide new clues to high-temperature superconductivity In the RIXS technique, intense x-rays deposit energy into the electron waves of atomically thin layers of high-temperature superconductors. The difference in x-ray energy before and after interaction reveals key information about the fundamental behavior of these exciting and mysterious materials. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory Superconductors carry electricity with perfect efficiency, un
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two super-Earths around star K2-18 Credit: University of Montreal New research using data collected by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has revealed that a little-known exoplanet called K2-18b could well be a scaled-up version of Earth. Just as exciting, the same researchers also discovered for the first time that the planet has a neighbor. "Being able to measure the mass and density of K2-18b was tremendous, but to disco
6h
Feed: All Latest
Ghostery 8 Deploys Artificial Intelligence in the Fight Against Ad Trackers Most ad blockers—and there are so, so many of them now—operate roughly the same way, comparing the scripts they encounter on a given site to their whitelist and block list letting the former run and stopping the others. This means they largely share the same drawback, as well; they can’t block what they’ve never seen before. With its latest release, popular ad blocker Ghostery attempts to solve t
6h
Live Science
Viking-Era Stone Carved with Runes Found in Norway This whetstone (a stone used for sharpening knives) has letters known as runes engraved on it, archaeologists found. Discovered recently during excavations in Oslo, the stone dates back to the Middle Ages, a time when the Vikings flourished in Norway Credit: Karen Langsholt Holmqvist/NIKU A stone carved with symbols known as runes and dating to the Middle Ages has been discovered during an exca
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Copper will replace toxic palladium and expensive platinum in the synthesis of medications Chemists of Ural Federal University with colleagues from India proved the effectiveness of copper nanoparticles as a catalyst on the example of analysis of 48 organic synthesis reactions. One of the advantages of the catalyst is its insolubility in traditional organic solvents. This makes copper nanoparticles a valuable alternative to heavy metal catalysts, for example palladium, which is current
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First insight into which patients repeatedly miss GP appointments Many patients are regularly missing GP appointments according to the largest ever analysis of NHS patients who fail to attend. The most important indicator of which patients will miss multiple appointments is socio-economic deprivation according to researchers. The paper in The Lancet Public Health led jointly by Dr David Ellis of Lancaster University and Dr Ross McQueenie from the University of
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early avian evolution: The Archaeopteryx that wasn't IMAGE: The two slabs that make up the Haarlem specimen, which was thought to be the first Archaeopteryx to be discovered. view more Credit: Source: Oliver Rauhut, LMU. Paleontologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich correct a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil "Archaeopteryx" to be discovered is actually a predatory dinosaur belonging to the anchiornithid famil
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's heaviest bony fish identified and correctly named Japanese fish experts have identified and clarified the biological name of the world's heaviest bony fish ever caught. The 2,300 kilogram whopper is a Mola alexandrini bump-head sunfish, and not, as originally thought, a member of the more commonly known Mola mola ocean sunfish species. The study was led by Etsuro Sawai of Hiroshima University and is published in Ichthyological Research , which i
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tubers in trouble Credit: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Extinction by its very nature is irreversible. Once a species is extinct, it's too late for conservation practitioners to act. So, for us working on the front line of plant conservation, instead of just questioning whether a species is extinct, we need to look at the risk of extinction. Using assessments of extinction risk, we can uncover trends that help us to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microwaves against cold-start emissions The geometric ceramic structure of the test catalytic converter designed on the computer. Specialists at Empa coated it with the catalytically active layer and tested the cleaning effect in an artificial stream of exhaust gas. Credit: Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology During cold start, a car engine emits far more particulate matter and other pollutants than during w
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panasonic develops unique vacuum insulated glass based on its plasma display panel technology Credit: Panasonic Panasonic Corporation today announced it has developed and succeeded in mass production of thin, high-performance vacuum insulated glass by applying technologies the company accumulated in the development and manufacturing of plasma display panels (PDPs). The glass achieves a heat transfer coefficient (Ug value) of 0.7 (W/m²K), the industry's top-class insulation performance for
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests heat waves during childhood can adversely impact adult earnings Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests children exposed to high temperatures for even short periods can experience lower earnings as adults. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , Adam Isen, Maya Rossin-Slater and Reed Walker describe comparing temperatures
6h
Futurity.org
Watch: 3D printer uses ink made with live bacteria Researchers have created a new kind of 3D-printing platform that uses ink containing living bacteria. The new ink makes it possible to print small biochemical factories with certain properties, depending on the species of bacteria in the ink. The work also paves the way for the production of biological materials capable of breaking down toxic substances or high-purity cellulose for biomedical app
6h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: To See the Best Christmas Trees, You’ll Need Scuba Gear They don’t burrow into it. Instead, they latch on to a dead spot or wound and start making their tubes. By adjusting the tube’s growth rate to match the coral’s growth, the worm keeps up with the coral growing around its tube and maintains an entrance to its home. Settled Christmas tree worms stay for life — up to 30 or 40 years. “They cannot say ‘this is not for me’ and move,” said Mrs. Perry. “
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward a continuous atom laser The experiment used to create the permanently existing cold gas cloud. Credit: F. Schreck et al Ever since its invention, the laser has been an invaluable tool in physics. It is expected that an atom laser - with the light waves replaced by the quantum waves of atoms - could have similarly important applications, for example in constructing ultra-precise clocks. A research team led by UvA researc
6h
Ingeniøren
Eks-energiminister vil løse »verdens største teknologiske udfordring«Omdannelse af bæredygtig energi til flydende kulbrinter er opskriften på at løse verdens klimaudfordring, mener tidligere amerikansk energiminister, der selv forsker i emnet.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Future arctic sea ice loss could dry out CaliforniaArctic sea ice loss of the magnitude expected in the next few decades could impact California's rainfall and exacerbate future droughts, according to new research.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The bacterial community on the International Space Station resembles homesMicrobiologists have analyzed swabs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared them with samples from homes on earth as well as the Human Microbiome Project. This work, part of a nationwide citizen science project called Project MERCCURI, found that the microbial community in this unique habitat was very diverse and more closely resembled that of homes than of humans
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multicultural awareness boosts teaching competency, but is an uneven resource among future teachersStudent teachers with more multicultural awareness foster more positive classroom environments for their students, finds a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lithium chloride blunts brain damage linked to fetal alcohol syndromeA single dose of lithium chloride, a drug used to treat bipolar disease and aggression, blocks the sleep disturbances, memory loss, and learning problems tied to fetal alcohol syndrome, new experiments in mice show.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Replicating peregrine falcon attack strategies could help down rogue dronesPeregrine falcons steer their attacks using the same control strategies as guided missiles, new research indicates. The findings could be applied to the design of small, visually guided drones that can take down other 'rogue' drones in settings such as airports or prisons.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-stress childhoods blind adults to potential lossAdults who lived high-stress childhoods have trouble reading the signs that a loss or punishment is looming, leaving themselves in situations that risk avoidable health and financial problems and legal trouble. According to researchers, this difficulty may be biological, stemming from an unhelpful lack of activity in the brain when a situation should be prompting heightened awareness. And that dis
7h
Popular Science
How to prepare your car for winter This article originally appeared in DriverSide . When temperatures start to drop, it's time to get your car ready for winter. The right maintenance, preparation and tools can be literal lifesavers in harsh conditions. Regular maintenance Now's the time to get your car up to speed on all of its regular maintenance. That means taking care of any fluids that may have been neglected while you were ou
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Superior hydrogen catalyst just grows that way IMAGE: These inorganic 'flowers,' color added, were created by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Stanley Chou and University of California, Merced colleague Vincent Tung in a spray-printing process that uses molybdenum disulfide... view more Credit: courtesy, Sandia National Laboratories ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Replacing your everyday gas guzzler with a hydrogen fueled car could drasticall
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smaller branches pack the fastest, biggest fire-spreading punchPreliminary findings indicate the diameter of the branches that are burning is the biggest single factor behind which ones will form embers the most quickly and how much fire-starting energy they'll pack.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First step toward practical application of holographic memory with magnetic assist IMAGE: Reconstructed image with and without magnetic assist. view more Credit: COPYRIGHT (C) TOYOHASHI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. In recent years, due to technology such as the Internet and 8K broadcasting, more and more information has been distributed across the world. Along this trend, there is a demand for an innovative storage method for storing large volumes of
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
Can 10,000 Humans Clean Up YouTube? A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Patterns of climate changeResearchers have developed a technique to monitor and predict how plant species will respond to climate change. The experiment was conducted in an area the size of two football pitches within the Garraf National park south west of Barcelona. The landscape is mostly a Mediterranean scrubland, featuring thickets of low rise shrubs and herbs such as rosemary and thyme, and home to many protected spec
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NEST360º's low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in AfricaThe first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, report an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Important foraging hotspots for loggerhead turtle rookery identifiedSea turtles are what they eat -- but where they eat may be even more important. Females who eat in southern areas tend to have more offspring.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Tissue FeastResearchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.
7h
Futurity.org
Gentle nudges teach robots to better assist us Like toddlers, robots can use a little help as they learn to function in the physical world. A new program uses gentle physical feedback to guide machines toward the most helpful, human-like ways to best work side-by-side with people. “Historically, the role of robots was to take over the mundane tasks we don’t want to do: manufacturing, assembly lines, welding, painting,” says Marcia O’Malley, a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social networking sites may be controlling your mind – here's how to take charge Are you a Facebook addict? Here’s how to find out. Credit: Marcos Mesa Sam Wordley/Shutterstock How can you live the life you want to, avoiding the distractions and manipulations of others? To do so, you need to know how you work. " Know thyself ", the Ancients urged. Sadly, we are often bad at this . But by contrast, others know us increasingly well. Our intelligence, sexual orientation – and mu
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemist studying electric fields, microfluidics to improve dialysis technology Joseph Banovetz, Beatrise Berzina and Robbyn Anand, left to right, set up a prototype device to test separation performance in blood plasma. They're using a fluorescence microscope to follow two tracers, shown in red and green on the monitor. Credit: Christopher Gannon About the time Robbyn Anand began studying concentration and separation technologies for her doctoral research, her older brother
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dark fiber: Using sensors beneath our feet to tell us about earthquakes, water, and other geophysical activity IMAGE: Shan Dou (from left), Jonathan Ajo-Franklin, and Nate Lindsey were on a Berkeley Lab team that used fiber optic cables for detecting earthquakes and other subsurface activity. view more Credit: Berkeley Lab Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown for the first time that dark fiber - the vast network of unused fiber-optic
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parenting behaviors linked to suicide among adolescents How often do you tell your kids they did a good job? Do you say you are proud of them? Do you help with homework? Are you emotionally engaged with your kids? A fresh look at a federally sponsored 2012 national study shows a significant link between parent's behaviors and thoughts of suicide among adolescents, according to a presentation given by two University of Cincinnati professors at the 2017
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Girls will be boys: Sex reversal in dragon lizardsOne of Australia's iconic lizard species is hiding a secret-- female central bearded dragon embryos temporarily grow the lizard equivalent of a penis during development. Researchers at The University of Queensland, the University of Canberra and CSIRO made the discovery while investigating what happens to the body and genitalia of male dragons that reverse their sex at high temperature treatment.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new spin to solving mystery of stellar companions IMAGE: Planetary-mass companions are more massive than Jupiter. view more Credit: NASA/JPL-CALTECH Maunakea, Hawaii - Taking a picture of an exoplanet--a planet in a solar system beyond our sun -- is no easy task. The light of a planet's parent star far outshines the light from the planet itself, making the planet difficult to see. While taking a picture of a small rocky planet li
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beyond wind speed—A new measure for predicting hurricane impacts Credit: Colorado State University Six major hurricanes that engulfed the Atlantic Basin in 2017 were a devastating reminder of the vulnerability of coastal communities, where more than half the U.S. population resides. What if there was a better way to forecast and communicate these storms' damaging economic impacts, before they happen? Colorado State University civil engineers have developed a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New stellar stream discovered by astronomers False-colour map of the density of stars with 0.1 (Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected a new thin stellar stream in the halo of the Milky Way galaxy. The newly discovered feature, named "jet stream," could help researchers answer fundamental questions about the mass distribution of the Milky Way's dark matter halo. The finding was presented November 24 in a paper published
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earliest example of large hydraulic enterprise excavated in China Map of the Liangzhu city and hydraulic system, Lower Yangtze River, China Credit: PNAS (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in China has uncovered one of the largest water management projects in the ancient world in what is now a part of the eastern coast of modern China. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the group describes their
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compact hyperspectral imaging at low cost IMAGE: A closeup inset that the researchers capture and use as an input image for running their algorithm. view more Credit: ACM SIGGRAPH ASIA BANGKOK, Thailand, - With hyperspectral imaging, photographers can obtain super fine detailed images, capturing the spectrum for each pixel in an image of a scene. This technology has wide reach and is being applied in fields such as military combat, a
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simplifying assembly-based design for 3-D modeling IMAGE: A lamp and a chair fully automatically synthesized by component in the database. view more Credit: SIGRAPH ASIA BANGKOK, THAILAND, Geometric modeling is essential for populating virtual environments and designing real objects, ranging from furniture and car assembly to 3D modeling of chemical compounds and medical devices. Yet creating 3D models from scratch are tedious and a time-cons
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika vaccine induces robust immune responses in three phase 1 trials IMAGE: Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, the Director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. view more Credit: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BOSTON - Healthy adults mounted strong immune responses after receiving an investigational whole inactivated Zika virus vaccine, according to interim analyses of three Phase 1, placebo-controlled, double-blind
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trees on fire IMAGE: Combustion of a tree model: a tree is exposed to fire until the branching structure reaches its ignition temperature (a). The combustion releases energy stored in the tree organs and... view more Credit: SIGGRAPH ASIA BANGKOK, Thailand, -- Models of trees and plants appear frequently as part of everyday scenes in a variety of applications, ranging from architectural design and urban pl
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IBM scientists demonstrate 10x faster large-scale machine learning using GPUs DuHL in action for the application of training large-scale Support Vector Machines on an extended, 30GB version of the ImageNet database. Credit: IBM Blog Research Together with EPFL scientists, our IBM Research team has developed a scheme for training big data sets quickly. It can process a 30 Gigabyte training dataset in less than one minute using a single graphics processing unit (GPU)—a 10x s
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Pluto's Secrets Revealed Pluto's Secrets Revealed NASA's New Horizons changed everything we thought we knew about this distant planet As the clock neared 9 P.M. on July 14, 2015, I stood with then NASA administrator Charles Bolden and others in our mission control at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland. Within about a minute we were due to receive the first signals from the New Horizons sp
7h
Dagens Medicin
Region: Prøvesvar forsvinder ikke i Sundhedsplatformen Prøvesvar forsvinder ikke i Sundhedsplatformen, skriver Region Hovedstaden i en pressemeddelelse.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Vi vil uddanne læger i EsbjergDet er svært at få læger til at slå sig ned i Vestjylland. Men hvis lægerne flytter dertil allerede under uddannelsen, er der større sandsynlighed for, at de bliver boende. Så hvorfor ikke oprette en kandidatuddannelse i medicin i Esbjerg?
7h
Futurity.org
Updated EEG offers high-res view into brain A new high-density EEG captures the brain’s neural activity at a higher spatial resolution than ever before, report researchers. The next-generation brain-interface technology—the first non-invasive, high-resolution system of its kind—offers higher density and coverage than any existing system and has the potential to revolutionize future clinical and neuroscience research as well as brain-comput
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The patterns of climate change Automatic shelters used to alter either precipitation or temperature in Garraf National Park near Barcelona. Credit: Courtesy of Josep Peñuelas Plant Ecology researchers at the University of Tübingen have developed a technique to monitor and predict how plant species will respond to climate change. Dr. Mark Bilton and Professor Katja Tielbörger, from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology, re-ana
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A crucial enzyme unveiled at last Credit: CEA After 40 years of research, researchers at the CEA, CNRS, University Grenoble-Alps, University of Montpellier and Inserm have finally identified the enzyme responsible for the tubulin detyrosination. Surprisingly, it is not one enzyme but two which control the modification of this essential component of the cytoskeletal structure. This work opens up new prospects for improved understa
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galileo's free-falling objects experiment passes space test further proving equivalence principle Credit: CNES/D. Ducros A team of researchers from the French Aerospace Lab and at the Côte d'Azur Observatory working on France's MICROSCOPE satellite project has further confirmed the equivalence principle by recreating Galileo's free-falling objects experiment in a satellite. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters , the group describes their experiment and why it was ca
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safer opioid drugs could treat pain and save lives Opioid drugs are the most widely prescribed and effective type of pain medication. But they are highly addictive and have some unpleasant and potentially deadly side effects. Now a group of researchers, led by Dr. Laura Bohn at The Scripps Research Institute, may have found a way to make opioids safer by separating the drugs' pain relieving effects from their most dangerous side effect, respirato
8h
Ingeniøren
Spritny satellit afdækker europæisk luftforureningSentinel-5P er en vigtig brik i EU’s Copernicus-miljøovervågningsprogram. Prøvebilleder afslører allerede nogle af EU's mest forurenende byer.
8h
New Scientist - News
Robofish floats about tracking antibiotics in the Great Lakes Xiaobo Tan / MSU College of Engineering A ROBOTIC fish may be an unlikely ally in the fight against antibiotic resistance. Swimming through streams and lakes, it will monitor the levels of antibiotics in the water, among other pollutants. The prototype will soon be sent below the surface of the lakes near Michigan, which are under threat from industrial pollution and contaminants from farming
8h
New Scientist - News
NASA fires Voyager 1’s engines for the first time in 37 years Voyager has been in space for more than 40 years – and is still going strong NASA/JPL-Caltech By Leah Crane It’s alive! By firing a set of thrusters that have been gathering dust for more than 3 decades, NASA has extended the lifetime of the Voyager 1 mission by a few years. The interstellar probe is 13 billion miles away, moving at a speed of over 17 kilometres per second, but it still manag
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A smart, portable and miniaturized system that can analyze sweat Credit: EPFL / Alain Herzog EPFL researchers have teamed up with startup Xsensio to develop a tiny, fully portable system that can encapsulate and analyze biomarkers in a person's sweat. The low-power system, which fits on a chip measuring under 1 cm 2 , was presented this week at the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco. The miniature chip was developed by researchers a
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record low contact resistivity on Ga-doped Ge source/drain contacts for pMOS transistors Ga implanted in Ge and activated by NLA. Credit: IMEC At this week's 2017 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technology, reports ultralow contact resistivity of 5x10 -10 Ωcm 2 on Gallium (Ga)-doped p-Germanium (Ge) source/drain contacts. The low contact resistivity and high level of Ga activation were a
8h
Popular Science
Scientists are trying to figure out which bacteria have colonized our space station Bacteria are hard to annihilate. We have a talent for killing lots of them, but eliminating every last one is nearly impossible. This doesn’t matter so much when you’re sanitizing your hands after a bus ride or wiping down your kitchen counter. It matters a lot more when you’re trying to protect the rest of the galaxy from our germs. NASA has an entire office devoted to this effort—the Office of
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hearing hybrid and electric vehicles while quieting noise pollution AUDIO: Audio tests for acoustic vehicle alerting systems. view more Credit: UNECE WASHINGTON, D.C. Dec. 5, 2017 -- Europe, as well as most of the world, faces a future with hybrid or pure electronic road vehicles that rely on alternative drive chains. But these low-emission vehicles are considered too quiet for hearing-impaired pedestrians, so the European Union is mandating that they be eq
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pop the bubbly and hear the quality IMAGE: This is a hydrophone in a champagne glass. view more Credit: Kyle Spratt WASHINGTON, D.C., December 5, 2017 -- The classic sparkling wine that has rung in countless new years with a bang may have more to its bubbles. Champagne is notable for its iconic cork popping, but the bubble acoustics also play a key role in determining how expensive that bottle should be. Investigators Kyle S. Spr
8h
Dagens Medicin
Flere regioner vil permanent støtte bæltefrie afdelinger Seks satspuljeprojekter, der har skullet nedsætte brugen af bælter i psykiatrien, udløber ved årsskiftet. Men flere regioner vil videreføre de bæltefrie afdelinger, selv om det bliver uden økonomisk støtte fra regeringen.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research zooms in on enzyme that repairs DNA damage from UV rays SLAC associate staff scientist Thomas Joseph Lane at the Coherent X-Ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Credit: Miyuki Dougherty/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory A research team at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study an enzyme found in plants, bacteria and some animals that
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists shed light on how wetness affects a phenomenon in foams Image of a quasi-2d foam of wet soap bubbles squashed between parallel plates. Credit: A.T. Chieco and D.J. Durian Whether drinking beer, eating ice cream or washing the dishes, it's fair to say that many people come across foam on a day-to-day basis. It's in everything from detergents to beverages to cosmetics. Outside of everyday life, it has applications in areas such as firefighting, isolatin
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using neural networks to predict outcomes of organic chemistry The web-based tool is simple, and the model is trained end-to-end, fully data-driven and without to aid of querying a database or any additional external information. Credit: IBM For more than 200 years, the synthesis of organic molecules remains one of the most important tasks in organic chemistry. The work of chemists has scientific and commercial implications that range from the production of
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A revolution in cross-linguistic research In his new book, "The Comparative Method of Language Acquisition Research" (University of Chicago Press), Associate Professor of Linguistics Clifton Pye introduces a revolutionary method for crosslinguistic research. He argues that while we now have sophisticated techniques for studying how children learn their first language, researchers have neglected the problem of fitting the results from ind
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Functional ring oscillators based on stacked gate-all-around silicon nanowire transistors Figure: Ring oscillator gate delay versus VDD for stacked silicon nanowire FETs. The gate delay reduces with increasing VDD and with decreasing LG, confirming ring oscillator functionality. Credit: IMEC At this week's 2017 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), imec, the research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technology, reports on multiple key process optimizations f
8h
Futurity.org
This method cuts toxic side effects of nanodrug chemo Administering an FDA-approved nutrition source called Intralipid before nanodrug chemotherapy can reduce the amount of the toxic drugs that settle in the spleen, liver, and kidneys, researchers report. “This methodology could have a major impact in the delivery of nanodrugs…” Nanodrugs, drugs attached to tiny biocompatible particles, show great promise in treatment of a number of diseases, includ
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stronger storms hamper ability of streams and rivers to clean up pollution New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researchers studied part of the Oyster River watershed system — the river network — to see how much nitrogen it removed. They used a new generation of high-technology sensors placed directly into streams and rivers to measure nitrate concentrations continuously under different flow conditions. Credit: Dan Bolster/UNH Freshwater streams and rivers natu
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to save the world? Start by eating less beef If Americans halved their meat consumption, all our beef could theoretically be raised on pastures instead of factory farms. Credit: Martin Abegglen Cows are like the Humvees of the animal world; they're not very efficient, at least when it comes to producing food for humans. A hectare of land that would be able to grow 1,500 or 2,000 pounds of protein from peanuts or soybeans per year can only s
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study verifies more paths to survival for endangered winter-run Chinook salmon LLNL geochemist Peter Weber collects salmon otoliths in Battle Creek in the northern Central Valley. Credit: Fred Feyrer/California Department of Water Resources The most treacherous journey of any salmon's life is from its natal river to the ocean when it is still a juvenile, usually when they are only a few months old. For endangered salmon, this early journey is a matter of life and death for
8h
Science | The Guardian
Cheap fizz or luxury champagne: can you hear the difference? With the bubbly flowing freely over the festive period, you may well wonder if you are being plied with top-notch champagne or fobbed off with cheap fizz. Now scientists say you don’t have to have a discerning palate to find out. Researchers using underwater microphones say the sounds bubbles make as they ping off the sides of the glass can provide tell-tale clues as to their size – a factor long
8h
Live Science
Ancient 'Cave of the Dead” Revealed in 3D Model A forbidding sea cave in the far north of Scotland — feared since ancient times as a place of the dead and the scene of at least one gruesome act of execution or human sacrifice — is getting a breath of new life. Archaeologists have mapped the mysterious cave for the first time to create a digital three-dimensional model that can be explored online in virtual reality. The cave in Moray, ove
8h
Live Science
Why Do Dogs Chew Everything? For dog owners, the following scenario may be all too familiar: You get home from a long day of work only to find your favorite slippers in tatters on the floor, scattered pieces of foam torn from the sofa cushions and teeth marks running up the legs of your wooden chair. Your first instinct may be to scold your four-legged friend , but before you do that, it's important to understand why d
8h
Live Science
In Photos: Scotland's Cave of the DeadArchaeologists have created a 3D digital model of a sea cave in Scotland where bodies were left to rot in the Bronze Age.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hearing hybrid and electric vehicles while quieting noise pollution Europe, as well as most of the world, faces a future with hybrid or pure electronic road vehicles that rely on alternative drive chains. But these low-emission vehicles are considered too quiet for hearing-impaired pedestrians, so the European Union is mandating that they be equipped with acoustic vehicle alerting systems. With these alert systems would come a marked increase in the amount of noi
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Champagne bubble acoustics and size distribution may provide details about wine quality Hydrophone in a champagne glass. Credit: Kyle Spratt The classic sparkling wine that has rung in countless new years with a bang may have more to its bubbles. Champagne is notable for its iconic cork popping, but the bubble acoustics also play a key role in determining how expensive that bottle should be. Investigators Kyle S. Spratt, Kevin M. Lee and Preston S. Wilson, from the Applied Research
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds new light on how animals and plants respond to changes in the environment Water flea. Credit: University of Sheffield Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered that living creatures' responsiveness to changes in the environment can evolve and depends on the conditions they experienced in their past. The study, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution , is the first to show that the ability of a living creature to change its characteristics in response
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Narrow glass threads synchronize the light emissions of distant atoms An optical nanofiber enables interactions between distant atoms, allowing them to synchronize their light emissions. Credit: E. Edwards/JQI If you holler at someone across your yard, the sound travels on the bustling movement of air molecules. But over long distances your voice needs help to reach its destination—help provided by a telephone or the Internet. Atoms don't yell, but they can share i
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A 'holy grail' of computing hidden in human speech Imagine all 30,557 words of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" being written simultaneously by tens of thousands of people. To maintain the elegance of the prose, there is a necessary interplay between words. Each line has to coordinate with the next to keep the overall meaning of the play intact. For some of the most advanced computer programmers, that imaginary scenario is close to reality. Only instead of
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Flying Chariots and Exotic Birds: How 17th-Century Dreamers Planned to Reach the Moon The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. People have been dreaming about space travel for hundreds of years, long before the arrival of the spectacular technologies behind space exploration today—mighty engines roaring fire and thunder, shiny metal shapes gliding in the vastness of the universe. We’ve only
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What it will take to decarbonize the economy Credit: Flickr user richardghawley The transition to a renewable resource-based economy should not be limited to energy, but extend to all material goods; nevertheless, the most urgent transition must focus on energy. This will be a massive and complex endeavor and its difficulty should not be underestimated. The transition depends on five key components, and I will address them in this summary:
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligent algorithms can help reduce disruptions in online services When the Swedish Tax Agency website went down for nearly two days, thousands of people across Sweden were left frustrated. Users of Gmail, Slack, Facebook, Apple services, and other popular services also regularly experience delays and this type of disruptions. Olumuyiwa Ibidunmoye has developed automated algorithms for troubleshooting to prevent prolonged delays or disruption in services hosted
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UN commits to stop ocean plastic waste Image copyright Getty Images Nations have agreed that the world needs to completely stop plastic waste from entering the oceans. The UN resolution, which is set to be sealed tomorrow, has no timetable and is not legally binding. But ministers at an environment summit in Kenya believe it will set the course for much tougher policies and send a clear signal to business. A stronger motion was reject
8h
Dagens Medicin
DR taber sag om kræftdokumentar i MenneskerettighedsdomstolDer var ikke brud med ytringsfriheden, da to DR-journalister blev dømt efter kræftdokumenter, lyder europæisk dom.
8h
Futurity.org
Our efficient brains may explain language ‘universals’ Some of the similarities among human languages may have roots in the brain’s preference for efficient information processing, a new study suggests. “If we look at languages of the world, they are very different on the surface, but they also share a lot of underlying commonalities, often called linguistic universals or cross-linguistic generalizations,” says Masha Fedzechkina, an assistant profess
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring fluid dynamics in virtual reality Anything that moves through water or air leaves behind an invisible wake of swirls and waves. Flow visualization makes these “flow field” patterns visible to allow researchers to study them. Credit: Syracuse University Virtual reality has grown beyond the gaming world and is increasingly being used for a variety of applications—including education. Researchers in Assistant Professor Melissa Green
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transforming how we think about soils from the ground up The remarkable range of sizes and shapes found in soil particles has been captured in the new classification system. Credit: J. Carlos Santamarina A new soil classification, and tools to implement it, helps understanding of the properties of the ground underpinning geo-engineering projects. While most of us take soils for granted, researchers from KAUST's Energy Geo-Engineering Laboratory literal
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First-ever tagging of Amazon dolphins to boost conservation efforts Credit: Jaime Rojo / WWF-UK For the first time ever, WWF and research partners are now tracking river dolphins in the Amazon using satellite technology after scientists successfully tagged dolphins in Brazil, Colombia and Bolivia, attaching small transmitters that will provide new insights into the animals' movements and behaviour and the growing threats they face. As of today, 11 dolphins, inclu
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California's dry regions are hotspots of plant diversity Geraea canescens, Death Valley. Credit: Bruce Baldwin photo, Jepson Herbarium Slide Collection The first "big data" analysis of California's native plants, using digitized information from more than 22 herbaria and botanical gardens around the state, provides some surprises about one of the most thoroughly studied and unique areas in the country. For one, the state's arid regions, including deser
9h
Ingeniøren
Danfoss: »Vores skrækscenarie er et ukonkret og smalt energiforlig«Ifølge Danfoss-direktør har Danmark en unik mulighed for igen at blive et førende energiland indenfor intelligente, integrerede energiløsninger, hvis en ny energiaftale lægger de rigtige spor.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Space station transits the moonThe International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Moon at roughly five miles per second, Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017, in Manchester Township, York County, Pennsylvania.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers systematize the methods for synthesis of azocine-containing systems Credit: Open Chemistry Database The search for synthetic routes for new drugs plays an extremely important role in contemporary medicinal chemistry. Organic chemists from Russia conducted a systematic study of modern advances in the methods for the synthesis of annulated azocines. The results of this analytical work were published by RUDN University professor Leonid Voskressensky and candidate of
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists revise chronology of the last hunter-gatherers in the Near East Archaeologists working at the Shubayqa 1 site. Credit: University of Copenhagen New research by a team of scientists and archaeologists based at the Weizmann Institute of Science and the University of Copenhagen suggests that the 15,000-year-old Natufian Culture could live comfortably in the steppe zone of present-day eastern Jordan .This was previously thought to be either uninhabitable or only
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team devises rapid test for vitamin A, iron deficits Cornell engineers and nutritionists have created a swift solution for a challenging global health problem: a low-cost, rapid test to detect iron and vitamin A deficiencies at the point of care. Their work was published Dec. 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "Vitamin A and iron deficiency affect more than one-third of the world's population. Problems resulting from these d
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-rate and long-life lithium-ion battery with improved low-temperature performance through a prelithiation strategy Credit: Wiley When it is cold in winter, cars tend to have starting problems. This is not much better with electric cars, which inevitably lose capacity of their rechargeable lithium-ion batteries at freezing temperatures. Now, Chinese scientists have offered a strategy to avoid plunging battery kinetics. In a study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , they designed a battery system with
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains Scientists discovered a way to manufacture tiny interlocking chains (right, with chemical formulas at left) with loops each just a nanometer across. Credit: Peter Allen For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published online Nov. 30, University of Chicago researchers announced the first conf
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New way to form bioactive spider silk for medical use To create nanowires the researchers placed a droplet on the surface, and then dragged the droplet laterally, leaving strands of the material spanning the pillars. Credit: KTH Royal Institute of Technology With recent advances, researchers can synthesize silk with mechanical properties similar to those of an actual spider's silk. But applying this material to promising medical therapies for illnes
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The bacterial community on the International Space Station resembles homes Microbiologists at the University of California, Davis who analyzed swabs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared them with samples from homes on earth as well as the Human Microbiome Project found that the microbial community in this unique habitat was very diverse and more closely resembled that of homes than of humans. This study, titled "A microbial survey of
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Worm genomes reveal a link between humans and distant relatives A nemertean worm ( Notospermus geniculatus ). Left: a contracted worm. Right: an extended worm. The nemertean body is usually highly contractible and extendable. Some nemertean species, such as Lineus longissimus , can reach 30m long. Credit: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University,
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big data helps researchers in battle to control plant invaders Credit: University of Western Australia Researchers at The University of Western Australia are part of an international team that has discovered why some plant species are more successful than others at successfully invading new regions. In a research paper published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ), co-author Professor Laco Mucina, from UWA's School of Biological
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ireland to start collecting $15 billion in tax from AppleIreland has struck a deal with Apple to collect up to 13 billion euros ($15 billion) in back taxes and hold it in an escrow account pending an appeal before the Court of Justice of the European Union.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
This Video Game May Help Kids with ADHD Akili Interactive Labs on Monday reported that its late-stage study of a video game designed to treat kids with ADHD met its primary goal, a big step in the Boston company’s quest to get approval for what it hopes will be the first prescription video game. In a study of 348 children between the ages of 8 and 12 diagnosed with ADHD, those who played Akili’s action-packed game on a tablet ove
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The bacterial community on the International Space Station resembles homes The International Space Station. Credit: NASA Microbiologists at the University of California, Davis who analyzed swabs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared them with samples from homes on earth as well as the Human Microbiome Project found that the microbial community in this unique habitat was very diverse and more closely resembled that of homes than of hum
9h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook for 6-Year-Olds? Welcome to Messenger Kids Facebook says it built Messenger Kids, a new version of its popular communications app with parental controls, to help safeguard pre-teens who may be using unauthorized and unsupervised social-media accounts. Critics think Facebook is targeting children as young as 6 to hook them on its services. Facebook’s goal is to “push down the age” of when it’s acceptable for kids to be on social media, say
9h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden ansætter ny økonomidirektør
9h
Dagens Medicin
Norsk pris på Spinraza kan få betydning i Danmark og SverigeDe norske myndigheder skal på fredag tage stilling til et nyt pristilbud på Spinraza fra Biogen. Indgår Norge en aftale, ventes prisen at få betydning i de øvrige nordiske lande.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Hinkley Point's Cardiff Bay toxic mud claim 'alarmist' Image copyright Getty Images Controversial plans to dump 300,000 tonnes of mud from the site of a new nuclear plant into the sea off Cardiff Bay will be scrutinised by AMs. Campaigners want further testing of the sediment, which will be dredged from near the disused Hinkley Point A and B power stations in Somerset. The disposal is needed as part of the £19.6bn Hinkley Point C building work. Devel
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Parents in a Remote Amazon Village Barely Talk to Their Babies--and the Kids Are Fine In 1995 a landmark study ( pdf ) found that children whose families were on welfare heard 1,500 fewer words every hour—or eight million fewer per year—than children from professional backgrounds. Eight years later these same children performed significantly worse on vocabulary tests and language assessments than their higher-income peers did. These findings have influenced child-rearing pract
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental drug blocks toxic ion flow linked to Alzheimer's disease An international team of researchers has shown that a new small-molecule drug can restore brain function and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The drug works by stopping toxic ion flow in the brain that is known to trigger nerve cell death. Scientists envision that this drug could be used to treat Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and ALS. "This
10h
Science | The Guardian
Will the UK get a Brexit deal on research? That's the €160bn question | Ludovic Highman T he government isn’t committing to a Brexit deal for universities, but we need a new partnership in science and innovation between the EU and the UK – and we need it urgently. The stakes are high: the continued ability of British universities to produce high quality research, and of the UK to retain its status as a leading knowledge economy, depend upon it. Brexit threatens UK's reputation for s
10h
Ingeniøren
Solskin lægger en dæmper på fremtidens mobilnet Fremtidens 5G-netværk kan tabe pusten på varme, solskinsrige dage. Det skriver forskere fra Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University i Arizona, USA og King Saud University i Saudi-Arabien i en artikel i antenneforskernes førende tidsskrift IEEE Transactions of Antennas and Propagation . 5G Fremtidens femtegenerations mobilnetværk er for tiden i støbeskeen med tung forskningsmæssig aktivitet mange ste
10h
The Atlantic
What Made That Hypnosis Scene in Get Out So Terrifying Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. First up is Jordan Peele’s Get Out. (Read our previous entries here .) Thirty minutes into the horror film Get Out , Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) senses something malevolent is afoot as he sits down to tal
10h
Feed: All Latest
How Does Crispr Gene Editing Work? In the last five years, biology has undergone a seismic shift as researchers around the globe have embraced a revolutionary technology called gene editing. It involves the precise cutting and pasting of DNA by specialized proteins—inspired by nature, engineered by researchers. These proteins come in three varieties, all known by their somewhat clumsy acronyms: ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPRs. But it’s
10h
Feed: All Latest
The Overwatch Videogame League Aims to Become the New NFL Stefano Disalvo is a professional athlete. He has the physical gifts of a professional athlete, the dedication and drive of a professional athlete, the monomaniacal schedule of a professional athlete. He wakes up at 6:30 in the morning and spends some time reviewing game tape of his own performance before calisthenics begin around 9—jogging, frisbee, soccer—followed by practice, seven straight ho
10h
Viden
Facebook sætter kloen i børn under 13 år Skrevet af Nicolai Franck kl. 09.33 opdateret kl. 10.36 Historierne om, at Facebook har svært ved at få tag i de yngre brugere, har efterhånden været mange. Nu kaster Facebook så snøren ud efter de alleryngste børn med en ny app med navnet Messenger Kids, som I første hug bliver lanceret i USA. Konceptet er, at forældrene kontrollerer, hvilke personer børnene må kommunikere med. Forældrene kontro
10h
Dagens Medicin
Nye anbefalinger for screening for livmoderhals­kræft i høringPå baggrund af ny evidens har Sundhedsstyrelsen lavet en opdatering af anbefalinger for screening for livmoderhalskræft.
10h
Ingeniøren
Venstrehåndede atleter klarer sig bedre i batsport end ketsjersport Omkring 12 pct. af befolkningen er venstrehåndet, men inden for visse sportsgrene er det velkendt, at antallet af venstrehåndede er overrepræsenteret. Florian Loffing fra Universität Oldenburg i Tyskland har set nærmere på dette forhold i en artikel i Biology Letters og er kommet frem til, at antallet af venstrehåndede topatleter inden for batsport (baseball, cricket, bordtennis) og ketsjersport
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Pizza night aboard the International Space StationCrew members aboard the International Space Station are treated to a special meal.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify genes that distinguish mammals from other animals What distinguishes mammals from other vertebrates? Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) have been trying to answer this question in collaboration with the researchers from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF). To do this, they analysed the sequenced genomes of 68 mammals and identified 6,000 families of genes that are only found in these animals. These are genes w
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers quantify factors for reducing power semiconductor resistance by two-thirds Electron scattering under the silicon carbide (SiC) interface is limited by three factors: roughness of the SiC interface, charges under the SiC interface and atomic vibration. Credit: 2017 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. A research group in Japan announced that it has quantified for the first time the impacts of three electron-scattering mechanisms for determining the resistance of silicon carb
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A monkey and a virus: One million years together A monkey and a virus: one million years together. Credit: MIPT An international research team including Vasily Ramensky, a bioinformatics scientist at MIPT's Genome Engineering Laboratory, has classified the six species of African green monkeys based on their genomes, studied their genetic adaptations to the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and produced a gene expression atlas for one of the
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computerized biology, or how to control a population of cells with a computer A. A new cell phone: direct cell-to-cell communication made possible via computer interfaces.B. Dynamical stabilization: real-time control allows maintaining cells in unstable configurations. Credit: Gregory Batt, Jakob Ruess, Chetan Aditya (Inria / Institut Pasteur) Researchers from the Pasteur Institute and Inria, with researchers from the CNRS and Paris Diderot University, and from the Institu
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a mechanism for determining the direction of collective cell migration The cell population moves in the direction opposite to that of the activity of ERK. Credit: NIBB The phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Until now, the mechanism by which each cell takes part in ordered collective movement, in particular what kind of information is used by cells to determi
11h
Ingeniøren
Aarhusianske mikro-robotter skal bekæmpe ParkinsonsLED-lys fra mikroskopiske robotter kan kurere bevægelsesforstyrrelser fra eksempelvis Parkinsons, mener forskere, der nu går i gang med at udvikle teknologien.
11h
Science : NPR
Making Pizza In Space Astronauts at the International Space Station sent down video of pizza night. Without gravity, they made pizza tossing look like a slow game of Frisbee.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Refrigeration technology to maintain cold-stored mouse sperm viability for 10 days A Japanese research team from Kumamoto University has succeeded in developing a refrigeration preservation technology that maintains the fertilization functionality of mouse sperm for 10 days. Previously, the maximum freezing period was limited to three days, but by extending the preservation period by over three times that amount, it is now possible to send sperm of genetically modified mice to
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron stars on the brink of collapse The upper and lower series of pictures each show a simulation of a neutron star merger. In the scenario shown in the upper panels the star collapses after the merger and forms a black hole, whereas the scenario displayed in the lower row leads to an at least temporarily stable star. Credit: Andreas Bauswein, HITS When a massive star dies, its core contracts. In a supernova explosion, the star's o
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeologists revise chronology of the last hunter-gatherers in the Near East IMAGE: Archaeologists working at the Shubayqa 1 site. view more Credit: University of Copenhagen New research by a team of scientists and archaeologists based at the Weizmann Institute of Science and the University of Copenhagen suggests that the 15,000-year-old 'Natufian Culture' could live comfortably in the steppe zone of present-day eastern Jordan - this was previously thought to be either un
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New TB drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic Tuberculosis could be fought more effectively with future drugs - thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by University of Warwick and Francis Crick Institute Deeper understanding of how simple but effective drug D-cycloserine attacks bacteria opens up possibility of development of new, desperately needed antibiotic drugs Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly resistant to drugs - n
11h
Ingeniøren
Video: Fra flad pakke til hus på to dageSe timelapse-video af huset, der kommer i en pakke flad som en pandekage og kan opstilles på blot to dage.
11h
Ingeniøren
Forsker: Forbud mod internet ved eksamener er en falliterklæring Man går den forkerte vej ved at forbyde internettet til eksamen. Foto: SDU Nina Bonderup Dohn »Det er en falliterklæring,« siger dr. phil. Nina Bonderup Dohn fra Syddansk Universitet til bladet Gymnasieskolen. Hun har netop forsvaret sin doktordisputats, hvor en af de helt centrale pointer er, at viden er afhængig af den kontekst og situation, som den opnås i. Og hvis man forbyder internettet for
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report: European science academies call for urgent action on food and nutrition security As part of an unprecedented global InterAcademy Partnership project by 130 science academies, a team of scientists from across Europe undertook a two-year, extensive analysis on the future of food, nutrition, agriculture, and health. Scientists from national academies across Europe are calling for urgent action on food and nutrition in a new rigorous and independent report published today by the
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working memory positively associated with higher physical endurance and better cognitive function (New York - Dec. 5, 2017) -- Mount Sinai researchers have found a positive relationship between the brain network associated with working memory -- the ability to store and process information relevant to the task at hand -- and healthy traits such as higher physical endurance and better cognitive function. These traits were associated with greater cohesiveness of the working memory brain netwo
12h
Dagens Medicin
Hjerteoperationer er mindst farlige for diabetespatienter om eftermiddagenRisikoen for, at en patient med overvægt eller diabetes får fremprovokeret et hjerteanfald eller hjertesvigt under en operation er størst, hvis operationen finder sted om formiddagen, viser nyt studie i Lancet.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After 900 hours in space, Robert Curbeam is now down to earth at Raytheon Robert Curbeam is vice president and deputy of the space systems division at Raytheon Co. A retired U.S. Navy captain and former NASA astronaut, Curbeam shares the record for most spacewalks - four - by one astronaut during a single space shuttle mission. Born and raised in Baltimore, Curbeam is the son of a factory-worker father and chemistry-teacher mother. He inherited his mother's knack for s
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eating for your health is also better for the environment, study shows Credit: CC0 Public Domain So, you want to reduce your carbon footprint? You might consider improving your diet. It turns out that healthy eating isn't just good for your body, it can also lessen your impact on the environment. Scientists say that food production including growing crops, raising livestock, fishing and transporting all that food to our plates is responsible for 20 percent to 30 p
12h
Science | The Guardian
How Neolithic farming sowed the seeds of modern inequality 10,000 years ago Most people regard hierarchy in human societies as inevitable, a natural part of who we are. Yet this belief contradicts much of the 200,000-year history of Homo sapiens . In fact, our ancestors have for the most part been “ fiercely egalitarian ”, intolerant of any form of inequality. While hunter-gatherers accepted that people had different skills, abilities and attributes, they aggressively re
12h
Dagens Medicin
Undersøgelse afslører tandskadelig medicinMedicin mod alt fra hjertekarsygdomme til kræft kan medføre mundtørhed, som kan give tandsygdomme, viser ny undersøgelse.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Australia's frog count: App calls on citizen scientists Image copyright Australian Museum Image caption The FrogID app allows anyone to record and upload a frog call Croaks and chirps. Even whistles and barks. These are some of the sounds that Australian frogs make, and local biologists are hoping members of the public will help record them on a new app called FrogID. It is part of a conservation effort to better track 240 frog species around Australi
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nyopdaget genmutation giver alvorlig hjertesygdomForskere fra Aarhus Universitetshospital finder ny genmutation, som giver alvorlig hjertesygdom og død.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2 kiwi birds are rare bright spot in grim extinction report This undated photo released by International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) shows a Northern brown kiwi in New Zealand. Global conservation group IUCN's update issued Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, mostly includes news of grave threats to many species, much of it caused due to loss of habitat and unsustainable farming and fisheries practices. The IUCN said that it has upgraded the Okarito ki
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Whodunnit', as Aussie reptiles go extinct: study (Update) Three species of reptile on Christmas Island in Australia have been declared extinct in the wild, according to a study released on Tuesday, with scientists baffled as to the cause. Lister's gecko, the blue-tailed skink and the Christmas Island forest-skink were downgraded from "critically endangered" to "extinct in the wild" in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) lates
13h
New Scientist - News
Extreme radiation around small stars may not doom life nearby It’s a tough neighbourhood MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY By Mika McKinnon Could our Milky Way’s many red and white dwarf stars be home to alien life? These tiny, dim stars seem inhospitable with intense flares and destructive tidal forces. But with just the right circumstances, life forms on nearby planets could survive. Our galaxy is full of small, cool stars. Red dwarfs are common but
13h
New Scientist - News
Spaceplanes may be the best hope in war on deadly orbiting junk An EU-backed satellite called RemoveDEBRIS will test ways to destroy space debris when it launches in early 2018 Surrey Space Centre By Paul Marks After the party, there’s always the cleanup to take care of. It’s no different in space. Earth orbit is littered with derelict satellites, dead rockets and fragments of both that really ought to be tidied up – pushed into the atmosphere to safely i
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shorter course of treatment may provide better outcome for intermediate-risk prostate cancer Boston, MA-- Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among males in the United States. Approximately, 180,000 men are diagnosed each year, and approximately 95 percent of these men have localized disease that is potentially curable. Previously, studies have consistently demonstrated that conventionally fractionated high dose external beam radiation therapy (CRT), consisting of daily treatment f
13h
Science-Based Medicine
I Was Wrong about Protandim I have written about Protandim several times, here , here , here , here , and here . In May, 2017, I said that while there was no evidence from human studies that it improved meaningful clinical health outcomes, Protandim was probably safe to try . I based my opinion about its safety on a human trial in athletes . That trial was negative, but I relied on its report of signs/symptoms to conclude t
13h
Viden
Har du taget en selfie med en dopet tiger? Instagram advarer mod dyremishandling Lægger du en selfie eller et billede op på Instagram, hvor du eksempelvis krammer en lille elefant, panda, tiger eller slange, vil du nu formentlig modtage en advarsel. På Instagram kommer der nu en advarsel op, hvis du søger på bestemte hashtags eller forsøger at lægge bestemte billeder op med vilde dyr. (Foto: Troels Karlskov, DR Nyheder) "Dyremishandling og salg af truede dyrearter eller deres
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Doctors say no to sport in Delhi as cricketers choke in smog (Update) Unprecedented scenes of Sri Lankan cricketers wearing face masks have reignited debate about hosting major sports in heavily polluted New Delhi, where doctors are increasingly vocal about the health risks posed by smog Unprecedented scenes of Sri Lankan cricketers wearing face masks have reignited debate about hosting major sports in heavily polluted New Delhi, where doctors are increasingly voca
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
10,000 Google staff set to police YouTube content: chief YouTube chief executive Susan Wojcicki claimed that her company had developed "computer-learning" technology to identify extremist videos, and that it could also be used to identify content that risked children's safety Google is to deploy a staff of 10,000 to hunt down extremist content on its YouTube platform following recent criticism, the video-sharing site's chief executive told Britain's Da
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US transportation and water infrastructure not broken Transportation and water infrastructure funding and finance in the United States are not nearly as dire as some believe, but a national consensus on infrastructure priorities, accompanied by targeted spending and selected policy changes, is needed, according to a new RAND Corporation study. While much of the nation's transportation and water infrastructure is adequately maintained, a 2.5 percent
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Red-bellied lemurs maintain gut health through touching and 'huddling' each other Red-bellied lemur in the trees of Madagascar. Credit: Avery Lane, University of Helsinki Scientists have found a direct link between physical contact and gut bacteria in red-bellied lemurs. Likely passed through 'huddling' behaviour and touch, the findings suggest implications for human health. The University of Oxford worked in collaboration with scientists from several universities, including t
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
IUCN Red List: Wild crops listed as threatened Image copyright The Crop Trust Image caption Wild wheat can be bred with modern crops to boost resilience Wild relatives of modern crops deemed crucial for food security are being pushed to the brink of extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. More than 20 rice, wheat and yam plants have been listed as threatened on the latest version of the IUCN's Red list. Th
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk The study site on the roof of UW Bothell's science building has audio recorders placed at four corners of a 10-foot square. The birds get used to the equipment and then can be observed when they gather as usual at dusk. Credit: University of Washington What are crows saying when their loud cawing fills a dark winter's evening? Despite the inescapable ruckus, nobody knows for sure. Birds congregat
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows how ant colonies behave differently in different environments A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that some ant colonies defend more gallantly than others, revealing that colonies themselves may have personalities. Trees that have more active, aggressive colonies have less leaf damage, suggesting that colony personality may play an important role in plant health and survival. Scientists have known for decades that the behavior of one partner c
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows how ant colonies behave differently in different environments A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that some ant colonies defend more gallantly than others, revealing that colonies themselves may have personalities. Trees that have more active, aggressive colonies have less leaf damage, suggesting that colony personality may play an important role in plant health and survival. Scientists have known for decades that the behavior of one partner
15h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 5. december Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: Hvilken kendt politiker fra det 20. århundrede havde en fortid som krigskorrespondent og en stor interesse for videnskabsjournalistik? Klik her for at gå til kalenderen Dagens låge præsenteres af Forsvaret Faglige udfordringer i et
15h
Viden
Kunstigt edderkoppespind kan måske bruges i kroppen Forskere fra det tekniske universitet KTH (Royal Institute of Technology) i Stockholm har prøvet at eftergøre edderkoppers og silkeorms evne til at skabe biologiske tråde med ganske særlige egenskaber. Styrken og smidigheden i spindelvæv gør det oplagt at prøve at kopiere strukturen i et syntetisk materiale, som også kan bruges til sundhedsformål. Læs også: Mysterium: Edderkoppens silke snor sig
15h
Popular Science
Amazing new sci-fi books to give (and then borrow from) your friends Sometimes you just need to get far, far away. Below, a selection of science fiction published this year that will give you or your loved ones a chance to visit other worlds and times, many that eerily mirror our own. In addition to robots and spaceships, you’ll see wars, rising sea levels, genetically altered beings, and revolution. Some books ride the line between science and fantasy, mixing mag
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk What are crows saying when their loud cawing fills a dark winter's evening? Despite the inescapable ruckus, nobody knows for sure. Birds congregate daily before and after sleep, and they make some noise, but what might be happening in those brains is a mystery. Curious about these raucous exchanges, researchers at the University of Washington Bothell are listening in. They are placing equipment o
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows lithium chloride blunts brain damage linked to fetal alcohol syndrom A single dose of lithium chloride, a drug used to treat bipolar disease and aggression, blocks the sleep disturbances, memory loss, and learning problems tied to fetal alcohol syndrome, new experiments in mice show. Published in the journal Neuroscience online Nov. 26, and led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine, the new study found that giving the drug to newborn mice 15 minutes after "bing
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US transportation and water infrastructure not broken Transportation and water infrastructure funding and finance in the United States are not nearly as dire as some believe, but a national consensus on infrastructure priorities, accompanied by targeted spending and selected policy changes, is needed, according to a new RAND Corporation study. While much of the nation's transportation and water infrastructure is adequately maintained, a 2.5 percent
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
L.A. homeless housing program saves more money than it costs A public-private effort to provide permanent supportive housing to people in Los Angeles County with complex medical and behavioral health issues who were experiencing homelessness caused a significant drop in their use of public services, resulting in an overall savings to local government, according to a new RAND Corporation study. The use of emergency medical services and inpatient hospital
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial disparities persist in the survival of patients with ovarian, colon, and breast cancer Three new articles present trends in survival for patients with ovarian, colon, and breast cancer in the United States by race and stage. Published early online in CANCER , a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings reveal large, consistent, and persistent racial disparities in survival. For the analyses, a team led by investigators at the Centers for Disease Control and
16h
Ingeniøren
Undersøgelse: Hierarki kvæler innovation hos softwareudviklere Danske softwareudviklere vil gerne være en del af et hold med et stærkt fællesskab og have mulighed for innovation. Virkeligheden er bare, at deres arbejdspladser er domineret af hierarki og markedstænkning. Det er resultatet af en ny undersøgelse udviklet af konsulentvirksomheden Courant og software udviklerne Strongminds. De har spurgt 176 softwareudviklere fordelt på 10 udviklingsorganisatione
17h
Ingeniøren
Fem tip til at gå fra arbejde med et smil Det er vigtigt at gå fra arbejde i godt humør. Både for at have mere overskud og nyde dit arbejde mere. Jobfinder har fem råd til at gå glad fra arbejde hver dag. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fem-tip-at-gaa-arbejde-med-smil-11467 Emner Arbejdsmiljø Stress Jobfinder
17h
Ingeniøren
Forskere vil optimere flowbatterier til energilagring i stor skala En løsning på energilagringsproblematikken kommer fra to tanke fyldt med en speciel væske. Det er i hvert fald håbet hos et forskersamarbejde mellem AAU, DTU, Vestas, Harvard og flere andre aktører, der har fået bevilliget 18 mio. kr. til at udvikle et flowbatteri, som er profitabelt for vindindustrien. For selvom flowbatterier i sig selv ikke er nogen revolutionerende nyhed – faktisk har idéen e
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers quantify factors for reducing power semiconductor resistance by two-thirds IMAGE: Electron scattering under the silicon carbide (SiC) interface is limited by three factors: roughness of the SiC interface, charges under the SiC interface and atomic vibration. view more Credit: 2017 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. A research group in Japan announced that it has quantified for the first time the impacts of three electron-scattering mechanisms for determining t
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Red-bellied lemurs maintain gut health through touching and 'huddling' each other IMAGE: This is a Red-bellied lemur, Madagascar. view more Credit: Avery Lane, University of Helsinki Scientists have found a direct link between physical contact and gut bacteria in red-bellied lemurs. Likely passed through 'huddling' behaviour and touch, the findings suggest implications for human health. The University of Oxford worked in collaboration with scientists from several u
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon’s Investment in Robots is Eliminating Human Jobs A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
20h
Popular Science
Do ADHD and dyslexia make athletes more likely to get concussions? Risk factors for concussion are plentiful—playing soccer, playing football, having a prior concussion , being female . In an addition to the scientific to-do list, a new report is calling for researchers and to pay attention to something else that seems to make concussions more likely: learning disabilities. Researchers first keyed into the relationship between learning disabilities and concussio
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trickle-down is the solution (to the planetary core formation problem)Scientists have long pondered how rocky bodies in the solar system -- including our own Earth -- got their metal cores. According to new research, evidence points to the downwards percolation of molten metal toward the center of the planet through tiny channels between grains of rock.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New estimates of modern contraceptive use in the world's poorest countries IMAGE: UMass Amherst's Leontine Alkema and colleagues offer new estimates and projections of modern contraceptive prevalence in poor nations. At the regional level, they report Asia with slow growth when compared... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Statisticians Leontine Alkema, Niamh Cahill and Chuchu Wei at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others, today released
21h
Futurity.org
Team digs up more of Michigan farm’s ‘Bristle mammoth’ Paleontologists conducted a second excavation at the Michigan farm where the skull, tusks, and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were pulled from the ground in late 2015. Nothing that dramatic happened during the recent two-day follow-up. But 40 additional bones and bone fragments from the “Bristle Mammoth” were recovered, and researchers were able to thoroughly document the site—somet
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How UK's birds are being affected by a changing climate Image copyright RSPB Image caption Migrating swallows cover 200 miles a day Migratory birds are arriving in the UK earlier each spring and leaving later each autumn, a report has confirmed. Some visitors are now appearing more than 20 days earlier than they did in the 1960s, according to the state of the UK's birds 2017 report. The swallow, for instance, is arriving 15 days earlier than 50 years
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ocean plastic a 'planetary crisis' - UN Image copyright AFP Image caption Plastic waste has a variety of detrimental effects on the environment Life in the seas risks irreparable damage from a rising tide of plastic waste, the UN oceans chief has warned. Lisa Svensson said governments, firms and individual people must act far more quickly to halt plastic pollution. "This is a planetary crisis," she said. "In a few short decades since w
21h
Futurity.org
Plate tectonics on Jupiter’s moon could reveal hidden ocean The icy shell of Jupiter’s moon Europa may have plate tectonics similar to those on Earth, a new study suggests. “If indeed there’s life in that ocean, subduction offers a way to supply the nutrients it would need…” The presence of plate tectonic activity could have important implications for the possibility of life in the ocean thought to exist beneath the moon’s surface. The study, published in
21h
Futurity.org
How natural materials like teeth and shells stay tough Researchers have created a “map” to help in designing materials based on some of the toughest substances in nature. How a material breaks could be the most important property to consider when designing layered composites that mimic those found in nature. The new map decodes the interactions between materials and the structures they form and can help maximize their strength, toughness, stiffness,
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trials show inactivated Zika virus vaccine is safe and immunogenic IMAGE: Zika virus particles (red) shown in African green monkey kidney cells. view more Credit: NIAID The investigational Zika purified inactivated virus (ZPIV) vaccine was well-tolerated and induced an immune response in participants, according to initial results from three Phase 1 clinical trials. Scientists at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), part of the U.S. Department
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene-based Zika vaccine is safe and immunogenic in healthy adults IMAGE: A Zika virus researcher pipets samples at the NIAID Vaccine Research Center lab. view more Credit: NIAID Results from two Phase 1 clinical trials show an experimental Zika vaccine developed by government scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is safe and induces an immune response in healthy adults. Th
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
New AR Display Nestles Digital Images Into Real Life Way More Accurately In real life, we see objects block other objects all the time. This kind of occlusion offers our eyes and brains great clues about where things are in space, and it helps us believe that the things in front of us are actually there. It’s also one of the biggest challenges to achieving realism in augmented reality, where you’re trying to mix virtual objects with actual ones. The thing is, augmente
22h
Big Think
How Conducting Galileo's Classic Experiment In Space Proved Einstein Right An experiment designed by the legendary Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei (1564 - 1642) was recreated in space and proved another famous scientist right, confirming a part of Einstein’s theory of gravity with unprecedented precision. The original experiment allegedly involved Galileo dropping two balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Doing that proved that they fell at the same rate, regardl
22h
The Atlantic
A Day in the Life of a Sniper in Syria “Did you kill any members of ISIS?” a hairdresser asks his client. The young man doesn’t answer. He simply stares at himself in the mirror—a soldier clad in camouflage with a rifle casually slung over his shoulder. Another try: “So, did you kill people or not?” Save for distant gunshots, silence hangs in the air. The reticent soldier in question is Haron, a Kurdish sniper who has come to the occu
22h
Big Think
New Study Shows a Vegetarian Diet Is Associated with Poorer Health Every month an onslaught of new nutrition news dominates the health blogosphere. Fish will kill you. Fish are heart-healthy. Coconut oil is like manna from heaven. Coconut oil will definitely give you a heart attack. Red meat is the devil, unless it’s raw, in which case you can survive solely from it. Kelp. And so on. Part of the challenge of reading the studies this news is based on—and, often,
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Moonshining Can Be Hazardous To Your Health #Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Spending hours in the extreme Carolina heat doing hard labor sends Josh straight to the emergency room. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dis
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic toolNew MUSE technology obtains high-resolution images of fresh biopsies for analysis within minutes, eliminating need for conventional slides and preserving original tissue sample.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatmentFor prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference. In a study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Australian researchers demonstrate that PET scans can identify which of these prostate cancer patients would benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT).
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New dental material resists plaque and kills microbesResearchers have evaluated a new dental material tethered with an antimicrobial compound that can not only kill bacteria but can also resist biofilm growth. In addition, unlike some drug-infused materials, it is effective with minimal toxicity to the surrounding tissue, as it contains a low dose of the antimicrobial agent that kills only the bacteria that come in contact with it.
23h
Live Science
New 3D-printed Mask Helps Heal Puppy's Fractured Skull An image of a 3D-printed mask used to help heal a dog's fractured skull. Credit: UC Davis Vet Med/YouTube A new 3D-printed mask helped a puppy in California heal after its face was severely wounded in an attack by another dog. The puppy, a 4-month-old female Staffordshire bull terrier named Loca, arrived at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine with a fractured ch
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kidney disease diagnosis may benefit from DNA sequencing New York, NY (Dec. 4, 2017)--DNA sequencing could soon become part of the routine diagnostic workup for patients with chronic kidney disease, suggests a new study from Columbia University Medical Center. The researchers found that DNA sequencing could identify the genetic cause of the disease and influence treatment for many patients with chronic kidney disease. The study was published today in
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in six patients with PAD who undergo revascularization readmitted within 30 days IMAGE: This is Robert Yeh, MD, MSc, and Eric Secemsky, MD, MSc. view more Credit: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BOSTON - Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a vascular condition that prevents blood flow to the extremities, currently affects 8.5 million people in the United States. A study of nearly 62,000 hospitalizations nationwide has found that more than one in six patients wit
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronauts make, fling, float, eat pizzas on space station In this Nov. 18, 2017 photo provided by NASA, from left, American Mark Vande Hei, Russian Sergei Ryazanskiy, Italian Paolo Nespoli, American Joe Acaba and American Randy Bresnik display the results of their made-from-scratch pizza pies at the International Space Station. The fixings flew up in November on a commercial supply ship. (NASA via AP) The first-ever pizza party in space is getting sky-h
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Entomologist discovers invertebrate that comes in more color combinations than any other Apheloria polychroma , as the millipede is known, also has an enviable trait in the animal world -- it's covered in cyanide, ensuring any bird that snacks on the colorful but lethal invertebrate won't do it a second time. Lots of other millipedes that don't have as much toxic defense, mimic Apheloria polychroma 's coloring in hopes of avoiding becoming another link in the food chain. Credit: Virg
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
Google Has Released an AI Tool That Makes Sense of Your Genome Almost 15 years after scientists first sequenced the human genome, making sense of the enormous amount of data that encodes human life remains a formidable challenge. But it is also precisely the sort of problem that machine learning excels at. On Monday, Google released a tool called DeepVariant that uses the latest AI techniques to build a more accurate picture of a person’s genome from sequenc
23h
The Scientist RSS
Investigation Reveals Sexual Assault of Adolescents in Federally Funded Research StudyAn internal investigation has revealed why the $8.8 million Purdue University study was abruptly terminated earlier this year.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lamborghini drives into crowded SUV market Lamborghini has revealed its new luxury SUV, the Urus, in a bid to capture the attention of the world's wealthier drivers Lamborghini, the fabled Italian sports car manufacturer, on Monday unveiled its new Sports Utility Vehicle, accelerating into a fast growing market already crowded with upmarket rivals. The Urus, as the four-wheel drive "super SUV" will be known, was revealed at the Volkswagen
23h
Big Think
How Thinking in a Foreign Language Reduces Superstitious Belief Superstition is everywhere in our modern lives. Each Friday the 13 th , nearly a billion dollars in business is avoided because people are afraid that it will be bad luck to do it that day . In the United Kingdom, traffic accidents increase dramatically on the same day, despite less traffic overall. Even for those of us who consider ourselves rational people, the effects of superstition can still
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality users must learn to use what they see Anyone with normal vision knows that a ball that seems to quickly be growing larger is probably going to hit them on the nose. But strap them into a virtual reality headset, and they still may need to take a few lumps before they pay attention to the visual cues that work so well in the real world, according to a new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists. "The companies leading
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virginia Tech entomologist discovers invertebrate that comes in more color combinations than any oth The new millipede that Paul Marek discovered is as pretty as it is dangerous. The thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered. Apheloria polychroma , as the millipede is known, also has an enviable trait in the animal world -- it's covered in cyanide, ensuring any bird that s
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover how plants respond to changes in light at the molecular level Scientists at UC Riverside have identified the molecular mechanism by which photoreceptors called phytochromes control plant growth and development. The findings have implications in agriculture, where farmers are increasingly looking to grow more food on less land. Credit: Gilles San Martin (CC BY 2.0) Plants don't have eyes, but they do "see" their surroundings using light. That's made possible
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MACHOs are dead, WIMPs are a no-show -- say hello to SIMPsThe nature of dark matter remains elusive, with numerous experimental searches for WIMPs coming up empty-handed and MACHOs all but abandoned. Theorists have proposed a different type of dark matter particle, a strongly interacting massive particle or SIMP, that differs from WIMPs in that they interact strongly with one another and hardly at all with normal matter. The dark matter structure of a ga
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
A Translation Algorithm Can Predict the “Language” of a Chemical Reaction A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, California, can look at an image of a sunny road… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pret
23h
Big Think
Certain Kinds of Lightning Produce Nuclear Reactions in Thunderclouds If you’ve ever been shaken by a thunderclap, or sat in spectacle as a white forked tongue streaked across the sky, you’ve bore witness to one of the most powerful phenomena in the universe. Researchers in Japan recently found out just how powerful lighting is. Certain kinds produce gamma rays, leading to a nuclear reaction . According to the report published in the journal Nature , “Thunderclouds
23h
Feed: All Latest
Eagles vs. Seahawks: Why Russell Wilson's Forward Pass Looks Backward During Sunday's NFL game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Philadelphia Eagles, Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson makes a pretty nice move. After taking the ball and running with it, he makes a quick pitch off to the side while faking out the defender. Looks pretty cool, but it probably wasn't legal. In the NFL, once you cross the line of scrimmage you can only toss the ball backward. This s
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Despite city tree benefits, California urban canopy cover per capita lowest in US Despite the benefits of city trees, California has the lowest urban canopy cover per capita in the United States, with room to accommodate an estimated 236 million more plantings. Credit: US Forest Service Trees in California communities are working overtime. From removing carbon dioxide and pollutants from the air, intercepting rainfall and increasing property values, California's 173.2 million
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trickle-down is the solution (to the planetary core formation problem) New research from The University of Texas at Austin adds evidence to a theory that claims the metallic cores of rocky planets like Earth were formed when molten metal trapped between grains of silicate rock percolated to the center of the planet during its early formation. Credit: UT Austin Scientists have long pondered how rocky bodies in the solar system—including our own Earth—got their metal
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool MUSE technology captures breast tissue with nerve coursing over and through a layer of intact fat cells. Credit: Richard Levenson, UC Davis MUSE image of sebaceous glandA microscope using ultraviolet light to illuminate samples enables pathologists to assess high-resolution images of biopsies and other fresh tissue samples for disease within minutes, without requiring the time-consuming preparati
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer simulations reveal roots of drug resistance Bacterial efflux pumps, such as the P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM pump shown here, are one of the dominant molecular mechanisms available to Gram-negative pathogens for removing toxins, including antibiotics. Inactivation of the pump assembly and function would be a major step for reducing bacterial multidrug resistance. Credit: LANL New supercomputer simulations have revealed the role of transport pr
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood pressure declines 14 to 18 years before deathBlood pressure in the elderly begins to decrease about 14 or so years before death, according to a new study. Researchers looked at the electronic medical records of 46,634 British citizens who had died at age 60 or older. Blood pressure declined over the last 14 to 18 years of life in both healthy elders and those with serious health problems.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relativesResearchers have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicians' experiences with family and friends impact breast cancer screeningResults of a national survey of more than 800 physicians suggest that their experiences with patients, family members and friends with breast cancer are linked with their recommendations for routine mammograms.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Programmable drug delivery platform combats diseased cells at genetic levelA research team has developed a unique linker technology to connect a synthetic drug delivery vehicle referred to as a nucleic acid nanocapsule (NAN) with a new peptide cross-linker approach. The NAN enables both a small molecule drug and a nucleic acid -- RNA or DNA -- to be delivered to a cell. This combination generates a nanocapsule capable of shepherding genetic or pharmaceutical molecules to
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preemies' dads more stressed than moms after NICUFor the first time, scientists have measured the stress levels of fathers of premature babies during the tense transition between the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and home and discovered fathers are more stressed than moms, according to a new study.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shining a light on plant growth and development RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- Plants don't have eyes, but they do "see" their surroundings using light. That's made possible by proteins called photoreceptors that absorb light and convert it into a signal that turns genes on or off. Until now, scientists haven't fully understood the molecular mechanism underlying that process, which allows plants to recognize when they're in the shade and grow toward the
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do doctors make decisions when managing care for critically & terminally ill patients? With the U.S. population aging rapidly, more resources are being dedicated to understanding how doctors make decisions while caring for critically ill, older patients at the end of their lives. If faced with an elderly, critically ill patient who has expressed the wish not to be intubated, for example, which factors affect the doctor's decision about whether to abide by the patient's preference?
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medication errors for admitted patients drop when pharmacy staff take drug histories in ER LOS ANGELES (Dec. 4, 2017) -- When pharmacy professionals -- rather than doctors or nurses -- take medication histories of patients in emergency departments, mistakes in drug orders can be reduced by more than 80 percent, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai. Acting on the findings, Cedars-Sinai now assigns pharmacy staff members to take medication histories for high-risk patients admitted to
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Important foraging hotspots for loggerhead turtle rookery identified Research scientist Simona Ceriani and a team of biologist from the University of Central Florida and the University of Colorado examined chemical signatures of more than 700 loggerhead turtles over nine years which nest at the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. They found that sea turtles are what they eat - but where they eat may be even more important. Credit: University of Central Florida U
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CEBAF begins operations following upgrade completion Magnets that steer and focus the electron beams in Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Credit: DOE's Jefferson Lab The world's most advanced particle accelerator for investigating the quark structure of matter is gearing up to begin its first experiments following official completion of an upgrade to triple its original design energy. The Continuous Electron Beam Accele
1d
New on MIT Technology Review
Ethereum’s First Killer App Is Here, and It’s a Game Where You Create Digital Cats A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, CA, can look at an image of a sunny road and imagine… Read more A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MACHOs are dead. WIMPs are a no-show. Say hello to SIMPs: New candidate for dark matter Conventional WIMP theories predict that dark matter particles rarely interact with one another, and only weakly with normal matter. Hitoshi Murayama of UC Berkeley and Yonit Hochberg of Hebrew University predict that dark matter SIMPs, comprised of a quark and an antiquark, would collide and interact strongly with one another, producing noticeable effects when the dark matter in galaxies collide.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dental material resists plaque and kills microbes, dental team finds Biofilms composed of Streptococcus mutans--a common cause of tooth decay--were much easier to remove when grown on a newly developed dental material (right image), which has an antimicrobial agent within it, compared to a control material. Credit: University of Pennsylvania Dentists rely on composite materials to perform restorative procedures, such as filling cavities. Yet these materials, like
1d
Science : NPR
Across The World, If You Eat For Your Health, You'll Help The Planet Brahman cattle graze in a field in Innisfail, Queensland, Australia. Researchers can estimate the greenhouse gas emissions and land used to produce various foods in different parts of the world. They've used that data to calculate the environmental impact of a shift in what people eat. David Messent/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption David Messent/Getty Images Brahman cattle graze in a fiel
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early avian evolution: The Archaeopteryx that wasn‘tPaleontologists have corrected a case of misinterpretation: The first fossil "Archaeopteryx" to be discovered is actually a predatory dinosaur belonging to the anchiornithid family, which was previously known only from finds made in China.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism-linked gene stunts developing dendritesIncreased expression of a gene linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) leads to a remodeling of dendrites during brain development, according to a new study conducted in cultured neurons and an ASD mouse model. The research identifies a series of cellular and molecular events that may contribute to differences in neuronal connectivity that underlie the social and communication deficits observed
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise changes gut microbial composition independent of diet, team reportsTwo studies -- one in mice and the other in human subjects -- offer the first definitive evidence that exercise alone can change the composition of microbes in the gut. The studies were designed to isolate exercise-induced changes from other factors -- such as diet or antibiotic use -- that might alter the intestinal microbiota.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gorillas can develop food cleaning behavior spontaneouslyResearchers have suggested that gorillas are capable of learning food cleaning behaviors without having to witness it in others first.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer simulations reveal roots of drug resistanceNew supercomputer simulations have revealed the role of transport proteins called efflux pumps in creating drug-resistance in bacteria, research that could lead to improving the drugs' effectiveness against life-threatening diseases and restoring the efficacy of defunct antibiotics.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electricity generated from low-cost biomaterialMobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to new research.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nature's toughest substances decodedResearchers have developed computer simulations to decode nature's toughest materials, like seashells and tooth enamel, to guide making synthetic multifunctional composites.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the UK smoking ban increased wellbeingMarried women with children reported the largest increase in well-being following the smoking bans in the UK in 2006 and 2007 but there was no comparable increase for married men with children.
1d
Futurity.org
How young people talk about abstaining from sex New research determines how college students initiate conversations about their decision to abstain from or delay sex, and the strategies they use to explain this to their partners. At a time of greater awareness about sexual assault, Tina Coffelt, an assistant professor of English and communication studies at Iowa State University, says it is important to help students navigate these conversatio
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher closes in on pathways involved in ALS disease It is estimated that between 14,000 and 15,000 Americans have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to the National Institutes of Health. Symptoms of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, may be subtle at first but develop into more obvious muscle weakness and paralysis. Recently, a University of Missouri researcher identified a potential target for therapeutics that may help to lesse
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite city tree benefits, California urban canopy cover per capita lowest in US Trees in California communities are working overtime. From removing carbon dioxide and pollutants from the air, intercepting rainfall and increasing property values, California's 173.2 million city trees provide ecosystem services valued at $8.3 billion a year. However, according to a recent study, more benefits could be realized if the Golden State's urban forests didn't have the lowest canopy c
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggests Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder. Medication treatment, usually consisting of methadone or buprenorphine, both of which are opioids, h
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removing cancer cell debris improves conventional cancer treatments Cancer therapies are designed to kill tumor cells, but produce tumor cell debris in the process. In a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine , researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and colleagues show that leftover debris can stimulate inflammation and tumor growth, but that molecules called resolvins can block that unwanted inflammatory response. The findings point towar
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicare shift to quality over quantity presents challenges A new study hints that even large physician practices may have trouble moving to a payment system that rewards quality of health care over quantity of services delivered. The analysis included data from the first year of a program run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and known as the Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier program. Under the Affordable Care Act, CMS in 2012
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US provides most development assistance for health, but lags behind others in per person spending SEATTLE - A new study finds that while the United States consistently has provided more funding for development assistance for health (DAH) than any other country, some high-income European nations have far surpassed the US's assistance in per capita and other expenditure measurements. Today's study, published in the December issue of Health Affairs journal, examines DAH trends in 23 high-income
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four-fold jump in deaths in opioid-driven hospitalizations People who end up in the hospital due to an opioid-related condition are four times more likely to die now than they were in 2000, according to research led by Harvard Medical School and published in the December issue of Health Affairs . The country is in the throes of a growing, and increasingly deadly, opioid epidemic, yet little is known about how people hospitalized for opioid-related diagno
1d
New on MIT Technology Review
Nvidia’s Tag-Teaming AIs Imagine Night as Day, and House Cats as Tigers A new direction in machine learning is giving computers the ability to daydream, and the results are fascinating and potentially pretty useful. A system developed by researchers at Nvidia in Santa Clara, CA, can look at an image of a sunny road and imagine what it would look like, in stunning detail, if it were raining, nighttime, or a snowy day. It can also imagine what a house cat would look
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multicultural awareness boosts teaching competency, but is an uneven resource among future teachers Student teachers with more multicultural awareness foster more positive classroom environments for their students, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and published in the Journal of Teacher Education . However, multicultural awareness varies considerably among future teachers based on their own race or ethnicity and prior experience working wit
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New robots can see into their future University of California, Berkeley, researchers have developed a robotic learning technology that enables robots to imagine the future of their actions so they can figure out how to manipulate objects they have never encountered before. In the future, this technology could help self-driving cars anticipate future events on the road and produce more intelligent robotic assistants in homes, but the
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatment IMAGE: A 69-year-old man presented with rising PSA (0.16ng/ml) following radical prostatectomy for Gleason score 7 prostate cancer 4 years prior. PSMA PET CT showed a solitary pelvic node with no... view more Credit: L Emmett et al., St Vincent's Hospitals, Sydney, Australia RESTON, Va. - For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prosta
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood pressure declines 14 to 18 years before death Blood pressure in the elderly gradually begins to decrease about 14 or so years before death, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine. Researchers from UConn Health and the University of Exeter Medical School in the U.K. looked at the electronic medical records of 46,634 British citizens who had died at age 60 or older. The lar
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MACHOs are dead, WIMPs are a no-show -- say hello to SIMPs IMAGE: Conventional WIMP theories predict that dark matter particles rarely interact with one another, and only weakly with normal matter. Hitoshi Murayama of UC Berkeley and Yonit Hochberg of Hebrew University... view more Credit: Kavli IPMU graphic The intensive, worldwide search for dark matter, the missing mass in the universe, has so far failed to find an abundance of dark, massive s
1d
Science : NPR
This Year's Hurricane Season Was Intense. Is It A Taste Of The Future? Satellite imagery of the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 8, as three hurricanes (Katia, Irma, and Jose) are on the move. NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen hide caption toggle caption NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen Satellite imagery of the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 8, as three hurricanes (Katia, Irma, and Jose) are on the move. NASA/J. Stevens/J. Allen With the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season finally over, scientists are t
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Repetition can make sounds into musicNew research shows that listeners perceive repeated environmental sounds as music.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tanners who use sprays and lotions less prone to get tattoos and piercings than sunbathers People who often sunbathe or use tanning beds are more likely to try risky weight-loss methods and have cosmetic surgery, as well as get tattoos and piercings. But while people who seldom tan also may try unsafe diets and cosmetic surgery, they rarely opt for tattoos or piercings, according to a Baylor University study. "When compared to infrequent tanners, frequent body-tanners -- regardless of
1d
Popular Science
Voyager 1 just fired up some thrusters for the first time in 37 years When Voyager 1's trajectory correction maneuver thrusters last fired, Ronald Reagan had just been elected president. Over 30 years ago, about a decade into the spacecraft's journey out to the edge of our solar system and beyond, the thrusters had officially served their purpose. The trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) thrusters sent out little puffs of power to correct the object's course, allow
1d
The Atlantic
The Never-Ending Story of the Tiger Woods Comeback Over the weekend, a familiar story repeated itself: Tiger Woods returned to professional golf. The event in question, this time, was the casual but star-studded Hero World Challenge in the Bahamas, and the time elapsed since his last competitive round was 10 months, during which Woods underwent another in a string of back surgeries and was arrested for driving under the influence of painkillers.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pigeons can discriminate both space, timePigeons aren't so bird-brained after all. New research shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time, likely using a different region of the brain than humans and primates to do so.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New dental material resists plaque and kills microbes, Penn dental team finds Dentists rely on composite materials to perform restorative procedures, such as filling cavities. Yet these materials, like tooth enamel, can be vulnerable to the growth of plaque, the sticky biofilm that leads to tooth decay. In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania evaluated a new dental material tethered with an antimicrobial compound that can not only kill bacteria but
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trickle-down is the solution (to the planetary core formation problem) IMAGE: New research from The University of Texas at Austin adds evidence to a theory that claims the metallic cores of rocky planets like Earth were formed when molten metal trapped... view more Credit: UT Austin Scientists have long pondered how rocky bodies in the solar system--including our own Earth--got their metal cores. According to research conducted by The University of Texas at
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Dec. 2017 Weather--Precision de-icing A precision approach to treating snow- and ice-covered roads, developed by an Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led research team, aims to help cities effectively allocate resources and expand coverage on roadways. The combined software and hardware technology analyzes existing city data and uses high-resolution modeling to identify areas most vulnerable to d
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool IMAGE: MUSE technology captures breast tissue with nerve coursing over and through a layer of intact fat cells. view more Credit: Richard Levenson, UC Davis MUSE image of sebaceous glandA microscope using ultraviolet light to illuminate samples enables pathologists to assess high-resolution images of biopsies and other fresh tissue samples for disease within minutes, without requiring the t
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why musical training benefits us in processing speech IMAGE: (A-I) Brain regions showing significant classification of phoneme-elicited neural responses at each SNR in musicians (left panels) and non-musicians (right panels). (J) Speech-relevant anatomical regions used in multivoxel pattern analysis.... view more Credit: DU Yi Musical training is associated with various cognitive improvements and pervasive plasticity in human brains. Among its merit
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to keep students in science IMAGE: SEA-PHAGES students present their work at a symposium held at Janelia Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia. view more Credit: Matt Staley Over the last nine years, more than 8,800 bacteria-infecting viruses have been discovered by students exploring scientific research for the first time--most during their first year of college. These student-scientists are part of a global
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Replicating peregrine falcon attack strategies could help down rogue drones Researchers at Oxford University have discovered that peregrine falcons steer their attacks using the same control strategies as guided missiles. The findings, which overturn previous assumptions that peregrines' aerial hunting follows simple geometric rules, could be applied to the design of small, visually guided drones that can take down other 'rogue' drones in settings such as airports or pri
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-stress childhoods blind adults to potential loss MADISON, Wis. -- Adults who lived high-stress childhoods have trouble reading the signs that a loss or punishment is looming, leaving themselves in situations that risk avoidable health and financial problems and legal trouble. According to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, this difficulty may be biological, stemming from an unhelpful lack of activity in the brain when a situati
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New test provides accurate measure of DNA damage from chemical compounds WASHINGTON -- A new biomarker test developed by researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and their colleagues can help predict, with up to 90 percent certainty, which chemical compounds can cause DNA damage that could lead to cancer. The study was published early online the week of December 4, 2017, in PNAS . Current laboratory tests that assess potential toxicity in human
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NEST360º's low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in Africa HOUSTON -- (Dec. 4, 2017) -- The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts preparing for a Dec. 11 competition for $100 million from the MacArthur Foundation. The money would allow the team to carry out its visi
1d
The Atlantic
Climate Change Might Lower Salaries Even if countries take moderate action on climate change, by the end of this century , Phoenix is expected to have an extra month of days above 95 degrees Fahrenheit, while Washington, D.C., is expected to have another three weeks of these sweltering days, as the Climate Impact Lab and New York Times reported. A new study suggests that even days that are an average of 90 degrees Fahrenheit, or 32
1d
Science : NPR
Peregrine Falcons Attack Like Missiles To Grab Prey Midair, Scientists Find A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathemati
1d
New on MIT Technology Review
Global Warming May Harm Children for Life A growing body of research concludes that rising global temperatures increase the risk of heat stress and stroke, decrease productivity and economic output, widen global wealth disparities , and can trigger greater violence (see “ Hot and Violent ”). Now a new study by researchers at Stanford, the University of California, Berkeley, and the U.S. Department of the Treasury suggests that even short
1d
The Scientist RSS
Breakthrough Prizes Recognize Geneticists, Big Bang ResearchersAmong this year's winners are a geneticist who revealed how plants respond to shade and a group of physicists who mapped the universe's background radiation.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Important foraging hotspots for loggerhead turtle rookery identified UCF alumna Simona Ceriani today published a new study that finds sea turtles are what they eat - but where they eat may be even more important. Ceriani, who is a tenured research scientist with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, collaborated with three UCF Department of Biology researchers on the study, published in Scientific Reports . "Where you eat and what you eat
1d
The Atlantic
Why CVS Wants to Buy Aetna On Sunday night, the enormous drugstore company CVS said it had agreed to buy the enormous health-insurance company Aetna for almost $70 billion . It’s a deal that, if government regulators and both companies’ shareholders give it their blessing, would be the biggest deal in the U.S. this year . There are two main reasons CVS would benefit from acquiring a health insurer—one that’s specific to th
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New test provides accurate measure of DNA damage from chemical compounds Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new biomarker test developed by researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and their colleagues can help predict, with up to 90 percent certainty, which chemical compounds can cause DNA damage that could lead to cancer. The study was published early online the week of December 4, 2017, in PNAS . Current laboratory tests that assess potential toxicit
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to keep students in science Students examine results in the lab as part of the SEA-PHAGES program at the College of William and Mary. SEA-PHAGES students -- regardless of background -- are more likely to stay in science than students who take traditional lab courses. Credit: Eric Bradley Over the last nine years, more than 8,800 bacteria-infecting viruses have been discovered by students exploring scientific research for th
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NEST360's low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in Africa BiliSpec is a low-cost, battery-powered reader designed to diagnose jaundice by immediately quantifying serum bilirubin levels from a small drop of whole blood. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors an
1d
Live Science
The Wrong Way to Pop a Pimple A 23-year-old construction worker used a woodworking blade to remove what he called a pimple on his lower lip, developing a rare fungal infection afterward, a recent report of the man's case revealed. The infection was likely caused by his unusual choice of tools to zap his zit , the report said. Doctors said they suspect the woodworking blade directly transferred the spores of a fungus cal
1d

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.