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New Scientist - News
Bizarre supernova may be powered by hidden disc of dust and gas An explosion that just keeps going? Getty By Leah Crane The strange supernova that just kept exploding may not be quite so weird, after all. Most supernovae brighten once as they explode and then fade, but one that was first spotted three years ago has brightened five times so far and has only just started to dim over the past few months. Researchers thought it might be a new kind of explosio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech toolVast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests.
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Futurity.org
Closely-orbiting black holes caught in ‘cosmic photobomb’ A ‘cosmic photobomb’ found in the background of images of the Andromeda galaxy reveals what could be the most tightly coupled pair of supermassive black holes ever seen. As they report in a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal , astronomers made this discovery using X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical data from two ground-based telescopes, Gemini-North in Hawaii a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrical stimulation in brain bypasses senses, instructs movementThe brain's complex network of neurons enables us to interpret and effortlessly navigate and interact with the world around us. But when these links are damaged due to injury or stroke, critical tasks like perception and movement can be disrupted. New research is helping scientists figure out how to harness the brain's plasticity to rewire these lost connections, an advance that could accelerate t
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Science : NPR
Black Mothers Keep Dying After Giving Birth. Shalon Irving's Story Explains Why Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption toggle caption Becky Harlan/NPR Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon
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Dagens Medicin
(Untitled) Vejle Sygehus kan igen i år kalde sig landets bedste til kræftbehandling i Dagens Medicins analyse af de bedste hospitaler og behandlere. Hospitalet har fra begyndelsen haft en stor klarhed omkring opgaven, strategien og missionen.
30min
The Atlantic
What It's Like to Get Caught in a Wildfire I never thought we were going to die. Even when the canyon air filled with smoke, when the flames came rushing up, when darkness fell and the sky glowed red both behind and ahead of us. So okay, it was a little scary. But we were just a short drive from Portland, Oregon, on a well-traveled trail my family had hiked a dozen times in the last 10 years. No one dies in a forest fire when they’re that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discrimination harms your health, and your partner's, study showsDiscrimination not only harms the health and well-being of the victim, but the victim's romantic partner as well, indicates new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Suite of papers shed light on decade-long stem cell mysteryA series of studies has shed light on vital, yet previously unclear, aspects of cell reprogramming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientist's accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detectorA novel nanoscale device has been developed for detecting DNA biomarkers. The device preconfines translocating molecules using an ultrathin nanoporous silicon nitride membrane separated from a single sensing nanopore by a nanoscale cavity. The membrane serves as a pre-filter and improves the DNA sensing capabilities of the nanopore in multiple ways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How malaria tricks the immune systemA possible defense in the battle against malaria has now been presented by a team of researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leading doctors back legal action to force UK government to cut carbon emissions Leading doctors are today backing legal action against UK government ministers on the grounds that they have not fulfilled their commitments to cutting carbon emissions in line with the Climate Change Act of 2008 and the Paris Agreement objective of limiting warming to 1.5?C or 'well below' 2?C. In an open letter published by The BMJ today, 18 health professionals, including The BMJ 's Editor in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breath test could be possible for drugs and diseaseTesting for drug use and disease in humans could soon be much simpler, thanks to new Swedish research.Whereas drug tests currently rely on blood or urine samples, researchers from the University of Gothenburg have identified a method for drug testing by analyzing various compounds in exhaled breath.
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Futurity.org
How 1 key nutrient limited life in ancient oceans Low recycling of the key nutrient phosphorus may have limited the amount of biomass—life—in Earth’s ancient oceans, new research suggests. The research also comments on the role of volcanism in supporting Earth’s early biosphere—and may even apply to the search for life on other worlds. The researchers’ aim was to use theoretical modeling to study how ocean phosphorus levels have changed througho
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Futurity.org
Triangle-headed reptile mashup moved from land to sea A 155-million-year-old reptile fossil is filling some holes in the evolutionary story of animals that once roamed on land and then transitioned to life in the water. A new report, which appears appears in the journal Royal Society Open Science, suggests some of the features of Vadasaurus herzogi , including its elongated, whip-like tail and triangular head, are suited to aquatic life. Its relativ
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Science : NPR
Watch: N.J. Dashcam Captures Brilliant Nighttime Streak It wasn't criminal, it was celestial. A police dashcam in New Jersey caught a dazzling sight in the early hours of Saturday: a meteor soaring through the sky in a flash of fiery brilliance. A second or two passes and then with a burst of light, it's gone and the sky returns to blackness. Hamilton Police Sgt. Michael Virga was on patrol around 3 a.m. when he saw it. "It was a pinpoint in the sky,
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Science | The Guardian
Windmill drawing found on wall of Isaac Newton childhood home A friend of Isaac Newton once described him as a compulsive scribbler on walls. Almost 300 years after the scientist’s death, a wobbly drawing of a windmill has turned up, scratched into a wall at his childhood home. The image was found during a conservation study at Woolsthorpe Manor in Lincolnshire, now owned by the National Trust, where there is also an apple tree said to be the one that inspi
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Futurity.org
This disruption contributes to muscle paralysis New research marks a step forward in the quest to find the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. In the cells of flies, mice, and humans with ALS, scientists have pinpointed a process that collapses when a critical protein’s blueprint is arrested on its way to protein construction. The study appears in the journal Cell Reports . ALS is a neurodegenerat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breath test could be possible for drugs and disease Testing for drug use and disease in humans could soon be much simpler, thanks to new Swedish research. Whereas drug tests currently rely on blood or urine samples, researchers from the University of Gothenburg have identified a method for drug testing by analysing various compounds in exhaled breath. Reporting their results today in the Journal of Breath Research , they demonstrate how collecti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Life of an albatross: Tackling individuality in studies of populationsEcologists commonly round off the individuality of individuals, treating animals of the same species, sex, and age like identical units. But individual differences can have demographic effects on interpretation of data at the scale of whole populations, if due to an underlying variability in individual quality, not chance. Researchers examined in the peculiarities that make some wandering albatros
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animalsA new study has revealed that an extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and mammals.
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Futurity.org
High-pressure steam bath may have formed clay on Mars The clay on Mars’ surface may have formed as the planet’s crust cooled and solidified, not by later interactions with water on the surface as has long been assumed, new research suggests. There are thousands of ancient phyllosilicate outcrops on the Martian surface. Phyllosilicates, or clays, are formed by the interaction of water with volcanic rock, leading scientists to conclude that there must
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NYT > Science
In a Warming California, a Future of More Fire That contrast has occurred this decade in the state, where years of drought were followed last winter by very wet weather that led to a bumper crop of grasses and other vegetation. That season was followed this year by more dryness: a hot, desiccating summer and fall that turned all the vegetation into tinder. Coupled with strong, warm winds, the fire risk was extreme. The resulting blazes destro
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Futurity.org
Don’t mess with these little ‘pockets’ of soil Global warming and land use practices like farming could change the environment for microbes living in the soil and alter the amount of greenhouse gases they release into the atmosphere, research shows. Nearly a third of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere annually can be traced back to bacteria living in the soil, where they break down plant and animal matter for energy. For most soi
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NeuWrite San Diego
Ancient Aliens Among Us Ancient Aliens Among Us Posted by Jarrett Lovelett on December 7, 2017 in Uncategorized | Leave a comment First contact. The prospect of intelligent extraterrestrial life has tantalized us Earthbound humans throughout our history. In relatively recent times, artists such as H.G. Wells, Ursula Le Guin, and Gene Roddenberry have created wide-eyed fantasies full of violent invasions, fraught coexist
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revised trainee guidelines permit full spectrum of 'conscientious objection' Trainee doctors and nurses can opt out of providing certain aspects of sexual and reproductive healthcare, but only if they can ensure that patients' needs are still being met, whatever their own personal beliefs, say new guidelines on 'conscientious objection' from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH).* Explaining the thinking behind the updated guidance in an editorial in BM
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ditch plan to disregard all athletic world records before 2005, urge experts The proposal by the European Athletics Council to disregard all athletic world records set before 2005 should be abandoned, insist experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine . The proposal, which has now been put to the world governing body, the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF), aims to redress the consequences of past undetected doping vio
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Futurity.org
Here’s why it takes a moment to stop on a dime Neuroscientists have figured out why it’s so hard for us to stop our movement at the last second, and our brains are to blame. Imagine trying to stop at the last second, perhaps to keep from stepping on a patch of ice. “The question is: When we do succeed, how do we do that? What needs to happen in order for us to stop in time?” Stopping a planned body movement requires extremely fast choreograph
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Futurity.org
Bacteria mix can boost or bust antibiotic resistance The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease the antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus , another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa , researchers report. “The interactions with P. aeruginosa can completely change S. aureus ‘s susceptibility to standard antibiotics…” The findings, which appear in a paper
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Science : NPR
Is The Tide Of Antibiotic Use On Farms Now Turning? Grass-fed, antibiotic-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. For the first time, government statistics show America's pigs, cattle and poultry are getting fewer antibiotic drugs. Don Ryan/AP hide caption toggle caption Don Ryan/AP Grass-fed, antibiotic-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. For the first time, government statistics show America's pigs, cattle and poultry are getting
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New on MIT Technology Review
Genetic Programmers Are the Next Startup Millionaires A two-year-old company developing molecular “logic” for cancer treatment has been snapped up for $175 million by Gilead Sciences amid a surge of interest in ways to battle disease using engineered immune cells. The pricey acquisition of Cell Design Labs, a startup that’s produced no drugs, signals an ongoing acquisition frenzy around one of cancer medicine’s most promising approaches. Cell Design
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Dagens Medicin
Læge møder sine patienter gennem faglige podcastsSom den – måske – første danske læge udgiver gynækolog Henrik Vittrup podcasts til sine patienter med informationer om de undersøgelser og indgreb, de skal have foretaget. Formålet er at klæde patienterne på, skabe genkendelighed og udbytterige samtaler. Og det virker, siger gynækologen, som ser, at lydmediet har et stort potentiale i resten af sundhedsvæsenet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damageIn a first-of-its-kind study, researchers are using adaptive optics (AO) to analyze retinal eye damage from the August solar eclipse on a cellular level. The research could help doctors develop a deeper understanding of this rare condition, called solar retinopathy, which has no currently accepted treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age; may explain normal cognitive decline and neurodegenerationResearchers used whole-genome sequencing of individual neurons and found strong evidence that brain mutations accumulate as we age. They also found that mutations accumulate at a higher rate in people with genetic premature aging disorders causing early brain degeneration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychologist examines methods of classifying mental disordersA new article presents the challenges in using three major diagnostic manuals from a scientific perspective and offer some recommendations for re-conceptualizing the mental disorders they describe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New discovery, more bees mark Michigan's first, full bee censusThe first complete bee census in Michigan has confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier estimates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flowScientists have revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury.
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Dagens Medicin
Parnasset må se at oppe sigDe forstandige må vågne op og forstå, at deres autoritet og rutinetænkning er under stærkt pres.
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Dagens Medicin
Kan vi høre patientens stemme for bar støj?Rækker ressourcerne til en god dialog, når vi sender mange patienter hjem, før de selv føler, at de er raske.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inflammatory factors linked to inhibition of factor VIII gene therapy in hemophilia A IMAGE: Human Gene Therapy presents reports on the transfer and expression of genes in mammals, including humans. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 7, 2017--As a gene therapy cure for hemophilia A moves closer to reality, a new study sheds light on a challenging complication in which a host autoimmune response inhibits the production of normal clotting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credibleVirtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories, but they should avoid being too flashy, or their credibility could suffer, according to a team of researchers.
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Dagens Medicin
Lidt på tværs i rimelighedens navnSikkerhed i behandling er i alles interesse, men et tilhørende krav savner logik og kan udpege lægen som syndebuk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular diseaseAlthough obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular disease. However, a new study finds that the 'obesity paradox' is not present among people with new cases of cardiovascular disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology attends to seniors' health, quality of life Who hasn't worried about elderly family members and wished it was easier to keep up with them from afar? Now there's technology that offers better care for the seniors and peace of mind for the family caregivers, employing advances in artificial intelligence , big data and voice technologies. One company has a solution that tracks and analyzes a senior loved one's activity and routines and will
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life of an albatross: Tackling individuality in studies of populations A wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) displays its individuality in the Crozet Islands, a remote archipelago in the southern Indian Ocean. Credit: V. Nivet-Mazerolles When ecologists study populations of animals, they commonly round off the individuality of individuals, treating animals of the same species, sex, and age like identical units. This has practical utility for studies focused on ho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Learning from Mr. Spock: Researcher examines sci-fi as social commentary What if science fiction like the Star Trek series could teach us how to better understand and engage with the real world around us? That is the premise of a collection of scholarly articles written by five cultural researchers from around the country, including UT's Hannah Gunderman, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography. The papers apply a variety of social theories and geographic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life of an albatross: Tackling individuality in studies of populations When ecologists study populations of animals, they commonly round off the individuality of individuals, treating animals of the same species, sex, and age like identical units. This has practical utility for studies focused on how populations change in size and composition and how they respond to their environment. Rémi Fay, a student at Université de La Rochelle, in Villiers-en-Bois, Franc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Screen time before bed linked with less sleep, higher BMIs in kids It may be tempting to let your kids stay up late playing games on their smartphones, but using digital devices before bed may contribute to sleep and nutrition problems in children, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. After surveying parents about their kids' technology and sleep habits, researchers found that using technology before bed was associated with less sleep, poorer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
McMaster researchers find genes may 'snowball' obesity Hamilton, ON (Dec. 7, 2017) - There are nine genes that make you gain more weight if you already have a high body mass index, McMaster University researchers have found. "It's similar to a tiny snow ball at a top of a hill that becomes bigger and bigger when rolling down the hill," said senior author David Meyre, an associate professor of health research methods, evidence and impact at McMaster U
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding mental disorder through a scientific lens Diagnosing mental-health issues may seem straightforward: Patients discuss their symptoms and a clinician matches those symptoms to a disorder and devises an appropriate treatment. In reality, this view belies the complexity inherent in understanding, classifying, and diagnosing psychiatric phenomena. Advances in clinical science over the past several decades have led to major improvements in how
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New mapping technique can help fight extreme poverty This image depicts a poverty map (552 communities) of Senegal generated using the researchers' computational tools. Credit: University at Buffalo For years, policymakers have relied upon surveys and census data to track and respond to extreme poverty. While effective, assembling this information is costly and time-consuming, and it often lacks detail that aid organizations and governments need in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police officers highly motivated by supervisor scrutiny Credit: CC0 Public Domain Police officers are highly responsive to the scrutiny of their superiors, a Princeton University study shows. The findings suggest that rules and supervision can be effective at reforming police behavior. Published Dec. 7 in the Journal of Politics , the study examines millions of police records from the New York Police Department's (NYPD) stop-question-and-frisk program
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the goEngineers have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they're at home or on the go.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stretching language to its limit Credit: Paul Brennan/public domain Language - humanity's finest attribute - becomes stretched to its limit when faced with sacrifice, sexuality, or the brutality of war and predation. In the article "A space that will never be filled: Sharp communication and the simultaneity of opposites," published in the latest issue of Current Anthropology , author Alex Pillen documents a search for what she c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space program should focus on Mars, says editor of New SpaceThe U.S. space exploration program should continue to focus on robotic sample recovery and human missions to Mars, says Scott Hubbard, Editor-in-Chief of New Space. He details the benefits and risks of this strategy in an editorial entitled "Keeping the Focus on Mars," published in New Space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International collaboration could reduce smoking prevalence, MU researchers find IMAGE: Mansoo Yu, associate professor of social work, found smoking rates are higher in Turkey at 27 percent compared to the US at 18 percent. He hopes the findings will be... view more Credit: MU News Bureau COLUMBIA, Mo. - According to the World Health Organization, approximately 80 percent of the world's more than 1 billion smokers live in low-and middle-income countries, where the burden
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth, says UC research For some young people, dealing with life stressors like exposure to violence and family disruption often means turning to negative, risky behaviors -- yet little is known about what can intervene to stop this cycle. But one long-term study by the University of Cincinnati looks at the link between stressful life events and an increase in substance abuse, risky sexual behaviors and delinquency in a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning from Mr. Spock: Gunderman examines sci-fi as social commentary What if science fiction like the Star Trek series could teach us how to better understand and engage with the real world around us? That is the premise of a collection of scholarly articles written by five cultural researchers from around the country, including UT's Hannah Gunderman, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography. The papers apply a variety of social theories and geographic co
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Science | The Guardian
Spacewatch: Voyager 1 gets new lease of life F or the first time in 37 years, Nasa fired up a set of reserve thrusters on Voyager 1. The resulting manoeuvre will allow the ageing spacecraft to remain in contact with Earth, extending its life by two to three years. Voyager 1 lifted off from Earth on 5 September 1977. It encountered the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn, and Saturn’s intriguing moon, Titan. Then it headed off towards interstel
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The Scientist RSS
Support Cells Gain Stem Cell-Like Properties After Nerve InjuryWhen peripheral nerves are severed, Schwann cells at the injury site begin to proliferate and exhibit stem cell-like gene expression patterns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A common virus may help inform treatment planning for stem cell transplant patients IMAGE: This is Amir Toor, M.D. of VCU Massey Cancer Center. view more Credit: VCU Massey Cancer Center Most healthy people barely notice infection with the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV), a form of the herpes virus that has evolved with humans over thousands of years and usually lays dormant in the body after initial infection. Now, in a study recently published in the journal PLOS ONE , a team
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mapping technique can help fight extreme poverty BUFFALO, N.Y. -- For years, policymakers have relied upon surveys and census data to track and respond to extreme poverty. While effective, assembling this information is costly and time-consuming, and it often lacks detail that aid organizations and governments need in order to best deploy their resources. That could soon change. A new mapping technique, described in the Nov. 14 issue of the Pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How we learn: Mastering the features around you rather than learning about individual objects A Dartmouth-led study on how we learn finds that humans tend to rely on learning about the features of an object, rather than on the individual object itself. The research published in Nature Communications examines how the brain evaluates choices in relation to reward feedback. Learning from reward feedback can be challenging when faced with a myriad of choice options, since each option has a un
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could death rates have swung the 2016 election?A new study shows that climbing mortality rates of middle-aged white people were associated with many counties voting Republican in the 2016 presidential election.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Device makes power conversion more efficientResearchers have presented a new design that, in tests, enabled gallium nitride power devices to handle voltages of 1,200 volts. That's already enough capacity for use in electric vehicles, but the researchers believe that further work can boost its capacity to the 3,300-to-5,000-volt range, to bring the efficiencies of gallium nitride to the power electronics in the electrical grid itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hope for autism: Optogenetics shines light on social interactionsNew research, using mice to identify a neural link between spatial learning and socialization, hints at new avenues to help people with autism and other social behavior disorders that affect their prefrontal cortex.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movementFinding ways to get around those broken networks in the brain is an important area of research for those seeking to develop treatment interventions. Now researchers are showing in monkeys that stimulation delivered directly to the premotor cortex can elicit a feeling or experience that can instruct different movements, even when the stimulus is too small to induce any response directly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
West coast earthquake early warning system continues progress toward public useA decade after beginning work on an earthquake early warning system, scientists and engineers are fine-tuning a US West Coast prototype that could be in limited public use in 2018.
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Live Science
Solar Eclipse Damage to Woman's Eye Revealed in Striking Images An image taken of the woman's left retina shows damage at the center. Reproduced with permission from JAMA Ophthalmology. 2017. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2017.5517. Credit: Copyright©(2017) American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Using a new type of imaging, doctors were able to peer into the eyes of a young woman and see — on the cellular level — the type of damage that occurs from
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The Atlantic
'Suicide Would Have Been a Blessing' In 2014, nearly 10,000 Yazidis, a Kurdish religious minority, were killed or captured when ISIS took over Mount Sinjar in Iraq. Thousands of women—some as young as nine—were forced to become sex slaves for ISIS. When Sinjar was finally liberated by Kurdish Peshmergas in early 2016, some Yazidi women were able to return to their region. N early 4,000 Yazidi men, women, and children remain missing
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotechA research team has leapfrogged their 'DNA bricks' technology by two orders of magnitude, enabling next-generation DNA bricks to self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures that are 100 times more complex than those created with existing methods. The study provides user-friendly computational tools to design DNA nanostructures with complex cavities (and possibly surfaces) that have the pot
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How urban agriculture is transforming Detroit | Devita DavisonThere's something amazing growing in the city of Detroit: healthy, accessible, delicious, fresh food. In a spirited talk, fearless farmer Devita Davison explains how features of Detroit's decay actually make it an ideal spot for urban agriculture. Join Davison for a walk through neighborhoods in transformation as she shares stories of opportunity and hope. "These aren't plots of land where we're j
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Science : NPR
Why Your Brain Has Trouble Bailing Out Of A Bad Plan I guess it's too late to change my mind. Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images I guess it's too late to change my mind. Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images You're in your car, heading for an intersection. The light turns yellow, so you decide to hit the gas. Then you see a police car. Almost instantly, you know that stomping on the
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Big Think
There Is a Better Way to Parent Than the Nuclear Family The pressures and pace of modern life has made parents and children stressed and miserable. With the rise of dual-earning families, mothers, and increasingly, fathers are struggling with work-life issues, forcing many to lean in or opt out. But is it truly modern life that’s at fault or is it our expectation that two people – whether hetero or same-sex – can do it alone and do it well? Is the nuc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Stanford study analyzes recent research on causes of gun violence Researchers fr­­om Stanford and Duke University examined recent studies on the causes of gun violence in the United States in an effort to find consensus in a body of research that often covers different states or different time periods, making conclusions difficult to draw. The consensus of recent research shows that right-to-carry laws are linked with higher violent crime rates, according to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Money-saving health plans do little to curb spending on unnecessary medical services An increasingly popular form of health insurance touted for its money-saving potential has not reduced spending on unnecessary medical services, a new study shows. Researchers from the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and the RAND Corp. found that consumer-directed health plans have little or no effect on curbing spending on 26 services that medical professional and industry g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could death rates have swung the 2016 election? IMAGE: A chart showing the average change in the premature deaths of 45-54 year-old white people in roughly 91 percent of US counties, broken down by presidential election results. view more Credit: Courtesy of Drexel University. Significant increases in the death rates of white, middle-aged people over the last 15 years appear to be tied to increases in Republican voting that helped lead to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydropower dam energy without sacrificing Mekong food supply: New research offers solutionNearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. In a new article, researchers present a mathematical formula to balance power generation needs with the needs of fisheries downstream.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoesA species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistancePhysicists compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-dose gene therapy produces clotting factor, safely stops bleeding in hemophilia B patientsA team of gene therapy researchers has reported positive results in a phase 1/2 clinical trial for the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. A single intravenous infusion of a novel bioengineered gene therapy enabled adult participants to safely produce sustained levels of clotting factor that prevented debilitating bleeding episodes. Patients were able to terminate prophylactic treatments; th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding long strands of RNA in skin development and diseaseResearchers have discovered how unusually long pieces of RNA work in skin cells. The RNA pieces, called 'long non-coding RNAs' or 'lncRNAs,' help skin cells modulate connective tissue proteins, like collagen, and could represent novel therapeutic targets to promote skin repair.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's diseaseA drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer appears to be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, and offers a potential pathway to treat other neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Security flaw found: 10 million banking app users at riskResearchers have developed a tool to perform semi-automated security testing of mobile phone apps. After running the tool on a sample of 400 security critical apps, they were able to identify a critical vulnerability in banking apps.
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Big Think
10 American Philosophers and Why You Should Know Them Americans are, often with justification, regarded as being poorly versed in philosophy. This is a shame, as the United States and the colonies that proceeded it have produced many great thinkers. Here is a list of ten of the greatest philosophers the United States has given the world. Please note, several great American thinkers, such as Martha Nussbaum or Noam Chomsky, have made it to our other
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Popular Science
Humans may be scaring narwhals to death Until recently, narwhals have led pretty secluded lives in the Arctic . But the sea ice that has kept these tusked whales isolated from people is beginning to melt , likely bringing a boom in shipping and seismic exploration for oil and natural gas to the area. Unfortunately, narwhals may not be equipped to handle such close encounters with humans. When these whales face hazards they aren’t used
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Big Think
No Afterlife? No Problem! How to Face Oblivion Like a Pro You are going to die. So am I. These are facts. The question of how to deal with the reality of death is one as old as mankind. Billions of people, living and dead, have put their hopes on an afterlife. The promise of Heaven, Valhalla, Elysium, reincarnation, or even a decent hell makes death but an inconvenience. For atheists, however, there is no such benefit to death. It is merely the end of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stretching language to its limit Language - humanity's finest attribute - becomes stretched to its limit when faced with sacrifice, sexuality, or the brutality of war and predation. In the article "A space that will never be filled: Sharp communication and the simultaneity of opposites," published in the latest issue of Current Anthropology , author Alex Pillen documents a search for what she calls "antipodal words," words that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights the need for research into prevention of inflammatory bowel disease Countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and South America have seen a rise in incidence of inflammatory bowel disease as they have become increasingly industrialised and westernised, a new study has found. The research, a collaboration between the University of Birmingham, the University of Calgary, Canada, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, is the most definitive and comprehensive study
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The structure of cool: Researchers discover the unexpected atomic structure of cold and menthol sensor TRPM8The first determination of the atomic structure of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), a molecular sensor in nerve ends that detects cold temperatures as well as menthol and other chemicals that induce cold sensations, has been made by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brittle starfish shows how to make tough ceramicsNature inspires innovation. An international team of scientists has discovered how a brittle star can create material like tempered glass underwater. The findings may open new bio-inspired routes for toughening brittle ceramics in various applications that span from optical lenses to automotive turbochargers and even biomaterial implants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Right-handed and left-handed moleculesThe subtle properties of mirror molecules have been revealed by a new study. The researchers examined camphor photoionization using an ultrafast laser. Circularly polarized light directed at camphor molecules allowed the measurement of electron emission, giving the first precise measurement of the asymmetry in the reaction of a camphor molecule. It confirms that more electrons are emitted in one d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across EurasiaMost people are now familiar with the traditional 'Out of Africa' model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then dispersed across Asia and reached Australia in a single wave about 60,000 years ago. However, technological advances in DNA analysis and other fossil identification techniques, as well as an emphasis on multidisciplinary research, are revising this story. Recent discoveries show that h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crafty crows know what it takes to make a good toolBiologists have discovered how New Caledonian crows make one of their most sophisticated tool designs -- sticks with a neatly shaped hooked tip. New Caledonian crows are the only species besides humans known to manufacture hooked tools in the wild. The study reveals how crows manage to fashion particularly efficient tools, with well-defined 'deep' hooks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracksResearchers describe a new approach to prevent death in essential kidney cells during kidney disease. Studying multiple animal models of kidney disease, the team discovered a compound that can impede loss of the filtration cells and restore kidney function. The work, inspired by an investigation into a genetic form of the condition, has the potential to affect therapeutic research for millions of
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Science : NPR
Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether to Freeze or Flee, Scientists Find Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Police officers highly motivated by supervisor scrutiny PRINCETON, N.J.--Police officers are highly responsive to the scrutiny of their superiors, a Princeton University study shows. The findings suggest that rules and supervision can be effective at reforming police behavior. Published Dec. 7 in the Journal of Politics , the study examines millions of police records from the New York Police Department's (NYPD) stop-question-and-frisk program -- a con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they're at home or on the go. Currently, checking blood sugar levels can be a hassle for people with diabetes, especially when they have to pack their glucose monitoring kits around with them every t
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Space program should focus on Mars, says editor of New Space IMAGE: New Space is the leading peer-reviewed journal dedicated to facilitating and supporting the efforts of researchers, engineers, analysts, investors, business leaders, and policymakers to capitalize on the opportunities of commercial... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 7, 2017--The U.S. space exploration program should continue to focus on robot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New power devices could drastically reduce energy waste Power electronics, which do things like modify voltages or convert between direct and alternating current, are everywhere. They're in the power bricks we use to charge our portable devices; they're in the battery packs of electric cars; and they're in the power grid itself, where they mediate between high-voltage transmission lines and the lower voltages of household electrical sockets. Power c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discrimination harms your health -- and your partner's EAST LANSING, Mich. - Discrimination not only harms the health and well-being of the victim, but the victim's romantic partner as well, indicates new research led by a Michigan State University scholar. The work, which analyzed a nationally representative sample of nearly 2,000 couples, is the first study to consider how the discrimination experiences of both people in a relationship are associat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study funded by Morris Animal Foundation demonstrates loss of drug potency DENVER/December 7, 2017 - Drugs work best when their potency remains stable or consistent, but a new study funded by Morris Animal Foundation shows a commonly compounded antimicrobial drug used in veterinary medicine may be losing potency over time. The study recently was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association . Doxycycline is used to treat a number of bacterial i
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Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience Leading artificial-intelligence researchers gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. The issue was crystallized in a keynote from Microsoft researcher Kate Crawford Tuesday. The conference, which drew nearly 8,000
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Click to unwrap: More retailers are letting customers send digital gifts this holiday season It's Christmas Eve, you still have gifts to buy, and as the hours tick by, your options grow thin. Anything you order online won't arrive in time. A gift card feels impersonal. You're skeptical that something picked primarily because it was in stock at a retailer open late on a holiday will be a hit, and don't want to saddle the recipient, or yourself, with the hassle of returning a slapdash gift
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Inside Science
Extra Males Make These Endangered Monkeys Grow Big and Strong Extra Males Make These Endangered Monkeys Grow Big and Strong When it comes to raising golden-headed lion tamarin babies, everyone cooperates -- especially the grown males. Golden-headed-lion-tamarin_topNteaser.jpg A golden-headed lion tamarin at the Mexico City Zoo with two babies on its back. Image credits: Uspn via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Creature Thursday, December
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Big Think
Light-Based Computers May Soon Become a Reality Pretty soon, we’ll no longer be able to base computers on electronics. We can only make the microchip so small. At some point, the silicon chip will grow so thin that the amount of power used to perform calculations will melt it. Other models have been in the works, quantum computing for example. But that’s difficult and the process it’s built upon, not well understood. Another option is light-
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Narwhal escape: Whales freeze and flee when frightened Image copyright M P Heide Jorgensen Image caption These unicorns of the sea may face more human disturbance as sea ice declines in The Arctic Scientists who fitted heart rate-monitoring tags to Arctic narwhals have discovered a strange paradox in how the animals respond to threats. When these tusked whales are frightened, their hearts slow, but at the same time they swim quickly to escape. Scient
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Add at least 57 to the number of gun-related deaths tied to the Sandy Hook mass shooting An infographic depicting results from Phillip B. Levine and Robin McKnight, who found that searches related to guns, gun sales, and accidental deaths related to firearms all spiked significantly following the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Credit: Carla Schaffer / AAAS One little-known fact about mass shootings is that they have been very good for the gun business. Americans' anxieties
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in miceScientists report a modified CRISPR-Cas9 technique that alters the activity, rather than the underlying sequence, of disease-associated genes. The researchers demonstrate that this technique can be used in mice to treat several different diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stressStress from human disturbances could cause behavioral responses in narwhals that are inconsistent with their physiological capacities, researchers say. They found that narwhals released after entanglement in nets and outfitted with heart monitors performed a series of deep dives, swimming hard to escape, while their heart rates dropped to unexpectedly low levels of three to four beats per minute.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpyBlack holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in AustraliaA team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings are based on fossilized remains of the animal's skull, teeth, and humerus (upper arm bone) found in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote northwestern Queensland.
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Live Science
Love at First Sight? It's Probably Just Lust Can you fall in love with someone the very first time you see them? Credit: Iryna Inshyna/Shutterstock We've all seen that movie moment when two strangers meet and feel an instant romantic connection — in fact, "love at first sight" has been a mainstay of literature for thousands of years, and people in real life often claim to experience a similar spark. But is that feeling actually love?
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Live Science
80-mph Wind Gusts Could Force L.A. Firefighters to a Standstill The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this view of smoke from the Southern California wildfires on Dec. 5, 2017. Credit: NASA Multiple wildfires have scorched more than 110,000 acres (44,500 hectares) in California's Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. And the blazes will continue to spread at least through Satu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California judge dismisses lawsuit over Google's pay to women, but it could be refiled A lawsuit by three female former Google employees claiming that the company paid women less than men has been dismissed, but may reappear in a different form. The women - Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease and Kelli Wisuri - sued in September, alleging that Google had a "sexist culture" and systematically discriminated against women by segregating them into lower-paying jobs and career tracks, while men wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyberattack slows North Carolina county as it works on fixes Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio speaks at a news conference at the Government Center about the hacking of Mecklenburg County's servers in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. A $25,000 ransom in bit coin was being sought for the files being held. County officials said late this afternoon they are not paying the ransom. (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP) Time-consuming paper
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To save climate, stop investing in fossil fuels: economists Economists have warned that boosting renewable energy sources such as solar and wind won't be enough to compensate for emissions produced from fossil fuel use The development of oil, gas and coal energy must stop in order to avoid the worst ravages of global warming, 80 top economists said Thursday, days ahead of a climate summit in Paris. "We call for an immediate end to investments in new fossi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making fuel out of thick air IMAGE: The researchers gained new insights into the atomic-scale structure of rhodium-based catalysts. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Lawrence F. Allard and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Scientists hoping to develop new energy resources have long pursued the goal of directly converting methane, a simple and abundant chemical found in natural gas, into a usable fuel such as methanol.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The First CRISPR Studies for Inherited Disease Will Start Soon If you have ever dealt with sexual harassment in the workplace, there is now a private online place for you to go for help. Botler AI , a startup based in Montreal, on Wednesday launched a system that provides free information and guidance to those who have been sexually harassed and are unsure of their legal rights. Using deep learning, the AI system was trained on more than 300,000 U.S. and C
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time matters: Does our biological clock keep cancer at bay?Our body has an internal biological or 'circadian' clock, which cycles daily and is synchronized with solar time. New research done in mice suggests that it can help suppress cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordingsScientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. This approach could potentially help distinguish between dolphin species in the wild.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why we can't always stop what we've startedWhen we try to stop a body movement at the last second, perhaps to keep ourselves from stepping on what we just realized was ice, we can't always do it -- and neuroscientists have figured out why.
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Popular Science
A gift guide in which everything is 'green' Composting is a great way to start going GREEN, and this 7-cubic-foot dual tumbler is a simple and efficient way to get started. It’s made of 100 percent recycled material and comes fully assembled. There’s a five-gallon receptacle to catch the “compost tea” created as your refuse composts. Note: even though it’s called tea, it’s meant to fertilize plants. Don’t drink it. Trust me. Feel is an imp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fat squirrel steals pricey goods left out for delivery folks An obese squirrel was caught on video stealing gourmet chocolate and lip balm that a family leaves outside as a holiday treat for delivery people. Michele Boudreaux, of Maplewood, New Jersey, said on her blog she provides candy, snacks, tissues, hand warmers and other goodies on her doorstep every year. She's never had any issues before, but this year, her basket was raided within hours of being
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Narwhals react to certain dangers in a really strange way View the video When escaping from humans, narwhals don’t just freeze or flee. They do both. These deep-diving marine mammals have similar physiological responses to those of an animal frozen in fear: Their heart rate, breathing and metabolism slow, mimicking a “deer in the headlights” reaction. But narwhals ( Monodon monoceros ) take this freeze response to extremes. The animals decrease their he
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Live Science
Did The Wildfire Rabbit 'Rescuer' Doom A Litter of Babies? There's a video making the rounds online: A rabbit dashes through a gap in the flames of the huge Thomas fire in California. A man rushes after it and stops at the edge of the fire line, anxiously dancing around and trying to coax the critter out of the burning brush. A few moments later, the rabbit bounds back through the same flame gap, and the guy scoops it up, cradling it pinned against his
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Big Think
Can Giving Ayahuasca to Prisoners Reduce Recidivism? In 1953, long before shots of ayahuasca were paired with cacao elixirs at Burning Man Decompression parties, William Burroughs traveled around South America in search of the mystical beverage called yagé . Though Burroughs is remembered predominantly as a heroin junkie, he documented not only the hallucinogenic qualities of ayahuasca, but also the scientific possibilities of this intriguing ble
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The Scientist RSS
Putative Gay Genes Identified, QuestionedA genomic interrogation of homosexuality turns up speculative links between genetic elements and sexual orientation, but researchers say the study is too small to be significant.
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The Scientist RSS
Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a LifetimeSingle-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech is taking over our lives, and our 401(k) accounts In this April 16, 2015, file photo, an employee monitors prices at the tech-driven Nasdaq MarketSite in New York. From Silicon Valley to Shanghai, surging share prices for technology companies means the industry is making up an ever-larger chunk of stock funds. Tech companies have been able to produce strong profit growth for years, even when the global economy was scuffling, but the strong perfo
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Live Science
Is the World's First Nuclear Fusion Plant Finally on Track? The world's first nuclear fusion plant has now reached 50 percent completion, the project's director-general announced Wednesday (Dec. 6). When it is operational, the experimental fusion plant, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will circulate plasma in its core that is 10 times hotter than the sun, surrounded by magnets as cold as interstellar space. It
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Live Science
Viagra Goes Generic: 5 Interesting Facts About the 'Little Blue Pill' A generic version of Viagra will be available on Monday (Dec. 11), and it will cost half the price of the "little blue pill." Pfizer, which makes Viagra, will produce its own generic version of the drug, which contains the active ingredient sildenafil, according to the Associated Press . The generic will be white rather than blue, and it will cost around $32 a pill, half Viagra's price.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are molecules right-handed or left-handed? The starting signal is given and two electrons speed off in opposite directions. The one that wins the race is barely seven attoseconds (7x10-18 seconds) ahead. The difference is so small that up till now it has been impossible to measure. Yet, that difference is caused by chirality, a hallmark of molecules that emit electrons. An international research team (INRS/CNRS/CEA/UPMC/University of Bord
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How the cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain "We have decoded how the parasite takes control of immune cells, converting them into moving "zombies" which spread the parasite in the body," said Antonio Barragan, professor at Stockholm University and one of the authors of the new study. The infection toxoplasmosis is caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and is widely spread. It's estimated that 30-50 per cent of the global human populatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The structure of cool IMAGE: The TRPM8 ion channel (blue and white in center) is embedded in the outer membrane of cells, and is able to sense cold temperatures on the outside (the top half... view more Credit: Image by Gabe Lander and Graham Johnson LA JOLLA, Calif. - Dec. 7, 2017 - A team of researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Duke University has made the first determination of the atomic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brittle starfish shows how to make tough ceramics Nature inspires innovation. An international team lead by researchers at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, together with ESRF -the European Synchrotron, Grenoble, France- scientists, have discovered how a brittle star can create material like tempered glass underwater. The findings are published in Science and may open new bio-inspired routes for toughening brittle ceramics in various ap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protamine neutralizes CSPG-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation Remyelination is a critical repair process in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), a family of large molecules consisting of a core protein and glycosaminoglycans comsposed of chains of alternating sugars, are enriched in glial scars. In MS lesions, CSPGs accumulate as constituents of demyelinating plaques, which inhibit the migration
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Researchers launch atlas of developing human brain The human brain has been called the most complex object in the cosmos, with 86 billion intricately interconnected neurons and an equivalent number of supportive glial cells. One of science's greatest mysteries is how an organ of such staggering complexity - capable of producing both love poetry and scientific discovery - builds itself from just a handful of stem cells in the early embryo. Now res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methane CAMBRIDGE, MA -- Industrial and agricultural activities produce large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. Many bacteria also produce methane as a byproduct of their metabolism. Some of this naturally released methane comes from the ocean, a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists because there are no known methane-producing organisms living near the ocean'
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Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age; may explain normal cognitive decline & neurodegeneration IMAGE: This graph of all 161 neurons in the dataset, sampled at different ages, shows the quantity and type of mutations they carry. From left to right, by ascending age in... view more Credit: Reprinted with permission from MA Lodato et al., Science Dec. 7, 2017, DOI: 10.1101/221960 Scientists have wondered whether somatic (non-inherited) mutations play a role in aging and brain degenera
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Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy GAINESVILLE, Fla.-- Black holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype. In a paper published today in the journal Science , University of Florida scientists have discovered these tears in the fabric of the universe have sign
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A glimpse of the magnetic field around a black hole A sudden flare and cooling of gas around a black hole in a binary system has offered astronomers a rare opportunity to measure the system's magnetic field, finding it weaker than expected. Observations of black holes consuming material ripped from a nearby star reveal that these binary systems amass material into an accretion disk. Above this disk lies an accretion disk coronae (ADC), the behavio
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Freeze and flee: The costly 'escape' response of narwhals East Greenland narwhals exhibit both "freeze" and "flee" responses when escaping from threats, researchers report. This paradoxical reaction is highly costly, and it challenges scientists' current understanding of mammalian escape activity, which states that mammals cannot simultaneously freeze and flee when frightened. Historically, narwhals have not been bothered much by humans because their ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sandy Hook shooting aftermath: Increased gun sales, more accidental deaths by firearms In the wake of the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, in Newtown, Connecticut, the number of guns purchased in America spiked compared to baseline levels, and there were 60 additional accidental deaths related to firearms - 20 among children and 40 among adults, a new study estimates. The results begin to explore the question of whether greater exposure to guns can increase t
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An unexpected way to boost fishery yields using dams A new study based on the Mekong River basin, home to one of the largest freshwater fisheries in the world, reveals particular dam flow patterns that could be harnessed to boost food production - by up to nearly four-fold compared to un-dammed ecosystems. Because operation of dams can pose a threat to fisheries, and thus to food security, insights into smarter dam operations are critical. For many
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydropower dams can be managed without an all-or-nothing choice between energy and food IMAGE: Fishing in Cambodia. view more Credit: John Sabo/Arizona State University Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. The river, one of the world's largest, flows through Burma, China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand and Cambodia. It is an economic engine for fishermen and a food source for millions of people worldwide. And
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physiochemical 'fingerprint' of parasitic 'American murderer' uncovered IMAGE: Researchers interrogate the worm surface and its sheath in unprecedented detail using Atomic Force Microscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. view more Credit: The University of Nottingham The physical and chemical 'fingerprint' profile of a parasitic worm, dubbed the 'American murderer,' which infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, has been uncover
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New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks Progressive kidney diseases, whether caused by obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or rare genetic mutations, often have the same outcome: The cells responsible for filtering the blood are destroyed. Reporting today in Science , a team led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School describes a new approach to prevent death in
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Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia IMAGE: Map of sites and postulated migratory pathways associated with modern humans dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene. view more Credit: Bae et al. 2017. On the origin of modern humans: Asian perspectives. Science. Image by: Katerina Douka and Michelle O'Reilly Most people are now familiar with the traditional "Out of Africa" model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress Narwhals released after entanglement in nets and outfitted with heart monitors performed a series of deep dives, swimming hard to escape, while their heart rates dropped to unexpectedly low levels of three to four beats per minute. This combination of hard exercise and low heart rate while not breathing under water is costly and could make it difficult for the deep-diving whales to get enough oxy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings IMAGE: Three-dimensional rendering of Risso's dolphin echolocation click spectra recorded in the Gulf of Mexico, aggregated by an unsupervised learning algorithm. view more Credit: Kaitlin Frasier Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. This approach, presented in PLOS Computational Bi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular disease. However, a new study by NYU College of Global Public Health and the University of Michigan finds that this "obesity paradox" is not present among people with new cases
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Live Science
Survival of the Fishiest? How 'Shape of Water' Creature Could Evolve A bizarre fish-humanoid creature is subjected to nefarious experiments in film director Guillermo del Toro's new fantasy thriller "The Shape of Water." Strange as it is, this fictional creature could be explained — at least somewhat — from an evolutionary perspective, scientists say. The Fox Searchlight Pictures film, which opened in theaters Dec. 1, tells the story of Elisa (Sally Hawkins)
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Neuroscientists Just Launched an Atlas of the Developing Human Brain Your brain is one enigmatic hunk of meat—a wildly complex web of neurons numbering in the tens of billions. But years ago, when you were in the womb, it began as little more than a scattering of undifferentiated stem cells. A series of genetic signals transformed those blank slates into the wrinkly, three-pound mass between your ears. Scientists think the way your brain looks and functions can be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forests are the key to fresh waterFreshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global water resources as climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is there a musical method for interpreting speech?Vocoded speech, or distorted speech that imitates voice transduction by a cochlear implant, is used throughout acoustic and auditory research to explore speech comprehension under various conditions. Researchers evaluated whether musicians had an advantage in understanding and reciting degraded speech as compared to nonmusicians.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover the unexpected atomic structure of cold and menthol sensor TRPM8 The TRPM8 ion channel (blue and white in center) is embedded in the outer membrane of cells, and is able to sense cold temperatures on the outside (the top half of the image), and communicate this information to the warm cellular interior (lower half of the image). Credit: Gabe Lander and Graham Johnson A team of researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Duke University has made
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Dana Foundation
Questioning Perception with Illusions Can you spot the difference between the two pictures in the video above? Most of the packed audience at the “The Neuroscience of Illusion” event at the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan couldn’t. What if we told you to look for something the men couldn’t leave without? Even with that clue, many attendees were still stumped. One women continued to struggle even when told to look for
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Science : NPR
Researchers Look For Gun Violence Clues In Google Searches And Background Checks Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images Aft
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Live Science
DNA Has Gone Digital — What Could Possibly Go Wrong? This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . Biology is becoming increasingly digitized. Researchers like us use computers to analyze DNA, operate lab equipment and store genetic information. But new capabilities also mean new risks – and biologists remain largely unaware of the potenti
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Latest Headlines | Science News
AI eavesdrops on dolphins and discovers six unknown click types A new computer program has an ear for dolphin chatter. The algorithm uncovered six previously unknown types of dolphin echolocation clicks in underwater recordings from the Gulf of Mexico, researchers report online December 7 in PLOS Computational Biology . Identifying which species produce the newly discovered click varieties could help scientists better keep tabs on wild dolphin populations and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Abundant enzyme in marine microbes may be responsible for production of ocean methane Credit: CC0 Public Domain Industrial and agricultural activities produce large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. Many bacteria also produce methane as a byproduct of their metabolism. Some of this naturally released methane comes from the ocean, a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists because there are no known methane-producing organisms living near t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydropower dams can be managed without an all-or-nothing choice between energy and food Fishing in Cambodia. Credit: John Sabo/Arizona State University Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. The river, one of the world's largest, flows through Burma, China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand and Cambodia. It is an economic engine for fishermen and a food source for millions of people worldwide. And while the dams are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy An illustration of a black hole. Credit: Michael McAleer/UF News Black holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype. In a paper published today in the journal Science , University of Florida scientists have discovered thes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings Three-dimensional rendering of Risso's dolphin echolocation click spectra recorded in the Gulf of Mexico, aggregated by an unsupervised learning algorithm. Credit: Kaitlin Frasier Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. This approach, presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Kaitlin Fras
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia Map of sites and postulated migratory pathways associated with modern humans dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene. Credit: Bae et al. 2017. On the origin of modern humans: Asian perspectives. Science. Image by: Katerina Douka and Michelle O'Reilly Most people are now familiar with the traditional "Out of Africa" model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then dispersed across Asia a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress Greenland narwhals. Credit: M.P. Heide-Jorgensen Narwhals released after entanglement in nets and outfitted with heart monitors performed a series of deep dives, swimming hard to escape, while their heart rates dropped to unexpectedly low levels of three to four beats per minute. This combination of hard exercise and low heart rate while not breathing under water is costly and could make it diffi
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A Visit From St. Grim: Accuracy Happy Hour On a very fine Friday our events will begin, Play this game right and some points you may win. For those who trace quick, who always hit the mark, This is one competition you’ll hit out of the park! Our first game’s at 2 for those who are here, Or a 10 PM game may suit your hemisphere. Just try your best, it really can’t hurt, And our most accurate player will win a t-shirt! Accuracy HH Session 1
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes behind higher education linked to lower risk of Alzheimer’sUsing genetic information, researchers provide new evidence that higher educational attainment is strongly associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Night owls have larger social networks than early birdsUsing anonymous mobile phone data, researchers have tapped into patterns in people’s behavior. They have found out that our ‘chronotypes’ – our inherent periods of sleep during a 24-hour-period – correlate with the size of our social networks and how much we are in contact with others and also the kind of chronotypes with whom we interact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recreational drug users not what we thinkA researcher has been investigating why Australians are among the top users of illegal drugs in the world -- and has uncovered some revealing new facts about the motivations of recreational drug users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ford shifts production of electric SUV to Mexico The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator' Rice's "topological excitonic insulators" are made of sheets of semiconductors (top) that become insulators at a critical temperature around 10 kelvins. At the critical point, a superfluid quantum liquid of excitons -- pairs of negatively charged electrons (blue dots) and positively charged electron holes (red dots) -- forms inside the devices (bottom) and electricity ceases to pass through them.
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Popular Science
This new, duck-like dinosaur is so wacky scientists thought it was fake When European scientists encountered their first platypus skeleton, they thought the duck-billed mammal must surely be a fake . "It naturally excites the idea of some deceptive preparation by artificial means," English zoologist George Shaw wrote in 1799. The specimen looked like a bad attempt at a fake new species, destined for a low-budget freakshow collection. Modern researchers are a bit more
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Aurora Australis, or Southern Lights, over the South Pole Telescope IMAGE: The Aurora Australis, or Southern Lights, over the South Pole Telescope at NSF's Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. view more Credit: Dr. Keith Vanderlinde, NSF Observations of two galaxies made with the National Science Foundation-funded Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope suggest that large galaxies formed faster than scientists had previously thought.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
US firm picks UK for weather satellites Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption William Hosack: "We benefit from the miniaturisation that's come out of the cell phone industry" A miniaturised instrument to monitor the weather will be the first payload to fly on one of the UK Space Agency's new demonstration satellites. US-based Orbital Micro Systems will launch their microwave radiometer aboard the 30cm-long spacecra
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Science current issue
Designing river flows to improve food security futures in the Lower Mekong Basin Rivers provide unrivaled opportunity for clean energy via hydropower, but little is known about the potential impact of dam-building on the food security these rivers provide. In tropical rivers, rainfall drives a periodic flood pulse fueling fish production and delivering nutrition to more than 150 million people worldwide. Hydropower will modulate this flood pulse, thereby threatening food secu
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Harassment in science is real Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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News at a glance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Bioelectronics herald the rise of the cyborg AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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NASA sensor to study space junk the size of dust AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Nations put science before fishing in the Arctic AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cuban panel claims stress caused mystery illnesses AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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To help save the heart, is it time to retire cholesterol tests? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science groups urge changes as Congress nears final tax bill AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Last stands AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Best books for curious kids Summary How does the Moon's influence on Earth's wobble affect the weather? Which animal earns the title of the world's deadliest? Can the Arctic undergo a drought? Even adults may struggle to articulate the answers to these seemingly simple questions. Fear not: This year's finalists for the Science Books and Films (SB&F) Prizes for Excellence in Science Books have you covered. Sponsored by Subar
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Can dams be designed for sustainability? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Putting the RuBisCO pieces together AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Coherent nanoparticles in calcite AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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TRP'ing up chronic kidney disease AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Concerns for ozone recovery AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Saving lives by regulating guns: Evidence for policy Summary Gun violence is a leading cause of death in the United States, where over 36,000 people were killed by gunshot in 2015 [including homicide, suicide, and accident ( 1 )]. The gun-murder rate is 25 times as high in the United States as in other high-income nations, and the gun-suicide rate is eight times as high ( 2 ). Interpersonal gun violence has deleterious effects on economic developme
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EU can help Spain's endangered seabird AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Broad conservation: Protect the unknowns AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Quake warning funds on shaky ground AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Probing the metabolism of microorganisms Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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Metabolic markers as cancer clues Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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Reading the genome like a history book Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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Biology and physics rendezvous at the membrane Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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The flight of the narwhal AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Gaining a foothold on kidney disease?
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Conditions in a black hole outburst AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Watching electrons lose steam in graphene AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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FAK directs tumor immune evasion AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Understanding splicing from the 3' end AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A sweet source to make acrylonitrile AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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One cause of accidental deaths AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Taking a direct route to the brain AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The peopling of Asia AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Optimizing flow in dammed rivers AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Computer or human? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Probing an excitonic condensate AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Building a brain AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A magnetic tip reconfigures edge states AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A biotech tour de force AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Clocking departures from chiral origins AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Many roads to being tough AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A source of methane in the upper ocean AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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An even longer road to recovery? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Priming T follicular helper cells AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Detecting skeletal growth AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Skin stem cells regenerate a human epidermis Skin stem cells have been successfully used in life-saving therapy. PHOTO: STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE SOURCE In a landmark study, Hirsch et al. used engineered autologous skin stem cells to replace more than 80% of the epidermis of a critically ill 7-year-old boy. The child suffered from junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a rare skin condition affecting fewer than 1 in 1 million people. Affe
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Science current issue
Multifactorial response to drought Drought is not just characteristic of the desert, but also occurs as transient dry spells in agricultural settings. Plants respond to drought by waterproofing their surfaces, closing pores, and adjusting internally, largely in response to the hormone abscisic acid. The hormones strigolactone, which triggers germination of parasitic plants, and karrikin, a component of smoke that triggers seed ger
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Science current issue
The health hazards of fiber intake Carbon nanotube fibers cause mesothelioma in mice. ILLUSTRATION: SCIENCE PICTURE CO/SCIENCE SOURCE Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used in a variety of commercial applications, from automotive parts to computers. Increased human exposure to these nanomaterials has sparked concerns about possible health risks because CNTs have structural similarities to asbestos, which causes the incurable cancer meso
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Downplaying versus embracing differences Inclusive teaching practices are often taught during workshops aimed at increasing student diversity. Aragón et al. analyzed data from an intensive workshop on inclusive teaching practices held by the National Academies of Sciences Summer Institutes on Undergraduate Education to model how educators adopt such practices. Two ideologies were considered: colorblindness, which downplays differences b
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The metabolic needs of migrating Tregs Regulatory T cells (T regs ) are thought to rely primarily on oxidative metabolism, in contrast to CD4 + T helper subsets (T H 1, T H 2, and T H 17 cells), which are highly glycolytic. However, Kishore et al. find that integrins (LFA-1) and costimulatory molecules (CD28) can enhance T reg glycolysis, whereas the coinhibitory receptor CTLA-4 can block it. Glycolysis is required for T reg migration
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Science current issue
Softly getting a grip For delicate work, our fingers can softly grasp an object such as an egg, whereas when precision is called for, we can hold something like a pencil or fine tool with a stiff grasp. In robotic arms, soft pneumatic actuation allows for dexterity and flexibility, but the stiffness of the arm cannot be decoupled from the position of the device at its end. Giannaccini et al. used a combination of cont
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Science current issue
Pulling versus heating Mechanical force can activate and break bonds in ways that differ from thermal mechanisms or photoactivation. Stevenson and Bu studied the effects of substituent positions on retro-Diels-Alder reactions in which a bridged ring opened to form substituted furans and malemides. Thermal activation depended on stereochemistry (endo or exo configurations), but mechanochemistry (activating the molecule
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Science current issue
Plant RuBisCo assembly in E. coli with five chloroplast chaperones including BSD2 Plant RuBisCo, a complex of eight large and eight small subunits, catalyzes the fixation of CO 2 in photosynthesis. The low catalytic efficiency of RuBisCo provides strong motivation to reengineer the enzyme with the goal of increasing crop yields. However, genetic manipulation has been hampered by the failure to express plant RuBisCo in a bacterial host. We achieved the functional expression of
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Science current issue
Structure of the yeast spliceosomal postcatalytic P complex The spliceosome undergoes dramatic changes in a splicing cycle. Structures of B, B act , C, C*, and intron lariat spliceosome complexes revealed mechanisms of 5'–splice site (ss) recognition, branching, and intron release, but lacked information on 3'-ss recognition, exon ligation, and exon release. Here we report a cryo–electron microscopy structure of the postcatalytic P complex at 3.3-angstrom
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Science current issue
Postcatalytic spliceosome structure reveals mechanism of 3'-splice site selection Introns are removed from eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors by the spliceosome in two transesterification reactions—branching and exon ligation. The mechanism of 3'–splice site recognition during exon ligation has remained unclear. Here we present the 3.7-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of the yeast P-complex spliceosome immediately after exon ligation. The 3'–splice site AG dinucleo
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Science current issue
Attosecond-resolved photoionization of chiral molecules Chiral light-matter interactions have been investigated for two centuries, leading to the discovery of many chiroptical processes used for discrimination of enantiomers. Whereas most chiroptical effects result from a response of bound electrons, photoionization can produce much stronger chiral signals that manifest as asymmetries in the angular distribution of the photoelectrons along the light-p
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Science current issue
Coherently aligned nanoparticles within a biogenic single crystal: A biological prestressing strategy In contrast to synthetic materials, materials produced by organisms are formed in ambient conditions and with a limited selection of elements. Nevertheless, living organisms reveal elegant strategies for achieving specific functions, ranging from skeletal support to mastication, from sensors and defensive tools to optical function. Using state-of-the-art characterization techniques, we present a
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Science current issue
A precise measurement of the magnetic field in the corona of the black hole binary V404 Cygni Observations of binary stars containing an accreting black hole or neutron star often show x-ray emission extending to high energies (>10 kilo­–electron volts), which is ascribed to an accretion disk corona of energetic particles akin to those seen in the solar corona. Despite their ubiquity, the physical conditions in accretion disk coronae remain poorly constrained. Using simultaneous infrared,
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Science current issue
Imaging resonant dissipation from individual atomic defects in graphene Conversion of electric current into heat involves microscopic processes that operate on nanometer length scales and release minute amounts of power. Although central to our understanding of the electrical properties of materials, individual mediators of energy dissipation have so far eluded direct observation. Using scanning nanothermometry with submicrokelvin sensitivity, we visualized and contr
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Science current issue
Renewable acrylonitrile production Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a petroleum-derived compound used in resins, polymers, acrylics, and carbon fiber. We present a process for renewable ACN production using 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP), which can be produced microbially from sugars. The process achieves ACN molar yields exceeding 90% from ethyl 3-hydroxypropanoate (ethyl 3-HP) via dehydration and nitrilation with ammonia over an inexpensi
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Science current issue
Quantized chiral edge conduction on domain walls of a magnetic topological insulator Electronic ordering in magnetic and dielectric materials forms domains with different signs of order parameters. The control of configuration and motion of the domain walls (DWs) enables nonvolatile responses against minute external fields. Here, we realize chiral edge states (CESs) on the magnetic DWs of a magnetic topological insulator. We design and fabricate the magnetic domains in the quantu
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Science current issue
Signatures of exciton condensation in a transition metal dichalcogenide Bose condensation has shaped our understanding of macroscopic quantum phenomena, having been realized in superconductors, atomic gases, and liquid helium. Excitons are bosons that have been predicted to condense into either a superfluid or an insulating electronic crystal. Using the recently developed technique of momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (M-EELS), we studied electronic
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Science current issue
Spatiotemporal gene expression trajectories reveal developmental hierarchies of the human cortex Systematic analyses of spatiotemporal gene expression trajectories during organogenesis have been challenging because diverse cell types at different stages of maturation and differentiation coexist in the emerging tissues. We identified discrete cell types as well as temporally and spatially restricted trajectories of radial glia maturation and neurogenesis in developing human telencephalon. The
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Science current issue
Firearms and accidental deaths: Evidence from the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting One cause of accidental deaths The number of accidental deaths involving a firearm might be expected to correlate with the number of firearms, but claims that a causal relationship exists have not been persuasive (see the Policy Forum by Cook and Donohue). The 2012 mass shooting at an elementary school in the eastern United States resulted in the deaths of 20 children. Levine and McKnight used th
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Science current issue
Paradoxical escape responses by narwhals (Monodon monoceros) Until recent declines in Arctic sea ice levels, narwhals ( Monodon monoceros ) have lived in relative isolation from human perturbation and sustained predation pressures. The resulting naïvety has made this cryptic, deep-diving cetacean highly susceptible to disturbance, although quantifiable effects have been lacking. We deployed a submersible, animal-borne electrocardiograph-accelerometer-dept
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Science current issue
A small-molecule inhibitor of TRPC5 ion channels suppresses progressive kidney disease in animal models Progressive kidney diseases are often associated with scarring of the kidney’s filtration unit, a condition called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). This scarring is due to loss of podocytes, cells critical for glomerular filtration, and leads to proteinuria and kidney failure. Inherited forms of FSGS are caused by Rac1-activating mutations, and Rac1 induces TRPC5 ion channel activity an
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Science current issue
Structural basis for methylphosphonate biosynthesis Methylphosphonate synthase (MPnS) produces methylphosphonate, a metabolic precursor to methane in the upper ocean. Here, we determine a 2.35-angstrom resolution structure of MPnS and discover that it has an unusual 2-histidine-1-glutamine iron-coordinating triad. We further solve the structure of a related enzyme, hydroxyethylphosphonate dioxygenase from Streptomyces albus ( Sa HEPD), and find th
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Technology Feature | Biomarkers on the brain: Putting biomarkers together for a better understanding of the nervous system Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Science current issue
Sponsored Collection | A new age in scanning electron microscopy: Applications in the life sciences CUSTOM PUBLISHING OFFICE SPONSORED SUPPLEMENT Sponsored Collection | A new age in scanning electron microscopy: Applications in the life sciences See all Hide authors and affiliations Science 08 Dec 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6368, pp. 1344 DOI: 10.1126/science.358.6368.1344-b
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Science current issue
Sponsored Collection | Novel trends in immuno-oncology research: Advanced cell analysis for immunotherapeutic applications CUSTOM PUBLISHING OFFICE SPONSORED SUPPLEMENT Sponsored Collection | Novel trends in immuno-oncology research: Advanced cell analysis for immunotherapeutic applications See all Hide authors and affiliations Science 08 Dec 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6368, pp. 1344 DOI: 10.1126/science.358.6368.1344-c
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Science current issue
An unexpected career resource A few years ago, my graduate student association ran into some trouble. We knew that our classmates wanted our career development seminar series to cover opportunities in biotechnology, yet we were struggling to identify speakers. As president of the association, it was my responsibility to tell faculty members and program administrators that we might need to shorten the seminar series. Their res
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Science current issue
Comment on "Cognition-mediated evolution of low-quality floral nectars" Nachev et al . (Reports, 6 January 2017, p. 75) present dilute nectar in bat-pollinated plants as "paradoxical" because bats prefer concentrated nectar, but paradox disappears with realistic assumptions about nectar evolution. We argue that they make unrealistic assumptions about the cognitive abilities of bat pollinators, invoke Weber’s law inappropriately, and cannot predict observed nectar con
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Science current issue
A generative vision model that trains with high data efficiency and breaks text-based CAPTCHAs Computer or human? Proving that we are human is now part of many tasks that we do on the internet, such as creating an email account, voting in an online poll, or even downloading a scientific paper. One of the most popular tests is text-based CAPTCHA, where would-be users are asked to decipher letters that may be distorted, partially obscured, or shown against a busy background. This test is use
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Cognition-mediated evolution of low-quality floral nectars" Pyke and Waser claim that our virtual pollination ecology model makes unrealistic assumptions and fails to predict observed nectar concentrations of bat flowers and negative correlations between pollinator body size and sugar concentration. In their comment, crucial model features are misrepresented, misunderstood, or ignored. Sensitivity to the supply/demand ratio explains both the equilibrium c
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Science current issue
Erratum for the Book Review "The realities of race" by J. Kang In the Book Review “The realities of race,” the following note was added in proof: The author acknowledges that his own work is referenced extensively throughout the book. He has nonetheless strived to provide a fair and balanced review.
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Science current issue
On the origin of modern humans: Asian perspectives The peopling of Asia In recent years, there has been increasing focus on the paleoanthropology of Asia, particularly the migration patterns of early modern humans as they spread out of Africa. Bae et al. review the current state of the Late Pleistocene Asian human evolutionary record from archaeology, hominin paleontology, geochronology, genetics, and paleoclimatology. They evaluate single versus
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Viden
Bitcoin sluger lige så meget strøm som hele Danmark Prisen på kryptovalutaen Bitcoin er steget voldsomt de sidste måneder. I skrivende stund er en enkelt bitcoin over 15.500 dollars værd, hvilket er over 95.000 kroner. Det er et svimlende beløb, når man ser bare et år tilbage, hvor prisen på en bitcoin var på knap 5.000 kroner. Den høje pris på Bitcoin har givet grund til begejstring hos mange, som har satset penge på kryptovalutaen. Men når man s
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Science : NPR
Strange Parallels: Alternative Histories In Physics And Culture Certain pivotal events in history seem to open up a schism in time, separating what really happened from countless other "what ifs." World War II, with its succession of controversial decisions, included many such pivotal moments, culminating in President Truman's order to launch atomic bombs on Japan. Physicists were sharply divided about that choice: Some such as Albert Einstein regretted the b
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cognitive science
[Crosspost from r/science] I’m Dr. Henry Mahncke, neuroscientist and CEO, here today to talk about brain training, and the recent independent research showing that our specific type of brain training can significantly reduce the risk of dementia. AMA! Can it help those whose dementia have already begun? How does brain training help dementia? Is dementia a physical atrophy in neural connections?
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The Atlantic
Robots Will Transform Fast Food V isitors to Henn-na, a restaurant outside Nagasaki, Japan, are greeted by a peculiar sight: their food being prepared by a row of humanoid robots that bear a passing resemblance to the Terminator. The “head chef,” incongruously named Andrew, specializes in okonomiyaki , a Japanese pancake. Using his two long arms, he stirs batter in a metal bowl, then pours it onto a hot grill. While he waits fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria activate their own killerA new photothermal treatment could help to overcome antibiotic resistance. In this method, an agent transforms near-infrared light into local heating, which kills the pathogens. However, this 'transformer' must first be activated. In this case the target bacteria do this themselves. Other types of bacteria do not switch the agent on and remain unharmed.
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Ingeniøren
Nye scenarier for produktudvikling er klar til ‘Take-Off’ - er du med? I mandags havde jeg fornøjelsen at deltage i et 75 års jubilæumsarrangement hos Brüel & Kjær i Nærum nord for København. I stedet for blot at se tilbage på hæderkronede dage og firmaets store op- og nedture havde firmaet valgt, at jubilæet skulle have fokus på fremtiden og ikke mindst fremtidens produktudvikling. Gennem det seneste halve år har den danske akustikgigant derfor sammen med flere af
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Big Think
Why You're Probably Related to Nefertiti, Confucius, and Socrates The theory of evolution holds that all living things have common ancestors. But just how far back do humans need to go to find a common ancestor of their own: a person to whom all living people are related? The answer, for people of European descent at least, is surprisingly recent: 600 years. The common ancestor for every single person alive on the planet today, no matter where, lived approx
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator' IMAGE: Rice's "topological excitonic insulators " are made of sheets of semiconductors (top) that become insulators at a critical temperature around 10 kelvins. At the critical point, a superfluid quantum liquid of... view more Credit: R. Du/Rice University Rice University physicists dedicated to creating the working components of a fault-tolerant quantum computer have succeeded in creating a pre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team created techniques to analyze thousands of hours of NASA tape From left: Dr. John H.L. Hansen, Chengzhu Yu PhD'17, Dr. Abhijeet Sangwan and Lakshmish Kaushik pose with a model of an astronaut at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. The four oversaw the project to develop speech processing techniques to reconstruct and transform thousands of hours of audio from NASA's lunar missions. Credit: The University of Texas at Dallas NASA recorded thousands of h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cells Although too much cholesterol is bad for your health, some cholesterol is essential. Most of the cholesterol that the human body needs is manufactured in its own cells in a synthesis process consisting of more than 20 steps. New research from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, to be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on Dec. 8, explains how an enzyme responsible
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NYT > Science
Matter: Scientists ‘Inject’ Information Into Monkeys’ Brains “You could potentially bypass the damaged areas and deliver stimulation to the premotor cortex,” said Kevin A. Mazurek, a co-author of the study. “That could be a way to bridge parts of the brain that can no longer communicate.” In order to study the premotor cortex, Dr. Mazurek and his co-author, Dr. Marc H. Schieber, trained two rhesus monkeys to play a game. The monkeys sat in front of a panel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative system images photosynthesis to provide picture of plant healthResearchers have developed a new imaging system that is designed to monitor the health of crops in the field or greenhouse. The new technology could one day save farmers significant money and time by enabling intelligent agricultural equipment that automatically provides plants with water or nutrients at the first signs of distress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triplesResearchers have studied 389,166 volunteers who gave DNA samples to the UK Biobank, US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In addition to confirming the eight genetic variants that had already been linked to longevity, this study found 17 more to expand the list of known variants affecting lifespan to 25 genes, with some sex-specific.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More than 1,000 ancient sealings discoveredClassical scholars have discovered a large number of sealings in southeast Turkey. More than 1,000 sealings give new insights into the Greco-Roman pantheon. The finds were in a late antique building complex point to a hitherto unknown church.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cells IMAGE: Researchers at the University of New South Wales have discovered that a spring-shaped protein structure senses cholesterol in cells. view more Credit: Andrew J. Brown, University of New South Wales Although too much cholesterol is bad for your health, some cholesterol is essential. Most of the cholesterol that the human body needs is manufactured in its own cells in a synthesis process con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Psychologist examines methods of classifying mental disorders IMAGE: Lee Anna Clark, William J. and Dorothy K. O'Neill Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame. view more Credit: University of Notre Dame Mental illnesses, such as major depression, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, affect nearly 1 in 5 adults in the United States, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Many aspects of these illnesses remain so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dust on the wind: Study reveals surprising role of dust in mountain ecosystems IMAGE: What stories they tell: Jeffrey pine needles have a record of the trees' dust-derived nutrients. view more Credit: Lindsay Arvin Trees growing atop granite in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains rely on nutrients from windborne dust more than on nutrients from the underlying bedrock. This surprising finding resulted from a study led by University of Wyoming (UW) scientists. The resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar power advances possible with new 'double-glazing' device IMAGE: Dr. Gavin Bell and Dr. Yorck Ramachers in the laboratory. view more Credit: University of Warwick New 'double-glazed' solar power device opens up fresh opportunities to develop more advanced photovoltaics - invented by University of Warwick researchers Totally new way of collecting solar energy - using gas rather than vacuum to collect electricity - inspired by early 20th centur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UT Dallas researchers develop techniques to analyze thousands of hours of Apollo mission audio IMAGE: From left: Dr. John H.L. Hansen, Chengzhu Yu PhD'17, Dr. Abhijeet Sangwan and Lakshmish Kaushik pose with a model of an astronaut at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston.... view more Credit: The University of Texas at Dallas NASA recorded thousands of hours of audio from the Apollo lunar missions, yet most of us have only been able to hear the highlights. The agency recor
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Researchers find 'oldest ever eye' in fossil Image copyright Gennadi Baranov Image caption Side view of the fossil's right eye An "exceptional" 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, according to scientists. The remains of the extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals, including crabs, bees and dragonflies. Scientists made the find while looking at the w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabricScientists have developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
1st state opts out of broadband public safety networkNew Hampshire on Thursday became the first state to say it will reject FirstNet, the nationwide public safety communications system that's been approved in two-thirds of the rest of the country.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
CRISPR/Cas9 can reverse multiple diseases in mice A new twist on gene editing makes the CRISPR/Cas9 molecular scissors act as a highlighter for the genetic instruction book. Such highlighting helps turn on specific genes. Using the new tool, researchers treated mouse versions of type 1 diabetes, kidney injury and Duchenne muscular dystrophy , the team reports December 7 in Cell. The new method may make some types of gene therapy easier and could
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The Atlantic
Texting With a Ghost in Personal Shopper Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. Next up is Olivier Assayas’s Personal Shopper . (Read our previous entries here .) When Personal Shopper begins, Maureen Cartwright (Kristen Stewart) has been waiting a long time for a sign. A few mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research papers shed light on decade-long stem cell mystery Members of the Monash BDI led research teams (L-R) Dr Fernando Rossello, Dr Anja Knaupp, Associate Professor Jose Polo and Dr Christian Nefzger. Credit: Monash University A series of studies led by Monash University researcher Associate Professor Jose Polo have this week shed light on vital, yet previously unclear, aspects of cell reprogramming. Cell reprogramming, in which one type of cell can b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers Motion labs similar to the one pictured require space and can cost upward of $100,000. According to new studies from a MU research team, depth sensors found in video game technology can provide healthcare providers a portable and inexpensive option. Credit: Amy Pariss, University of Missouri Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist's accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detector Doctoral student Greg Madejski's illustration of the layers comprising his new DNA detection device. Credit: University of Rochester illustration / Greg Madejski Greg Madejski held his breath as he looked into the microscope, trying to weld two fingernail-sized chips together: a tiny chip containing a nanofilter on top of another chip with a DNA sensor. It was frustrating work. The chips weren't
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Cyberbiosecurity' and protecting the life sciences Biology and biotechnology have entered a digital age, but security policies around such activities have not kept pace. That's according to Colorado State University's Jean Peccoud, Abell Chair of Synthetic Biology and professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. Peccoud is lead author on a new paper in Trends in Biotechnology , published online Dec. 7, urging awareness of "
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals Transparent skulls of an extinct plesiosaur (top) and a living crocodile (bottom). The inner ear is the pink structure towards the back of the head. Credit: James Neenan A new study led by Oxford University Museum of Natural History has revealed that an extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patient bedside important for medical student learning Boston - A new web-based tool aimed at improving experiential learning for medical students has demonstrated that learning occurs in patient rooms and in other areas within the hospital, including workstations. Developed by clinicians at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and BU School of Medicine, "Learning Moment" allows students to electronically log their learning experiences and share them with the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify first brain cells that respond to soundA new study is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientist's accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detectorResearchers at the Universities of Rochester and Ottawa have developed a novel nanoscale device for detecting DNA biomarkers. The device, described in Nano Letters, preconfines translocating molecules using an ultrathin nanoporous silicon nitride membrane separated from a single sensing nanopore by a nanoscale cavity. The membrane serves as a pre-filter and improves the DNA sensing capabilities of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers IMAGE: Mackenzie Sconce jumps off a platform while Aaron Gray, associate professor of clinical medicine, measures her biomechanics using a video game motion sensor. view more Credit: Photo by Rachel Coward COLUMBIA, Mo. - Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we move--it also is very expensive. Some motion labs can cost up
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quick evaluation can predict whether drugs, talk therapy work better for anxiety patients Clinicians and patients often struggle to find the right treatment for anxiety, sometimes cycling through various therapies for months before the patient begins to feel their symptoms improve. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that a brief test that can be performed in the office can help determine whether an antidepressant or a form of talk therapy, called cogn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hope for autism: Optogenetics shines light on social interactions IMAGE: From left: HeeJae Jang, Malavika Murugan, Ilana Witten and their colleagues have identified a neural substrate for social learning in mice, with possible relevance to disorders such as autism. view more Credit: Danielle Alio/Princeton University Ilana Witten didn't set out to study spatial learning. She thought she was investigating how mice socialize--but she discovered that in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Cyberbiosecurity' and protecting the life sciences Biology and biotechnology have entered a digital age, but security policies around such activities have not kept pace. That's according to Colorado State University's Jean Peccoud, Abell Chair of Synthetic Biology and professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. Peccoud is lead author on a new paper in Trends in Biotechnology , published online Dec. 7, urging awareness of "
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electrical stimulation in brain bypasses senses, instructs movement The brain's complex network of neurons enables us to interpret and effortlessly navigate and interact with the world around us. But when these links are damaged due to injury or stroke, critical tasks like perception and movement can be disrupted. New research is helping scientists figure out how to harness the brain's plasticity to rewire these lost connections, an advance that could accelerate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution: It's all in the ears IMAGE: Transparent skulls of an extinct plesiosaur (top) and a living crocodile (bottom). The inner ear is the pink structure towards the back of the head. view more Credit: James Neenan The inner ears of extinct aquatic reptiles from millions of years ago closely resemble those of some living aquatic animals with similar lifestyles or body proportions, including crocodiles, sea turtles
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals IMAGE: Transparent skulls of an extinct plesiosaur (top) and a living crocodile (bottom). The inner ear is the pink structure towards the back of the head. view more Credit: James Neenan Inner ears of fossil marine reptiles called sauropterygians are revealed for the first time by international team led by researchers at the University of Oxford Extinct sauropterygians inner ears foun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Suite of Monash papers shed light on decade-long stem cell mystery IMAGE: Members of the Monash BDI led research teams (L-R) Dr Fernando Rossello, Dr Anja Knaupp, Associate Professor Jose Polo and Dr Christian Nefzger. view more Credit: monash university A series of studies led by Monash University researcher Associate Professor Jose Polo have this week shed light on vital, yet previously unclear, aspects of cell reprogramming. Cell reprogramming, in which
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancers To understand what has gone wrong when cancer occurs and to create new possibilities for treatment, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind what is happening at the cellular level. New research, which is now published in the journal Molecular Cell , explains how the motor of an enzyme in DNA damage repair is switched on and off and how these processes might go awry in cancer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crafty crows know what it takes to make a good tool Biologists at the University of St Andrews have discovered how New Caledonian crows make one of their most sophisticated tool designs - sticks with a neatly-shaped hooked tip. New Caledonian crows are the only species besides humans known to manufacture hooked tools in the wild. Birds produce these remarkable tools from the side branches of certain plants, carefully 'crafting' a crochet-like hook
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
5G set to revolutionize communications and to transform industry The new generation of 5G mobile networks is the future of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) sector - a true technological revolution that will deliver the Internet of Things and is being driven by R&D+i initiatives like '5TONIC', Spain's leading 5G innovation laboratory. At the 4th Mobility Forum of RedIRIS (the Spanish academic and research network), Professor Arturo Azcorra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One wet winter can shake up San Francisco Bay's invasive species IMAGE: Marine ecologist Andy Chang tracks invasive species in California, and is discovering ways climate change and extreme weather can alter the playing field. view more Credit: Julia Blum For many Californians, last year's wet winter triggered a case of whiplash. After five years of drought, rain from October 2016 to February 2017 broke more than a century of records. In San Fran
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inhibiting TOR boosts regenerative potential of adult tissues IMAGE: In the top image, a tracheal epithelium after one round of regeneration; and in the lower picture, a tracheal epithelium after 3 rounds of regeneration. The stem cells are green... view more Credit: Samantha Haller, PhD Adult stem cells replenish dying cells and regenerate damaged tissues throughout our lifetime. We lose many of those stem cells, along with their regenerative capacit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salk scientists modify CRISPR to epigenetically treat diabetes, kidney disease, muscular dystrophy LA JOLLA -- (Dec. 7, 2017) Salk scientists have created a new version of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology that allows them to activate genes without creating breaks in the DNA, potentially circumventing a major hurdle to using gene editing technologies to treat human diseases. Most CRISPR/Cas9 systems work by creating "double-strand breaks" (DSBs) in regions of the genome targe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel harvesting method rapidly produces superior stem cells for transplantation A new method of harvesting stem cells for bone marrow transplantation - developed by a team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute - appears to accomplish two goals: making the donation process more convenient and less unpleasant for donors and providing cells that are superior to those acquired by current protocols. Result
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice Much of the enthusiasm around gene-editing techniques, particularly the CRISPR-Cas9 technology, centers on the ability to insert or remove genes or to repair disease-causing mutations. A major concern of the CRISPR-Cas9 approach, in which the double-stranded DNA molecule is cut, is how the cell responds to that cut and how it is repaired. With some frequency, this technique leaves new mutations i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movement IMAGE: In these images, on the left a monkey initially performed the reach-grasp manipulate task instructed by blue LEDs. On the right, monkeys then learned to perform the same task instructed... view more Credit: Mazurek and Schieber Like an appliance with faulty wiring, injury and disease in the brain can result in lost connections, wreaking havoc on critical functions like perception and m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why we can't always stop what we've started IMAGE: The three key brain areas involved in stopping what you've started are circled. view more Credit: Johns Hopkins University When we try to stop a body movement at the last second, perhaps to keep ourselves from stepping on what we just realized was ice, we can't always do it -- and Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists have figured out why. Stopping a planned behavior requires extr
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Forskerspire undersøger sammenhæng mellem Facebook og frygten for terror 07. december 2017 Forskerspire undersøger sammenhæng mellem Facebook og frygten for terror TALENTUDVIKLING Fire gymnasieelever er netop kåret som vindere af Projekt Forskerspirer 2017 på Københavns Universitet. Vinderne er originale projekter, der strækker sig fra undersøgelse af sammenhæng mellem klasserumsledelse og unges stress, Facebook-forbrug og frygt for terror til, hvordan posttraumatisk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hands in the stars: The first international comparative list of astronomical words in sign languages "Astronomy" as it is represented in Sign Language in different counties. Credit: IAU-C1 WG3 and collaborators During the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, an encyclopedic dictionary of astronomy for French Sign Language, entitled Hands in the Stars, was published under the direction of Dominique Proust. This dictionary contains approximately 300 signs describing several classical celestial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: How is a bitcoin mined? A look at the virtual currency Credit: CC0 Public Domain A company in Slovenia that mines bitcoin says it has been hacked, for a potential loss of tens of millions of dollars. The company, NiceHash, gives customers the ability to mine for bitcoins. As the price of the world's most popular virtual currency keeps surging—to a record $15,000 on Thursday—here's a look at what it is and how it is "mined." ___ WHAT IS A BITCOIN?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin tops $17,000; hack raises concerns ahead of US trade In this Monday, April 7, 2014, file photo, a bitcoin logo is displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. The bitcoin miner NiceHash says it is investigating a security breach and the theft of the contents of the NiceHash "bitcoin wallet." The company said Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 in a statement posted on its website that it had stopped operations and was working to verif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes A TEM micrograph showing Dengue virus virions (the cluster of dark dots near the center). Image: CDC A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The fungus exerts this effect by reducing the production and activit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team uses 4.5G mobile phone network for drone traffic management (From left) M1 Chief Operating Officer Patrick Scodeller, M1 Chief Technical Officer Denis Seek and NTU ATMRI Director Professor Duong and NTU Professor Low Kin Huat with the custom drone built by NTU which can be controlled through M1's 4.5G mobile network. Credit: NTU Singapore Researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has embarked on a research project which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery, more bees mark Michigan's first, full bee census The first complete bee census, led by Michigan State University scientists, confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier estimates. Credit: Jason Gibbs The first complete bee census, led by Michigan State University scientists, confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier estimate
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Big Think
'Rick and Morty' Co-Creator Dan Harmon Gives Advice on Coping with Depression Social media has the potential to expose our deepest struggles and challenges to the public. While it too often serves as a soapbox for trolling and bullying, it also connects people to communities in ways previously unimagined. I probably never would have known I suffered from misophonia if not for the Internet; now, a thriving community exists, in which sufferers share tales, problems, and so
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Science | The Guardian
Adapted Crispr gene editing tool could treat incurable diseases, say scientists Incurable diseases such as diabetes and muscular dystrophy could be treated in future using a new form of genetic engineering designed to boost gene activity, according to scientists. The technique is an adapted version of the powerful gene editing tool called Crispr. While the original version of Crispr snips DNA in precise locations to delete faulty genes or over-write flaws in the genetic code
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indian's 'revolution' inspired by Bolsheviks, according to new academic article spurred on by Britain plundering the Sub-Continent's wealth IMAGE: This is Dr Kalim Siddiqui. view more Credit: University of Huddersfield THE centenary of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia has led to widespread debate about its impact. Now, an economics lecturer at the University of Huddersfield has published an article which argues that the tumultuous events of 1917 played a part in toppling the British Empire. In addition to his view t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parental lifespan genes could hold clue to longer life A large-scale international study led by the University of Exeter Medical School has discovered new genes linked to parents' lifespan - which could one day be targeted to help prolong human life. How long we live is determined by a range of factors including our lifestyle and how well we treat factors including blood pressure and cholesterol from midlife. However, genetics, and how long our paren
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Next generation electronic monitoring of parolees in development For people on probation and parole and those who work with them, electronic monitoring can be a useful tool to ensure they are making curfew or determining when they are in places they should not be. What electronic monitoring doesn't do well is provide offenders with positive support to meet the conditions of their probation or parole so that they avoid violations and the resulting jail time, sa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
530-million-year-old fossil has look of world's oldest eye, study suggests Schmidtiellus reetae fossil. Credit: Gennadi Baranov A 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, a study reveals. The remains of an extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals, including crabs, bees and dragonflies, researchers say. Scientists made the finding while examining the well-preserved fossil of a hard-she
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists modify CRISPR to epigenetically treat diabetes, kidney disease, muscular dystrophy The Belmonte lab's advanced in vivo Cas9-based epigenetic gene activation system enhances skeletal muscle mass (top) and fiber size growth (bottom) in a treated mouse (right) compared with an independent control (left). The fluorescent microscopy images at bottom show purple staining of the laminin glycoprotein in tibialis anterior muscle fibers. Credit: Salk Institute Salk scientists have create
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One wet winter can shake up San Francisco Bay's invasive species The tunicate Ciona robusta ranks as one of San Francisco Bay's most dominant invaders. But it needs salty water to thrive, and its numbers dwindled when a single wet winter sent freshwater streaming into the bay. Credit: Melissa Frey/Royal British Columbia Museum For many Californians, last year's wet winter triggered a case of whiplash. After five years of drought, rain from October 2016 to Febr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crafty crows know what it takes to make a good tool Credit: James St Clair Biologists at the University of St Andrews have discovered how New Caledonian crows make one of their most sophisticated tool designs - sticks with a neatly-shaped hooked tip. New Caledonian crows are the only species besides humans known to manufacture hooked tools in the wild. Birds produce these remarkable tools from the side branches of certain plants, carefully 'crafti
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Neuroscience of Changing Your Mind Every day our brains grapple with various last-minute decisions. We adjust our gait to avoid a patch of ice; we exit to hit the rest stop; we switch to our backhand before thwacking a tennis ball. Scientists have long accepted that our ability to abruptly stop or modify a planned behavior is controlled via a single region within the brain’s prefrontal cortex, an area involved in planning and
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The Atlantic
Google Taught an AI That Sorts Cat Photos to Analyze DNA When Mark DePristo and Ryan Poplin began their work, Google’s artificial intelligence did not know anything about genetics. In fact, it was a neural network created for image recognition—as in the neural network that identifies cats and dogs in photos uploaded to Google. It had a lot to learn. But just eight months later, the neural network received top marks at an FDA contest for accurately iden
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel lenses enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution The silica shell of the diatom Actinoptychus senarius , measuring only 0.1 mm across, is revealed in fine detail in this X-ray hologram (detail) recorded at 5,000-fold magnification with the new lenses. Credit: DESY/AWI, Andrew Morgan/Sasa Bajt/Henry Chapman/Christian Hamm Scientists at DESY have developed novel lenses that enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution in the nanometre regime. U
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New Scientist - News
What do the new ‘gay genes’ tell us about sexual orientation? By Andy Coghlan Two gene variants have been found to be more common in gay men, adding to mounting evidence that sexual orientation is at least partly biologically determined. How does this change what we already knew? Didn’t we already know there were “gay genes”? We have known for decades that sexual orientation is partly heritable in men, thanks to studies of families in which some people are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool Glaucocystis sp. Image: Wikipedia. Vast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests. Scientists have devised a method that could lead to cheap, environmentally friendly ways of making products for use in the cosmetics, plastics and food industries . Algae are highly prized for their ability to make useful products, bu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New guidelines to tackle China's severe air pollution problem Credit: CC0 Public Domain More must be done to tackle air pollution in China, according to a leading climate change expert in a new study published today in the journal Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters . Professor Wang Hui-Jun, from the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, outlines five specific ways in which the issue could be more effectively managed. These steps, wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How malaria tricks the immune system Nanovesicles released from red blood cells infected by Plasmodium falciparum , viewed under an electron microscope. Scale bar: 100 nm Credit: Weizmann Institute of Science Global efforts to eradicate malaria are crucially dependent on scientists' ability to outsmart the malaria parasite. And Plasmodium falciparum is notoriously clever: It is quick to develop resistance against medications and has
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New on MIT Technology Review
Cryptocurrency Exchanges Can Be Pretty Sketchy Places. The Solution? A Blockchain, of Course If the future of money is decentralized, most of today’s cryptocurrency exchanges are still stuck in the past. Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin and its distributed accounting ledger, called the blockchain, so that people could trade units of value without the need to trust centralized authorities like banks (For more: “ What Bitcoin Is, and Why It Matters ”). But most cryptocurrency users still t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative system images photosynthesis to provide picture of plant health A new fluorescence imaging system uses a large imaging area to provide information about plant health. It is designed for use in greenhouses or in the field and could one day enable farm machinery that automatically responds to plants showing stress. Credit: Haifeng Li, Zhejiang University Researchers have developed a new imaging system that is designed to monitor the health of crops in the field
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The molecular structure of a forest aroma deconstructed Gas-phase structure of alpha-pinene has been experimentally unveiled, using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Credit: Elias M. Neeman The fresh, unmistakable scent of a pine forest comes from a medley of chemicals produced by its trees. Researchers have now, for the first time, accurately determined the chemical structure of one of these compounds in its
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Startup's online system assists in quantitative risk assessments of chemicals A startup based on an Indiana University innovation could help federal and international organizations conduct more-efficient quantitative risk assessments of chemicals in food, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other products. Traditional methods to conduct quantitative risk assessments have drawbacks, according to Kan Shao, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health in IU's Scho
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: You Should Think of Hummingbirds as Bees With Feathers To be fair, hummingbirds and bees differ. Hummingbirds have more advanced eyes and brains than bees. Olfaction, while important for bee memory, has historically been ignored in hummingbirds. Honeybees and bumblebees are social; hummingbirds typically aren’t. Bees rely solely on flowers for nectar and pollen; hummingbirds also eat insects, which may require that their brains work differently, Beth
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spark Therapeutics and Pfizer announce publication in The New England Journal of Medicine of Interim Data from phase 1/2 clinical trial of investigational gene therapy for Hemophilia B PHILADELPHIA and NEW YORK, Dec. 6, 2017 -- Spark Therapeutics (NASDAQ: ONCE), a fully integrated gene therapy company dedicated to challenging the inevitability of genetic disease, and Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE), today announced that The New England Journal of Medicine has published interim data as of July 25, 2017, from the Phase 1/2 clinical trial of SPK-9001, an investigational gene therapy for he
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Lancaster study 'reimagines infertility' New research from Lancaster University has identified the 'invisible infertile', a group of marginalized people missing from survey data sources because they do not fit neatly into popular notions of who is at risk of infertility. Around the world, the 'invisible infertile' includes racial and ethnic minorities, those with limited economic resources, those who do not have access to affordable hea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inadequate regulation for vaginal mesh products has exposed women to unnecessary harms, warn experts Inadequate regulatory processes for vaginal mesh products used to treat stress incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse have exposed women to unnecessary harms, warn experts in The BMJ today. Professor Carl Heneghan at Oxford University's Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and colleagues argue that regulatory failings have enabled new devices to be brought to market with inadequate evidence - and m
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Ingeniøren
Minister i samråd om kampfly: »Vi vurderede, at støjbelastningen kunne bringes ned« Det var en fejl, at resultatet af en rapport om de fremtidige støjgener omkring Flyvestation Skrydstrup ikke blev fremlagt på et tidligere samråd i foråret 2016. Det indrømmede forsvarsminister Claus Hjort Frederiksen (V) fredag på et nyt samråd om Danmarks kommende kampfly F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Beslutningen om, at Danmark skal anskaffe de 27 kampfly har vakt debat, siden den blev truffet i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples A new large-scale international study expands the number of genetic markers now known to be associated with exceptional longevity. Researchers at the University of Connecticut, University of Exeter, University of Wisconsin and University of Iowa undertook a genome-wide search for variants influencing how long participants' parents lived. Their findings indicated genes that could one day be target
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Media research: Time not up for newsprint Young spend more time with newspapers in print than online, shows a new study. Readers aged 18-34 are spending nearly twice as much time with newspapers' print editions than with their websites and apps, according to a new study from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and the universities of Oxford and London. In 2016, the 18-34 year old British readers of eight UK national newspaper
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is age-related hearing loss associated with increased risk for cognitive decline, dementia? Bottom Line: Age-related hearing loss may be a risk factor for cognitive decline, impairment and dementia. Why The Research Is Interesting: Age-related hearing loss is common. Research about a link between age-related hearing loss and cognitive decline and dementia has been inconsistent. Understanding any possible association between hearing loss and cognitive decline could help with strategies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai researchers use breakthrough technology to understand eclipse eye damage In a first-of-its-kind study, Mount Sinai researchers are using adaptive optics (AO) to analyze retinal eye damage from the August solar eclipse on a cellular level. The research could help doctors develop a deeper understanding of this rare condition, called solar retinopathy, which has no currently accepted treatment. Adaptive optics is a sophisticated technology that allows clinicians to exami
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Popular Science
It might be possible to remodel a baby's microbiome The microbiome —the collection of bacteria and other microbes that reside in our bodies and on our skin—has huge potential. Over the past decade or so, we’ve found that our microbial makeup influences everything from acne to food allergies, obesity, and digestive diseases. But so far, there hasn’t been much research on exactly what strains of bacteria do what, and how much of an influence these m
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Do You Design an Autonomous Car from Scratch? If you have ever dealt with sexual harassment in the workplace, there is now a private online place for you to go for help. Botler AI , a startup based in Montreal, on Wednesday launched a system that provides free information and guidance to those who have been sexually harassed and are unsure of their legal rights. Using deep learning, the AI system was trained on more than 300,000 U.S. and C
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What makes something go viral? | Dao NguyenWhat's the secret to making content people love? Join BuzzFeed's Publisher Dao Nguyen for a glimpse at how her team creates their tempting quizzes, lists and videos -- and learn more about how they've developed a system to understand how people use content to connect and create culture.
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Live Science
Mystery Attacks Caused Brain Damage in US Embassy Workers in Cuba The U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba, is seen on Sept. 29, 2017, after the United States announced the withdrawal of more than half its personnel due to the mysterious health symptoms showing up in its diplomatic staff. Credit: ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images The U.S. embassy workers in Cuba who were initially thought to have been attacked by a " sonic weapon " have sustained damage to the white m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
530-million-year-old fossil has look of world's oldest eye, study suggestsA 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, a study reveals.
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon South Africa The choice that could save South Africa, or wreck it To avoid a dire, two-decade dynasty of dysfunction, South Africa’s ruling ANC should ditch the Zumas
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Quanta Magazine
Mathematicians Crack the Cursed Curve Mathematical proofs are elaborate theoretical arguments that often say little about actual numbers and calculations — the concrete values non-mathematicians think of as “solving a math problem.” Occasionally, though, theoretical proofs lead to explicit results. This was the case with an exciting sequence of events that culminated last month. The story takes place in the mathematical field of numb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The molecular structure of a forest aroma deconstructed IMAGE: Gas-phase structure of alpha-pinene has been experimentally unveiled, using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. view more Credit: Elias M. Neeman, including the picture of the forest WASHINGTON, D.C., December 7, 2017 -- The fresh, unmistakable scent of a pine forest comes from a medley of chemicals produced by its trees. Researchers have now, for th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Foreign investments crucial for positive return on exports Experts at Higher School of Economics (HSE) have shown that the foreign direct investment is an important and necessary determinant for positive return on exports. Such companies consequently encounter a higher level of competition in terms of quality and intensity. Research results have been published in the Baltic Journal of Management : http://www. emeraldinsight. com/ doi/ full/ 10. 1108/ BJM
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Scientific American Content: Global
Without a Treaty to Share the Arctic, Greedy Countries Will Destroy It Snow crabs have arrived off the Arctic coast of Norway, around the islands of Svalbard—foot soldiers in the world's newest territorial battle. The crabs were not seen there at the start of this century, but today multitudes have migrated to the chilly waters. Models project that the snow crab catch could soon reach 170,000 metric tons a year—potentially bringing in about $1 billion and making it,
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Microsoft's Project Sopris Could Secure the Next Generation of IoT The Internet of Things security crisis persists, as billions of inadequately secured webcams , refrigerators, and more flood homes around the world. But IoT security researchers at Microsoft Research have their eye on an even larger problem: the billions of gadgets that already run on simple microcontrollers—small, low-power computers on a single chip—that will gradually gain connectivity over th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New manifestation of magnetic monopoles discovered IMAGE: A superfluid helium droplet acts as a magnetic monopole. view more Credit: IST Austria/Birgit Rieger The startling similarity between the physical laws describing electric phenomena and those describing magnetic phenomena has been known since the 19th century. However, one piece that would make the two perfectly symmetric was missing: magnetic monopoles. While magnetic monopoles in the for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric BINGHAMTON, NY - A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics. The team, led by Binghamton University Electrical and Computer Science Assistant Professor Seokheun Choi, created an entirely textile-based biobattery that can produc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological factors don't fully explain racial disparities for breast cancer type SAN ANTONIO - Higher risk of recurrence for black women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer compared with white women cannot be completely explained by underlying biological factors, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers reported at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on Thursday, Dec. 7. For women with breast cancer, horm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research dispels misconception of superconductivity in niobium compound For over 65 years, niobium boride (NbB) has been considered a classic example of a superconducting material. This assumption, recorded in manuals on the physics of condensed matter and articles in scientific journals, has now been contested in a study conducted by researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil and at San Diego State University in the United States. In an article pub
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Live Science
Raging Southern California Wildfires Seen from Space (Photos) This image, taken by the European Space Agency's Sentinel-2 satellite on Dec. 5, 2017, shows a massive burn scar just east of the California city of Ventura, along with areas of active fires. Credit: ESA Satellite photos show just how big and destructive the Southern California wildfires have become. A dramatic image captured Tuesday (Dec. 5) by the European Space Agency's Sentinel-2 spacec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clot-busting drugs not recommended for most patients with blood clotsAbout half of people with blood clots in the deep veins of their legs develop a complication that involves chronic limb pain and swelling, making it difficult to walk and perform daily activities. A large-scale clinical trial has shown that a risky, costly procedure to remove such clot fails to reduce the likelihood that patients will develop the debilitating complication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage, study showsA two-way link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes has been uncovered by research. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can diet help reduce disability, symptoms of MS?For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains may be linked to having less disability and fewer symptoms than people whose diet is less healthy, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Probiotic gets a boost from breast milkSupplementation with probiotics can improve a person's gut health, but the benefits are often fleeting, and colonization by the probiotic's good microbes usually doesn't last. Breast milk may help sustain those colonies in the long run, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Head start through human intervention: Study on the spread of European plant species on other continentsA new study has investigated the spread of European plant species on other continents.
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Ingeniøren
Regeringen vil åbne en 'ladeport': Myndigheder skal hemmeligt kunne tilgå dine persondata Regeringen har fået førstebehandlet et lovforslag , der skal give forskellige offentlige instanser adgang til danskeres persondata på tværs af myndighedsskel. Den nye lovs navn L 68 Forslag til lov om supplerende bestemmelser til forordning om beskyttelse af fysiske personer i forbindelse med behandling af personoplysninger og om fri udveksling af sådanne oplysninger Det gælder f.eks. Skat, polit
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor rumler maven?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor maven rumler, og om denne rumlen kan være indstillet efter spisetiderne. Det svarer overlæge fra Hvidovre Hospital på.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Therapy Stops Bleeding in Hemophilia Patients During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
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Bolt Threads' New Hat Shows the Promise of Synthetic Spider Silk A hat made from Rambouillet wool is a perfectly nice hat. The fiber, shorn from a Rambouillet sheep, is fine and soft. Not at all scratchy. “They call it the American merino,” says Dan Widmaier, the founder of Bolt Threads, a biotech company that grows synthetic spider silk from yeast. Earlier this year, Bolt bought Best Made Company , a high-design outdoor brand that makes hand painted axes and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative system images photosynthesis to provide picture of plant health IMAGE: A new fluorescence imaging system uses a large imaging area to provide information about plant health. It is designed for use in greenhouses or in the field and could one... view more Credit: Haifeng Li, Zhejiang University WASHINGTON -- Researchers have developed a new imaging system that is designed to monitor the health of crops in the field or greenhouse. The new technology could one
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arctic influences Eurasian weather and climate IMAGE: Arctic influence in winter. Between the two rings of dashed lines (the Northern mid-latitudes) white areas indicate no discernable Arctic influence and dark yellow areas indicate strongest Arctic influence. view more Credit: Tido Semmler Over the past decades the Arctic has lost 65% of its sea ice volume. The atmosphere above the Arctic has been rapidly warming and moistening at the sa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cochrane review of effectiveness of strategies to improve access to treatment for TB Every year, health services miss finding nearly four million people infected with tuberculosis. Evaluating the available evidence on diagnosis-supporting strategies, such as outreach screening, health promotion, outreach clinics, and active case-finding, the authors examined 17 randomized and non-randomized controlled studies to see which interventions were most effective. While the authors found
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery, more bees mark Michigan's first, full bee census EAST LANSING, Mich. - The first complete bee census, led by Michigan State University scientists, confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier estimates. Identifying potential pollinators, including the 38 new bees recorded in the state, is crucial, especially in the face of declining honey bee populations. All pollinators make an estimat
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New forms of orchids identified and described by Lobachevsky University scientists At the 22nd World Orchid Conference held in Guayaquil, Ecuador, Lobachevsky University was represented by Director of the Botanical Garden Alexander Shirokov and head of the laboratory at the UNN Institute of Biology and Biomedicine Lavr Kryukov who shared the results of their studies of the polymorphism of Cypripedium guttatum flowers in Russia. The following forms of Cypripedium guttatum were f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How malaria tricks the immune system IMAGE: Nanovesicles released from red blood cells infected by Plasmodium falciparum , viewed under an electron microscope. Scale bar: 100 nm view more Credit: Weizmann Institute of Science Global efforts to eradicate malaria are crucially dependent on scientists' ability to outsmart the malaria parasite. And Plasmodium falciparum is notoriously clever: It is quick to develop resistanc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The fungus exerts this effect by reducing the production and activity of digestive enzymes in the mosquitoes. The discovery, reported this week in eLife , illuminates
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guidelines to tackle China's severe air pollution problem More must be done to tackle air pollution in China, according to a leading climate change expert in a new study published today in the journal Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters . Professor Wang Hui-Jun, from the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, outlines five specific ways in which the issue could be more effectively managed. These steps, which can also be applied to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering varied pathways to agriculture Around 15,000 years ago, the Natufian culture appeared in what is today's Middle East. This culture, which straddled the border between nomadic and settled lifestyles, had diverse, complex origins - much more than researchers have assumed. This finding arises from new research by a team of scientists and archaeologists from the Weizmann Institute of Science and the University of Copenhagen. The h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Duration of sleep increases and sleeping difficulties decrease after retirement When people retire from work life, they sleep approximately 20 minutes longer than before retirement. The quality of sleep also improves, as retired people experience less early morning awakenings or nonrestorative sleep, unlike in their last working years. Researchers at the University of Turku, Finland, discovered in collaboration with the Finnish Institution of Occupational Health, Univers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aging with an intellectual disability -- new longitudinal report Increased rates of important health screenings and access to GPs amongst people with an intellectual disability have been highlighted in a new report launched this week. These health gains, however, are potentially being offset by poorly managed chronic health problems and emerging social isolation issues amongst the same population. The report was conducted by The Intellectual Disability Supplem
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with Huntington's want more openness around assisted dying IMAGE: Many feared prolonged suffering at the end of their lives and saw assisted dying as an act of compassion towards their families. view more Credit: Lancaster University Research has shown that better communication around assisted dying is needed between clinician and patients diagnosed with Huntington's Disease. This is the first study in the UK (where assisted dying is illegal) into the
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Ingeniøren
Kronik: Tiden er inde til en arbejdsmiljøuddannelse for professionelle Christian Uhrenholdt Madsen er post.doc., og Peter Hasle er professor ved Institut for Materialer og Produktion, Aalborg Universitet Foto: privat Arbejdsmiljøarbejdet i virksomhederne er inde i en rivende udvikling. Der var en tid, hvor arbejdsmiljøarbejde var synonymt med besøg fra Arbejdstilsynet, og hvor de højere ledelsesniveauer trygt overlod arbejdsmiljøet til en sikkerhedsleder og til sikk
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Ingeniøren
Forskere: Mennesket har snart nået sin maksimale alder For godt et år siden fastslog amerikanske forskere i tidsskriftet Nature, at grænsen for menneskers levealder ligger på 115 år. Det skabte nogen debat, og i sommer konkluderede forskere fra Center for Sund Aldring på Københavns Universitet i en anden Nature-artikel, at den antagelse ikke holder stik, for mennesket kan blive ældre end 115 år. »Vi kan ikke forudsige en grænse for menneskelige præst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exposure to wildfire smoke—5 questions answered Smoke streams from several fires in Southern California on Dec. 5, 2017. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory Wildfires once again are raging in California – this time in the Los Angeles area, where five fires are currently burning. The fast-moving Thomas fire alone has burned more than 65,000 acres in three days. State agencies are issuing air quality alerts due to wildfire smoke. Atmospheric chemist
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Viden
Kæmpe millionbeløb kan være forsvundet i bitcoin-hack Bitcoin-markedspladsen NiceHash er blevet hacked, og er nu midlertidig lukket. - Vores betalingssystem blev kompromitteret, og indholdet af NiceHash’s Bitcoin-wallet (en digital tegnebog, som Bitcoin er gemt i, red) er blevet stjålet. Vi arbejder på at finde ud af, det præcise antal bitcoins, der er forsvundet, skriver firmaet på sin hjemmeside . NiceHash er derfor lukket ned de næste 24 timer. F
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A Madcap Fantasy Game All About Survival. And Bunnies I just made a meal for an adorable rabbit. However, I failed to account for all its food allergies and pretty soon the bunny vomits. Then, I think, it dies. Disoriented, I click my way out of the scene—one of 20 or so "pages" that make up the body of the game I'm playing—and stumble into another. In the next minigame, I offer a pep talk to a creature while a parasitic worm in its mouth whispers a
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Live Science
Taking Vitamin B7 Can Mess Up Your Medical Tests High doses of the vitamin biotin in a person's blood can cause errors in some medical lab tests, and these faulty test results have already been linked to one death, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Biotin, also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H, is commonly found in multivitamins, prenatal vitamins and supplements that claim to improve nails, hair and skin. In a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The unique pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase protein regulates the ability of fish to swim A study carried out at the University of Tampere has shown that carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) is present in some species as a combination of two proteins. According to current data, this "fusion protein", called pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase, has disappeared from the genome of - almost all - mammals through evolution. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyse the transformation of water
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers make important bacterial discovery in oral pre-cancer condition Scientists at the School of Dental Science in Trinity have made an important discovery involving bacteria and a pre-cancerous growth called oral leuoplakia which can precede oral cancer. The researchers examined the microbiome of oral leukoplakia in order to determine if certain bacteria were associated with oral leukoplakia and whether the type of bacteria could predict whether these condition b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel lenses enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution IMAGE: The silica shell of the diatom Actinoptychus senarius , measuring only 0.1 mm across, is revealed in fine detail in this X-ray hologram (detail) recorded at 5,000-fold magnification with the new... view more Credit: Credit: DESY/AWI, Andrew Morgan/Sasa Bajt/Henry Chapman/Christian Hamm Scientists at DESY have developed novel lenses that enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered Classical scholars from the Cluster of Excellence "Religion and Politics" of the University of Münster discovered a large number of sealings in south-east Turkey. "This unique group of artefacts comprising more than 1,000 pieces from the municipal archive of the ancient city of Doliche gives many insights into the local Graeco-Roman pantheon - from Zeus to Hera to Iuppiter Dolichenus, who turned
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool Vast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests. Scientists have devised a method that could lead to cheap, environmentally friendly ways of making products for use in the cosmetics, plastics and food industries. Algae are highly prized for their ability to make useful products, but a lack of engineering tools has hi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria activate their own killer A new photothermal treatment could help to overcome antibiotic resistance. In this method, an agent transforms near-infrared light into local heating, which kills the pathogens. However, this "transformer" must first be activated, as explained by Chinese scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie . In this case the target bacteria do this themselves. Other types of bacteria do not switch the age
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530-million-year-old fossil has look of world's oldest eye, study suggests IMAGE: Image of Schmidtiellus reetae fossil's right eye. view more Credit: Gennadi Baranov A 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, a study reveals. The remains of an extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals, including crabs, bees and dragonflies, researchers say. Scientists made the finding while examini
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UGR research calls current methods of studying photosynthesis into question IMAGE: This is a green leaf. view more Credit: UGR The current scientific assumption that the transport of gases between the surface and atmosphere is produced exclusively through diffusion is mistaken, according to research conducted by Prof. Andrew Kowalski of the UGR's Department of Applied Physics. His groundbreaking research describes how the flow of water vapour (which is not 100% diffu
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New insights into life and death of Jumbo the elephant revealed in BBC One documentary IMAGE: Image of the team with Sir David Attenborough. view more Credit: Photography: Vik Manchanda, Copyright: Humble Bee Films New insights into the life and mysterious death of Jumbo the elephant - a celebrity animal superstar whose story is said to have inspired the film 'Dumbo' - will be revealed in a BBC One documentary hosted by Sir David Attenborough and featuring a University of Leicest
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life under the surface in live broadcast Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have invented new systems to study the life of microorganisms in the ground. Without any digging, the researchers are able use microchips to see and analyse an invisible world that is filled with more species than any other ecosystem. Under our feet there is life and movement. In a spoonful of soil there are more microorganisms (fungi and bacteria) than th
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Popular Science
12 tricks for improving your computer's appearance and sound When you boot up a brand-new computer, you expect it to deliver the most up-to-date technology, from gorgeous visuals to perfectly clear audio. While your experience will be pretty good right out of the box, desktop operating systems like Windows and macOS cater to the tastes and preferences of most users, which won't necessarily match your personal preferences. To make the software work just rig
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Scientific American Content: Global
Squirrels Can Store the Same Kinds of Nuts in Specific Groupings Faculty members of the University of California, Berkeley, have received 22 Nobel Prizes. But some of the most impressive displays of intelligence in recent years on the Berkeley campus have been made by squirrels. “I dedicated seven years of my life to squirrels,” said the also cerebral Mikel Delgado when I spoke to her in September, the month after she'd completed her doctorate at Berkeley.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Art of Translating Science A recent New York Times magazine profile of Emily Wilson, celebrated as the first woman to translate Homer’s Odyssey into English, quotes her as saying, “All translations are interpretations.” The author of the profile, Wyatt Mason, offers as evidence of that claim a dizzying range of descriptions of the poem’s hero Odysseus from previous translations. Based on a single Greek word, “ polytropos,”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance Fermi Surface calculations of PDSn4. A comparative study recently conducted at Ames Laboratory serves to point the way to the conditions necessary to achieve extreme magnetoresistance in some materials. Credit: Ames Laboratory Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to expl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cartogram maps provide new view of climate change risk A cartogram set that visualizes the risks of climate change due to decreases of renewable groundwater resources. The degree of climate change hazard (a decrease in groundwater resources by more than 10 percent) is indicated by color. The cartograms distort regions by expanding areas with large populations in 2010 and high degrees of vulnerability. Credit: Petra Döll Scientists have developed cart
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The Atlantic
A History of the Conservative War on Universities The Republican-controlled Congress is now poised to pass one of the most dramatic changes to the tax code in more than a generation—one with significant benefits for the wealthiest sector of society. Yet an aspect of this legislation receiving little attention is how it marks the culmination of a decades-long renouncement of higher education by portions of the American conservative movement. The
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Viden
GRAFIK Sådan beskytter du dig i sengen uden hormoner Bliver p-pillerne taget til tiden, eller er hormonspiralen sat rigtigt op, så er man med hormonprævention næsten helt sikker på at slippe for uønsket graviditet. Men prævention, der indeholder hormoner har også sine skyggesider og kommer med en del bivirkninger. P-piller kan give humørsvingninger , de kan øge risikoen for depression, selvmord og blodpropper . Og så kan hormonpræventionen også øge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk for depression, burnout and low quality of life The current financial crisis has heavily impacted the public sector in Europe and, to a greater extent, in countries in which the public system has higher costs. At the same time, workers from the public health sector are highly exposed to a number of job stressors, ranging from work overload, time pressures, low support and lack of role clarity. Research literature suggests that burnout, depress
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientist found out what happens with 'smart' magnetic gel in a magnetic field IMAGE: Microphotographs of magnetic polymers with particles forming chain aggregates directed along the magnetic field H. view more Credit: Andrey Zubarev Magnetic gels are the new generation of "smart" composite materials. They consist of a polymer medium and nano- or micro-dimensional magnetic particles embedded in it. These composites are frequently used in magnetically controlled shock absorb
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Swansea research finds babies that feed themselves have no increased risk of choking The research was carried out by Dr Amy Brown, Associate Professor in Child Public Health, and maternal and infant health researcher. 1151 mothers with a baby aged 4 - 12 months (solids are not recommended until 6 months of age, but some mothers introduce earlier) reported how they gave their baby solid foods, what foods they gave them and whether their baby had ever choked. Overall no difference
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Community practices not following guidelines for MRI breast cancer screening Guidelines are not being followed to ensure that breast cancer screening of high risk women, such as those with a strong family history of breast cancer, includes an additional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan. According to Deirdre A. Hill of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in the US, this signals a missed opportunity to use technology that can help detect breast cancer early
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds ways to avoid hidden dangers of accumulated stresses on seagrass Credit: Queensland University of Technology A new QUT-led study has found ways to detect hidden dangers of repeated stresses on seagrass using statistical modelling. The research, published by the Journal of Applied Ecology , found cumulative maintenance dredging which affected the light on the sea floor increased risks on seagrass survival. It found, globally, seagrass meadows can be at risk o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the future, your sports headlines may be generated by algorithm Grayson Allen headed for the hoop. Credit: Duke University What if there were a scientific way to come up with the most interesting sports headlines? With the development of computational journalism, this could be possible very soon. Dr. Jun Yang is a database and data-intensive computing researcher and professor of Computer Science at Duke. One of his latest projects is computational journalism,
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New on MIT Technology Review
Quantum Simulation Could Shed Light on the Origins of Life What role does quantum mechanics play in the machinery of life? Nobody is quite sure, but in recent years, physicists have begun to investigate all kinds of possibilities. In the process, they have gathered evidence suggesting that quantum mechanics plays an important role in photosynthesis, in bird navigation, and perhaps in our sense of smell. There is even a speculative line of thought that qu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells in space ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli prepares the Kubik hardware. Kubik is a controlled-temperature incubator for studying biological samples. After preparing the unit, Paolo loaded it with the muscle, retinal, and stem cells being studied by Italian researchers in an experiment coordinated and funded by Italy’s ASI space agency. Credit: ESA/NASA Laboratories on Earth hardly make the news, unless they com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nobel Laureates say change is coming for women in sciences From left, Richard Henderson, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Joachim Frank, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Jacques Dubochet, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Kip Thorne, Nobel Laureate in Physics and Barry Barish, Nobel Laureate in Physics speak during a press conference at the Royal Academy of Science in Stockholm, Thursday Dec. 7, 2017. (Pontus Lundahl/TT News Agency via AP) A group of 2017 Nobel Laure
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forecast of higher winds could complicate wildfire fight Motorists on Highway 101 watch flames from the Thomas fire leap above the roadway north of Ventura, Calif., on Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. As many as five fires have closed highways, schools and museums, shut down production of TV series and cast a hazardous haze over the region. About 200,000 people were under evacuation orders. No deaths and only a few injuries were reported. (AP Photo/Noah Berger
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forests are the key to fresh water UBC researchers (from left to right) Abby Yang, Associate Professor Adam Wei, Krysta Giles-Hansen and Qiang Li discuss the role forest vegetation plays while monitoring water resources. Credit: UBC Okanagan Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on glob
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moving beyond the green revolution in Africa's new era of hunger Seeds and cereals are assessed in in laboratories to check the quality of the grains. Credit: Shutterstock A quarter of the world's hungry people are in sub-Saharan Africa and the numbers are growing. Between 2015 and 2016, the number of hungry – those in distress and unable to access enough calories for a healthy and productive life – grew from 20.8% to 22.7%. The number of undernourished rose f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of hardware is AI IBM’s new POWER9 processor. Credit: IBM AI workloads are different from the calculations most of our current computers are built to perform. AI implies prediction, inference, intuition. But the most creative machine learning algorithms are hamstrung by machines that can't harness their power. Hence, if we're to make great strides in AI, our hardware must change, too. Starting with GPUs, and then
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smog should stop play, Indian doctors tell cricket bosses Cricket organisers must take pollution into account before allowing matches to go ahead, the Indian Medical Association told the country's governing body for the sport Thursday, after a smog-plagued Test match in New Delhi. The IMA said in a letter to the Indian cricket board it was "greatly troubled" by scenes of players wearing masks to protect themselves from air pollution many times the globa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin roars to record past $15,000 Bitcoin has risen from $752 in mid-January to dramatically surge past $15,000 Bitcoin ploughed past $15,000 to a fresh record on Thursday, triggering a warning the cryptocurrency was "like a charging train with no brakes" and prompting fresh concern about its looming launch on mainstream markets. It struck a new high of $15,242.99 around 1030 GMT, according to Bloomberg News. The rally came jus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts scramble to monitor long-dormant Iceland volcano The Jokulsarlon glacial lagoon at the foot of the Oraefajokull volcano on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. The Oraefajokull volcano, dormant since its last eruption in 1727-1728, has seen a recent increase in seismic activity and geothermal water leakage that has worried scientists. With the snow hole on Iceland's highest peak deepening 18 inches (45 centimeters) each day, authorities have raised the vol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Herschel data links mysterious quasar winds to furious starbursts This image is an artist's impression of a radio-loud quasar in a star-forming galaxy. The quasar is powered by the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's centre. As gas is drawn into an accretion disc around the black hole it heats to very high temperatures and radiates energy across the electromagnetic spectrum, preferentially in the direction of two powerful jets. In addition, the galaxy is ma
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Futurity.org
Amazon’s in-home delivery raises concerns In certain cities, Amazon customers can opt for a new service—package delivery inside their homes while they’re away. The convenience has raised alarm about security and privacy hazards—and with good reason—say experts. To avoid porch pirates and nasty weather, Amazon Key uses a cloud computer system to operate a smart door lock with encrypted safeguards and a security camera that records in-home
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New on MIT Technology Review
Honda’s Driverless Cars and Robots Will Get Smarts from a Chinese AI Firm During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration. Now scientists are exploring whether transplanting lab-made ovaries might stop those symptoms. In one of the first efforts… Read more During menopause a woman’s ovaries stop working—leading to hot flashes, sleep problems, weight gain, and worse, bone deterioration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing discrimination in AI with new methodology A decision tree from the pre-processed ProPublica COMPAS dataset. Credit: IBM I finally had a chance to watch Hidden Figures on my long journey to Sydney, where I co-organized the second annual ICML Workshop on Human Interpretability (WHI). The film poignantly illustrates how discriminating by race and gender to limit access to employment and education is suboptimal for a society that wants to ac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find urban development dramatically increases stream flow Credit: Georgia State University Urban development dramatically increases the flow of water in streams and rivers, creating an uptick in flood events, according to a study by Georgia State University researchers. This is one of the first studies to successfully minimize the influence of precipitation when analyzing the effects of urbanization on streams. In the paper, published in the Journal o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests new pathways for hyperaldosteronism IMAGE: Ze'ev Ronai, Ph.D., chief scientific advisor, Professor, Tumor Initiation and Maintenance Program, SBP. view more Credit: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute La Jolla, Calif., December 7, 2017 - A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), in collaboration with researchers at Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child He
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS researchers uncover novel pathway to suppress virus-induced cancers IMAGE: Dr Sudhakar Jha, Principal Investigator at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (right) and Deepa Rajagopalan, PhD student at NUS (left), identified a novel molecular pathway by which a tumor... view more Credit: National University of Singapore Researchers at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forests are the key to fresh water IMAGE: UBC researchers (from left to right) Abby Yang, Associate Professor Adam Wei, Krysta Giles-Hansen and Qiang Li discuss the role forest vegetation plays while monitoring water resources. view more Credit: UBC Okanagan Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds recreational drug users not what we think A reasearcher from James Cook University in Queensland has been investigating why Australians are among the top users of illegal drugs in the world - and has uncovered some revealing new facts about the motivations of recreational drug users. Professor David Plummer led a study by JCU and Griffith University that interviewed drug users. "We weren't satisfied enough work had been done to explain w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds evidence that a protein, MCP-1, may determine bone loss responses to parathyroid hormone In a new study published in November in Scientific Reports , New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) researchers investigating the catabolic effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in hyperparathyroidism (HPT) showed, for the first time, that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is required for catabolic responses to PTH. HTP is a condition in which an abnormally high concentra
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Futurity.org
Tweak lets mice eat high-fat diet but stay lean Researchers discovered they could feed mice a high-fat diet without making them obese by activating a pathway in fat cells. The process prevents fat cells from growing larger—which can lead to weight gain. “This could lead us to a new therapeutic target for treating obesity,” says Fanxin Long, a professor of orthopedic surgery at Washington University in St. Louis and senior investigator of the s
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New Scientist - News
Robot’s terrible jokes are a new test of machine intelligence By Douglas Heaven Pretend for a minute you’re the captain of a ship that’s being attacked by enemy cannons. Your crew is panicking. Now – say something funny. Making up jokes on the spot is a real test of wits. Yet two comedians have developed an improv show in which many of the ad-libbed gags are delivered by a toy robot. In the last couple of years this unlikely comedy trio – known as Human
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New Scientist - News
Earth’s climate will warm 15 per cent more than we thought Earth is toast plainpicture/Jochen Knobloch By Michael Le Page CHILDREN born now could live to witness the planet warming more than 4°C, even if we cut greenhouse emissions by a fair amount. That’s one of the terrifying implications of a study that adds to the growing evidence that the “official” projections underestimate future warming. “ Basically, it shows between 10 and 20 per cent more w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Demonstrating high performance 2-D monolayer transistors on paper substrates Credit: Deji Akinwande (Tech Xplore)—A pair of researchers, Saungeun Park and Deji Akinwande, with the University of Texas at Austin, recently demonstrated high-performance 2-D monolayer transistors on paper substrates at this year's International Electron Devices Meeting. At their presentation, they reported creating graphene and molybdenum disulfide transistors on a normal paper substrate and h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tackling exams like an athlete Credit: University of Manitoba You have a big exam coming up. You've done everything you can possibly to do to prepare. You attended all your classes, took good notes, and studied often. You stayed up late the night before the exam, cramming every last nugget of knowledge into your brain. There's no way you're not going to be ready for this. Then, for some reason, you're not ready for it. You sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carnivores know that eating other carnivore carcasses transmits diseases Credit: University of Granada An international team of researchers led by the University of Granada (UGR) has explained for the first time the scientific basis of the old Spanish saying 'perro no come perro' (dog eats no dog): for a carnivorous animal, eating carrion of another carnivore, especially if it is of the same species, increases the probability of contracting pathogens that could endang
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans, unlike monkeys, turn competitive situation into cooperative one Credit: Georgia State University Rhesus macaques and capuchin monkeys can find a stable solution when playing a competitive game in which one opponent always does better than the other, but only humans can find a solution that benefits both competitors equally, turning a competitive situation into a cooperative one, according to a Georgia State University study. The findings advance scientists' u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellites to battle the digital divide A Franco-Finnish consortium developed a new generation of satellite technologies to deliver fast Internet to remote communities. Six publications and two patents demonstrate the scientific quality of the research performed. Researchers at Thales Alenia Space and some of its Finnish suppliers spotted the potential of High Throughput Satellite (HTS) more than six years ago. They gathered an impress
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Dagens Medicin
Svend Hartling: Patientskaderne skyldes fejlopsætninger i Sundhedsplatformen Teknikken i Sundhedsplatformen virker som den skal – det er alene opsætningen af systemet, der er skyld i, at læger ikke modtog deres patienters prøvesvar i deres indbakker, siger Region Hovedstadens koncerndirektør Svend Hartling,
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How to Design Around the Airport Identity Crisis If you think you know how to complain about airports, just listen to Benjamin Bratton’s beatnik spoken-word fugue of polysyllables. “The airport is where the birth pangs of the Stack, the armature of planetary computation, are felt most viscerally,” the philosopher said at a fancy conference on airport architecture in Los Angeles a few weeks back. “Long ago, the ceremonial interface to the city m
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The Physics of the Invisible Box Challenge https://twitter.com/arielo1220/status/936825731371241473 Humans dance. It's what they do. Everyone always wants to get some cool new dance move. First there was the electric slide. Yeah, that was cool—but then there was the moonwalk. That was really cool. And now we have the invisible box. OK, maybe it's not exactly a dance move, but more like a trick. The basic idea of this move is to make it se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists capture Earth's 'hum' on ocean floor An image of the Earth constructed from NASA’s Terra satellite. Credit: NASA/Goddard Scientists have long known earthquakes can cause the Earth to vibrate for extended periods of time. However, in 1998 a research team found the Earth also constantly generates a low-frequency vibrational signal in the absence of earthquakes. Since then, seismologists have proposed different theories to explain the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research shows retail crime increasing and more violent Retail crime is becoming more violent and organised, shows a joint University of Otago and Retail NZ study. Credit: University of Otago A new study by Retail NZ and the University of Otago shows retail crime costs about $1.1 billion a year, and retailers are facing increasingly organised and violent criminals. Greg Harford, Retail NZ's General Manager for Public Affairs, says retail crime "is a m
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Dagens Medicin
Tre patientskader kobles til SundhedsplatformenRegion Hovedstaden orienterede tilbage i oktober Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed om tre patientskader, der skyldes forsinket reaktion på prøvesvar og dermed også forsinket behandling. Regionen kunne ikke afvise, at skaderne var udløst af Sundhedsplatformen.
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Live Science
Sleep Paralysis Is Linked to Stress (and Supernatural Beliefs) Have you ever dozed off for a 30-minute nap and woken up with a demon perched on your chest, pinning you to your bed? English folklore once dubbed such nocturnal visitations as simply "nightmares." Today, however, the phenomenon is called sleep paralysis — or being mentally aware while falling asleep or waking up, yet totally unable to move. These episodes may last only a few minutes but ca
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why Autism Seems to Cluster in Some Immigrant Groups Around 2 p.m. on a perfect summer afternoon in 2014, the clinicians arrived at Maki Gboro’s home in Denver, Colorado, to test his 18-month-old son Baraka for autism. The family had only recently moved to the United States from the Democratic Republic of Congo: Gboro came first, in 2009. His wife Odile Nabunyi arrived in 2013 with their two sons. They later had a third child, but at the time, Bara
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Online Subscription Services Deal with the Problem of Password Sharing Decades ago a “subscription” generally referred to magazines or newspapers. Once you'd paid, the publisher didn't care how many times you read each article. You were even welcome to share an issue with family and friends. After all, a physical magazine has a built-in piracy limit: the number of people who can crowd around the pages simultaneously. Digital subscriptions, though, are quite diff
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Scientific American Content: Global
Quantum Leaps in Quantum Computing? Quantum computers can theoretically blow away conventional ones at solving important problems. But they face major hurdles: their basic computational units, called quantum bits or qubits, are difficult to control and are easily corrupted by heat or other environmental factors. Now researchers have designed two kinds of qubits that may help address these challenges. Conventional computer bits
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The space station is getting a new gadget to detect space debris Artist's impression of all the space junk in Earth orbit. Credit: NASA Since the 1960s, NASA and other space agencies have been sending more and more stuff into orbit. Between the spent stages of rockets, spent boosters, and satellites that have since become inactive, there's been no shortage of artificial objects floating up there. Over time, this has created the significant (and growing) proble
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research on clay formation could have implications for how to search for life on Mars The Wdowiak Ridge on Mars as seen by NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. Today Mars has only a thin atmosphere, and its surface is very dry with the possible exception of some localised and temporary water seeps. However, ancient eroded valley networks that were discovered by orbiting spacecraft in the early days of exploration pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making mock meat poses questions of health, ethics and sustainability for a former butcher Johannes van Dijk, a doctoral student at the USC School of Pharmacy, received the Charles and Charlotte Krown Fellowship for his work in genetic engineering. Credit: Photo/Eric Lindberg Creating a lab-grown burger that sizzles, smells and even bleeds like real meat might sound like sci-fi fantasy, but for one USC student, it's a promising career path. Johannes "Jan" van Dijk, a doctoral student a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less water beneficial in biogas production Credit: Lena M Fredriksson When organic waste is turned into biogas, water is usually an important component of the process. This results in a high water and energy consumption and a lot of residue. Doctoral student Regina Jijoho Patinvoh at the University of Borås, Sweden, has investigated and developed processes for dry digestion of solid waste in two different types of reactors. Her research r
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Live Science
Photos: Analyzing an Amazing, Amphibious Dinosaur About 75 million years ago, an odd dinosaur walked from land into the water, where it used its flipper-like arms to swim in the ocean. This amazing feat was rare, as most dinosaurs of its kind could not swim that well, with the exception of Spinosaurus . A fossilized specimen of this enigmatic species was uncovered and sold on the black market for years before researchers could study it. However,
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Live Science
This Dinosaur Fossil Was So Bizarre, Scientists Thought It Was Fake An enigmatic dinosaur — which sported a swan-like neck, amphibious flippers and Velociraptor -esque claws — could walk like a duck on land and likely swim like a penguin during its heyday on Earth, scientists have found after examining its fossilized remains. In fact, the remains, which were on the black market for years, painted such a wacky image of a dinosaur that paleontologists thought
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acupuncture significantly reduces joint pain for breast cancer patients IMAGE: Dr. Dawn Hershman, a SWOG investigator, will present results of a study on acupuncture and breast cancer joint pain at a Dec. 7 press conference at the San Antonio Breast... view more Credit: SWOG/The Hope Foundation In the largest, most rigorous study of its kind, acupuncture was found to significantly reduce the debilitating joint pain experienced by tens of thousands of women each y
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetics study adds further evidence that education reduces risk of Alzheimer's disease The theory that education protects against Alzheimer's disease has been given further weight by new research from the University of Cambridge, funded by the European Union. The study is published today in The BMJ. Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia. Its chief hallmark is the build of 'plaques' and 'tangles' of misshapen proteins, which lead to the gradual death of brain cells. P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When celebrities die, 'grief policing' abounds, social media gets toxic After David Bowie's death, grieving fans gathered online to plan real-life memorials. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder After the deaths of David Bowie, Prince and actor Alan Rickman in 2016, grieving fans flocked to public comment threads on social media to pay their respects in what has been likened to a virtual wake. But many arrived to also find a toxic space where so-called "grief po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA damage repair—molecular insightsThe first line of defense against skin cancer is the ability to repair DNA damage caused by UV light. The XPA protein plays an important role in the repair of certain DNA damage, and mutations in this protein have been implicated in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) disorders, characterized by increased UV sensitivity and risk for skin cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reilly Center releases its 2018 top 10 list of ethical dilemmas in science and technologyThe John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at the University of Notre Dame has released its sixth annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology. The annual list is designed to get people thinking about the ethics of potentially controversial technology, but the 2018 list shows that many of these issues are already here. See the list at reil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Cygnus cargo spacecraft at sunriseNASA astronaut Randy Bresnik photographed Orbital ATK's Cygnus cargo spacecraft at sunrise, prior to its departure from the International Space Station at 8:11 a.m., Dec. 6, 2017. Expedition 53 Flight Engineers Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba of NASA gave the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm the command to release Cygnus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water changes how cobalt-based molecule turns carbon dioxide into promising chemical Catalysis researchers determined that the cobalt-based catalyst (center) takes a different path to adding hydrogen to carbon dioxide depending on whether it is in water or another solvent. Credit: Nathan Johnson Working under good conditions makes it easy to get a job done. But what if you could turn good to great? That's what scientists did for a popular catalyst that drives the conversion of ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring small forces that lead to large effectsForces between individual particles in slurries are responsible for their rheological behavior. Direct quantification of physical forces between mineral faces is now possible with atomic force microscopy, thanks to work at IDREAM, an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) funded by DOE's Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mastering tailored design of aluminum nanomaterialsWhether for energy applications or nuclear waste management, industrial processing of aluminum requires understanding its behavior in highly alkaline solutions. Processing slurries and precipitates (typically gibbsite, α-Al(OH)3) from these solutions is aided by controlling the shape of tiny particles that are produced. Researchers at the IDREAM Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by DOE's Off
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Applying alternating twists to cylindrical container found to cause dice to line up Experimental cell and sketch of the twist excitation. The pictures show the initial (left) and final (right) states for a ensemble of 25 000 cubes submitted to N = 3×10 5 twists of intensity Γ=1.01. Credit: Physical Review Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.228002 (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from Universidad de Navarrahas in Spain and Cinvestav Unidad Monterrey in Mexico has
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Fragile FlyResearchers examine the effects on the fruit fly intestine of the protein responsible for Fragile X syndrome in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is there a musical method for interpreting speech? WASHINGTON, D.C. December 7, 2017 -- Cochlear implants have been a common method of correcting sensorineural hearing loss for individuals with damage to their brain, inner ear, or auditory nerves. The implanted devices use an electrode array that is inserted into the cochlea and assists in stimulating auditory nerve fibers. However, the speech patterns heard with the use of a cochlear implant are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Selective photothermal therapy with supramolecular radical anions generated in situ Credit: Wiley A new photothermal treatment could help to overcome antibiotic resistance. In this method, an agent transforms near-infrared light into local heating, which kills the pathogens. However, this "transformer" must first be activated, as explained by Chinese scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie . In this case the target bacteria do this themselves. Other types of bacteria do not
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers uncover novel pathway to suppress virus-induced cancers Dr Sudhakar Jha, Principal Investigator at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (right) and Deepa Rajagopalan, PhD student at NUS (left), identified a novel molecular pathway by which a tumour suppressor, TIP60, inhibits the growth of cancer cells. Credit: National University of Singapore Researchers at the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research bridges scaling gap between astrophysics and cosmology This simulation shows the turbulent gas when a supernova collides with a nearby star-forming halo. Credit: Ken Chen, East Asian Core Observatories Association In their respective efforts to understand the universe and all it comprises, there is a telling gap between what cosmologists and astrophysicists study and how they study it: scale. Cosmologists typically focus on the large-scale properties
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New screening technique will allow crop breeders to develop drought resistant varieties faster Scanning electron micrographs of the epicuticular ultrastructure of flag leaves collected from plants that had fully emerged heads. Images were taken from adaxial and abaxial surfaces of ‘Stettler’ and ‘Superb’ spring wheat grown under well-watered (control) and MdS conditions. Magnification = 10 000×, scale bar = 2.5 μm. Credit: Canadian Light Source Scientists from the Canadian Light Source (CL
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cognitive science
Computational Foundations of Natural Intelligence I'm a bot, bleep , bloop . Someone has linked to this thread from another place on reddit: If you follow any of the above links, please respect the rules of reddit and don't vote in the other threads. ( Info / Contact )
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Futurity.org
There may be at least 5 kinds of depression and anxiety Researchers have identified five new categories of mental illness that cut across current diagnoses of anxiety and depression. The five categories, which researchers define by their specific symptoms and areas of brain activation, are: tension, anxious arousal, general anxiety, anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure), and melancholia. “By refining the diagnosis, better treatment options could
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Dagens Medicin
Antabus kan bruges i kampen mod kræftDet velkendte middel mod alkoholmisbrug kan også bruges i behandlingen af kræft, viser nyt danske studie udgivet i Nature.
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Popular Science
How do performance-enhancing drugs work? The Russian Olympic team is officially barred from competition in this year’s winter games for using performance-enhancing drugs in Sochi back in 2014. But it’s mostly non-Olympians—actually, mostly non-athletes—who use those drugs on a daily basis. Anabolic steroids are more popular than you might think, especially given the potential side effects. Estimates put the number of total users in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA Mars rover team's tilted winter strategy works This view from within "Perseverance Valley," on the inner slope of the western rim of Endurance Crater on Mars, includes wheel tracks from the Opportunity rover's descent of the valley. The Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on Opportunity's mast took the component images of the scene during the period Sept. 4 through Oct. 6, 2017, corresponding to sols (Martian days) 4840 through 4871 of the rover's work
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Scientific American Content: Global
ESPRESSO Gives Planet Hunting a Jolt A powerful new planet hunter has begun searching the heavens for rocky, potentially habitable worlds . The ESPRESSO instrument, which is installed on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in northern Chile, made its first observations last month, project team members announced today (Dec. 6). ESPRESSO is designed to find alien planets via the "radial velocity" met
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Southern Ocean's health affected by River Murray's ebb and flow Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found that reductions in the flow of water out of the River Murray could be harmful to marine life in the Southern Ocean. Up until now there has been almost no research into the effect of the river's flow on the ocean beyond its mouth. In contrast, changes in flow and how it affects the river's own ecology and the economy which depends on it, have be
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The Atlantic
A Unified Theory of Meme Death Memes aren’t built to last. This is an accepted fact of online life. Some of our most beloved cultural objects are not only ephemeral but transmitted around the world at high speed before the close of business. Memes sprout from the ether (or so it seems). They charm and amuse us. They sicken and annoy us. They bore us. They linger for a while on Facebook and then they die—or rather retreat back
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Quantum Computing Is the Next Big Security Risk The 20th century gave birth to the Nuclear Age as the power of the atom was harnessed and unleashed. Today, we are on the cusp of an equally momentous and irrevocable breakthrough: the advent of computers that draw their computational capability from quantum mechanics. WIRED OPINION ABOUT US representative Will Hurd (R-Texas) ( @HurdOnTheHill ) chairs the Information Technology Subcommittee of th
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Accused VC Sends Same Sorry Sexual Harassment Email to Critics Justin Caldbeck, whose venture firm collapsed after six women came forward with allegations of sexual harassment in June, says he’s trying to make amends. His efforts have included handwritten notes to his accusers and others to whom he now thinks he may have acted improperly, as well as emails to women who’ve been critical of him in the media. But some recipients of Caldbeck’s "apology" emails a
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Live Science
This 5,000-Pound Behemoth Is the World's Heaviest Bony Fish The new "largest bony fish" ( Mola alexandrine ) was originally misidentified as a Mola mola sunfish, which is shown in this image with diver Daniel Botelho in San Diego, California. Credit: Daniel Botelho/Barcroft Media via Getty Images The heaviest bony fish ever caught weighs in at a staggering 5,070 lbs. (2,300 kilograms). Now, scientists know its name. The fish is a Mola alexandrini oc
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Science | The Guardian
AlphaZero AI beats champion chess program after teaching itself in four hours AlphaZero, the game-playing AI created by Google sibling DeepMind , has beaten the world’s best chess-playing computer program, having taught itself how to play in under four hours. The repurposed AI , which has repeatedly beaten the world’s best Go players as AlphaGo , has been generalised so that it can now learn other games. It took just four hours to learn the rules to chess before beating th
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Viden
Verdens bedste til skak efter 4 timers træning Hvis du aldrig havde hørt om skak, fik reglerne stukket i hånden og en halv arbejdsdag til at spille mod dig selv, er det ganske nemt at forestille sig, at du stadig ville være udpræget nybegynder. Men for Googles kunstige intelligens AlphaZero var det alt, det krævede at opnå overmenneskelige evner i det klassiske brætspil. Med andre ord tog det 240 minutter for computeren at slå det mest komple
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