Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia Reconstruction of Wakaleo schouteni challenging the thylacinid Nimbacinus dicksoni over a kangaroo carcass in the late Oligocene forest at Riversleigh. Credit: Peter Schouten in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings, published in the Journal of System
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans at maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, study suggestsNewly emerging trends in data suggests humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. These biological limitations may be affected by anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - which could have a deleterious effect on these limits. This review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while c
11h
Ingeniøren
Svanelignende dinosaur fundet i Mongoliet Hønsefødder, luffer og en hals som en svane. Det er nogle af de karakteristika, som kendetegner en ny dinosaurtype, der er fundet som fossil i Mongoliet. Det er en forskergruppe ledet af Andrea Cau, ph.d. fra universitetet i Bologna, der har publiceret det nye fund i Nature . Den nye art har fået navnet Halszkaraptor escuilliei . Her er første del opkaldt efter den polske kvinde Halszka Osmólska,
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LATEST

The Atlantic
L.A.'s Day at the Mercy of the Wind LOS ANGELES—As dawn nears on the West Coast the residents of America’s second largest city are in something like the opposite position of stranded sailors praying for wind to escape ruin. Greater Los Angeles is not quite overwhelmed by fire. 475 acres are ablaze near the mountain pass that connects the L.A. basin to the San Fernando Valley. The mountains on the Valley’s northern border are aflame
4min
Ingeniøren
Her er kampflyenes hemmeligholdte støjrapport I starten af ugen kom det frem, at regeringen vidste, at de nye F35-kampfly, der skal have hjem på Skydstrup luftbase, støjer mere end de nuværende F-16, og overskrider støjgrænserne i flere områder nær Skydstrup. Disse oplysninger blev fremlagt i en ‘Støjrapport’, som ministeriet udarbejdede i 2015, og hvis konklusioner den daværende forsvarsminister Peter Christiansen modsagde, da han i 2016 af
2min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messagesWhat if you could look into the brains of potential drug abusers and see what messages would be most likely to persuade them to 'just say no?' That's the ultimate goal of researchers whose new study scanned the brains of people while they watched anti-drug public service announcements.
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Airline food study 2017 - 2018 NEW YORK, NY (December 6, 2017) There will more than 51 million passengers traveling during this holiday season (Dec. 15th -Jan 4th) according to trade group Airlines for America . Knowing what are the "best" and "worst" choices is a valuable tool for any traveler, so Dr. Charles Platkin, the director of the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center and editor of DietDetective.com., once again studie
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Venezuelan rock art mapped in unprecedented detailRock engravings located in Western Venezuela -- including some of the largest recorded anywhere in the world -- have been mapped in unprecedented detail by UCL researchers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Microwaved, hard-boiled eggs can explode. But the bang isn’t the worst part. Hard-boiled eggs are a dish best served cold. When quickly reheated in a microwave and then pierced, the picnic staple can explode with a loud bang in a shower of hot, rubbery shrapnel. But this blast is far more likely to make a hot mess than hurt your hearing , according to research presented December 6 at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in New Orleans. That distinction isn’t as odd a
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venezuelan rock art mapped in unprecedented detail a) View of Raudal Wayuco and Picure (background), facing south; b) Raudal Yavariven looking west; c) overview of the Atures Rapids from mainland Venezuela (photograph by Jose Oliver); d) view from Picure looking north towards Cotua. Credit: Dr Philip Riris Rock engravings located in Western Venezuela - including some of the largest recorded anywhere in the world - have been mapped in unprecedente
29min
Scientific American Content: Global
What Will NASA's Biggest-Ever Space Telescope Study First? Astronomers are scrambling to keep a rapidly approaching date with destiny—a chance to gaze farther than ever before into the universe’s hidden depths. After decades of development, the nearly $9-billion James Webb Space Telescope is set for launch from French Guiana in spring 2019. Built in cooperation with the European and Canadian space agencies, Webb is NASA’s biggest, costliest and most
42min
Ingeniøren
Store danske banker vil ikke tage imod bitcoin-gevinster De store banker i Danmark vil ikke have noget at gøre med dine bitcoin-gevinster. Enkelte banker er mindre kritiske. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/store-danske-banker-vil-ikke-tage-imod-bitcoin-gevinster-1083629 Version2
45min
Ingeniøren
Japan Airlines investerer i overlydsfly Det er ikke så sjældent, at der publiceres nye flotte illustrationer akkompagneret af store fantasier om fly, der rejser mellem New York og London på et kvarter - for nu at sætte det på spidsen. 14 år efter, at Concorde blev taget ud af drift, er der fortsat mange, der drømmer om genkomsten af supersoniske passagerfly. Men een ting er at lave noget, som ser lækkert ud på papir. Det er noget svære
45min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special issue to highlight impact of changes in Arctic climate IMAGE: In recent decades, Arctic warming has amplified markedly and sea ice has shrunk drastically, leading to an emergent forcing that possibly drives anomalous atmospheric circulation and weather patterns beyond the... view more Credit: Advances in Atmospheric Sciences There's controversy in climate change research--not whether climate change exists, but how the evidence is gathered and used
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsstyrelsen udgiver nye anbefalinger for den palliative indsatsLige adgang til de palliative behandlingstilbud for alle uanset diagnose. Det er fokuspunktet i Sundhedsstyrelsens nye anbefalinger for palliativ behandling.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA origami surpasses important thresholds In a first step scientists at the Technical University of Munich form V-shaped building blocks using DNA-origami techniques. Determined by the opening angle a defined number of building blocks self-assemble into a gear-wheel. In a third step these gear-wheels form tubes with sizes of virus-capsids. Credit: Hendrik Dietz / TUM Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz has
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Ingeniøren
Googles AI tager skakføringen efter at have lært spillet på fire timer Google DeepMinds AlphaGo Zero har slået en af verdens førende specialiserede skakprogrammer efter at have lært sig selv det tusinde år gamle spil på kun fire timer. Det skriver BBC. Programmet spillede 100 kampe mod skakprogrammet Stockfish 8 og tabte ikke en eneste. AlphaGo Zero fik kun fortalt spillets regler og spillede derefter skak i fire timer mod sig selv for til sidst at nå et niveau, der
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The Atlantic
Frank Lloyd Wright's Striking Pop-Cultural Legacy The apartment of Rick Deckard in Blade Runner . The titular House on Haunted Hill , where Vincent Price’s character invites guests to survive a night of frights and win a fortune. The penthouse setting of Twin Peaks ’s faux soap opera “Invitation to Love.” The Great Pyramid of Meereen, prominently featured on Season 6 of Game of Thrones . These TV and film settings span decades and genres, from s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The underground effects of earthquakes and volcanoes The time variation of seismic velocity relative to the averaged pre-earthquake value are displayed. Each panel shows the central date within the 30-day window: (a) 8 March, (b) 1 May, (c) 1 June, and (d) 1 October 2016. Warm colors indicate regions where seismic velocity was decreased. During the 2016 earthquake, seismic velocity around the seismogenic Hinagu-Futagawa fault system and Mount Aso d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How does it look when Earth is bombarded with dark matter? Credit: University of Southern Denmark University of Southern Denmark researchers have conducted simulations of dark matter particles hitting the Earth. Physicists believe that Earth collides with uncountable dark matter particles as it hurtles through space. Although no one has ever seen these mysterious particles, there is no question among physicists about their existence. Researchers have ins
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team saves information on a single molecule The images from the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) show the three different states of the molecule, which correspond to a trinary code for encrypting information: in a highly magnetic state (left), in a low magnetic state with atoms that have moved closer together (middle) and in an equally low magnetic state but turned by 45 degrees (right). Credit: Manuel Gruber Over the past few years, t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste Prototype antineutrino detector for monitoring nuclear waste repository sites. Credit: Virginia Tech, Center for Neutrino Physics New scientific findings suggest neutrino detectors may play an important role in ensuring better monitoring and safer storage of radioactive material in nuclear waste repository sites. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have made calcul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists stretch diamond using an electric field The scheme of the experiment (for practical use). Credit: Alexander Obraztsov A research team from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University stretched acicular diamond crystallites using an electric field. Deformation occurring during the stretching causes changes in the luminescence spectrum. This effect can be used to develop electric field detectors and other quantum optic de
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temple research: Canola oil linked to worsened memory & learning ability in Alzheimer's IMAGE: Domenico Praticò, MD, Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology and Microbiology and Director of the Alzheimer's Center at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, as well as... view more Credit: Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) - Canola oil is one of the most widely consumed vegetable oils in the world, yet surprisingly little is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team reveals high prevalence of bacteria that carry gene mcr-1 in ecosystem A research collaborative recently found that bacteria that carry the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 commonly exist in food and environmental samples collected from Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland. The mcr-1 gene is a new plasmid-encoded colistin resistance mechanism discovered by scientists in China in 2015. Colistin has been a last-resort antibiotic used to treat severe infections caused by c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlling spin for memory storage By applying light, the parallel spin arrangement is changed to antiparallel. Credit: Sumio Ishihara Tohoku University researchers have developed a computational simulation that shows that using ultrafast laser pulses to excite electrons in a magnetic material switches them into a transient non-magnetic state. This could reduce the time involved in manipulating a material's magnetism, improving ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marshmallow-like silicone gels used as insulation in containers for cryopreserved embryos Photograph of the container packing a MG. Credit: Gen Hayase As the genetic modification of mice is increasingly prevalent in medical and biological research, so, too, is the need for an efficient way to transport cryopreserved embryos and sperm. For the preservation of the frozen embryos/sperm, liquid nitrogen is used to keep the temperatures in the transport containers below -150 °C. These cont
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Carolina county's ransomware recovery will take days Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio speaks at a news conference at the Government Center about the hacking of Mecklenburg County's servers in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. A $25,000 ransom in bit coin was being sought for the files being held. County officials said late this afternoon they are not paying the ransom. (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP) A North Carolina coun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Go home' drone seeks to stop Japan overtime binge A drone that hovers over Japanese employees and blares music to force them to go home was unveiled Thursday, as the country tries to reduce its notoriously long work hours. The "T-Frend" buzzes over those trying to work late, blasting out the strains of "Auld Lang Syne", a Scottish tune typically used in Japan to announce that a store is closing. "You can't really work when you think 'it's comi
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Ingeniøren
Tunet 3D-printer syvdobler sin ydeevne En hjemmelavet dyse-anordning, en fiberdiodelaser og et servostyret gantry-system. Det er de tre hovedkomponenter, som to forskere på Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) har brugt til at bygge en tunet version af en 3D-printer, der er mange gange hurtigere end tilsvarende kommercielle printere. Til eksperimentet har forskerne benyttet en FFF-printer (fuesed filament fabrication), hvor et
2h
Viden
Ny dansk forskning: P-piller øger risikoen for brystkræft med 20 procent Kvinder mellem 15 og 49 år, der spiser p-piller, har en hormonspiral eller bruger anden hormonprævention, har i gennemsnit 20 procent øget risiko for at få brystkræft. Det viser ny, dansk forskning, som torsdag er offentliggjort i et af verdens førende videnskabelige tidsskrifter New England Journal of Medicine. Det skriver Politiken. 55 kvinder ud af 100.000 mellem 15 og 49 år, som aldrig har br
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists call on US to allow research on pot meds for pets In this Monday, Oct. 30, 2017, photo, Luke Byerly tends to his 14-year-old beagle, Robbie, during a break at Byerly's job as a technician at a veterinary clinic in east Denver. Byerly is using CBD, a non-psychoactive component of marijuana, oil to treat the dog's arthritis. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) Dr. Byron Maas surveys a supply of marijuana products for dogs that lines a shelf in his veterin
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stock of drone maker AeroVironment soars after strong earnings report Shares of AeroVironment Inc., a drone manufacturer based in Monrovia, Calif., soared Wednesday after the company reported strong second-quarter earnings, boosted by a growth in sales of unmanned aircraft systems. AeroVironment stock was up as much as 34 percent on Wednesday morning before losing some of its gains. It was up 26 percent at $54.49 around noon Pacific time. The company held its sec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery about rare nitrogen molecules offers clues to makeup of other life-supporting planets Researchers found that the Earth’s atmosphere contains more of a rare nitrogen molecule than can be accounted for by geochemical processes occurring near the Earth’s surface. Credit: ISS Expedition 7 Crew, EOL, NASA A team of scientists using a state-of-the-art UCLA instrument reports the discovery of a planetary-scale "tug-of-war" of life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin miner NiceHash reports hack, theft of its 'wallet' In this Monday, April 7, 2014, file photo, a bitcoin logo is displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. The bitcoin miner NiceHash says it is investigating a security breach and the theft of the contents of the NiceHash "bitcoin wallet." The company said Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 in a statement posted on its website that it had stopped operations and was working to verif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ransomware slows North Carolina county government to a crawl Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio speaks at a news conference at the Government Center about the hacking of Mecklenburg County's servers in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. A $25,000 ransom in bit coin was being sought for the files being held. County officials said late this afternoon they are not paying the ransom. (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP) A cyberattack slowed
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NOAA satellite data illuminate oil production trends in Iraq and Syria Oil flares in Syria and Northern Iraq. Credit: CIRES and NOAA Between 2014 and 2016, it was taxation and extortion—not oil—that filled the coffers of the militant Islamic group ISIS, according to a new assessment that relied on NOAA satellite data. The publication also describes how anyone can use rapidly updated NOAA data to quickly assess the production status of oil wells around the world. Quy
4h
Ingeniøren
Gallup: Du kan vinde en iPhone X, hvis vi må tracke dig i 10 år Lad trackere følge dig rundt på nettet, og vind en iPhone X. Det er budskabet i en mail som analysebureauet TNS Gallup sender rundt til folk, der tidligere har medvirket i deres undersøgelser. En Version2 læser, der ikke ønsker sit navn offentliggjort, modtog en mail fra Gallup, hvor direktør Henrik Hansen bad ham om, at slå funktionen ‘undgå sporing fra websteder' fra, så han fortsat kan hjælpe
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First line combination therapy improves progression-free survival in advanced lung cancer IMAGE: This is Dr. Martin Reck. view more Credit: ©ESMO LUGANO-GENEVA, Dec. 7, 2017 - A new combination therapy for the first line treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves progression-free survival (PFS), according to results of the phase III IMpower150 trial presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017. (1) "This is the first phase III trial to
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Science-Based Medicine
Damn the evidence and regulations: VA goes full speed ahead with medical pseudoscience The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has announced (VHA Directive 1137: VA Provision of Complementary & Integrative Health ) that acupuncture, reiki, and reflexology, among other “complementary and integrative health [CIH] practices” will now be included in the standard veterans’ medical benefits package. [Translation: You, the taxpayer, will foot the bill.] The VHA found “adequate evidence e
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Population of Americans with Alzheimer's will more than double by 2060, UCLA study shows IMAGE: This is Ron Brookmeyer. view more Credit: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health About 15 million Americans will have either Alzheimer's dementia or mild cognitive impairment by 2060, up from approximately 6.08 million this year, according to a new study by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. The findings highlight the need to develop measures that could slow th
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the blink of an eye: People perceive sex ratio & threat of group in less than a second In almost as quickly as it takes to blink an eye, we make assumptions about a group of people. New research from UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shows people perceive the sex ratio of a group, and decide if the group is threatening or not, in half a second. The perceptions of the number of men in the group are accurate, according to the research. Nicholas Alt (UCLA), Brianna Mae Good
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detection New tests to detect early Lyme disease - which is increasing beyond the summer months -could replace existing tests that often do not clearly identify the infection before health problems occur. In an analysis published on December 7 in Clinical Infectious Diseases , scientists from Rutgers University, Harvard University, Yale University, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mining electronic medical records could help depression patients find the right treatment Personalized medicine has been one of the most promising medical developments in recent years. To personalize treatment for patients, some doctors have turned to predictive models to help determine which patients will benefit from different treatments. A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University finds that using data from electronic medical records in those models could
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
Behind South Korea’s Cryptocurrency Boom It’s well known that South Korea is one of the world’s most wired societies, with near-ubiquitous broadband access and blazing-fast Internet speeds. Now the country is also becoming a hotbed for cryptocurrency trading. South Korea is the world’s No. 3 market in Bitcoin trading , after Japan and the U.S., and the largest exchange market for Ether, Ethereum ’s cryptocurrency, accounting for more th
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Ingeniøren
Jobsamtale: 5 signaler afslører, om du får jobbet Tvivl er en af de værste ubekendte, når du søger arbejde. Jobfinder fremhæver flere faktorer, som kan indikerer, hvorvidt du har imponeret til jobsamtalen. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/jobsamtale-5-diskrete-signaler-afsloerer-du-faar-jobbet-11506 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
8h
Ingeniøren
Flowbatteriet: Nu gemmer de strøm fra sol og vindKina sætter strøm til flowbatterier på kommerciel basis. Det kommer vi også til i Danmark, mener forsker, som har besøgt kinesisk batterifabrik.
8h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 7. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Efter indsættelsen af Donald Trump spredte en protestbevægelse sig blandt forskere verden over - og i Danmark. Hvad hed bevægelsen? Klik
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exploring a world without food animalsWhat would happen if U.S. farmers stopped producing animals for food and Americans went vegan? Some have called for a move in that direction to address increasing concerns about U.S. health, eating habits, and climate change. Researchers recently explored those questions and found surprising results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parents' reports of children's autism symptoms differ by ethnicityRacial differences in parents' reports of concerns about their child's development to healthcare providers may contribute to delayed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in black children, according to a study.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel regulation of gene expression in brain tumors identifiedNew study results reveal a previously unknown interplay between two key enzymes and a novel understanding of how brain cancer tumors form and spread.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to wildfire smoke in utero lowers birthweightEconomics researchers capitalize on the dynamics of wildfires to prove infants’ proximity to smoke pollution while in utero affects birthweight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Youth who experience violent victimization seek intimate relationships at an earlier ageExperiencing violence as an adolescent leads to early romantic relationships and cohabitating, research concludes. On average, they found that victimized youth entered romantic relationships nine months earlier than non-victimized youth.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Routing gene therapy directly into brainA new technique, which could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain, has been revealed by scientists in a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unearthing the underground effects of earthquakes and volcanoesResearchers analyzed high-resolution seismic velocity data from 36 seismograph stations across the island of Kyushu to identify variations before, during, and after the MW 7.0 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. Velocity decreased in the region of the rupture fault when the earthquake struck, and then gradually recovered, although this recovery showed spatial variability. This variability corresponded to af
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method helps identify causal mechanisms in depressionPeople with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, in depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What makes a happy working mom?A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother.
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Blog » Languages » English
5 Years of Eyewire December 10th is Eyewire’s 5th birthday. Five years..I can hardly believe it! It seems like just yesterday that we were planning a launch and hoping people would play. I’m so glad that you did! Three cheers to YOU, the Eyewire community. Without you this endeavor of citizen neuroscience wouldn’t be possible. On behalf of the whole team at Eyewire HQ, thank you! To celebrate, and in addition to he
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Popular Science
What happened when a ship packed with six million pounds of explosives went up in flames At 9:04:35 a.m., while firefighters and crews from other ships battled the blaze, the fire on Mont-Blanc either penetrated the magazines storing the TNT and picric acid or finally nudged the temperature in the cargo hold just past the 572-degree-Fahrenheit threshold needed to detonate picric acid. Regardless, the result was the same. The instant Mont-Blanc’s cargo ignited, it started a chemical c
11h
The Atlantic
Did Climate Change Worsen the Southern California Fires? Massive wildfires are raging across Southern California, threatening thousands of homes and cultural landmarks like the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Some of the largest fires were still barely contained by Wednesday afternoon. It’s been an unusually bad year for the state—amid an unusually bad year for the West at large. Fires in California have destroyed more than 6,000 structures and incinerate
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plug-in hybrid vehicles are better than their reputationHybrid vehicles are often considered the fig leaf of electric mobility. However, plug-in hybrids with a real electric range of about 60 km drive the same number of kilometers electrically as battery electric vehicles. Hence, their carbon dioxide reduction potential also is the same. This is the result of a comparison of battery and plug-in hybrid vehicles in Germany and the US.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forestsLogging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. But new research by ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to protect, have continued to experience population declines in the forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wheat gets boost from purified nanotubesResearchers test the effects of carbon nanotubes on the growth of wheatgrass. While some showed no effect, purified single-walled nanotubes dispersed in water enhanced the plants' growth, while the same nanotubes in an organic solvent retarded their development.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First DNA sequence from a single mitochondriaDNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, researchers found. This knowledge will help to better illuminate the underlying mechanisms of many disorders that start with accumulated mutations in individual mitochondria and provide clues about how patients might respond to specific therapies.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's SuperTIGER balloon flies again to study heavy cosmic particlesA science team in Antarctica is preparing to fly SuperTIGER, a balloon-borne instrument designed to collect heavy high-energy particles from beyond the solar system that constantly bombard Earth's atmosphere.
11h
Feed: All Latest
Los Angeles Fire: Why Southern California Is Burning This Time The Thomas Fire spread through the hills above Ventura, in the northern greater Los Angeles megalopolis, with the speed of a hurricane. Driven by 50 mph Santa Ana winds—bone-dry katabatic air moving at freeway speeds out of the Mojave desert—the fire transformed overnight from a 5,000-acre burn in a charming chaparral-lined canyon to an inferno the size of Orlando, Florida, that only stopped spre
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Futurity.org
Purified carbon nanotubes can help or hurt wheatgrass The introduction of purified carbon nanotubes appears to have a beneficial effect on the early growth of wheatgrass, according to scientists. But in the presence of contaminants, those same nanotubes could do great harm. The Rice University lab of chemist Andrew Barron grew wheatgrass in a hydroponic garden to test the potential toxicity of nanoparticles on the plant. To their surprise, they foun
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Futurity.org
Scientists turn tofu byproduct into booze Researchers have developed a method for turning tofu whey, a liquid generated from the production of tofu, into a tasty alcoholic beverage that they call Sachi. The innovative fermentation technique also enriches the drink with isoflavones, which are antioxidants that have many health benefits. “Our unique fermentation technique also serves as a zero-waste solution to the serious issue of tofu wh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South AfricaCryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been found large numbers on trees in South Africa.
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Science | The Guardian
Australian researchers identify new species of extinct marsupial lion Australian researchers have identified a new species of marsupial lion that roamed the rainforests of northern Australia 25m years ago. Weighing in at just over 22kg and boasting a squat, flat head, the new species, named Wakaleo schouteni after wildlife illustrator and paleoartist Peter Schouten, is the fifth known species of dog-sized marsupial lion discovered at Riversleigh, located within Boo
12h
Science : NPR
Even Low-Dose Contraceptives Slightly Increase Breast Cancer Risk Katherine Streeter for NPR Katherine Streeter for NPR It's long been known that hormonal contraception, like any medicine, carries some risks. But doctors and women have hoped that the newer generations of low-dose contraceptive pills, IUDs and implants eliminated the breast cancer risk of earlier, higher-dose formulations. Now a big study from Denmark suggests the elevated risk of getting breast
12h
The Atlantic
This Is Fine In video after video posted to Twitter and Snapchat early this morning, the scene near Los Angeles was the same: a stream of cars moving through the Sepulveda Pass on the 405 driving right past seams of fire, walls of flame racing up and down hillsides. The comparisons were inevitable: Mordor. The famous ‘ This is fine ’ dog. And a question arose, too. Why are these people driving on this highway
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Futurity.org
Watch: 3D-printed plastic sends info through Wi-Fi Researchers have created a method for 3D printing plastic objects and sensors that can communicate with other internet-connected devices all on their own. For example, imagine a bottle of laundry detergent that can sense when you’re running low on soap—and automatically connect to the internet to place an order for more. With CAD models that the team is making available to the public, 3D printing
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Live Science
Mariana Trench: The Deepest Depths The Mariana Trench is a crescent-shaped trench in the Western Pacific, just east of the Mariana Islands near Guam. The region surrounding the trench is noteworthy for many unique environments. The Mariana Trench contains the deepest known points on Earth, vents bubbling up liquid sulfur and carbon dioxide, active mud volcanoes and marine life adapted to pressures 1,000 times that at sea level.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spinal tap needle type impacts the risk of complications IMAGE: This is a photo of the two needles used in lumbar puncture: Left: Conventional. Right: Atraumatic view more Credit: McMaster University Hamilton, ON (December 6, 2017) - The type of needle used during a lumbar puncture makes a significant difference in the subsequent occurrence of headache, nerve irritation and hearing disturbance in patients, according to a study by Hamilton medical
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Satellite tracking provides clues about South Atlantic sea turtles' 'lost years'Biologists have been tracking the movements of sea turtle yearlings in the South Atlantic Ocean, and have come up with some surprising results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unique field survey yields first big-picture view of deep-sea food websA new article documents the first comprehensive study of deep-sea food webs, using hundreds of video observations of animals caught in the act of feeding off the Central California coast. The study shows that deep-sea jellies are key predators, and provides new information on how deep-sea animals interact with life near the ocean surface.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optimal amount of rainfall for plantsResearchers have determined what could be considered a 'Goldilocks' climate for rainfall use by plants: not too wet and not too dry. But those landscapes are likely to shrink and become less productive in the future through climate change.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Next Big Step for AI? Understanding Video A screenshot from one of the videos in the Moments in Time Dataset, which could help AI better understand video content. Moments in Time Dataset For a computer, recognizing a cat or a duck in a still image is pretty clever. But a stiffer test for artificial intelligence will be understanding when the cat is riding a Roomba and chasing the duck around a kitchen . MIT and IBM this week released a v
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Futurity.org
Placement on sex offender registries puts children at risk Children legally required to register as sex offenders are at greater risk for suicide attempts, sexual assault, and other harm than juvenile offenders not forced to register, according to a new study. The most troubling findings, the authors say, pertain to suicidal intent and victimization experiences. “…the time has come to abandon juvenile registration.” The study found that registered childr
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Big Think
Researchers Create a Robot That Can See Its Own Future Researchers from UC Berkeley have created a technology that allows robots to imagine how their actions will turn out in the future. Using this approach, the robots are able to interact with objects that they’ve never come across previously. The way the technology helps the robots predict the future is called visual foresight. It gives the robotic system an ability to anticipate what future ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Contrast-enhanced digital mammography comparable to breast MRI after therapy or chemo SAN ANTONIO - Contrast-enhanced digital mammography is comparable to breast MRI in evaluating residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant endocrine therapy or chemotherapy, according to the results of a study presented by Mayo Clinic researchers today at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. "Our study aimed to compare contrast-enhanced mammography with breast MRI in evaluating residual brea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chainsFor decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. Researchers have announced and confirmed a method to craft such a molecular chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When a common cold may trigger early supportive careA new study shows that in infants who were born severely premature, human rhinovirus infections appear to trigger airway hyper-reactivity, which leads to wheezing, hyperinflation and more severe respiratory disease.
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Science : NPR
Senior Volkswagen Executive Sentenced In Diesel-Emissions Scandal Volkswagen executive Oliver Schmidt was sentenced to 7 years in prison for conspiring to evade U.S. clean air laws. AP hide caption toggle caption AP Volkswagen executive Oliver Schmidt was sentenced to 7 years in prison for conspiring to evade U.S. clean air laws. AP High-ranking U.S.-based Volkswagen executive, Oliver Schmidt, has been sentenced to seven years in prison and ordered to pay a $40
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Breathe the Shaman’s Fire | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe to Discovery VR for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Summon Aztec spirits in an ancient ritual to honor Mother Earth Discovery TRVLR takes you to meet Roberto Peño, a modern-day guru in Mexico City. join this shaman as he and his tribe perform ancient and awe-inspiring rituals to keep the traditions of their ancestors alive. For the most immersive experience of
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Live Science
Yes, Your Daily Stress Can Haunt Your Dreams After a stressful day, you may hope to find some solace in sleep. But a new study from the United Kingdom suggests that stressful experiences from your day can make their way into your dreams. The findings, published Nov. 30 in the journal Motivation and Emotion , suggest that, even in your sleep, you can't escape your nagging boss and other daily pressures. And if you feel lonely and isolated in
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Latest Headlines | Science News
What hospitals can do to help keep excess opioids out of communities To halt the misuse of opioids, it may help to slash the number of pills prescribed, a new study suggests. Five months after the implementation of new opioid prescription guidelines at a University of Michigan hospital, roughly 7,000 fewer pills went home with patients — a drop that might reduce the risk of accessible pills leading to substance abuse. But the opioid reduction didn’t leave patients
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Routing gene therapy directly into the brain A therapeutic technique to transplant blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells directly into the brain could herald a revolution in our approach to treating central nervous system diseases and neurodegenerative disorders. The technique, which could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain, was reported in Sci
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NYT > Science
Birth Control Pills Still Linked to Breast Cancer, Study Finds The study found few differences in risk between the formulations; women cannot protect themselves by turning to implants or intrauterine devices that release a hormone directly into the uterus. The research also suggests that the hormone progestin — widely used in today’s birth control methods — may be raising breast cancer risk. “This is an important study because we had no idea how the modern d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain functionHospitals are making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combating eye injuries with a reversible superglue sealScientists and engineers have developed a reversible, on-the-spot, temperature-sensitive gel that could seal eye injuries on the battlefield.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehensionPeople who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA-origami surpasses important thresholdsIt is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicists have been building nanometer-scale objects for several years. Now scientists have not only broken out of the nanometer realm to build larger objects, but have also cut the production costs a thousand-fold. These innovations open a whole new frontier for the technology.
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Live Science
Even New Birth Control Pills May Raise Women's Breast Cancer Risk Using hormonal birth control methods — including newer types of birth control pills, as well as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants — may slightly increase women's risk of breast cancer, according to a new study from Denmark. The study builds on earlier findings linking hormonal birth control and breast cancer, but the new study focused on newer forms of birth control. The study, w
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San Francisco Just Put the Brakes on Delivery Robots San Francisco, land of unrestrained tech wealth and the attendant hoodies and $29 loaves of bread , just said whoa whoa whoa to delivery robots. The SF Board of Supervisors voted on Tuesday, December 5 to severely restrict the machines, which roll on sidewalks and autonomously dodge obstacles like dogs and buskers . Now startups will have to get permits to run their robots under strict guidelines
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Science | The Guardian
All forms of hormonal contraception carry breast cancer risk, study finds All forms of the pill and other hormonal contraception carry a small risk of breast cancer, which lasts for about five years after women stop taking it, according to new research. The increased risk has been known for some time, but there were hopes that newer forms of hormonal contraception – such as those which release progesterone only – would be safer. However, the new study in the New Englan
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The Scientist RSS
Max Planck Society Seeks to Keep More Women as FacultyThe German research institution will invest more than $35 million in creating tenure-track positions for female scientists.
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The Scientist RSS
New Insights into Tardigrades Ability to Withstand Drying OutWater bears can reanimate after years of desiccation-and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.
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Big Think
Should You Skip Breakfast? It Depends on Your Weight There are all kinds of new diets out there where one skips meals, intermittently fasts, or only eats between certain hours. These have been hailed for weight loss. But does it work for everyone? The most common meal to omit is breakfast. Yet, the research conducted so far has conflicting results as to whether or not this is a good idea. One study found that skipping breakfast increases the risk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Student entrepreneurs develop device to combat gender violence Lena McDonnell '17, Lehigh University computer science and engineering. Credit: Lehigh Univeristy As many as one-third of the world's women, says Lena McDonnell '17, a Lehigh University computer science and engineering major, will be the victims of sexual assault at some point during their lives. The regions of the world where sexual violence is most prevalent, she adds, are often the regions whe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California wind, and fire danger, hits unprecedented high (Update) Homes stand along the beach as the sun is visible through thick smoke from a wildfire Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Ventura, Calif. A dramatic new wildfire erupted in Los Angeles early Wednesday as firefighters battled three other destructive blazes across Southern California. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Southern California has felt yellow wind, orange wind, and red wind. But never purple wind. Until no
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seeing through walls of unknown materialsResearchers have devised a way to see through walls without any advance knowledge of what the walls are made out of. Besides having obvious applications in the realm of security, the approach could lead to inexpensive devices to help construction workers easily locate conduits, pipes and wires.
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Live Science
Blood Red Skies Over China Explained 300 Years Later On Sept. 10, 1770, the skies above China, Korea and Japan turned an eerie red, and for eight more nights these glowing red auroras lingered. For nearly three centuries, this mysterious event was lost to history. Now, researchers poring through palace diaries and other historical documents from East Asia have rediscovered the bizarre phenomenon, and have proposed a likely cause: A giant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's CATS concludes successful mission on space station CATS observed part of a plume streaming on July 11, 2015 from the Raung Volcano on the Indonesian island of Java. The top image was taken by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite. The red line shows where, less than an hour after Suomi NPP passed over, CATS scanned a vertical slice through the atmosphere (bottom image). CATS observed this plume after dar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees sees Ockhi's Rain reach India's Western coastNASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM Core Observatory satellite passed over western India on December 5, 2017 at (12:21 a.m. EST) 0521 UTC and found that the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Ockhi has reached the coast.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees sees Ockhi's Rain reach India's Western coast NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM Core Observatory satellite passed over western India on December 5, 2017 at (12:21 a.m. EST) 0521 UTC and found that the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Ockhi has reached the coast. GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments showed precipitation from dissipating tropical cyclone. GPM's radar (DPR
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study: Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have found a two-way link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intestinal changes. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage. This is the first study to find that TBI in mice can trigger delayed, long-term changes in the colon and that subsequent bacterial
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's CATS concludes successful mission on space station A spaceborne lidar instrument that fired more laser pulses than any previous orbiting instrument has ended its operations on the International Space Station, after a successful 33-month mission to measure clouds and tiny atmospheric particles that play key roles in Earth's climate and weather. During its mission, NASA's Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) lidar provided measurements of the vert
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals significant role of dust in mountain ecosystems Lindsay Arvin, a University of Wyoming master's degree student from Chicago majoring in geology and geophysics, was the lead author of a paper, titled "Global Patterns of Dust and Bedrock Nutrient Supply to Montane Ecoystems," that was published in Science Advances . Here, Arvin samples pine needles in the Sierra Nevada to be analyzed for the fraction of nutrients derived from dust. Arvin took al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seeing through walls of unknown materials IMAGE: A view of a microwave scan of a typical wall interior before and after distortions have been removed. By taking into account the types of distortions typically created by flat,... view more Credit: Daniel Marks, Duke University DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke University have devised a way to see through walls using a narrow band of microwave frequencies without any advance know
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals significant role of dust in mountain ecosystems Trees growing atop the Bald Mountain Granite in the southern Sierra Nevada rely on nutrients from windblown atmospheric dust -- more than 50 percent -- compared to nutrients provided from underlying bedrock. University of Wyoming researchers led a study that found this surprising result by measuring the isotopes of neodymium in the bedrock, soil, dust and pine needles in living trees. Using this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UChicago scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published online Nov. 30, University of Chicago researchers announced the first confirmed method to craft such a molecular chain. Many molecules described as "linked" are joined with fixed covalent bonds--not two freely moving interlocked rings. The dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guide: How science academies can support the sustainable development goals The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) whose realization will require expertise from many sectors, including science, engineering, and medicine. Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals: A Guide for Merit-Based Academies, a new publication from the InterAcademy Partnership, explains why and how academies around the globe
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Farthest monster black hole found Image copyright Robin Dienel Image caption Quasars are some of the brightest objects in the Universe Astronomers have discovered the most distant "supermassive" black hole known to science. The matter-munching sinkhole is a whopping 13 billion light-years away, so far that we see it as it was a mere 690 million years after the Big Bang. But at about 800 million times the mass of our Sun, it manag
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeing through walls of unknown materials A view of a microwave scan of the Duke logo taken through a wall before and after distortions have been removed. By taking into account the types of distortions typically created by flat, uniform walls, the new algorithm allows for better scans without needing to know what the wall is made of beforehand. Credit: Daniel Marks, Duke University Researchers at Duke University have devised a way to se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow Human TRPM4 bound with the agonist Ca+ and modulator DVT at 3.8 Å. Credit: Wei Lü, Ph.D. A team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Called TRPM4, this protein is found in tissues throughout the body, including the brain, heart, kidney
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SuperTIGER balloon flies again to study heavy cosmic particles On Dec. 1, SuperTIGER was brought onto the deck of Payload Building 2 at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, to test communications in preparation for its second flight. Mount Erebus, the southernmost active volcano on Earth, appears in the background. Credit: NASA/Jason Link A science team in Antarctica is preparing to loft a balloon-borne instrument to collect information on cosmic rays, high-energy p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drones more damaging than bird strikes to planes, study findsA new study focused on unmanned aerial systems is helping quantify the dangers associated with drones sharing airspace with planes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate modelExtreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming and will likely increase in frequency, warn scientists. Their model showed that the burning of fossil fuels since 1860 would lead to an increase in the destructive storms in the Arabian Sea by 2015, marking one of the first times that modeled projections have synchronized with real observati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High prevalence of bacteria that carry gene mcr-1 in ecosystem, study showsBacteria that carry the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 commonly exist in human and various types of food and environmental samples collected from Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland. The prevalence of mcr-1 in our ecosystem challenges the role of colistin as the last resort antibiotic to treat infections caused by carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE genePeople who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Now, researchers have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta. The findings indicate that APOE could potentially be a real target for treatment or prevention.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
West coast earthquake early warning system continues progress toward public use Credit: CC0 Public Domain A decade after beginning work on an earthquake early warning system, scientists and engineers are fine-tuning a U.S. West Coast prototype that could be in limited public use in 2018. In two papers published December 6 in Seismological Research Letters , researchers describe the key components and testing platform for the prototype ShakeAlert system, now being tested in C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotech DNA, present in almost every cell, is increasingly being used as a building material to construct tiny, but sophisticated structures such as autonomous 'DNA walkers' that can move along a microparticle surface, fluorescent labels for diagnostic applications, 'DNA boxes' that serve as smart drug-delivery vehicles programmed to open up at disease sites to release their therapeutic content, or progr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding long strands of RNA in skin development and disease Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how unusually long pieces of RNA work in skin cells. The RNA pieces, called "long non-coding RNAs" or "lncRNAs," help skin cells modulate connective tissue proteins, like collagen, and could represent novel therapeutic targets to promote skin repair. In a recent Frontiers Genetics study, researchers identified s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Parents' reports of children's autism symptoms differ by race ATLANTA--Racial differences in parents' reports of concerns about their child's development to healthcare providers may contribute to delayed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in black children, according to a study led by Georgia State University. The study found that compared to white parents, black parents reported significantly fewer concerns related to symptoms of ASD in their chil
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Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease IMAGE: This is a profile pic of Al La Spada. view more Credit: Duke Department of Neurology A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer may also be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, according to a new study in the latest issue of Science Translational Medicine . The same study also increases our understanding of how this drug, and other medications like it, may offer hop
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's SuperTIGER balloon flies again to study heavy cosmic particles A science team in Antarctica is preparing to loft a balloon-borne instrument to collect information on cosmic rays, high-energy particles from beyond the solar system that enter Earth's atmosphere every moment of every day. The instrument, called the Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (SuperTIGER), is designed to study rare heavy nuclei, which hold clues about where and how cosmic rays at
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Popular Science
Cuddling up may keep red-bellied lemurs healthy Most microbes are good at spreading themselves around. That’s how viruses like the flu can infect a classroom full of kids, or even an entire office staff. But not all microbes are dangerous pathogens. In fact, some are pretty beneficial, if not crucial to our health and survival. That’s especially true for many of the microbes living in our digestive system, what scientists call the gut microbio
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Popular Science
Facebook Messenger Kids probably won't ruin your children Earlier this week, I downloaded the new Facebook Messenger Kids app onto my daughter’s phone. The app is aimed at kids between 6 and 12 years old and offers a chat-based experience with none of the advertising or traditional social media elements of the full Facebook. My daughter is near the top of that age range, but I added her as a contact and she requested I let her connect with one of her fr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CLOCK gene may hold answers to human brain evolutionA gene controlling our biological clocks plays a vital role in regulating human-specific genes important to brain evolution. These findings open new paths of research into how CLOCK proteins produced by the CLOCK gene affect brain function and the processes by which neurons find their proper place in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
United States has lost dominance in highly intense, ultrafast laser technology to Europe and Asia, new report findsThe U.S. is losing ground in a second laser revolution of highly intense, ultrafast lasers that have broad applications in manufacturing, medicine, and national security, says a new report. Currently, 80 percent to 90 percent of the high-intensity laser systems are overseas, and all of the highest power research lasers currently in construction or already built are overseas as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's good to be rare, for some speciesFor many species, rarity is not a guarantee of impending extinction. Instead, the traits that enable some species to be rare may hold the ticket to their survival. A new paper predicts what these traits might be and how having them could place chronically rare species at an advantage during crises.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlling spin for memory storageResearchers have learned how to manipulation of a material's magnetism, making room for faster magnetic memory devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What's that smell? The advantage of sniffingBreathe in through your nose, and chances are you will feel the air coming in and also smell something nearby. Researchers have discovered how these sensations are kept separate and why sniffing can help identify odors, two problems that have puzzled scientists for years. The study used a system in mice that systematically controls airflow and odor delivery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychosis incidence highly variable internationallyRates of psychosis can be close to eight times higher in some regions compared to others, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioelectronic 'nose' can detect food spoilage by sensing the smell of deathStrong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano, researchers have developed a bioelectronic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow IMAGE: Human TRPM4 bound with the agonist Ca+ and modulator DVT at 3.8 Å. view more Credit: Courtesy of Wei Lü, Ph.D. GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Dec. 6, 2017)--A team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. Called TRPM4, this protein is f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function HOUSTON-(Dec. 6, 2017) - The Houston Methodist Research Institute is making mini brains from human stem cells that put researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Houston Methodist neuroscientist Robert Krencik, Ph.D., and his team have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers found a security flaw that had 10 million banking app users at risk Researchers from the University of Birmingham have developed a tool to perform semi-automated security testing of mobile phone apps. After running the tool on a sample of 400 security critical apps, they were able to identify a critical vulnerability in banking apps; including apps from HSBC, NatWest, Co-op and Bank of America Health. This vulnerability allowed an attacker, who is connected to th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Smarter Management Means More Inventions Get to Market “In the United States we spend about $160 billion a year on R&D . And so for the last 7 years we’ve spent about a trillion dollars. With about 250,000 inventions that are sitting on the shelf that have more than 13 years of patent life, and only 0.5 to 0.7 percent of the inventions that are federally funded get out a year. So, what does that mean, get out? That they’re actually commercialized—the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heavy metal: How first supernovae altered early star formationAn international team of researchers ran multi-scale, multi-physics 2-D and 3-D simulations to illustrate how heavy metals expelled from exploding supernovae held the first stars in the universe regulate subsequent star formation and influence the appearance of galaxies in the process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some video games are good for older adults' brainsPlaying 3D-platform video games on a regular basis may improve cognitive functions in seniors and increase grey matter in a brain structure called the hippocampus, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key to curing cirrhosisThe unique liver function of a South American amphibian, Siphonops annulatus, could pave the way to finding a cure to the devastating liver condition cirrhosis, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dwarf Mongooses Struggle to Fit In and Dig In Dwarf Mongooses Struggle to Fit In and Dig In These mammals cannot eat a lot of food when they are on their own, and spend months integrating into new groups before gaining weight. Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now! Dwarf Mongooses Struggle to Fit In and Dig In These mammals cannot eat
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BBC News - Science & Environment
A closer look at '3.67m-year-old' skeletonIt took 20 years to excavate, clean and put together Little Foot, found in caves north of Johannesburg.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
West coast earthquake early warning system continues progress toward public use A decade after beginning work on an earthquake early warning system, scientists and engineers are fine-tuning a U.S. West Coast prototype that could be in limited public use in 2018. In two papers published December 6 in Seismological Research Letters , researchers describe the key components and testing platform for the prototype ShakeAlert system, now being tested in California, Oregon and Wash
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Invasive 'supervillain' crab can eat through its gillsInvasive green shore crabs can 'eat' by absorbing nutrients across its gills -- the first demonstration of this ability in crustaceans -- scientists have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Abnormal electrocardiogram findings are common in NBA playersAbout 1 in 5 professional basketball players had abnormalities on their electrocardiograms (ECGs), some but not all of which were explained by changes in the shape and size of their hearts as a result of athletic training.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Go with the flow (or against it)Researchers are using magnetic fields to influence a specific type of bacteria to swim against strong currents, opening up the potential of using the microscopic organisms for drug delivery in environments with complex microflows- - like the human bloodstream.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotech (BOSTON) --DNA, present in almost every cell, is increasingly being used as a building material to construct tiny, but sophisticated structures such as autonomous 'DNA walkers' that can move along a microparticle surface, fluorescent labels for diagnostic applications, 'DNA boxes' that serve as smart drug-delivery vehicles programmed to open up at disease sites to release their therapeutic co
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why the Ventura Wildfire Is So Explosive A disastrous combination of tinder-dry vegetation, the strongest Santa Ana winds in a decade and a spark caused a wildfire to explode in Ventura County, California, north of Los Angeles, overnight Monday (Dec. 4). Less than 24 hours later, the blaze had torn through more than 45,000 acres and destroyed 150 structures, with windy conditions hampering efforts to combat the flames. While not unp
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: This Duck-Like Dinosaur Could Swim. That Isn’t the Strangest Thing About it. Photo The fossilized Halszkaraptor escuillei, a rare semiaquatic dinosaur related to the velociraptor. Researchers believe it was able to swim, but don’t yet know how. Credit Pierre Jayet/European Synchotron Radiation Facility If it looked like a duck, did it swim like a duck? Paleontologists studying an unusual fossil have identified a new dinosaur, related to the velociraptor, that had a neck l
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The Atlantic
Taylor Swift and Beyoncé Speak Through—Not to—the Media Taylor Swift stares defiantly from the cover of her album Reputation , newsprint scrawled on the side. Taken together, the image and the title are a taunt to the media, to whom she hasn’t given any interviews about the album . This week, though, Taylor Swift stares out from the covers of two mega-famous magazines: the Person-of-the-Year issue of Time , and the U.K. edition of Vogue . Both are str
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Google's 'superhuman' DeepMind AI claims chess crown Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Alpha Go Zero was more successful at playing with white pieces than black Google says its AlphaGo Zero artificial intelligence program has triumphed at chess against world-leading specialist software within hours of teaching itself the game from scratch. The firm's DeepMind division says that it played 100 games against Stockfish 8, and won or drew all o
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New on MIT Technology Review
It’s Recruiting Season for AI’s Top Talent, and Things Are Getting a Little Zany During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lyft puts driverless cars to work in BostonLyft on Wednesday began rolling out self-driving cars with users of the smartphone-summoned ride service in Boston in a project with technology partner nuTonomy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model Cyclone Chapala over the Gulf of Aden Nov. 2, 2015. Credit: NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response Researchers from Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report in the journal Nature Climate Change that extreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming and will likely increase
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite tracking provides clues about South Atlantic sea turtles' 'lost years' South Atlantic sea turtles do not passively ride prevailing currents as historically assumed, but instead actively swim and orient to keep themselves offshore. Depending on whether they hatch early, in the middle or late in the sea turtle hatching season, they travel in different and sometimes opposite directions, including into the Northern Hemisphere. Credit: Projeto TAMAR A University of Centr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How does it look when Earth is bombarded with dark matter?A whole lot of zig-zagging: Perhaps that is what happens when the universe's mysterious dark matter particles hit the Earth. Researchers can now show through simulations how it might look.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning beer into fuelChemists have made the first steps towards making sustainable fuel using beer as a key ingredient, outlines a new report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests While California spotted owls (left, adult; right, juvenile) typically perch and roost in smaller trees like this incense cedar, their nest trees are often several feet in diameter. Credit: Danny Hofstadter Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the
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New Scientist - News
Gruesome eyeball wounds patched up with squirt of smart glue Plugging the hole now could save problems later KeystoneUSA-ZUMA/REX/Shutterstock By Andy Coghlan A smart glue may safely fill cuts in the outer eyeball in emergency situations, keeping the wound safe until proper treatment is available. In battlefield situations or remote locations, people who sustain eyeball injuries may not be able to find someone capable of the skilled microsurgery they n
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When a common cold may trigger early supportive care IMAGE: Geovanny Perez, M.D., a specialist in pulmonary medicine at Children's National and lead study author. view more Credit: Children's National Health System Human rhinovirus (HRV), the culprit behind most colds, is the leading cause of hospitalization for premature babies. However, in very preterm children, exactly how HRV causes severe respiratory disease -- and which patients may nee
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DNA-origami surpasses important thresholds IMAGE: In a first step scientists at the Technical University of Munich form V-shaped building blocks using DNA-origami techniques. Determined by the opening angle a defined number of building blocks self-assemble... view more Credit: Hendrik Dietz / TUM It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz
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Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests MADISON, Wis. -- Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the journal Diversity and Distributions by University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to prot
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Satellite tracking provides clues about South Atlantic sea turtles' 'lost years' A University of Central Florida biologist whose groundbreaking work tracking the movements of sea turtle yearlings in the North Atlantic Ocean attracted international attention has completed a similar study in the South Atlantic with surprising results. South Atlantic sea turtles do not passively ride prevailing currents as historically assumed, but instead actively swim and orient to keep themse
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Some video games are good for older adults' brainsPlaying 3-D platform video games on a regular basis may improve cognitive functions in seniors and increase grey matter in a brain structure called the hippocampus, an Université de Montréal study suggests.
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Dangers of commonly prescribed painkillers highlighted in study Commonly prescribed painkillers need to be given for shorter periods of time to reduce the risk of obesity and sleep deprivation, a new study has revealed. Over the past 10 years, there has been a large increase in the prescription of medications such as opioids and some antidepressants for chronic pain management. Experts at Newcastle University, UK, have today published a study in the academic
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A new gene therapy transplantation technique could improve treatment of neurodegenerative diseases Immune cells defending the central nervous system (the so-called microglia) have a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases. A study published today in Science Advances shows for the first time the efficacy of a new gene therapy transplantation technique which aims at repopulating the brain with new, genetically engineered immune cells. Such cells are generated by progenitors which are injecte
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Combating eye injuries with a reversible superglue seal IMAGE: Scientists and engineers at USC have developed an on-the-spot, temperature-sensitive gel that could seal eye injuries on the battlefield. view more Credit: N. Bayat et al., Science Translational Medicine (2017) LOS ANGELES - When a soldier sustains a traumatic eye injury on the battlefield, any delay in treatment may lead to permanent vision loss. With medical facilities potentia
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Clinical trial shows therapeutic HIV vaccination doesn't lead to viral suppression A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial found no benefit for a therapeutic HIV vaccine, but could offer researchers much needed insights for future cure efforts. The authors say their results represent yet another addition to the burgeoning body of evidence that therapeutic vaccination fails to help patients suppress HIV in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Althou
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Diabetes drug metformin inhibits multidrug-resistant breast cancer The drug metformin, typically prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes, keeps breast cancer cells from developing multiple drug resistance (MDR) and can reverse MDR after it¹s appeared, according to a study published December 6, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Terra Arnason from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and colleagues. Previous studies have shown that metformin has some an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaurA well-preserved dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia unites an unexpected combination of features that defines a new group of semi-aquatic predators related to Velociraptor. Detailed 3-D synchrotron analysis allowed an international team of researchers to present the bizarre 75-million-year-old predator, named Halszkaraptor escuilliei. The study not only describes a new genus and species of bird-like
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bathNew research suggests that the bulk of clay minerals on Mars could have been formed as the planet's crust cooled and solidified, not by later interactions with water on the surface as has long been assumed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solvedScientists have discovered that microbes in Antarctica have a previously unknown ability to scavenge hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the air to stay alive in the extreme conditions. The find has implications for the search for life on other planets, suggesting extraterrestrial microbes could also rely on trace atmospheric gases for survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ALMA finds massive primordial galaxies swimming in vast ocean of dark matterNew observations push back the epoch of massive-galaxy formation even further by identifying two giant galaxies seen when the universe was only 780 million years old, or about 5 percent its current age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The world's smallest Mona LisaNew techniques in DNA self-assembly allow researchers to create the largest to-date customizable patterns with nanometer precision on a budget.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ modelsA team of researchers has 3-D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn expertsAir pollution from road traffic is having a detrimental impact upon babies' health in London, before they are born, finds a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood test could help predict skin cancer's returnTesting skin cancer patients' blood for tumor DNA could help predict the chances of an aggressive cancer returning, scientists have discovered.
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Science | The Guardian
Women harmed because vaginal mesh regulation 'not fit for purpose' Women have been exposed to unnecessary harm due to poor regulation for vaginal mesh products, medical experts have warned. The team, from the University of Oxford, have called for clinical trials to be made mandatory for invasive medical devices and for a registry to be created in response to the vaginal mesh scandal . Prof Carl Heneghan at Oxford’s Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, who led the
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Alphabet's Latest AI Show Pony Has More Than One Trick The history of artificial intelligence is a procession of one-trick ponies. Over decades researchers have crafted a series of super-specialized programs to beat humans at tougher and tougher games. They conquered tic-tac-toe, checkers, and chess. Most recently, Alphabet’s DeepMind research group shocked the world with a program called AlphaGo that mastered the Chinese board game Go. But each of t
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Feed: All Latest
The Wikipedia Competitor That's Harnessing Blockchain For Epistemological Supremacy At the time of this writing, the opening sentence of Larry Sanger’s Everipedia entry is pretty close to his Wikipedia entry. It describes him as “an American Internet project developer … best known as co-founder of Wikipedia.” By the time you read this, however, it may well mention a new, more salient fact—that Sanger recently became the Chief Information Officer of Everipedia itself, a site that
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Viden
Danske mødre skal hjælpe resten af verden med amning Mødre i Danmark er gode til at amme. De er sunde. Og de spiser godt og varieret, så modermælken er nærende. Sådan er det langt fra alle steder i verden. Man kunne hvert år redde 820.000 babyer fra at dø, hvis de alle blev ammet lige så effektivt som i Danmark. Det anslår Verdenssundhedsorganisationen WHO . Vi får også en bedre forståelse for, hvordan modermælk påvirker børnene og deres trivsel Ki
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The Scientist RSS
The Biggest DNA Origami Structures YetThree new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Oldest Supermassive Black Hole Found from Universe's Infancy Astronomers have discovered the oldest supermassive black hole ever found—a behemoth that grew to 800 million times the mass of the sun when the universe was just 5 percent of its current age, a new study finds. This newfound giant black hole, which formed just 690 million years after the Big Bang , could one day help shed light on a number of cosmic mysteries, such as how black holes could h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension People who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to a team of researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading. In a study, a group of adult readers who frequently used electronic devices were significantly less successful
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model IMAGE: Cyclone Chapala over the Gulf of Aden Nov. 2, 2015. view more Credit: (NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response) Researchers from Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report in the journal Nature Climate Change that extreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming a
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CLOCK gene may hold answers to human brain evolution IMAGE: This cluster of human neurons grown in culture shows red cells with altered CLOCK levels migrating farther than control green cells. The image is part of a study demonstrating that... view more Credit: UTSW DALLAS - Dec. 6, 2017 - Scientists have long sought to unravel the molecular mysteries that make the human brain special: What processes drove its evolution through the millennia? Which
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The Atlantic
2017 in Photos: A Look at the Middle Months As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2017. Among the events covered in this essay (the second of a three-part photo summary of the year): Hurricane Harvey hits Texas, France elects a new president, wildfires rage in Portugal and in California, white nationalists hold a torchlight march at the University of Virginia, a total
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The Atlantic
Does She's Gotta Have It Live Up to Its Promise? In his 1986 film She’s Gotta Have It, Spike Lee imagined the life of a fictional young, independent, polyamorous, black woman living in Brooklyn and trying to navigate relationships, work, and adult life on her own terms. Now, more than 30 years later, Lee has rebooted the story as a 10-episode series for Netflix. The plot follows the original movie closely, centering on Nola Darling (DeWanda Wis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UAE launches programme to send astronauts into space Dubai's ruler on Wednesday launched the United Arab Emirates' first space programme aimed at sending four Emirati astronauts to the International Space Station within five years. "On this day, a new chapter in our history begins with the launch of the first UAE Astronaut Programme," within the next five years, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashed Al-Maktoum, the UAE's vice president and prime minister, sai
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer'sUsing a bioinformatics and experimental approach, scientists have found that rendering mitochondria resistant to damage can halt diseases caused by amyloid toxicity, such as Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurateThe climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate, according to a article. Their findings suggest that the models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, on average, may be underestimating future warming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universeA team of astronomers has detected the most distant supermassive black hole ever observed. The black hole sits in the center of an ultrabright quasar and presents a puzzle as to how such a huge object could have grown so quickly.
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Researchers model optimal amount of rainfall for plants CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers have determined what could be considered a "Goldilocks" climate for rainfall use by plants: not too wet and not too dry. But those landscapes are likely to shrink and become less productive in the future through climate change, said Stephen Good, a hydrologist at Oregon State University and lead author on a recent study, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Ev
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Unique field survey yields first big-picture view of deep-sea food webs IMAGE: his complex food web shows groups of animals (indicated by different colored circles and lines) that were observed eating each other during MBARI remotely operated vehicle dives. Thicker lines indicate... view more Credit: © 2017 MBARI MOSS LANDING, CA--Deep-sea animals have been systematically studied for over 100 years, yet scientists are still learning about what many of these anima
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Science : NPR
Can Science Teach Us Something About How To Live? Trial and error, experimentation, the understanding that some questions have complex answers or no answers at all, the notion that failure teaches, the acceptance that mistakes can actually guide you in the right direction, persistence in the face of difficulty: These are some of the everyday components of scientific research, accumulated wisdom that can serve us well in many walks of life — from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique field survey yields first big-picture view of deep-sea food webs his complex food web shows groups of animals (indicated by different colored circles and lines) that were observed eating each other during MBARI remotely operated vehicle dives. Thicker lines indicate more commonly observed predator/prey interactions. Credit: © 2017 MBARI Deep-sea animals have been systematically studied for over 100 years, yet scientists are still learning about what many of th
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Popular Science
Local knowledge can save endangered animals F rom knowing where animals live, to which plants provide what medicinal benefits, communities around the world hold expert levels of knowledge on their local environments. In general, scientific investigations provide precise and measurable information, collected over short amounts of time. But this “local ecological knowledge” is made up of observations collected over very long time periods, wh
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This new dinosaur species was one odd duck It may have walked like a duck and swum like a penguin, but a flipper-limbed creature discovered in what is now Mongolia was no bird. The strange new species is the first known nonavian dinosaur that could both run and swim, researchers say. To compensate for a long swanlike neck, probably used for dipping underwater for fish, this dino’s center of mass shifted toward its hips, allowing it to sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here are your options if YouTube vanishes from Amazon gizmos This Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, file photo shows an Amazon Fire TV streaming device with its remote control. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, Google announced plans to pull its popular YouTube video service from Amazon's Fire TV and Echo Show devices in an escalating feud that has caught consumers in the crossfire. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) Attention Fire TV owners: YouTube might soon disappear f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New report: US has lost dominance in highly intense, ultrafast laser technology to Europe and Asia The U.S. is losing ground in a second laser revolution of highly intense, ultrafast lasers that have broad applications in manufacturing, medicine, and national security, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Currently, 80 percent to 90 percent of the high-intensity laser systems are overseas, and all of the highest power research lasers currently i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wheat gets boost from purified nanotubes Purified single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in water promoted greater plant growth (center) than the nanomaterial-free control (left) after eight days of an experiment at Rice University. Feeding plants tetrahydrofuran with the nanotubes (right) produced the opposite effect, stunting plant growth. Credit: Pavan Raja/Rice University The introduction of purified carbon nanotubes appears to ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world's smallest Mona LisaNew techniques in DNA self-assembly allow researchers to create the largest to-date customizable patterns with nanometer precision on a budget.
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Supermassive black hole is ahead of its time The discovery of an extremely distant supermassive black hole, with a mass some 800 million times that of our Sun is causing astronomers to re-think our understanding of the early cosmos. Researchers report that this is the most distant giant black hole ever detected, and at this distance, our Universe was only about 5% of its current age, or about 690 million years after the Big Bang.
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ALMA finds massive primordial galaxies swimming in vast ocean of dark matter Astronomers expect that the first galaxies, those that formed just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, would share many similarities with some of the dwarf galaxies we see in the nearby universe today. These early agglomerations of a few billion stars would then become the building blocks of the larger galaxies that came to dominate the universe after the first few billion years. Ongo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universe CAMBRIDGE, MA -- A team of astronomers, including two from MIT, has detected the most distant supermassive black hole ever observed. The black hole sits in the center of an ultrabright quasar, the light of which was emitted just 690 million years after the Big Bang. That light has taken about 13 billion years to reach us -- a span of time that is nearly equal to the age of the universe. The
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More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate IMAGE: Climate model simulations are used to predict how much warming should be expected for any given increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. New... view more Credit: Public domain Washington, DC-- The climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate, acc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Found: The most distant supermassive black hole ever observed IMAGE: Artist's conceptions of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. It is surrounded by neutral... view more Credit: Illustration by Robin Dienel, courtesy of Carnegie Institution for Science. Pasadena, CA -- A team of astronomers led by Carnegie's Eduardo Bañados used Carnegie's Magellan tele
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Gargantua in the mist: A precocious black hole behemoth at the edge of cosmic dawn IMAGE: The black hole resides in a mostly neutral universe, 690 million years after the Big Bang, at a time when the first galaxies were appearing. view more Credit: Image by Robin Dienel, courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science Supermassive black holes lurk at the centers of many galaxies. While some -- like the black hole at the center of our own Galaxy -- live quiet live
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Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's IMAGE: Whole-brain hemisphere sections of Alzheimer's mice, the model APP/PSEN1, before and after treatment with the NAD+ booster Nicotinamide riboside (NR). The beta-amyloid plaque content in the brain of the APP/PSEN1... view more Credit: Vincenzo Sorrentino, Mario Romani, Francesca Potenza/EPFL. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and neurodegeneration worldwide. A ma
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Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaur IMAGE: Reconstruction of Halszkaraptor escuilliei (by Lukas Panzarin, scientific supervision by Andrea Cau). This small dinosaur was a close relative of Velociraptor, but in both body shape and inferred lifestyle it much closely... view more Credit: Lukas Panzarin and Andrea Cau for scientific supervision An exceptionally well-preserved dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia unites an unex
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Study shows first extensive and stable microbiome remodeling via B. infantis in infants Evolve BioSystems, Inc. today announced positive results from their landmark clinical trial in support of Evivo™, an activated form of the beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ( B. infantis EVC001, ActiBif®). The study showed that providing dietary B. infantis EVC001 resulted in rapid, substantial, and persistent remodeling of the gut microbiome in breastfed infants. This st
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Clean energy: Experts outline how governments can successfully invest before it's too late Governments need to give technical experts more autonomy and hold their nerve to provide more long-term stability when investing in clean energy, argue researchers in climate change and innovation policy in a new paper published today. Writing in the journal Nature , the authors from UK and US institutions have set out guidelines for investment based on an analysis of the last twenty years of "
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Needle in a haystack Clearing a major hurdle in the field of microbiome research, Harvard Medical School scientists have designed and successfully used a method to tease out cause-and-effect relationships between gut bacteria and disease. Reporting Dec. 6 in Nature , the team says the approach could propel research beyond mere microbiome-disease associations and elucidate true cause-effect relationships. The experime
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Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath IMAGE: Mars may have been enveloped in a thick, steamy atmosphere as the planet's crust cooled and solidified. That steam bath could have created many of the clay mineral deposits that... view more Credit: Kevin Cannon PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Planetary scientists from Brown University have proposed a new scenario for the formation of ancient clay minerals on Mars that, if shown
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solved IMAGE: Adams Flat, one of the two sites in Antarctica where microbes were collected. view more Credit: Credit: Phil O'Brien UNSW-Sydney led scientists have discovered that microbes in Antarctica have a previously unknown ability to scavenge hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the air to stay alive in the extreme conditions. The find has implications for the search for life on other
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly discovered Goliath galaxies from early universe hint at massive dark matter trove IMAGE: Two titanic galaxies inhabited the early universe just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, as seen in this illustration. The larger of the pair, right, is the... view more Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; D. Berry New York City -- A newfound pair of galaxies from the early universe is so massive that it nearly breaks the current understanding of how the cosmos evolved. The larger
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Probiotic gets a boost from breast milk Washington, DC - Dec. 6, 2017 - Supplementation with probiotics can improve a person's gut health, but the benefits are often fleeting, and colonization by the probiotic's good microbes usually doesn't last. Breast milk may help sustain those colonies in the long run, say researchers at the University of California, Davis. In a study out this week in mSphere , they report that breastfeeding babie
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New on MIT Technology Review
Global Warming’s Worst-Case Projections Look Increasingly Likely Global warming’s worst-case projections look increasingly likely, according to a new study that tested the predictive power of climate models against observations of how the atmosphere is actually behaving. The paper , published on Wednesday in Nature , found that global temperatures could rise nearly 5 °C by the end of the century under the the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's stee
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teensChronic sleep deprivation -- which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school -- has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental health risks: new research finds that for teenagers, even a short period of sleep restriction could, ove
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioidsAs the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors -- and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US and Norwegian trials compare treatment options for opioid dependenceThe current opioid epidemic is destroying lives, families, and communities. Medication is widely considered to be the most effective treatment, but far too few people who could benefit are actually treated.
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The Atlantic
Apparently This Is What a Swimming Dinosaur Looks Like At first, the fossil was smuggled out of Mongolia, as many dinosaurs are . It found its way to Japan, then Britain, then France. In 2015, the private collector who finally bought it contacted the paleontologist Pascal Godefroit to get his opinion on the specimen. Godefroit’s opinion was: This is one weird dinosaur. The creature was clearly a small predator, much like Velociraptor . Its feet even
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The Atlantic
The Most Distant Supermassive Black Hole Ever Discovered Scientists searching for astronomical objects in the early universe, not long after the Big Bang, have made a record-breaking, two-for-one discovery. Using ground-based telescopes, a team of astronomers have discovered the most distant supermassive black hole ever found. The black hole has a mass 800 million times greater than our sun, which earns it the “supermassive” classification reserved for
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New Scientist - News
US cyberweapons have been stolen and there’s nothing we can do Weaknesses are everywhere Mel Evans/AP/REX/Sutterstock By Douglas Heaven US INTELLIGENCE agencies have been looking pretty stupid recently. Since last year, a group called the Shadow Brokers has been releasing cyberweapons stolen from the US National Security Agency. The WannaCry ransomware attack that knocked out computers across the world and shut down UK hospitals earlier this year, was po
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New Scientist - News
The usual way of hunting dark matter may be all wrong Dark among the light? Ixstudio/Alamy By Leah Crane WHAT if we’ve been hunting for dark matter in the wrong place? If the particles are small and interact even slightly with normal matter, we may be able to spot them above ground. Dark matter detectors are usually placed deep in mine shafts so the rock above will deflect unwanted background radiation while allowing the passage of weakly intera
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New Scientist - News
Most distant quasar ever seen is way too big for our universe Quasars – discs of gas around supermassive black holes – are incredibly bright Mark Garlick/Science Photo Library By Leah Crane A quasar has been spotted 13 billion years away from us. It’s the farthest one we’ve ever seen, and it already existed 690 million years after the birth of the universe. Finding a quasar – a supermassive black hole with a bright disc of material circling it – from so
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Science | The Guardian
Smuggled fossil 'very weird' new species of amphibious dinosaur, say experts An unusual set of fossilised remains illegally poached from Mongolia belonged to a new species of dinosaur with the rare trait of living on both land and water, researchers have claimed. Thought to have lived around 71–75m years ago, the creature boasts a swan-like neck, razor-sharp “killer claws” on its feet, a duck-billed snout and forelimbs with proportions that might have helped it swim. Have
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Science : NPR
Massive Black Hole Reveals When The First Stars Blinked On An artist's conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature hide caption toggle caption Robin Dienel/Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science/Nature An artist's conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever dis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists 'paint' the world's smallest Mona Lisa on the world's largest DNA canvas DNA rendering of the Mona Lisa viewed with atomic force microscopy. Credit: Qian laboratory In 2006, Caltech's Paul Rothemund (BS '94)—now research professor of bioengineering, computing and mathematical sciences, and computation and neural systems—developed a method to fold a long strand of DNA into a prescribed shape. The technique, dubbed DNA origami, enabled scientists to create self-assembli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaur Reconstruction of Halszkaraptor escuilliei (by Lukas Panzarin, scientific supervisionby Andrea Cau). This small dinosaur was a close relative of Velociraptor, but in bothbody shape and inferred lifestyle it much closely recalls some waterbirds like modernswans. Credit: Lukas Panzarin and Andrea Cau An exceptionally well-preserved dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia unites an unexpected combination of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Living on thin air—microbe mystery solved Adams Flat, one of the two sites in Antarctica where microbes were collected. Credit: Phil O'Brien UNSW-Sydney led scientists have discovered that microbes in Antarctica have a previously unknown ability to scavenge hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the air to stay alive in the extreme conditions. The find has implications for the search for life on other planets, suggesting extra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath Mars may have been enveloped in a thick, steamy atmosphere as the planet's crust cooled and solidified. That steam bath could have created many of the clay mineral deposits that have long been attributed to water flow on or just beneath the surface. Credit: Kevin Cannon Planetary scientists from Brown University have proposed a new scenario for the formation of ancient clay minerals on Mars that,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universe Artist's conceptions of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. It is surrounded by neutral hydrogen, indicating that it is from the period called the epoch of reionization, when the universe's first light sources turned on. Credit: Robin Dienel, Carnegie Institution for Science A team of astronomers, incl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate: study Climate model simulations are used to predict how much warming should be expected for any given increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. New work from Carnegie's Ken Caldeira and Patrick Brown indicates that the climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate. C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ALMA finds massive primordial galaxies swimming in vast ocean of dark matter A composite image showing ALMA data (red) of the two galaxies of SPT0311-58. These galaxies are shown over a background from the Hubble Space Telescope (blue and green). The ALMA data show the two galaxies' dusty glow. The image of the galaxy on the right is distorted by gravitational lensing. The nearer foreground lensing galaxy is the green object between the two galaxies imaged by ALMA. Credit
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Inside Science
Gargantuan Black Hole Discovered in the Young Universe Gargantuan Black Hole Discovered in the Young Universe The giant black hole is one of the biggest ever observed from this far back in time. Quasar_topNteaser.jpg Artist’s conception of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. Image credits: Robin Dienel, courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Spa
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The most distant quasar ever spotted hails from the universe’s infancy The most distant quasar yet spotted sends its light from the universe’s toddler years. The quasar, called J1342+0928, existed when the universe was only 690 million years old, right when the first stars and galaxies were forming. Quasars are bright disks of gas and dust swirling around supermassive black holes. The black hole that powers J1342+0928 has a mass equivalent to 800 million suns, and i
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The Atlantic
Common Misperceptions About the Human Body As it turns out, some widely-held ideas about the human body are flat-out wrong. In fact, many scientific discoveries in the 19th century made their way into 20th-century textbooks, but have since been disproven. In this episode of School Myths by The Atlantic , we explore some of the new discoveries that challenge conventional wisdom about the human body, including an erroneous map of the tongue
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes associated with progression of melanoma are identified When researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil treated human melanoma cell lines with a synthetic compound similar to curcumin, one of the pigments that give turmeric (Curcuma longa) its orange color, they identified genes with altered expression in potentially invasive tumors and malignant cells resistant to chemotherapy. According to the scientists, if further studies confirm
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Ingeniøren
Dansk undersøgelse: Antabus hjælper mod kræft Tidligere studier har vist, at disulfiram, det aktive stof i antabus, har potentiale som middel i kræftbehandling. En international forskergruppe ledet af Jiri Bartek fra Kræftens Bekæmpelses Center for Kræftforskning har testet den hypotese med brug af danske data. I en online artikel i Nature redegør de for et studie, der har omfattet 3.000 danskere i alderen 35-85 år, som fik deres første canc
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Quanta Magazine
Earliest Black Hole Gives Rare Glimpse of Ancient Universe Astronomers have at least two gnawing questions about the first billion years of the universe, an era steeped in literal fog and figurative mystery. They want to know what burned the fog away : stars, supermassive black holes, or both in tandem? And how did those behemoth black holes grow so big in so little time? Now the discovery of a supermassive black hole smack in the middle of this period i
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Ease Travel Anxiety I have a client—let’s call him Andre—who works hard all year at a demanding job. He could really use a vacation. But every year, he does the same thing. For one week in the middle of July, he goes to the same waterfront hotel about an hour’s drive from his home. He leaves the rest of his vacation time on the table. After many years of doing this, he’s let months and months of vacation time slip
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Live Science
They've Got Personality: Ant 'Superorganisms' Have Unique Temperaments Azteca ants on the trunk of the Cecropia tree. They live within its hollow segments and protect it from vines, insects and larger animals. Credit: Peter Marting, aztecacecropia.com Individuality isn't just for individuals. Insect colonies, which function as so-called " superorganisms ," appear to have personalities, scientists are finding. A new study has uncovered evidence of consistent behavi
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New Scientist - News
Welcome to the limb lab where organs are kept alive on shelves Flushing and twitching Sam Wong By Clare Wilson I’M GREETED by the sight of several litres of pig’s blood being poured into bags on a hospital drip-stand. The red splashes on the wall and the stainless steel counters make the place feel like a butcher’s shop, but it is something altogether different. This is James Fildes’s workshop, where he is trying to reanimate detached body parts. Based a
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New Scientist - News
Why brewing beer in space is more important than you think Last spring, Budweiser declared its intention to be the beer of choice for future Martian colonists seeking a cold one in space. The company is due to take one giant step for beerkind on 12 December, when a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to take Budweiser’s barley seeds from Cape Canaveral in Florida up to the International Space Station. The seeds, a small part of a big cargo resupply m
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New Scientist - News
How we breathe between words can be used to identify us Even your breathing has a ‘signature’ Ramesh Amruth/plainpicture By Chris Baraniuk The way you breathe could be giving you away. The patterns of inhalations made by people when they speak seem to be unique to each individual – which means an algorithm can be used to identify the speaker, even if they don’t say anything. The inhalation sounds are turbulence rather than noises made by vocal cho
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Anne Pringle (U. Wi.) 3: Convergent Interactions and the Genome Architectures of Symbiotic Fungi Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and tells us the story behind Bay Area Amanita phalloides. https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/amanita-phalloides/#part-3 Talk Overview: Although people usually relate fungi with diseases, Dr. Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and provides examples of the benefic
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Anne Pringle (U. Wi.) 2: Reverse Ecology: Understanding the Natural Histories of Cryptic Organisms Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and tells us the story behind Bay Area Amanita phalloides. https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/amanita-phalloides/#part-2 Talk Overview: Although people usually relate fungi with diseases, Dr. Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and provides examples of the benefic
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Anne Pringle (U. Wi.) 1: Introduction to Fungi Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and tells us the story behind Bay Area Amanita phalloides. https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/amanita-phalloides/ Talk Overview: Although people usually relate fungi with diseases, Dr. Anne Pringle provides an overview of the vastly diverse and complex world of fungi, and provides examples of the beneficial rol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models Researchers can attach sensors to the organ models to give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue. Credit: McAlpine Research Group A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wheat gets boost from purified nanotubes IMAGE: Purified single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in water promoted greater plant growth (center) than the nanomaterial-free control (left) after eight days of an experiment at Rice University. Feeding plants tetrahydrofuran with... view more Credit: Photo illustration by Pavan Raja/Rice University The introduction of purified carbon nanotubes appears to have a beneficial effect on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa IMAGE: Microbiologists from Stellenbosch University in South Africa found large populations of cryptococcal fungi from woody debris collected from old trees in a public park in the centre of Cape Town. view more Credit: Alf Botha Large populations of potentially deadly cryptococcal fungi have been found on woody debris collected from old trees in two public areas in the centre of Cape Town
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report: US has lost dominance in highly intense, ultrafast laser technology to Europe and Asia WASHINGTON - The U.S. is losing ground in a second laser revolution of highly intense, ultrafast lasers that have broad applications in manufacturing, medicine, and national security, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Currently, 80 percent to 90 percent of the high-intensity laser systems are overseas, and all of the highest power research laser
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key in curing cirrhosis The unique liver function of a South American amphibian, Siphonops annulatus, could pave the way to finding a cure to the devastating liver condition cirrhosis, a new study published in the prestigious Journal of Anatomy reports. Researchers from the University of Surrey (UK), the Federal University of São Paulo and the Butantan Institute in Brazil used an innovative 3D liver cell examination t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change: can hummingbirds take the heat? Warmer temperatures could make it harder for hummingbirds to meet their voracious energy needs, a study found Extreme heat sometimes forces hummingbirds to seek shade instead of foraging for food, researchers said Wednesday, warning that global warming could test the tiny birds' capacity to adapt. With hearts beating more than 1,000 times a minute, hummingbirds need to feed constantly, which mean
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Futurity.org
Early test scores don’t predict academic growth A new analysis indicates that poverty does not determine the quality of an American school system. For years, parents and policymakers have looked to test scores to gauge the effectiveness of school districts and teachers. New research provides a different measure: students’ academic progress over a period of years. Professor Sean Reardon of the Stanford Graduate School of Education examined test
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new law to tackle contract cheating and Essay Mills? The academics propose that the new law should be applicable in many countries around the world and is described in a study "A legal approach to tackling contract cheating? " co-authored by Michael Draper, an Associate Professor in the College of Law and Professor Phil Newton from the Swansea University Medical School, an expert in contract cheating ,which has been published by the International J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viruses share genes with organisms across the tree of life A new study reveals that viruses share genes across the three superkingdoms of life, from the single-celled microbes known as bacteria and archaea, to eukarya, a group that includes animals, plants, fungi and all other living things. Most of this unusual sharing occurs between eukarya and bacteria and their viruses. Credit: Julie McMahon A new study finds that viruses share some genes exclusively
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mission to gather petrified Antarctic plants could help predict future of flora on warming Earth Glossopteris leaves, the dominant plant type during the Permian in Antarctica. Credit: University of Kansas A team of investigators from the University of Kansas currently is stationed at Antarctica's Shackleton Glacier to collect the remains of plants that once thrived there during the boundary between the Permian and Triassic periods. The fieldwork, supported by a new National Science Foundatio
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NYT > Science
New Jersey Seeks Stricter Limit on Chemical in Drinking Water If accepted by New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection, the recommendation would mean that the chemical is subject to a “maximum contaminant limit”, allowing state officials to require operators of water systems to meet the new standard by installing carbon filters or other technology. The proposal is the third in the last three years by the panel, official known as New Jersey’s Drink
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientists discover six new species of beetles in Borneo One of the newly discovered beetle species, Dermatohomoeus maliauensis . Credit: Taxon Expeditions, Menno Schilthuizen Scientists estimate that 80% of the world's animal and plant species are still unknown. Although the work of taxonomists (whose job is to describe and name those) is appreciated by the general public, funding for taxonomy is dwindling. Moreover, while the areas hosting most of th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Green' cataract surgery model drastically reduces environmental footprintA healthcare center in India's model for cataract surgery emits 96 percent less carbon than in the United Kingdom -- and a likely even greater savings in the United States -- while yielding comparable or better health outcomes for one of the world's most common surgical procedures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor?Electronic fetal monitoring is often used during labor to detect unborn babies at risk of brain damage (neonatal encephalopathy) from a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). In the UK, continuous monitoring is used only for women in high-risk labor, but should it be used for all women in labor?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands, study suggestsBreast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research.
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Live Science
Here's Why the Ventura Wildfire Is So Explosive A disastrous combination of tinder-dry vegetation, the strongest Santa Ana winds in a decade and a spark caused a wildfire to explode in Ventura County, California, north of Los Angeles, overnight Monday (Dec. 4). Less than 24 hours later, the blaze had torn through more than 45,000 acres and destroyed 150 structures, with windy conditions hampering efforts to combat the flames. While not unprece
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide. The research was p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell tissue must not freeze! Nature has evolved sugars, amino acids, and special antifreeze proteins as cryoprotectants. People use organic solvents and synthetic polymers as additives to prevent cell cultures from freezing damage. Now, English scientists have combined both methods: In work published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , they introduced polyproline, a polypeptide made of the natural amino acid proline, as an ef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen scientists discover 6 new species of beetles in Borneo Scientists estimate that 80% of the world's animal and plant species are still unknown. Although the work of taxonomists (whose job is to describe and name those) is appreciated by the general public, funding for taxonomy is dwindling. Moreover, while the areas hosting most of the unknown biodiversity are under threat, time is running out. To help solve this problem, Taxon Expeditions has become
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphone health apps miss some daily activity of users If you use your smartphone to monitor your physical activity, you're probably more active than it suggests. A new UBC study finds that the iPhone's built-in pedometer missed about 1,340 steps during a user's typical day when compared to a purpose-built accelerometer worn on the waist. The accuracy of smartphones and health apps is becoming more important as medical experts and technology companie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantifying the greenhouse gas footprint of crop cultivation IMAGE: A 'climate-smart' crop cultivation system is characterized by a low greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint, low consumption of synthetic nitrogen (i.e., new Nr), and simultaneously high crop yields. view more Credit: ZHENG Xunhua "Climate-smart" crop cultivation, characterized by a low greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint, low synthetic nitrogen consumption, and simultaneously high yields (Fig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unearthing the underground effects of earthquakes and volcanoes Fukuoka, Japan - Most of what we know about earthquakes and volcanoes is based on what we can observe at the Earth's surface. However, most of the action - especially early activity that could help with disaster prediction and preparedness - occurs deep underground. Developing a clearer picture of changes in subsurface conditions, together with continuous monitoring, could provide life-saving inf
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE gene People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta. "Scientists have been interested in APOE for years but there are o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's that smell? The advantage of sniffing Breathe in through your nose, and chances are you will feel the air coming in and also smell something nearby. Researchers led by Takeshi Imai at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) have discovered how these sensations are kept separate and why sniffing can help identify odors, two problems that have puzzled scientists for years. Published in Neuron on December 6th, the study used a
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Big Think
How Game Theory Can Help You Do a Better Job of Parenting In 1944, the economist, physicist, mathematician and computer scientist John von Neumann published a book that became a sensation, at least among mathematicians – Theory of Games and Economic Behavior . Written with a colleague, Oskar Morgenstern, this volume of nearly biblical proportions is so dense and littered with mathematics that only a game-theory specialist could understand it – and some
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microwaved exploding eggs make for an unusual acoustic experimentIf you have looked closely at a microwave's warnings or have experienced an accidental explosion, you know that certain foods pose a risk due to an increase in their internal pressure, and potatoes and hard-boiled eggs are among the most common culprits. Researchers are presenting new findings on the sound pressures generated by exploding eggs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine invertebrates have noisy human neighborsMarine invertebrates are impacted by the rising levels of underwater noise produced by humans, but the production of underwater noise is not only difficult to control, but the direct effect on marine invertebrates can be challenging to observe or measure. Researchers are presenting results on the use of a standing wave tube to simulate and measure the effects of anthropogenic noise on marine inver
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisisIn the US alone, more than 2 million people struggle with opioid use disorders. Opioids, often prescribed as pain medications, have now become the country's leading cause of drug overdose. But scientists are identifying ways to help combat the epidemic, which include getting people treatment faster, developing safer opioids, and helping patients choose appropriate treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environmentsSpending a night in the hospital is not only stressful, but also loud. The constant beeps, whirrs and alarms ascend to a cacophony that produces anything but a relaxing, restful environment. Researchers summarize the limited number of studies available on hospital noise and discuss the different approaches health care facilities are taking to bring restful repose to patients across the country.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's successThe acoustics of political speech are known to be a powerful influencer of voter preferences, but vocal disorders can change the qualities of a person's speech, and voice scientists have found that this alters politicians' perceived charisma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What gave early New Orleans jazz clarinets their unique sound?The hauntingly beautiful 'wailing' sounds of early New Orleans jazz clarinets, often featured in brass bands or jazz funerals, are one of the most distinctive instrument styles in American music. The unique sound begs the question: what's behind incredible their range of sound and tonal variety?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to listen better? Lend a right earListening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In multiple myeloma, high levels of enzyme ADAR1 are associated with reduced survivalUsing a database of multiple myeloma patient samples and information, researchers found that high ADAR1 levels correlate with reduced survival rates. They also determined that blocking the enzyme reduces multiple myeloma regeneration in experimental models derived from patient cancer cells.
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Science | The Guardian
Australian researchers identify new species of marsupial lion Australian researchers have identified a new species of marsupial lion that roamed the rainforests of northern Australia 25m years ago. Weighing in at just over 22kg and boasting a squat, flat head, the new species, named Wakaleo schouteni after wildlife illustrator and paleoartist Peter Schouten, is the fifth known species of dog-sized marsupial lion discovered at Riversleigh, located within Boo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes Bamboo lemur. Credit: David Haring, Duke Lemur Center A new study from North Carolina State University, the Smithsonian and Duke University finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common - despite the fact that they are separated by millions of years of evolution. "The bamboo lemur's evolutionary tree diverged from that of both panda species 83 million years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate Credit: American Chemical Society Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn't matter that much, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New test procedure for developing quick-charging lithium-ion batteries When lithium-ion batteries are charged too quickly, metallic lithium gets deposited on the anodes. This reduces battery capacity and lifespan and can even destroy the batteries. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Forschungszentrum Juelich have now developed a procedure using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to measure the lithium plating process direc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Go with the flow (or against it) Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering Carlos Escobedo and PhD candidate Saeed Rismani Yazdi in the laboratory. Credit: Queen's University Queen's University researchers are using magnetic fields to influence a specific type of bacteria to swim against strong currents, opening up the potential of using the microscopic organisms for drug delivery in environments with complex microflows - like
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Live Science
Humans Would Be Cool with Finding Aliens If extraterrestrial life is ever discovered, humanity would probably be pretty cool with it. A new study, one of very few of its kind, finds that people typically respond quite positively to the notion of life on other planets. The study investigated the possibility of finding microbial extraterrestrials , not intelligent E.T.s, so people's responses might be a little different if they were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Screening chemicals in everyday products for safety—without animalsThousands of substances in toys, electronics and other products have not yet been assessed for their potential risks to consumers. Last year's update to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) could make this task more manageable by setting a new path for prioritizing and evaluating these risks. And much of it will be done without animal testing, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering N
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bioelectronic 'nose' can detect food spoilage by sensing the smell of death Credit: American Chemical Society Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano , researchers have developed a bioelectronic "nose" that can specifically detect a key decay compound at low levels, enabling people to potentially take action before the stink spreads. It can detect rotting food, as wel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive 'supervillain' crab can eat through its gills Carcinus maenas. Credit: Hans Hillewaert/Wikipedia CC BY-SA 4.0 Invasive green shore crabs can "eat" by absorbing nutrients across its gills—the first demonstration of this ability in crustaceans—scientists from the University of Alberta have found. "People just assumed that, because of their hard body, the crabs would not be able to access nutrients present in the water via the gills, and theref
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers devise better recommendation algorithm The recommendation systems at websites such as Amazon and Netflix use a technique called "collaborative filtering." To determine what products a given customer might like, they look for other customers who have assigned similar ratings to a similar range of products, and extrapolate from there. The success of this approach depends vitally on the notion of similarity. Most recommendation systems u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Viruses share genes with organisms across the tree of life IMAGE: A new study reveals that viruses share genes across the three superkingdoms of life, from the single-celled microbes known as bacteria and archaea, to eukarya, a group that includes animals,... view more Credit: Graphic by Julie McMahon CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new study finds that viruses share some genes exclusively with cells that are not their hosts. The study, reported in th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's good to be rare, for some species This Tritonia nudibranch found in the Red Sea may be chronically rare. This species is generally seen only once every few years. Credit: Flickr/prilfish When most people think of rare species, they think of endangered ones that humans have caused to be rare through habitat loss, poaching, climate change and other disturbances. But some species have always been rare—occurring in small densities th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's nations adopt plan 'towards a pollution-free planet' Pollution has become the biggest killer of humans, claiming nine million human lives every year—one in six deaths worldwide The world's nations vowed Wednesday to curb plastic and chemical contamination of the air, soil, rivers and oceans, calling for a steep change in how goods are produced and consumed. Government envoys issued a political declaration outlining the path to "a pollution-free pla
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How ribosomes shape the proteomeCells are crowded with macromolecules, which limits the diffusion of proteins, especially in prokaryotic cells without active transport in the cytoplasm. While investigating the relationship between crowding, ionic strength and protein diffusion, biochemists made a fascinating discovery: positively charged proteins stick to the surface of ribosome complexes. This explains why most water-soluble pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanomaterials: How to separate linear and ring-shaped moleculesWhat is the difference between linear chains and rings composed of the same material? The molecular building blocks are identical, but from a mathematical point of view the two structures have distinct topologies, namely ring and linear chain. This difference is readily recognizable on a macroscopic scale, as for example a golden ring and a gold bar, but represents a tricky task on the microscopic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Freezing trees, finding answersIce storms can wreak havoc on communities. Frozen limbs, dragged down by the weight of the ice, can snap off and fall on cars, homes, and power lines. But scientists aren't sure how ice storms affect long-term forest health. Researchers are changing that.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficientPrevious studies about nurse workflow have used time-motion study methods, which involve manually observing nurses in person or on video and then clocking how much time they spend on each task. Now, an engineer has developed a method for better tracking how nurses in an intensive care unit (ICU) spend their workday. Findings could help improve the health care delivery process in the ICU and could
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollutionWildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant
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Live Science
The World's Largest Organism Is Dying It's death by a thousand nibbles. Pando, the world's largest living organism — and possibly its oldest — is being destroyed by the voracious appetite of mule deer. Also known as the trembling giant , Pando is a colony of quaking aspen that spans 106 acres (43 hectares) of south-central Utah. Because of an explosion of deer in the area, new sprouts from Pando are eaten before they have a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LGBQ* women's sexual desire particularly impacted by social and cultural pressures LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2017) -- Women's sexual desire is influenced by a host of factors, but one factor is often left out by researchers and clinicians. University of Kentucky researchers homed in on that missing piece -- the influence of social and cultural issues on desire. In a study published in Sexuality & Culture , the researchers find that these issues are particularly impactful for LGBQ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new law to tackle contract cheating and essay mills?Swansea University academics have designed a new law to specifically target the inappropriate activities of companies who offer to write student assignments for a fee; also known as 'essay mills.'
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The Atlantic
The Preventable Problem That Schools Ignore Nearly 1.5 million high-school students in the U.S. are physically abused by dating partners every year. More than one-third of 10th-graders (35 percent) have been physically or verbally abused by dating partners, while a similar percentage are perpetrators of such abuse. Youth from low-income backgrounds, those from marginalized racial and ethnic groups, and LGBTQ students are at the greatest ri
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The Atlantic
The Deeper Significance of Bryan Singer's Firing Bryan Singer—a director with credits like X-Men , The Usual Suspects , and Superman Returns — was fired Monday from the upcoming Fox film Bohemian Rhapsody. He was dismissed from the biopic about the Queen singer Freddie Mercury (starring Mr. Robot ’s Rami Malek) after he stopped reporting to set a week earlier, which initially prompted the studio to suspend production. But Fox is now looking for
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The Atlantic
How the Kremlin Tried to Rig the Olympics, and Failed When the Russian national hockey team lost to Canada, seven to three, in the hockey quarterfinals of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, forward Alexander Ovechkin knew it would be bad. “Now the dirt will pour down on us,” he said at the time. The dirt poured down from the very top. “Because of disgraceful performance of our team I’m afraid to approach TV-set,” tweeted Dmitry Rogozin, then Rus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the oldest compound eyes were constructedResearchers have discovered that the compound eyes of today's insects and crustaceans are still constructed in much the same way as they were in their extinct ancestors 500 million years ago. The research team looked at fossil trilobites. However, these arthropods lacked the lenses of contemporary compound eyes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Litte Foot takes a bowLittle Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. It is by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found. It is also the oldest fossil hominid in southern Africa, dating back 3.67 million years. For the first time ever, the completely cleaned and reconstructed skeleton was viewed by the national and internation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is laughter the greatest medicine for cancer patients?Spontaneous humor is used and appreciated by people with cancer and can be a helpful way of dealing with distressing, taboo or embarrassing circumstances, research shows.
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Live Science
How Do Solar Panels Work? Contractors install solar panels on a residential roof. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Touted as a promising alternative energy source for decades, solar panels crown rooftops and roadside signs, and help keep spacecraft powered. But how do solar panels work? Simply put, a solar panel works by allowing photons, or particles of light, to knock electrons free from atoms, generating a flow of
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Live Science
$450 Million Da Vinci: Why Was Damaged Painting So Expensive? Leila Amineddoleh is the founder and managing partner of Amineddoleh & Associates, LLP in New York City, where she specializes in art, cultural heritage and intellectual property law. Amineddoleh contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . Last month, I was lucky enough to enjoy a private viewing of Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvator Mundi." It was a remarkable e
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Want in on Humanity's Next Big Space Station As the world’s leading spacefaring nations plan for their next big outpost in space—a successor to the International Space Station—scientists are drafting a wish list of experiments for the most remote human laboratory ever built. NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are hosting meetings to discuss the science plans, the first of which are taking place on December 5–6 in Noordwijk, the Nether
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: What Happens When You Microwave a Boiled Egg And so began a long campaign of microwaving eggs, setting them under a microphone and giving them a prod. Nearly 100 eggs were sacrificed for the cause, and while most did nothing but lie there, about a third exploded gratifyingly (some also burst inside the microwave before getting to the microphone). Mr. Nash, who presented the research, said that at first they microwaved the eggs in a water ba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China dominates top Western economies in patent applicationsThe U.N.'s intellectual property agency says China racked up a record 1.3 million patent applications last year, topping the combined total in the U.S., Japan, Korea and Europe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PET tracer gauges effectiveness of promising Alzheimer's treatment IMAGE: PET imaging shows the average 18F-AV45 uptake per animal group at 8 and 13 months of age. A significant interaction of genotype treatment was observed in the cortex (p =... view more Credit: MICA, University of Antwerp, Belgium RESTON, VA. - In the December featured basic science article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine , Belgian researchers report on the first large-scale longitud
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Short intervention boosts safe-sex skills in teen girls IMAGE: Only 57 percent of high school teens who are sexually active used a condom in their most recent sexual encounter. This puts teens at risk of unwanted pregnancy or sexually... view more Credit: Matt Shipman A recent study from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds that a 45-minute online sexual health program improved the ability of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Towards data storage at the single molecule level IMAGE: The tip of the STM (yellow) assumes the role of a hard drive's reading and writing head for the molecule attached to the copper nitride surface (black). view more Credit: Figure/Copyright: Manuel Gruber Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by fundamental limits
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthroughs in understanding the genetic basis of aggressive prostate cancer IMAGE: This plot represents a circularized version of the human genome. Each subsequent inner ring represents novel findings in the study relevant to disease. view more Credit: Christopher McNair, Thomas Jefferson University (PHILADELPHIA) - The retinoblastoma (RB) susceptibility gene was the first gatekeeper gene discovered for cancer. When it was removed, or damaged, cancers thrived. Over
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Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes IMAGE: A new study from North Carolina State University, the Smithsonian and Duke University finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common - despite... view more Credit: Erin McKenney A new study from North Carolina State University, the Smithsonian and Duke University finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes
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Children on sex offender registries at greater risk for suicide attempts, study suggests A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater risk for harm, including suicide attempts and sexual assault, compared to a group of children who engaged in harmful or illegal sexual behavior but who were not required to register. The most troubling findings, the auth
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abnormal electrocardiogram findings are common in NBA players Bottom Line: About 1 in 5 professional basketball players had abnormalities on their electrocardiograms (ECGs), some but not all of which were explained by changes in the shape and size of their hearts as a result of athletic training. Why The Research Is Interesting: Because of rare but high-profile instances of cardiac death among professional athletes there is intense interest in identifying
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Surgery-related opioid doses can drop dramatically without affecting patients' pain IMAGE: Before the guideline was implemented at Michigan Medicine, the University of Michigan's academic medical center, gallbladder surgery patients received an average of 250 mg of opioid pain medications. Soon after... view more Credit: University of Michigan ANN ARBOR, MI - Some surgeons might be able to prescribe a third of opioid painkiller pills that they currently give patients, and not af
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychosis incidence highly variable internationally Rates of psychosis can be close to eight times higher in some regions compared to others, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL, King's College London and the University of Cambridge. The study, published today in JAMA Psychiatry , was the biggest international comparison of incidence of psychotic disorders, and the first major study of its kind in more than 25 years. "It's well-establi
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New on MIT Technology Review
Bots Are Ruining Christmas by Beating Humans to Online Checkouts During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marshmallow-like silicone gels used as insulation in containers for cryopreserved embryosAs the genetic modification of mice is increasingly used in medical and biological research, so too is the need for an efficient way to transport cryopreserved embryos and sperm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species discovered in Malaysian rainforest during unprecedented, top-to-bottom surveyThis fall, the California Academy of Sciences partnered with The Habitat Penang Hill and colleagues to conduct a rainforest survey on Malaysia's island state of Penang. A 117-member team documented flora and fauna from the tops of trees to the dark reaches of caves and discovered several species previously unknown to science living just miles from a major metropolis. Survey results will contribute
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dibenzoazepine defender: Drug found to be effective against resistant hepatitis CResearchers have identified a class of chemicals that can combat resistant strains of the hepatitis C virus, as well as parasites that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact, study showsResearchers have revisited workplace sexual harassment issues after the initial study was done nearly 20 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Catalyzing carbon dioxideA system that uses renewable electricity to electrochemically transform carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide -- a key commodity used in any number of industrial processes -- has now been developed by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study findsReducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New weakness found in most common childhood malignant brain tumorA new weakness found in medulloblastoma, the most common form of childhood brain tumor, could lead to more personalized medicine and improved treatment for some patients, according to an early study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Consistently Lower Cancer Survival Rates for Black Patients in U.S. (Reuters Health) - Whether it's colon cancer, breast cancer, or ovarian cancer, survival rates in the U.S. are lower for black people than for white people, three new studies show. All three were published in the journal Cancer. In one, Dr. Arica White from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, and her team looked at colon cancer survival rates in 2001-2003
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Futurity.org
Stress hormone spikes in pregnant women with PTSD In a new study, researchers found that pregnant women with a type of dissociative PTSD that’s often related to childhood abuse or trauma had levels of the stress hormone cortisol up to 10 times higher than their peers. To learn more about the effect of past stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder on an expectant woman, researchers measured cortisol levels in pregnant women from early pregnan
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The Atlantic
The Secrets That Product Packaging Reveals About Retail In the mid-to-late 1800s, shoppers interested in purchasing many everyday products— from flour to crackers to pickles —usually had to ask store attendants to fish what they wanted out of a barrel for them. Customers would then transport their goods home in a cloth sack, a paper bag, or wrapped in paper. Shortly after the turn of the century, the burgeoning field of marketing brought consumer prod
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The Fake Space Agency Searching for Life on Mars' Nonexistent Third Moon In June 1944, two geologists unearthed a black, 125-pound meteorite in the Swiss Alps. This remarkable discovery went mostly unnoticed in wartime Europe, but more than three decades later, scientist Rudolph H. Obrist traced the extraterrestrial rock to Ferox, Mars’ third moon. Even more astonishing, he believed the orb might harbor the possibility of life and launched a years-long mission to find
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Always On: Don't Miss This 50-Hour Progressive Electronic Music Show VIDEO Do you think you can sustain the funk for two whole days? Here's your chance to find out. Starting today at 12 pm Eastern (9 am Pacific) right here at the top of this story, you can watch Always On , a continuous, 50-hour livestream of progressive electronic music performed entirely by a roster of women, transgender, and non-binary artists. The musicians will be broadcasting from around the
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Scientific American Content: Global
Songbirds Shift Migration Patterns to Sync with Warming As the planet warms, scientists are seeing evidence of earlier springs and later autumns all over the world. Snow is melting sooner, plants are flowering earlier—and now, researchers find that birds are changing their migration patterns, too. A new study , just out this week in the journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications , is the latest in a growing body of research that suggests our
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Go with the flow (or against it) Queen's University researchers are using magnetic fields to influence a specific type of bacteria to swim against strong currents, opening up the potential of using the microscopic organisms for drug delivery in environments with complex microflows - like the human bloodstream. Led by Carlos Escobedo (Chemical Engineering) and PhD candidate Saeed Rismani Yazdi (Chemical Engineering), the research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality at the service of psychologyOur environment is composed according to certain rules and characteristics which are so obvious to us that we are scarcely aware of them. Professor Melissa Le-Hoa Vo, psychologist at Goethe University Frankfurt, is studying this 'scene knowledge' in a virtual reality laboratory. In the current issue of the Forschung Frankfurt research journal, journalist Jessica Klapp tells readers about her virtu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioelectronic 'nose' can detect food spoilage by sensing the smell of death Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano , researchers have developed a bioelectronic "nose" that can specifically detect a key decay compound at low levels, enabling people to potentially take action before the stink spreads. It can detect rotting food, as well as be used to help find victims
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seizure study sheds light on lasting brain effects in children Prolonged convulsive seizures in childhood could be linked to the development of other brain conditions, a study suggests. Lasting effects are more pronounced in children who had other neurological problems before their seizure, researchers say. The study - the first of its kind worldwide - provides insight into the long-term health impact of convulsive status epilepticus (CSE), in which a single
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn't matter that much, the specific weather conditions do.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method helps identify causal mechanisms in depression Philadelphia, Dec. 6, 2017 - People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging . The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, in depre
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Big Think
Study Finds Huge Cognitive Benefits to Getting Married Scientists have long observed that there are many potential benefits of married life. One of their most popular findings perhaps pertains to the longevity advantage married people, and particularly men, have over their never married, divorced or widowed peers. Studies point to many social-cognitive, emotional, behavioral and biological benefits that marriage seems to bestow on its participant
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New on MIT Technology Review
The U.S. Leads in Artificial Intelligence, but for How Long? Even as the world’s top artificial-intelligence researchers gathered in Los Angeles this week, many are beginning to wonder just how much longer the U.S. will remain the epicenter of AI. The Neural Information Processing System (NIPS) conference in Long Beach is the number one place for presenting breakthroughs in AI. But U.S. government policies threaten to put a dampener on the recent boom in t
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How fake handbags fund terrorism and organized crime | Alastair GrayWhat's the harm in buying a knock-off purse or a fake designer watch? According to counterfeit investigator Alastair Gray, fakes like these fund terrorism and organized crime. Learn more about the trillion-dollar underground economy of counterfeiting -- from the criminal organizations that run it to the child labor they use to produce its goods -- as well as measures you can take to help stop it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines safety and effectiveness of infliximab biosimilar in patients with inflammatory bowel Biosimilars are biologic agents that highly similar to original biomedical medications (oringinators), but are much cheaper. A new study in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics found no differences in drug levels and disease activity between infliximab originator and an infliximab biosimilar in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, indicating that this biosimilar is indeed safe and effectiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flipping the electron spin IMAGE: When lithium-ion batteries are charged too quickly, metallic lithium gets deposited on the anodes. This reduces battery capacity and lifespan and can even destroy the batteries. Scientists at the Technical... view more Credit: Tobias Schloesser / FZ Juelich When lithium-ion batteries are charged too quickly, metallic lithium gets deposited on the anodes. This reduces battery capa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The human race has peakedNewly emerging trends in data suggests humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. These biological limitations may be affected by anthropogenic impacts on the environment -- including climate change -- which could have a deleterious effect on these limits. This review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydrogen gas from enzyme productionResearchers at Freie Universität Berlin and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have uncovered a crucial reaction principle of hydrogen-producing enzymes. Teams led by Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel in Bochum and Dr. Sven Stripp at Freie Universität investigated the production of molecular hydrogen in single-cell green algae. They were able to demonstrate how the enzyme succeeds in transferring two electrons in succ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How does it look when Earth is bombarded with dark matter? A whole lot of zig-zagging: Perhaps that is what happens when the universe's mysterious dark matter particles hit the Earth. SDU researchers can now show through simulations how it might look. Planet Earth is constantly on the move, colliding with myriads of dark matter particles as it hurtles through space. Although no one has ever seen these mysterious particles, there is no question among phys
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mainz physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste IMAGE: This is a prototype antineutrino detector for monitoring nuclear waste repository sites. view more Credit: photo/©: Virginia Tech, Center for Neutrino Physics New scientific findings suggest neutrino detectors may play an important role in ensuring better monitoring and safer storage of radioactive material in nuclear waste repository sites. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg Univ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A head start through human intervention IMAGE: The common sowthistle, Sonchus oleraceus , occurs typically in human-made environments in its native European range (right), and is globally the most widely naturalized plant species (left, here in Taizhou, China).... view more Credit: Mark van Kleunen More and more plant species are introduced to new areas through humans. Often, however, it is not clear which factors decide whethe
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Live Science
What If the Big Bang Wasn't the Beginning? New Study Proposes Alternative Was the universe created with a Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago, or has it been expanding and contracting for eternity? A new paper, inspired by alternative explanations of the physics of black holes, explores the latter possibility, and rejects a core tenant of the Big Bang hypothesis . The universal origin story known as the Big Bang postulates that, 13.7 billion years ago, our universe emerged
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How ribosomes shape the proteome Right panel: interaction of positively charged proteins (dark blue) with the ribosome complex (light blue/yellow). Negatively charged proteins do not interact. At high ionic strength (left panel) the positive proteins hardly interact with the ribosome. Credit: Poolman lab, University of Groningen Cells are crowded with macromolecules, which limits the diffusion of proteins, especially in prokaryo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists say recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea Vadasaurus herzogi fossil. Credit: Mick EllisonUsed with permission from the American Museum of Natural History Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water. A report
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Little Foot skeleton unveiled in South Africa Image caption The skeleton was discovered in the Sterkfontein caves One of the oldest and most complete skeletons of humankind's ancestors has been unveiled in South Africa. A team spent more than 20 years excavating, cleaning and putting together the skeleton of Little Foot. Its exact age is debated, but South African scientists say the remains are 3.67 million years old. This would mean Little
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Freezing trees, finding answers: Researchers study impact of ice storms, climate change Wendy Leuenberger, a former graduate student at SUNY-ESF, measures ice accumulation following a simulated ice storm at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH. Credit: Joe Klementovitch Ecologist Lindsey Rustad sculpts ice forests. She's not a sculptor by trade, but in her latest ecology experiment, her team sprayed water over a portion of forest during the coldest part of the night. Within hou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists turn beer into fuel Credit: CC0 Public Domain Chemists at the University of Bristol have made the first steps towards making sustainable petrol using beer as a key ingredient. It is commonly accepted that there is an urgent need for sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels for transportation to replace diesel and petrol . One of the most widely used sustainable alternatives to petrol world-wide is bioethanol - in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species discovered in Malaysian rainforest during unprecedented, top-to-bottom survey The Malayan forest gecko ( Cyrtodactylus pulchellus ) is endemic to Penang, meaning that it is found nowhere else on Earth. Credit: © 2017 Phil Torres/bioGraphic This fall, the California Academy of Sciences partnered with The Habitat Penang Hill and colleagues to conduct a top-to-bottom rainforest survey unprecedented in its comprehensive approach. On Malaysia's island state of Penang, a 117-mem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tobacco plants as life-savers QUT researchers' work sequencing the genome of Australian native tobacco plant Nicotiana benthamiana will underpin Newcotiana project research to develop new varieties of non-smoking tobacco to be used as biofactories. Credit: QUT Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, is the sole international cooperation partner in an AUD$10.5 million European project to develop new tobacco varie
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Futurity.org
The wrong location can offset health benefits of walking Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the health benefits of exercise in adults over 60, according to a new study. The findings, published in The Lancet , show that short-term exposure to traffic exhaust on a busy street can cancel out the positive effects a two-hour stroll would otherwise have on older adults’ heart and lungs. This is the first study to document these ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharks A great white shark launches an attack in pursuit of a Cape fur seal. Credit: Chris Fallows/ Apex Shark Expeditions While a little added stress may be helpful to flee a dangerous situation, or to meet an approaching deadline, it's no secret that prolonged exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is linked to health problems. So, what effects does stress have on animals in the wild that need to nav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanomaterials: How to separate linear and ring-shaped molecules IMAGE: This is the view into the canal perpendicular to the flow direction. The fluid and the flow profile are represented by the blue background and the vector graphics. view more Credit: Copyright: Lisa Weiss The purely mathematical property - linear or circular - can have severe consequences in the world of materials. Since circular molecules lack any ends, which could serve as a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists from MSU stretched a diamond using an electric field IMAGE: This is the scheme of the experiment (for practical use). view more Credit: Alexander Obraztsov A research team from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University found out a stretching of acicular diamond crystallites under action of an electric field. Deformation occurring during the stretching causes changes in luminescence spectrum. This effect can be used for devel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes a happy working mom? A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother. So says Katrijn Brenning of the University of Ghent in Belgium who led research that investigated what affects a working mother's sense
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A risk factor for drug-induced skin disease identified IMAGE: These are non-inflammatory bullous pemphigoids (BP) seen in the type 2 diabetes patient who are administered with DPP-4 inhibitor. view more Credit: Hokkaido University Researchers have identified a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) that is associated with the skin disease bullous pemphigoid (BP) in diabetic patients administered with DPP-4 inhibitory drugs. DPP-4 inhibitor (DP
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plug-in hybrid vehicles are better than their reputation Both electric cars and plug-in hybrids can be run on electricity. Scientists involved in the Karlsruhe Priority Region for Mobility Systems have now compared their carbon dioxide emissions. Credit: KIT/L. Albrecht Hybrid vehicles are often considered the fig leaf of electric mobility. However, plug-in hybrids with a real electric range of about 60 km drive the same number of kilometers electrical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogen gas from enzyme production Researchers at Freie Universität Berlin and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have uncovered a crucial reaction principle of hydrogen-producing enzymes. Teams led by Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel in Bochum and Dr. Sven T. Stripp at Freie Universität investigated the production of molecular hydrogen in single-cell green algae. They were able to demonstrate how the enzyme succeeds in transferring two electrons in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Linking lakes with an eye on the future Credit: European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) The fragile nature of Europe's lakes and reservoirs has seen an increase in the level of monitoring of their current state. COST's role in linking up scientists across the continent has been crucial, with one researcher being inspired to raise awareness on a local level. A COST Action has helped link experts using cutting-edge technolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to separate linear and ring-shaped molecules What is the difference between linear chains and rings composed of the same material? The molecular building blocks are identical, but from a mathematical point of view, the two structures have distinct topologies, ring and linear chain. This difference is readily recognizable on a macroscopic scale, as, for example, a golden ring and a gold bar, but represents a tricky task on the microscopic sc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea-level rise threatens archaeological and historic sites Joshua Wells. Photo courtesy of IU South Bend Rising sea levels resulting from climate change will threaten vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites near the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study co-authored by Indiana University researchers. The study finds that a rise of 1 meter in sea levels, widely expected by the end of this century using a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60'sExposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in older adults, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharksWhile a little added stress may be helpful to flee a dangerous situation, or to meet an approaching deadline, it's no secret that prolonged exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is linked to health problems. So, what effects does stress have on animals in the wild that need to navigate the same waters as the ocean's top predator -- great white sharks?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain activity and anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorderThe error-related negativity (ERN) is a brain signal response to errors that is thought to reflect threat sensitivity and has been implicated in anxiety disorders in individuals without autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First step toward practical application of holographic memory with magnetic assistScientists have successfully applied magnetic assist recording to magnetic-holographic memory to reduce recording energy consumption and achieve error-free data reconstruction. This new technology is promising for practical application of magnetic-holographic memory as a rewritable, ultra-high-density, high-speed optical information storage medium.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study opens window on meltwater from icebergs Large iceberg in Sermilik Fjord with the research vessel MV Adolf Jensen visible at left. Credit: Dave Sutherland Surface water conditions in Greenland's fjords and in the northern Atlantic Ocean are dictated by what's going on deep below the surface next to the massive Greenland Ice Sheet, UO-led research has found. Breakaway icebergs, according to research findings appearing online Dec. 4 ahead
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough could help gardeners achieve seed sowing success Credit: Royal Holloway, University of London Researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London, and the University of Osnabrück in Germany have found that common fungi could hold the key to help so-called hard seeds germinate. New research, published today in Nature Communications , looked at Lepidium didymum, also known as Lesser Swine Cress, and found that fungi helped the plant's seeds ger
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Mini-radar chip Credit: ESA/TNO A prototype transmit/receive module on a single 6x6 mm chip, intended to deliver miniaturised space radar systems for future missions. Traditional transmit/receive modules used on Europe's Sentinel-1 and comparable radar missions employ separate circuits for the high-power amplifier, the low-noise amplifier and the switch/isolator. The aim, developed for ESA by TNO in the Nether
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Science | The Guardian
Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs - Science Weekly podcast Nicola Davis explores the origins of antiseptic surgery and asks what we might learn from its founding father about taking on today’s biggest healthcare threats Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In March 1867, the Lancet published an article by surgeon Joseph Lister that would change the healthcare la
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Live Science
Horseshoe Crab Fossil from a Long Time Ago Named After Darth Vader Vaderlimulus tricki looks just like Darth Vader's helmet. Credit: New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science The fossil of an ancient "Star Wars" Sith Lord from a long time ago, but not quite so far, far away, was recently unearthed, a new study reports. Fossilized remains of an extinct species of horseshoe crab, named after Darth Vader because the animal's bizarre shape resembles the "Star
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The Atlantic
The Futile Resistance Against Classroom Tech Imagine a classroom in the not-too-distant future. Textbooks, slideshows, and notes all interface neatly with devices that once called “phones” and “laptops”—but now those learning materials proliferate through desks, walls, clothes, jewelry, glasses, and maybe even tattooes or contact lenses. The teacher, trained to teach in the 2010s, wants to say, “close your laptops and put away your phones.”
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Fighting infection: from Joseph Lister to superbugs - Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis explores the origins of antiseptic surgery and asks what we might learn from its founding father about taking on today’s biggest healthcare threats
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Hulu’s 'Runaways' Succeeds By Making Superpowers Fun Again “Protect us!” Nico yells, holding the staff out in front of hers. It's less an incantation than a last-ditch effort; the staff is her mother's, so she knows that it's magic, she just doesn't know how it's magic. Five other teenagers stand behind her as a would-be kidnapper fires at them, a pistol in each hand. Yet, none of them duck. Some of that is standard-issue teenage invincibility, but the r
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Futurity.org
European nations hostile to immigrants share this The European countries that tend to be most hostile towards immigrants have lost territory or sovereignty or experienced a history of conflict, a new study suggests. In these nations, prior traumatic experiences have led to the growth of a more ethnically-based nationalist narrative of “us” and “them” that makes accepting immigrants of different origins today more difficult, researchers report. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bristol scientists turn beer into fuel Chemists at the University of Bristol have made the first steps towards making sustainable petrol using beer as a key ingredient. It is commonly accepted that there is an urgent need for sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels for transportation to replace diesel and petrol. One of the most widely used sustainable alternatives to petrol world-wide is bioethanol - in the United States gasoline is
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dibenzoazepine defender: Drug found to be effective against resistant hepatitis C IMAGE: (Upper panel) Val223 and Phe258 of SPP interacts with the inhibitors for SPP and γ-secretase. (Lower panel) The inhibitor prevents proliferation of protozoa in toxoplasma infected mice. The inhibitor also ameliorates... view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka University researchers identify class of chemicals that can combat resistant strains of the hepatitis C virus, as well as pa
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Ingeniøren
Frankrig lover fleksible atomkraftreaktorer, der kan skrue ned, når vinden blæserFrankrigs nationale elselskaber plæderer for, at kernekraften og vedvarende energi skal supplere hinanden i kampen mod fossile brændstoffer.
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New on MIT Technology Review
DeepMind’s Groundbreaking AlphaGo Zero AI Is Now a Versatile Gamer During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery about rare nitrogen molecules offers clues to makeup of life-supporting planetsA new study on atmospheric nitrogen provides a clue about what geochemical signatures of other planets might look like, especially if they are capable of supporting life as we know it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the seaUsing modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut microbiome influenced heavily by social circles in lemursSocial group membership is the most important factor in structuring gut microbiome composition, even when considering shared diet, environment and kinship, according to research on lemurs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes, study suggestsHot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New species discovered in Malaysian rainforest during unprecedented, top-to-bottom survey SAN FRANCISCO (December 6, 2017) - This fall, the California Academy of Sciences partnered with The Habitat Penang Hill and colleagues to conduct a top-to-bottom rainforest survey unprecedented in its comprehensive approach. On Malaysia's island state of Penang, a 117-member team of scientists documented flora and fauna from the tops of towering trees to the dark reaches of damp caves. Over the c
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marshmallow-like silicone gels used as insulation in containers for cryopreserved embryos IMAGE: This is a photograph of the container packing a MG. view more Credit: Gen Hayase As the genetic modification of mice is increasingly used in medical and biological research, so too is the need for an efficient way to transport cryopreserved embryos and sperm. For the preservation of the frozen embryos/sperm, liquid nitrogen is used to keep the temperatures in the transport cont
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How ribosomes shape the proteome IMAGE: Right panel: interaction of positively charged proteins (dark blue) with the ribosome complex (light blue/yellow). Negatively charged proteins do not interact. At high ionic strength (left panel) the positive proteins... view more Credit: Illustration Poolman lab, University of Groningen Cells are crowded with macromolecules, which limits the diffusion of proteins, especially in pr
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Litte Foot takes a bow IMAGE: Professor Ron Clarke busy excavating the Little Foot Skull from the Sterkfontein Caves. view more Credit: Wits University South Africa's status as a major cradle in the African nursery of humankind has been reinforced with today's unveiling of "Little Foot", the country's oldest, virtually complete fossil human ancestor. Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Au
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PolyU reveals high prevalence of bacteria that carry gene mcr-1 in ecosystem Food Safety and Technology Research Centre of the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology (ABCT), The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) recently found that bacteria that carry the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 commonly exist in human and various types of food and environmental samples collected from Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland. The mcr-1 gene is a new plasmid-encoded
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Jumping genes' solve swamp wallaby ancestry IMAGE: This is a swamp wallaby. view more Credit: © Queensland Museum, Gary Cranitch. Swamp wallabies, long thought to be a genus all of their own, have been found to be a member of Macropus, which also includes the large grey and red kangaroos, mid-sized wallaroos, and the smaller woodland wallabies of Australia and New Guinea. Genetic research by QUT evolutionary biologists, Will Dodt a
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive 'supervillain' crab can eat through its gills Invasive green shore crabs can "eat" by absorbing nutrients across its gills--the first demonstration of this ability in crustaceans--scientists from the University of Alberta have found. "People just assumed that, because of their hard body, the crabs would not be able to access nutrients present in the water via the gills, and therefore they could only ingest nutrients through their digestive s
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ice-Diving Drones Embark on Dangerous Antarctic Mission Deep below the bright, weather-smoothed surface of Antarctica’s ice shelves there is a dark landscape unlike any other on Earth. Fed by ice sheets on land, these giant shelves float on the frigid waters of the Southern Ocean. In their undersides melting water has carved out great inverted canyons and caves reaching up hundreds of meters, with terraces and ledges that step upward into the gloom. S
21h
Futurity.org
Nano ‘sushi’ catch toxic amyloids in action When proteins misfold, accumulate, and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. New research captures a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level. The researchers hope this kind of detail can help in the search for drugs to target the incorrectly folding proteins. The clumps of misfolded proteins, called p
21h
Ingeniøren
Aalborg Portland forvandler skidt og møg til grøn cement Hvis der ikke til stadighed fjernes sand ved Hals Barre i den østlige del af Limfjorden, vil sandet efterhånden sætte sig som en prop i sejlrenden. Hvert år pumpes der derfor cirka 40.000 kubikmeter sand op. Det kunne sejles ud og dumpes i Kattegat, men i stedet fragter sandsugeren det vestpå i fjorden til cementfabrikken Aalborg Portland. Her indgår det som en vigtig ingrediens i cementfremstill
22h
New Scientist - News
Superheated water makes microwaved eggs explode when you dig in Yokes on you Maarten Wouters/Getty By Leah Crane Your breakfast plate might be more dangerous than you thought. A hard-boiled egg that’s reheated in the microwave could explode when you bite into it or prick it with your fork, and a new study shows that this may happen up to a third of the time. Anthony Nash , a consultant at Charles M. Salter Associates, was hired as an expert witness for a
22h
New Scientist - News
A boy is missing the vision bit of his brain but can still see A normal brain (left) and the boy missing a visual cortex (right) Description:Inaki-Carril Mundinano,Juan Chen,Mitchell de Souza,Marc G. Sarossy,Marc F. Joanisse,Melvyn A. Goodale,James A. Bourne By Alice Klein An Australian boy missing the visual processing centre of his brain has baffled doctors by seeming to have near-normal sight. The 7-year-old, known as “BI”, lost his primary visual cor
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
After Deployment Storms, Skies Turn Sunny for Multi-Cloud Environments What does digital transformation mean and what does it look like? How does a company change itself to become more competitive? A new worldwide survey produced by MIT Tech Review Custom and sponsored by VMware, provides a detailed snapshot of digital transformation in action. The study looked at large companies that had adopted a multi-cloud infrastructure — a forward-looking IT environment that e
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compound eyes a continuous feature of evolution IMAGE: Compount eyes are a continuous feature of evolution, but have improved in their performance in the course of their developmet. view more Credit: G. Baranov Dr Brigitte Schoenemann (University of Cologne) and her colleagues Helje Pärnaste (Tallinn, Estonia), and Euan Clarkson (Edinburgh, Scotland) have succeeded in unraveling the structure and functioning of the oldest known compound ey
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water. A report on the new discoveries about the reptile, Vadasaurus herzogi , appears online in the Nov. 8 issue of Royal Socie
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Freezing trees, finding answers Ecologist Lindsey Rustad sculpts ice forests. She's not a sculptor by trade, but in her latest ecology experiment, her team sprayed water over a portion of forest during the coldest part of the night. Within hours, the water froze to the branches, simulating an ice storm. Rustad, a scientist with USDA Forest Service, is concerned about evidence suggesting climate change will bring severe ice stor
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling spin for memory storage IMAGE: By applying light, the parallel spin arrangement is changed to antiparallel. view more Credit: Sumio Ishihara Tohoku University researchers have developed a computational simulation that shows that using ultrafast laser pulses to excite electrons in a magnetic material switches them into a transient non-magnetic state. This could reduce the time involved in manipulating a material's ma
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's good to be rare, for some species IMAGE: Attenborough's pitcher plant may be a chronically rare species, though more research is needed to understand which specific species have always been rare. view more Credit: Alastair Robinson/Wikimedia By Dr. Alastair Robinson (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 ( https:/ / creativecommons. org/ licenses/ by/ 3. 0/ legalcode ) or CC BY 3.0 ( https:/ / creativecommons. org/ licenses/ by/ 3. 0/ legalcod
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microcavity-engineered plasmonic resonances for strong light-matter interaction Figure 1. Left. A quantum emitter interacting with a metallic nanostructure in the vacuum. Right. A quantum emitter interacting with a microcavity-engineered metallic nanostructure. Credit: Peking University Achieving strong light-matter interaction at the quantum level has always been a central task in quantum physics since the emergence of quantum information and quantum control. However, the s
22h
Futurity.org
Fragile X discovery may clarify root cause of symptoms Discovery of a previously undetected link between the gene that causes fragile X syndrome and uncontrolled tissue growth could shed light on what’s behind the physical and mental impairments the disorder causes, researchers report. An inheritable genetic condition, fragile X syndrome is estimated to cause mild to moderate intellectual disabilities in 1 in 4,000 to 5,000 males and 1 in 6,000 to 8,
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Feed: All Latest
Freefly Movi: Price, Features, Release Date Tabb Firchau thinks a lot about the future of cinema. He's the president of Freefly Systems, a company that makes high-end camera gear like $20,000 gimbals and $17,000 drones for Hollywood movies and shows. The company's creations help professional filmmakers get sweeping aerial footage they can't capture with a standard camera rig, but those high prices make the equipment—and the shots—inaccessi
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers are working to improve the health of the San Diego River's mountainous tributaries SDSU geography professor Trent Biggs (left) and reserve manager Pablo Bryant . Credit: San Diego State University On an unseasonably warm December afternoon in the mountains of eastern San Diego County, Boulder Creek's name feels half-right—hundreds of stony gray outcrops line a dry indentation in the land. In a couple of months, rain will fill the creek up to six feet deep, forming the largest t
22h
Dagens Medicin
Vangsted til møde med Vestdanmark om styrelsens linjeEn række vestdanske lægefaglige direktører var onsdag til møde om Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds linje. Mødet var positivt og understreger behov for klar kommunikation, siger flere direktører.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Click Speech Is Rare Click sounds, such as those found in some languages in Africa, make perfectly good consonants. So why do they appear so rarely in most human speech? One culprit may be anatomy. Previous studies have suggested that in some speakers of click languages, the alveolar ridge—the rounded bump between the upper teeth and the roof of the mouth—is small or even absent. In recent research, Scott Moisik
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery about rare nitrogen molecules offers clues to makeup of life-supporting planets A team of scientists using a state-of-the-art UCLA instrument reports the discovery of a planetary-scale "tug-of-war" of life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. The Earth's atmosphere differs from the atmospheres of most other rocky planets and moons in our solar system in that it is rich in nitrogen gas, or N2; the Earth's atmosphere is 78 percent nit
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharks MIAMI -- While a little added stress may be helpful to flee a dangerous situation, or to meet an approaching deadline, it's no secret that prolonged exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is linked to health problems. So, what effects does stress have on animals in the wild that need to navigate the same waters as the ocean's top predator -- great white sharks? Predators are known to
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut microbiome influenced heavily by social circles in lemurs, UT study says AUSTIN, Texas -- Social group membership is the most important factor in structuring gut microbiome composition, even when considering shared diet, environment and kinship, according to research on lemurs at The University of Texas at Austin. The gut microbiome refers to the thousands of species of bacteria, viruses and fungi living in the digestive tract. Because of its significant impact on dev
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MU program to improve nursing home care reduces hospitalizations by nearly 50 percent IMAGE: Marilyn Rantz is leading the Missouri Quality Initiative for Nursing Homes which has reduced hospitalizations in participating nursing homes by nearly 50 percent, saving residents money and improving care. view more Credit: MU News Bureau COLUMBIA, Mo. - Researchers from the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing are continuing to see success in their work to improve quality
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient IMAGE: Jung Hyup Kim and his team developed a method for better tracking how nurses in an intensive care unit (ICU) spend their workday. Findings could help improve the health care... view more Credit: MU College of Engineering Previous studies about nurse workflow have used time-motion study methods, which involve manually observing nurses in person or on video and then clocking how mu
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It´s a matter of gradients Credit: P. Rona / NOAA Photo Library Thermophoresis for the energy supply of early cells. NIM scientist Dr Christof Mast and his team suggest thermally driven formation of pH gradients and proton flux as source of chemical energy conversion in early stages of life. The transport of positively charged protons along a pH gradient serves to generate energy in cellular systems where membranes maintai
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
Victims of Sexual Harassment Have a New Resource: AI During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
22h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Actin BurstResearchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.
22h
The Scientist RSS
Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized ClustersBacteria on the tongue's surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.
22h
The Scientist RSS
Clinical Trial Reporting for Pharma-Sponsored Trials Shows ImprovementThe Good Pharma Scorecard finds some big pharmaceutical companies are meeting legal standards for disclosing results-but many studies still go unreported.
22h
Futurity.org
‘Wiretap’ aims to determine what crows caw about What are crows saying when their loud caws fill the night? Despite the ruckus, nobody quite knows. The birds congregate daily before and after sleep, and they make some noise, but what might be happening in those brains is a mystery. Researchers at the University of Washington Bothell are listening in by placing equipment on the roof of their building—a meeting place for some of the thousands of
22h
Ingeniøren
Google fjerner adgang til YouTube på Amazons platforme Google og Amazon slås ikke blot om kunderne. Nu slås de så meget, at det faktisk begynder at gå ud over konkurrentens kunder. Google valgte i går, at deres enorme streamingplatform YouTube ikke længere skal være tilgængelig på Amazons Fire TV, skriver The Verge . En talsmand fra Google skrev, at: »Vi har prøvet at blive enige med Amazon om at give brugerne adgang til begge selskabers produkter og
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research reveals the dark side of brand loyalty Credit: University of Portsmouth New research is the first to establish the darker side of being devoted to your favourite brand. As Christmas takes hold of the nation's wallets, the study reveals that people buy items from their beloved brands because it makes them feel good and reinforces an image of the kind of person they want to be. But this strong brand attachment can encourage excessive pu
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tigers cling to survival in Sumatra's increasingly fragmented forests Researchers on an expedition that tracked endangered tigers through Sumatran jungles for one year have found that tigers are now clinging to survival in low-density populations. The team's findings have renewed fears about the potential for extinction of these elusive predators. Tigers on neighboring islands of Java, Bali and Singapore went extinct in the 20th century, prompting new anti-poaching
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UN signals 'end' of throwaway plastic Image copyright Getty Images The end of the era of throwaway plastic has been signalled by UN environment ministers meeting in Kenya. They signed off a document stating that the flow of plastic into the ocean must be stopped. Scientists welcomed the statement, but were unhappy the agreement was only based in principle, with no firm targets or timetables. Ministers say it's a milestone because it
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscientists develop new material with controllable pores Dmytro Nykypanchuk, a scientist at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, is pictured at the complex materials scattering beamline, where the study was conducted. Credit: US Department of Energy What do your skin, the clothes you wear, and the soil you stand on have in common? They are all porous substances. Like a sponge, their surfaces are covered with tiny holes that allow liquids and gasses
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After 20 years, researcher presents the most complete Australopithecus fossil ever found Credit: Wits University South Africa's status as a major cradle in the African nursery of humankind has been reinforced with today's unveiling of "Little Foot", the country's oldest, virtually complete fossil human ancestor. Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. It is by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 millio
22h
Science | The Guardian
Have we lost an Archaeopteryx but gained a new species of theropod dinosaur? A paper published earlier this week in BMC Evolutionary biology suggests that one of only 12 known Archaeopteryx fossil skeletons is not in fact an Archaeopteryx at all but a new species of theropod dinosaur, Ostromia crassipes. One Dutch newspaper, perhaps over-egging it slightly, went as far as likening the discovery to finding out that your Monet painting turned out to be a Van Gogh . So what
22h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister vil undersøge tilbud til patienter med lavt stofskifteEt eftersyn af tilbuddene til stofskiftepatienter skal klarlægge, om der er brug for en styrket indsats, siger sundhedsministeren.
22h
Ingeniøren
Crispr kan gøre hvede spiselig for glutenallergikere Spanske forskere har ved hjælp af Crispr udviklet en ny type af hvede, der har et lavt indhold af gluten. Den nye hvedetype kan derfor kan spises af glutenallergikere, der lider af cøliaki . Det skriver The Independent . Planteforædling med Crispr Crispr/Cas9 fungerer som en slags dna-saks, som kan klippe et gen over meget præcist i alle organismer. Man designer enzymerne til at binde sig til et
22h
Live Science
Why Microwaved Eggs Explode Hot splatter on your tongue, loud ringing in your ears — these are the consequences of biting a microwaved egg without thinking. Hard-boiled eggs don't react well (or, depending on the perspective, react extremely well) to microwaves. Heat one up in a microwave and — assuming it doesn't burst while the timer is still running — there's a good chance it will go off with a pop and a rain of ho
22h
Viden
Google rykker osten i kikset burger-emoji Hvor skal osten placeres i en burger? Det spørgsmål nåede nye højder, da Googles direktør, Sundar Pichai, for et par måneder siden blandede sig i debatten på Twitter om netop dette emne. På Android-telefoner er osten i burger-emojien nemlig placeret direkte ovenpå bollen, hvilket en bruger påpegede på Twitter . - Jeg tror, vi bliver nødt til tage en snak om, at Googles burger-emoji har osten plac
22h
Dagens Medicin
Diabetespatienter undervurderer deres risiko for hjertesygdommeOmkring hver tredje med diabetes vurderer, at de er i lav risiko for at få hjerte-kar-sygdom, selv om hjertesygdomme er den hyppigste dødsårsag blandt diabetikere.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea lions have unique whiskers that help them catch even the fastest fish Credit: BBC NHU 2017/Rachel Butler Astounding footage of Galapagos sea lions hunting was perhaps the highlight of the latest Blue Planet II . For the first time ever, these marine mammals were filmed working as a pack to drive tuna fish in to shallow, rocky waters where they could be caught. Yellowfin tuna are typically able to outswim all predators but the fastest sharks and marlins, yet the muc
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polyproline protects cell monolayers from freeze damage Credit: Wiley Nature has evolved sugars, amino acids, and special antifreeze proteins as cryoprotectants. People use organic solvents and synthetic polymers as additives to prevent cell cultures from freezing damage. Now, English scientists have combined both methods: In work published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , they introduced polyproline, a polypeptide made of the natural amino acid pro
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality The internet would be nothing without hyperlinks. They are what makes the net a network. They define the paths that give users access to content. And they also help to determine which results search engines show over others. Hyperlinks are set neither evenly nor randomly. What does all this mean for political discourse? And which actors are given disproportionately high visibility? A study examin
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Compound eyes a continuous feature of evolution Fossil tribolite. Credit: University of Cologne Dr Brigitte Schoenemann (University of Cologne) and her colleagues Helje Pärnaste (Tallinn, Estonia), and Euan Clarkson (Edinburgh, Scotland) have succeeded in unraveling the structure and functioning of the oldest known compound eye. The researchers used an exceptionally well-preserved fossil trilobite (Schmidtiellus reetae), which is over half a b
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermal gradients shown to enhance spin transport in graphene Credit: Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Scientists of the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group, led by ICREA Prof. Sergio O. Valenzuela, have contributed to the literature on spin caloritronics with a focus on the effect of thermal gradients on spins in graphene. The paper titled "Thermoelectric spin voltage in graphene" was published this week in Nature Nanotechn
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Live 3-D imaging highlights cellular activity during embryonic heart development Live imaging techniques have given Spanish researchers deeper insight into the development of the embryonic heart in mice. Their analysis reveals the coordination that occurs between cardiac progenitor cells – cells similar to stem cells that can change into another specific type of cell during heart development. They found that progenitor cells go through alternate phases of changing into cardia
23h
Popular Science
These aquatic creatures eat in seriously strange ways There are lots of disadvantages to living underwater . Oxygen is a lot harder to come by, for one. For another, you get all pruny. But one of the big advantages is that you’re basically bobbing around in a big nutrient soup. Apart from basic gases, there’s not a lot of useful material floating around in the air, so breathing is not a practical way for land-lubbing animals to feed. Most of us have
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want to listen better? Lend a right ear IMAGE: Displays an example of dichotic digit stimuli presentation, with both 'A' binaural separation tasks (i.e., directed ear) and 'B' binaural integration (i.e., free recall) instructions. view more Credit: Sacchinelli, Weaver, Wilson and Cannon - Auburn University WASHINGTON, D.C. December 6, 2017 -- Listening is a complicated task. It requires sensitive hearing and the ability to proces
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutan
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What gave early New Orleans jazz clarinets their unique sound? WASHINGTON, D.C. December 6, 2017 -- The hauntingly beautiful "wailing" sounds of early New Orleans jazz clarinets, often featured in brass bands or jazz funerals, are one of the most distinctive instrument styles in American music. The unique sound begs the question: What's behind incredible their range of sound and tonal variety? During the 174th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, be
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environments IMAGE: The word cloud of patient responses based on reports. view more Credit: The Beryl Institute WASHINGTON, D.C. December 6, 2017-- Spending a night in the hospital is not only stressful, but also loud. The constant beeps, whirrs and alarms ascend to a cacophony that produces anything but a relaxing, restful environment. Ilene Busch-Vishniac, of BeoGrin Consulting in Baltimore, Maryland, w
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success WASHINGTON, D.C. December 6, 2017 -- The acoustics of a political speech delivery are known to be a powerful influencer of voter preferences, perhaps giving some credence to the saying, "It's not what you say, but how you say it." Vocal disorders change the qualities of a person's speech, and voice scientists Rosario Signorello and Didier Demolin at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris have fo
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine invertebrates have noisy human neighbors IMAGE: This is a standing wave tube design. view more Credit: J.S. Krumholtz, D.M. Hudson, D.L. Pochtar, N.C. Dickenson, G.A. Dossot, E.B. Baker, T.E. Moll WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 6, 2017 -- Just like humans, marine life experiences constant stress. They face threats of competition, the fear of predation and a growing list of anthropogenically induced stressors. Humans have contributed to risi
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microwaved exploding eggs make for an unusual acoustic experiment IMAGE: If you have looked closely at a microwave's warnings or have experienced an accidental explosion, you know that certain foods pose a risk due to an increase in their internal... view more Credit: Shutterstock/montreep WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 6, 2017 -- Microwave ovens are often a fast way of warming food and have become a staple cooking appliance in both household kitchens and restauran
23h
Science-Based Medicine
False Claims for Acupuncture The principles of science-based medicine include using all available scientific evidence to assess the safety, efficacy, and risk vs benefit of any medical intervention. Further, treatments supported by rigorous evidence should be preferred over those with less scientific support, and there should be a lower boundary of plausibility and evidence below which it is unethical to recommend treatments
23h
The Atlantic
Ring To throw your hat in is to make yourself bare- headed, ready— by oils to be anointed, or by ark- hard rains, of an instant, stricken.
23h
Feed: All Latest
Saudi Prince Plans a 'City of the Future.' Don't Bet on It From time immemorial, rulers have built new cities to satisfy everything from security to vanity. Some of those cities crumbled into obsolescence; others blossomed into capitals of legend. The recipe for success remains elusive, but that hasn’t stopped successive generations from trying. And if recent moves are any gauge, the 21st century will see a surge of new and often grandiose plans. The mos
23h
Feed: All Latest
Your Online Shopping Habit Is Fueling a Robotics Renaissance Go ahead, hit that BUY NOW button. Procure that sweater or TV or pillow that looks like a salmon fillet . Hit that button and fulfill the purpose of a hardworking warehouse robot. Just know this: the more you rely on online shopping, the more online retailers rely on robots to deliver those products to you. Robots shuttle cabinets of goods around warehouses. Other robots scan barcodes to do inven
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering the design principles of cellular compartments Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have uncovered the principles underlying the formation and organization of membraneless organelles, which are thought to regulate a single cell's movement and division. Credit: Pappu Lab Membraneless organelles are tiny droplets inside a single cell, thought to regulate everything from division, to movement, to its very destruction. A better underst
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A about the toughness of NASA's webb telescope NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will orbit the sun, 1 million miles away from the Earth at what is called the second Lagrange point, or L2. What is special about this orbit is that it lets the telescope stay in line with the Earth as it moves around the sun. Credit: NASA Just how resilient does a space telescope have to be to survive both Earth's environment and the frigid, airless environment
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What gave early New Orleans jazz clarinets their unique sound? The hauntingly beautiful "wailing" sounds of early New Orleans jazz clarinets, often featured in brass bands or jazz funerals, are one of the most distinctive instrument styles in American music. The unique sound begs the question: What's behind incredible their range of sound and tonal variety? During the 174th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, being held Dec. 4-8, 2017, in New Orlea
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success The acoustics of a political speech delivery are known to be a powerful influencer of voter preferences, perhaps giving some credence to the saying, "It's not what you say, but how you say it." Vocal disorders change the qualities of a person's speech, and voice scientists Rosario Signorello and Didier Demolin at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris have found that this alters politicians' per
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollutionWildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine invertebrates have noisy human neighbors Standing wave tube design. Credit: J.S. Krumholtz, D.M. Hudson, D.L. Pochtar, N.C. Dickenson, G.A. Dossot, E.B. Baker, T.E. Moll Just like humans, marine life experiences constant stress. They face threats of competition, the fear of predation and a growing list of anthropogenically induced stressors. Humans have contributed to rising ocean temperatures, increases in pollution, ocean acidificatio
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microwaved exploding eggs make for an unusual acoustic experiment If you have looked closely at a microwave's warnings or have experienced an accidental explosion, you know that certain foods pose a risk due to an increase in their internal pressure, and potatoes and hard-boiled eggs are among the most common culprits. Credit: Shutterstock/montreep Microwave ovens are often a fast way of warming food and have become a staple cooking appliance in both household
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual fur flies as 'CryptoKitties' collar blockchain If I was virtual, would you love me to bits? Never mind Bitcoin mania taking the doyen of virtual currencies into the stratosphere. The real online craze to get with right now is to breed virtual cats. Net-based cousins of the Tamagotchi digital pet launched in Japan 20 years ago, "CryptoKitties" are wowing owners of Ethereum, one of Bitcoin's main rivals. With some 50,000 sold for more than $6.6
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Ingeniøren
Professor: Ingen beviser for, at Sundhedsplatformen øger effektivitet og patientsikkerhed De mål om mere sikre og effektive hospitaler, som Region Hovedstaden har lagt frem i forhold til Danmarks største sundheds-it-projekt Sundhedsplatformen, er på ingen måde underbygget i den eksisterende forskning. Professor Jørgen Bansler, Datalogisk Institut, Københavns Universitet: Amerikansk forskning peger på en række problemer med indholdet i elektroniske journaler, som allerede har haft indf
1d
NYT > Science
UnitedHealth Buys Large Doctors Group as Lines Blur in Health Care The possible threat of new competitors like Amazon entering the pharmacy business and technology companies delivering medical care through cellphones has led former adversaries to become partners , driving insurers to team up with hospitals and doctors’ groups. They are seeking to deliver care in novel ways, outside the expensive setting of a hospital. While the combination with CVS allows Aetna
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The Atlantic
Future Historians Probably Won't Understand Our Internet, and That's Okay What’s happening? This has always been an easier question to pose—as Twitter does to all its users—than to answer. And how well we answer the question of what is happening in our present moment has implications for how this current period will be remembered. Historians, economists, and regular old people at the corner store all have their methods and heuristics for figuring out how the world arou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handed When proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. Now, researchers, including University of Michigan biophysicists, have obtained a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level. The researchers hope this kind of detail can help in the search for drugs to target the incorrectly fol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From a spaghetti-like jumble of microfibers and water comes a promising new material Princeton researchers have found that when tiny strands of flexible material are forced through a syringe, they produce a highly useful material known as a hydrogel. The discovery points to a new method to create injectable hydrogels, squishy materials similar to living tissues. Credit: Princeton University Princeton researchers have discovered that when water flows around long plastic fibers, th
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Inside Baidu’s Bid to Lead the AI Revolution Presumably, Robin Li wanted attention last summer when he decided to launch Baidu’s bid for the future of self-driving cars from the front seat of a car that was driving itself. He wanted to draw attention to Apollo, the company’s new set of artificial intelligence-driven tools, which Li hopes will come to power vehicles everywhere. Having launched China’s dominant search engine, Li is a celebrit
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Feed: All Latest
The AI Company That Helps Boeing Cook New Metals for Jets At HRL Laboratories in Malibu, California, materials scientist Hunter Martin and his team load a grey powder as fine as confectioner’s sugar into a machine. They’ve curated the powder recipe—mostly aluminum, blended with some other elements—down to the atom. The machine, a 3-D metal printer, lays the powder down a single dusting at time, while a laser overhead welds the layers together. Over seve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple CEO hopeful banned apps will return to China storeApple's chief executive said Wednesday he's optimistic some apps that fell afoul of China's tight internet laws will eventually be restored after being removed earlier this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First light for ESPRESSO—the next generation planet hunter This colorful image shows spectral data from the First Light of the ESPRESSO instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile. The light from a star has been dispersed into its component colors. This view has been colorized to indicate how the wavelengths change across the image, but these are not exactly the colours that would be seen visually. Close inspection shows many dark spectral lines in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birth control for parasites: Researchers reveal new vaccine target for malaria Plasmodium parasite (green) infecting red blood cells, inducing malaria. Credit: Imperial College London Scientists have identified a protein involved in the life cycle of the malarial parasite, paving the way for a new vaccine to reduce disease spread. Malaria, a disease caused by the transfer of the Plasmodium parasite from certain mosquitos to humans, is responsible for 429,000 deaths every ye
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new tool to help plan for expected growth in electric vehicles More than 700,000 plug-in electric vehicles are expected on Southern California roads by the end of 2025. Credit: University of California, Los Angeles More than 82,000 electric vehicles were registered in Southern California between 2011 and 2015. The number of new plug-in electric vehicles registered there in 2015 increased a whopping 992 percent from 2011. Now, a report produced by the UCLA Lu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Surviving the onslaught of invasive speciesNo place on the planet is truly isolated anymore, which means invasive species travel as easy as humans, hitchhiking on boats and planes with potentially devastating effects on the ecosystems they land in.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene at the forefront of a sports footwear revolution Credit: University of Manchester A University of Manchester partnership is launching a revolutionary world-first in the sports footwear market following a unique collaboration with graphene experts. British sportswear brand inov-8 has teamed up with The University of Manchester to become the first-ever company to incorporate graphene into running and fitness shoes. Laboratory tests have shown t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extreme fieldwork, drones, climate modeling yield new insights about Greenland's melting ice sheet A UCLA-led team was the first to measure Greenland’s melting glaciers from the top of the ice sheet. Their discoveries could help scientists better predict sea level rise. Credit: University of California, Los Angeles A new UCLA-led study reinforces the importance of collaboration in assessing the effects of climate change. The research, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cooling climate drove evolution of the Tasmanian devil and its relatives Tasmanian devil. Credit: University of Salford A big drop in global temperatures 12-14 million years ago may explain the evolutionary success of Australia's unique marsupial carnivores, a new study has found. Tasmanian devils, the cat-like Quoll and several shrew-like species are among 80 species of carnivorous marsupials called "dasyurids" which still inhabit parts of Australia and New Guinea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lemurs' gut microbiomes influenced heavily by social circles, study says A group of lemurs in Kirindy Mitea National Park in Madagascar. Credit: Photo courtesy of Amanda Perofsky, UT Austin Social group membership is the most important factor in structuring gut microbiome composition, even when considering shared diet, environment and kinship, according to research on lemurs at The University of Texas at Austin. The gut microbiome refers to the thousands of species of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodiversity surprises at bubbly deep-sea cold seeps along Cascadia fault Figure 1: Tubeworm bushes were discovered at the Hecata cold seep off the coast of Oregon in 2016. Cold seeps along the Cascadia Margin attract surprisingly rich and diverse microbial and animal communities, including crabs (top middle). Credit: Ocean Exploration Trust A new study led by Oregon State University (OSU) graduate student Sarah Seabrook that uses scientific data and samples from Ocean
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mid-Atlantic residents see ocean health as major economic issue Credit: CC0 Public Domain Eight in 10 residents of Mid-Atlantic states believe the ocean and beaches are important to their economies, including 95 percent of those living in coastal communities. Eighty-three percent of residents living in coastal communities believe that climate change is real—13 percentage points higher than a national survey taken by Monmouth University in 2015. Support for of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report identifies ways to rejuvenate Alaska's commercial fishing fleet A new report on Alaska's aging fishing fleet and loss of access to commercial fisheries in rural communities recommends five steps to reverse these troubling trends. The report , called "Turning the Tide," is based on a global review of access to commercial fisheries . It is the work of a research team at the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Alaska Sea Grant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aussie owls fall foul of rat poisons Credit: Edith Cowan University Lethal toxins from commercial rat poisons (rodenticides) have been found in more than 70 per cent of Australia's smallest and most common owl species, the Southern Boobook (Ninox novaeseelandiae). PhD candidate Michael Lohr of Edith Cowan University's Centre for Ecosystem Management said the problem is linked to Australian use of poisons restricted in many other cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combined imaging approach characterises plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease Histology, FTIR, XFM, and tissue autofluorescence imaging of Aβ-plaques. Credit: University of Adelaide Australian Synchrotron X-ray and infrared imaging techniques have been used in a powerful combined approach to characterise the composition of amyloid plaques that are associated with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is major international health problem that accounts for 50-75 per cent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool for the early detection of blue-green algaeAlgae and/or cyanobacteria blooms are increasingly invading Quebec's waters, with some 500 bodies of water affected in the past 10 years. Methods for tracking these microorganisms are costly and labour-intensive, but satellite imaging has shown real promise as a way to monitor their development. However, early detection of blooms in freshwater is a challenge. A research team led by INRS professor
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Ingeniøren
Havarikommission: Flere regler brudt op til dødsulykke med godstogDet var kutyme at rangere tog uden at få de rette tilladelser, og den omkomne togklargøringselev burde ikke have arbejdet uden opsyn, skriver havarikommissionen i sin rapport om sidste års dødsulykke på kombiterminalen i Høje Taastrup.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First step toward practical application of holographic memory with magnetic assist Reconstructed image with and without magnetic assist. Credit: (C) Toyohashi University Of Technology. In recent years, due to technology such as the Internet and 8K broadcasting, more information is being distributed across the world. Along with this trend, there is a demand for an innovative method for storing large volumes of data at ultra-high recording density and at ultra-high speed. Magneti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Preventing the next blackout Large power transformers are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather conditions exacerbated by climate change. Credit: Iris Shreve Garrott/Flickr Nine of the 10 biggest blackouts in U.S. history were caused by hurricanes, whose sustained high winds have knocked out power lines over broad geographical areas. Topping the list is Hurricane Maria, which in October disabled the electric grid in Pue
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Live Science
Tiny Spider Gobbles Tadpole in Never-Before-Seen Behavior A jumping spider was caught eating a tadpole in the Western Ghats in India. Credit: Sagar Satpute Forget meals of flies and gnats; those are for amateurs. One jumping spider in India is feasting on tadpoles instead. For the first time, researchers have observed a jumping spider preying on a tadpole. The scientists stumbled across the strange scene in the Kumbharli Ghat mountain pass of west
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Live Science
Jumping Spider Eating Tadpole (Photos) Snagging a Snack In a first-ever observation, scientists have documented a jumping spider catch and eat a tadpole. Though some large species of jumping spiders have been known to prey on frogs and lizards, this is the first time any jumping spider has been seen attacking a tadpole. Here, the spider struggles to pull its prey up a muddy cliff face. Unusual hunt A doomed tadpole's developing legs a
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Feed: All Latest
Will Russia's Olympic Ban Shred the Culture of Doping? It took a while, but Russia finally got body-checked out of the Olympic Games. The road to ruin began in 2015, when two Russian track athletes-turned-whistleblowers raised suspicion about widespread state-sponsored doping at the 2012 London Games, followed by an independent report about problems at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. Now, the International Olympic Committee has slammed the door on Ru
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Feed: All Latest
What Happens When an Algorithm Helps Write Science Fiction 1 “Topic modeling,” Hammond says of the process he and Brooke used to create the 14 rules, “is mathematically sophisticated but otherwise stupid. The algorithm looks for words that tend to occur near one another in a very large corpus of text.” Based on how frequently the words appear together, Hammond determined what my story had to be about. For instance, after finding clusters of words through
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Dagens Medicin
Myndigheder og producenter skal have helt styr på kliniske data for lægemidlerDet altafgørende, at vi stopper dårligt dokumenteret halvfabrikata før det havner i medicin på det danske marked.
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The Atlantic
Can You Prove Your Innocence Without DNA? E arlier this year, I visited the New Jersey home of Jim McCloskey. We sat at his dining-room table, eating takeout Greek on paper plates. McCloskey is 75, stocky and bald, with wisps of white hair that tend to stand on end, as if he’s just walked across a carpet in wool socks. For more than three decades, he has worked to exonerate the wrongly convicted. The group he founded, Centurion Ministrie
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Ingeniøren
17-årige Cathrine afvist til teoriprøve: Politisystem mener, hun er 4 Et it-system, der håndterer køreprøver hos politiet, evner ikke at tage højde for borgere, der er født på en skuddag, skriver TV2 Lorry . Derfor afviste systemet i torsdags den ellers 17-årige Cathrine Skjøtt i at kunne tage en teoriprøve til kørekort. Hun er nemlig født d. 29. februar, altså i et skudår. Dermed har hun strengt teknisk kun har haft fødselsdag fire gange i sit liv. Og så meldte sy
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Ingeniøren
Kinesere søsætter elektrisk fragtskib Både Danmark, Sverige, Norge og Finland er i gang med at introducere elektriske færger. På trods af store investeringer er der fordele i form af lavere driftsomkostninger og bedre miljø i og omkring færgen. Nu har et kinesisk rederi i Guangzhou søsat et elektrisk fragtskib. Det er 70,5 meter langt og har en lastkapacitet på 2.000 ton. Ifølge det kinesiske medie Chinanews.com , skal skibet sejle m
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Ingeniøren
Store konsulenthuse fra hele landet søger ingeniører Erfaren VVS/Ventilation Ingeniør Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma A/S Konstruktør/teknisk designer Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma A/S Konstruktions Ingeniør Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma A/S Standardiseringskonsulent Medcom Teamleder til Laboratorie & Data HOFOR A/S Analytics Consultant Wunderman A/S Dynamics NAV seniorkonsulent Netcompany A/S Seniorkonsulenter søges til Infor
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Ingeniøren
Vejsalt sender regnvandsprojekter på glatis Træer og andre planter, som pynter langs danske veje, bliver hvert år udpint af tørke forårsaget af vejsalt. Problemet koster årligt kommunerne store beløb og stikker potentielt en kæp i hjulet på flere projekter, der skal håndtere stigende regnvandsmængder. Når regnen vælter ned over danske veje, vil kommuner på tværs af landet gerne lede vandet væk fra kloaksystemerne. Dermed vil de kunne undgå
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Dagens Medicin
Demensforsker får Lassen-prisen
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Viden
Kendt DNA-ekspert: Sex er vejen til hurtig integration Forskning i vores forfædres vandringer rundt på planeten og deres forplantning på kryds og tværs af befolkningsgrupper har fået DNA-forsker Eske Willerslev til at skifte holdning til indvandring. Før var han skeptisk. Nu er han varm tilhænger. Som leder af Center for GeoGenetik ved Københavns Universitet har Eske Willerslev og kollegerne været med til at omskrive historien om vores oprindelse. De
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Dagens Medicin
Forskningsprojekt skal skræddersy individuelle kræftvaccinerEn kræftvaccine målrettet den enkelte kræftpatients helt unikke celleforandringer er målet for et nyt dansk forskningssamarbejde.
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Science : NPR
Evaluating Smoking Bans A new study indicates that smoking bans, which were designed to affect adults' behavior, in fact improve children's health.
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Ingeniøren
2016 var det sikreste år i luftfartens historie Selvom der årligt opstår nye tragedier, som flypassagerer med gru kan mindes, når turbulensen er allerværst, så er civil luftfart en ekstremt sikker transportform. Og sidste år var det hidtil sikreste. Med kun 2,1 omkomne per 10 millioner flyvninger i 2016, var frekvensen af dødsfald for luftfarten på verdensplan lavere end nogensinde før. Det viser Trafik, Bygge og Boligministeriets 'Sikkerhedsr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cambodia seizes shipment of ivory hidden in hollow logs Cambodian authorities display pieces of smuggled ivory Cambodia has seized nearly a tonne of ivory hidden in hollowed-out logs and discovered inside an abandoned shipping container, an official said Wednesday. The country has become a key regional transit point for the illicit wildlife trade. Nearly 280 pieces of ivory—full and partial elephant tusks—were found in the container at the southwest
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New Scientist - News
Japan’s refusal to stop ivory trade undermines bans elsewhere By Andy Coghlan Japan has got out of implementing tough measures to clamp down on domestic sales of ivory. The move could undermine the international effort to halt the ivory trade. Elephants are poached for the ivory in their tusks, which is sold on to consumers in Asian countries like China and Vietnam. As a result, the ivory trade is a significant threat to elephants’ survival. Last week,
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Forskeren der blev fascineret af fisk 06. december 2017 Forskeren der blev fascineret af fisk SCIENCE Formidlingspris 2017 Camilla Trab Damsgaard, lektor i børneernæring på Institut for Idræt og Ernæring på Københavns Universitet, modtager SCIENCE Formidlingspris 2017. Hun får prisen som initiativtager og forskningsleder for projekt FiSK - et samarbejdsprojekt mellem Københavns Universitet og fire danske akvarier. Camilla Trab Dams
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Dagens Medicin
Nye muligheder i Fredericia Sundhedshus lokker læger tilFredericia Kommune har lyttet til de praktiserende læger, da de skulle indrette det nye sundhedshus. Det har fået 13 læger til at sige ja tak til en praksis i sundhedshuset, heriblandt fem nye læger til kommunen.
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Dagens Medicin
Almen praksis kan lære amerikanere om forebyggelse Det amerikanske sundhedsvæsen kan lære meget af Danmarks almen praksis, for fremtiden ligger i mere og bedre forebyggelse, siger dansk amerikaner med års erfaring på området.
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Ingeniøren
Appens industrielle fætter forfiner og forenkler robotløsninger Ville nogen kontakte Spotify for at få dem til at skræddersy en musikstreamingstjeneste til deres mobiltelefon? Næppe. Vil man høre musik, downloader man da bare appen. I løbet af de kommende år vil nogenlunde denne metode med at downloade en app vinde indpas i produktionen, forudser Casper Hansen, adm. direktør i virksomheden Technicon: »Hvorfor skulle industrien ikke stille samme krav til færdi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Duke Energy vendor's hack may mean stolen customer bank info The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Carolina county's servers hacked; $23K ransom sought The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia's selfie-snapping monkey named 'Person of the Year' The court case set off an international about personhood for animals and whether they can own property An Indonesian monkey who shot to fame after it snapped a grinning selfie—and sparked a landmark US copyright case—was named "Person of the Year" Wednesday by the animal rights group that took on the simian's cause. The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) said it was honouring Naru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippines a global hotspot for environmental murders Nieves Rosento, mayor of the town of El Nido, Palawan island, the Philippines, speaks at the wake of murdered environmental para-enforcer Ruben Arzaga, from the Palawan NGO Network Inc (PNNI) Environmental activists are being killed in record numbers around the world, with the corruption-plagued Philippines one of the most dangerous countries, according to watchdog Global Witness. At least 200 co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australian dogs trained to sniff out endangered species Australian researchers are training dogs to sniff out the droppings of the endangered tiger quoll Australian dogs are being trained to sniff out the droppings of endangered animals in a scheme that offers greater understanding of threatened species through the less-intrusive method of canine tracking. Emma Bennett, a PhD candidate at Monash University in Melbourne, is working with environmentally
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Confiscation crusaders try to save Philippine paradise Efren "Tata" Balladares and his men track illegal loggers through the forests of Palawan and confiscate their chainsaws Tata gives hand signals for his men to drop to the rainforest floor as the searing whine of a chainsaw fades, their mission to save a critically endangered piece of paradise in the Philippines suddenly on hold. Former para-military leader Efren "Tata" Balladares has been leading
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delivery robots will need permits to roam San Francisco The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ed Sheeran rules Spotify in 2017 Ed Sheeran, 26, has seized on the rapid growth of streaming during his rise to pop fame English singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran dominated Spotify in 2017, with his latest album "Divide" played 3.1 billion times worldwide, the leading streaming service said Tuesday. The ginger-haired pop guitarist was streamed more than any other artist in the year so far—not a surprise, considering his song "Shape o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big fines planned for 'revenge porn' in Australia Social media firms could be fined US$380,000 under new Australian laws cracking down on 'revenge porn' Social media networks face fines of more than Aus$500,000 (US$380,000) under new Australian laws proposed Wednesday cracking down on "revenge porn", with individuals distributing images without consent also risking hefty punishment. It follows a survey this year that revealed abuses, including s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google blocks YouTube on Amazon devices in escalating feud This Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, file photo shows an Amazon Fire TV streaming device with its remote control. On Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, Google announced plans to pull its popular YouTube video service from Amazon's Fire TV and Echo Show devices in an escalating feud that has caught consumers in the crossfire. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) Google is pulling its popular YouTube video service from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon claims record-breaking Australia launch Amazon already had Aus$1 billion (US$760 million) in sales in Australia annually through shipping from overseas before launching its local site, according to Morgan Stanley analysts Amazon's Australia launch was the company's biggest-ever opening day for orders, the US giant said Wednesday, but some shoppers were underwhelmed by the range of goods and prices on offer. The country's retailers have
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach measures early human butchering practices Archaeologist and biostatistician Erik Otárola-Castillo leads the research team that used 3-D imaging, shape analysis and Bayesian statistics to identify butchery cut marks with an 88 percent success rate in classifying butchery behaviors. The 3D imaging technology is similar to what engineers use to measure scratches on microchips and surgical blade sharpness. The findings are published in the J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real? Relic of St Nicholas (pelvis fragment) at St. Martha of Bethany Church/Shrine of All Saints, Morton Grove Ill., USA. Credit: copyright T. Higham & G. Kazan Was St Nicholas, the fourth century saint who inspired the iconography of Santa Claus, a legend or was he a real person? New Oxford University research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the rig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poll: At least one-fourth of Asian Americans report workplace, housing discrimination Credit: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experi
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The Atlantic
Ferocious Wind-Driven Wildfires Burn Across Southern California Some of the strongest Santa Ana winds recorded in years have been pushing several sudden and destructive wildfires across the hills and towns north of Los Angeles, burning thousands of acres and hundreds of structures and forcing tens of thousands to flee their homes over the past two days. Hundreds of firefighters are stretched across suburbs and foothills tonight, trying to contain fires that a
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Viden
Er det sundt at spise sin moderkage? Katte spiser den, hunde spiser den, og de seneste år er det også blevet populært blandt mennesker at spise den, fordi det angiveligt skulle have positiv effekt på helbredet. Læs også: VIDEO Katja spiste af moderkagen, da hun havde født Vi taler om moderkagen. Organet, der sørger for, at dit barn får ilt og næring under graviditeten, og som nogle nybagte mødre spiser, fordi den er fyldt med vitami
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Ingeniøren
Porno-links bomber danske sider i bund på Google Link-bombing er en type cyberangreb, der flyver noget under radaren. Angrebene fungerer ved, at folk med onde hensigter køber tusindvis af links til at pege mod en hjemmeside, f.eks. en webshop, og det får Google til at lægge siden på den dødsensfarlige side 2 - eller endnu længere inde - i søgemaskinens dyb Det er ikke ulovligt, men har alvorlige konsekvenser, fordi en god Google-placering er al
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Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 6. december Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: Europas største elbilbatterifabrik bygges i Tyskland. Til hvor mange busser regner fabrikken med at producere batterier til årligt? Klik her for at besvare Dagens låge præsenteres af Kamstrup Kamstrup er blandt verdens førende leve
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Science | The Guardian
Inequalities among older people, especially women, 'shameful' Older women are more likely to be poor, socially isolated, badly housed, unhealthy and die sooner because of a lifetime of lower pay and unequal working conditions than older men, according to a new report. A study by the Centre for Ageing Better found “shameful” and stark contrasts in people’s experiences of later life, with severe inequalities among older people largely a product of poverty and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach measures early human butchering practices WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- Researchers, led by a Purdue University anthropology professor, have found that statistical methods and 3D imaging can be used to accurately measure animal bone cut marks made by prehistoric human butchery, and to help answer pressing questions about human evolution. Archaeologist and biostatistician Erik Otárola-Castillo leads the research team that used 3-D imaging
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Activity matters: How Fitbit can help us understand cancer surgery recovery A new study published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine finds that more activity during inpatient recovery predicted lower risk of 30- and 60-day readmission after surgery for metastatic peritoneal cancer. By monitoring patients using Fitbit, researchers found that higher Fitbit steps forecast better patient outcomes. Exercise is encouraged after surgery and is a key component of recovery, but pos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Green' cataract surgery model drastically reduces environmental footprint IMAGE: The waste generation from just one cataract surgery in the United States compared to the waste generation from 93 cataract surgeries in India view more Credit: Cassandra Thiel, PhD Transportation and fossil fuel industries typically come to mind as major sources of pollution. Less noticed is the contribution of the healthcare industry, which emits nearly ten percent of greenhouse
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain remaps itself in child with double hand transplant The first child to undergo a successful hand transplant also is the first child in whom scientists have detected massive changes in how sensations from the hands are represented in the brain. The brain reorganization is thought to have begun six years before the transplant, when the child had both hands amputated because of a severe infection during infancy. Notably, after he received transplante
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes CLEVELAND, Ohio (Dec 6, 2017)--Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes. Results are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants IMAGE: Aphids of Brevicoryne brassicae and the aphid parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae on Brassicanigra flowers. view more Credit: Photo credit Dani Lucas-Barbosa A New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers examine how opioids affect proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors In a new study, researchers have characterized the effects of a series of opioids on proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors. In the British Journal of Pharmacology study, several synthetic opioids inhibited serotonin and norepinephrine transporters, which may contribute to their analgesic properties but may also increase the risk of serotonin toxicity, a group of symptoms that can incl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines brain activity and anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder The error-related negativity (ERN) is a brain signal response to errors that is thought to reflect threat sensitivity and has been implicated in anxiety disorders in individuals without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A new Autism Research study has revealed that the ERN is related to social anxiety symptoms -- specifically performance fears -- in youth with ASD. The findings suggest that heighte
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precision medicine test may help detect coronary artery disease In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, a blood-based precision medicine test incorporating age, sex, and gene expression score (ASGES) was helpful in evaluating older outpatients with symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). In the study of 176 stable, non-acute outpatients presenting with symptoms suggestive of obstructive CAD who were aged 65 and older,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain changes following childhood limb loss may be reversible In a recent study, investigators found that certain changes in the brain that occurred after limb amputation in a child were reversible after restoring sensory input through bilateral hand transplantation. The findings are published in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology . "We are still learning exactly how these large-scale changes in the brain's representation of the body occur;
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amount or intensity? Study examines potential benefits of exercise for patients with heart failure Physical activity can benefit patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a common condition with no pharmacological treatment, but no clear recommendations exist on the optimal amount or intensity of physical activity for these patients. A new ESC Heart Failure study found that a higher amount of physical activity is related to higher sub-maximal exercise capacity and physica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Technology may help increase number of kidneys transplanted Many deceased donor kidneys are declined for transplantation because of concerns over their quality, but a new BJS ( British Journal of Surgery ) study found that a technique called normothermic machine perfusion can assess the quality of a kidney and determine its suitability for transplantation. "Of five kidneys that would normally be discarded but were found suitable by the technique, four fun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physical activity in mid-life may help protect joint health during aging In an Arthritis Care & Research analysis of 6661 participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, maintaining at least low levels of physical activity throughout middle age was associated with lower prevalence and incidence of joint symptoms later in life. The potential protective effect of physical activity on joint symptoms was stronger in obese women than in under or normal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prior exposure to smoking may affect infants' respiratory health In a Pediatric Pulmonology study of children aged 15 months, increasing hair nicotine levels were related to prior parent-reported smoking exposure and were associated with potential increased risks of wheeze and asthma. In the study of 376 infants, researchers obtained detailed information from parents about smoking exposure during pregnancy and in the home at 3 and 15 months of age. Data for de
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US and Norwegian trials compare treatment options for opioid dependence The current opioid epidemic is destroying lives, families, and communities. Medication is widely considered to be the most effective treatment, but far too few people who could benefit are actually treated. Two medications, buprenorphine and naltrexone--representing pharmacologically and conceptually opposite approaches--are available for office-based treatment, yet until now, patients, families,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors--and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens Chronic sleep deprivation--which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school--has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental health risks: new research finds that for teenagers, even a short period of sleep restriction could, over t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing of migration is changing for songbirds on the Pacific coast IMAGE: Volunteers assisted with bird banding efforts at the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory that identified changes in the timing of songbird migration. view more Credit: San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory Changes in the timing of birds' migration can have serious negative effects if, for example, they throw the birds out of sync with the food resources they depend on. A new study from The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis In the US alone, more than 2 million people struggle with opioid use disorders. Opioids, often prescribed as pain medications, have now become the country's leading cause of drug overdose. But scientists are identifying ways to help combat the epidemic, which include getting people treatment faster, developing safer opioids, and helping patients choose appropriate treatment. A number of recent br
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Feed: All Latest
Ethiopian Espionage Shows Commercial Spyware Is Out of Control Throughout 2016 and 2017, individuals in Canada, United States, Germany, Norway, United Kingdom, and numerous other countries began to receive suspicious emails. It wasn’t just common spam. These people were chosen . WIRED OPINION ABOUT Ronald Deibert ( @rondeibert ) is professor of political science and director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Timing of migration is changing for songbirds on the Pacific coast Volunteers assisted with bird banding efforts at the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory that identified changes in the timing of songbird migration. Credit: San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory Changes in the timing of birds' migration can have serious negative effects if, for example, they throw the birds out of sync with the food resources they depend on. A new study from The Condor: Ornithologic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plantsA New Phytologist study indicates that plants prioritize the protection of flowers over leaves and that simultaneous attack by aphids, caterpillars and bacteria leaves plants vulnerable to aphids but more protected from caterpillars.
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New on MIT Technology Review
This VR Exhibit Lets You Connect with the Human Side of War Sun streams through a grid of skylights, carving the gallery’s wooden floor into a checkerboard. When I look up, I can see wispy clouds passing overhead. Large photos hang on the gallery walls. They’re pictures of a landscape devastated by war and portraits of men fighting in those wars. I hear footsteps behind me. I turn around and watch two figures enter the room and take up stations in front o
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Science | The Guardian
It's OK not to be OK: why we need to embrace sadness | Johanna Leggatt I have never suffered from a depressive episode. I’ve never thought of harming myself or been suicidal, nor have I been afflicted with any serious form of anxiety. Don’t get me wrong, my mind, like most people’s, is a confounding and mysterious place, but it’s also predictable in its mix of competing thoughts, grand ambitions and impractical whims. It doesn’t agitate or disturb, and there is no s
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Ingeniøren
Styrker humor dine jobchancer? Tre eksperter giver dig svaret. Jokes, ironi og sarkasme er muligvis elementer, du skal springe fuldstændig udenom, når du søger job. Spørgsmålet forsøger Jobfinders at besvare med et panel af rekrutteringseksperter. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/oeger-god-joke-dine-jobchancer-11476 Emner Arbejdsmarked Arbejdsmiljø Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
Ny kulegravning af budgettet: Nu er også Københavns letbane forsinket Københavns første letbane er blevet et halvt år forsinket, allerede inden offentligheden har fået kendskab til de bud, som entreprenørerne har indleveret på at bygge banen langs Ring 3 fra Ishøj i syd til Lyngby i nord. Det står klart, efter at transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) har bestilt endnu en ekstern kulegravning af budgettet for den godt fire milliarder kroner dyre letbane fra revisio
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ArXiv Query
The Presence of Dust and Ice Scattering in X-ray Emissions from CometsX-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres were modeled from first principles using charge-exchange interaction with solar wind ions as well as coherent scattering of solar X-rays from dust and ice grains. Scattering cross sections were interpolated over the 1 nm - 1 cm grain radius range using approximations based on the optically thin or thick nature of grains with different sizes. The theoretica
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Scientific American Content: Global
Computers Learn to Use Sound to Find Ships In The Hunt for Red October, the Soviet submarine captain played by Sean Connery commands his crew to verify the location of a target. > That ping is known as " active sonar ." Bob Headrick of the Office of Naval Research, the ONR, says it's the audio equivalent of switching on a flashlight. You're getting information, but also broadcasting your location to other ships. "And you know the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45PWhen comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. The results help fill in crucial details about ices in Jupiter-family comets and reveal that quirky 45P doesn't quite match any comet studied so far.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cooling climate drove evolution of Tasmanian Devil and its relativesA big drop in global temperatures 12-14 million years ago may explain the evolutionary success of Australia's unique marsupial carnivores, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real? IMAGE: Relic of St Nicholas (pelvis fragment) at St. Martha of Bethany Church/Shrine of All Saints, Morton Grove Ill., USA. view more Credit: Image Credit copyright T. Higham & G. Kazan Was St Nicholas, the fourth century saint who inspired the iconography of Santa Claus, a legend or was he a real person? New Oxford University research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the
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Popular Science
You have to admit that this horseshoe crab looks just like Darth Vader A long time ago, in a watery area not so far away... dinosaurs were just getting started, and a horseshoe crab that looked an awful lot like Darth Vader’s helmet was chilling in shallow waters on Idaho’s coastline (yep, 245 million years ago, Idaho had a coast .) In a paper published in the German journal Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie , paleontologists identify a 245-million-year-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test could help predict skin cancer's return Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that testing skin cancer patients' blood for tumour DNA could help predict the chances of an aggressive cancer returning. Published in the Annals of Oncology * today (Wednesday), the findings could pave the way to identifying patients who are most at risk of their disease returning, and who might benefit from new immunotherapy treatments. Led by resea
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Big Think
So Now Running Doesn't Help Heart Health? The second most popular TED Talk of all time, “ Your body language may shape who you are ,” features social psychologist Ann Cuddy presenting the idea that “power posing” boosts self-confidence and may even increase your chance of success. There’s a reason such a message resonates with so many people— Youtube alone has 13.3 million views. Problem is, the study Cuddy references has not been repr
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Futurity.org
How accents at home affect baby language Babies raised in homes where they hear one language spoken with different accents recognize words dramatically differently at about 12 months than babies who hear little variation in accent, a new study suggests. “Variability in children’s language input, what they hear and how they hear it, can have important consequences on word recognition…” The findings point to the importance of considering
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Futurity.org
Device mimics photosynthesis to make chemical for plastic Researchers have developed a prototype device that mimics natural photosynthesis to produce ethylene gas using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The novel method, which produces ethylene at room temperature and pressure using benign chemicals, could be scaled up to provide a more eco-friendly and sustainable alternative to the current method of ethylene production. Ethylene, which is the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in older adults IMAGE: Short-term exposure to traffic exhaust on busy city streets, such as London's Oxford Street, can cancel out the health benefits of two hours of exercise for people over 60, a... view more Credit: Junfeng Zhang, Duke Univ. DURHAM, N.C. -- Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in adults over 60, according to a new study l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
London air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over-60s Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in older adults, according to new research. The findings, published today in The Lancet , show that short term exposure to air pollution in built up areas like London's busy Oxford Street can prevent the positive effects on the heart and lungs that can be gained from walking. According to the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor? Electronic fetal monitoring is often used during labour to detect unborn babies at risk of brain damage (neonatal encephalopathy) from a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). In the UK, continuous monitoring is used only for women in high risk labour, but should it be used for all women in labour? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ . Obstetrics specialists, Edward Mullins and Christoph Lees, at Imperial Col
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research in The BMJ today. Their findings show that screening would be associated with up to 5% reductions in breast cancer mortality in women aged 50 and over, whereas improved treatments would be associated with a 28% reduction. And they point out that overdiagnosi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn experts Air pollution from road traffic is having a detrimental impact upon babies' health in London, before they are born, finds a study published by The BMJ today. The findings suggest that exposure to air pollution from road traffic in London during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of low birth weight babies born at full term. But traffic related noise seems to have no effect. The
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Science | The Guardian
Traffic fumes in city streets 'largely wipe out exercise benefits for over-60s' The over-60s should stick to green spaces and parks when they go for a walk and avoid the city streets, according to a groundbreaking study that says air pollution from traffic fumes largely wipes out the health benefit from the exercise. Walking is often recommended for older people, but the study from Imperial College London and Duke University in the USA suggests that the over-60s and those wi
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Futurity.org
Super thin, ‘unclonable’ security system fends off hackers Researchers have created an “unclonable” security device made of a low-cost nanomaterial that can defend computers against hacking. “It’s maximum security with minimal investment.” The device, called a “security primitive,” has the highest possible level of structural randomness. Randomness is highly desirable for constructing the security primitives that encrypt and thereby secure computer hardw
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dahl's toad-headed turtle threatened by fragmented habitat, shrinking populationsA recent study shows that the Dahl's Toad-headed Turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli), a rare reptile found only in Colombia, is threatened with extinction due to alarmingly small and fragmented populations and high levels of inbreeding.
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Live Science
Why You May Hear a Loud Boom When Watching This Silent GIF What do you hear when you watch this GIF? If you hear a loud boom each time the tower lands, you're not alone — but there isn't actually any sound accompanying the GIF. The animated image, which has been making the rounds on Twitter recently, was created 10 years ago by HappyToast . The GIF shows three telephone wire towers playing jump rope — the wires spin around as the middle tower
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Big Think
Sex, Drugs and Late Nights: on Night Owls and Psychopaths Some people like going to bed early in the evening and waking up at the crack of dawn. Others are most alive after the Sun has set, preferring the darkness of night to the brightness of morning. Research into chronotypes (the propensity to sleep at a particular time during a 24-hour day) shows that people do indeed have stable individual differences in their activity levels at different times of
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New on MIT Technology Review
General Electric Sets a Record for Gas Turbine Efficiency, Giving Natural Gas Another Win During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—there are hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts to explore the potential of such a technique, researchers say they used tissue engineering to construct artificial rat ovaries able to supply fe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tigers cling to survival in Sumatra's increasingly fragmented forestsA research expedition tracked endangered tigers through the Sumatran jungles for a year and found tigers are clinging to survival in low density populations. The study found that well-protected forests are disappearing and are increasingly fragmented: Of the habitat tigers rely on in Sumatra, 17 percent was deforested between 2000 to 2012 alone. Their findings have renewed fears about the possible
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cold discomfort: Increasing cancer rates and adaptation of living in extreme environments IMAGE: Earth maps showing that the lowest 'average annual temperature' correlates with the highest cancer incidence worldwide. view more Credit: Konstantinos Voskarides, University of Cyprus Medical School It is well known that cancer incidence is increasing worldwide, with pockets of human populations and geographical locations seemingly at higher risk than others. Researcher Konstantinos
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Science : NPR
First Baby Born To U.S. Uterus Transplant Patient Raises Ethics Questions The first baby born as a result of a womb transplant in the United States in the neonatal unit at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. AP hide caption toggle caption AP The first baby born as a result of a womb transplant in the United States in the neonatal unit at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. AP Beautiful. Pure. Natural. Medicine at its pinnacle. Those were the words of Dr
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Big Think
Everything We Know About Physics in One Neat Infographic Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. But DON’T PANIC. Physics is on it. And if you've ever wondered which part of physics covers which part of space, fret no more. Here is an awesome map that lays it all out. Dominic Walliman , “youtuber, science writer and physicist,” has created a wonderful infographic that shows the many branches of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish exposed to treated wastewater have altered behaviorResearchers have found that fish living downstream from a wastewater treatment plant showed changes to their normal behavior --- ones that made them vulnerable to predator --- when exposed to elevated levels of antidepressant drugs in the water.
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