BBC News - Science & Environment
Huntington’s breakthrough may stop disease Image copyright James Gallagher Image caption Peter has Huntington's disease and his siblings Sandy and Frank also have the gene The defect that causes the neurodegenerative disease Huntington's has been corrected in patients for the first time, the BBC has learned. An experimental drug, injected into spinal fluid, safely lowered levels of toxic proteins in the brain. The research team, at Univer
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Viden
Plastpartikler findes i fire af fem norske blåmuslinger En undersøgelse af mikroplast i blåmuslinger, der lever langs den norske kyst, afslører indhold af små plastpartikler i fire ud af fem. Det er Norsk Institutt for Vannforskning (Niva), som står bag undersøgelsen, skriver avisen VG. Den er udarbejdet på vegne af Miljødirektoratet. - Mikroplasten findes nok overvejende i dyrets fordøjelsessystem. Men da vi spiser hele blåmuslingen, kan mikroplast h
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Ingeniøren
Trods advarsler: Ny finanslov tillader højere fart Aftalen om finansloven, som regeringen fredag indgik med Dansk Folkeparti , indebærer som ventet, at hastighedsgrænserne bliver sat op på landeveje og motorveje landet over. Aftalen indebærer konkret, at hastighedsgrænsen på omkring 150 kilometer statsveje øges fra 80 km/t til 90 km/t, mens hastighedsgrænsen på omkring 70 kilometer motorvej øges fra 110 km/t til 130 km/t. Samlet kommer hastigheds
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LATEST

Science | The Guardian
Stop accusing men of overreacting – 'man flu' really does exist, claims doctor The fight against the ridicule of “man flu” has been taken up by a doctor who says, somewhat tongue-in cheek, that he delved into the issue after growing tired of being accused of overreacting. In a treatise based on previous studies – some scientific, some notably less so – the Dr Kyle Sue not only puts the case that men might indeed experience worse cold and flu symptoms than women, but also ex
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Science | The Guardian
Risk of fatal motorcycle crash higher under a full moon, researchers find Motorcyclists venturing forth under a full moon, beware – the risk of having a fatal crash is higher, researchers have found. While the reason for the link is not clear the researchers say there could be several possibilities, including that the full moon could distract riders, or make it harder to gauge speed. “Our study suggests that extra care is needed when riding a motorcycle under a full mo
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Futurity.org
Test aims to match cystic fibrosis patients with treatment A simple test aims to predict which treatment for cystic fibrosis is most likely to work for each patient, an approach called personalized, or precision, medicine, researchers report. Several cutting-edge treatments have become available in recent years to correct the debilitating chronic lung congestion associated with cystic fibrosis. While the new drugs are life-changing for some patients, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies barriers to transplant therapy to treat multiple myeloma among racial minority groupsA study by researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Fla., has found that barriers to patients receiving stem cell therapy as part of their treatment for multiple myeloma include income, education, insurance status and access to care at an academic center or facility that treats a high volume of patients.
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Feed: All Latest
As the Southern California Fires Rage, a Boeing 747 Joins the Fight The largest and most destructive fire burning in California continues to grow, consuming dry brush as it races not just through but across the canyons north of Los Angeles. Strong winds and dry conditions mean flames can leap large distances, prompting thousands to evacuate their homes. The Thomas Fire has now spread from Ventura County into Santa Barbara County, burning up 230,000 acres—an area
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Emirati Treasure: The Oasis City of Al Ain (360 Video) Located only an hour’s drive from Abu Dhabi city, Al Ain is one of the world’s oldest permanently inhabited settlements and an UNESCO World Heritage Site. For a more immersive experience and other amazing 360 content, download the Discovery VR app: http://www.discoveryvr.com From: Discovery
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Watching this newborn island erode could tell us a lot about Mars In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS, a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Saturn’s rings mess with the gas giant’s atmosphereData from Cassini’s shallow dives into Saturn’s ionosphere show that this charged layer in the atmosphere interacts with the planet’s rings.
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Big Think
How the Brain Keeps Time Neuroscientists discover networks of neurons that stretch or compress their activity to control timing Anne Trafton | MIT News Office Timing is critical for playing a musical instrument, swinging a baseball bat, and many other activities. Neuroscientists have come up with several models of how the brain achieves its exquisite control over timing, the most prominent being that there is a centr
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Big Think
How the Keto Diet—Even Without Exercise—Slays the Opposition Myths die hard—especially bad ones, it seems. In the last few months I’ve attended fitness classes in which the instructor told us that if we finish the upcoming workout, we’re allowed to eat whatever we want that night; that this class will take care of the holiday weekend; that this exercise will eradicate flabby arms and tummies. Some were expressed jokingly, yet the verbiage still points to
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New on MIT Technology Review
Digital Pills Track How Patients Use Opioids New pill capsules that send a message to a smartphone as they move through the GI tract have emerged as a way to track whether patients are taking their medicine as prescribed. The problem of nonadherence to medication instructions causes about 125,000 deaths a year and at least 10 percent of hospitalizations, according to one estimate . Soon the ingestible tracking technology could also be used
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Feed: All Latest
Crispr Therapeutics Plans to Launch Its First Clinical Trial in 2018 In late 2012, French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier approached a handful of American scientists about starting a company, a Crispr company. They included UC Berkeley’s Jennifer Doudna, George Church at Harvard University, and his former postdoc Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute—the brightest stars in the then-tiny field of Crispr research. Back then barely 100 papers had been published on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transfusion dependence a barrier to quality end-of-life care for some with leukemiaFor patients with advanced leukemia, access to high-quality end-of-life care appears to be reduced in those dependent on blood transfusions, according to a new study being presented during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta. The study associates this reduced access and consequent diminished use of hospice services with a reduced quality of end-of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two holograms in one surface IMAGE: Nanoposts of varying shapes can act as pixels in two different holograms. view more Credit: Andrei Faraon/Caltech A team at Caltech has figured out a way to encode more than one holographic image in a single surface without any loss of resolution. The engineering feat overturns a long-held assumption that a single surface could only project a single image regardless of the angle of ill
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People aged 75 years and older are underrepresented in blood cancer clinical trials (Atlanta, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017) -- In the first comprehensive analysis of clinical trial enrollment among older adults with blood cancers, researchers from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found significant gaps in participation among those aged 75 and older when considered against the incidence of these malignancies in this age group, according to research being presented today durin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New silicon structure opens the gate to quantum computers IMAGE: The researchers demonstrated the ability to control with precision the behavior of two silicon-based quantum bits, or qubits, paving the way for making complex, multi-qubit devices using technology that is... view more Credit: David Zajac, Princeton University In a major step toward making a quantum computer using everyday materials, a team led by researchers at Princeton Universit
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Big Think
Which Sex Makes for Better Athletes, Men or Women? Science Has the Answer Though we’ve made great progress toward gender equality, the consistent leak of sexual harassment allegations is showing us we’ve still got a long way to go. The power dynamic is still very much toward the male side of the spectrum. That said, there’s no arguing men are smarter any longer. More women earn degrees in higher education today than men, an upward trend that’s held for decades. In rese
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New Scientist - News
We may know why younger brothers are more likely to be gay Having lots of boys can affect a woman’s immune response AleksandarNakic/Getty By Andy Coghlan The more older brothers a boy has, the more likely he is to be gay when he grows up – an effect called the “ fraternal birth order effect ”. Now it seems that increasing levels of antibodies in a mother’s immune system could play a role. Anthony Bogaert at Brock University, Canada, and his team thin
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New Scientist - News
Bumblebees solve the travelling salesman problem on the fly A bumblebee outfitted with a tiny tracking device Joe Woodgate/PA By New Scientist staff and Press Association Bumblebees aren’t just hard workers, they’re efficient, too. These insects have a grasp of maths that enables them to crack the classic travelling salesman problem as they forage for pollen and nectar. The problem, a benchmark of computer science, poses the question, “Given a list of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemics Single-Dose Vaccine Could Provide Faster Protection in Cholera Epidemics Each year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide, a disease transmitted through contaminated food and water that hits developing countries particularly hard. While the standard regimen for protecting against cholera with existing non-living oral cholera vaccines includes administering two doses over a t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survivorship care plan improves cancer care-related distress levels for HCT recipients MINNEAPOLIS, December 11, 2017 - Patients treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), also known as blood and marrow transplant, have a higher risk for long-term or late complications such as organ damage, cardiovascular disease, bone loss and second cancers. These complications begin with chemotherapy and radiation therapy and require ongoing medical follow-up care. Results from a rec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CAR T-cell therapies drive outcomes in lymphoma, myelomaFor people with certain types of aggressive, refractory blood cancers, treatment options are woefully limited. But three studies being presented today at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta spotlight the emerging role played by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies in helping individuals mount a clinical response and, in some cases, ach
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug suppresses spread of breast cancer caused by stem-like cells IMAGE: A rare-stem like tumor cell, which plays a critical role in the spread of breast cancer, is identified with immunostaining for the β3 integrin subunit (blue) and transcription factor Slug... view more Credit: UC San Diego Health Rare stem-like tumor cells play a critical role in the spread of breast cancer, but a vulnerability in the pathway that powers them offers a strategy to targ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality control is vital for the energy production of cellsResearchers have uncovered a mitochondrial error-correction mechanism, which is vital for the construction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the energy production of cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your mood depends on the food you eat, and what you should eat changes as you get older IMAGE: This is Lina Begdache, assistant professor of health and wellness studies at Binghamton University. view more Credit: Binghamton University, State University of New York BINGHAMTON, NY- Diet and dietary practices differentially affect mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Lina Begdache, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers invent novel RNA nanotech to decorate exosomes for effective cancer therapyA new study shows that attaching antibody-like RNA nanoparticles to microvesicles can deliver effective RNA therapeutics specifically to cancer cells. Researchers used RNA nanotechnology to apply the RNA nanoparticles and control their orientation. The microscopic, therapy-loaded extracellular vesicles successfully targeted three types of cancer in animal models. The findings could lead to a new g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopesA study by the University of Cincinnati found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews INDIANAPOLIS -- Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of erro
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Science : NPR
How Labels Can Affect People's Personalities And Potential What is it that makes you...you? How much of a person's personality and potential are based on the expectations of others? NPR's Shankar Vedantam explores new research that suggests the labels we use to categorize people affect not just who they are now, but who they'll become in the future.
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Big Think
New DNA-Scanning Software Can ID You in Minutes Imagine a security system, say a key card scanner, an airport security checkpoint, or a pass code based on your DNA. That’d be really hard to hack. It sounds like science fiction. But researchers at Columbia University, along with colleagues at the New York Genome Center , have gotten us much closer to that day. They’ve created software which can identify someone’s DNA in minutes. This has impl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers invent novel RNA nanotech to decorate exosomes for effective cancer therapy Credit: Ohio State University Medical Center A new study shows that attaching antibody-like RNA nanoparticles to microvesicles can deliver effective RNA therapeutics such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) specifically to cancer cells. Researchers used RNA nanotechnology to apply the RNA nanoparticles and control their orientation to produce microscopic, therapy-loaded extracellular vesicles that s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great Basin seed study experiment targets rangeland restoration Associate professor Beth Leger, left, and graduate student Allison Agneray sort through a handful of the millions of seeds collected for rangeland restoration studies in Nevada's Great Basin. Credit: Mike Wolterbeek, University of Nevada, Reno Restoration of rangelands in the Great Basin is taking a new direction as scientists seek to find the ideal seed stock to use for the many different ecosys
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientists to help researchers gauge Susquehanna water quality Wastewater treatment plants across the country were not designed to remove endocrine-disrupting compounds found in products like these. Therefore, the chemicals and their metabolites often persist in the wastewater effluent, which is typically discharged into rivers such as the Susquehanna. Credit: Heather Gall, Penn State Using a network of up to 60 citizen scientists, a team of Penn State resea
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Adventures of an interplanetary architect | Xavier De KestelierHow will we live elsewhere in the galaxy? On Earth, natural resources for creating structures are abundant, but sending these materials up with us to the Moon or Mars is clunky and cost-prohibitive. Enter architect Xavier De Kestelier, who has a radical plan to use robots and space dust to 3D print our interplanetary homes. Learn more about the emerging field of space architecture with this fascin
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NYT > Science
With Climate Change, Tree Die-Offs May Spread in the West “The confidence we’ve developed about our forests being at great risk is really high now,” said David D. Breshears, a professor of natural resources at the University of Arizona and a co-author on the paper. “Warming makes droughts more lethal.” Dr. Breshears said that the research shows that warming temperatures and drought alone could cause 9 or 10 additional forest die-offs per century during
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NYT > Science
A Nasty, Nafta-Related Surprise: Mexico’s Soaring Obesity To its supporters, Nafta would complete the transition. “It was a change in the economic model,” said Mr. Kuper, the deputy chief negotiator. “We started to seek the advantage of the geographical proximity to the United States.” The agreement removed hurdles to cross-border investment and fully eliminated Mexican restrictions on foreign majority ownership in Mexican companies. The United States,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Violence a matter of scale, not quantity, researchers show IMAGE: The researchers show that the larger the population of a society, the smaller its war group size, proportionally -- which means fewer casualties in a conflict. view more Credit: University of Notre Dame Anthropologists have debated for decades whether humans living in tribal communities thousands of years ago were more or less violent than societies today. Researchers at the University
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Natural route mastersFew people draw a parallel between bumblebees and travelling salesmen but that's what comes after months of tracking the flight paths of the foraging pollinators as they refine their routes around multiple destinations and, in the process, provide insights into analogous problems in logistics and robotics and into how land might be used more efficiently.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide onto gold nanorodsResearchers have found a simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods, creating multifunctional nanoparticles with useful magnetic and optical properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-intensity exercise delays Parkinson's progression High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson's disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2, multi-site trial led by University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Northwestern Medicine scientists. This is the first time scientists have tested the effects of high-intensity exercise on patients with Parkinson's d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain books can increase infant learning during shared reading, study shows Parents and pediatricians know that reading to infants is a good thing, but new research shows reading books that clearly name and label people and objects is even better. That's because doing so helps infants retain information and attend better. "When parents label people or characters with names, infants learn quite a bit," said Lisa Scott, a University of Florida psychology professor and co-a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wakeEngineers at Duke University develop a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saturn's rings cast shadows, affect the planet's ionosphere Data collected by the Cassini spacecraft, before it was deliberately crashed into Saturn's atmosphere in September 2017, show that the planet's illustrious rings are casting a shadow in ionized particles over the planet. Cassini has transmitted a hoard of valuable data from Saturn since it arrived at the planet in 2004. In its final months, the probe was sent on a series of orbital dips within th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insights on how SHARPIN promotes cancer progression IMAGE: SHARPIN counteracts PRMT5 repression, its overexpression coincides with poor survival in MTAP-deleted melanomas. view more Credit: Ronai Lab, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) La Jolla, Calif., December 11, 2017 - Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery (SBP) and the Technion in Israel have found a new role for the SHARPIN protein. In addition t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake A schematic for a prototype of the proposed water cloaking device. It consists of wires and coils that create an electromagnetic field that acts on dissolved ions to move water around the object. Credit: Duke University Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while simultaneously helping i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide onto gold nanorods Credit: ACS Researchers from North Carolina State University and MIT have found a simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods, creating multifunctional nanoparticles with useful magnetic and optical properties. Gold nanorods have widespread potential applications because they have a surface plasmon resonance – meaning they can absorb and s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavy snow, high winds wreak havoc across Europe Motorists braved the snow-covered E19 highway in Kontich as cold temperatures swept across Belgium on Monday High winds and heavy snow in Europe on Monday stranded thousands of travellers, kept schoolchildren at home and even played havoc with international diplomacy. It was the second day running of fierce weather across the continent, with Britain still digging out from its deepest snowfall in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poll finds younger women and college-educated women more likely to say they've experienced slurs, offensive comments Credit: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Too many nutrients make microbes less responsive Credit: University of Minnesota Bacteria in lakes play a key role in maintaining water quality by absorbing excess nitrogen and phosphorus. They also help store carbon, which has implications for our climate. But, as it turns out, their ability to do these tasks varies depending on the makeup of the lake in which they live, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researchers that was
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistanceLimiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. New research demonstrates that harnessing competition among pathogens inside a patient could extend the life of existing drugs where resistance is already present and prevent resistance to new drugs from emerging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patients' individual genomes may affect efficacy, safety of gene editingGene editing has begun to be tested in clinical trials, using CRISPR-Cas9 and other technologies to directly edit DNA inside people's cells, and multiple trials are recruiting or in planning. A new study raises a note of caution, finding person-to-person genetic differences that may undercut the efficacy of gene editing or, more rarely, cause potentially dangerous 'off target' effects. It suggests
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social media trends can predict tipping points in vaccine scaresAnalyzing trends on Twitter and Google can help predict vaccine scares that can lead to disease outbreaks, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Violence a matter of scale, not quantity, researchers showAre societies more or less violent today than they were thousands of years ago? It's a matter of scale, researchers show. In a new study, researchers present an expanded data set showing that the larger the population of a society, the smaller its war group size, proportionally, and the fewer casualties in a conflict.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Glass with switchable opacity could improve solar cells and LEDsResearchers have created glass that lets through a large amount of light while appearing hazy, a combination of properties that could help boost the performance of solar cells and LEDs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disagreements can be a healthy antidote for biasesPeople who are exposed to others who disagree with their views are more likely to let go of pre-existing biases, research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A diamond as the steppingstone to new materials, using plasma physics technologyPhysicists have taken the first step in a five-year effort to create novel compounds that surpass diamonds in heat resistance and nearly rival them in hardness. Reserachers investigated how the addition of boron, while making a diamond film via plasma vapor deposition, changed properties of the diamond material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The origin of the Andes unravelledWhy do the Andes exist? Why is it not a place of lowlands or narrow seas? A geophysicist has been pondering these questions for more than a decade. Now, he has found the answers using an advanced computer model.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Invading Beavers Turn Tundra to Ponds When you look at satellite images it’s easy to pick out hurricanes, deserts, and the work of a certain semiaquatic rodent : “And the reason you can see beaver activity from space is because they leave a mark on the landscape.” Ken Tape is an Arctic Ecologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. “So they make these ponds, and when a pond forms my idea was that we could infer, if it w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents This illustration shows some of the 16 sediment-flow events documented during the Coordinated Canyon Experiment. The arrows indicate minimum estimates of how far each event traveled down the floor of Monterey Canyon. Credit: 2017 MBARI Just as rivers move sediment across the land, turbidity currents are the dominant process carrying sediments and organic carbon from coastal areas into the deep se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blueprints for anti-cancer drugs discovered in bacterial genomes Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) who had previously discovered the prostate cancer-killing compound LNM E1 have now brought the family of LNM molecules even closer to clinical testing by "mining" the information stored in bacteria genomes. Their research suggests these hidden genes hold the blueprints for designing new, even more effective cancer-targeting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth Salmonella typhi. Credit: Wikipedia Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments. Salmonella typhi can live either inside or outside host cells. Those living with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork The original painting (left), along with images made using hyperspectral reflectance, luminescence and X-ray fluorescence. Credit: National Gallery of Art (left); National Gallery of Art/UCLA Scientists from UCLA and the National Gallery of Art have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the fir
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Popular Science
New trials show cancer immunotherapy can be incredibly effective—and incredibly dangerous In the past decade, immunotherapies have become an increasingly promising way of combatting cancer. Most of them work by hijacking the body’s immune system and employing it to fight disease. But one treatment has arguably shown the most promise. Originally known as CAR T-cell immunotherapy, two brands of the treatment were recently approved by the FDA: Novartis’ Kymriah and Kite Pharma’s Yescarta
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The Neurocritic
Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 2: Fred McNeill Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such as boxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations of tau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence and supercomputers to help alleviate urban traffic problems A new deep learning tool uses raw traffic camera footage from City of Austin cameras to recognize objects - people, cars, buses, trucks, bicycles, motorcycles and traffic lights - and characterize how those objects move and interact. Credit: TACC, CTR, City of Austin Look above the traffic light at a busy intersection in your city and you will probably see a camera. These devices may have been in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new way to power electrical devices University of Alberta researcher Thomas Thundat and PhD student Jun Liu have made a major advance in the development of triboelectric nan generators. These devices can turn small amounts of mechanical energy, like vibrations, into a steady DC power current. The nanogenerators can power small handheld devices or sensors that monitor anything from pipelines to medical implants. Credit: UAlberta Eng
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method for more effective photothermal tumor therapy with infrared light Credit: Wiley Nanorods made of bismuth sulfide kill tumor cells with heat when they are irradiated with near-infrared light (NIR). Chinese scientists are now making these weapons more powerful by remodeling the defect state of the nanorod crystal lattice by adding gold nanodots. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie , this could be a good basis for more effective photothermal treatment of
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Live Science
Linen-Wrapped Mummy Found Inside 3,500-Year-Old Tomb in Luxor Archaeologists have excavated two ancient tombs in Luxor, Egypt, that haven't seen the light of day in about 3,500 years, according to the country's antiquities ministry. The tombs are filled with archaeological treasures, including a mummy wrapped in linen, as well as bright wall paintings and a small, painted wooden mask. The Egyptian government hopes that the discoveries will help re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New statistical method links vast records, shows negative effect of Texas voter ID law As state voter identification (ID) laws across the country are being contested amid questions about the integrity of the voting process, researchers have developed a new statistical method that not only matches multiple records with precision, but can also identify the scope of discrimination when applied to voter ID laws. Recently featured in the American Statistical Association's journal Statis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Patients' individual genomes may affect efficacy, safety of gene editing The top of this diagram shows a 30-base-pair region of a single genetic locus (HLA-A) that is involved in the immune response and could potentially be targeted with gene editing. The six smaller bars below it represent different guide RNAs that are designed to bind to different parts of that HLA-A locus. On the Y (vertical) axis are haplotypes with highlighted DNA variations identified from diffe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eclipse 2017: Science from the moon's shadow A team of NASA-funded scientists led by Amir Caspi of the Southwest Research Institute used telescopes mounted on a pair of NASA jets to extend their observation time of the Sun's corona, seen here in green-wavelength visible light. Credit: NASA/SwRI/Amir Caspi/Dan Seaton On Dec. 11, 2017, six researchers discussed initial findings based on observations of the Sun and on Earth gathered during the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glass with switchable opacity could improve solar cells and LEDs Researchers created a new type of glass that is etched with nanograss structures. The top image shows that text can be read through normal flat glass, while the glass etched with nanostructure scatters light, making the glass appear opaque. This glass could help boost the performance of solar cells and LEDs. Credit: Sajad Haghanifar, University of Pittsburgh Using nanoscale grass-like structures,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists unveil new satellite-based global drought severity index The global GRACE drought severity index for October 2010 shows such extreme events as the western Russia drought, the Amazon drought, flooding in China and La Niña-induced flooding in eastern Australia. Credit: Meng Zhao / UCI Just in time for the holidays, researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions are rolling out a new satellite-based drought severity index for c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX launching recycled rocket, supply capsule for NASA In this April 17, 2015, file image from NASA-TV, the SpaceX Dragon 6 resupply capsule nears the International Space Station. The capsule will be making a return trip to the space station when it is launched on a recycled rocket for NASA on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (NASA-TV via AP, File) Space Age hand-me-downs are soaring to a whole new level. On Tuesday, SpaceX plans to launch its first recycled
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mining to resume at nuke waste dump for first time since leak This March 6, 2014 file photo shows the idled Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nation's only underground nuclear waste repository, near Carlsbad, N.M. By conducting some of the most high-tech research in the world, maintaining the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons and cleaning up after decades of bomb-making, the Department of Energy has its share of management challenges. A report released this
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The force is strong: Amputee controls individual prosthetic fingersLuke Skywalker's bionic hand is a step closer to reality for amputees in this galaxy. Researchers have created an ultrasonic sensor that allows amputees to control each of their prosthetic fingers individually. It provides fine motor hand gestures that aren't possible with current commercially available devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists pioneer new way to analyze ancient artworkScientists have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the first to use the specific combination -- which they termed "macroscale multimodal chemical imaging" -- to examine an ancient work of art.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How social networking keeps people healthyMicroblogging may be a valuable online tool for reducing negative emotions for people who experience social anxiety, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New satellite-based global drought severity index unveiled by researchersJust in time for the holidays, researchers are rolling out a new satellite-based drought severity index for climate watchers worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Managing concerning behaviors when opioids are taken for chronic painPatients receiving long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain sometimes demonstrate challenging and concerning behaviors, such as using more opioid medication than prescribed or concomitant alcohol or drug use. A new study establishes expert consensus about treatment approaches that should be implemented when these behaviors arise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Battery research could triple range of electric vehiclesNew research could lead to the development of batteries that triple the range of electric vehicles, report scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People say they want to live longer -- if in good health LAWRENCE -- Longevity is a such a pervasive goal in public health policy and even popular media, but individually most people only want to live long lives if they will be healthy, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas gerontologist. "People in three cultures from around the world are reluctant to specify their desired longevity," said David Ekerdt, KU professor of sociolog
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Blueprints for anti-cancer drugs discovered in bacterial genomes JUPITER, Fla. - Dec. 11, 2017 - Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) who had previously discovered the prostate cancer-killing compound LNM E1 have now brought the family of LNM molecules even closer to clinical testing by "mining" the information stored in bacteria genomes. Their research suggests these hidden genes hold the blueprints for designing new, even
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Patients' individual genomes may affect efficacy, safety of gene editing IMAGE: The top of this diagram shows a 30-base-pair region of a single genetic locus (HLA-A) that is involved in the immune response and could potentially be targeted with gene editing.... view more Credit: Lessard S; et al. PNAS Early Edition , week of Dec. 11, 2017. Gene editing has begun to be tested in clinical trials, using CRISPR-Cas9 and other technologies to directly edit DNA inside p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein Daple coordinates single-cell and organ-wide directionality in the inner ear Humans inherited the capacity to hear sounds thanks to structures that evolved millions of years ago. Sensory "hair cells" in the inner ear have the amazing ability to convert sound waves into electrical signals and transmit them to the brain for processing. To do so, each individual hair cell must develop a motion sensor in the form of a brush of protrusions, or hair bundle, that is precisely
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major cause of dementia discovered An international team of scientists have confirmed the discovery of a major cause of dementia, with important implications for possible treatment and diagnosis. Professor Garth Cooper from The University of Manchester, who leads the Manchester team, says the build-up of urea in the brain to toxic levels can cause brain damage - and eventually dementia. The work follows on from Professor Cooper's
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistance Limiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. New research demonstrates that harnessing competition among pathogens inside a patient could extend the life of existing drugs where resistance is already present and prevent resistance to new drugs from emerging. A paper describing this ecological approach to drug resistance appe
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Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?Small trials using younger donors and elderly recipients hint that mesenchymal stem cell transfers might reduce frailty.
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The Atlantic
Stopping the Rise of Superbugs by Making Them Fight For Food The history of antibiotics is a history of running in place. Two years after the first of these life-saving drugs—penicillin—was mass-produced, bacteria that resisted the drug became widespread, too. With grim inevitability, the same events have unfolded for every other drug. Every time scientists identify a new substance that can hold back the tide of infectious disease, resistant superbugs surg
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The Atlantic
'I Wanted My House to Be a Sculpture' Performance artist, sculptor, and painter Clarina Bezzola has dedicated her life to exploring the delicate psychological boundaries between the self and society. When designing her dream home, art and life converged. “I wanted my house to be like a sculpture, but also like my home,” Bezzola says in a new video by The Atlantic . Bezzola brought her art’s macabre, Lynchian aesthetic to the architec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medicaid expansion popular among Americans connected to programA concerted effort by Republicans in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hit a surprising road block earlier this year: strong pushback against cuts to Medicaid. According to new findings, Medicaid is now seen as an important part of the middle-class social safety net, thanks to nearly 60 percent of Americans being connected to the program directly or through a family member or
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How much can 252-million-year-old ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lotDuring the late Permian, the equator was dry and desert-like, yet surprisingly a hotspot for biodiversity, new paleontological research shows. Similarly to modern rainforests, equator ecosystems were home a unique diversity of species, including those both anciently and newly evolved. After the late Permian extinction, this diversity was decimated, and the climate change event that triggered an ex
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible master switch for programming cancer immunotherapyResearchers report the discovery that a protein called 'Runx3' programs killer T cells to establish residence in tumors and infection sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Selecting sounds: How the brain knows what to listen toHow is it that we are able -- without any noticeable effort -- to listen to a friend talk in a crowded café or follow the melody of a violin within an orchestra? Scientists have developed a new approach to how the brain singles out a specific stream of sound from other distracting sounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria development marks new era in cellular designScientists have built a miniature scaffold inside bacteria that can be used to bolster cellular productivity, with implications for the next generation of biofuel production. Because there is a growing need for agricultural or renewable production of biofuels and other commodity chemicals to move away from fossil fuels, scientists have long sought to enhance the internal organization of bacteria a
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Science | The Guardian
Astronomers to check interstellar body for signs of alien technology Astronomers are to use one of the world’s largest telescopes to check a mysterious object that is speeding through the solar system for signs of alien technology. The Green Bank telescope in West Virginia will listen for radio signals being broadcast from a cigar-shaped body which was first spotted in the solar system in October. The body arrived from interstellar space and reached a peak speed o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Violence a matter of scale, not quantity, researchers show Credit: CC0 Public Domain Anthropologists have debated for decades whether humans living in tribal communities thousands of years ago were more or less violent than societies today. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame wonder if the question of more or less violence is the wrong one—what if it's a matter of scale? In a new paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistance New research demonstrates that manipulating competition among pathogens can lead to successful treatment with traditional drugs, even where drug resistance to that drug is already present. Credit: Penn State Limiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. New research demonstrates that harnessing competition among pathogens ins
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
South Carolina & George Mason link women's sexual orientation to (un)happiness about birth IMAGE: Sexual orientation was measured by the combination of sexual identity, sexual attraction, and sexual behavior. view more Credit: Lisa Lindley Unhappiness about a pregnancy or birth has been associated with negative health outcomes for mothers and babies. Yet, unhappiness about a pregnancy or birth has been understudied, particularly among sexual minority (non-heterosexual) women. Georg
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Scientists from UCLA, National Gallery of Art pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork IMAGE: This image shows the original painting (left), along with images made using hyperspectral reflectance, luminescence and X-ray fluorescence. view more Credit: National Gallery of Art (left); National Gallery of Art/UCLA Scientists from UCLA and the National Gallery of Art have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century E
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New model for Zika developed to aid in testing vaccines and treatments San Antonio, TX (Dec. 11, 2017) - An alternative animal model that mimics key features of the Zika virus infection, including its lingering presence in bodily fluids, has been developed at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio. Acute infections in male marmosets, a New World monkey, resemble the human illness the Zika virus creates in people, including the presence of the virus in se
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disagreements can be a healthy antidote for biases A personal bias can influence everything from the brands we buy to the way we treat other people, and in today's world, these pre-existing beliefs can lead to intense racial, political and religious conflicts. What if there were a way to reduce this bias? Research from the College of Business at Virginia Tech University suggests that it's possible to activate a mindset that leads people to become
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Live Science
Sorry, Mount Jackson: The U.K.'s New Tallest Mountain Is Ice Cold An image shows Mount Hope from the east. Credit: Alan Vaughan/BAS The United Kingdom has a new tallest mountain, though the formation stands 10,200 miles (16,400 kilometers) south of London. Mount Hope , part of the British Antarctic Territory (BAT), has been revealed to stand 10,654 feet (3,247 meters) above sea level — 1,236 feet (377 m) higher than the mountain's last measurement. That m
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Scientific American Content: Global
Austria to Drop Impending Smoking Ban, Bucking Western Trend VIENNA (Reuters) - While much of the West has barred smoking in restaurants and bars, Austria’s impending ban is set to be stubbed out. The small, affluent country is famed for its Alpine scenery and its capital, Vienna, is regularly rated as the world’s best city to live in. But many visitors are surprised to find that nights out often feature the acrid smell of decades past. Austria pas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liver cancer: Lipid synthesis promotes tumor formationLipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells among other functions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
After the fire, charcoal goes against the grain, with the flowA two-year study of property damaged by a 2011 forest fire found that charcoal behaved very differently from other forms of soil carbon as the land rebounded from the fire. The study could help researchers and land managers make better use of charcoal soil amendments called biochar.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asphalt-based filter now advanced to sequester greenhouse gas at wellheadAdding a bit of water to asphalt-derived porous carbon greatly improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, at natural gas wellheads, report scientists. The filter is highly selective for carbon dioxide while letting methane pass through.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
US flood risk 'severely underestimated' Image copyright Getty Images Image caption During Hurricane Harvey, Port Arthur in Texas experienced some the most extreme impacts of flooding Scientists and engineers have teamed up across the Atlantic to "redraw" the flood map of the US. Their work reveals 40 million Americans are at risk of having their homes flooded - more than three times as many people as federal flood maps show. The UK-US
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Science : NPR
How The Food Industry Uses Cavitation, The Ocean's Most Powerful Punch Cavitation produces a bubble that rapidly collapses and becomes hotter than the sun's surface. The mantis shrimp uses it, and now so do food and drink firms, to improve flavors — from yogurt to beer. Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images Cavitation produces a bubble that rapidly collapses and becomes hotter
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How social networking keeps people healthy Have you ever wanted to tell someone about a tough day at work or scary medical news, but felt nervous about calling a friend to share what's going on? Findings from a new study suggest that people who feel apprehensive about one-on-one interactions are taking advantage of a new form of communication that may help regulate emotions during times of need: online social networks. The study is availa
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Study finds variation within species plays critical role in health of ecosystems Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important and unexpected consequences on the environment. Many species play important roles in nature and provide services important to people. For example, many fish species are harvested for food, and many insect species pollinate wild and cultivated
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Patient satisfaction, caregiver communication can reduce risk of hospital readmission A survey of patients admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found that patients reporting greater levels of satisfaction with their care and good communication with the health care providers were significantly less like to readmitted to the hospital in the 30 days after discharge. The study, the first to focus on patients' perceptions on future readmission during their initial hospi
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Poll: Younger women, college educated women more likely to say they have been harassed Boston, MA -- This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination. Of note,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) integration has brought about tremendous change to the Southeast Asia region, and this has not only had many benefits but has caused many problems. Moreover the characteristic differences among the GMS countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and work environment have become major hea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial intelligence and supercomputers to help alleviate urban traffic problems Look above the traffic light at a busy intersection in your city and you will probably see a camera. These devices may have been installed to monitor traffic conditions and provide visuals in the case of a collision. But can they do more? Can they help planners optimize traffic flow or identify sites that are most likely to have accidents? And can they do so without requiring individuals to slog
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents IMAGE: This illustration shows some of the 16 sediment-flow events documented during the Coordinated Canyon Experiment. The arrows indicate minimum estimates of how far each event traveled down the floor of... view more Credit: Image © 2017 MBARI Just as rivers move sediment across the land, turbidity currents are the dominant process carrying sediments and organic carbon from coastal areas i
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Glioblastoma survival mechanism reveals new therapeutic target A Northwestern Medicine study, published in the journal Cancer Cell , has provided new insights into a mechanism of tumor survival in glioblastoma and demonstrated that inhibiting the process could enhance the effects of radiation therapy. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of brain tumor, with a particularly poor prognosis. Patients are treated with surgery, radiation therapy an
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Live Science
Down the Drain: How 'Pulling the Plug' on Earth's Oceans Would Look What happens when you pull the plug on the Marianas Trench [OC] from dataisbeautiful What might it look like if you "pulled the plug" in the Mariana Trench — the planet's deepest spot — and drained the water from all the oceans in the world? A recent time-lapse video portrays that speculative scenario using real data, shown in an animation by Ryan Brideau , a masters candidate in geospa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New world standard in nano generatorsEngineers have developed a new way to produce electrical power that can charge handheld devices or sensors that monitor anything from pipelines to medical implants. The discovery sets a new world standard in triboelectric nanogenerators by producing a high-density DC current -- a vast improvement over low-quality AC currents produced previously. The devices can transform mechanical energy such as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Injuries from window blinds send two children to the emergency department every dayAlmost 17,000 children under six years of age were treated in hospital emergency departments in the US for window blind-related injuries from 1990 through 2015, averaging almost two per day. While the majority of children were treated and released, there was about one child death each month -- most from strangulation when a child became entangled by the neck in a window blind cord.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Presenting facts as 'consensus' bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate changeNew evidence shows that 'social facts' highlighting expert consensus changes perceptions across US political spectrum -- particularly among highly educated conservatives. Facts that encourage agreement are a promising way of cutting through today's 'post-truth' bluster, say psychologists.
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NYT > Science
Basics: Precious Gems Bear Messages From Earth’s Molten Heart Yet the public arguably got the best deal of all: the stone was later donated to the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Today, the Patricia remains one of the largest uncut emeralds in the world, and will be a featured star when the overhaul of the museum’s gem and mineral halls is finished in 2019. In its raw, columnar beauty, the Patricia encapsulates an often overlooked feature of
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Glass with switchable opacity could improve solar cells and LEDs IMAGE: New glass etched with nanograss structures can be switched from hazy to clear by applying water. As shown here, removing the water from the glass makes it appear hazy again.... view more Credit: Sajad Haghanifar, University of Pittsburgh WASHINGTON -- Using nanoscale grass-like structures, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania have created glass that lets thr
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Scientists identify promising new approach for immune system defense against cancer IMAGE: The Nature paper coauthors (left to right) Justin Milner, Bingfei Yu, Ananda Goldrath and Clara Toma. view more Credit: UC San Diego Looking to bolster the body's immune system in the fight against infection and cancer, researchers at the University of California San Diego and their colleagues have identified a promising new strategy to program the immune system to meet the pat
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Scientists discover new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. People with severe spinal cord injuries can remain paralysed for life and this is often accompanied by incontinence. A team led by Drs Liang-Fong Wong and Nicolas Granger from Bristol's Faculty of Health Sciences has successfully transplanted genetically modifi
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University of Rochester Faces Lawsuit for Mishandling Sexual Harassment CaseThe nine plaintiffs allege the university's actions put women at risk.
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The Atlantic
Shohei Ohtani Might Be the Most Underpaid Man in the World Shohei Ohtani was the most sought-after free agent in all of baseball this off-season. Based on his career so far in his native Japan, the 23-year-old star, who signed on Friday with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, may turn out to be the first player since Babe Ruth who can both pitch and hit at a major-league level—a possibility that led Robert O’Connell to write in The Atlantic that Ohtani m
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Quanta Magazine
The (Math) Problem With Pentagons Children’s blocks lie scattered on the floor. You start playing with them — squares, rectangles, triangles and hexagons — moving them around, flipping them over, seeing how they fit together. You feel a primal satisfaction from arranging these shapes into a perfect pattern, an experience you’ve probably enjoyed many times. But of all the blocks designed to lie flat on a table or floor, have you e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large genetic study links tendency to undervalue future rewards with ADHD, obesityResearchers have found a genetic signature for delay discounting -- the tendency to undervalue future rewards -- that overlaps with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), smoking and weight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A global north-to-south shift in wind power by end of centuryWind resources in the next century may decrease in many regions in the Northern Hemisphere -- and could sharply increase in several hotspot regions down south.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny ice losses at Antarctica's fringes can accelerate ice loss far awayIt is known that the ice shelves surrounding the continent regulate the ice flow from the land into the ocean. Now scientists found that also melting near the fringes and in the midst of the ice shelves can have direct effects reaching very far inland. This could increase ice loss and hence sea-level rise.
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Scientific American Content: Global
9 Researchers Sue University of Rochester over Sexual-Harassment Allegations Nine researchers filed a federal lawsuit on 8 December against the University of Rochester in New York, its president Joel Seligman and its provost Robert Clark over their handling of alleged sexual harassment by a professor there. Eight of the nine are current or former faculty members in Rochester’s department of brain and cognitive sciences; the ninth is a former graduate student there. Th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cyanobacteria in lakes: Risks linked to loss of diversityThe composition of cyanobacterial communities in peri-alpine lakes has become increasingly similar over the past century. Climate warming and a period of eutrophication have favored in particular potentially toxic species which can adapt rapidly to environmental changes. These are the findings of an study analyzing DNA extracted from sediment cores.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dolphin, bear studies have paved the way to improved population forecastingA new article challenges the validity of current methods for forecasting the persistence of slow-growing species for conservation purposes, and provides a better approach to reducing the threat of extinction.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Pacific 'baby island' is natural lab to study Mars Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Dr Jim Garvin: "We're watching the island do its dance" It is one of Earth's newest landforms and it could just tell us where to look for evidence of life on Mars. The tongue-twisting volcanic island of Hunga Tonga Hunga Ha'apai exploded out of the Pacific Ocean in 2015, and its shape has been evolving ever since as it has been lashed and
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New on MIT Technology Review
Self-Driving Cars Endanger Nearly Four Million Jobs but Could Create a $7 Trillion Industry How Do You Design an Autonomous Car from Scratch? Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-powered. That’s according to an announcement from the automaker, explaining that it will buck the trend of repurposing consumer vehicles as driverless ones and build a car designed… Read more Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-power
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicaid expansion popular among Americans connected to program IMAGE: A new study examines pushback against cuts to Medicaid, finding those connected to Medicaid were more likely to view the program as important and to support increases in spending. view more Credit: Twenty20 Photos A concerted effort by Republicans in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hit a surprising road block earlier this year: strong pushback against cuts to Med
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AGU Fall Meeting: New simulations suggest meteors explode from the inside NEW ORLEANS -- Researchers have identified an explosive new mechanism that breaks down meteors as they hurtle toward Earth. New simulations of falling meteors suggest air particles penetrate the space rocks' porous interiors as they careen through the atmosphere. These air particles create pockets of high pressure that ultimately lead the rock to explode from the inside, tens of kilometers above
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Too many nutrients make microbes less responsive Bacteria in lakes play a key role in maintaining water quality by absorbing excess nitrogen and phosphorus. They also help store carbon, which has implications for our climate. But, as it turns out, their ability to do these tasks varies depending on the makeup of the lake in which they live, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researchers that was funded by the National Science F
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The Atlantic
Will the Angels’ Shohei Ohtani Experiment Work? The most exciting player in Major League Baseball has not yet played an inning. The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim signed Shohei Ohtani, a 23-year-old Japanese hitter and pitcher, last Friday to a minimum-salary contract with a paltry $2.3 million signing bonus , and made official what fans stateside had been looking forward to for months. When next season opens in the spring, MLB will feature som
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African deforestation not as great as fearedThe loss of forests in Africa in the past century is substantially less than previously estimated, an analysis of historical records and paleontology evidence shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug for spinal muscular atrophy prompts ethical dilemmas, bioethicists sayMedical experts have raised ethical questions about the way a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy is being used.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does prescription opioid use by one household member increase risk of prescribed use in others?Living in a household with a prescription opioid user may be associated with increased risk of prescription opioid use by other household members.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World-first uses satellites, ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversityIn a world-first, a research team has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Financial incentives may increase breastfeeding ratesOffering new mothers financial incentives may significantly increase low breastfeeding rates, new English research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preventing colon polyps: Another reason to lose those holiday poundsBeing over ideal body weight has known risks with respect to heart and blood pressure problems, but the list is growing. Now researchers have studied nearly 3000 patients undergoing routine physicals over a 6-year period, and found a link between weight and colon polyps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New statistical method links vast records, shows negative effect of Texas voter ID law ALEXANDRIA, Va. (December 11, 2017) - As state voter identification (ID) laws across the country are being contested amid questions about the integrity of the voting process, researchers have developed a new statistical method that not only matches multiple records with precision, but can also identify the scope of discrimination when applied to voter ID laws. Recently featured in the American St
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eclipse 2017: Science from the moon's shadow IMAGE: Structures in the solar corona are visible in polarized light, such as the dark prominence that can be seen on the bottom right of the Sun captured during the eclipse... view more Credit: David Elmore and Richard Kautz On Dec. 11, 2017, six researchers discussed initial findings based on observations of the Sun and on Earth gathered during the solar eclipse that stretched acr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Managing concerning behaviors when opioids are taken for chronic pain PITTSBURGH, Dec. 11, 2017 - Patients receiving long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain sometimes demonstrate challenging and concerning behaviors, such as using more opioid medication than prescribed or concomitant alcohol or drug use. A new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine , establishes expert consensus about treatment approaches that should be implemented when thes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work IMAGE: This is Marina Vannucci. view more Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University HOUSTON - (Dec. 11, 2017) - Surgery to remove a part of the brain to give relief to patients with epilepsy doesn't always result in complete seizure relief, but statisticians at Rice University have developed a method for integrating neuroimaging scans to identify patients at high risk of continued seizures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth ITHACA, N.Y. - Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments. Salmonella typhi can live either inside or outside host cells. Those living within cells, called in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery sets new world standard in nano generators IMAGE: University of Alberta researcher Thomas Thundat and PhD student Jun Liu have made a major advance in the development of triboelectric nan generators. These devices can turn small amounts of... view more Credit: UAlberta Engineering A team of University of Alberta engineers developed a new way to produce electrical power that can charge handheld devices or sensors that monitor anythin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumors heat up Nanorods made of bismuth sulfide kill tumor cells with heat when they are irradiated with near-infrared light (NIR). Chinese scientists are now making these weapons more powerful by remodeling the defect state of the nanorod crystal lattice by adding gold nanodots. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie , this could be a good basis for more effective photothermal treatment of tumors. In pho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI scientists unveil new satellite-based global drought severity index New Orleans, Dec. 11, 2017 - Just in time for the holidays, researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions are rolling out a new satellite-based drought severity index for climate watchers worldwide. Relying on data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment mission, the index adds terrestrial water storage (groundwater) to drought assessments, augmenting comm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum effects explain changes in nanometric circuit electron flows Transistors capable of functioning with an electrical current consisting of the passage of a single electron at each point in time are on the horizon for research in the field of information technology. By associating the 0/1 binary with electron transit or non-transit, the device can drastically improve space usage and reduce power consumption in future computers. This option is not yet economic
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NYT > Science
To Test for Climate Disasters: Burn, Bash and Hurl Wood at 100 M.P.H. A cannon-like device, the launcher hurls chunks of wood — meant to simulate debris flying at 100 miles an hour, or about the speed of a Category 2 hurricane — at a target about 20 feet away. “You could get debris, tree limbs, stop signs, pieces of your neighbor’s roof, all coming at you,” Mr. Gritzo said. On the cue of “Fire!” an 8-foot-long piece of lumber flew across the lab toward a piece of p
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Science : NPR
Science's Journey From Data To Truth A Hubble Space Telescope image of the Ant Nebula. Astrophysicist Adam Frank spent last week at an international meeting in Hong Kong trying to understand the science of what these objects tell us about the last gasp of dying stars like the sun. NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption toggle caption NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team A Hubble Space Telescope image of the Ant Nebula
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The Atlantic
A Viral Short Story for the #MeToo Moment Recent months make it seem like humanity has lost the instruction manual for its “procreate” function and has had to relearn it all from scratch. After scores of prominent men have been fired on sexual-assault allegations, confusion reigns about signals, how to read them, and how not to read into them. Some men are wondering if hugging women is still okay . Some male managers are inviting third p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Powerful new method for microbiome analysis developedA new approach can identify antibiotic resistance and virulence markers missed by conventional techniques, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers peer under the hoods of neural networksA recently developed interpretive technique, which had been applied in other areas, has now been used to analyze neural networks trained to do machine translation and speech recognition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeking music edge, Apple buys song recognition app Shazam (Update)Apple said Monday that it would buy leading song recognition app Shazam in a fresh bid to secure an edge in the intensifying battle of streaming services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quake hits Iran-Iraq border region The epicentre of a 5.4-strength earthquake December 11, 2017 was in Iraq's Halabja, some 20 kilometres (12.5 miles) north of the Iranian town of Ezgeleh in Kermanshah province A tremor shook Kermanshah province in western Iran near Iraq's border Monday, causing panic a month after a major quake killed hundreds of people there, state media and officials said. Two hours after the tremor the state b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After the fire, charcoal goes against the grain, with the flow The Tri-County wildfire in September 2011 destroyed more than 18,000 acres of forest, including a Rice University-owned tract in Waller County, Texas. (Photo courtesy of C. Masiello/Rice University) Credit: C. Masiello/Rice University When a forest fire decimated more than 3,000 acres of Rice University-owned timberland in 2011, biogeochemist Carrie Masiello saw a silver lining in the blackened t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A diamond as the steppingstone to new materials, using plasma physics technology University of Alabama at Birmingham physicists have taken the first step in a five-year effort to create novel compounds that surpass diamonds in heat resistance and nearly rival them in hardness. They are supported by a five-year, $20 million National Science Foundation award to create new materials and improve technologies using the fourth state of matter—plasma. Plasma—unlike the other three
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ESnet's Petascale DTN project speeds up data transfers between leading HPC centers Operations staff monitor the network in the ESnet/NERSC control room. Credit: Marilyn Chung, Berkeley Lab The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science operates three of the world's leading supercomputing centers, where massive data sets are routinely imported, analyzed, used to create simulations and exported to other sites. Fortunately, DOE also runs a networking facility, ESnet (short for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover possible master switch for programming cancer immunotherapy JUPITER, Fla. -- Dec. 11, 2017 -- During infection or tumor growth, a type of specialized white blood cells called CD8+ T cells rapidly multiply within the spleen and lymph nodes and acquire the ability to kill diseased cells. Some of these killer T cells then migrate where required to vanquish the germs or cancers. But how do killer T cells "learn" to leave their home base and amass within speci
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After the fire, charcoal goes against the grain, with the flow HOUSTON -- (Dec. 11, 2017) -- When a forest fire decimated more than 3,000 acres of Rice University-owned timberland in 2011, biogeochemist Carrie Masiello saw a silver lining in the blackened trees. Masiello is an expert on how carbon behaves in soil, and she noticed a vexing problem in both the scientific literature and findings from her lab: Charcoal is abundant in soil, particularly in fertil
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A diamond as the steppingstone to new materials, using plasma physics technology IMAGE: This is Yogesh Vohra. view more Credit: UAB BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - University of Alabama at Birmingham physicists have taken the first step in a five-year effort to create novel compounds that surpass diamonds in heat resistance and nearly rival them in hardness. They are supported by a five-year, $20 million National Science Foundation award to create new materials and improve technolog
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Live Science
Do Elves Clean Your Brain While You Sleep? Ken A. Paller is a professor of psychology and director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Program at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Paller has contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Sleep will consume one-third of your life. You can't avoid it, nor should you. Sound slumber is energizing and uplifting. But there's more to it. Sleep is also es
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much can 252-million-year-old ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot. This map of Pangea shows the distribution of life during the late Permian period. Many species exclusively thrived near the equator, including early amphibian tetrapods and early crocodiles and dinosaurs, while animals like dicynodonts (early mammal-relatives) were in greater abundance farther north and south. Credit: Brandon Peecook, The Field Museum, using illustrations from Wikimedia Commons A
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How Zika virus induces congenital microcephaly (Liège-Paris, December 11, 2017) - Epidemiological studies show that in utero fetal infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV) may lead to microcephaly, an irreversible congenital malformation of the brain characterized by an incomplete development of the cerebral cortex. However, the mechanism of Zika virus-associated microcephaly remains unclear. An international team of researchers within the Euro
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Graphene spin transport takes a step forward towards applicationsResearchers from the Graphene Flagship have predicted and demonstrated a giant spin anisotropy in graphene, paving the way for new spintronic logic devices. This landmark collaborative effort shows the Flagship's role in rapid progress, from theoretical concept to experimental confirmation.
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'Star Wars' Surprise: Jedi Are Celibate! Despite seven (going on eight) movies and myriad books, comics, and animated series, there are still a lot of unknown mysteries when it comes to the Jedi of the Star Wars universe. The Force-sensitive folks are so fascinatingly unknowable that people are constantly asking the internet for explanations for their many secrets. We here at WIRED spend a lot of time Googling for answers, but when we h
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Battery research could triple range of electric vehicles New research at the University of Waterloo could lead to the development of batteries that triple the range of electric vehicles. The breakthrough involves the use of negative electrodes made of lithium metal, a material with the potential to dramatically increase battery storage capacity. "This will mean cheap, safe, long-lasting batteries that give people much more range in their electric vehic
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Report: New system for more accurate cancer staging to aid precision medicine WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Dec. 11, 2017 - Adding a blood test called liquid biopsy to a standard tissue biopsy could significantly improve the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment for patients with cancer, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Their recommendation is published in the current online issue of the journal Annals of Oncology . Cancer management relies on the abil
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New research links brain structure with hallucinations and musical aptitude New research published in Schizophrenia Research conducted at the University of Liverpool links brain structure to an individual's likelihood of experiencing hallucinations and to their musical aptitude. Previous research has showed that musicians have increased white matter integrity in a specific part of the brain called the corpus callosum, a thick band of nerve fibres that connects the left a
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A new weapon against bone metastasis? In the ongoing battle between cancer and modern medicine, some therapeutic agents, while effective, can bring undesirable or even dangerous side effects. "Chemo saves lives and improves survival, but it could work much better if you eliminate unwanted side effects from it," said Princeton University cancer researcher Yibin Kang , the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology. To e
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AML study reports high response rates with combination targeted therapy IMAGE: This is Michael Andreeff, M.D, Ph.D. view more Credit: MD Anderson Cancer Center Initial findings from a multi-national open-label phase Ib study of inhibitory drug therapy for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have demonstrated a complete response in up to 50 percent patients say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center . The patients, age
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Liver cancer: Lipid synthesis promotes tumor formation IMAGE: Lipid accumulation (red) in liver tissue promotes development of hepatocellular carcinoma. view more Credit: Biozentrum, University of Basel Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Ge
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NYT > Science
Q&A: Neanderthals: The Original Globetrotters Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. W here did Neanderthals come from ? A. Most scientists think that Neanderthals probably evolved in Europe from African ancestors. The consensus now is that modern humans and Neanderthals shared a common ancestor in Africa about 700,000 years ago. The ancestors of Neanderthals left Africa first, expanding to the Near East and then to Europe and Central Asia. DNA ex
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Science | The Guardian
Thylacine DNA reveals weakness – and kinship with the kangaroo The first full genetic blueprint of the long-extinct thylacine has revealed the animal suffered from genetic weakness well before it was isolated on Tasmania 10,000 to 13,000 years ago. An international team of researchers led by associate professor Andrew Pask from the University of Melbourne used DNA from the 106-year-old preserved remains of a juvenile thylacine or Tasmanian tiger to sequence
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Why Stephen Wolfram Decided to Livestream His Company's Work Seeing Decisions Be Made In the world at large, people often complain that “nothing happens in meetings.” Well, that’s not true of my meetings. In fact, I think it’s fair to say that in every single product-design meeting I do, significant things are figured out, and at least some significant decisions are made. So far this year, for example, we’ve added over 250 completely new functions to the W
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Major life events shared on social media revive dormant connections, study showsNew research examines the impact of major life events, on social network evolution, which, the study shows, has important implications for business practices, such as in marketing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yeast can be engineered to create protein pharmaceuticalsIt took several years, but a research team has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough means a huge step forward in the potential to more efficiently produce protein therapies for diseases such as cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to air pollution just before or after conception raises risk of birth defectsWomen exposed to air pollution just prior to conception or during the first month of pregnancy face an increased risk of their children being born with birth defects, such as cleft lip or palate or abnormal hearts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
E-cig use increases risk of beginning tobacco cigarette use in young adultsYoung adults who use electronic cigarettes are more than four times as likely to begin smoking tobacco cigarettes within 18 months as their peers who do not vape, according to new research. The findings demonstrate that e-cigarettes are serving as a gateway to traditional smoking, contrary to their purported value as a smoking cessation tool. The study is the first nationally representative survey
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Technology developed by LSUHealthNO to drive advances in obesity-related diseases New Orleans, LA - For the first time, researchers led by Frank Lau, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans, have successfully kept white fat tissue alive outside of the body for up to eight weeks. This breakthrough will pave the way for research advances improving treatment or prevention of such diseases as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and others
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Midwife and signpost for photons IMAGE: Sketch of an optimized optical antenna: A cavity is located inside; the electrical fields during operation are coded by the colour scale. Current patterns are represented by green arrows. view more Credit: Thorsten Feichtner Atoms and molecules can be made to emit light particles (photons). However, without external intervention this process is inefficient and undirected. If it was p
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How much can 252-million-year-old ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot. IMAGE: One of the study's authors, Brandon Peecook, doing fieldwork. view more Credit: Brandon Peecook, The Field Museum A whopping 252 million years ago, Earth was crawling with bizarre animals, including dinosaur cousins resembling Komodo dragons and bulky early mammal-relatives, a million years before dinosaurs even existed. New research shows us that the Permian equator was both a lit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Private sector support is key to reducing emissions in the Middle East and North Africa Air quality experts from the University of Surrey are calling on private businesses to help the Middle East and North African (MENA) region reduce harmful emissions after conducting a comprehensive review on air pollution. The advice comes after their study was published in the Atmospheric Environment journal this week. The study, conducted by researchers from the Global Centre for Clean Air Rese
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Live Science
How Does Your Brain Stop a Task It Already Started? An image from the study shows three areas of the brain involved in arresting decisions. Credit: Johns Hopkins University To stop an activity, your brain must engage in very precise timing that involves the careful coordination of three distinct areas of the brain, new research has found. The findings, set to be published on Dec. 20 in the journal Neuron , help explain how people switch task
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IAU approves 86 new star names from around the world Star map painting by Senior Wardaman Elder Bill Yidumduma Harney, featuring the Milky Way, the Moon, and ancestor spirits. Credit: Bill Yidumduma Harney Traditionally, most star names used by astronomers have come from Arabic, Greek, or Latin origins. Now, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Division C Working Group on Star Names (WGSN) has formally approved 86 new names for stars drawn fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop powerful new method for microbiome analysis Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sema4, and collaborating institutions New York University and the University of Florida today published a report detailing their new, more accurate method for identifying individual microbial species and strains in a community. This technique has important implications for microbiome analysis, with potential long-term applications for c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study identifies genetic basis for western corn rootworm resistance in maize Farmers are stuck. Western corn rootworm can destroy cornfields - and profits - but populations of the "billion-dollar bug" have stopped responding to insecticides and the genetically modified corn hybrids designed to resist insect attacks. But there may be hope. In a new study, University of Illinois researchers uncover the genetic basis of resistance to western corn rootworm, paving the way for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA shows new Tongan island made of tuff stuff, likely to persist years View from the top of tuff cone of the new Tongan island, June 2017. Credit: NASA/Damien Grouille/Cecile Sabau In late December 2014, a submarine volcano in the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga erupted, sending a violent stream of steam, ash and rock into the air. The ash plumes rose as high as 30,000 feet (9 kilometers) into the sky, diverting flights. When the ash finally settled in January 2015,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs Early morning, a female cheetah (HNP002) uses a high vantage point to look for potential prey. Credit: Stéphanie Périquet A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ , researchers present evidence that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Internal forces directing cell migration are revealed by live-cell microscopyNew research show how cells respond to internal forces when they orient, gain traction, and migrate in a specific direction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soy, cruciferous vegetables associated with fewer common breast cancer treatment side effectsConsuming soy foods (such as soy milk, tofu and edamame) and cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli) may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, say a team of scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Use of chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer declining, study saysA study of nearly 3,000 women with early stage breast cancer indicates a recent, significant decline in the use of chemotherapy despite the lack of any change in national treatment recommendations or guidelines, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reductions in individual plant growth sometimes boost community resilienceIn sports, sometimes a player has to take one for the team. The same appears to be true in the plant world, where reduced individual growth can benefit the broader community.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why meteroids explode before they reach EarthWhen a meteor comes hurtling toward Earth, the high-pressure air in front of it seeps into its pores and cracks, pushing the body of the meteor apart and causing it to explode, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global CAR T therapy trial shows high rates of durable remission for non-Hodgkin's lymphomaIn a pair of clinical trials stretching from Philadelphia to Tokyo, the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah™ (formerly known as CTL019) demonstrated long-lasting remissions in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients.
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Big Think
Gut Microbiome Health Linked to Social Circles We influence one another more than we’ll ever know. Ideas, mores, customs, and religions spread through communities like contagions. So does bacteria, as we know from a history of infections as well as new research on the social circles of lemurs. This study might offer another insight into the complex and fascinating nature of what health entails. One major advance in recent years has been r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable dams—are they possible? Expert weighs in Credit: Colorado State University Humans have been altering natural waterways for centuries, but only in the last several decades have dams raised ecological concerns. N. LeRoy Poff, professor of biology at Colorado State University, studies the ecological impact to rivers from human-caused changes, such as dam building, and how these modified river systems can be managed for resilience. In a Dec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brazilian researchers uncover six new species of silky anteater In a recent study published in Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society , a team of Brazilian researchers discovered six new species of silky anteater, a mammal that lives in tropical rain forests of the Amazon region and Central America. The new study combines genetic and anatomical data to review the classification of silky anteaters. Led by former Dr. Flávia Miranda, the team of researchers a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soon you can watch the NFL free on your phone on YahooWatching NFL football games on your phone used to be mainly limited to Verizon customers. Soon anyone will be able to watch football games on the go for free on Yahoo's app, now that Verizon owns Yahoo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Major life events shared on social media revive dormant connections, study shows Credit: CC0 Public Domain Online social networking has revolutionized the way people communicate and interact with one another, despite idiosyncrasies we all love to hate—think top-10 lists of the most annoying people and habits on social media. However, there are specific advantages to using social media , beyond the simple joys—and occasional annoyances—of reconnecting and gossiping with old fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria development marks new era in cellular design Graphic image of tubular scaffolds in cells. Credit: University of Kent Scientists at the universities of Kent and Bristol have built a miniature scaffold inside bacteria that can be used to bolster cellular productivity, with implications for the next generation of biofuel production. Because there is a growing need for agricultural or renewable production of biofuels and other commodity chemica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at Mount Sinai and Sema4 develop powerful new method for microbiome analysis Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sema4, and collaborating institutions New York University and the University of Florida today published a report detailing their new, more accurate method for identifying individual microbial species and strains in a community. This technique has important implications for microbiome analysis, with potential long-term applications for c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study identifies genetic basis for western corn rootworm resistance in maize URBANA, Ill. - Farmers are stuck. Western corn rootworm can destroy cornfields - and profits - but populations of the "billion-dollar bug" have stopped responding to insecticides and the genetically modified corn hybrids designed to resist insect attacks. But there may be hope. In a new study, University of Illinois researchers uncover the genetic basis of resistance to western corn rootworm, pav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Selecting sounds: How the brain knows what to listen to How is it that we are able--without any noticeable effort--to listen to a friend talk in a crowded café or follow the melody of a violin within an orchestra? A team led by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and Birkbeck, University of London has developed a new approach to how the brain singles out a specific stream of sound from other distracting sounds. Using a novel experimental ap
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Searching for the CRISPR Swiss Army knife Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has visualized the atomic structures of the Cpf1 and Cas9 proteins to analyse each of their properties and
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Multiple health implications of women's early marriage go beyond early childbearing A new study of four South Asian countries reveals complex associations between early marriage and women's education, health and nutrition that go beyond the impacts of early childbearing. These health implications -- which include higher risk of domestic violence and poor mental health -- may also affect the next generation of children. Furthermore, increased education has had some, but not enoug
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Twitter can reveal our shared mood In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the University of Bristol have analysed mood indicators in text from 800 million anonymous messages posted on Twitter. These tweets were found to reflect strong patterns of positive and negative moods over the 24-hour day. Circadian rhythms, widely referred to as the 'body clock', allows people's bodies to predict their needs over the dark and li
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New RNA Drug Could Help Slow Huntington’s How Do You Design an Autonomous Car from Scratch? Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-powered. That’s according to an announcement from the automaker, explaining that it will buck the trend of repurposing consumer vehicles as driverless ones and build a car designed… Read more Ford thinks driverless cars need to be rugged and, more surprising, hybrid-power
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The origin of the Andes unravelled Why do the Andes exist? Why is it not a place of lowlands or narrow seas? Wouter Schellart, a geophysicist at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, has been pondering these questions for more than a decade. Now, he has found the answers using an advanced computer model. "It's a matter of enormous size, longevity and great depth", he said. "These aspects made the Andes the longest and second-highest m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
End of unwanted items in the bagging area Queuing for the checkout and struggling with snappy self-scanners could be over with a superfast, super safe ultra-connected broadband set to revolutionise supermarket shopping. Picture instead gliding down the aisles guided by your phone or tablet to items on your list while you monitor your baby in the store's crèche via live video link. Back home, someone's swiped the last of the milk, so yo
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Live Science
Beyond Clickbait: Viral Skin-Cancer Selfie Boosted Online Searches A Kentucky woman's brutally honest selfie and Facebook post while undergoing treatment for skin cancer drew the type of social media attention and news coverage usually reserved for celebrity health disclosures, a new study suggests. The riveting photo — which showed then 27-year-old Tawny Willoughby's raw, scab-ridden face along with her message that "this is what skin-cancer treatment can
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Scientific American Content: Global
California Wildfire Sets Grim Record California's 2017 wildfire season is poised to shatter records as the 155,000-acre Thomas Fire in Ventura County continued to grow over the weekend, placing it among the state's 20 largest wildfires dating to the 1930s, according to a database maintained by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire). Two other large fires also continued to burn north of Los Angeles:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health warnings on cigarettes could deter young people Young people are less likely to try cigarettes with the printed health warning 'Smoking kills' on each stick than standard cigarettes, according to a new study by Cancer Research UK published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research .* Researchers wanted to examine new, innovative ways to reinforce health messages around smoking. They surveyed nearly 1000 16-24 year olds from across the UK to evaluate thei
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA shows new Tongan island made of tuff stuff, likely to persist years In late December 2014, a submarine volcano in the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga erupted, sending a violent stream of steam, ash and rock into the air. The ash plumes rose as high as 30,000 feet (9 kilometers) into the sky, diverting flights. When the ash finally settled in January 2015, a newborn island with a 400-foot (120-meter) summit nestled between two older islands - visible to satellites
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immunotherapy for Merkel cell carcinoma -- novel research highlights quality of life benefits 11th December 2017 Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of an article in Future Oncology that has demonstrated in patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (mMCC), non-progression during treatment with the anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy avelumab correlates with gains in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). "MCC is a potentially devastating disease with few therapeutic opti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PharmaMar presents positive results of the pivotal Phase III trial with plitidepsin in MM With regards to the primary endpoint, in patients who received the combination of plitidepsin with dexamethasone, a 3.8 month progression free survival (PFS) was observed in comparison to 1.9 months with dexamethasone alone, according to the investigator´s assessment With respect to overall survival, all patients obtained an overall survival that almost doubled the comparative with dexamethasone
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers peer under the hoods of neural networks Neural networks, which learn to perform computational tasks by analyzing huge sets of training data, have been responsible for the most impressive recent advances in artificial intelligence, including speech-recognition and automatic-translation systems. During training, however, a neural net continually adjusts its internal settings in ways that even its creators can't interpret. Much recent w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria development marks new era in cellular design IMAGE: This is a graphic image of tubular scaffolds in cells. view more Credit: University of Kent Scientists at the universities of Kent and Bristol have built a miniature scaffold inside bacteria that can be used to bolster cellular productivity, with implications for the next generation of biofuel production. Because there is a growing need for agricultural or renewable production of b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A good decision is not made in one go The best decisions are made on the basis of the average of various estimates: this has been confirmed by the research of Dennie van Dolder and Martijn van den Assem, scientists at VU Amsterdam. Using data from Holland Casino promotional campaigns, they have researched whether it is true that when people make estimates, the average of their estimates is relatively close to reality. The results of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cold suns, warm exoplanets and methane blankets Somewhere in our galaxy, an exoplanet is probably orbiting a star that's colder than our sun, but instead of freezing solid, the planet might be cozy warm thanks to a greenhouse effect caused by methane in its atmosphere. NASA astrobiologists from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a comprehensive new model that shows how planetary chemistry could make that happen. The model, publ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Updated brain cell map connects various brain diseases to specific cell types Researchers have developed new single-cell sequencing methods that could be used to map the cell origins of various brain disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. By analyzing individual nuclei of cells from adult human brains, researchers at the University of California San Diego, Harvard Medical School and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Instit
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Study: Most enrolled in Michigan's Medicaid expansion already either work or can't work ANN ARBOR, MI - Nearly half of the people who enrolled in Medicaid after it expanded in Michigan have jobs, a new study finds. Another 11 percent can't work, likely due to serious physical or mental health conditions. About 1 in 4 enrollees are out of work but also are much more likely to be in poor health, according to the findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine by a team from the Universit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hyperlens crystal capable of viewing living cells in unprecedented detail IMAGE: A new hyperlens crystal is capable of resolving details as small as a virus on the surface of living cells. The atomic structure of the hexagonal boron nitride crystal is... view more Credit: Keith Wood, Vanderbilt University Just imagine: An optical lens so powerful that it lets you view features the size of a small virus on the surface of a living cell in its natural environment. C
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The direct route from A to C We use specialized nerve cells for spatial orientation. The place cells fire whenever we stay in a particular place. The grid cells, on the other hand, measure distances and play a crucial role in "path integration". So much for the theory. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the University Hospital Heidelberg have now, for the first time, provided experimental proof of t
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World-first uses satellites and ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversity IMAGE: An under-ice seafloor community in O'Brien Bay showing a diverse community of marine invertebrates, including rounded sea-squirts (ascidians), feathery polychaete worms (also visible in the background) and a bright orange spiky sponge.... view more Credit: © Jonny Stark/Australian Antarctic Division In a world-first, a research team of Australian and international scientists has used
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Financial incentives may increase breastfeeding rates Breastfeeding increased in areas where shopping vouchers were offered to mothers 46 per cent of all eligible mothers signed up to the scheme and over 40 per cent claimed at least one voucher for breastfeeding Women reported that the vouchers were an incentive to continue breastfeeding Offering new mothers financial incentives may significantly increase low breastfeeding rates, new research fr
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Unravelling the mysteries of extragalactic jets University of Leeds researchers have mathematically examined plasma jets from supermassive black holes to determine why certain types of jets disintegrate into huge plumes. Their study, published in Nature Astronomy , has found that these jets can be susceptible to an instability never before considered as important to the jet's flow and is similar to an instability that often develops in water f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does prescription opioid use by one household member increase risk of prescribed use in others? Bottom Line: Living in a household with a prescription opioid user may be associated with increased risk of prescription opioid use by other household members. Why The Research Is Interesting: Millions of opioid prescriptions are dispensed each year in the United States and unused opioids stored in household medicine cabinets are opportunities for drug sharing. However, whether prescription opi
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Drug for spinal muscular atrophy prompts ethical dilemmas, Stanford bioethicists say When the Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug for people with spinal muscular atrophy a year ago, clinicians finally had hope for improving the lives of patients with the rare debilitating muscular disease. But the extraordinary cost of the drug and complicated logistics of delivering it present barriers for many patients, according to experts in bioethics at the Stanford Universi
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High-intensity exercise delays Parkinson's progression Exercise needs to between 80 and 85 percent maximum heart rate for benefit First time high-intensity exercise tested in Parkinson's patients Moderate intensity had no effect "Exercise is medicine," says scientist CHICAGO --- High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson's disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African deforestation not as great as feared The loss of forests in Africa in the past century is substantially less than previously estimated, an analysis of historical records and paleontology evidence by Yale researchers shows. Previous estimates put deforestation at 35% to 55% on the continent since 1900. The new analysis estimates closed-canopy forests have shrunk by 21.7%, according to findings published Dec. 11 in the journal Nature
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Presenting facts as 'consensus' bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change In the murk of post-truth public debate, facts can polarise. Scientific evidence triggers reaction and spin that ends up entrenching the attitudes of opposing political tribes. Recent research suggests this phenomenon is actually stronger among the more educated, through what psychologists call 'motived reasoning': where data is rejected or twisted - consciously or otherwise - to prop up a partic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A global north-to-south shift in wind power by end of century CIRES and RASEI researchers suggest that wind resources in the next century may decrease in many regions in the Northern Hemisphere--and could sharply increase in several hotspot regions down south. The first-of-its-kind study predicting how global wind power may shift with climate change appears today in Nature Geoscience (linked). "There's been a lot of research looking at the potential climate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny ice losses at Antarctica's fringes can accelerate ice loss far away A thinning of small areas of floating ice at Antarctica's coast can accelerate the movement of ice grounded on rocks hundreds of kilometers away, a new study shows. It is known that the ice shelves surrounding the continent regulate the ice flow from the land into the ocean. So far it was assumed that the ice flow is most vulnerable to melting at the base near the grounding line where the ice flo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large genetic study links tendency to undervalue future rewards with ADHD, obesity Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found a genetic signature for delay discounting -- the tendency to undervalue future rewards -- that overlaps with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), smoking and weight. In a study published December 11 in Nature Neuroscience , the team used data of 23andme customers who consented to participate in research
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New Scientist - News
Ancient microbes caused Earth’s first ever global warming Warmer times Tom Murphy/Getty By Alice Klein We’re not the first living beings to drastically alter Earth’s climate. The earliest photosynthetic microorganisms belched out enough methane to warm the planet by 15 ° C. This bout of global warming may have saved Earth from freezing over, and created a comfortable climate for early organisms. When Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago, the sun was 2
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New Scientist - News
Fasting may boost brainpower by giving neurons more energy Fasting diets may make you smarter Gergely Kishonthy / Alamy Stock Photo By Clare Wilson Could regular fasting make you smarter? People following regimes like the popular 5:2 diet usually do so for weight loss, but some who try it say it makes them mentally sharper too. If this is true, experiments in mice may have explained why. In these animals, fasting has been found to cause changes in th
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Popular Science
We're scientists who turn hurricanes into music D uring the 2017 hurricane season, major storms in the North Atlantic devastated communities in and around Houston, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the wider Caribbean. The destruction shows how important it is to understand and communicate the serious threats that these storms pose. Scientists have made great strides in forecasting many aspects of storms, but if the people at risk don’t understand the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A global north-to-south shift in wind power by end of century A composite image of the Western hemisphere of the Earth. Credit: NASA CIRES and RASEI researchers suggest that wind resources in the next century may decrease in many regions in the Northern Hemisphere—and could sharply increase in several hotspot regions down south. The first-of-its-kind study predicting how global wind power may shift with climate change appears today in Nature Geoscience (lin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Presenting facts as 'consensus' bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change Credit: CC0 Public Domain In the murk of post-truth public debate, facts can polarise. Scientific evidence triggers reaction and spin that ends up entrenching the attitudes of opposing political tribes. Recent research suggests this phenomenon is actually stronger among the more educated, through what psychologists call 'motived reasoning': where data is rejected or twisted - consciously or other
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unravelling the mysteries of extragalactic jets University of Leeds researchers have mathematically examined plasma jets from supermassive black holes to determine why certain types of jets disintegrate into huge plumes. Their study, published in Nature Astronomy , has found that these jets can be susceptible to an instability never before considered as important to the jet's flow and is similar to an instability that often develops in water f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World-first uses satellites and ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversity An under-ice seafloor community in O'Brien Bay showing a diverse community of marine invertebrates, includingrounded sea-squirts (ascidians), feathery polychaete worms (also visible in the background) and a bright orangespiky sponge. Credit: Jonny Stark/Australian Antarctic Division In a world-first, a research team of Australian and international scientists has used data collected by satellites
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyperlens crystal capable of viewing living cells in unprecedented detail A new hyperlens crystal is capable of resolving details as small as a virus on the surface of living cells. The atomic structure of the hexagonal boron nitride crystal is shown in the cutout. Credit: Keith Wood, Vanderbilt University Just imagine: An optical lens so powerful that it lets you view features the size of a small virus on the surface of a living cell in its natural environment. Constr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny ice losses at Antarctica's fringes can accelerate ice loss far away Credit: CC0 Public Domain A thinning of small areas of floating ice at Antarctica's coast can accelerate the movement of ice grounded on rocks hundreds of kilometers away, a new study shows. It is known that the ice shelves surrounding the continent regulate the ice flow from the land into the ocean. So far, it was assumed that the ice flow is most vulnerable to melting at the base near the groun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrobiologist's visionary model builds on the legacy of Carl Sagan's explanation for the 'faint young Sun paradox' Artist's depiction of what exoplanet Kepler 22b might look like. It was discovered by the Kepler satellite telescope. Kepler 22b likely receives a similar amount of light and heat from its star as our Earth does from our sun. Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech Somewhere in our galaxy, an exoplanet is probably orbiting a star that's colder than our sun, but instead of freezing solid, the planet might b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
African deforestation not as great as feared: study Satellite imagery of Africa. Credit: Public Domain The loss of forests in Africa in the past century is substantially less than previously estimated, an analysis of historical records and paleontology evidence by Yale researchers shows. Previous estimates put deforestation at 35% to 55% on the continent since 1900. The new analysis estimates closed-canopy forests have shrunk by 21.7%, according t
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Blog » Languages » English
A Visit From St. Grim: Sledding vs Skating It’s time for a game which is really quite neat, We’ll all pick team and then we’ll compete! A bit of winter fun is now on the table, So please choose your favorite, if you are able! One game is for those who like skating on ice, They find spirals and jumps are really quite nice. Others may sled through the powdery snow, The steeper the hill, the faster you’ll go! VS 11:00 AM on Tuesday 12/12 – 1
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Scientists Reveal Genetic Secrets of Tasmanian Tiger BRIEF: Scientists Reveal Genetic Secrets of Tasmanian Tiger A 108-year-old museum specimen helps answer evolutionary questions about the extinct marsupial carnivore. Tiger.jpg Image credits: Biodiversity Heritage Library via Flickr Rights information: Public Domain Creature Monday, December 11, 2017 - 11:00 Kimberly Hickok, Contributor (Inside Science) -- The genome of the Tasmanian tiger ( Thyla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice University advances asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellhead IMAGE: Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined... view more Credit: Almaz Jalilov/Rice University Rice University scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide fr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs WASHINGTON (Dec. 11, 2017)--A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ , researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline suppor
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Climate Change Could Take the Air Out of Wind Farms Big offshore wind farms power Europe’s drive for a carbon-free society, while rows of spinning turbines across America’s heartland churn enough energy to power 25 million US homes. But a new study predicts that a changing climate will weaken winds that blow across much of the Northern hemisphere, possibly leading to big drops in clean wind energy. That’s because the temperature difference between
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The Atlantic
How Russia Hacked America—And Why It Will Happen Again During the 2016 presidential campaign, Russian hackers attacked the U.S. on two fronts: the psychological and the technical. Hackers used classic propaganda techniques to influence American voters, bought thousands of social media ads to propagate fake news, and broke into Democratic party email servers to steal information. And it won't be the last time. Russian-backed psychological cyber warfar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists developed new approaches to treating diabetes IMAGE: These are the UrFU scientists, who worked on the article, headed by Irina Danilova. view more Credit: Irina Danilova A team of scientists from the Ural Federal University (UrFU) and the Institute of Immunology and Physiology (IIP, Ural Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences) modeled type 1 diabetes in an experiment to study recovery processes in the pancreas. The results of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stable quantum bits IMAGE: These are the quantum gates of two silicon electrons. Two nano-electrodes (VL and VR) control the angular momentum of both electrons. A third nano-electrode (VM) coordinates the interaction of both... view more Credit: University of Konstanz Milestone on the path to the quantum computer: Scientists of the University of Konstanz, Princeton University, and the University of Maryland de
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using software, researchers predict tumor markers that could be immune targetsResearchers report at the 59th Annual American Society for Hematology Annual Meeting in Atlanta on Saturday, Dec. 9, that they were able to validate their approach for predicting markers -- called minor histocompatibility antigens -- in a group of patients with blood cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major life events shared on social media revive dormant connections, study shows Online social networking has revolutionized the way people communicate and interact with one another, despite idiosyncrasies we all love to hate -- think top-10 lists of the most annoying people and habits on social media. However, there are specific advantages to using social media, beyond the simple joys -- and occasional annoyances -- of reconnecting and gossiping with old friends about babies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The origin of the Andes unraveledWhy do the Andes exist? Why is it not a place of lowlands or narrow seas? Wouter Schellart, a geophysicist at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, has been pondering these questions for more than a decade. Now, he has found the answers using an advanced computer model. 'It's a matter of enormous size, longevity and great depth,' he said. 'These aspects made the Andes the longest and second highest mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AGU Fall Meeting: Mistletoe is 'kiss of death' to drought-stressed trees The following release and accompanying images can be found at: http://news. agu. org/ press-release/ agu-fall-meeting-mistletoe-is-kiss-of-death-to-drought-stressed-trees/ AGU Fall Meeting: Mistletoe is 'kiss of death' to drought-stressed trees Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, Louisiana 11-15 December 2017 AGU Contacts: Nanci Bompey +1 (914) 552-5759 nbompey@agu.org Lauren Lipuma +
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Futurity.org
A.I. spots epilepsy seizures in advance Researchers report that they’ve used a mobile, brain-inspired processor to analyze brain signals from retrospective patient data and successfully predict an average of 69 percent of seizures across all patients with artificial intelligence. The research could help pave the way for personalized seizure prediction for patients with epilepsy. “Our algorithm also allows for instantaneous and easy adj
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug lowers deadly Huntington's disease proteinThe first drug targeting the cause of Huntington's disease was safe and well-tolerated in its first human trial, and successfully lowered the level of the harmful huntingtin protein in the nervous system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twitter can reveal our shared moodIn the largest study of its kind, researchers have analyzed mood indicators in text from 800 million anonymous messages posted on Twitter. These tweets were found to reflect strong patterns of positive and negative moods over the 24-hour day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infant brain responses predict reading speed in secondary schoolA new study has found that the brain responses of infants with an inherited risk for dyslexia, a specific reading disability, predict their future reading speed in secondary school.
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Futurity.org
Massive primordial galaxy will soon get even bigger A galaxy first seen less than 800 million years after the Big Bang, when the universe was less than 6 percent of its current age, is actually a massive galaxy and a smaller neighbor that will soon form an even larger structure. Astronomers expect that the first galaxies would share many similarities with some of the dwarf galaxies seen in the nearby universe today. These early agglomerations of a
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Viden
Klimavenlig kulkraft slår ikke vind- og solenergi Kulkraft er kendt som den værste CO2-synder af dem alle. Men i dag er det faktisk muligt at reducere CO2-udledningen fra kulkraftværker med 90 procent ved at opsamle og lagre CO2'en. Derfor er det også oplagt at se på, hvordan kulkraft med opsamling af CO2 klarer sig i forhold til andre energiteknologier. Og netop det har en gruppe internationale forskere gjort ved sammenligne CO2-udledningen på
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A bold plan to house 100 million people | Gautam BhanMumbai, Delhi, Chennai, Kolkata -- all the major cities across India, have one great thing in common: they welcome people arriving in search of work. But what lies at the other end of such openness and acceptance? Sadly, a shortage of housing for an estimated 100 million people, many of whom end up living in informal settlements. Gautam Bhan, a human settlement expert and researcher, is boldly rei
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Ingeniøren
Overskud i virksomheden smitter ikke af på ingeniør-lønnen »Når vi har dårlige år, bliver vi opfordret til løntilbageholdenhed. Da vi så fik et historisk flot årsregnskab i 2016, forventede vi det modsatte af løntilbageholdenhed til lønforhandlinger i foråret 2017,« fortæller Benny Gøbel, formand for AC-­bestyrelsen i Ørsted Wind Power samt Bioenergy & Thermal Power og for IDA Privat. Sådan kom det ikke til at gå. Forhandlingerne med ledelsen endte for a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sustainable dams -- are they possible? Humans have been altering natural waterways for centuries, but only in the last several decades have dams raised ecological concerns. N. LeRoy Poff, professor of biology at Colorado State University, studies the ecological impact to rivers from human-caused changes, such as dam building, and how these modified river systems can be managed for resilience. In a Dec. 8 Perspective piece in the journ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioengineering and specialized therapies yield results for rare, challenging blood diseases (Atlanta, December 9, 2017) -- In four studies being presented today during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta, researchers announce promising findings on innovative tools and therapies for hard-to-treat blood disorders including sickle cell disease (SCD), beta thalassemia, and X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID). The studies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Death receptors' -- new markers for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found that the presence of death receptors in the blood can be used to directly measure the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. "We see that people with known risk factors such as high blood sugar and high blood fats also have heightened death receptor levels", says Professor Jan Nilsson who led the study. Death receptors
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brazilian researchers uncover 6 new species of silky anteater In a recent study published in Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society , a team of Brazilian researchers discovered six new species of silky anteater, a mammal that lives in tropical rain forests of the Amazon region and Central America. The new study combines genetic and anatomical data to review the classification of silky anteaters. Led by former Dr. Flávia Miranda, the team of researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research offers guidelines to improve patient care for sexual assault survivors CHICAGO--December 11, 2017--Disclosing personal history of sexual assault and other forms of abuse to a primary care physician can have a profound impact on the patient's experience in the doctor's office as well as the quality of care, according to a review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association . The authors analyzed more than 50 studies, including topics like post-tra
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The world's youngest islandScientists think Hunga Tunga Hunga Ha'apai might hold clues on where to look for life on Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate summit: The greening of international finance Green bonds, anyone? It is often said that the colour of money is green, but until recently the finance industry hasn't been well adapted to helping achieve policy objectives for the environment. New instruments have been developed to help mobilise financing for projects to mitigate climate change , some of which have caught on, but measuring their impact remains difficult. Green bonds Also k
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Asian investors embrace bitcoin, but regulators are wary In this Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, photo, people use the Bitcoin ATM in Hong Kong. The launch of a U.S. futures contract for bitcoin on Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, underscores the virtual currency's increasing mainstream acceptance, including in many parts of Asia, where it already has a wide following among speculators and investors. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung) The weekend launch of a U.S. futures contract for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Smoke rings' in the ocean spotted from space Researchers from the University of Liverpool have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean. The ocean is full of eddies, swirling motions some tens to hundreds of kilometres across, which mix the water and carry it across the average currents. The 'smoke-rings' ar
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The Scientist RSS
Genetic Variant Detection in Cancer: Using ISH to Track Tumor EvolutionAnalyzing intratumor heterogeneity is essential for predicting therapeutic response.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use ears in the ground to monitor the eyes of hurricanes One of the biggest challenges of mitigating the danger of hurricanes is predicting where a storm will make landfall and estimating how powerful it will be when it hits. Researchers Dr. Toshiro Tanimoto and Annie Valovcin at University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) are looking at new methods to monitor the intensity of hurricanes using seismic data. "Hurricanes have strong winds that cause p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine scientists lead comprehensive review of giant clams species worldwide The world's largest giant clam species and the most threatened mollusc, according to a recent study led by NUS marine scientists. Credit: Neo Mei Lin An international team of marine researchers led by Dr Neo Mei Lin and Associate Professor Peter Todd from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has recently published a comprehensive study on the status of giant clams worldwide. Between 2014 to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists develop novel Washington Red dye for bio-imaging Visualization of cellular hydrogen sulfide by a Washington Red based fluorescent sensor. Credit: WSU Washington State University scientists have created an injectable dye that illuminates molecules with near infrared light, making it easier to see what is going on deep inside the body. The new dye will help medical researchers track the progression of a wide array of diseases, such as cancer. Min
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Popular Science
How to keep latkes crispy for eight days and nights Hanukkah is the Jewish festival of lights, an eight-day holiday celebrating—among other things—a miracle in which a jar of oil, only enough to provide light for one night, burned for eight. While it isn’t a particularly important religious event, it does come with one of the best traditions: eating fried foods to commemorate that long-lasting oil. So when Hanukkah begins tomorrow night, I'll be b
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Futurity.org
To improve CO2 filter for gas wells, just add water Scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide from gas wells: Adding water. The lab of chemist James Tour, a chair in chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice University, discovered that treating grains of inexpensive Gilsonite asphalt with water allows the material to adsorb mor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Endangered listing urged for cheetahsResearchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa support a call to list the cheetah as "Endangered" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Basic element for quantum computer -- stable quantum gate -- createdPhysicists create a stable quantum gate as a basic element for the quantum computer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to tackle drug resistant parasites that cause killer disease malariaA new analysis of all relevant previously published clinical data shows how parasites causing malaria become resistant to a commonly used treatment for malaria in travellers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New therapies improve outlook for bleeding and clotting disorders (Atlanta, December 9, 2017) -- In three studies being presented today during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta, researchers report remarkable benefits from new, more easily administered therapies for bleeding and clotting disorders. Two studies, one involving a novel drug and the other a gene therapy, could significantly improve the lives
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yeast can be engineered to create protein pharmaceuticals IMAGE: In regular yeast (the left-hand images), the secretion of proteins is hampered by harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the yeast. The lower image shows these as fluorescent areas,... view more Credit: Mingtao Huang/Chalmers It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mappin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Smoke rings' in the ocean spotted from space Researchers from the University of Liverpool have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean. The ocean is full of eddies, swirling motions some tens to hundreds of kilometres across, which mix the water and carry it across the average currents. The 'smoke-rings' ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU chemists develop novel Washington Red dye for bio-imaging Washington State University scientists have created an injectable dye that illuminates molecules with near infrared light, making it easier to see what is going on deep inside the body. The new dye will help medical researchers track the progression of a wide array of diseases, such as cancer. Ming Xian, the Ralph G. Yount Distinguished Professor of chemistry, calls the new dye Washington Red. He
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cascading use is also beneficial for woodAnother 10 years -- that is approximately how long sustainable forestry will be able to satisfy the continuously growing demand for wood. In Germany and Europe, new concepts are therefore being discussed for more responsible and efficient industrial use of the renewable, but still limited wood resources. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using data from a European researc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Percutaneous coronary intervention is a well-justified option also in severe coronary artery disease The treatment of left main coronary artery disease by percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with a smaller risk of severe cardiovascular events than coronary artery bypass grafting in the weeks following surgery. A meta-analysis of several trials and nearly 5,000 patients revealed no differences in mortality between the two treatments. The finding is significant when it comes to select
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Irish DNA map reveals history's imprint Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The genetic landscape of Ireland had been laid down by the Bronze Age, but it continued to be subtly influenced by later events Scientists have unveiled a detailed genetic map of Ireland, revealing subtle DNA differences that may reflect historic events. In their sample of the Irish population, the researchers identified 10 genetic groupings - clusters -
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Dagens Medicin
Sådan fordeles finanslovsmidlerne på sundhedsområdetDet nære sundhedsvæsen topper listen over områder, der har fået midler fra finansloven.
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Am I The Worst For Looking at Other People's Texts on the Subway? Q: I Catch Myself Peeking at Other People's Texts on the Subway. Am I the Worst? A: Imagine being eaten by a cave bear. Or a saber-toothed cat. Imagine, with that first gash of claw or incisor, instantaneously transitioning from being a person to being food. Imagine what it feels like, the first, dangling bits of you being rent apart, ground up and ingested, while the rest of you watches. Very un
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study showsDiabetes is known to increase a person's risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study suggests that the converse also is true: kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Further, the researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The findings are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication and diet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radar tracking reveals how bees develop a route between flowersAs bees gain foraging experience they continually refine both the order in which they visit flowers and the flight paths they take between flowers to generate better and better routes, according to researchers.
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Ingeniøren
Vejen skal banes for seks spor på E45 mellem Vejle og Randers En seks-sporet motorvej fra Vejle til Randers er tættere på at blive en realitet, efter at regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti i fredags afsatte 78 millioner kroner i deres aftale om en finanslov til at igangsætte en VVM-undersøgelse af projektet. I alt er der planer om at udvide en strækning på omkring 80 kilometer. Cirka 35 kilometer mellem Hornstrup (ved Vejle) og Skanderborg Syd, den 16 kilometer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The likelihood for mixed breeding between two songbird species lessens with warmer springs IMAGE: Collared flycatchers are small passerine birds that are expanding their European breeding range towards the north in response to global climate warming. view more Credit: Eryn McFarlane Collared flycatchers are small passerine birds that are expanding their European breeding range towards the north in response to global climate warming. Approximately 50 years ago this species started
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stress hormone may identify family members likely to suffer from anxiety after loved one's ICU care IMAGE: When a loved one has been hospitalized in intensive care for a critical illness, many family members experience anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress or other negative effects lasting months, according to... view more Credit: Intermountain Medical Center When a loved one has been hospitalized in intensive care for a critical illness, many family members experience anxiety, depre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists use ears in the ground to monitor the eyes of hurricanes One of the biggest challenges of mitigating the danger of hurricanes is predicting where a storm will make landfall and estimating how powerful it will be when it hits. Researchers Dr. Toshiro Tanimoto and Annie Valovcin at University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) are looking at new methods to monitor the intensity of hurricanes using seismic data. "Hurricanes have strong winds that cause p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS marine scientists lead comprehensive review of giant clams species worldwide IMAGE: These are cultured Tridacna squamosa that were transplanted to reefs at Sisters' Islands in Singapore. This restocking project was led by NUS marine scientists. view more Credit: Neo Mei Lin An international team of marine researchers led by Dr Neo Mei Lin and Associate Professor Peter Todd from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has recently published a comprehensive stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeted therapies show promise improving outcomes across several hematologic malignancies IMAGE: Four studies being presented today at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta highlight the multiple ways in which novel targeted cancer therapies are... view more Credit: American Society of Hematology (Atlanta, December 10, 2017) -- Four studies being presented today at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and E
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snow grounds flights at Dutch airports Cars drive slowly along a snow-covered road in Rotterdam during heavy snowfall. Snow wreaked havoc in the low-lying Netherlands on Monday, closing down Eindhoven airport completely, shutting schools and leading to transport chaos with hundreds of flights and trains cancelled or delayed. The rare winter show may have delighted children, who once again set off in search of any slope on their sledge
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Futurity.org
Discrimination’s effects on health spill over to partner Facing discrimination can have negative health consequences not only for the victim but also for their romantic partner, research suggests. The work, which analyzed a nationally representative sample of nearly 2,000 couples, considers how the discrimination experiences of both people in a relationship are tied to their health. “We found that when an individual experiences discrimination, they rep
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes may 'snowball' obesity, researchers find37 genes that are well established as modulating the body mass in 75,230 adults with European ancestry have been examined by researchers, who found nine that have a "snowball effect."
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Dagens Medicin
Finanslovsaftalen giver omkring en halv milliard ekstra til sundhed i 2018 En stor del af midlerne fra finansloven til sundhedsområdet går til regeringens udspil for det nære sundhedsvæsen. Aftalen er forventelig, siger Kjellberg, mens Rudkjøbing er skuffet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A bird in the bush is worth $223,851 in the hand Black-backed Oriole. Credit: Susan Schmoyer The arrival of a single Black-backed Oriole bird in rural Pennsylvania—5000 kilometres from its usual home in Mexico—was worth an estimated $US 223,851 to the economy from bird watchers flocking to see it. The study, by a UNSW Sydney-led team, is the first to quantify the economic impact of a vagrant bird - a species observed outside its normal geograph
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Tax Overhaul Could Cripple the U.S. as a Leader in Science The graduate education system in the United States is rightly considered the best in the world. But Republicans in the House of Representatives have passed a bill that would undermine America’s great universities and the nation’s preeminence in scientific research, submitting to the self-serving interests of their wealthy donors (see “ Stop Emissions ”). One provision of the lower chamber’s tax o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers identify twelve new Herbig-Haro objects in the dark nebula LDN 673 A color composite image of HH 1183–1186. The four objects appear to be emerging from the edge of a dense cloud. The HH objects can be distinguished by their deep red color. Credit: Rector et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—Astronomers have found a dozen new faint Herbig-Haro objects in the dark nebula LDN 673 by employing a novel color-composite imaging method. The discovery, reported in a paper published
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immunotherapy strategy could be beneficial for relapsed acute myeloid leukemia ATLANTA - University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that pairing an immunotherapy drug with chemotherapy proved beneficial for some patients with acute myeloid leukemia whose disease did not respond to standard treatment or had relapsed. Seven out of 18 patients with relapsed or persistent AML, or nearly 39 percent, had a complete remission following t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer declines, Stanford-led study says A study of nearly 3,000 women with early stage breast cancer indicates a recent, significant decline in the use of chemotherapy despite the lack of any change in national treatment recommendations or guidelines, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Michigan. The findings reflect a growing acknowledgement by oncologists and patients that for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify epigenetic orchestrator of pancreatic cancer cells IMAGE: SUV420H2 (green) is highly expressed in advanced, invasive regions (lower right) of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but is less prevalent in healthy regions of the tissue (upper right) and early stage lesions... view more Credit: Viotti et al., 2018 Genentech researchers have identified an enzyme that shifts pancreatic cancer cells to a more aggressive, drug-resistant state by epigenetica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dolphin and bear studies have paved the way to improved population forecasting IMAGE: This is a Bottlenose dolphin mother and calf ( Tursiops aduncus ) of Western Australia. view more Credit: Kate Sprogis, Murdoch Cetacean Research Unit A new article by a UNSW Sydney-led team challenges the validity of current methods for forecasting the persistence of slow-growing species for conservation purposes, and provides a better approach to reducing the threat of extinction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A bird in the bush is worth $223,851 in the hand IMAGE: This is a Black-backed Oriole. view more Credit: Credit: Susan Schmoyer The arrival of a single Black-backed Oriole bird in rural Pennsylvania - 5000 kilometres from its usual home in Mexico - was worth an estimated $US 223,851 to the economy from bird watchers flocking to see it. The study, by a UNSW Sydney-led team, is the first to quantify the economic impact of a vagrant bir
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Futurity.org
Targeting this protein could prevent Alzheimer’s People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant are at substantial risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Now, researchers have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta. “Scientists have been interested in APOE for years but there are only a few examples where researchers have targeted it wit
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Right Whale or Left Whale?Scientists examine lateralized behaviors in blue whales.
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The Scientist RSS
Idaho Officials Challenge Court Order to Destroy Illegally Collected Wildlife DataA federal court had ordered the Idaho Fish and Game Department to destroy data collected from a protected wilderness area.
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Viden
Her er årets mest populære apps Det er blevet den tid på året, hvor en masse regnskab skal gøres op. Blandt andet hvilke apps, der er årets mest populære. Læs også: Iværksættere vil lave internet - hvor du ejer dine data Apple, som leverer smartphones - og dermed også apps - til ca. halvdelen af danskerne, har netop sendt 2017-hitlisterne på gaden. Toppen ligner i høj grad listen fra 2016 - dog med med en markant undtagelse. Si
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhoodChildren between the ages of 7 and 9 may be at greater risk for developing asthma if they consumed high amounts of fructose in early childhood or their mothers drank a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages while pregnant, according to new research.
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The Atlantic
Terrorists Are Still Obsessed With New York City Updated at 11:07 a.m. ET A man wearing an improvised explosive device caused an explosion Monday in a New York subway tunnel near Times Square, authorities said. The state’s governor told New Yorkers what they already know: attacks like this one are inevitable in a city that is a permanent target for anti-American terrorists. “This is New York,” Andrew Cuomo, the New York state governor, said Mon
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The Atlantic
Astronomers to Check Mysterious Interstellar Object for Signs of Technology The email about “a most peculiar object” in the solar system arrived in Yuri Milner’s inbox last week. Milner, the Russian billionaire behind Breakthrough Listen, a $100 million search for intelligent extraterrestrial life, had already heard about the peculiar object. ‘Oumuamua barreled into view in October, the first interstellar object seen in our solar system. Astronomers around the world chas
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Once settled, immigrants play important guard roles in mongoose packs View the video Immigrants, they get the job done — eventually. Among dwarf mongooses, it takes newcomers a bit to settle into a pack. But once these immigrants become established residents , everyone in the pack profits, researchers from the University of Bristol in England report online December 4 in Current Biology . Dwarf mongooses ( Helogale parvula ) live in groups of around 10, with a pecki
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Scientific American Content: Global
Lab Work for X-Ray Stars and Movie Stars December 1967 X-ray Stars “In the five years since Scorpius X-I was discovered a total of about 30 X-ray stars, or at least sources of X radiation, have been detected in rocket surveys. A general, diffuse background of X rays in space has also been observed. About a dozen rockets have been flown on these missions, and the total observing time so far adds up to only one hour (five minutes
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Scientific American Content: Global
Alien Probe or Galactic Driftwood? SETI Tunes In to 'Oumuamua Ever since its discovery in mid-October as it passed by Earth already outbound from our solar system, the mysterious object dubbed ‘Oumuamua (Hawaiian for “first messenger”) has left scientists utterly perplexed. Zooming down almost perpendicularly inside Mercury’s orbit at tens of thousands of kilometers per hour—too fast for our star’s gravity to catch—‘Oumuamua appeared to have been dropped in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Going virtual—UniSA app to equip next-gen journalists Credit: University of South Australia Journalism has emerged as one of the 21st century's most rapidly "disrupted" industries as the rise of social media has undermined the effectiveness of traditional journalism. So how do you teach journalism in this new context so that it is meaningful and relevant to new generations of journalists? UniSA is pioneering a new virtual reality journalism app that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A keep-fit gadget for your dog this Christmas – who really benefits? The ‘Dog Internet’ project explores how commercial pet technology is not designed with the end-user in mind. Credit: University of York Researchers at the University of York have enlisted the help of our canine friends to test the concept of a "Dog Internet." The Dog Internet project explores how commercial pet technology , such as GPS trackers to follow your cat's movement or devices to monitor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traces of historical reindeer grazing can still be observed after 100 years A typical historical milking ground in Padjelanta, Sweden. Credit: Dagmar Egelkraut With the holiday season around the corner, most people may first think of reindeer as Santa Claus' trusted helpers. But it turns out that reindeer are not only good at pulling Santa's sleigh; they can also teach us important lessons about the functioning of ecosystems. By studying small meadows in the Swedish moun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Private sector support is key to reducing emissions in the Middle East and North Africa, experts say Air quality experts from the University of Surrey are calling on private businesses to help the Middle East and North African (MENA) region reduce harmful emissions after conducting a comprehensive review on air pollution in the region. The advice comes after their study was published in the Atmospheric Environment journal. The study, conducted by researchers from the Global Centre for Clean Air
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellhead Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material seque
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA as a supramolecular building block Credit: Leiden University PhD student Willem Noteborn has investigated supramolecular structures. These can be useful for the loading of medicines and signalling molecules regarding, for example, cellular differentiation. In his thesis, he describes the functioning of these structures. Noteborn: 'The goal of my research is making materials on a nanoscale, that eventually can form structures excee
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Dagens Medicin
Hjerteforeningen lukker stort hjerteprojektSammen med Dansk Cardiologisk Selskab sætter Hjerteforeningen en stopper for det store studie af blodfortyndende lægemidler, DANNOAC-studiet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secret surveillance methods in the Digital Age—how to ensure human rights protection Secret surveillance powers of authorities are reaching unprecedented levels in the Digital Age, raising challenges for the protection of human rights such as the right to privacy. In her inaugural address at Tilburg University on Friday, December 15th 2017. Prof. Eleni Kosta analyzes the right to privacy and its justified limitations as stipulated in the European Convention on Human Rights in rel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hate crimes against LGBT+ people in deprived areas ignored Hate crimes against LGBT+ residents in deprived neighbourhoods risk going unrecorded because housing associations rarely enquire about tenants' sexual or gender identity, research has found. The University of Stirling study , which was funded by the British Academy, found many gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people living in deprived neighbourhoods in Scotland have experienced either abuse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Additive manufacturing, explained Additive manufacturing makes it possible to create objects with complex geometries. Credit: MIT Sloan School of Management Additive manufacturing is the process of creating an object by building it one layer at a time. It is the opposite of subtractive manufacturing, in which an object is created by cutting away at a solid block of material until the final product is complete. Technically, additi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snatching at the cradle of life Silence of the WA outback key in detecting low-frequency radio waves and, maybe, the precursors of life itself. The hunt for extraterrestrial life might not look like you would expect. Rather than fully formed, many-limbed, slime-covered humanoid beings, scientists at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) are detecting much tinier things. They're detecting molecules on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three of nature's most bizarre relationships Not every partnership in the animal kingdom is fair and equal. The notion of nature's sacred balance is an intriguing one, full of tales of the intricate web of life that enables plants and animals to thrive, evolve and grow. But Mother Nature has not created all relationships equally. In fact, some of the partnerships that exist in the natural world are positively bizarre. Here are three of ou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secret life of island animals Islands are places of myth and wonder that have fascinated people for centuries. They're also places to find odd versions of some familiar animals. For some time, scientists have noticed that something weird happens to mammals living on islands . Islands seem to host small versions of mammals that are normally much bigger on the mainland and large versions of mammals that are normally small on th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows why meteroids explode before they reach Earth Our atmosphere is a better shield from meteoroids than researchers thought, according to a new paper published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science . When a meteor comes hurtling toward Earth, the high-pressure air in front of it seeps into its pores and cracks, pushing the body of the meteor apart and causing it to explode. "There's a big gradient between high-pressure air in front of the meteor a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As building floor space increases, time running out to cut energy use and meet climate goals: UN IMAGE: (GABC) is a voluntary, international, multi-stakeholder partnership. Its Secretariat is hosted by UN Environment. The GABC was launched by France and UN Environment at COP21. Since COP21, 24 countries and... view more Credit: GABC Energy intensity per square meter of the building sector needs to improve 30% by 2030 to stay on track to meet Paris climate goals Use of smart controls and con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study shows Diabetes is known to increase a person's risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Further, the researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The nitrogen-containing waste product
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Popular Science
We're missing out on a better way to make flu vaccines Every year, the World Health Organization makes a gamble : which flu viruses will dominate? They get two chances (one for each hemisphere) and this year, the WHO seems to have gotten it right twice. But vaccine effectiveness was still only 10 percent in Australia . It’s going to be a tough flu season —and we have eggs to blame. First things first: What does 10 percent effectiveness look like? Jus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why doesn't Venus have a magnetosphere? At a closest average distance of 41 million km (25,476,219 mi), Venus is the closest planet to Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL/Magellan For many reasons, Venus is sometimes referred to as "Earth's twin" (or "sister planet," depending on who you ask). Like Earth, it is terrestrial (i.e. rocky) in nature, composed of silicate minerals and metals that are differentiated between an iron-nickel core and silic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can cranberries conquer the world? A US industry depends on it Credit: USDA Name all the billion-dollar crops grown in the U.S. Midwest. The answer: Corn, soybeans and cranberries. Wait, what? Roughly 60 percent of the U.S. cranberry crop is produced in Wisconsin, generating close to US$1 billion in revenue and 4,000 jobs . Other top-producing states include Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon and Washington. Overall, cranberries are almost exclusively North A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How divesting of fossil fuels could help save the planet The announcements show that investors withdraw their funds to either mitigate financial risks or for ethical reasons. But the question remains whether divestment and divestment announcements have a financial impact on the share price of fossil fuel companies . We're a team of researchers at the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) at the University of Waterloo. We recently c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scars left by Australia's undersea landslides reveal future tsunami potential The Byron Scar, left behind by an undersea landslide. Colours indicate depths. Credit: Samantha Clarke, Author provided It is often said that we know more about the surface of other planets than we do about our own deep ocean. To overcome this problem, we embarked on a voyage on CSIRO's research vessel, the Southern Surveyor , to help map Australia's continental slope – the region of seafloor con
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Live Science
Geminid Meteor Shower Peaks This Week! How to See Year's Best Meteor Display Were it not for this past summer's Great American Solar Eclipse , the most anticipated celestial event in 2017 would almost certainly be the upcoming performance of the Geminid meteor shower. This pre-Christmas display of celestial fireworks is due to reach its peak during the long, dark hours from Wednesday night (Dec. 13) into early Thursday morning (Dec. 14). The moon will be a thin,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooks The skeletal remains and fish hooks. Credit: ANU An archaeologist from The Australian National University (ANU) has uncovered the world's oldest known fish-hooks placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor. The five fish hooks were among items carefully placed under the chin, and around the jaws of a female from the Pleistocene era, dating back 12,000 year
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could a cardboard principle boost vehicle safety?Prior research has shown that even thin-walled tubing can effectively absorb energy, which makes it appealing to those who engineer vehicles and other structures that may endure crashes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows why meteroids explode before they reach Earth Credit: CC0 Public Domain Our atmosphere is a better shield from meteoroids than researchers thought, according to a new paper published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science . When a meteor comes hurtling toward Earth, the high-pressure air in front of it seeps into its pores and cracks, pushing the body of the meteor apart and causing it to explode. "There's a big gradient between high-pressure ai
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Dagens Medicin
Formand for sundhedsudvalg vil frede Sundhedsplatformen et halvt årDet nyvalgte formand for Hovedstaden sundhedsudvalg Christoffer Buster Reinhardt vil give Sundhedsplatformen til sommer til at bevise, at den kan reddes.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Sensor Gives Driverless Cars a Human-Like View of the World When you stare through the windshield of your car, you don’t see the world the same way a dash cam does. What you see is being warped by the inner workings of your brain, prioritizing detail at the center of the scene while keeping attention on the peripheries to spot danger. Luis Dussan thinks that autonomous cars should have that ability, too. His startup, AEye, has built a new kind of hybrid s
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cognitive science
How a CogSci undergrad invented PageRank three years before Google — Bradley C. Love A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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When Your Fitbit Goes From Activity Tracker to Personal Medical Device Fitbit spent its first decade selling activity trackers. With its latest moves, the company is starting to look less like a gear maker selling pricey accessories to fitness buffs and more like a medical-device company, catering to hospitals, patients, and health insurers. The company’s business-to-business arm, called Health Solutions, is now addressing four health conditions—sleep disorders incl
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Feed: All Latest
The US Flirts With Geoengineering to Stymie Climate Change The thing about humans is, for all our faults, we’re actually pretty good at fixing things we know we’ve screwed up. Lead in gasoline? Bad idea—let’s ban lead in gasoline. Running out of oil to make gasoline? Let’s switch to electric vehicles . Runaway climate change because humanity has taken too long to ditch fossil fuels? That’s … a bit trickier. Because even if the world meets the emissions g
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Scientific American Content: Global
DNA Has Gone Digital--What Could Possibly Go Wrong? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Biology is becoming increasingly digitized. Researchers like us use computers to analyze DNA, operate lab equipment and store genetic information. But new capabilities also mean new risks – and biologists remain largely unaware of the potential vulnerabilities that come
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Scientific American Content: Global
Will Changing Cloud Cover Accelerate Global Warming? Will Changing Cloud Cover Accelerate Global Warming? Scientists are beginning to understand whether changing cloud cover will accelerate global warming or slow it down I hate clouds. Not because they sometimes bring rain but because they are hard. Clouds come in all shapes and sizes: wispy, high cirrus, puffy cumulus, the low, gray stratocumulus layers that blanket gloomy days. This great diversi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yeast can be engineered to create protein pharmaceuticals In regular yeast (the left-hand images), the secretion of proteins is hampered by harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the yeast. The lower image shows these as fluorescent areas, which indicate cell damage. In the modified yeast (right) protein production is improved. Credit: Mingtao Huang/Chalmers It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The likelihood for mixed breeding between two songbird species lessens with warmer springs Collared flycatchers are small passerine birds that are expanding their European breeding range towards the north in response to global climate warming. Credit: Eryn McFarlane Global climate warming is considered a major threat to many living organisms but not all consequences of warming need to be harmful to species. A recent study from the University of Helsinki published on Evolution shows tha
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Science | The Guardian
Virtual therapy and stress-busting apps: can tech support mental health at work? I magine stepping into the break room in the office and instead of making yourself some coffee and complaining about work, you put on a virtual reality (VR) headset and listen to the voice of a therapist guide you through a meditation session with the aim of transporting you to a calming place far away. Trust, flexitime and free therapy – tips for a happier, healthier workforce Whether the experi
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Science | The Guardian
'You know that you’re gradually lessening': life with Huntington's H untington’s has blighted Peter Allen’s family for generations. He watched his mother, Stephanie, slowly die from the disease and before that his grandmother, Olive, fell victim to the same illness. At 51 years old, Peter is the first of his generation to show signs of the illness, but his sister, Sandy, and brother, Frank, know they are also carrying the gene. The onset of Huntington’s is insid
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Science | The Guardian
Excitement as trial shows Huntington's drug could slow progress of disease A landmark trial for Huntington’s disease has announced positive results, suggesting that an experimental drug could become the first to slow the progression of the devastating genetic illness. The results have been hailed as “enormously significant” because it is the first time any drug has been shown to suppress the effects of the Huntington’s mutation that causes irreversible damage to the bra
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Ingeniøren
Ingeniører mangler madro i frokostpausen Når offentligt ansatte IDA-medlemmer går til frokost, betaler kommuner, regioner og staten for de 29 minutters spisepause, men det er en forsvindende del, der reelt har madro. Faktisk står 96 procent af dem til rådighed for arbejdsgiveren, blandt andet fordi de mener, at det forventes af dem. Det fremgår af en undersøgelse, som IDA har foretaget blandt 3.729 af sine offentligt ansatte medlemmer.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Talk to a Science Denier without Arguing It’s the holiday season, which means plenty of opportunities for uncomfortable interactions with friends and family who are science deniers, from people who believe the moon landing was faked to those who believe vaccines cause autism or who think that humans did not cause significant global climate change . How can you deal with such science deniers effectively? My close friend invited me to
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Ingeniøren
Svenskerne sejler Danmark agterud i brug af IoT Endnu engang må Danmark se sig slået af broderfolket i øst. Mens 44 procent af svenske virksomheder allerede har implementeret IoT, så er det kun sølle 24 procent her til lands, som har gennenmført et IoT-projekt. De tilsvarende tal i og USA og Storbritannien er henholdsvis 65 og 47 procent. Det, der får danske virksomheder til at holde igen er bekymringer om sikkerheden, besvær med at finde pers
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Live Science
Ancient Rock Art Mapped in Amazing Detail, Revealing 100-Foot Snake A drone took this photo of rock art high on a mountain. Researchers used digital overlay to highlight the art in this image. Credit: Philip Riris, as featured in Antiquity Ancient rock art isn't always easy to reach, but a researcher in Venezuela has solved this challenge with a bit of modern technology: A camera-equipped drone that zipped across a rocky, watery landscape to photograph ancient
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This ancient marsupial lion had an early version of ‘bolt-cutter’ teeth Marsupial lions got their nickname from the first species discovered, which was close to the size of a lion (silhouette at left, bottom). The newly named species, Wakaleo schouteni (left, top), was smaller and lived much earlier in time, but it already has some elongated teeth (right) that were a hallmark of the family. The later, bigger lion’s slicing teeth were even longer. J. Systematic Paleon
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Las Vegas Casinos Are Now Testing Covert Gun-Sensing Technology Activate satellite view in Google Maps and head to the Las Vegas strip, and you'll see it: a strange smattering of Y-shaped buildings. Mandalay Bay. Monte Carlo. Treasure Island. The Mirage. Their blueprints put gambling at the center of everything, funneling visitors past slot machines and card tables whether they're en route to a show, their room, a restaurant, or a retail shop. For years, the
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientific American's 2017 Gadget Guide Scientific American 's 2017 Gadget Guide Big tech companies—including Apple, Amazon and Nintendo—made headlines this year, but here are some under-the-radar devices worth checking out Credits: Curiscope Ltd. Scientific American 's 2017 Gadget Guide LANTERN/SPEAKER/BOTTLE: If you had been hoping someone would invent a versatile device that could be used alternately (or simultaneously) as a lantern
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Numerical simulations reveal 'rivers of charge' in materials that become superconducting at high temperatures Illustration shows “rivers of charge” in a copper-based superconducting material. The blue circles represent charges. Credit: Caltech/Chan Laboratory Imagine phones and laptops that never heat up or power grids that never lose energy. This is the dream of scientists working with so-called high-temperature superconductors, which can effortlessly carry electrical currents with no resistance. The fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA airborne science team surveys California fires The Ventura coastline is barely visible under a plume of smoke as NASA's ER-2 high-altitude aircraft carrying JPL's AVIRIS spectrometer instrument surveys the Southern California wildfires on Dec. 7, 2017. Credit: NASA/Tim Williams A team of NASA scientists is using a high-altitude aircraft and a sophisticated imaging spectrometer built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuclear technology unlocks 50-million-year-old time capsules Sample of amber. Credit: Monash University A scientific analysis of fossilised tree resin has caused a rethink of Australia's prehistoric ecosystem, and could pave the way to recovering more preserved palaeobiological artefacts from the time of dinosaurs or prehistoric mammals. In a project that could be straight out of Jurassic Park, Monash University researchers and collaborators from the Deaki
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fowl Language: AI Decodes the Nuances of Chicken "Speech" Chickens are loquacious creatures, and Kevin Mitchell would know. He oversees the care of about a million of them on Wilcox Farms properties in Washington State and Oregon. Mitchell says the birds have “patterns of speech” that reveal a lot about their well-being. They are usually noisiest in the morning—a robust concert of clucks, chortles and caws. “When I hear that, I know they are pretty
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Live Science
Earth's Mysterious Hum Recorded Underwater for 1st Time Earth "hums" — and it does it all the time. Credit: NASA Far from the blaring cacophony of cities, towns and suburbs, there are far quieter soundtracks to be found — the murmurs of wind rustling grasses, rushing waves tumbling onto beaches, the creaking of tree branches and trunks. But underneath all that is yet another soundscape, a permanent, low-frequency drone produced by Earth itself, from t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble frames an explosive galaxyDon't be fooled! The cosmic swirl of stars in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image may seem tranquil and unassuming, but this spiral galaxy, known as ESO 580-49, actually displays some explosive tendencies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New satellite imagery reveals new highest Antarctic Peninsula Mountain A view of Mount Hope from the East. Credit: Alan Vaughan Cartographers surveying Antarctica have discovered Mt Hope is the tallest mountain in the British Antarctic Territory (BAT) at 3,239 m (10,654 ft) above sea level. Until now, maps showed Mt Jackson as the tallest mountain in the territory at 3,184 m (10,444 ft). New satellite data reveals this isn't the case, with Mt Hope being 55 m taller
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dolphin and bear studies pave the way to improved population forecasting A bottlenose dolphin mother and calf (Tursiops aduncus) of Western Australia. Credit: Kate Sprogis, Murdoch Cetacean Research Unit A new article by a UNSW Sydney-led team challenges the validity of current methods for forecasting the persistence of slow-growing species for conservation purposes, and provides a better approach to reducing the threat of extinction. Previous research on wild dolphin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Black box' recorder puts surgeons' robotic surgery skills under the microscope IMAGE: Andrew Hung, M.D., with the "black box " recorder and da Vinci Surgical System. view more Credit: Ricardo Carrasco III LOS ANGELES - You may know that your surgeon is using the latest minimally invasive technology for your surgery, but how do you know if they've mastered it? To help answer that question, researchers at Keck Medicine of USC looked to a custom recording tool similar in conce
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New Scientist - News
Faltering carbon capture needs more investment not doubt Boundary Dam Power Station runs a world-leading carbon capture project Design Pics Inc/REX/Shutterstock By Olive Heffernan It’s been hailed as a game-changer, a get-out-of-jail-free card that would allow us to burn fossil fuels without precipitating dangerous climate change. But the potential for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to clean up coal – the cheapest and dirtiest fossil fuel – is no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin tops $18,000 in debut on major bourse Bitcoin surged after its debut on a major global exchange Bitcoin surged past $18,000 after making its debut on a major global exchange but was trading lower on Monday, highlighting the volatility of the controversial digital currency that has some investors excited but others nervous. Trading on a futures contract began at 6:00 pm (2300 GMT) on the Chicago board options exchange (Cboe) at a pric
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New online database brings the genome into focus using molecular structure A hairpin loop from a pre-mRNA. Highlighted are the nucleobases (green) and the ribose-phosphate backbone (blue). Note that this is a single strand of RNA that folds back upon itself. Credit: Vossman/ Wikipedia Iowa State University researchers have built an accessible online database that brings critical genomic data into sharp focus with the single click of a mouse. In an article published toda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The moon in 1992The moon was a focal point for NASA in 2017, whether it was blocking out the sun during one of the most-viewed events in U.S. history, or reinvigorating the agency's human space exploration plans. But the moon has always been a focus of humanity's imagination.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galileo satellites atop rocket for next Tuesday's flight Four Galileo satellites seen before being encapsulated by the protective payload fairing on 7 December, completing the Ariane 5 for flight VA240, scheduled for 12 December 2017. Credit: ESA-CNES-Arianespace / Optique video du CSG – JM Guillon Europe's next four Galileo navigation satellites are in place atop their Ariane 5, ready to be launched next Tuesday. Liftoff from Europe's Spaceport in Kou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen boss urges end to diesel tax breaks VW's boss says diesel cars should no longer be helped with taxpayers' money The head of the world's biggest automaker Volkswagen has issued an unprecedented call to end tax breaks for diesel fuel in Germany, saying the technology must make way for cleaner ways of getting around. "I'm convinced that we need to question the sense and purpose of these diesel subsidies," Mueller told business daily H
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: California in flamesCaptured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission on 5 December 2017, this image shows flames and smoke from the fierce blazes devastating northwest Los Angeles in Southern California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Projected winter Arctic sea-ice decline coupled to Eurasian circulationArctic sea-ice cover will diminish rapidly under global warming, but its rate of retreat in boreal winter shows large intermodel differences across the models involved in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). When a model simulates a larger sea-ice decline, how does the circulation outside the Arctic change?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Crescent nebulaA young massive star that began life around 25 times more massive than our own Sun is shedding shells of material and fast winds to create this dynamic scene captured by ESA's XMM-Newton.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transformation to wind and solar achievable with low indirect GHG emissions Different low carbon technologies including wind and solar energy, and fossil carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) differ greatly when it comes to indirect greenhouse gas emissions in their life cycle. This is the result of a comprehensive new study conducted by an international team of scientists, now published in the journal Nature Energy . Contrary to some arguments, the researchers found th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The initial mass function The elliptical galaxy NGC 1600, approximately 200 million light-years away – shown in the center of the Hubble image and highlighted in the box. Astronomers have concluded from the study of this and similar galaxies that the relative populations of stars of different masses in a cluster of stars (the IMF) is influenced by the distribution of velocities in the cluster. Credit: NASA / ESA / Digital
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three kinds of information from a single X-ray measurement The physicists Dr. Andreas Johannes (l.) and Professor Dr. Carsten Ronning in a laboratory at the Institute of Solid State Physics of Friedrich Schiller University Jena. Credit: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU Jena Whatever the size of mobile phones or computers are, the way in which such electronic devices operate relies on the interactions between materials. For this reason, engineers as well as researche
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Ingeniøren
Tyske forskere forsøger at øge datatætheden mere end 100 gange En enkelt bit på en harddisk fylder i dag omkring 10 x 10 nanometer, men tyske forskere har i laboratoriet fået reduceret arealet væsentligt - måske helt op på en faktor 100 i reduktion. Med dagens teknologi kan arealet for en bit ikke komme længere ned, på grund af kvantemekaniske begrænsninger, udtaler Torben Jasper-Tönnies, som er ph.d-studerende på universitet i Kiel til Eenews Europe . Det b
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Ingeniøren
Tysk efterretningstjeneste advarer om kinesisk spionage på LinkedIn Den tyske efterretningstjeneste BfV mener, at Kina bruger falske LinkedIn-profiler til at indsamle information om tyske embedsmænd og politikere. Det skriver BBC. LinkedIn-profilerne har forsøgt at kontakte mindst 10.000 tyskere, siger efterretningstjenesten, der mener, at formålet muligvis er at rekruttere hemmelige kilder i den tyske stat. Kina har afvist lignende beskyldninger om it-spionage f
12h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #30: Teknologiske startups slår USA »Hvem gider tage til Finland i mørke og slud,« spørger den årlige start-up festival Slush med glimt i øjet. Den tiltrækker nu på tiende år 20.000 festivalgængere til en uge for startups og tech. For tredje år i træk er Slush gået sammen med investorfirmaet Atomico i London om at tage pulsen på det europæiske tech-startup-miljø. Og for tredje år i træk ser det bedre ud end året før. Hvis man kigge
12h
Ingeniøren
Google Maps vil nu sige, når du skal stå af bussen Nu er Google Maps snart klar med en konkurrent til Rejseplanen, hvor du ikke blot får lagt en plan, men faktisk bliver fulgt tæt under turen. I en kommende opdatering til Google Maps vil du kunne få live-opdateringer, så den kan fortælle dig, hvis du skal hoppe af bussen - eller stå af på næste togstation, skriver TechCrunch . På Android-telefoner vil beskederne ikke kun kunne komme inde i appen,
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Progress on tailorable nanoscale emulsion for a wide variety of applications including drug delivery Credit: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Researchers from the University of Queensland and Monash University in collaboration with ANSTO scientists have clarified how behaviour of tailorable nanoscale emulsions (TNEs) interact with their targets is directed by the interfacial structure. The study was recently published in Soft Matter . The collaboration reported that
12h
Dagens Medicin
Antibiotika har ingen effekt i behandling af myelomatose Et uafhængigt dansk studie har afkræftet tese om antibiotikaet clarithromycin fordelagtige potentiale i behandlingen af myelomatose. Tværtimod fandt forskerne en række bivirkninger ved brug af clarithromycin.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny genterapi viser lovende resultatet mod genstridig lymfom Fase II-forsøg viser, at seks måneder efter en enkelte dosis med kræftlægemidlet Kymriah mod non-Hodgkin lymfom har mange patienter ingen tegn på tilbagefald.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volumetric 3-D printing builds on need for speed Volumetric 3D printing creates parts by overlapping three laser beams that define an object’s geometry from three different directions, creating a hologram-like 3D image suspended in the vat of resin. The laser light, which is at a higher intensity where the beams intersect, is kept on for about 10 seconds, enough time to cure the object. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory While addit
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaner, cheaper hydrogen from methane Credit: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain Researchers from the Institute of Chemical Technology (ITQ), Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) and the Superior Council of Scientific Investigations (CSIC) have developed ceramic membranes that make it possible to produce compressed hydrogen from methane in a cleaner, cheaper way. Results of the investigation have applications in the field of hydrog
12h
Big Think
Who Can Translate This Mysterious Map Rug? This rug would really tie any map-lover's room together. It is the product of two venerable map-making traditions, one eastern, the other western. Since at least the time of the Soviet occupation (1979-'89), Afghanistan is the source of so-called 'war rugs': carpets depicting the instruments of modern warfare rather than ancient geometric patterns (see # 395 ). This particular rug fits into t
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny metode kan forudsige prognose for patienter med leukæmiFlowcytometri kan bruges til at finde restsygdom hos T-ALL-patienter, viser nyt studie. Det kan forbedre den individuelle behandlingsstrategi for patienterne.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic sea ice loss and the Eurasian winter cooling trend: Is there a link? Mean DJF 2-m temperature and 200-hpa geopotential height changes in the ERA-Interim reanalysis product (2005-2014 mean minus 1981-1990 mean). Credit: Thomas W. Collow, Wanqiu Wang, and Arun Kumar Observations of Arctic sea ice have shown that it has been melting at a fast pace over the last few decades. However, what is more uncertain and presently a subject of debate is how these sea ice changes
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nyt lægemiddel forbedrer behandling af Hodgkin lymfomKombinationsbehandling til patienter med fremskreden Hodgkin lymfom giver 23 pct. højere succesrate end standardbehandling.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrastretchable and deformable bioprobes using Kirigami designs Ultrastretchable 'Kirigami' bioprobe device. The stretched device (upper picture) and the device placed over the biological tissue (lower image). Credit: Toyohashi University Of Technology. A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has devel
12h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rambøll, Sweco, Man Diesel og flere endnu jagter ingeniører Capacity & Inventory Planning Specialist Novozymes A/S Senior tilsynsleder Arup & Partners Danmark A/S Maskinmester til Teknisk Planlægningssektion Forsvarsministeriets Ejendomsstyrelse (FES) Ingeniør til driftsanalyse Forsvaret Manager leading department Electrical & Mechanical Substation Design Ørsted Erfaren Project Manager Bavarian Nordic A/S Erfarne Project Managers til udstyrsprojekter Bava
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Ingeniøren
BAGGRUND: AlphaZero spiller skak på en overnaturlig måde Folkene fra DeepMind i London har gjort det igen. Lavet et nyt system, der mestrer kunsten at spille brætspil bedre end nogen på Jorden. Det nye program AlphaZero er en generalisering af det tidligere program AlphaGo Zero, der lærte sig selv at spille det komplicerede asiatiske spil Go. Det nye program spiller ikke alene Go bedre end alle andre. Det er også verdens bedste til skak og shogi, også
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nyt våben på vej i kampen mod knoglemarvskræftIndledende forsøg viser god effekt af celleterapi til myelomatose-patienter, som ikke har haft gavn af nogen anden form for behandling.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ingen effekt af individuelle dosisøgninger til leukæmi-patienter Det kan tilsyneladende ikke svare sig at tilpasse dosis af kemoterapistoffet 6-MP til hver enkel patient under konsolideringsbehandling for akut lymfoblastær leukæmi.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Her er årets prismodtagere på ASH Den forhenværende amerikanske vicepræsident Joe Biden var blandt prismodtagerne på årets ASH-kongres.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Kombinationsbehandling virker lovende mod kronisk lymfatisk leukæmiEn tredjedel af de patienter, som tidligere var blevet fejlslagent behandlet for kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi, havde ingen tegn på sygdommen efter behandling med ny kombinationsbehandling.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reductions in individual plant growth sometimes boost community resilience ANN ARBOR--In sports, sometimes a player has to take one for the team. The same appears to be true in the plant world, where reduced individual growth can benefit the broader community. The findings from the University of Michigan's Paul Glaum and André Kessler of Cornell University help explain the persistence of some plant communities when theory predicts they should go extinct. The work is s
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel framework to infer microbial interactions Inferring the underlying ecological networks of microbial communities is important to understanding their structure and responses to external stimuli. But it can be very challenging to make accurate network inferences. In a paper published in Nature Communications , researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital detail a method to make the network inference easier by utilizing steady-state data with
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radar tracking reveals how bees develop a route between flowers As bees gain foraging experience they continually refine both the order in which they visit flowers and the flight paths they take between flowers to generate better and better routes, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London. Despite this, bees can be tricked into taking tempting shortcuts between flowers even at the cost of increasing the overall distance they have to fly. An
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internal forces directing cell migration are revealed by live-cell microscopy WOODS HOLE, Mass. -- How do cells move in a certain direction in the body -- go to a wound site and repair it, for example, or hunt down infectious bacteria and kill it? Two new studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) show how cells respond to internal forces when they orient, gain traction, and migrate in a specific direction. The research, which began as a student project in the MBL
13h
Science : NPR
Evaluating Personality Tests A drive to better understand ourselves and the people around us has led to the creation of a thriving industry built around personality testing.
13h
Science : NPR
Scientists Work To Stop Violence After Losing Their Child In Newtown After losing their child in the Newtown shooting five years ago, two scientists are working to identify the neurological roots of violence and antisocial behavior.
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Science : NPR
Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics? Michele Comisky of Vienna, Va., enrolled her 8-year-old son Jackson in a study to test the value of probiotics in preventing the gut distress often experienced when taking antibiotics. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption toggle caption Rob Stein/NPR Michele Comisky of Vienna, Va., enrolled her 8-year-old son Jackson in a study to test the value of probiotics in preventing the gut distress often experience
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reductions in individual plant growth sometimes boost community resilience The Tomato, (Lycopersicon lycopersicum) flowering, associated with a young, developing fruit. Credit: Earth100/Wikipedia In sports, sometimes a player has to take one for the team. The same appears to be true in the plant world, where reduced individual growth can benefit the broader community. The findings from the University of Michigan's Paul Glaum and André Kessler of Cornell University help
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel framework to infer microbial interactions Credit: CC0 Public Domain Inferring the underlying ecological networks of microbial communities is important to understanding their structure and responses to external stimuli. But it can be very challenging to make accurate network inferences. In a paper published in Nature Communications , researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital detail a method to make the network inference easier by utiliz
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internal forces directing cell migration are revealed by live-cell microscopy Orientation of integrins at the leading edge of a migrating Jurkat T cell, analyzed using a fluorescence polarized light microscope (instantaneous FluoPolScope) developed at the Marine Biological Laboratory. [Full caption: Representative total fluorescence intensity image of αL-T Jurkat T cell migrating on ICAM-1 (10 μg/ml) with overlay of ROIs (white = leading edge, magenta = cell body), normal
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radar tracking reveals how bees develop a route between flowers A bumblebee eats a food reward presented on an artificial flower. Five such feeders each contain 1/5 of the amount required to fill her up and the bee must learn a route to take her to all five. Visible in the background are a Landrover from which researchers monitor the harmonic radar and a shed which contains the bee's nest. Credit: Joseph Woodgate As bees gain foraging experience they continua
13h
New Scientist - News
‘Scary’ spider photos on Facebook are revealing new species By Joshua Rapp Learn Freaky photos of giant spiders on social media may have revealed dozens of new species. “When people see an animal that they think is frightening or dangerous, the most common response is to take a photo and post it to social media,” says Heather Campbell , previously at the University of Pretoria in South Africa and now at Harper Adams University, UK. In 2013, Campbell g
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cognitive science
In Pursuit of an Artificial Brain A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Dagens Medicin
Novo Nordisks danske datterselskab får ny landechefMads Veggerby Lausten er ny general manager for Novo Nordisk Scandinavia AB, Danmark og Island.
13h
Ingeniøren
Rigshospitalet lægger filter på patienternes arvemasse Fra nytår bliver det på Rigshospitalet en del af standardbehandlingen at tilbyde patienter, der formentlig lider af en arvelig sygdom, en kortlægning af deres fulde arvemasse. Hidtil har man kun kortlagt gendefekter, som man ved, er knyttet til kendte sygdomme ved at kigge efter fejl i 5.000-6.000 gener ud af menneskets ca. 21.000 gener – svarende til én procent af genomets tre milliarder basepar
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavy snow causes travel mayhem in northern Europe Pedestrians walk over the Millennium Bridge in central London The heaviest snowfall in four years in Britain caused travel mayhem Sunday, while more than 300 flights were cancelled at Germany's busiest airport and a ferry ran aground in the French port of Calais. Hundreds of air passengers were stranded in Frankfurt, Germany's financial capital, as well as Britain, and many took to Twitter to com
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five elephants killed by train in India Many busy migratory routes have been cut by roads and railway lines in India's Assam and West Bengal states, increasing the risk of accidental elephant deaths A train has struck and killed five elephants as they crossed over tracks at a tea plantation in northeast India, an official said Monday. The elephants, including a pregnant female, were part of a larger herd wandering through the plantatio
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snow and ice ground hundreds of flights in Frankfurt An airplane of British Airways is being de-iced as it stands on the tarmac of the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on December 10, 2017, as flights in Frankfurt also faced snow-related delays More than 300 flights were cancelled and hundreds more delayed as snow and ice blocked runways at Germany's largest airport in Frankfurt on Sunday, the airport operator said. Some 330 flights were ca
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin futures rise as virtual currency hits major exchange This Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, photo shows the Chicago Board Options Exchange website announcing that bitcoin futures will start trading on the CBOE on Sunday evening, Dec. 10. Bitcoin futures will start trading a week later on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato) The first-ever bitcoin future jumped after it began trading Sunday as the increasingly popular virtual currency made
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As bitcoin soars, warnings of a bubble proliferate This Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, photo shows the Chicago Board Options Exchange website announcing that bitcoin futures will start trading on the CBOE on Sunday evening, Dec. 10. Bitcoin futures will start trading a week later on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato) Is bitcoin in a bubble? The price of bitcoin has been soaring this year, and last week alone it jumped from $11,000 t
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subway paleontology: LA construction unearths fossil trove In this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, a skull of a young Columbian mammoth found at the construction site of the Metro Purple Line extension is placed on a cart at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles subway system is expanding and so too are the number of prehistoric fossils being recovered as crews dig beneath the city. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) As part of the crew digging a sub
14h
Science-Based Medicine
SXSW Wellness Expo and Goop: Accepting HIV/AIDS denialism and antivaccine pseudoscience by embracing Dr. Kelly Brogan I couldn’t help but notice that Goop was in the news again last week. Goop, in case you’re not familiar with it, is an online “lifestyle” and “wellness” empire founded and overseen by Gwyneth Paltrow, or, as I like to refer to it, yet another triumph of celebrity pseudoscience and quackery . It’s an imperfect rule of thumb that, whenever you see the word “wellness” you will usually find some quac
15h
Science | The Guardian
Breast cancer screening – is it worth it? M any of us will know someone who had breast cancer found at screening. The cancer seen on a mammogram may have been microscopic, so early in its malignant life that it hadn’t broken through the wall of its milk duct. Thank heavens, then, for breast screening, which is offered to all women between 50 and 70 in the UK and other countries. It is promoted enthusiastically as lifesaving, but does it
15h
Science | The Guardian
Why did climate scientists emit 30,000 tonnes of C02 this weekend? | Peter Kalmus T his weekend, 25,000 Earth, Sun, and planetary scientists from across the US and abroad flew to New Orleans for the annual American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting. These scientists study the impact global warming is having on Earth. Unfortunately, their air travel to and from the meeting will contribute to that warming by emitting around 30,000 tonnes of CO2. As an Earth scientist and AGU memb
15h
Ingeniøren
Fire tip til at opdatere dit CV Stop med at spild tiden i Word Mange benytter Microsoft Word til at fifle med deres CV, hvor man ender med at sidde og rykke margen frem og tilbage for at få alle oplysninger med. Det er imidlertid bøvlet og besværligt. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Men løsningen ligger heldigvis lige for. På et bredt udvalg af hjemmesider kan du nemlig finde skabeloner, som du kan b
16h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 11. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: En norsk ingeniør forsøger at bevise, at han i et specialbygget drivhus kan dyrke konkurrencedygtige agurker, i et af verdens tørreste
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Ingeniøren
Ny formand for Region H’s sundhedsudvalg: Nødt til at se, om skidtet kan fungere Den nyvalgte formand for Region Hovedstadens Sundhedsudvalg – Christoffer Buster Reinhardt (K) – vil frede Sundhedsplatformen indtil sommer for at give de politiske hjælpepakker en chance for at virke. »Jeg kunne godt have lyst til at svare, at vi bare skal afskaffe det,« forklarer politikeren, da Version2 spørger om hans holdning til platformen. »Men det er også det nemme svar. Jeg har ikke noge
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Science | The Guardian
Mass starvation is humanity’s fate if we keep flogging the land to death | George Monbiot B rexit; the crushing of democracy by billionaires; the next financial crash; a rogue US president: none of them keeps me awake at night. This is not because I don’t care – I care very much. It’s only because I have a bigger question on my mind. Where is all the food going to come from? By the middle of this century there will be two or three billion more people on Earth. Any one of the issues I
17h
Science | The Guardian
Country diary: even reduced to bare bones the bat's magic remains I found it at the top of the field in July, after the barley harvest. A little body, wings folded and face scrunched. It was snagged on a scaffold of stubble like a miniature sky burial, overlooking a vista it must have known well until the previous night, when, somehow, all its knowing became nothing. Reflexively, I picked it up. In my hand, with its sky-tickling energy surrendered to gravity an
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ben-Gurion U. researcher indicates nicotine replacement is safer for pregnant women than smoking BEER-SHEVA, Israel...December 11, 2017 - Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is safer than smoking and should be recommended to more pregnant patients who are not able to quit on their own, according to a new review study in the Medical Journal of Australia led by a Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researcher. NRT is a medically approved way to ingest nicotine to help quit smoking. Types o
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile IMAGE: 3-D printed part for nuclear fusion test reactor. view more Credit: Dr. Leifeng Liu, University of Birmingham A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been show to achieve exception levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes. The findings, published in Materials Today , outline how
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soy, cruciferous vegetables associated with fewer common breast cancer treatment side effects WASHINGTON -- Consuming soy foods (such as soy milk, tofu and edamame) and cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli) may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, say a team of scientists led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. In the study, published
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
E-cig use increases risk of beginning tobacco cigarette use in young adults PITTSBURGH, Dec. 11, 2017 - Young adults who use electronic cigarettes are more than four times as likely to begin smoking tobacco cigarettes within 18 months as their peers who do not vape, according to new University of Pittsburgh research. The findings demonstrate that e-cigarettes are serving as a gateway to traditional smoking, contrary to their purported value as a smoking cessation tool. P
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anesthetics have the same effects on plants as they have on animals and humans A new study published in Annals of Botany shows that plants react to anesthetics similarly to the way animals and humans do, suggesting plants are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future. Anesthetics were first used in the 19th century when it was discovered that inhaling ether gas stopped patients feeling pain during surgery. Since then many different chemicals have been found to
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to air pollution just before or after conception raises risk of birth defects CINCINNATI -- Women exposed to air pollution just prior to conception or during the first month of pregnancy face an increased risk of their children being born with birth defects, such as cleft lip or palate or abnormal hearts. Although the increased risk is modest, the potential impact on a population basis is noteworthy because all pregnant women have some amount of exposure. "The most suscept
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy may increase chronic disease risk in children New research reveals that children born to women with rheumatoid arthritis face an increased susceptibility for certain chronic diseases. The findings, which appear in Arthritis Care & Research , should be used to increase awareness among pediatricians and general practitioners. Pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis may be concerned that they might pass rheumatoid arthritis or other related
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Payment incentives to psychiatrists in Ontario do not increase access for new patients Incentive payments, introduced to encourage community-based psychiatrists to see new patients after discharge from a psychiatric hospital or following suicide attempts, do not increase access, found new research published in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal ) . Many jurisdictions have introduced incentive payments to improve delivery of and access to care, and to improve health outcome
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicians, especially female and rural doctors, retiring earlier than expected Physicians in British Columbia are retiring earlier than previously thought and many are reducing their working hours in the years leading up to retirement, found new research published in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal ) . These findings indicate that estimates based on physician "head counts" from data on physician licences may be overestimating the number of active physicians. "Th
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with atrial fibrillation at greater risk of death in rural hospitals than urban hospitals Philadelphia, December 11, 2017 - Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted to rural hospitals in the United States have a greater chance of dying during their hospital stay than patients admitted to urban hospitals for the same condition, according to a new report in HeartRhythm . AF is a common problem, consisting of skipped or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) that can lead to blood clo
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Injuries from window blinds send two children to the emergency department every day Most homes have them. They help keep our rooms warm or cold and even add a pop of color to tie the décor together. But window blinds can cause serious injuries or even death to young children. A new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital looks at this ongoing cause of injury and fatality and urges the industry to do more for the safety of
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Can China Contain Bitcoin? It was only a matter of time before Bobby Lee, CEO of China’s longest-running Bitcoin exchange, found himself in the crosshairs of Chinese regulators. His exchange, BTCC, had occupied a gray area of Chinese law, neither licensed nor explicitly illegal. Bitcoin is a decentralized digital currency that can be sent electronically around the world, and its growing popularity made Chinese authorities
18h
Ingeniøren
DB Cargo efter dødsulykke: Vi ved ikke, hvordan det kunne ske Den 12. december 2016 var en sort dag for banegodsfirmaet DB Cargo. På kombiterminalen i Høje Taastrup, hvor gods omlastes fra togvogne til lastbiler og omvendt, omkom en 19-årig togklargøringselev, mens han var i gang med at rangere et godstog ind mod terminalen. Det knap 400 meter lange godstog skulle bakke ind mod kombiterminalen, så eleven havde stillet sig på trinbrættet på den bagerste vogn
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Mt Hope installed as 'UK's highest peak' Image copyright BAS/Alan Vaughan Image caption Mount Hope is more than twice the height of Ben Nevis in Scotland Britain has a new tallest mountain. Mt Hope, which is sited in the part of the Antarctic claimed by the UK, was recently re-measured and found to tower above the previous title holder, Mt Jackson, by a good 50m (160ft). Hope is now put at 3,239m (10,626ft); Jackson is 3,184m (10,446ft)
22h
Futurity.org
Black holes aren’t as strong as we thought Scientists have discovered that black holes have significantly weaker magnetic fields than previously thought. A 40-mile-wide black hole 8,000 light years from Earth named V404 Cygni yielded the first precise measurements of the magnetic field that surrounds the deepest wells of gravity in the universe. Study authors found the magnetic energy around the black hole is about 400 times lower than pr
23h


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