Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists excited by discovery of new form of matter, excitonium Artist's depiction of the collective excitons of an excitonic solid. These excitations can be thought of as propagating domain walls (yellow) in an otherwise ordered solid exciton background (blue). Credit: Peter Abbamonte, U. of I. Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Excitonium has a team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign... well
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NYT > Science
Supplements Claiming to Ease Opioid Addiction Come Under Scrutiny Peter Lurie thinks that is an unacceptable position from someone who sells supplements that purport to treat addiction. Dr. Lurie, a former Food and Drug Administration official, runs the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest, which on Friday urged the F.D.A. and the Federal Trade Commission to crack down on businesses that target addicts with products that make unproven health clai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For women with genetic risk, bi-annual MRI beats mammograms Intensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram, according to a research team based at the University of Chicago Medicine and the University of Washington, Seattle. The results, presented Dec. 8, 2017 a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study results offer another boon for PARP inhibitors in treatment of advanced breast cancer SAN ANTONIO - Patients with certain advanced hereditary breast cancers may have new treatments options on the horizon, according to two studies presented this week at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Susan Domchek, MD, executive director of the Basser Center for BRCA at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center, will present new results from the Mediola and OlympiAD trials showing continued su
46min
Live Science
Man's Unusual Sunburn Lets Him Make A Dent in His Forehead One time I shaved my head, got severely sunburned, & swelled up just a little bit :-) pic.twitter.com/9FWw3jcdYf — Cade Huckabay (@CadeHuckabay) December 5, 2017 A man in Texas recently got a reminder about the importance of sunscreen: He developed a sunburn so severe, the swelling allowed him to make a dent in his forehead. On Monday (Dec. 4), Cade Huckabay posted a series of photo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Talking to ourselves and voices in our headsAs far our brain is concerned, talking to ourselves in our heads may be fundamentally the same as speaking our thoughts out loud, new research shows. The findings may have important implications for understanding why people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia hear voices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blackbody radiation from a warm object attracts polarizable objectsYou might think that a hot object pushes atoms and molecules away due to radiation pressure. But a research team showed that for a polarizable atom, the opposite occurs: the hot object attracts it. Using an atom interferometer, they found the attraction was 20 times stronger than the gravitational attraction between a tungsten object and a cesium atom. Though negligible in most situations, next-ge
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How individuals with schizophrenia view their experiences and confidence in judgments may influence treatment targetsA schizophrenia patient's own perceptions of their experiences -- and confidence in their judgments -- may be factors that can help them overcome challenges to get the life they wish, suggests a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep insight into the heartA new article outlines how modern non-invasive examinations using state-of-the-art imaging technology can reduce the risk of not-detecting infections of the heart muscle possibly leading to chronic inflammations and sudden death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heatChemists have developed a new method to produce graphene nanoribbons, which are widely viewed as a next-generation material that might one day power the world's electronic devices.
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Popular Science
Libratone Q Adapt On-ear Headphone Review: this is what a 'made for Google' sticker gets you Google’s first attempt at wireless headphones, the Pixel Buds , showed a lot of promise, but a quirky user experience has so far hindered them from becoming an essential Android accessory. But, Google also started rolling out a “made for Google” logo to products that meet specific standards. The Libratone Q Adapt headphones are in the first wave of headphones and it's a good start. What is it? Go
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlled burns limited severity of Rim FireControlled burning of forestland helped limit the severity of one of California's largest wildfires, according to geographers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some doctors back legal action to force UK government to cut carbon emissions18 health professionals are supporting campaign group Plan B's legal challenge to force the government to revise its 2050 carbon target, saying it is inconsistent with the Paris Agreement temperature objective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Screen time before bed linked with less sleep, higher BMIs in kidsIt may be tempting to let your kids stay up late playing games on their smartphones, but using digital devices before bed may contribute to sleep and nutrition problems in children, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credibleVirtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories, but they should avoid being too flashy, or their credibility could suffer, according to a team of researchers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Invasive Frogs Don't Bug Hawaiian Birds Coquí frogs. They’re named for the sound they make. [Sound] And though just an inch long, a coqui can produce a 90 decibel call—about the volume of a motorcycle 25 feet away. The animals and their nocturnal chirps are beloved in their native Puerto Rico. But not in Hawaii, where they became invasive in the late 1980s. The frogs have become a nuisance in part because they cause people to l
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Live Science
Isaac Newton 'Graffiti' Discovered in Historic English Manor A painting of Sir Isaac Newton by Sir Godfrey Kneller, dated to 1689. Credit: Sir Godfrey Kneller Towering thinker Sir Isaac Newton carved a now-barely visible doodle of a windmill into a stone wall in his childhood home, according to a news release from the National Trust. The drawing was discovered at Woolsthorpe Manor, the Lincolnshire, England,home where Newton was born in 1642, said th
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New on MIT Technology Review
Patreon Artists Are Struggling to Achieve a Living Wage How Do You Design an Autonomous Car from Scratch? Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-powered. That’s according to an announcement from the automaker, explaining that it will buck the trend of repurposing consumer vehicles as driverless ones and build a car designed… Read more Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-power
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Science : NPR
In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images Health officials are warning t
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Why We ‘Hear’ Some Silent GIFs The act of hearing a visual highlights the trippy fact that our senses do not operate the way we often assume, with crisp boundaries between them. Smelling, hearing and tasting all “speak to each other and influence each other, so little things like the color of the plate you’re eating on can influence how food tastes,” said Mr. Fassnidge. Where Did This GIF Come From? Chris, an animator who goes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
USC researchers develop method to ensure human rights in public health services When measuring the success of public health work -- from immunizations to family planning services -- experts rely on sets of standardized indicators. But these indicators often neglect the voices and human rights of people who use the services, according to USC researchers. The USC Program on Global Health & Human Rights and the World Health Organization (WHO) developed a new methodology, publis
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New Scientist - News
That interstellar asteroid could be a shard of a shredded planet ‘Oumuamua may not be the only one of its kind ESO/M. Kornmesser By Leah Crane Our solar system’s first interstellar visitor may be a shard of a larger planet that got shredded by its star. Astronomers spotted a strange, fast-moving object in October that seems to be an interloper from beyond our solar system. Named ‘Oumuamua, it seems to be a cigar-shaped rock that tumbled into our neighbourh
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New Scientist - News
Will wildfires finally change Rupert Murdoch’s climate stance? Wildfires are burning California Xinhua/Alamy Live News By Richard Schiffman A wildfire has ripped through one of the wealthiest neighbourhoods in the US, damaging Rupert Murdoch’s $28.8 million vineyard estate in the Santa Monica mountains at the edge of Los Angeles. The media-mogul’s palatial house was saved, thanks to firefighters who spent the afternoon and night battling the conflagratio
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Eyewire Release Report 12/8/2017 Happy Friday! Here are all changes on Eyewire since the last report, even if there was a separate post about something big, so that you have a comprehensive picture of everything new from the last few weeks. We released the Activity Tracker, a major enhancement for accuracy monitoring, based on a script from @KrzysztofKruk! This post has the full details, including info about adjustments to the S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First black astronaut honored on 50th anniversary of death A team of astronomers from Maryland, Hawaii, Israel, and France has produced the most detailed map ever of the orbits of galaxies in our extended local neighborhood, showing the past motions of almost 1400 galaxies within ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells In this simulation, a biological membrane (gray) with an ion channel (center) is immersed in a solution of water and ions. This cross section of a simulation "box" shows the electric potential, the externally supplied "force" that drives ions through the channel. A dazzling pattern emerges in this potential due to the presence of the channel -- the colors show the lines of equal potential. The sl
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: How Embryos Take Control of Their Own DevelopmentThe switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: The Hazards of Life on MarsHigh levels of radiation, among other health risks, challenge the future colonation of the Red Planet.
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: Exosomes and Insulin ResistanceCirculating microRNAs may help explain how excess fat can lead to insulin resistance in distant cells.
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Popular Science
Good news: A microwaved egg can’t permanently damage your hearing Earlier this year, a person was eating a hard-boiled egg at a restaurant. The egg was cold. The restaurant patron asked the waiter to warm the edible ovum up—which they probably lived to regret. When the waiter brought the dish back, the eater took a bite and the egg exploded. The customer took the restaurant to court for burns and hearing damage, which is where scientists Anthony Nash and Lauren
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration, ion transport into cellsNanometer-scale pores etched into layers of graphene can provide a simple model for the complex operation of ion channels, researchers have demonstrated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three kinds of information from a single X-ray measurementThe way in which electronic devices operate relies on the interaction between various materials. For this reason, researchers need to know exactly how specific chemical elements inside a computer chip or a transistor diode behave, and what happens when these elements bond. Physicists have now developed an innovative method that enables them to obtain several different types of information simultan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extreme fieldwork, climate modeling yields new insight into predicting Greenland's meltA new study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery. Researchers discovered that some meltwater from the lakes and rivers atop the region's glaciers, is being stored and trapped on top of the glacier inside a low-density, porous 'rotten ice.' This phenomenon affects climate model predictions of Greenland's meltwater.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boosting the antibiotic arsenalA NEW way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include ciprofloxacin and are often used to treat infections such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, has been discovered by researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's in a name? How Taking a spouse's surname can define power in marriage IMAGE: UNLV Assistant Professor of Psychology Rachael D. Robnett is a developmental psychologist whose areas of expertise includes gender development. view more Credit: UNLV Photo Services The pending nuptials of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have royal watchers brushing up on royal naming practices and asking 'what's in a name?' A new study led by a UNLV psychology professor shows that a wife
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sandy claws: Like holiday enthusiasts, majoid crabs decorate their shellsMajoid crabs -- known as decorator crabs -- adorn themselves with items secured from their surroundings such as sponges, algae and other marine debris. Scientists are exploring what factors drive this behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taurine lends hand to repair cells damaged in multiple sclerosisNew research suggests that administering taurine, a molecule naturally produced by human cells, could boost the effectiveness of current multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viagra 'ineffective' for fetal growth restrictionA clinical trial has found an anti-impotence drug to be ineffective at improving outcomes for pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Guanidinium stabilizes perovskite solar cells at 19 percent efficiencyIncorporating guanidinium into perovskite solar cells stabilizes their efficiency at 19 percent for 1,000 hours under full-sunlight testing conditions, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transformation to wind and solar achievable with low indirect GHG emissionsDifferent low carbon technologies from wind or solar energy to fossil carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) differ greatly when it comes to indirect GHG emissions in their life cycle. The new study finds that wind and solar energy belong to the more favorable when it comes to life-cycle emissions and scaling up these technologies would induce only modest indirect GHG emissions -- and hence not im
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Going undercover to fight tuberculosisTuberculosis is one of the most widespread life-threatening infectious diseases. Not only does antibiotic resistance make treatment increasingly difficult, but the bacteria's relatively impermeable mycomembrane also limits the effectiveness of many drugs. In search of new antibiotics, researchers have developed a structural analogue of mycolic acid, the essential membrane building block. This drug
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When your spinal cord takes chargeSpinal cord neurons that inhibit distracting input to focus on task at hand have been discovered by researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cheap and safe electro-catalysts for fuel cellsScientists have produced non-metal electro-catalysts for fuel cells that could pave the way for production of low-cost, environmentally friendly energy generation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walkScientists show for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. These new insights could contribute to making the locomotion of robots more energy efficient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How developing visual system axons stay in the correct layerLittle is known about how axons in the developing visual system stabilize their connections upon reaching the correct layer, but scientists have identified two proteins that provide layer-specific stabilization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces, study showsA single plastic grocery bag could be shredded by marine organisms into 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a seahorse-shaped brain structure may help us recognize othersAn oxytocin-sensitive brain circuit that regulates social memory formation, recognition has been discovered by researchers. Their results shed light on brain's ability to sort out confusion by reconciling conflicting social stimuli.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Alpha Zero’s “Alien” Chess Shows the Power, and the Peculiarity, of AI The latest AI program developed by DeepMind is not only brilliant and remarkably flexible—it’s also quite weird. DeepMind published a paper this week describing a game-playing program it developed that proved capable of mastering Chess and the Japanese game Shoju, having already mastered the game of Go. Demis Hassabis, the founder and CEO of DeepMind, and an expert chess player himself, presented
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists slow progression of fatal form of muscular dystrophyResearchers report that a new drug reduces fibrosis (scarring) and prevents loss of muscle function in an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filamentsThe microbiologists who have discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or 'nanowires' in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new article that they have discovered the unexpected structures in many other species, greatly broadening the research field on electrically conducting filaments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine mammal beachings not likely due to space weatherAfter a collaboration between NASA scientists and marine biologists, new research rules out space weather as a primary cause of animal beachings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasoundAreas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease. Researchers have developed a way to find hypoxic spots noninvasively in real time. The researchers developed an oxygen-sensitive molecular beacon that emits ultrasound signals in response to light, a process called photoacoust
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toxoplasmosis: How a cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brainScientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study finds ways to avoid hidden dangers of accumulated stresses on seagrassA new study has found ways to detect hidden dangers of repeated stresses on seagrass using statistical modelling. The research found cumulative maintenance dredging which affected the light on the sea floor increased risks on seagrass survival. It found, globally, seagrass meadows can be at risk of collapse from accumulated effects of repeated dredging and natural stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using Kirigami designs. The Kirigami-based bioprobe enables one to follow the shape of spherical and large deformable biological samples such as heart and b
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Big Think
Why the World May Be Safe with More Nuclear Weapons, Not Fewer The United States tries hard to keep nuclear weapons away from countries it considers foes. Given how close the world came to nuclear armageddon during the Cold War, and recent threats from so-called “rogue states” like North Korea, it may seem like an essential goal. But America’s strategy for thwarting nuclear proliferation may be reaching a point where the costs outweigh the benefits. The fi
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Photo of the Week: This Emirati Housing Tract Will Have you Seeing Double If the cookie-cutter housing tracts of the American suburbs fill you with dread, don’t think about visiting this one in the United Arab Emirates, photographed on Wednesday by Getty photographer David Ramos. It's a positive nightmare. Ramos saw it while driving up Jebel Hafeet mountain near Al Ain, on the border with Oman. He intended to capture a bird’s eye view of the city ahead of the FIFA Club
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Popular Science
29 fail-safe present ideas for your office gift exchange Gift Guides You're sure to please with these. The annual office gift exchange is here, and you have no clue what to buy. Don't panic—these gifts are sure to please your coworker without breaking the bank.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tax Overhaul Hammers Clean Energy and Electric Cars A series of proposals in both the House and Senate tax overhaul bills would pummel the renewable-energy and electric-vehicle industries. Legislators from both chambers are now hashing out their differences in the reconciliation committee in hopes of delivering a final bill to the White House before the end of the year. Clean-energy lobbyists are scrambling to push back on provisions they and othe
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Big Think
Want to Know What Age You’ll Be Happiest? Check out This Chart There are many points of view on what exactly happiness is. Is it being successful, having close friends and a loving family, long stretches of contentment, or reaching your own life goals? If you define it as contentment with life, you may be surprised at what age(s) most people find it. There’s often more than one peak. According to a series of seven surveys recently digested and charted, most
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists excited by discovery of new form of matter, excitoniumExcitonium has a team of researchers ... well... excited! They have demonstrated the existence of an enigmatic new form of matter, which has perplexed scientists since it was first theorized almost 50 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Galaxy orbits in the local superclusterAstronomers have produced the most detailed map ever of the orbits of galaxies in our extended local neighborhood, showing the past motions of almost 1,400 galaxies within 100 million light years of the Milky Way. The team reconstructed the galaxies' motions from 13 billion years in the past to the present day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ditch plan to disregard all athletic world records before 2005, urge expertsThe proposal by the European Athletics Council to disregard all athletic world records set before 2005 should be abandoned, insist experts in a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common virus may help inform treatment planning for stem cell transplant patientsA genetic relationship has been found between the reactivation of the human cytomegalovirus and the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a potentially deadly condition in which the immune system attacks healthy tissue following a bone marrow or stem cell transplant.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells IMAGE: In this simulation, a biological membrane (gray) with an ion channel (center) is immersed in a solution of water and ions. This cross section of a simulation "box " shows the... view more Credit: NIST Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In lab research, scientists slow progression of a fatal form of muscular dystrophySaint Louis University researchers report that a new drug reduces fibrosis (scarring) and prevents loss of muscle function in an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).
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The Atlantic
Why Is Everyone So Bad At Giving Gifts? We’ve all received an unwelcome holiday gift. In fact, around 70 billion dollars’ worth of presents are returned every year in the U.S. In this video, The Atlantic writer Derek Thompson explains why many presents amount to what economists call “deadweight loss”: the company wasted time making it, the giver wasted time buying it, and the receiver wasted time returning it. So, how do we design a gi
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The Atlantic
For the First Time, Antibiotic Use in Farm Animals Drops For decades, farmers have relied on small but continuous doses of antibiotics—sometimes the same ones used to treat humans—to help animals grow. It’s unclear exactly why it works, but it does. These doses also create antibiotic-resistant bacteria that could spread to humans. For example, resistance to colistin, an antibiotic saved as a last resort in humans, may have spread through its use in pig
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Futurity.org
There are perks to attending class as a robot Robot learning—students learning remotely online while controlling robots in the classroom—can help students feel more engaged and connected to the instructor and other students, according to a new study. Stationed around the class, each robot in Michigan State University’s robot-learning course has a mounted video screen the remote user controls that lets the student pan around the room to see a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boosting the antibiotic arsenal CAMBRIDGE, MA -- MIT researchers have discovered a way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include ciprofloxacin and are often used to treat infections such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . The new strategy overcomes a key limitation of these drugs, which is that they often fail against infections that feature a very high density of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three kinds of information from a single X-ray measurement IMAGE: The physicists Dr. Andreas Johannes (l.) and Professor Dr. Carsten Ronning in a laboratory at the Institute of Solid State Physics of Friedrich Schiller University Jena. view more Credit: Photo: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU Jena Jena (Germany) Whatever the size of mobile phones or computers are, the way in which such electronic devices operate relies on the interaction between various materials. F
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Viden
Fra hjertesygdom til kræft: Personlig medicin revolutionerer Medicinrum er pakket med piller og sprøjter mod alt fra kræft til depression. Men behandlingerne virker langt fra altid efter hensigten og gør nogle gange patienterne mere syge af bivirkninger, end de bliver raske af medicinen. Læs også: Etisk Råd: Nyt dna-center åbner ladeport af dilemmaer I 75 procent af alle tilfælde virker behandling af kræft for eksempel ikke efter hensigten, viser en grafik
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extreme fieldwork, climate modeling yields new insight into predicting Greenland's meltA new UCLA-led study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery. UCLA professor of geography Laurence Smith and his team of researchers discovered that some meltwater from the lakes and rivers atop the region's glaciers, is being stored and trapped on top of the glacier inside a low-density, porous 'rotten ice.' This phenomenon af
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on the voices in our headAs far our brain is concerned, talking to ourselves in our heads may be fundamentally the same as speaking our thoughts out loud, new research shows. The findings may have important implications for understanding why people with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia hear voices.
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The Scientist RSS
Polyplus: Trends in Transfection - Live at SfN 2017Dr. Nyamay'antu shares the challenges of difficult-to-transfect cells, as well as the new solutions Polyplus offers.
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Live Science
Bizarre Origins of 4th-Century 'Santa Claus Bone' Revealed A pubic bone claimed to be that of St. Nicholas, whose generosity inspired tales of Santa Claus, has been dated to the fourth century by scientists at Oxford University. The researchers said they believe the bone may really come from the saint. However, the bone has a bizarre backstory that calls into question whether the relic is really from St. Nicholas, Live Science has found. The sa
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The Atlantic
Hopeful Images From 2017 2017 has been another year of news stories that produced photos which can often be difficult or disturbing to view. I’ve made it a tradition to compose an essay of uplifting images from the past year. The following are images of personal victories, families and friends at play, expressions of love and compassion, volunteers at work, assistance being given to those in need, or simply small and ple
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taurine lends hand to repair cells damaged in multiple sclerosis IMAGE: Study authors included (left to right) J. Rafael Montenegro-Burke, Gary Siuzdak, Luke Lairson and Brittney A. Beyer of TSRI. view more Credit: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt / The Scripps Research Institute LA JOLLA, Calif. - Dec. 7, 2017 - New research suggests that administering taurine, a molecule naturally produced by human cells, could boost the effectiveness of current multiple sclerosis (
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report offers framework to guide decisions about Spirit Lake and Toutle River at Mount St. Helens WASHINGTON - A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine offers a framework to guide federal, tribal, state and local agencies, community groups, and other interested and affected parties in making decisions about the Spirit Lake and Toutle River system, near Mount St. Helens in southwest Washington state. The process should include broader participation by gro
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Popular Science
This tiny bit of the brain could offer clues about addiction Neuroscientists know a lot about what happens in the brain when someone decides to do something, like reach for a cookie on the office snack table. What they’re less certain about, though, is what happens when someone starts to do something, and then quickly decides to stop—like starting to reach for a cookie, seeing that there’s a spider sitting on it, and pulling your hand away. New research pu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France to allow trading of securities via blockchain Blockchain technology adds transparency to transactions as well as security, experts say. France's finance minister unveiled Friday a decree that would make it the first nation in Europe to allow the trading of some non-listed securities using the blockchain technology that underpins cryptocurrencies. The decree, presented by Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire to the government, should enter into fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One wet winter can shake up San Francisco Bay's invasive speciesFor many Californians, last year's wet winter triggered a case of whiplash. After five years of drought, rain from October 2016 to February 2017 broke more than a century of records. In San Francisco Bay, biologists discovered a hidden side effect: All that freshwater rain can turn the tables on some of the bay's invasive species.
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The Atlantic
Brexit Negotiations Will Only Get Harder “Sufficient progress.” They’re the two words both sides of Brexit negotiations have worked for months to achieve, though perhaps no one was more happy to hear them than Theresa May. After nearly seven months of negotiating the terms governing the United Kingdom’s impending exit from the European Union, the U.K. prime minister, alongside her EU counterpart Jean-Claude Juncker, announced Friday tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Net neutrality fans speak up as FCC set to strike down rules Demonstrators rally in support of net neutrality outside a Verizon store, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, in New York. The FCC is set to vote Dec. 14 whether to scrap Obama-era rules around open internet access that prevent phone and cable companies from favoring certain websites and apps. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) Net neutrality is a simple concept but a dense and often technical issue that has been argu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool could help maintain quality during cheese production Dutch type cheeses, notably edam and gouda, are made using complex starter cultures, that have been employed for centuries. Due to changes in strain composition within a culture, the quality frequently fluctuates. A team of Norwegian investigators has developed a tool that could be used to monitor the strains within a culture with high resolution, in order to maintain cheese quality. The research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool could help maintain quality during cheese production Washington, DC - Dec. 8, 2017 - Dutch type cheeses, notably edam and gouda, are made using complex starter cultures, that have been employed for centuries. Due to changes in strain composition within a culture, the quality frequently fluctuates. A team of Norwegian investigators has developed a tool that could be used to monitor the strains within a culture with high resolution, in order to maint
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Big Think
It Was the Dress in 2015. In 2017 It's the Silent Gif People Can Hear. You certainly remember The Dress from 2015 and the viral internet debate regarding what color it really was. This year it’s a silent animated gif showing three electrical pylons playing jump rope — the odd thing is that many people can hear it. ( IAMHAPPYTOAST ) The gif was actually created by Twitter user I Am Happy Toast back in 2008 as part of a Photoshop challenge, and it appeared in Br
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Like seasoned holiday enthusiasts, majoid crabs decorate their shells Majoid crabs, known as decorator crabs, are well-known for adorning their surface with objects such as sponges and algae. Credit: University of Delaware 'Tis the holiday season and it seems homes are festively trimmed at every turn. Ornaments of all shapes and sizes embellish everything from trees to windows and yards. While tinsel originated in 17th century German decorating and modern day Chris
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments Microbiologist Derek Lovley and colleaugues at UMass Amherst report finding electrically conducting pili or 'e-pili' in more bacteria species than just the original Geobacter discovery he made 30 years ago. Credit: UMass Amherst Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blackbody radiation from a warm object attracts polarizable objects The blackbody attraction between a hot tungsten cylinder and a cesium atom is 20 times stronger than the gravitational attraction between them. Credit: Holger Müller, UC Berkeley Our physical attraction to hot bodies is real, according to UC Berkeley physicists. To be clear, they're not talking about sexual attraction to a "hot" human body. But the researchers have shown that a glowing object a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Guanidinium stabilizes perovskite solar cells at 19 percent efficiency Stability test of the novel MA(1-x)GuaxPbI3 perovskite material under continuous light illumination compared with the state-of-the-art MAPbI3. A schematic of the device architecture and the simulated crystalline structure is also provided. Credit: M.K. Nazeeruddin/EPFL With the power-conversion efficiency of silicon solar cells plateauing around 25%, perovskites are now ideally placed to become t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
25 species revealed for 25 Genomes Project To commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and its collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes of species in the UK. The final five species have now been chosen by thousands of school children and members of the public around the globe, who participated in the 25 Genomes Project online vote. The project could reveal why some brown trout migrate to the ope
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The Atlantic
The Finnish Director Making the Most-Interesting Movies About Immigration A small man, a refugee, his face and clothes blackened by coal, emerges from the darkness of a ship’s hold at the beginning of Aki Kaurismäki’s new film, The Other Side of Hope , and although the coal dust gets showered off a little later, the grit of politics won’t wash away. The stowaway, a young Syrian named Khaled Ali (Sherwan Haji), is not political himself—he neither knows nor especially ca
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The Scientist RSS
Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition TaxThe proposed tax on graduate tuition waivers would significantly increase students' taxable income.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Most complete map of Titan reveals connected seas and cookie-cutter lakes Liquid methane and ethane flow through a subterranean plumbing system on Titan, which drains lakes and connects seas. That’s one of the first scientific results from the latest, most complete map of the Saturnian moon’s topography . Planetary scientist Paul Corlies of Cornell University and colleagues released the map — based on all the data from NASA’s Cassini mission, which ended in September (
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large proportion of patients experiencing acute exacerbations of COPD are skipping out on pulmonary rehabilitation or not being referred all together Glenview, IL- Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) can negatively impact a patient's health-related quality of life, lead to a decline in pulmonary function, and can also cause an increased use of health care resources. On average, patients with COPD have one to three treated exacerbations per year, and up to 25 percent of patients with COPD who are hospitalized for an exacerbation die within a y
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Live Science
In Photos: Jaw-Dropping Images Reveal Science Is AmazingFrom a close-up of a tardigrade embryo, to an aerial of Antarctic "ice cubes," to a pensive polar bear, winning photographs in Royal Society competition will amaze you.
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The Atlantic
Germany's Perilous Political Dance Early Thursday afternoon, Martin Schulz, the head of the center-left Social Democrats (SPD), Germany’s second-largest party, strode onto the stage in Messe Berlin, the city’s trade fair center, as hundreds of delegates crowded in. It was the party’s national convention, and Schulz hoped to be re-elected as its leader. Equally important, however, was his proposal to begin talks with Chancellor Ang
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Viden
Tigre taber håbløs kamp mod palmeolie-industri Der er palmeolie i tusindvis af de produkter, vi benytter i vores dagligdag: Shampoo, chokolade, stearinlys og pizzaost er bare nogle få eksempler på daglig- og fødevarer, der indeholder olien, som herhjemme oftest går under navnet ‘vegetabilsk olie’. De truede tigre Bestanden af alle tiger-arter på globalt plan er faldet med 95 procent siden 1900. Tigrene har mindre end 7 procent af deres oprind
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Blog » Languages » English
Carl Sagan vs Neil deGrasse Tyson: Sagan wins! It was a very scientific competition, but in the end there could only be one. Our winner is original “Cosmos” pioneer Carl Sagan! Thanks to all who participated! Leaderboard:
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Including diagnosis related costs, 3-D mammography costs less than digital mammographyAlthough digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, costs more than a digital mammography (DM) screening, it actually may help rein in cancer screening costs, according to preliminary findings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALSScientists are one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel harvesting method rapidly produces superior stem cells for transplantationA new method of harvesting stem cells for bone marrow transplantation may make the donation process more convenient and less unpleasant for donors while providing cells that are superior to those acquired by current protocols.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inhibiting TOR boosts regenerative potential of adult tissuesAdult stem cells replenish dying cells and regenerate damaged tissues throughout our lifetime. We lose many of those stem cells, along with their regenerative capacity, as we age. Working in flies and mice, researchers discovered that TOR, a nutrient sensing pathway which is central to the aging process, drives the loss of adult stem cells. Treating mice with the TOR-inhibitor rapamycin prevented
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'Physicists dedicated to creating the working components of a fault-tolerant quantum computer have succeeded in creating an 'excitonic insulator,' a previously unseen state of matter that could be useful for encoding information in a topological quantum computer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The molecular structure of a forest aroma deconstructedThe fresh, unmistakable scent of a pine forest comes from a medley of chemicals produced by its trees. Researchers have now accurately determined the chemical structure of one compound in its gas phase, a molecule called alpha-pinene. The analysis can help scientists better detect and understand how alpha-pinene reacts with other gases in the atmosphere, a process that can affect health and climat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot bodies are attractive IMAGE: The blackbody attraction between a hot tungsten cylinder and a cesium atom is 20 times stronger than the gravitational attraction between them. view more Credit: Holger Müller, UC Berkeley Our physical attraction to hot bodies is real, according to UC Berkeley physicists. To be clear, they're not talking about sexual attraction to a "hot" human body. But the researchers have
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The Atlantic
Is Planet Nine Even Real? When Mike Brown first proposed that a hidden, massive planet lurks in the outer reaches of our solar system, he was confident someone would prove him wrong. “Planet Nine,” as the hypothetical world was nicknamed, was his explanation for the strange movements of half a dozen distant, icy planetoids that are farther away and smaller than Pluto: In theory, this huge, somehow-undiscovered planet coul
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Live Science
'American Murderer' Worm Strips To Evade Your Immune System There's a murderer loose in Southern soil, and it's taken to stripping to get by. A new study finds that the killer, the parasitic hookworm Necator americanus — nicknamed the " American Murderer " — may slither out of its skin to evade the immune systems of an estimated 700 million infected people around the world. (The worm earned its alias because it's commonly found in the soil of the southern
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Live Science
Watch a Brilliant Fireball Light Up the Sky in This NJ Police Dash-Cam Video When Sgt. Michael Virga went out on patrol last weekend in Hamilton, New Jersey, he wasn't expecting to see something truly out-of-this-world. But thanks to a spectacular fireball, that's exactly what the officer saw. The fireball streaked across the early-morning sky at 3:09 a.m. EST (0809 GMT) on Saturday, Dec. 2, and Virga's vehicle dash cam recorded the dazzling sight, according to
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Live Science
200-Year-Old Journal Reveals Rare American Sunspot Records A 200-year-old journal found in a small house in Maine gives a rare look at the sun's face ages ago. The aged pages are among a mere handful of early American solar observations, and they could shed significant light on the solar activity cycle , astronomers said. In 1816, the Northern Hemisphere experienced what many refer to as the " year without a summer ." Jonathan Fisher, a Congreg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New manifestation of magnetic monopoles discoveredWhile magnetic monopoles in the form of elementary particles remain elusive, there have been some recent successes in engineering objects that behave effectively like magnetic monopoles. Now, scientists have shown that there is a much simpler way to observe them: they have demonstrated that superfluid helium droplets can act as magnetic monopoles. Such droplets have been studied for decades, but u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tackling China's severe air pollution problemMore must be done to tackle air pollution in China, according to a leading climate change expert in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New chemical trail leads to the secrets of memory and depressionThe world is bad and life is meaningless? It is not necessarily the fault of the world or life – or even your willingness. The sources of depression are complex and still poorly understood chemical processes occurring in the brain between neurons. The knowledge gained will be used, among others, in search of new anti-depressants.
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Live Science
OCD Obsessions Often Come with Physical Sensations People with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) often find that their intrusive thoughts come along with "sensory experiences" — quasi-hallucinations that attach some physical sensation to the distorted thinking the disorder can produce. Now, researchers are starting to understand those sensations, and how they might be used to help treat the mental illness. In a new study, published in Nov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists excited by discovery of new form of matter, excitonium IMAGE: This is an artist's depiction of the collective excitons of an excitonic solid. These excitations can be thought of as propagating domain walls (yellow) in an otherwise ordered solid exciton... view more Credit: Peter Abbamonte, U. of I. Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Excitonium has a team of researchers at the University of Illinois a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sandy claws IMAGE: Majoid crabs, known as decorator crabs, are well-known for adorning their surface with objects such as sponges and algae. view more Credit: University of Delaware 'Tis the holiday season and it seems homes are festively trimmed at every turn. Ornaments of all shapes and sizes embellish everything from trees to windows and yards. While tinsel originated in 17th century German decora
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Scientific American Content: Global
Do Genes Mediate Our Behavior? [Video] What do we do when we’re hungry? How do we react when people gather around us? Where do we go when we want to be alone? Humans have so many complex behaviors, yet researchers think many of them have developed directly from the ways animals act and react. Whether that is true can be revealed by studying how genes direct biological functions, and how those functions result in action. VIDEO
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Scientific American Content: Global
Antibiotics Sales for Use in U.S. Farms Animals Dropping for First Time CHICAGO (Reuters)—The sale and distribution of antibiotics approved for use in food-producing animals in the United States decreased by 10 percent from 2015 to 2016, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report said on Thursday. It was the first decline in year-to-year sales since the FDA began collecting the data in 2009, according to food and consumer health groups. For years scient
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Inside Science
Thirdhand Smoke: Your Skin Absorbs Nicotine from Air and Clothing Thirdhand Smoke: Your Skin Absorbs Nicotine from Air and Clothing Nicotine in the air and clothing permeates skin and enters the bloodstream at levels equivalent to inhalation of secondhand smoke. Smoking.jpg Image credits: Lindsay Fox via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Human Friday, December 8, 2017 - 11:45 Kimberly Hickok, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Even if you’re not a cigarette smo
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Actually, You Do Want to Know How This Sausage Gets Made Photo Bacteria are responsible for the delicious taste of salami, although industrial microbes do not yield as tasty dried sausages as wild microbes. Credit Tony Cenicola/The New York Times When you slice into a salami, you are enjoying the fruits of some very small organisms’ labor. Like other dried sausages, salami is a fermented food. Its production involves a period where manufacturers allow
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Tracking Dolphins With Algorithms You Might Find on Facebook The method she and her collaborators developed worked in steps. First, a detection program scanned through years of audio recordings and pulled out all segments with dolphin clicks. Their algorithm then carved these segments into five-minute blocks, generating an average click rate and frequency shape for each time window. Next, the program grouped together five-minute chunks with similar average
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NYT > Science
How to Avoid a White-Knuckle Drive on Black Ice It can also form when the temperature of the pavement or a bridge deck is the same as the dew point, said Jennifer Post, a spokeswoman for the New York State Department of Transportation. “At freezing temperatures, dew will freeze, causing black ice,” she wrote in an email. “This can happen any time, but seems to be more prevalent at night, when there’s no solar heating.” How do you know if it’s
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Latest Headlines | Science News
When tumors fuse with blood vessels, clumps of breast cancer cells can spread In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS, a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
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Futurity.org
How babies learn to walk holds potential clues to autism Scientists have identified brain networks involved in a baby’s learning to walk—a discovery that eventually may help predict whether infants are at risk for autism. The findings build on previous research that has shown that babies who have delays in developing skills involved in coordination and movement are more likely to be diagnosed subsequently with autism spectrum disorder. In brain scans a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments IMAGE: Microbiologist Derek Lovley and colleaugues at UMass Amherst report finding electrically conducting pili or 'e-pili' in more bacteria species than just the original Geobacter discovery he made 30 years ago.... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discove
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Quanta Magazine
Solution: ‘Triumph or Cooperation in Game Theory and Evolution’ Our November Insights puzzle set out three scenarios exploring how competition and cooperation are modeled in game theory and how they might actually interact in modifying the equilibrium between two genes. Let’s work through them to gain a deeper appreciation for the intricacies in applying game theory to real-world situations. Problem 1 Morra is a competitive hand-and-finger game played between
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New on MIT Technology Review
Neural Networks Are Learning What to Remember and What to Forget Deep learning is changing the way we use and think about machines. Current incarnations are better than humans at all kinds of tasks, from chess and Go to face recognition and object recognition. But many aspects of machine learning lag vastly behind human performance. In particular, humans have the extraordinary ability to constantly update their memories with the most important knowledge while
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guanidinium stabilizes perovskite solar cells at 19 percent efficiency With the power-conversion efficiency of silicon solar cells plateauing around 25%, perovskites are now ideally placed to become the market's next generation of photovoltaics. In particular, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites offer manufacturing versatility that can potentially translate into much higher efficiency: studies have already shown photovoltaic performances above 20% across diffe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transformation to wind and solar achievable with low indirect GHG emissions Different low carbon technologies from wind or solar energy to fossil carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) differ greatly when it comes to indirect greenhouse gas emissions in their life cycle. This is the result of a comprehensive new study conducted by an international team of scientists that is now published in the journal Nature Energy . Unlike what some critics argue, the researchers not o
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How augmented reality could change the future of surgery | Nadine Hachach-HaramIf you're undergoing surgery, you want the best surgical team to collaborate on your case, no matter where they are. Surgeon and entrepreneur Nadine Hachach-Haram is developing a new system that helps surgeons operate together and train one another on new techniques -- from remote locations using low-cost augmented reality tools. Watch the system in action as she joins a surgeon in Minnesota perfo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A glass of whisky could help you get your head around deep time Credit: Chatchy4406/Shutterstock.com The Scottish geologist James Hutton made a proposal in 1788 that, at the time, was extraordinarily controversial. He described Earth as a "beautiful machine", constantly subjected to long-term decay and regeneration, that could only be understood over many millions of years. This may not sound that contentious, but the challenge this posed to humanity's sense
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Blog » Languages » English
A Visit From St. Grim: Evil Cubes This second game you may find quite frightening, You’ll need to be careful, don’t trace like lightning. Like the hare and the tortoise you’ll have to be wise, The slow and the steady always win the prize! But don’t worry my friend, you’ve many an hour, Saturday til Thursday these cubes you may scour. Do both sets of 12 cubes and you may need a hug, But crush all those Evils and you could win a mu
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Inside the Magically Mundane Lab of a Nobel Prize-Winning Chemist Receiving a call from the Nobel Prize committee is a fantasy nearly every scientist entertains at some point. And no wonder: It’s an incredible achievement, one followed by a glamorous awards ceremony, not to mention countless interviews, TV appearances, and magazine features. But it only comes after years of tedious, often frustrating, work in a lab. Jos Jansen captures this day-to-day reality i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can data save dolphins? How scientists are using NASA data to study link between solar storms and animal beachings Illustration of an Atlantic White-sided Dolphin and a Long-finned Pilot Whale, two marine mammal species that strand in Cape Cod. Credit: NASA GSFC/CIL/Brian Monroe The age-old mystery of why otherwise healthy dolphins, whales and porpoises get stranded along coasts worldwide deepens: After a collaboration between NASA scientists and marine biologists, new research suggests space weather is not t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound Illinois graduate student Hailey Knox and chemistry professor Jefferson Chan developed a photoacoustic molecular probe that activates in tissues low in oxygen, which could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of cancer, stroke and blocked or narrowed blood vessels. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brazil's Cerrado forests won't be saved by corporate pledges on deforestation Credit: www.shutterstock.com To the south of the Amazon basin lies a huge savannah known as the Cerrado. Once a mix of grassland and forest, much of the Cerrado has now been transformed into the vast soy farms and cattle ranches that have made Brazil an agricultural superpower. There is also plenty of untouched land – but protecting it requires a new approach to deforestation. Recently, 23 major
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Science : NPR
Scientists Discover Grass Species With Intriguing 'Salt And Vinegar' Chip Flavor Ben Anderson collects grass samples in Western Australia. Spinifex tastes to some like salt and vinegar chips — but it's so hard and spiky that scientists say collecting samples can be painful. Courtesy of Matt Barrett hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Matt Barrett Ben Anderson collects grass samples in Western Australia. Spinifex tastes to some like salt and vinegar chips — but it's so har
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals Viagra to be 'ineffective' for fetal growth restriction A University of Liverpool led international clinical trial has found an anti-impotence drug to be ineffective at improving outcomes for pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction. Fetal growth restriction, commonly called intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), occurs when the placenta (afterbirth) has failed to develop correctly. In most cases this has happened in the early stages of pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease. University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to find hypoxic spots noninvasively in real time. The researchers developed an oxygen-sensitive molecular beacon that emits ultrasound signals in resp
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Futurity.org
High temps pose double threat to crops New research links changing weather and plants’ ability to fend of disease. The findings are relevant to the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Overcoming crop loss due to disease and adverse weather will be key in achieving this goal. “Just like people, plants are more likely to get sick when they are growing in stressful environments.” One o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia claims radioactivity spike not due to nuclear plant Russian authorities denied Friday that a radioactivity spike in the air over Europe resulted from a nuclear fuel plant leak in the Urals, saying their probe has found no release of radioactivity there. Andrei Ivanov of Russia's Rosatom state nuclear corporation said that an inspection of the Mayak plant has proven that it wasn't the source of Ruthenium-106, a radioactive isotope spotted in the ai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlled burns limited severity of Rim Fire, researchers find The researchers examined factors like topography, weather conditions and fire history and used statistical models to determine what influenced fire severity. They found topography and weather conditions were the most important factors in the initial fire. However, the severity of that initial fire was the best predictor of how severe the next fire would be. Credit: Alan Taylor / Penn State Contro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New AI algorithm recommends right products at the right time Prediction performance on real-world Tmall and Amazon Review datasets. With 1 being best, the IBM algorithm noted in red and referred to here as DAROSS, most accurately predicted categories. Credit: IBM Consumers everywhere are exposed to AI algorithms that recommend products to them based on their past purchases and those of others. Of course, they don't always hit the mark. My IBM Research AI c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
nTIDE November 2017 Jobs Report: Ongoing job gains bode well for Americans with disabilities IMAGE: This graphic illustrates the gains in the labor participation rate and the employment-to-population ratio for people with and without disabilities. view more Credit: Kessler Foundation East Hanover, NJ - December 8, 2017. The job outlook remained positive for Americans with disabilities, with yet another month of gains in the major economic indicators, according to today's Na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can data save dolphins? The age-old mystery of why otherwise healthy dolphins, whales and porpoises get stranded along coasts worldwide deepens: After a collaboration between NASA scientists and marine biologists, new research suggests space weather is not the primary cause of animal beachings -- but the research continues. The collaboration is now seeking others to join their search for the factors that send
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lymph node surgery may raise risk of arm morbidity in younger women SAN ANTONIO -- Younger breast cancer patients who underwent axillary lymph node dissection were more likely to experience arm swelling and decreased range of arm motion than patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsies, according to data presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 5-9. "Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women under the age of 40, bu
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The Atlantic
I, Tonya Is Too Glib for Its Own Good “I was loved for a minute, then I was hated, then I was just a punchline,” Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) tells the camera in I, Tonya , summing up the life cycle of a scandalous public figure with pithy efficiency. She was once a competitive ice skater with serious promise, becoming the first American woman to land the notoriously hard triple axel jump in competition. She was a misfit in a cloist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird flu: Dutch farmers ordered to keep poultry indoors Transcription—the reading of a segment of DNA into an RNA template for protein synthesis—is fundamental for nearly all cellular processes, including growth, responding to stimuli, and reproduction. Now, Whitehead Institute ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should robots have rights? Credit: Northeastern University As robots gain citizenship and potential personhood in parts of the world, it's appropriate to consider whether they should also have rights. So argues Northeastern professor Woodrow Hartzog, whose research focuses in part on robotics and automated technologies. "It's difficult to say we've reached the point where robots are completely self-sentient and self-awar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists watch diamond turn into graphite Diamond and graphite are different forms of carbon that can be transformed into each other. The transition from diamond into graphite has now been observed in detail with the help of an X-ray laser. Credit: DESY, Gesine Born In a surprising achievement, a team of scientists has turned diamond into graphite, using an X-ray laser. What may seem undesirable at first glance, is a decisive step forwar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jellyfish have superpowers – and other reasons they don't deserve their bad reputation Credit: Shutterstock People rarely enjoy meeting a jellyfish. On the beach they appear limp, amorphous, and blistered in the sun. In the water it's often a brush of a tentacle on exposed skin followed by a sting. They hardly evoke the serene elegance of a turtle or the majesty of a breaching humpback whale. But despite making a poor first impression, jellyfish are among the most unusual animals o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron diffraction experiments of materials with structures comprising multiple metal elements Credit: Institut Laue-Langevin Materials containing multiple metal elements are important for various applications as the combination of different metal cations provides new or enhanced properties, which cannot be obtained through the use of just one metal. A recent study involving neutron diffraction experiments has enabled the development of a new general strategy to produce complex materials w
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Dana Foundation
New K-5 Lesson Plans Now Available New lesson plans about the brain are now available for teachers and students! Each lesson plan has an accompanying PowerPoint presentation for students and an interactive activity that allows them to get hands-on with how the brain works. The lesson plans also include student objectives and background information, and are paired with relevant Dana Alliance fact sheets (for 3 rd to 5 th grade stud
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liquefied gas proving to be a natural for energy firms Russia's giant Yamal LNG plant went on line above the Arctic Circle this week, an example of growing interest in the fuel The world's energy companies are being increasingly enticed by liquefied natural gas, thanks to an expected rise in global demand and the fuel's flexibility when compared to costly, long-term pipeline projects. France's Total, which holds a 20 percent stake in the Yamal projec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Militias, poachers wreak havoc on central Africa's wildlife: monitor The elephant population is stable or increasing in east and southern Africa but poaching remains high in the centre of the continent Sudan's Janjaweed, Uganda's Lord's Resistance Army and other notorious militias are wreaking havoc on wildlife in central Africa, poaching and trafficking elephants, hippopotamuses, buffaloes and other animals, a monitor said Friday. The threat comes from "highly or
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Futurity.org
Costly blood clot procedure may not be worth the risk For patients with blood clots in their legs, a condition called deep vein thrombosis, powerful but risky clot-busting drugs may not be worth the potential danger, according to results of a large-scale clinical trial. “We are dealing with a very sharp double-edged sword here…” The study shows that clearing the clot with drugs and specialized devices did not reduce the likelihood that patients woul
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The Atlantic
How to Tell If a Dinosaur Is Fake On Wednesday, a team of scientists unveiled a newly discovered dinosaur that had the body and sickle-clawed feet of Velociraptor , the head and snout of a swan, and weird arms that were somewhere between grasping limbs and flattened flippers. This bizarre murder-swan, which the team christened Halszkaraptor , was so odd that when they first saw it, they suspected that it was a fake—a Frankensaur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's physics after the Higgs boson? The CMS detector in the Large Hadron Collider with which Pekkanen and thousands of other physicists work at CERN. Credit: Panja Luukka Aalto University doctoral student Juska Pekkanen is part of a group working with the highest collision energies ever achieved. The work at the CERN research centre in Switzerland became widely known when the 2013 Nobel-prize-winning discovery of the Higgs boson co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pouring cold water on energy myths Fixated on those all-important energy ratings when buying a washing machine or dishwasher? We've all been led to believe they are a credible guide to using our appliances more cost effectively but the reality may be a little different, according to new research findings from the University of South Australia. UniSA PhD student Shiv Umapathi has been looking at the water -energy footprint of eco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Music streaming giants Spotify, Tencent invest in each other The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn't have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows Credit: Auguste Le Roux A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into around 1.75million microscopic fragments, according to new research. Marine scientists at the University of Plymouth examined the rate at which bags were broken down by the amphipod Orchestia gammarellus, which inhabits coastal areas in northern and western Europe. They discovered the organisms shred
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colliding protons head-on One of the first two crab cavities during construction in a clean room at CERN. Credit: Ulysse Fichet/CERN They won't pinch you and you won't find them on the beach. The name of the new radio-frequency crab cavities has nothing to do with their appearance and is merely illustrative of the effect they will have on circulating proton bunches. Crab cavities will help increase the luminosity of colli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spontaneous Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons Excitons are pairs of electrons and holes inside a solid material that together behave like a single particle. It has long been suspected that when many such excitons exist in the same piece of matter, they can form a single giant quantum state called a Bose-Einstein condensate – the same process which is responsible for a metal losing all its electrical resistance when it becomes a superconducto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Firewalls – a security risk? Protecting business networks is getting more important. But how well do firewalls actually do in protecting sensitive and confidential information? Configuring firewalls can be complicated, even for system administrators, and that can lead to security risks and opportunities for intruders. Today, almost every company and their systems are connected to the Internet, thereby they are exposed to a h
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sowing the Seeds of Diversity in Engineering Increasing the number of women in engineering is a problem without clear boundary conditions. Although we know that no single solution can help address the challenges women face in navigating their studies and careers, the understanding we’ve gained in recent years can point the way to seeing real change. Right now, the bar is low. Despite ongoing efforts across academia, government and indus
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Feed: All Latest
Videogames Are Award-Worthy—But They Don't Need Award Shows Last night, The Game Awards, hosted by journalist and television producer Geoff Keighley, aired on ... well, on the internet, streaming on Twitter, YouTube, Twitch, and just about every other platform imaginable. The successor to Spike TV's Spike Video Game Awards, the extravagant video event has the ambitions to be a major event in the culture of videogaming, crowning the top achievements of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Children negatively impacted by early intervention restrictions Credit: University of Sydney As the government extends its income management program, new research indicates the original rollout in the Northern Territory did not improve school attendance and birth outcomes, and had negative short-term effects. Analysis reveals the federal government's initial income management scheme – first introduced in 2007 during the Northern Territory Emergency Response (
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method enables automated fast investigation of enzymatic processes Principle of the mix-and-diffuse serial synchrotron crystallography: protein crystals are mixed with a solution of a drug candidate and X-rayed on a tape running through the X-ray beam. Credit: Beyerlein et al., IUCrJ Scientists at DESY have developed a new method that enables automated and fast screening of promising drug candidates. This novel technique, called mix-and-diffuse serial synchrotro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tool tests realistic changes to local transit networks A new digital tool developed by an MIT team lets people design alterations to transit networks and estimate the resulting improvements, based on existing data from urban transit systems. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Have you ever wanted to change your city's public transit system? A new digital tool developed by an MIT team lets people design alterations to transit networks and e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dusty protoplanetary disksPlanetary systems form out of disks of gas and dust around young stars. How the formation proceeds, however, is complex and poorly understood. Many physical processes are involved including accretion onto the star, photoevaporation of material of the disk, interactions of the disk with planetary embryos, growth of the dust grains, settling of the dust to the midplane of the disk, and more. To unra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving employees' work-life balance gives competitive advantage Providing working arrangements that meaningfully improve the work-life balance of employees can give firms a competitive advantage, research by Newcastle University has found. In his new book "Work-life Advantage," Dr Al James, Reader in Economic Geography, argues that the societal and moral significance of successfully integrating paid work with other meaningful parts of life is profound. Howeve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Older women liable to lifetime of unequal pay and working conditions Credit: Newcastle University Older women are more vulnerable to financial difficulties than older men, with their employment history and family circumstances impacting on pension income and ability to save. The report, Inequalities in Later Life , led by Newcastle University and the Centre for Ageing Better, highlights huge disparities in health, financial security, social connections, and housin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When your spinal cord takes charge IMAGE: Research by the lab of Martyn Goulding reveals that specific neurons called RORbeta (RORβ) interneurons inhibit transmission of potentially disruptive sensory information during walking in order to promote a fluid... view more Credit: Salk Institute LA JOLLA -- (Dec. 7, 2017) We think of our brain as masterminding all of our actions, but a surprising amount of information related to mo
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Ingeniøren
Løftebrud: Storebæltsforbindelsen skal finansiere motorvej Som et led i finanslovsforhandlingerne er der i dag indgået aftale mellem VLAK-regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti om at sænke taksten på Storebæltsforbindelsen. Det sker i første omgang med 15 procent fra januar 2018 og en yderligere nedsættelse fra januar 2023, som bringer den samlede prisnedsættelse ned på 25 procent, skriver Transportministeriet i en pressemeddelelse her til eftermiddag . Samtidig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making interaction with AI systems more natural with textual grounding Two women wearing hats covered in flowers are posing. Credit: IBM In an upcoming oral presentation at the 2017 Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) Conference, our teams from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and IBM Research AI have proposed a new supervised learning algorithm to solve a well-known problem in AI called textual grounding. Imagine you wanted to ask someone to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California fire damage to homes is less 'random' than it seems The thing is, though, it's not. Firefighters and researchers alike have a pretty solid understanding of why some houses are more vulnerable to wildfire than others. The real challenge ultimately lies in whether those with the power to act on that knowledge will do so. Available science It is commonly thought that it takes direct flame to spread a fire, but this isn't always the case. Small em
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Popular Science
Instant hot cocoa is awful, and it's starch's fault. Here's how to make your own. There is a time and a place for instant hot cocoa. It’s called “when you want it right this second and have nothing better on hand.” Hot chocolate mix is fine in a pinch, but the reality is that the homemade variety is far tastier, and surprisingly easy to make. Plus, you can stir it up in big batches—because let’s be honest here, once one person wants hot cocoa, everyone else does too. In anothe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to use artificial intelligence to predict chemical reactions (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with IBM has applied artificial intelligence to predict organic chemical reactions. In their paper uploaded to the preprint server arXiv , the group outlines their approach, which they describe as an improvement over other models. Predicting what will happen when chemicals are mixed or treated in certain ways is difficult because of all the variables involved. But
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What to teach your preschooler about internet safety Internet safety in early childhood is a new area of research because, until now, children as young as four weren’t able to easily access the internet. Credit: Shutterstock Fifteen years ago, parents and caregivers did not have to worry about teaching pre-school aged children about internet safety. A new report prepared for the Children's Commissioner of England suggests this time has passed. Chil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unique pattern of brain inflammation may explain neurocognitive impairment in HIV patients on antiretroviral drugsAlmost half of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated HIV patients experience some degree of neurocognitive impairment (neuroHIV). To search for underlying pathology, scientists analyzed the brains of monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) then treated with cART. The majority of the SIV-infected macaque brains showed signs of unusual lymphocyte-dominant inflammation,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acrobatic duo in the cellsJust like an acrobatic duo, some proteins lend each other stability. Researchers have discovered that the protein 'Trigger factor' recognizes a partner by unstable, flexible domains, to then together form a stable protein duo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
JPL deploys a CubeSat for astronomy A JPL CubeSat named ASTERIA was deployed from the International Space Station on November 21. It will test the use of CubeSats for astronomy research. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Tiny satellites called CubeSats have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Besides allowing researchers to test new technologies, their relative simplicity also offers hands-on training to early-career engineers. A
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New on MIT Technology Review
San Francisco Is Really, Really Worried about Robots Bots Are Ruining Christmas by Beating Humans to Online Checkouts Call it the Software Grinch. Entrepreneurial resellers have been using bots to snaffle popular toys ahead of the Christmas rush, so that they can charge massively inflated prices to desperate parents. If you have children of a certain age, chances are… Read more Call it the Software Grinch. Entrepreneurial resellers have been usin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine organisms can shred a carrier bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into around 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research. Marine scientists at the University of Plymouth examined the rate at which bags were broken down by the amphipod Orchestia gammarellus , which inhabits coastal areas in northern and western Europe. They believe the results are an example of marine wildl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ECOG-ACRIN discovers a simple blood test may predict recurrence of breast cancer A simple blood test that detects tumor cells circulating in the blood shows promise as a new way to predict high or low risk of a breast cancer relapse. This is according to data presented today at the 40th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. A proof-of-concept study by the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (ECOG-ACRIN) measured the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood sam
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep insight into the heart FRANKFURT. By no means are only elderly people at risk from heart diseases. Physically active individuals can also be affected, for example if a seemingly harmless flu bug spreads to the heart muscle. Should this remain undetected and if, for example, a builder continues with his strenuous job or an athlete carries on training, this can lead to chronic inflammation and in the worst case even to s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How individuals with schizophrenia view their experiences and confidence in judgments may influence treatment targets PHILADELPHIA - A schizophrenia patient's own perceptions of their experiences -- and confidence in their judgments -- may be factors that can help them overcome challenges to get the life they wish, suggests a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science from researchers at Penn Medicine's Aaron T. Beck Psychopathology Research Center. The findings buck a commonly-held belief about the r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers and BRCA IMAGE: Jennifer Litton, M.D. view more Credit: MD Anderson Cancer Center In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BR
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlled burns limited severity of Rim Fire IMAGE: Fire burning in forest. view more Credit: Alan Taylor, Penn State Controlled burning of forestland helped limit the severity of one of California's largest wildfires, according to Penn State geographers. The researchers studying the Rim Fire, which in 2013 burned nearly 400 square miles of forest in the Sierra Nevadas, found the blaze was less severe in areas recently treated with control
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh Researchers say there is an urgent need for action after 95 per cent of children from 12 primary schools in Dhaka tested positive for recent second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. The study, which involved collaboration with the University of Dhaka, is the first to report on biochemically validated second hand smoke exposure among children in a low and middle-income country (LMIC). The Dhaka results a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Going undercover to fight tuberculosis Tuberculosis is one of the most widespread life-threatening infectious diseases. Not only does antibiotic resistance make treatment increasingly difficult, but the bacteria's relatively impermeable mycomembrane also limits the effectiveness of many drugs. In search of new antibiotics, researchers have developed a structural analogue of mycolic acid, the essential membrane building block. As repor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Galaxy orbits in the local supercluster IMAGE: Our home Milky Way galaxy (MW, yellow) and our companion Andromeda galaxy (M31, red) are participating in a downward flow away from a vast underdense region called the Local Void... view more Credit: R. Brent Tully A team of astronomers from Maryland, Hawaii, Israel and France has produced the most detailed map ever of the orbits of galaxies in our extended local neighborhood, showin
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The Atlantic
The Winter Getaway That Turned the Software World Upside Down Snowbird, Utah, is an unlikely place to mount a software revolution. Around 25 miles outside Salt Lake City, Snowbird is certainly no Silicon Valley; it is not known for sunny and temperate climes, for tech-innovation hubs, or for a surplus of ever eager entrepreneurs. But it was here, nestled in the white-capped mountains at a ski resort, that a group of software rebels gathered in 2001 to frame
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Road salt is bad for the environment, so why do we keep using it? Road salt saves lives but can harm aquatic wildlife. Credit: Scott L/flickr Marshes, streams and lakes lie alongside many of the roads and highways that zigzag across North America. Plants and animals inhabit these water bodies and can be exposed to many of the substances we put on those roads, including road salt. Rock salt helps keep roads safe when winter storms hit, reducing winter road accid
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term prevention of organ rejectionMedical researchers have developed a procedure for preventing organ rejection in rats after renal transplantation, and for suppressing the creation of antibodies in the recipients' immune systems. Immunoproteasome inhibition, which suppresses the production of antibodies, is crucial to this process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel compound restores immune response in patients with melanomaA novel compound may restore immune response in patients with melanoma, according to a study presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geomythology—how a geographer began mining myths Mount Mazama, a volcano in Oregon. Indigenous stories preserve tales of its eruption more than 7,000 years ago. Credit: Shutterstock.com So you think the Loch Ness Monster never existed? That the story is a cunningly cobbled-together fiction intended to boost tourist interest in an otherwise unrelentingly dull (only to some) part of mid-Scotland? Think again. The embryonic science of geomythology
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Live Science
Why One Woman Mysteriously Started Hearing 'Divine' Voices A 48-year-old woman in Switzerland stabbed herself several times in the chest, claiming she heard divine voices that instructed her to commit the act as a religious sacrifice , a recent report of the woman's case reveals. But doctors suspect that these "heavenly" voices likely had an earthly cause; namely, a slow-growing brain tumor that could've caused the woman's religious delusions, acco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding Earth's geologic history to predict the future Pratigya Polissar is an organic geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and a Center for Climate and Life Fellow. Polissar uses molecular fossils—the remnants of plants and animals preserved in ocean, lake, and terrestrial sediments—to identify these organisms, understand what past landscapes and ecosystems looked like, and examine how climate shapes Earth's ecosystems. Q. What exactly are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How developing visual system axons stay in the correct layer IMAGE: During the pupal stage, photoreceptors extend the axons into the brain region called medulla which has layered structure. All the photoreceptor axons are labeled in red, and R7 photoreceptor axons... view more Credit: Takashi Suzuki Scientists at Tokyo Tech have made an important discovery concerning the development of layer-specific axonal connections in the developing visua
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk Using the example of cockroaches, the Cologne-based zoologist Dr Tom Weihmann and his team were able to show that quickly running insects change their gait at mid-speed. This behaviour has previously only been observed in fast mammals. This change in gait is similar to the way horses change from trop to gallop. The results of the study have now been published in the journal Frontiers in Zoology .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family members without inherited mutation have increased risk of melanoma In families who carry certain inherited mutations that increase the risk for melanoma, members who do not carry the mutation also have an increased risk of melanoma, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in Genetics in Medicine reports. The phenomenon, which is called phenocopy, could result from other shared risk-enhancing genes or environmental factors within the families. Malignant me
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows HIV-infected women not using statins as recommended IMAGE: AIDS Patient Care and STDs is the leading peer-reviewed journal dedicated to diagnostics and therapeutics for providing optimal care for HIV/AIDS patients. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 6, 2017--A new study has shown that HIV-infected women do not use statins as recommended by the most recent guidelines. Control of blood lipid levels
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS scientist develops 'toolboxes' for quantum cybersecurity A quantum information scientist from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed efficient "toolboxes" comprising theoretical tools and protocols for quantifying the security of high-speed quantum communication. Assistant Professor Charles Lim is part of an international team of experimental and theoretical scientists from Duke University, Ohio State University and Oak Ridge National
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research leads to call for lung health screening at top football clubs New research from the University of Kent has discovered that nearly three in 10 elite footballers at top clubs in England have undetected lung and airway problems that could impair their on-field performance. The findings of this study will be presented at a British Thoracic Society meeting on 8 December (details in Notes to Editors) by lead researcher Anna Jackson, who will also call for all
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Viden
Region laver forsøg med førerløse busser Bliv kørt til sygehuset i en bus - uden chauffør. Det bliver måske snart en realitet for patienter på Sjælland. Region Sjælland i samarbejde med trafikselskabet Movia aftalt rammerne for et forsøg med førerløse busser, oplyser regionen i en pressemeddelelse. - Det er vigtigt at komme i gang og få testet og skabt et erfaringsgrundlag, for der er ingen tvivl om, at vi kan løse mange kollektive traf
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Futurity.org
Can this pesticide kill pests but spare the bees? Molecular tweaks to a known pesticide may make it effective at killing pests while keeping beneficial bugs— such as bumble bees—safe, say researchers. Pyrethroid pesticides target the voltage-gated sodium channel, a protein found in nerve and muscle cells used for rapid electrical signaling. They basically work by binding to the voltage gate of the sodium channel and preventing it from closing. T
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The robot that detects underground water leaks Wei-Min Shen holds an autonomous robot that detects damage in underground pipes. Credit: USC Photo/Caitlin Dawson The United States faces a looming crisis over its deteriorating water infrastructure, and fixing it will be a monumental and expensive task. In Los Angeles alone, about two-thirds of the city's 7,000 miles of water pipes are more than 60 years old—and nearing the end of their useful l
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Science | The Guardian
The week in wildlife – in pictures Amazon river dolphins, a foraging raccoon and a snow-covered swan lake are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building confidence in hydrologic modelsUnderstanding water availability and quality for large-scale surface and groundwater systems requires simulation. Scientists have developed many numerical models to address these simulation needs. How do these models differ in their portrayal of these water-based systems? To answer that question, seven different modeling teams from the United States and Europe exercised their models to develop a c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designer yeast consumes plant matter and spits out fatty alcohols for detergents and biofuelsUsed in laundry detergents, medicines, and biofuels, certain alcohols known as long-chain fatty alcohols, with 12 to 18 carbon atoms in the backbone, are desirable products. These compounds can be made by a yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, yields have remained low, slowing the adoption of microbes as producers of fatty alcohols. Through genetic engineering of S. cerevisiae, scientis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surrey scientists create cheap and safe electro-catalysts for fuel cells Scientists from the University of Surrey have produced non-metal electro-catalysts for fuel cells that could pave the way for production of low-cost, environmentally friendly energy generation. In a study published in the Journal of Power Sources , the team from Surrey worked with colleagues from Queen Mary University of London to create low-cost carbon based electro-catalysts for anion exchange
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds ways to avoid hidden dangers of accumulated stresses on seagrass A new QUT-led study has found ways to detect hidden dangers of repeated stresses on seagrass using statistical modelling. The research, published by the Journal of Applied Ecology , found cumulative maintenance dredging which affected the light on the sea floor increased risks on seagrass survival. It found, globally, seagrass meadows can be at risk of collapse from accumulated effects of repeate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arctic sea ice loss and the Eurasian winter cooling trend: Is there a link? IMAGE: Mean DJF 2-m temperature and 200-hpa geopotential height changes in the ERA-Interim reanalysis product (2005-2014 mean minus 1981-1990 mean). view more Credit: Thomas W. Collow, Wanqiu Wang, and Arun Kumar Observations of the Arctic sea ice have shown that Arctic sea ice has been melting at a fast pace over the last few decades. However, what is more uncertain and presently undergoing a bi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Projected winter Arctic sea-ice decline coupled to Eurasian circulation IMAGE: Coupling between uncertainties in the global warming response: Arctic sea-ice concentrations (top) and mean sea level pressure over Eurasia (bottom), explaining 70.5 percent of intermodel covariability. view more Credit: Hoffman Cheung Arctic sea-ice cover will diminish rapidly under global warming, but its rate of retreat in boreal winter shows large intermodel differences across the mode
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat IMAGE: Illustration of the molecular structure of the graphene nanoribbons prepared by UCLA chemistry professor Yves Rubin and colleagues. view more Credit: Courtesy of Yves Rubin Silicon -- the shiny, brittle metal commonly used to make semiconductors -- is an essential ingredient of modern-day electronics. But as electronic devices have become smaller and smaller, creating tiny silicon comp
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Life of Enrico Fermi, an Epic Birding Quest and Other New Science Books The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age by David N. Schwartz. Basic Books, 2017 ($35) No one can know everything, but Enrico Fermi might have known everything it was possible to know about physics, writer Schwartz suggests. The Italian-born physicist was a prodigy, unusually gifted at both experimental and theoretical work, and made
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Scientific American Content: Global
Research on Clay Formation Could Have Implications for How to Search for Life on Mars The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Clay minerals cannot form unless there is water available—it is an essential ingredient in their microscopic crystalline structure. Clays are found virtually nowhere on the red planet except in Mars’s most ancient terrains, dating back to an epoch about 3.7-4.1 billion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Underappreciated microbes now get credit for holding down two jobs in soilIn soil, bacteria and other microbes are well known for their ability to decompose organic materials, releasing carbon to the atmosphere. Less understood is how microbes add persistent carbon compounds to the soil. Scientists reviewed both roles via the concept of a "microbial carbon pump." The pump is proposed as a mechanism for integrating how the contrasting breakdown and synthesis activities o
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:Where Have All The Pigeons Gone?A new study sheds light on how the most abundant bird in North America went extinct.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA has gone digital – what could possibly go wrong? Modern advances come with new liabilities. Credit: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com Biology is becoming increasingly digitized. Researchers like us use computers to analyze DNA, operate lab equipment and store genetic information. But new capabilities also mean new risks – and biologists remain largely unaware of the potential vulnerabilities that come with digitizing biotechnology. The emerging fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk Close up of a cockroach. Credit: Wikipedia/public domain Using the example of cockroaches, the Cologne-based zoologist Dr Tom Weihmann and his team were able to show that quickly running insects change their gait at mid-speed. This behaviour has previously only been observed in fast mammals. This change in gait is similar to the way horses change from trop to gallop. The results of the study have
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create cheap and safe electro-catalysts for fuel cells Scientists from the University of Surrey have produced non-metal electrocatalysts for fuel cells that could pave the way for production of low-cost, environmentally friendly energy generation. In a study published in the Journal of Power Sources , the team from Surrey worked with colleagues from Queen Mary University of London to create low-cost carbon based electro-catalysts for anion exchange m
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The Atlantic
The Cinematic Magic of The Shape of Water Each day before going to work, Elisa puts eggs on the stove to boil, gets into the bathtub, and pleasures herself. Eggs, water, and—yes—sex will all play crucial and overlapping roles in the director Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water , an adult fairy tale that is at once deeply familiar and utterly original. Del Toro’s principal inspiration for the film was the 1954 monster-movie classic Cr
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The Atlantic
It's Suddenly Cold Out. Am I Going to Get Sick? A couple of weeks ago, the temperature in New York dropped something like 30 degrees in the span of a day. A month or so earlier, the city had seen the reverse— a 40-something-degree day was followed soon after by an unseasonable 70-degree one. Weather is my favorite boring thing to talk about, so whenever I saw someone after these rapid temperature changes I said something like, “Crazy weather,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars atmosphere well protected from the solar wind Charged particles from the sun (the solar wind) form an induced magnetosphere round Mars, which unlike the sun does not have its own intrinsic magnetic field. Credit: Anastasia Grigoryeva Despite the absence of a global Earth-like magnetic dipole, the Martian atmosphere is well protected from the effects of the solar wind on ion escape from the planet. New research shows this using measurements f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows differences in energy digestibility between sows and gilts Gestating sows digest energy in diets more efficiently than growing gilts. Credit: University of Illinois Gestating sows digest energy in diets more efficiently than growing gilts. A recent study from the University of Illinois is shedding light on some of the reasons why. "There are a number of factors that might explain the difference in energy digestibility between sows and gilts," says Hans S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare glimpse of a black hole's magnetic field could help us to understand how it feeds Black hole Cygnus X. Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss Encountering a black hole would be a frightening prospect for our planet. We know that these cosmic monsters ferociously devour any object that strays too close to their "event horizon" – the last chance of escape. But even though black holes drive some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, the physics of their behaviour, including how they
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Ingeniøren
Nu beskyldes også BMW for diesel-snyd Indtil nu har BMW ikke været involveret i nogen af udledningsskandalerne, som har ramt den europæiske bilindustri. Men nu er det slut. Beskyldninger om snyd med NOx-tal stammer fra miljøorganisationen Deutsche Umwelthilfe (DUH). De har testet en BMW 320d og er kommet frem til, at bilen har software designet til at give bedre resultater i laboratoriet end i virkeligheden. DUH hævder , at bilen udl
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Live Science
5,500-Year-Old Wooden Clubs Were Deadly Weapons How do you solve a Stone Age murder mystery? First, identify the weapon. Archaeologists in the United Kingdom are turning to forensic methods to understand violence in the Neolithic period. In experiments described in the journal Antiquity yesterday (Dec. 7), researchers used a replica of a 5,500-year-old wooden club to see what kind of damage they could inflict on a model of a human he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algae and krill may be a tough sell for European consumers Sea-based agriculture that cultivates large quantities of algae could help triple or quadruple the amount of food we get from our oceans. Credit: pxhere/ picture is in public domain People will need to be persuaded to eat new types of seafood if we are to extract more food from the oceans and feed growing human populations, according to fishing industry experts. They were speaking in response to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What keeps women from reporting sexual harassment? Sociology professor Anna-Maria Marshall wrote a book on sexual harassment and specializes in the sociology of law. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer New accounts of sexual harassment by powerful men appear almost daily. So why now and not sooner? One reason might be the "miniature legal systems" set up in business, government and other institutions to handle such complaints, says Anna-Maria Marshall, a s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable yam systems in West Africa More than 60 million people eat yams almost every day in West Africa. Credit: Valéry Hgaza / Yamsys Yams are tuber crops and an essential staple food in West Africa. But the traditional cropping systems are unproductive and degrade soil. The YAMSYS project seeks to change this in cooperation with local actors working along the yam value chain. Yams (Dioscorea species) are not often found on the S
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Futurity.org
Video game tech cuts cost of high-end physical therapy A depth camera usually used with a video game console can give health care providers objective information that could improve patient care for thousands of dollars less than similar technology, researchers report. Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians, and athletic trainers analyze how we move, but it also is very expensive. Some motion labs can cost upward of $100,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Including diagnosis related costs, 3-D mammography costs less than digital mammography SAN ANTONIO - Although digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, costs more than a digital mammography (DM) screening, it actually may help rein in cancer screening costs, according to preliminary findings (PD7-05) presented by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania during the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. The group analyzed 46
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Popular Science
What you should know about birth control and breast cancer A lot of intimidating headlines have recently declared that taking hormonal birth control raises your risk of breast cancer. Some cited a specific number—38 percent—while others left it as a vague threat . Given that about a quarter of all women in the U.S. use some kind of hormonal birth control, this sounds like a huge public health issue. Here’s the reality: the very slight increased risk of b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gaps in required curricula may explain differences in climate change acceptance among college graduates The average American college student has just a 17 percent chance of learning about climate change before graduation through required core courses. The finding may help explain why having a bachelor's degree doesn't always lead to increased acceptance of human-caused global warming, according to new research led by Vanderbilt sociologist David Hess. Undergraduate Brandi Collins, who has since gra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping out a biorobotic future Vickie Webster-Wood is the lead author in a new paper calling for a comprehensive organization for the emerging and merging fields of tissue engineering and robotics. Credit: Case Western Reserve University You might not think a research area as detailed, technically advanced and futuristic as building robots with living materials would need help getting organized, but that's precisely what Vicki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Targeting cancer cells by measuring electric currents Credit: EPFL EPFL researchers have used electrochemical imaging to take a step forward in mapping the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. This technology, which uses only endogenous markers – rather than contrast agents – could be an alternative to current cell imaging techniques. In the field of theranostics – a portmanteau of the words "therapy" and "diagnostics" – researchers use spatial i
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Dagens Medicin
Kun hver tiende database får data fra Sundhedsplatformen Selv om Region Sjælland og Region Hovedstaden havde forventninger om, at alle kliniske kvalitetdatabaser og nationale registre skulle modtage data fra Sundhedsplatformen, sker det kun for hver tiende database.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studying gas mask filters so people can breathe easier Research led by Berkeley Lab scientists could potentially lead to better gas maks used to protect military and emergency personnel. Credit: iStock In research that could lead to better gas mask filters, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been putting the X-ray spotlight on composite materials in respirators used by the military, poli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geologists disprove theory about what stopped the formation of the Midcontinent Rift Geologists have disproved a theory about what stopped the formation of the Midcontinent Rift, which is responsible for creating the dramatic cliffs on the shores of Lake Superior. Credit: Northwestern University Geologists have corrected a mix-up that made an ancient geological structure in the central U.S. seem hundreds of miles shorter than it really is. The biggest failed rift known to geologi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team develops novel program to make more cost effective runways Credit: Texas A&M University An aircraft's impact on the runway is likely the last thing to cross anyone's mind when boarding a flight. The constant taking off and landing of aircraft throughout the day places stress on runway pavement, which needs to be in good condition to ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers. Thanks to a predictive model developed by a collaborative research te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It would cost 20 cents more per T-shirt to pay an Indian worker a living wage A farmer harvests cotton in Maharashtra, India. Credit: Shutterstock If we really care about protecting the people who make the things we wear and use, we need to raise wages for workers in supply chains to above the poverty line. Our research shows that this only requires a 20 cent increase in the Australian retail price for a T-shirt made in India. This small increase can lift wages by up to 22
10h
Science : NPR
Can Your Ceramic Cookware Give You Lead Poisoning? How does lead wind up in crockpots and other ceramic food and drink containers? Ceramic ware is glazed before entering a kiln to bake. These glazes sometimes contain lead to give products an attractive shine. Crockpots — ceramic slow cookers that coax chili into tender perfection — can make home cooks wax poetic. A Google search of "I love my crockpot" turns up well over a million matches, includ
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rethinking transcription factors and gene expression DNA loops create what Whitehead Institute researchers call “insulated neighborhoods” for genes and their promoters and enhancers. Credit: Steven Lee/Whitehead Institute Transcription—the reading of a segment of DNA into an RNA template for protein synthesis—is fundamental for nearly all cellular processes, including growth, responding to stimuli, and reproduction. Now, Whitehead Institute researc
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
French Zoo Offers Rare Look at Baby Manatee French Zoo Offers Rare Look at Baby Manatee Newborn manatee Kali’na weighed 33 pounds; her twin sister drowned New mother Lolita—a West Indian manatee ( Trichechus manatus )—with her two-day-old baby Kali’na at the Beauval Zoo in France. Credit: Eric Baccega naturepl.com Advertisement A newborn manatee is charming visitors at the Beauval Zoo in Saint-Aignan-sur-Cher, France. Baby Kali’na was born
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers determine how alphavirus changes into infectious state Cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of Chikungunya virus. From EMDB entry 5577. Credit: Wikipedia A key step in the infectious method of a family of disease-causing viruses has been identified by an international team led by scientists from Purdue University. The research is described in a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The team studied the structure of t
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strongly anisotropic spin relaxation observed in grapheneResearchers of the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group, led by ICREA Prof. Sergio O. Valenzuela, have unambiguously demonstrated the anisotropic nature of spin relaxation in graphene when interfaced with transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC). The paper, titled "Strongly anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene–transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures at room temperature," wa
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of crop engineering Folding and assembly of the Rubisco subunits is assisted by the chaperonin system and several specific factors. Together these factors form the assembly line that leads to the formation of the functional enzyme. Rubisco catalyses the key step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. The process of photosynthesis converts sunlight into chemical energy, splits water to liberate O2, and fixes CO2 into sug
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galaxy orbits in the local superclusterA team of astronomers from Maryland, Hawaii, Israel, and France has produced the most detailed map ever of the orbits of galaxies in our extended local neighborhood, showing the past motions of almost 1400 galaxies within 100 million light years of the Milky Way.
11h
Ingeniøren
Skanska: Brokollaps skyldes underdimensioneret stilladsDa støbeformen under en svensk bro i juli kollapsede, endte 12 tilskadekomne håndværkere på hospitalet og trafikken lå stille i to uger. Nu mener Skanska at have fundet årsagen.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds that fat fuel is needed to reverse cardiac hypertrophy Researchers at Purdue University are working to learn more about enlargement of the heart caused by high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. These cross-section images of a mouse heart show the rapid enlargement of a mouse heart (control heart on left, enlarged diseased heart in center, and end-stage diseased heart on right) when it is deficient in an enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat An illustration of the molecular structure of graphene nanoribbons produced by UCLA scientists. Credit: Yves Rubin Silicon—the shiny, brittle metal commonly used to make semiconductors—is an essential ingredient of modern-day electronics. But as electronic devices have become smaller and smaller, creating tiny silicon components that fit inside them has become more challenging and more expensive.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking the power of web text data Figure shows the word features which were found in online customer ratings and reviews for nine major restaurants managed by a hotel chain in Singapore. Each word feature in the corpus is displayed as a grey dot. The features selected by the RTL classifier are highlighted as black dots. Credit: National University of Singapore NUS statisticians have developed the Regularised Text Logistic (RTL) r
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibacterial beta-lactone infiltrates mycomembrane biosynthesis and kills tuberculosis pathogen Credit: Wiley Tuberculosis is one of the most widespread life-threatening infectious diseases. Not only does antibiotic resistance make treatment increasingly difficult, but the bacteria's relatively impermeable mycomembrane also limits the effectiveness of many drugs. In search of new antibiotics, researchers have developed a structural analogue of mycolic acid, the essential membrane building b
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists tune the dynamics of exotic quantum particles Credit: West Virginia University Physicists at West Virginia University have discovered a way to control a newly discovered quantum particle, potentially leading to faster computers and other electronic devices. Weyl fermions, massless quasiparticles that were predicted to exist in 1930 by mathematician H. Weyl, were first detected in solid crystals by three independent research groups in 2015.
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Science | The Guardian
Crime, terrorism and teen pregnancies: is it really all doom and gloom? Only in our minds | Bobby Duffy A new survey from Ipsos Mori reveals that the public in 38 countries have deeply inaccurate views about crime, terrorism and many other important social issues. And this is not just the result of random guessing – there is a systematic pattern to our errors. We tend to think things are worse than they are, and they’re going downhill fast. The Perils of Perception study found that only 7% of peopl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are molecules right-handed or left-handed? Properties of chiral molecules at the attosecond level You can get a good idea of chirality by putting a right-handed glove on your left hand—two identical shapes that cannot be superimposed because they are mirror images of each other. This property is common in our universe, from the smallest particles to huge galaxies. Although the physical characteristics of chiral molecules are the same, only one of the forms is generally used by living organism
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How toxoplasmosis exploits immune cells to reach the brain Image illustrates Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites invading across the cell membrane of a host cell. Upon invasion, a signaling cascade is activated via chloride channels, GABA channels and calcium signaling that mediates the migratory activation of the infected immune cell. Credit: S. Kanatani The infection toxoplasmosis is caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and is widespread. It's estimated
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brittle starfish shows how to make tough ceramics Schematic illustration showing the various scales, from the brittle star organism, the arm plate, the lenses and the TEM image showing the coherently aligned nano precipitates within the lattice. Credit: Iryna Polishchuk An international team lead by researchers at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, together with colleagues from the European Synchrotron, Grenoble, France, have discovered ho
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic influences Eurasian weather and climateIn recent decades, the Arctic has lost 65 percent of its sea ice volume. The atmosphere above the Arctic has been rapidly warming and moistening at the same time.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study 'smart' magnetic gel in a magnetic field Microphotographs of magnetic polymers with particles forming chain aggregates directed along the magnetic field H. Credit: Andrey Zubarev Magnetic gels are the new generation of "smart" composite materials. They consist of a polymer medium and nano- or micro-dimensional magnetic particles embedded in it. These composites are frequently used in magnetically controlled shock absorbers, stabilizers,
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research dispels misconception of superconductivity in niobium compound For over 65 years, niobium boride (NbB) has been considered a classic example of a superconducting material. This assumption, recorded in manuals on the physics of condensed matter and articles in scientific journals, has now been contested in a study conducted by researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil and at San Diego State University in the United States. In an article publi
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Night owls have larger social networks than early birds Night owls (blue) are more central than early birds (orange) in their social networks. Each circle represents one person, and the lines connecting the circles are indicative of interactions (phone calls) between them. Credit: Jari Saramäki, Talayeh Aledavood / Aalto University Using anonymous mobile phone data, Aalto University doctoral researcher Talayeh Aledavood has tapped into patterns in peo
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The unique pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase protein regulates the ability of fish to swim A study carried out at the University of Tampere has shown that carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) is present in some species as a combination of two proteins. According to current data, this "fusion protein," called pentraxin-carbonic anhydrase, has disappeared from the genome of almost all mammals through evolution. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are enzymes that catalyse the transformation of water and
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life under the surface in live broadcast Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have invented new systems to study the life of microorganisms in the ground. Without any digging, the researchers are able use microchips to see and analyse an invisible world that is filled with more species than any other ecosystem. In a spoonful of soil there are more microorganisms (fungi and bacteria) than there are people on Earth. At the same time,
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New strategy could enable existing drugs to kill bacteria that cause chronic infections MIT researchers have discovered a way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include ciprofloxacin and are often used to treat infections such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Credit: Chelsea Turner/MIT MIT researchers have discovered a way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include cip
11h
Dagens Medicin
Nyt nej til Spinraza i NorgeDe norske myndigheder siger også nej til det nye pristilbud på lægemidlet Spinraza, som Biogen er kommet med. Nu vil de norske myndigheder forhandle pris sammen med Danmark.
11h
Live Science
Flu Season Is Already Off to a Bad Start Flu season is underway in the United States, and a new report shows that flu activity is already higher than typical for this time of year. During the week that ended Nov. 25 (the most recent period for which data is available), three Southern states — Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina — reported high levels of flu activity ; one state (Georgia) reported moderate flu activity, and t
11h
Dagens Medicin
Dagens Medicin rapporterer fra ASHVi er på plads i Atlanta, når 20.000 eksperter mødes for at opsamle den nyeste videnskabelige viden om hæmatologi.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Are Social Networking Sites Controlling Your Mind? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. How can you live the life you want to, avoiding the distractions and manipulations of others? To do so, you need to know how you work. “ Know thyself ”, the Ancients urged. Sadly, we are often bad at this . But by contrast, others know us increasingly well. Our inte
11h
Feed: All Latest
The FCC Says Net Neutrality Cripples Investment. That's Not True Federal Communications Commission Chair Ajit Pai says the agency's net-neutrality rules are discouraging investment, leaving consumers with fewer, and less robust, choices for internet service, and potentially widening the digital divide. Broadband providers' own financial reports tell a different story. In its proposal to repeal the rules, which were enacted in 2015, the FCC cites industry-funde
11h
Feed: All Latest
Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA . But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over. It’s exactly the kind of problem that makes sense to outsource to artificial intelligence . On Monday, Goog
11h
Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om flowbatterier, linkbombning og gensekventeringIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, handler denne gang om hvordan Rigshospitalet nu kan kortlægge hele patientens arvemasse, om nye potente flowbatterier, og om hvordan hjemmesider bombes ned i bunden af Googles søgeresultater med suspekte links.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Some high-temperature superconductors might not be so odd after all A misfit gang of superconducting materials may be losing their outsider status. Certain copper-based compounds superconduct, or transmit electricity without resistance, at unusually high temperatures. It was thought that the standard theory of superconductivity, known as Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, couldn’t explain these oddballs. But new evidence suggests that the standard theory applies d
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
"Supermalaria" Is on the Way There has been growing hope in recent years that malaria could eventually be eradicated b ut that sense of optimism is currently facing some major new challenges. Scientists are warning that a “supermalaria” parasite is spreading rapidly across Southeast Asia, and could pose a global health threat if it spreads to Africa. It is resistant to artemisinin , the recommended first-line treatment for m
12h
The Atlantic
The Contradictions of Good Teaching Is a good teacher one who makes students enjoy class the most or one who is strict and has high standards? And are those two types even at odds? A new study that tries to quantify this phenomenon finds that on average, teachers who are good at raising test scores are worse at making kids happy in class. “Teachers who are skilled at improving students’ math achievement may do so in ways that make
12h
Ingeniøren
Bitcoin-børs mest downloadet i amerikansk App Store: Lagt ned af rekord-trafik Den populære Bitcoin-platform Coinbase var i timevis utilgængelig torsdag. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/bitcoin-boers-mest-downloadet-amerikansk-app-store-lagt-ned-rekord-trafik-1083651 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren
Endnu engang: Rødt lys for Aarhus LetbaneSikkerhedsgodkendelsen kan muligvis falde på plads i næste uge.
12h
New Scientist - News
Food delivery robots are teaching themselves how to cross roads The Kiwi bots trundles along campus streets and deliver food to students Rory Merry/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News By Niall Firth Ding dong! That’ll be the robot with my pizza. Such a scenario probably seems a bit far-fetched but, in the US and UK, delivery firms like JustEat and DoorDash are already experimenting using small robots to deliver groceries and meals. Currently these systems need huma
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
This Sunday, Look Up and Wave at Kepler Having spent the better part of a decade looking out from our solar system to survey the Milky Way’s population of exoplanets, NASA’s Kepler space telescope is easing into retirement by turning around and taking a photo of home. On December 10, if you look near the constellation Capricornus, the aging, venerable spacecraft will be gazing back from some 100 million miles away. To raise awarene
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland får 795 mio. kr. til at styrke diabetesindsatsen Novo Nordisk Fonden har bevilliget en stor millionpulje til Region Nordjylland til at etablere et Steno Diabetes Center.
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Simpel brochure hjalp ledige i job 08. december 2017 Simpel brochure hjalp ledige i job BESKÆFTIGELSE Ledige, der får information om, at deres egen indsats for at skaffe nyt job er afgørende, har større chance for hurtigt at finde nyt job end andre ledige. En enkel brochure på fire sider, viste sig at øge beskæftigelsen blandt ledige - især blandt dem med dårligste job-udsigter, hvor brochuren viste sig at øge beskæftigelsen med 4
12h
Ingeniøren
Regeringen: Borgerne kan se i Lovtidende hvilke myndigheder der overvåger dem Følg med i Lovtidende, hvis du vil vide, hvilke myndigheder der senest er i gang med at overvåge dig. Det er dagbladet Politiken , der har fundet frem til anvisningen fra Justitsministeriet. Med Lovtidende som argument mener ministeriet ikke, det er nødvendigt at oplyse borgerne direkte om, at staten nu bruger deres data på en helt ny måde. »Den registrerede – der allerede én gang er blevet oplys
12h
Ingeniøren
EU-Kommission til IT-giganter: Få bugt med ISIS-videoer, ellers tvinger vi jer Den udøvende magt i EU er ved at miste tålmodigheden med Facebook, Youtube og Twitter og deres spredning af ekstremistisk indhold. Få det væk eller vi tvinger jer til det, udmelder EU-Kommissionen ved EU-møde. Det skriver The Guardian. Flere andre IT-virksomheder har allerede taget skridt mod målet om at standse ekstremistisk indhold efter pres fra myndigheder, men ifølge EU's sikkerhedskommissær
13h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Flere firmaer jagter softwareingeniører og en enkelt it-chef På dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, ledere, specialister, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/ugens-it-job-2 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
13h
Ingeniøren
Ikke engang politikerne må læse stor undersøgelse af signalprojektet Konsulentfirmaet Deloitte har over de seneste syv måneder gennemført en ekstern undersøgelse af den store udskiftning af landets togsignaler. Den danner grundlag for den nylige erkendelse af, at det ikke bliver muligt at nå projektets deadline i 2023. Transportministeriet og Banedanmark præsenterede 15. november offentligheden og Folketingets forligskreds bag projektet for den nye plan for signal
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Dagens Medicin
Professor: Hovedstaden bør seriøst overveje at trække stikket til Sundhedsplatformen Professor: Hovedstaden bør seriøst overveje at trække stikket til Sundhedsplatformen Jørgen Bansler, som har arbejdet med sundheds-it i 15 år, har mistet tilliden til, at Hovedstaden er i stand til at løse udfordringerne med Sundhedsplatformen. Rikke Gundersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Udfordringerne
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New manifestation of magnetic monopoles discovered A superfluid helium droplet acts as a magnetic monopole. Credit: IST Austria/Birgit Rieger The startling similarity between the physical laws describing electric phenomena and those describing magnetic phenomena has been known since the 19th century. However, one piece that would make the two perfectly symmetric was missing: magnetic monopoles. While magnetic monopoles in the form of elementary p
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study published today in Nature Communications details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress. The paper explains how a repeat element in the DNA of C9orf72, a gene associated with am
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acrobatic duo in the cells Just like an acrobatic duo, some proteins lend each other stability. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered that the protein "Trigger factor" recognizes a partner by instable, flexible domains, to then together form a stable protein duo. The study has been published in the current issue of Nature Communications . Misfolded proteins are non-functional and cause
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a seahorse-shaped brain structure may help us recognize others How do we recognize others? How do we know friend from foe, threat from reward? How does the brain compute the multitude of cues telling us that Susan is not Erica even though they look alike? The complexity of social interactions--human as well as mammalian--has mystified brain researchers for decades. Now a new study conducted in mice by regenerative neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School, t
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Dagens Medicin
Heino Knudsen ny regionsrådsformand i Region SjællandEfter kollaps i konstitueringen i Region Sjælland står det nu klart, at socialdemokraten Heino Knudsen bliver ny regionsrådsformand.
13h
The Atlantic
Catalans Can't Agree on What Independence Means BARCELONA — Alfred Bosch, a member of the Barcelona City Council from the left-wing, pro-independence Esquerra Republicana party, sees Catalonia’s referendum on independence in dramatic terms. “The legality of the whole process is not the main issue,” he told me when we met last month. “Was apartheid legal? Yes. Was it legitimate? No.” he continued. “Was the lack of women’s rights legal? Yes. Doe
13h
Science : NPR
Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too David Lazarus developed Type 1 diabetes as an adult, and it took a while for doctors to recognize what it was. Courtesy of David Lazarus hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of David Lazarus David Lazarus developed Type 1 diabetes as an adult, and it took a while for doctors to recognize what it was. Courtesy of David Lazarus David Lazarus had just moved to Los Angeles to start a new job as a bus
13h
Ingeniøren
Kommentar: Energimærkningsordningen er en succes Huse Isolering
14h
Dagens Medicin
Region Sjælland henter ny koncerndirektør fra RigshospitaletLeif Panduro Jensen bliver ny koncerndirektør og indtræder i den øverste ledelse af Region Sjælland.
14h
Ingeniøren
EU's vinterpakke kan true Viking-kablets økonomi EU-Kommissionens forslag til et fælles elmarkedsdesign kan blive en bombe under økonomien i det kommende, omdiskuterede Viking-Link kabel til England. Ifølge forslaget må transmissionsselskaberne i EU – altså Energinet – ikke mere anvende en del af de såkaldte flaskehalsindtægter fra for eksempel Viking Link til at nedsætte forbrugernes nettarif-betaling med. Flaskehalsindtægterne er opgjort til
14h
Ingeniøren
Dilemma: Vil du kende alle defekter i dine gener? Viden om vores gener får stigende betydning i behandling og forebyggelse af sygdomme, og gensekventering har været anvendt i Danmark i flere år, men netop nu sker der afgørende nyt. Fra nytår vil Rigshospitalet som det første hospital tilbyde kortlægning af hele den genetiske arvemasse som standardbehandling til børn og voksne, der lider af sjældne genetiske sygdomme. Og inden for kort tid forven
14h
Ingeniøren
Inflationen tager en bid af ingeniørernes lønstigning 3,7 procent – eller et halvt procentpoint bedre end sidste år. Sådan kan IDAs medlemmer gør årets lønregulering op ifølge IDAs lønstatistik, som offentliggøres i dag. Helt så godt, som det lyder, er realiteterne dog ikke. I år har inflationen sneget sig op på 1,6 procent, og dermed svarer stigningen til en reallønsfremgang på blot 2,4 procent. Det er 1,4 procentpoint lavere end sidste år, hvor in
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California sent fire danger text alert to 12 million people Palm trees sway in a gust of wind as a firefighter carries a water hose while battling a wildfire at Faria State Beach in Ventura, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Millions of Southern Californians already dealing with a siege of destructive wildfires received an unprecedented t
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildfire destroys mobile homes in California retirement park A helicopter flies over a wildfire Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, in Bonsall, Calif. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes in Southern California. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) A brush fire driven by gusty winds that have plagued Southern California all week exploded rapidly Thursday north of San Diego, destroying dozens of mobile homes in a retiremen
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South Korea mulling ways to curb craze for bitcoins A man walks by a screen showing the price of bitcoin in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. South Korean is studying ways to regulate speculative trading in crypto currencies as the latest surge in prices stokes a craze over bitcoins. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) South Korean is studying ways to regulate speculative trading in crypto currencies as the latest surge in prices stokes a craze over bi
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pacific's Palau forces tourists to sign eco-pledge Palau is regarded as one of the world's best diving spots, but visitor numbers have exploded in recent years, particularly from China, straining both infrastructure and the environment Visitors to the tiny Pacific nation of Palau are being made to sign a promise to respect the environment, in an innovative move that authorities hope will curb ecological damage caused by booming numbers of tourist
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia launches giant Yamal gas project in the Arctic Russia's gigantic Yamal LNG plant in Arctic Siberia is one of the most ambitious such projects in the world Russia launches Friday its Yamal gas plant in Arctic Siberia, a gigantic project in one of the world's most remote areas, as the region becomes more accessible due to climate change. Russia's privately owned gas producer Novatek has partnered with France's Total and China's CNPC at the helm
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcanic eruptions no match for cockfighting, Bali-style Far off the Indonesian resort island's tourist trail, heavily-tattooed men gather at a clandestine site where birds battle each other—usually to the death— in a gory spectacle known as tajen that meshes bloodsport with ancient Balinese Hindu traditions A volcano may be rumbling off in the distance, but for a group of Balinese men and their fighting roosters it's the roar of the crowd that says th
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credible The project team (l to r) Jin Kang, a doctoral student studying mass communications at Penn State, S. Shyam Sundar, Distinguished Professor of Communications and co-director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory, and Danielle Oprean, post-doctoral scholar in architecture at Penn State. Credit: Patrick Mansell Virtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories,
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyperspectral content for cameras Credit: American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev New software developed by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers will enable standard cameras and smartphones to capture both hyperspectral images and video with a faster and more cost-efficient approach than what is commercially available today. The game-changing software captures the spectral signature of every pixel
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover resistance mechanism to checkpoint inhibitors and how to reverse it LUGANO-GENEVA, Dec. 8, 2017 - Researchers have discovered a mechanism of resistance to checkpoint inhibitors and how to reverse it. The biomarker results from the IMvigor210 study are reported at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017. (1) Therapeutic antibodies that block the programmed death ligand 1(PD-L1) / programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathway, such as atezolizumab, can induce robust and durab
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel compound restores immune response in patients with melanoma IMAGE: This is Dr. Sapna Patel. view more Credit: © ESMO LUGANO-GENEVA, Dec. 8, 2017 - A novel compound may restore immune response in patients with melanoma, according to a study presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017. (1) "Checkpoint inhibitors are a standard of care immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma," said lead author Dr Sapna Patel, Assistant Professor, Department of Melano
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term prevention of organ rejection IMAGE: Dr. Marcus Groettrup (left) and Dr. Jun Li. view more Credit: University of Konstanz Approximately one half of all organ recipients experience antibody-mediated organ rejection within ten years of the transplantation. Currently, pharmacological agents for the suppression of chronic rejection are lacking. Non-selective proteasome inhibitors can suppress antibody-mediated allograft rejection
16h
Science | The Guardian
Is the marsupial lion an early relative of the drop bear? They eat tourists and are not made up! | First Dog on the Moon The marsupial lion quite possibly gambolled through the treetops on the hunt for food. Is the drop bear an actually true story? Tourists stop reading here! Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Christmas is coming! Get your fabulous First Dog on the Moon Chrismerchandise . Tea Towels! Books! Brenda plush toys! Continue reading...
16h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 8. december Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel, vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: De gamle IC3-tog er stadig de mest driftsstabile tog i DSB's togflåde og præsterede sidste år flere kilometer mellem såkaldte tekniske hændelser, som forårsager forsinkelser (kendt som MDBF-tallet), end noget andet tog. Hvor langt
17h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Nobelpagten er lige så verdensfjern som Månegrisen Husker du Månegrisen? Det projekt, som blev lanceret i 2012, og som fem ministerier svor at hælde et milliardbeløb i, så Danmark kunne få et miljørigtigt og dyreetisk svineopdræt? Hvis ikke, så skal du være undskyldt, for meget lidt er kommet ud af projektet i de forløbne fem år – og da slet ingen teknologisk bedrift, der kan sammenlignes med at sende mennesket til Månen. Alligevel holder den nuv
18h
Science | The Guardian
Country diary: squirrel antics brighten up the bleak wintry days On bleak, damp days when the trees are devoid of birdlife, I can always rely on grey squirrels to bring a smile to my face. Rain or shine, they come tumbling through the bare winter branches like a troop of circus acrobats, walking the tightrope of my washing line and swinging from my bird feeders as though they are performing on the flying trapeze. I have three regular garden visitors – the domi
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique pattern of brain inflammation may explain neurocognitive impairment in HIV patients on antiretroviral drugs IMAGE: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated animals show a distinct pattern of inflammation compared to classic simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. In cART-treated animals, no giant cells and few macrophages are seen. Instead,... view more Credit: Joseph L. Mankowski Philadelphia, December 8, 2017 - Although combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has improved survival
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New assay may help predict which pancreatic lesions may become cancerous Philadelphia, Dec. 8, 2017 -A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics , describes a new simple molecular test to detect chromosomal abnormalities -- biomarkers known as telomere fusions--in pancreatic tumor specimens and pancreatic cyst fluids. This assay may help predict the presence of high-grade or invasive pancreatic cancers requiring surgical intervention. More sophisticated imaging o
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhood Dec. 5, 2017--Children between the ages of 7 and 9 may be at greater risk for developing asthma if they consumed high amounts of fructose in early childhood or their mothers drank a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages while pregnant, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society . In " Prenatal and Early-life Fructose, Fructose-containing Beverages, and Mi
18h
New Scientist - News
Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army is slaughtering Africa’s giraffes A member of the Lord’s Resistance Army Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures Joseph Kony and his notorious Lord’s Resistance Army haven’t gone away since US and Ugandan troops ended their campaign to capture him earlier this year. They have decamped to a politically unstable belt of countries near Uganda, where they and other lawless militias are now decimating iconic animals like elephants for foo
18h
Ingeniøren
Ekspert-tip ved cyberangreb fra en nationalstat: Ring og bed dem stoppe Black Hat Europe, London Retningslinjer for cyberangreb mellem nationalstater er et tilbagevendende diskussionsemne. Og hvordan ved et land, at det overhovedet er et andet land, der står bag et angreb og eksempelvis ikke bare en teenager i sine forældres kælder? Og hvornår giver det mening at besvare et cyberangreb med et misilangreb? Det var nogle af emnerne, som Chris Painter berørte i forbinde
19h
Dagens Medicin
Region Syddanmark sidder tungt på kræftområdet En førsteplads til Vejle, en andenplads til Esbjerg og en tredjeplads til Odense: De syddanske sygehuse giver resten af landet baghjul på kræftområdet. En decentral tilgang og en kultur med glimt i øjet og respekt for patienterne gør syddanskerne til vindere.
19h
New Scientist - News
Daughters of older mums are more likely to never have children Childlessness is rising in Europe Shestock/Blend Images By Penny Sarchet The older your mother was when you were born, the less likely you are to have children – but we don’t know why. An analysis of thousands of women has found that daughters of older mums are more likely to be childless – an effect that can’t be fully explained by social factors like wealth or education. So far, there’s bee
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disappearing sea snakes surprise researchers with hidden genetic diversity IMAGE: This is the venomous olive sea snake, Aipysurus laevis , at Timor Sea reefs. view more Credit: Rick Stuart-Smith, www.reeflifesurvey.com New research suggests an urgent need to find out why sea snakes are disappearing from known habitats, after it was discovered some seemingly identical sea snake populations are actually genetically distinct from each other and can't simply r
19h
Ingeniøren
Professor om Sundhedsplatformen: Region bør seriøst overveje at trække stikket Hver uge bringer nye historier om Danmarks største sundheds-it-projekt Sundhedsplatformen, som nu er implementeret på samtlige hospitaler i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland. Senest har Region H meldt ud, at en nedgang i produktion koster regionen 730 millioner kroner i statstilskud. Udfordringerne med platformen har nået et niveau, »hvor regionens politikere seriøst bør overveje, om man kan
19h
Ingeniøren
3 måder at bede din kollega holde kæft Åbne kontorer byder fællesskabsfølelse og forstyrrelser i en uendelighed. Støj på arbejdspladsen fra kolleger, computere og ringende telefoner kan blive voldsom, og derfor er det vigtigt at have nogle værktøjer til at finde arbejdsro i hverdagen. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Men hvordan får du stilhed uden at fornærme dine kolleger? Jobfinder har tre fifs. Kollegaer, der altid vimser o
19h
Dagens Medicin
Holdånd og struktureret indberetning af data har gjort os bedst Kampen om at blive Danmarks bedste handler ikke kun om at følge de kliniske retningslinjer. Det går i høj grad også ud på at sikre datakomplethed og at give plads til nye idéer, siger specialeansvarlige overlæge og sygeplejerske på Diabetesambulatoriet i Vejle, som indtager førstepladsen i Dagens Medicins kåring af de bedste til voksendiabetes.
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Ingeniøren
Riget har et tilbud: Få kortet over hele din arvemasse med hjem Når Rigshospitalet fra nytår modtager en patient, som muligvis lider af en medfødt arvelig sjælden sygdom, vil patienten som en del af standardbehandlingen blive tilbudt at få kortlagt hele sit genetiske arvemateriale på tre milliarder basepar til hjælp i diagnosticeringen. Hidtil har man hos patienter kun kortlagt de 50 millioner basepar, hvor man ved, at genvariationer er årsag til omkring 5.00
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Dagens Medicin
Viborg sidder solidt på diabetesområdet For tredje år i træk stryger Regionshospitalet Viborg ind på en samlet førsteplads i Dagens Medicins kåring af Danmarks Bedste Hospital til behandling af diabetes.
19h
Dagens Medicin
Højt niveau i diabetesbehandlingen på børneområdetDanmarks bedste til børnediabetes 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Stadig ikke retvisende data for type 2-patienter Stadig ikke retvisende data for type 2-patienter Danmarks bedste til voksendiabetes 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Igen i år konstateres det i Dansk Diabetes Databases årsrapport, at det ikke har været muligt at inkludere data fra almen praksis, da der har været lukket for t
19h
Live Science
DNA: Definition, Structure & Discovery The structure of DNA and RNA. DNA is a double helix, while RNA is a single helix. Both have sets of nucleotides that contain genetic information. Credit: udaix Shutterstock Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA is a molecule that contains the instructions an organism needs to develop, live and reproduce. These instructions are found inside every cell, and are passed down from parents to their children. DN
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recent research on causes of gun violence analyzedConsensus is growing in recent research evaluating the impact of right-to-carry concealed handgun laws, showing that they increase violent crime, despite what older research says.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Canola oil linked to worsened memory and learning ability in Alzheimer'sCanola oil is one of the most widely consumed vegetable oils, yet little is known about its health effects. Now, a study links canola oil consumption in the diet with worsened memory, worsened learning ability and weight gain in mice which model Alzheimer's disease. It's the first study to suggest that canola oil is more harmful than healthful for the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cellsNew research explains how an enzyme acts as a kind of thermostat that responds to and adjusts levels of cholesterol in the cell. This insight could lead to new strategies for combating high cholesterol.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Being treated unfairly at work increases risk of long-term sick leaveStaff who feel they are treated unfairly at work are at increased risk of being off sick more frequently and for longer, according to new research.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many donor kidneys that are discarded may be suitable for transplantationIn an analysis of pairs of kidneys from the same donor in which one kidney was used but the other was discarded, the kidneys that were used tended to perform well. The majority of discarded kidneys could have potentially been transplanted with good outcomes.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mapping technique can help fight extreme povertyA new mapping technique shows how researchers are developing computational tools that combine cellphone records with data from satellites and geographic information systems to create timely and incredibly detailed poverty maps. Unlike surveys or censuses, which can take years and cost millions of dollars, these maps can be generated quickly and cost-efficiently.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youthStudy shows a marked reduction in risky sex and substance abuse in troubled 18- to 24-year-olds after several months of participating in mindful yoga and positive coping strategies.
20h
Dagens Medicin
Her de bedste til 34 kræftbehandlinger
21h
Dagens Medicin
Fortsat for få akutte operationer foretages af specialisterDanmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af tarmkræft 2017
21h
Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af pancreaskræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af GEJ-kræft 2017
21h
Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af esofaguskræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Utilstrækkelig opfyldelseDanmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af brystkræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Færre får utæt anastomoseDanmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af ventrikelkræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til akut myeloid leukæmi 2017Danmarks bedste til akut myeloid leukæmi 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Høj og stabil 1-årsoverlevelseDanmarks bedste til lymfom 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Flere skal i kliniske protokollerDanmarks bedste til Kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Høj overlevelse og lav dødelighed på alle centreDanmarks bedste til kronisk myeloide sygdomme 2017
21h
Dagens Medicin
Stigende tidlig mortalitet blandt ældre patienter Stigende tidlig mortalitet blandt ældre patienter Danmarks bedste til myelomatose 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Indikatorerne for mortalitet og overlevelse er i Dansk Myelomatose Databases årsrapport for 2016 opdelt i forhold til, om patienterne er under eller over 65 år. M
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Dagens Medicin
Signifikant variation i 3-årsoverlevelsenDanmarks bedste til myelodysplastisk syndrom 2017
21h
Dagens Medicin
For mange venter for længe på palliationDanmarks bedste til palliativ behandling 2017
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Dagens Medicin
For få patienter modtager postoperativ kemoterapi For få patienter modtager postoperativ kemoterapi Danmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af hjernekræft 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Kvaliteten af onkologisk behandling af kræft i hjernen bedømmes bl.a. ud fra, hvor stor en andel af de patienter, som får postoperativ ra
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Dagens Medicin
Mange mangler at indberette Mange mangler at indberette Danmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af brystkræft 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Seks af de 14 centre, der foretager onkologisk behandling af brystkræft, udgår af kåringen pga. for mange uoplyste. Kåringen baserer sig på fem indikatorer, og
21h
Feed: All Latest
New 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Trailer Serves Up Big Dinos and Big Questions VIDEO It’s hard to believe that when Jurassic World arrived two summers ago, the movie seemed like a Tyrannosaurus-sized risk: The last film in the series, 2001’s Jurassic Park III , was a regrettable, forgettable mishmash of weirdo ideas (like the talking-Raptor dream sequence) and familiar-feeling action scenes, and sent the once-stomping franchise out with a limp. Returning to the Jurassic wor
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Dagens Medicin
Overlevelse på globalt niveauDanmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af ventrikelkræft 2017
22h
Dagens Medicin
Kun to ud af tre patienter får stråleterapi til tidenDanmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af lungekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Halvdelen af indikatorerne må udgåDanmarks bedste til onkologisk behandling af testikelkræft 2017
22h
Dagens Medicin
Her de bedste til 34 kræftbehandlinger
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link found between morning sickness, smoking and healthy pregnanciesA link between the 'old wives' tale that morning sickness may indicate a healthy pregnancy, and the reason smoking is so detrimental has been found, according to a new review. The article discusses the importance of the hormone endokinin for healthy pregnancies, its role in causing morning sickness, and how its normal function may be adversely affected by smoking, leading to poor outcomes in pregn
22h
Dagens Medicin
Ventetid til operation er for langDanmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af lungekræft 2017
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Hospitals Can Dampen the Decibels Medicine 60-Second Science How Hospitals Can Dampen the Decibels Hospitals consistently score low on quietness surveys. An acoustician suggests a few ways hospitals could keep the peace and quiet. Christopher Intagliata reports. Hospitals can be extremely noisy places . In fact, quietness is one of the lowest-rated categories on national surveys of hospital quality . And: "We know the situati
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af lungekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til kirurgisk behandling af modermærkekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Brug for flere ressourcer til at afkorte ventetider til operationDanmarks bedste til lever- og galdevejskræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
5-årsoverlevelsen er stigende 5-årsoverlevelsen er stigende Danmarks bedste til børnekræft 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Kompletheden af Dansk Børnecancer Register er igen i år vurderet til at være 100 pct. I den samlede vurdering er Aalborg Universitetshospital udeladt, da der behandles meget få patien
22h
Dagens Medicin
Spredning af sygdom opdages i tideDanmarks bedste til patologisk diagnostik af brystkræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til patologisk diagnostik af testikelkræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Patologidata er »helt i top«Danmarks bedste til patologiske diagnostik af modermærkekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Manglende dataindberetning er databasens akilleshælDanmarks bedste til prostatakræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
5-årsoverlevelsen er på internationalt niveau 5-årsoverlevelsen er på internationalt niveau Danmarks bedste til nyrekræft 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Siden 1994 er der sket en markant forbedring af overlevelsen for danske nyrekræftpatienter, og den er nu på internationalt niveau, viser Dansk Renal Cancer Databases år
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Money-saving health plans do little to curb spending on unnecessary medical servicesClaims for unnecessary medical services remain steady, despite changes in the insurance market designed to place more spending decisions in consumers' hands, report investigators. An increasingly common type of high-deductible insurance plan is touted for its money-saving potential, but a growing body of research indicates the plans don't motivate patients - or doctors - to curb spending on unnece
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physiochemical 'fingerprint' of parasitic 'American murderer' uncoveredThe physical and chemical 'fingerprint' profile of a parasitic worm, which infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, has been uncovered by researchers -- a discovery that could allow for more effective and earlier treatment. They have captured detailed movies reproducing the process the worm goes through as it enters the body and sheds its skin allowing them to interrogate the worm surface
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methaneA significant amount of the methane naturally released into the atmosphere comes from the ocean. This has long puzzled scientists because there are no known methane-producing organisms near the ocean's surface. A team of researchers has made a discovery that could help to answer this 'ocean methane paradox.'
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atlas of developing human brain launched by researchersScientists have taken the first step towards a comprehensive atlas of gene expression in cells across the developing human brain, making available new insights into how specific cells and gene networks contribute to building this most complex of organs, and serving as a resource for researchers around the world to study the interplay between these genetic programs and neurodevelopmental disorders
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancersTo understand what has gone wrong when cancer occurs and to create new possibilities for treatment, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind what is happening at the cellular level. New research explains how the motor of an enzyme in DNA damage repair is switched on and off and how these processes might go awry in cancer.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Galaxy growth in a massive halo in the first billion years of cosmic historyObservations of two galaxies made with the National Science Foundation-funded Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope suggest that large galaxies formed faster than scientists had previously thought.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detectionNew diagnostic methods offer a better chance for more accurate detection of the infection from the Lyme bacteria, the most common tick-borne infection in North America and Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First line combination therapy improves progression-free survival in advanced lung cancerA new combination therapy for the first line treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves progression-free survival (PFS), according to results of a phase III IMpower150 trial.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messagesWhat if you could look into the brains of potential drug abusers and see what messages would be most likely to persuade them to 'just say no?' That's the ultimate goal of researchers whose new study scanned the brains of people while they watched anti-drug public service announcements.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Being treated unfairly at work increases risk of long-term sick leave Staff who feel they are treated unfairly at work are at increased risk of being off sick more frequently and for longer, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Stockholm University. Sickness absence is a major health concern for organisations and important contributing factors are found in the work environment. For example, low job control and decision-making opportu
22h
Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til testikelkræft 2017
22h
Dagens Medicin
Gennemgående høj opfyldelse af standarderDanmarks bedste til blærekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Stor forskel i selektion til primær kirurgiDanmarks bedste til ovariekræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til cervixcancer 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Kun en region lever op til standarden for fjernelse af pelvine lymfeknuderDanmarks bedste til corpuskræft 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet får ikke lavet nok opfølgende MR-scanningerDanmarks bedste til Hjernekræft 2017
22h
Popular Science
Astronomers just discovered a supermassive black hole from the dawn of the universe There was a bang. A big one . It was the beginning of everything, but for several hundred million years, all was darkness. Then, lights started flickering to life, stars and gases and galaxies all coming online. One of the brightest lights during that dawn had a dark and hungry hole at its heart. More massive than 800 million suns, the black hole existed just 690 million years after the Big Bang,
22h

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