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Den blødende plantebøf kommer til Danmark Det vakte stor opsigt, da USA’s største kødproducent, Tyson Foods, for godt et år siden investerede i firmaet Beyond Meats, der udelukkende producerer kødløst kød, hvor proteinerne er plantebaserede. Dengang stod en introduktion af kødløst hakket fars ikke først for hos de to store danske supermarkedskoncerner, Coop og Dansk Supermarked. Men fra nytår får en 100 procent plantebaseret fars alligev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoking leads to less increase in life expectancy for less educated womenLife expectancy in Sweden has risen steadily during the last few decades for most groups. One exception is women whose highest educational level is compulsory school. This is mostly because of smoking, says a new dissertation in sociology.'Life expectancy has stayed level in the last 20-30 years for women with only a compulsory schooling in Sweden, but it's increased for other social groups. A big
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New silicon structure opens the gate to quantum computers The researchers demonstrated the ability to control with precision the behavior of two silicon-based quantum bits, or qubits, paving the way for making complex, multi-qubit devices using technology that is less expensive and easier to manufacture than other approaches. Credit: David Zajac, Princeton University In a major step toward making a quantum computer using everyday materials, a team led b
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Medical Labs Sue US Government Over Medicare FeesThe American Clinical Laboratory Association claims that scheduled reimbursements for tests are too low and could put small companies out of business.
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Inside Science
In a Lake Bed's Layers, a History of Pollution, Human Disease and More In a Lake Bed's Layers, a History of Pollution, Human Disease and More Sediment core from a Copenhagen lake tells the story of the Industrial Revolution. Copenhagenatdawn.jpg Copenhagen at dawn Image credits: Shutterstock Earth Tuesday, December 12, 2017 - 16:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- It's no secret that the Industrial Revolution's rapid increases in urban populations and m
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Science : NPR
How Scientists Are Growing Mini Brains In Petri Dishes For Experiments All week, All Things Considered is offering Highly Specific Superlatives in honor of the year that was. On Tuesday, we look at the weirdest leap forward in brain science. Researchers can now grow mini brains in a petri dish and then experiment on them.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Jupiter’s massive Great Red Spot is at least 350 kilometers deep NEW ORLEANS — Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has deep roots. Data from the first pass of NASA’s Juno spacecraft over the incessant storm show that its clouds stretch at least 350 kilometers down into the planet’s atmosphere. That means the storm is about as deep as the International Space Station is high above the Earth. Juno has been orbiting Jupiter since July 4, 2016, and it made its first close fly
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How body cells change during type 2 diabetes onsetResearchers have found fresh evidence to explain the processes that occur in the body's cells leading to the onset of type2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The planet’s largest landslides happen on submarine volcanoesLarge volume submarine landslides, triggered by the inception and growth of submarine volcanos, represent among the largest mass movements of sediment on Earth’s surface. These landslides could potentially cause tsunamis, and represent a significant, and as yet unaccounted for marine hazard.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer-protecting enzyme is 'also promoting its growth'The NEIL3 enzyme has long been known to repair ‘day-to-day’ oxidative damage to DNA that is implicated in diseases of ageing, including dementia and cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticlesUsing light-emitting nanoparticles, scientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more precise treatment. The technology could improve patient cure rates and survival times.
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Science : NPR
An Asteroid Gets Its Close-Up As Gemenids Light Up The Sky A photographer looks at the night sky to see the annual Geminid meteor shower in northern Italy in December 2015. This year's shower coincides with a close-range visit by its parent asteroid. Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images A photographer looks at the night sky to see the annual Geminid meteor shower in northern Italy in December 201
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A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cellsResearchers have found a key protein (Skn-1a) acts as a master regulator for the generation of chemosensory cells in mice. As these cells are known to detect bitter or toxic substances, the study provides insights into the body's innate defense mechanisms and could lead to the development of new drugs in future.
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Bitcoin Is Soaring. Here's Why It's Not Ready for the Big Time “To the moon!” The phrase is the battle cry of true believers in cryptocurrency bitcoin—and charts of its price in recent weeks point directly heavenward. Yet beyond a batch of newly minted crypto-millionaires, the digital asset’s recent bull run has also exposed long-standing weakness in the underlying technology that could crimp bitcoin’s long-term viability. Bitcoin was a gift to the world fro
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Science : NPR
Firefighters Struggle To Contain Southern California's Thomas Fire Cal Fire firefighters keep watch on a wildfire blaze burning the mountainside near the Cate School campus in Carpinteria, Calif., on Dec. 10, 2017. Kenneth Song/AP hide caption toggle caption Kenneth Song/AP Cal Fire firefighters keep watch on a wildfire blaze burning the mountainside near the Cate School campus in Carpinteria, Calif., on Dec. 10, 2017. Kenneth Song/AP Thousands of firefighters w
57min
NYT > Science
Trilobites: How Layers in a Latte Form Photo A layered latte made at home by Bob Fankauser, a retired engineer in Oregon, who wanted to know how espresso poured into heated milk created those layers. Credit Bob Fankhauser Any good barista will tell you that if you want to make a nice latte you pour milk into the espresso — not the other way around. But there’s another style of latte out there, too — the layered latte, or #layeredlatte
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perking up and crimping the 'bristles' of polyelectrolyte brushes IMAGE: Blair Brettmann has exposed dynamics of what makes polyelectrolyte brushes collapse and recover. The assistant professor at Georgia Tech's School for Material Sciences and Engineering is seated at an atomic... view more Credit: Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore If the bristles of a brush abruptly collapsed into wads of noodles, the brush would, of course, become useless. When
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Centralized population health coordinators improve care for patients with chronic disease A centralized chronic disease management program produced significant improvements in the care of patients with diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease treated at practices in the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) primary care network. The results of a six-month pilot study, published online today in the American Journal of Managed Care , have led to expansion of the program to all pr
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Lessons from a solar storm chaser | Miho JanvierSpace physicist Miho Janvier studies solar storms: giant clouds of particles that escape from the Sun and can disrupt life on Earth (while also producing amazing auroras). How do you study the atmosphere on the Sun, which burns at temperatures of up to around 10 million degrees Kelvin? With math! Join the TED Fellow as she shares her work trying to better understand how the Sun affects us here on
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Perking up and crimping the 'bristles' of polyelectrolyte brushes Polyelectrolyte brushes illustration: In the foreground, powerful ions in solution, shown as spheres, cause the brush's bristles to collapse like sticky spaghetti. In the background, gentler ions in solution cause the bristles to stand back straight. Credit: Peter Allen University of California Santa Barbara for this study / press handout If the bristles of a brush abruptly collapsed into wads of
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Popular Science
How to cover your digital tracks and keep your holiday gifts a surprise During the holiday season, it's hard enough to decide which gifts to buy and organize their delivery. On top of that, you need to prevent your kids, spouse, and other family members from getting wise to your plans. In the internet age, this operation is harder than ever before, because online shopping drops innumerable digital breadcrumbs. From a web browser that tracks your every move to a deliv
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter makes 'tweetstorms' easier with 'threads' Twitter is making it easier to create "tweetstorms" with a new button to add messages and create "threads" with more room to comment at the short-messaging service Twitter said Tuesday said it would make it easier for users to build "tweetstorms" by linking together posts in "threads" to expound at length at the famously short-form messaging service. The move comes just a month after Twitter ratt
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nutrition Guidelines Healthy for the Planet, Too You know those nutrition guidelines the government issues every few years? It turns out that following them isn’t just good for your health. It’s good for the planet too. “What we found is that impacts vary across nations, but in the high-impact nations, in general, you can see that, if you follow a nationally recommended diet, despite the fact that these diets don’t mention explicitly—or mos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Night-flyers or day-trippers? Study sheds light on when moths, butterflies are active Florida Museum lepidopterist Akito Kawahara displays a case of moth-butterflies, the only butterflies known to be nocturnal. Credit: Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace Butterflies fly during the day while moths travel at night - or so you might think. In reality, their behavior is much more complicated. A new Florida Museum of Natural History study offers the first comprehensive overview of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5 rocket takes off with European GPS satellites The Ariane 5 rocket blasted off in French Guiana on Tuesday with four more satellites for the Galileo navigation system, scheduled to be operational by 2020 An Ariane 5 rocket took off from the Kourou Space Centre in French Guiana on Tuesday, taking with it four satellites for Europe's Galileo navigation project, Arianespace said. The European space workhorse took off at 1836 GMT and was schedule
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers create artificial graphene in a nanofabricated semiconductor structure Etched pillars define the positions of quantum dots (red puddles) arranged in an hexagonal lattice. When the spacing between the quantum dots is sufficiently small, electrons can move between them. Credit: Diego Scarabelli/Columbia Engineering Researchers at Columbia Engineering, experts at manipulating matter at the nanoscale, have made an important breakthrough in physics and materials science,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coupled European and Greenland last glacial dust activity driven by North Atlantic climate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Coupled European and Greenland last glacial dust activity driven by North Atlantic climate Gábor Újvári a , b , 1 , Thomas Stevens c , Mihály Molnár d , Attila Demény a , Fabrice Lambert e , György Varga f , A. J. Timothy Jull d , g , h , Barna Páll-Gergely i , Jan-Pieter Buylaert b , j , and János Kovács k , l a Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Storm, rogue wave, or tsunami origin for megaclast deposits in western Ireland and North Island, New Zealand? [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Storm, rogue wave, or tsunami origin for megaclast deposits in western Ireland and North Island, New Zealand? John F. Dewey a , 1 and Paul D. Ryan b , 1 a University College, University of Oxford , Oxford OX1 4BH, United Kingdom; b School of Natural Science, Earth and Ocean Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway , Galway H91 TK33, Ireland Contributed by John F. Dewey, October 15, 2017 (s
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ideals, practices, and future prospects of stakeholder involvement in sustainability science [Sustainability Science] Ideals, practices, and future prospects of stakeholder involvement in sustainability science Jahel Mielke a , b , 1 , Hannah Vermaßen c , and Saskia Ellenbeck b , d a Global Climate Forum , 10178 Berlin, Germany; b Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences, University of Potsdam , 14482 Potsdam, Germany; c Centre for Political Practices and Orders, University of Erfurt , 99089 Erfurt, Germany; d Tr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prenatal stress accelerates offspring growth to compensate for reduced maternal investment across mammals [Anthropology] Prenatal stress accelerates offspring growth to compensate for reduced maternal investment across mammals Andreas Berghänel a , b , c , 1 , Michael Heistermann d , Oliver Schülke b , c , e , 2 , and Julia Ostner b , c , e , 2 a Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico , Albuquerque, NM 87131; b Department of Behavioral Ecology, University of Göttingen , 37077 Göttingen, Germany; c Lei
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphorylation of CENP-C by Aurora B facilitates kinetochore attachment error correction in mitosis [Biochemistry] Phosphorylation of CENP-C by Aurora B facilitates kinetochore attachment error correction in mitosis Xing Zhou a , b , c , d , 1 , Fan Zheng a , c , d , 1 , Chengliang Wang a , b , c , d , 1 , Minhao Wu a , b , c , d , Xiaozhen Zhang a , b , c , d , Qian Wang e , Xuebiao Yao a , c , d , Chuanhai Fu a , c , d , Xuan Zhang a , b , c , d , 2 , and Jianye Zang a , b , c , d , 2 a Hefei National Labor
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interaction of intramembrane metalloprotease SpoIVFB with substrate Pro-{sigma}K [Biochemistry] Interaction of intramembrane metalloprotease SpoIVFB with substrate Pro-σ K Sabyasachi Halder a , 1 , Daniel Parrell a , Douglas Whitten a , Michael Feig a , and Lee Kroos a , 2 a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University , East Lansing, MI 48824 Edited by Richard Losick, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved November 3, 2017 (received for review June 2
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
EB1-binding-myomegalin protein complex promotes centrosomal microtubules functions [Cell Biology] EB1-binding–myomegalin protein complex promotes centrosomal microtubules functions Habib Bouguenina a , Danièle Salaun a , 1 , Aurélie Mangon a , 1 , Leslie Muller b , Emilie Baudelet a , Luc Camoin a , Taro Tachibana c , Sarah Cianférani b , Stéphane Audebert a , Pascal Verdier-Pinard a , 2 , and Ali Badache a , 2 a Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), INSERM, Institut Paoli-
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
AP-4 mediates export of ATG9A from the trans-Golgi network to promote autophagosome formation [Cell Biology] AP-4 mediates export of ATG9A from the trans -Golgi network to promote autophagosome formation Rafael Mattera a , 1 , Sang Yoon Park a , 1 , Raffaella De Pace a , Carlos M. Guardia a , and Juan S. Bonifacino a , 2 a Cell Biology and Neurobiology Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892 Edited by Pie
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bicaudal D2 facilitates the cytoplasmic trafficking and nuclear import of HIV-1 genomes during infection [Cell Biology] Bicaudal D2 facilitates the cytoplasmic trafficking and nuclear import of HIV-1 genomes during infection Adarsh Dharan a , Silvana Opp b , Omar Abdel-Rahim c , Sevnur Komurlu Keceli a , Sabrina Imam a , Felipe Diaz-Griffero b , and Edward M. Campbell a , c , 1 a Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago , Maywood, IL 60153; b Department of Mi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Smek1/2 is a nuclear chaperone and cofactor for cleaved Wnt receptor Ryk, regulating cortical neurogenesis [Developmental Biology] Smek1/2 is a nuclear chaperone and cofactor for cleaved Wnt receptor Ryk, regulating cortical neurogenesis Wen-Hsuan Chang a , b , 1 , Si Ho Choi a , c , 1 , 2 , Byoung-San Moon a , Mingyang Cai a , Jungmook Lyu a , d , Jinlun Bai a , Fan Gao a , Ibrahim Hajjali a , Zhongfang Zhao e , Daniel B. Campbell f , Leslie P. Weiner f , and Wange Lu a , 2 a The Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
FMRFamide-like peptides expand the behavioral repertoire of a densely connected nervous system [Developmental Biology] FMRFamide-like peptides expand the behavioral repertoire of a densely connected nervous system James Siho Lee a , b , 1 , Pei-Yin Shih a , b , 1 , Oren N. Schaedel a , b , Porfirio Quintero-Cadena a , b , Alicia K. Rogers a , and Paul W. Sternberg a , b , 2 a Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA 91125; b Howard Hughes Medical Institute,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-resolution mapping of cis-regulatory variation in budding yeast [Genetics] High-resolution mapping of cis -regulatory variation in budding yeast Ryosuke Kita a , Sandeep Venkataram a , Yiqi Zhou a , and Hunter B. Fraser a , 1 a Department of Biology, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 Edited by Jasper Rine, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and approved November 3, 2017 (received for review October 4, 2017) Significance Genetic variants affecting gene-expres
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Precision genome editing using synthesis-dependent repair of Cas9-induced DNA breaks [Genetics] Precision genome editing using synthesis-dependent repair of Cas9-induced DNA breaks Alexandre Paix a , 1 , Andrew Folkmann a , Daniel H. Goldman a , Heather Kulaga a , Michael J. Grzelak a , Dominique Rasoloson a , Supriya Paidemarry a , Rachel Green a , Randall R. Reed a , and Geraldine Seydoux a , 1 a Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute , The Johns Hop
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Improved detection of synthetic lethal interactions in Drosophila cells using variable dose analysis (VDA) [Genetics] Improved detection of synthetic lethal interactions in Drosophila cells using variable dose analysis (VDA) Benjamin E. Housden a , b , 1 , Zhongchi Li b , Colleen Kelley b , Yuanli Wang b , Yanhui Hu b , Alexander J. Valvezan c , Brendan D. Manning c , and Norbert Perrimon b , d , 1 a Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter , Exeter, United Kingdom EX4
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transient receptor potential channel 6 regulates abnormal cardiac S-nitrosylation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy [Medical Sciences] Transient receptor potential channel 6 regulates abnormal cardiac S-nitrosylation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy Heaseung Sophia Chung a , 1 , Grace E. Kim b , 1 , Ronald J. Holewinski a , Vidya Venkatraman a , Guangshuo Zhu b , Djahida Bedja b , David A. Kass b , c , 2 , 3 , and Jennifer E. Van Eyk a , b , 2 , 3 a Advanced Clinical BioSystems Research Institute, Heart Institute, Cedars Sinai Med
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
WhiB6 regulation of ESX-1 gene expression is controlled by a negative feedback loop in Mycobacterium marinum [Microbiology] WhiB6 regulation of ESX-1 gene expression is controlled by a negative feedback loop in Mycobacterium marinum Rachel E. Bosserman a , 1 , 2 , Tiffany T. Nguyen a , 1 , 3 , Kevin G. Sanchez a , Alexandra E. Chirakos a , Micah J. Ferrell a , Cristal R. Thompson a , Matthew M. Champion b , Robert B. Abramovitch c , and Patricia A. Champion a , 4 a Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Characterization of SPP inhibitors suppressing propagation of HCV and protozoa [Microbiology] Characterization of SPP inhibitors suppressing propagation of HCV and protozoa Junki Hirano a , Toru Okamoto a , 1 , Yukari Sugiyama a , Tatsuya Suzuki a , Shinji Kusakabe a , Makoto Tokunaga a , Takasuke Fukuhara a , Miwa Sasai b , Takahiro Tougan c , Yasue Matsunaga d , Kazuo Yamashita e , Yusuke Sakai f , Masahiro Yamamoto b , Toshihiro Horii c , Daron M. Standley g , Kohji Moriishi h , Kyoji
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Osmosensing by the bacterial PhoQ/PhoP two-component system [Microbiology] Osmosensing by the bacterial PhoQ/PhoP two-component system Jing Yuan a , b , 1 , Fan Jin a , b , Timo Glatter a , and Victor Sourjik a , b , 1 a Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology , 35043 Marburg, Germany; b LOEWE Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO) , 35043 Marburg, Germany Edited by Susan Gottesman, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and approved November 6, 20
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Expansion microscopy of zebrafish for neuroscience and developmental biology studies [Neuroscience] Expansion microscopy of zebrafish for neuroscience and developmental biology studies Limor Freifeld a , Iris Odstrcil b , Dominique Förster c , Alyson Ramirez b , James A. Gagnon b , Owen Randlett b , Emma K. Costa d , Shoh Asano a , Orhan T. Celiker e , Ruixuan Gao a , f , Daniel A. Martin-Alarcon g , Paul Reginato g , h , Cortni Dick a , Linlin Chen a , i , David Schoppik j , k , l , Florian En
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphorylation of huntingtin at residue T3 is decreased in Huntington’s disease and modulates mutant huntingtin protein conformation [Neuroscience] Phosphorylation of huntingtin at residue T3 is decreased in Huntington’s disease and modulates mutant huntingtin protein conformation Cristina Cariulo a , 1 , Lucia Azzollini a , 1 , Margherita Verani a , Paola Martufi a , Roberto Boggio b , Anass Chiki c , Sean M. Deguire c , Marta Cherubini d , e , Silvia Gines d , e , J. Lawrence Marsh f , Paola Conforti g , h , Elena Cattaneo g , h , Iolanda
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Vasopressin excites interneurons to suppress hippocampal network activity across a broad span of brain maturity at birth [Neuroscience] Vasopressin excites interneurons to suppress hippocampal network activity across a broad span of brain maturity at birth Albert Spoljaric a , b , 1 , Patricia Seja a , b , 1 , Inkeri Spoljaric a , b , Mari A. Virtanen a , b , Jenna Lindfors a , b , Pavel Uvarov a , b , Milla Summanen a , b , Ailey K. Crow c , Brian Hsueh d , Martin Puskarjov a , b , Eva Ruusuvuori a , b , Juha Voipio a , Karl Dei
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Additive effects of climate and fisheries drive ongoing declines in multiple albatross species [Sustainability Science] Additive effects of climate and fisheries drive ongoing declines in multiple albatross species Deborah Pardo a , 1 , Jaume Forcada a , Andrew G. Wood a , Geoff N. Tuck b , Louise Ireland a , Roger Pradel c , John P. Croxall d , and Richard A. Phillips a a British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council , Cambridge CB3 0ET, United Kingdom; b Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Re
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proteomics of phosphorylation and protein dynamics during fertilization and meiotic exit in the Xenopus egg [Systems Biology] Proteomics of phosphorylation and protein dynamics during fertilization and meiotic exit in the Xenopus egg Marc Presler a , Elizabeth Van Itallie a , Allon M. Klein a , Ryan Kunz b , Margaret L. Coughlin a , Leonid Peshkin a , Steven P. Gygi b , Martin Wühr a , b , c , d , 1 , and Marc W. Kirschner a , 1 a Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02115; b Department of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Schroeder et al., Mutagenic cost of ribonucleotides in bacterial DNA [Correction]GENETICS Correction for “Mutagenic cost of ribonucleotides in bacterial DNA,” by Jeremy W. Schroeder, Justin R. Randall, William G. Hirst, Michael E. O’Donnell, and Lyle A. Simmons, which was first published October 16, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1710995114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:11733–11738). The authors note that, due to a printer’s error,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Alvarez et al., Human genetic variation in VAC14 regulates Salmonella invasion and typhoid fever through modulation of cholesterol [Correction] Correction for Alvarez et al., Human genetic variation in VAC14 regulates Salmonella invasion and typhoid fever through modulation of cholesterol GENETICS Correction for “Human genetic variation in VAC14 regulates Salmonella invasion and typhoid fever through modulation of cholesterol,” by Monica I. Alvarez, Luke C. Glover, Peter Luo, Liuyang Wang, Elizabeth Theusch, Stefan H. Oehlers, Eric M. Wa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Schulte et al., Prairie strips improve biodiversity and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services from corn-soybean croplands [Correction]SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Prairie strips improve biodiversity and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services from corn–soybean croplands,” by Lisa A. Schulte, Jarad Niemi, Matthew J. Helmers, Matt Liebman, J. Gordon Arbuckle, David E. James, Randall K. Kolka, Matthew E. O’Neal, Mark D. Tomer, John C. Tyndall, Heidi Asbjornsen, Pauline...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Alvarez et al., Human genetic variation in VAC14 regulates Salmonella invasion and typhoid fever through modulation of cholesterol [SI Correction]GENETICS Correction to Supporting Information for “Human genetic variation in VAC14 regulates Salmonella invasion and typhoid fever through modulation of cholesterol,” by Monica I. Alvarez, Luke C. Glover, Peter Luo, Liuyang Wang, Elizabeth Theusch, Stefan H. Oehlers, Eric M. Walton, Trinh Thi Bich Tram, Yu-Lin Kuang, Jerome I. Rotter, Colleen...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue Crocodile bites, ancient butchery, and human evolution Linear marks and pits on a 2.5-million-year-old ungulate leg bone from Bouri, Ethiopia. Traces and pits found on the surfaces of fossilized bones have been used to infer the use of stone tools by hominids for butchering carcasses. But whether the marks represent stone tool butchery or trampling and biting by carnivores remains u
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Models with unequal transition rates favor marine origins of Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes [Biological Sciences] Models with unequal transition rates favor marine origins of Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes Using a broadly sampled, time-calibrated phylogeny of Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes, Sánchez-Baracaldo et al. ( 1 ) report that the most-recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Archaeplastida likely inhabited a low-salinity (freshwater) habitat, providing an advance on a longstanding de
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Nakov et al.: Model choice requires biological insight when studying the ancestral habitat of photosynthetic eukaryotes [Biological Sciences] Reply to Nakov et al.: Model choice requires biological insight when studying the ancestral habitat of photosynthetic eukaryotes Patricia Sánchez-Baracaldo a , 1 , Giorgio Bianchini a , John P. Huelsenbeck b , John A. Raven c , d , Davide Pisani e , f , and Andrew H. Knoll g a School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol , Bristol BS8 1SS, United Kingdom; b Department of Integrative Bio
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Traditional fisheries management is the best way to manage weak stocks [Biological Sciences] Traditional fisheries management is the best way to manage weak stocks Ray Hilborn a , 1 a School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, WA 98195 Hastings et al. ( 1 ) model a fishery with a weak and a strong stock. Using several examples from the US West Coast they conclude that marine protected areas (MPAs) are an effective way to allow harvest of strong stock whil
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Hilborn: Role of marine reserves depends on assumptions [Biological Sciences] Reply to Hilborn: Role of marine reserves depends on assumptions Alan Hastings a , 1 , Steven D. Gaines b , and Christopher Costello b a Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, CA 95616; b Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 We appreciate the points made by Hilborn ( 1 ) that changing the ass
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Albatrosses hooked in the wind of change [Sustainability Science] Albatrosses hooked in the wind of change Christophe Barbraud a , 1 a Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UMR 7372, 79360 Villiers en Bois, France Marine megafauna, a key component of ocean condition and functioning ( 1 ), is increasingly threatened by direct exploitation, incidental capture of nontarget species or bycatch, competition for forage fish by fisheries, pollution, and rapid ongo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Revised taphonomic perspective on African Plio-Pleistocene fauna [Anthropology] Revised taphonomic perspective on African Plio–Pleistocene fauna Nicholas Toth a , b , 1 a Cognitive Science Program and Anthropology Department, Indiana University Bloomington , Bloomington, IN 47405; b The Stone Age Institute , Gosport, IN 47433 A recent article in PNAS by Sahle et al. ( 1 ) entitled “Hominid butchers and biting crocodiles in the African Plio–Pleistocene” is an important contri
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Vertebrate body size jumps the Wright way [Evolution] Vertebrate body size jumps the Wright way Peter J. Wagner a , 1 a Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska , Lincoln, NE 68588-0340 Fossil data provide copious evidence that anatomical (morphological) change within individual lineages is not constant: short bursts of great change commonly separate long durations of little change ( 1 , 2 ).
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Patterns of coevolving amino acids unveil structural and dynamical domains [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Patterns of coevolving amino acids unveil structural and dynamical domains Daniele Granata a , 1 , 2 , Luca Ponzoni b , 1 , 2 , Cristian Micheletti b , 2 , and Vincenzo Carnevale a , 2 a Institute for Computational Molecular Science, College of Science and Technology, Temple University , Philadelphia, PA 19122; b Molecular and Statistical Biophysics, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanz
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Direct measurements of meltwater runoff on the Greenland ice sheet surface [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Direct measurements of meltwater runoff on the Greenland ice sheet surface Laurence C. Smith a , 1 , 2 , Kang Yang b , 1 , Lincoln H Pitcher a , Brandon T. Overstreet c , Vena W. Chu d , Åsa K. Rennermalm e , Jonathan C. Ryan a , f , Matthew G. Cooper a , Colin J. Gleason g , Marco Tedesco h , Jeyavinoth Jeyaratnam i , Dirk van As j , Michiel R. van den Broeke k , Willem Jan van de Berg k , Brice
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hominid butchers and biting crocodiles in the African Plio-Pleistocene [Anthropology] Hominid butchers and biting crocodiles in the African Plio–Pleistocene Yonatan Sahle a , 1 , Sireen El Zaatari b , and Tim D. White c , d , 1 a Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) Center for Advanced Studies: “Words, Bones, Genes, Tools,” University of Tübingen , 72070 Tübingen, Germany; b Paleoanthropology, Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment, University of Tübingen , 7
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Spacecraft dare to fly close to the sun [Astronomy] Inner Workings: Spacecraft dare to fly close to the sun A wide swath of North America was reminded during last summer’s eclipse that you can’t stare at the sun without protection. But to study the sun, space probes have to do much more than stare. They have to get extremely close to the sun’s unforgiving environs. Next year, two solar missions will do exactly that—traveling tens of millions of mi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structures and enzymatic mechanisms of phycobiliprotein lyases CpcE/F and PecE/F [Biochemistry] Structures and enzymatic mechanisms of phycobiliprotein lyases CpcE/F and PecE/F Cheng Zhao a , Astrid Höppner b , Qian-Zhao Xu a , Wolfgang Gärtner c , Hugo Scheer d , Ming Zhou a , and Kai-Hong Zhao a , 1 a State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University , Wuhan 430070, P.R. China; b X-Ray Facility and Crystal Farm, Heinrich-Heine-Universität , D-40225 Düssel
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SUMOylation and ubiquitination reciprocally regulate {alpha}-synuclein degradation and pathological aggregation [Biochemistry] SUMOylation and ubiquitination reciprocally regulate α-synuclein degradation and pathological aggregation Ruth Rott a , Raymonde Szargel a , Vered Shani a , Haya Hamza a , Mor Savyon a , Fatimah Abd Elghani a , Rina Bandopadhyay b , and Simone Engelender a , 1 a Department of Biochemistry, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology , Haifa 31096,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinematics of flagellar swimming in Euglena gracilis: Helical trajectories and flagellar shapes [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Kinematics of flagellar swimming in Euglena gracilis : Helical trajectories and flagellar shapes Massimiliano Rossi a , b , 1 , Giancarlo Cicconofri a , 1 , Alfred Beran c , Giovanni Noselli a , and Antonio DeSimone a , 2 a MathLab, International School for Advanced Studies , 34136 Trieste, Italy; b Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics , Bundeswehr University Munich, 85577 Neubiberg, Ger
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proton movement and coupling in the POT family of peptide transporters [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Proton movement and coupling in the POT family of peptide transporters Joanne L. Parker a , 1 , Chenghan Li b , c , d , Allete Brinth e , f , Zhi Wang b , c , d , Lutz Vogeley e , f , Nicolae Solcan a , Gregory Ledderboge-Vucinic a , Jessica M. J. Swanson b , c , d , 1 , Martin Caffrey e , f , Gregory A. Voth b , c , d , and Simon Newstead a , 1 a Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Optimal nutrient exchange and immune responses operate in partner specificity in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis [Cell Biology] Optimal nutrient exchange and immune responses operate in partner specificity in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis Jennifer L. Matthews a , Camerron M. Crowder b , 1 , Clinton A. Oakley a , Adrian Lutz c , Ute Roessner c , Eli Meyer b , Arthur R. Grossman d , Virginia M. Weis b , and Simon K. Davy a , 2 a School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington , Wellington 6140, New
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Amorphous MoS3 as the sulfur-equivalent cathode material for room-temperature Li-S and Na-S batteries [Chemistry] Amorphous MoS 3 as the sulfur-equivalent cathode material for room-temperature Li–S and Na–S batteries Hualin Ye a , 1 , Lu Ma b , 1 , Yu Zhou a , Lu Wang a , Na Han a , Feipeng Zhao a , Jun Deng a , Tianpin Wu b , Yanguang Li a , 2 , and Jun Lu b , 2 a Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University , S
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chiral intertwined spirals and magnetic transition dipole moments dictated by cylinder helicity [Chemistry] Chiral intertwined spirals and magnetic transition dipole moments dictated by cylinder helicity Sota Sato a , b , 1 , Asami Yoshii c , Satsuki Takahashi a , b , Seiichi Furumi d , Masayuki Takeuchi e , and Hiroyuki Isobe a , b , 1 a Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo , Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan; b Japan Science and Technology Agency, Exploratory Research for Advanced T
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds [Chemistry] Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds Zhandong Wang a , 1 , Denisia M. Popolan-Vaida b , c , d , e , Bingjie Chen a , Kai Moshammer f , g , Samah Y. Mohamed a , Heng Wang a , Salim Sioud h , Misjudeen A. Raji h , Katharina Kohse-Höinghaus i , Nils Hansen f , Philippe Dagaut j , Stephen R. Leone b , c , d , and S. Mani
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Eph-ephrin signaling modulated by polymerization and condensation of receptors [Chemistry] Eph-ephrin signaling modulated by polymerization and condensation of receptors Samuel Ojosnegros a , b , c , d , 1 , 3 , Francesco Cutrale a , c , d , 1 , Daniel Rodríguez a , e , Jason J. Otterstrom f , Chi Li Chiu g , Verónica Hortigüela h , i , Carolina Tarantino b , Anna Seriola b , Stephen Mieruszynski j , Elena Martínez h , i , k , Melike Lakadamyali f , Angel Raya b , i , l , 2 , and Scott
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Using deep learning and Google Street View to estimate the demographic makeup of neighborhoods across the United States [Computer Sciences] Using deep learning and Google Street View to estimate the demographic makeup of neighborhoods across the United States Timnit Gebru a , 1 , Jonathan Krause a , Yilun Wang a , Duyun Chen a , Jia Deng b , Erez Lieberman Aiden c , d , e , and Li Fei-Fei a a Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Computer Science Department, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Vision and Learning Laboratory, Co
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Trunk neural crest origin of dermal denticles in a cartilaginous fish [Developmental Biology] Trunk neural crest origin of dermal denticles in a cartilaginous fish J. Andrew Gillis a , b , 1 , Els C. Alsema a , c , and Katharine E. Criswell a , b a Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom; b Whitman Center, Marine Biological Laboratory , Woods Hole, MA 02543; c Karolinska Institutet , SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden Edited by Marianne Bronner, Califor
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Membrane targeting of inhibitory Smads through palmitoylation controls TGF-{beta}/BMP signaling [Developmental Biology] Membrane targeting of inhibitory Smads through palmitoylation controls TGF-β/BMP signaling Wenqing Li a , b , 1 , Weini Li a , c , 1 , Lihui Zou b , 1 , Shanming Ji a , d , Chaoyi Li a , Kehui Liu a , Guoqiang Zhang a , c , Qinmiao Sun a , c , 2 , Fei Xiao b , 2 , and Dahua Chen a , c , 2 a State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Chaoyang Dist
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Causes of ice age intensification across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Causes of ice age intensification across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition Thomas B. Chalk a , b , 1 , 2 , Mathis P. Hain a , 1 , 2 , Gavin L. Foster a , Eelco J. Rohling a , c , Philip F. Sexton d , Marcus P. S. Badger d , e , Soraya G. Cherry a , Adam P. Hasenfratz f , Gerald H. Haug g , Samuel L. Jaccard h , i , Alfredo Martínez-García g , Heiko Pälike a , j , Richard D. Pancost e , and Paul A. W
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bulk magnetic domain stability controls paleointensity fidelity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Bulk magnetic domain stability controls paleointensity fidelity Greig A. Paterson a , b , 1 , Adrian R. Muxworthy c , Yuhji Yamamoto d , and Yongxin Pan a , b , e a Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100029, China; b Institutions of Earth Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100029, China; c Departmen
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Relationship of tropospheric stability to climate sensitivity and Earth’s observed radiation budget [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Relationship of tropospheric stability to climate sensitivity and Earth’s observed radiation budget Paulo Ceppi a , 1 and Jonathan M. Gregory b , c a Department of Meteorology, University of Reading , Reading RG6 6BB, United Kingdom; b National Centre for Atmospheric Science–Climate, University of Reading , Reading RG6 6BB, United Kingdom; c Met Office Hadley Centre , Exeter EX1 3PB, United Kingd
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inequality in nature and society [Ecology] Inequality in nature and society Marten Scheffer a , 1 , Bas van Bavel b , Ingrid A. van de Leemput a , and Egbert H. van Nes a a Environmental Science Department, Wageningen University , 6700 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands b Department of History, Utrecht University , 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands Edited by Simon A. Levin, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved November 3, 2017 (re
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Predicting phenological shifts in a changing climate [Ecology] Predicting phenological shifts in a changing climate Katherine Scranton a , 1 , 2 and Priyanga Amarasekare a , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California , Los Angeles, CA 90095 Edited by Nils Chr. Stenseth, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, and approved October 26, 2017 (received for review June 21, 2017) Significance Changes in species’ phenology, the seasonal
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In situ modeling of multimodal floral cues attracting wild pollinators across environments [Ecology] In situ modeling of multimodal floral cues attracting wild pollinators across environments Karin Nordström a , b , 1 , Josefin Dahlbom a , V. S. Pragadheesh c , Suhrid Ghosh c , 2 , Amadeus Olsson c , Olga Dyakova a , Shravanti Krishna Suresh c , 3 , and Shannon B. Olsson c a Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University , 751 24 Uppsala, Sweden; b Centre for Neuroscience, Flinders University ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fluid-driven origami-inspired artificial muscles [Engineering] Fluid-driven origami-inspired artificial muscles Shuguang Li a , b , c , 1 , Daniel M. Vogt a , b , Daniela Rus c , and Robert J. Wood a , b , 1 a John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; b The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; c Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence L
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Long-term dopamine neurochemical monitoring in primates [Engineering] Long-term dopamine neurochemical monitoring in primates Helen N. Schwerdt a , b , c , Hideki Shimazu a , b , Ken-ichi Amemori a , b , Satoko Amemori a , b , Patrick L. Tierney a , b , Daniel J. Gibson a , b , Simon Hong a , b , Tomoko Yoshida a , b , Robert Langer c , d , Michael J. Cima c , e , and Ann M. Graybiel a , b , 1 a McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Tech
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pulsed evolution shaped modern vertebrate body sizes [Evolution] Pulsed evolution shaped modern vertebrate body sizes Michael J. Landis a and Joshua G. Schraiber b , c , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University , New Haven, CT 06520; b Department of Biology, Temple University , Philadelphia, PA 19122; c Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine, Temple University , Philadelphia, PA 19122 Edited by Neil H. Shubin, The Universit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Def1 interacts with TFIIH and modulates RNA polymerase II transcription [Genetics] Def1 interacts with TFIIH and modulates RNA polymerase II transcription Nivedita Damodaren a , Trevor Van Eeuwen a , Joanna Zamel b , Enrique Lin-Shiao a , c , Nir Kalisman b , and Kenji Murakami a , 1 a Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104; b Department of Biological Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusal
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A STAT3-dependent transcriptional circuitry inhibits cytotoxic gene expression in T cells [Immunology and Inflammation] A STAT3-dependent transcriptional circuitry inhibits cytotoxic gene expression in T cells Thomas Ciucci a , Melanie S. Vacchio a , and Rémy Bosselut a , 1 a Laboratory of Immune Cell Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892 Edited by Christophe Benoist, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and approved October 26, 2017 (rece
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Broad detection of bacterial type III secretion system and flagellin proteins by the human NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome [Immunology and Inflammation] Broad detection of bacterial type III secretion system and flagellin proteins by the human NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome Valeria M. Reyes Ruiz a , Jasmine Ramirez a , Nawar Naseer a , Nicole M. Palacio a , Ingharan J. Siddarthan a , Brian M. Yan a , Mark A. Boyer a , Daniel A. Pensinger b , John-Demian Sauer b , and Sunny Shin a , 1 a Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman Scho
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Core Concept: Cryopreservation aims to engineer novel ways to freeze, store, and thaw organs [Medical Sciences] Core Concept: Cryopreservation aims to engineer novel ways to freeze, store, and thaw organs Five years ago, even top cryobiologists doubted that a human organ would ever be successfully frozen and thawed. It felt like “a long, long scientific step” from the freezing of cells or millimeter-thick tissues to the freezing of whole organs, says Janet Elliott, Canada Research Chair in Thermodynamics a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNAJB1-PRKACA fusion kinase interacts with {beta}-catenin and the liver regenerative response to drive fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma [Medical Sciences] DNAJB1–PRKACA fusion kinase interacts with β-catenin and the liver regenerative response to drive fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma Edward R. Kastenhuber a , b , Gadi Lalazar c , Shauna L. Houlihan a , Darjus F. Tschaharganeh d , e , Timour Baslan a , Chi-Chao Chen a , David Requena c , Sha Tian a , Benedikt Bosbach f , John E. Wilkinson g , Sanford M. Simon c , and Scott W. Lowe a , h , 1 a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protective effects of agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in early experimental diabetic retinopathy [Medical Sciences] Protective effects of agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in early experimental diabetic retinopathy Menaka C. Thounaojam a , Folami L. Powell b , Sagar Patel a , 1 , Diana R. Gutsaeva a , Amany Tawfik c , Sylvia B. Smith d , Julian Nussbaum a , Norman L. Block e , Pamela M. Martin b , Andrew V. Schally e , f , g , h , i , 2 , and Manuela Bartoli a , 2 a Department of Ophthalmolog
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
{Delta}Np63-mediated regulation of hyaluronic acid metabolism and signaling supports HNSCC tumorigenesis [Medical Sciences] ΔNp63-mediated regulation of hyaluronic acid metabolism and signaling supports HNSCC tumorigenesis Mirco Compagnone a , Veronica Gatti b , Dario Presutti b , Giovina Ruberti b , Claudia Fierro a , Elke Katrin Markert c , Karen H. Vousden d , Huiqing Zhou e , f , Alessandro Mauriello a , Lucia Anemone a , Lucilla Bongiorno-Borbone a , Gerry Melino a , g , 1 , and Angelo Peschiaroli b , 1 a Departm
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synaptic homeostasis requires the membrane-proximal carboxy tail of GluA2 [Neuroscience] Synaptic homeostasis requires the membrane-proximal carboxy tail of GluA2 Samantha G. Ancona Esselmann a , b , Javier Díaz-Alonso b , Jonathan M. Levy a , b , Michael A. Bemben b , and Roger A. Nicoll b , 1 a Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of California , San Francisco, CA 94158; b Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California , San Francisco, CA 94158 Con
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Loss of APOBEC1 RNA-editing function in microglia exacerbates age-related CNS pathophysiology [Neuroscience] Loss of APOBEC1 RNA-editing function in microglia exacerbates age-related CNS pathophysiology Daniel C. Cole a , b , 1 , Youngcheul Chung a , b , 1 , Khatuna Gagnidze a , b , 1 , Kaitlyn H. Hajdarovic a , b , Violeta Rayon-Estrada c , d , Dewi Harjanto c , Benedetta Bigio b , Judit Gal-Toth a , b , Teresa A. Milner b , e , Bruce S. McEwen b , 2 , F. Nina Papavasiliou c , f , and Karen Bulloch a ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
On the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric functional connectivity in humans [Neuroscience] On the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric functional connectivity in humans Jarod L. Roland a , 1 , Abraham Z. Snyder b , c , Carl D. Hacker a , d , Anish Mitra b , Joshua S. Shimony b , David D. Limbrick a , Marcus E. Raichle b , Matthew D. Smyth a , and Eric C. Leuthardt a , d , e , f , g , h a Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis, MO 6
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Robust zero resistance in a superconducting high-entropy alloy at pressures up to 190 GPa [Physics] Robust zero resistance in a superconducting high-entropy alloy at pressures up to 190 GPa Jing Guo a , 1 , Honghong Wang a , b , 1 , Fabian von Rohr c , 1 , Zhe Wang a , b , Shu Cai a , b , Yazhou Zhou a , b , Ke Yang d , Aiguo Li d , Sheng Jiang d , Qi Wu a , Robert J. Cava c , 2 , and Liling Sun a , b , e , 2 a Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100190, China; b Departm
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spin susceptibility of charge-ordered YBa2Cu3Oy across the upper critical field [Physics] Spin susceptibility of charge-ordered YBa 2 Cu 3 O y across the upper critical field Rui Zhou a , Michihiro Hirata a , 1 , Tao Wu a , 2 , Igor Vinograd a , Hadrien Mayaffre a , Steffen Krämer a , Arneil P. Reyes b , Philip L. Kuhns b , Ruixing Liang c , d , W. N. Hardy c , D. A. Bonn c , d , and Marc-Henri Julien a , 3 a Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, CNRS–Université Grenob
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Glycosyltransferase MDR1 assembles a dividing ring for mitochondrial proliferation comprising polyglucan nanofilaments [Plant Biology] Glycosyltransferase MDR1 assembles a dividing ring for mitochondrial proliferation comprising polyglucan nanofilaments Yamato Yoshida a , 1 , Haruko Kuroiwa b , Takashi Shimada c , Masaki Yoshida d , Mio Ohnuma e , Takayuki Fujiwara f , Yuuta Imoto g , Fumi Yagisawa h , Keiji Nishida i , Shunsuke Hirooka f , Osami Misumi j , k , Yuko Mogi a , l , Yoshihiko Akakabe m , Kazunobu Matsushita m , and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Speaker gaze increases information coupling between infant and adult brains [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Speaker gaze increases information coupling between infant and adult brains Victoria Leong a , b , 1 , Elizabeth Byrne c , Kaili Clackson a , Stanimira Georgieva a , Sarah Lam a , and Sam Wass d a Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, United Kingdom ; b Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University , Singapore 637332, Republic of Singapore; c MRC Cogniti
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Development of self-protective biases in response to social evaluative feedback [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Development of self-protective biases in response to social evaluative feedback Alexandra M. Rodman a , b , Katherine E. Powers a , b , and Leah H. Somerville a , b , 1 a Department of Psychology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; b Center for Brain Science, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved November 6, 201
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hydraulic fracturing near domestic groundwater wells [Sustainability Science] Hydraulic fracturing near domestic groundwater wells Scott Jasechko a , b , 1 , 2 and Debra Perrone c , d , e , 1 a Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara , CA 93106; b Department of Geography, University of Calgary , Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; c Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara , CA 93106; d Water
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epitranscriptomic profiling across cell types reveals associations between APOBEC1-mediated RNA editing, gene expression outcomes, and cellular function [Systems Biology] Epitranscriptomic profiling across cell types reveals associations between APOBEC1-mediated RNA editing, gene expression outcomes, and cellular function Violeta Rayon-Estrada a , b , 1 , Dewi Harjanto a , 1 , Claire E. Hamilton a , b , c , Yamina A. Berchiche d , 2 , Emily Conn Gantman b , e , Thomas P. Sakmar d , f , Karen Bulloch g , Khatuna Gagnidze g , Sheila Harroch h , Bruce S. McEwen i , 3
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines medicinal compound in plant rootsXanthones are specialized metabolites with antimicrobial properties that are found in the roots of medicinal plants called Hypericum perforatum, also known as St. John's wort.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin cancer treatment selfie goes viral, has public health lessons You've heard of the Katie Couric effect, the Angelina Jolie effect and the Charlie Sheen effect, but could the next effect be named after you? University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and colleagues have discovered that celebrity status may not be necessary to make a public health concern go viral on social media. In a new study, they showed just how effective one person can be in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Night-flyers or day-trippers? Study sheds light on when moths, butterflies are activeButterflies fly during the day while moths travel at night - or so you might think. In reality, their behavior is much more complicated.A new Florida Museum of Natural History study offers the first comprehensive overview of the surprisingly complex question of when butterflies and moths are active.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble's celestial snow globe The stars in the globular star cluster Messier 79 look a lot like a blizzard in a snow globe in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image. Credit: NASA and ESA, Acknowledgment: S. Djorgovski (Caltech) and F. Ferraro (University of Bologna) It's beginning to look a lot like the holiday season in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a blizzard of stars, which resembles a swirling snowstorm in a s
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Giant Penguin: This Ancient Bird Was As Tall As a Refrigerator The giant penguin Kumimanu biceae was likely as tall as a human. Credit: G. Mayr/Senckenberg Research Institute The fossils of a refrigerator-size penguin were so gargantuan that the scientists who discovered them initially thought they belonged to a giant turtle. The ancient behemoth is now considered the second-largest penguin on record. The newfound penguin species would have stood nearly 6 fe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Important new aspects are revealed about the control of cell divisionExperts have published a new study on the mechanisms that regulate cell division and guarantee the correct distribution of chromosomes during this process. In particular, they especially highlight the fundamental role that an organelle, specifically the nucleolus, plays in the coordination of these processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Don't mix business with pleasureIn working life it's now almost expected that employees answer work-related emails after hours, or take their laptops with them on holiday. But the blurring of boundaries between work and personal life can affect people's sense of well-being and lead to exhaustion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stuttering: Stop signals in the brain disturb speech flow'G-g-g-g-g-ood morning' is a daily obstacle for people who stutter. However, so far, not much is known about the causes of persistent developmental stuttering, which is the most frequent speech disorder. Scientists have recently discovered that a hyperactive network in the right frontal part of the brain plays a crucial role in this deficit. It inhibits speech movement planning and execution, ther
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Closing in on advanced prostate cancerMedical researchers have discovered a new avenue through which to attack prostrate cancer cells that have developed drug-resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visualizing single molecules in whole cells with a new spinScientists have adapted DNA-PAINT technology to microscopes that are widespread among cell biology laboratories, called confocal microscopes, and that are used by researchers to image whole cells and thicker tissues at lower resolution. They have demonstrated that the method can visualize a variety of different molecules, including combinations of different proteins, RNAs and DNA throughout the en
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shrinking wilderness ignored at our perilMaps of the world's most important wilderness areas are now freely available online.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plant pathologists discover unusual evolutionary transition in common bacteriaThere are mostly benign species in the soil-borne, plant-associated genus of bacteria known as Rhodococcus, but a few species can be pathogenic. Researchers used genome sequencing to identify species of Rhodococcus that transition between beneficial and pathogenic -- stimulating growth in some plants in the former case while deforming tissues in the latter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enhancing chemotherapy's efficiency against leukemiaResearchers have found a mechanism through which certain types of leukemia resist chemotherapy, revealing novel molecular targets to improve this therapy's efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Few California retailers offer pharmacist-prescribed birth control, despite law A new law took effect in California last year allowing pharmacists to prescribe birth control. But few of the state's pharmacies are actually offering this service, according to new UC Berkeley research. A study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association , shows that just 11 percent of the state's more than 5,000 community-based retail pharmacies offer birth control. Amon
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Columbia engineers create artificial graphene in a nanofabricated semiconductor structure IMAGE: Etched pillars define the positions of quantum dots (red puddles) arranged in an hexagonal lattice. When the spacing between the quantum dots is sufficiently small, electrons can move between them. view more Credit: Diego Scarabelli/Columbia Engineering New York, NY -- Dec. 12, 2017 -- Researchers at Columbia Engineering , experts at manipulating matter at the nanoscale, have mad
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Put the cookie down! Researchers create app to predict and intervene in users' over IMAGE: Carolina Ruiz, left, associate professor of computer science at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), and Bengisu Tulu, associate professor in WPI's Foisie Business School, are the developers (with Sherry Pagoto, professor... view more Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Worcester, Mass. - Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and the University of Connecticut
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Hubble's celestial snow globeIt's beginning to look a lot like the holiday season in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a blizzard of stars, which resembles a swirling snowstorm in a snow globe.
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Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart IMAGE: Human heart cells grown from stem cells show less robust muscle fibers (green) in high glucose conditions (left) compared to reduced glucose conditions (right). view more Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/eLife Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels -- whether caused by di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does New Horizons' next target have a moon? On three occasions in June and July 2017, New Horizons mission team members attempted to track a small, distant Kuiper Belt object, 2014 MU69, as it passed in front of a star – an event known as an occultation. The colored lines mark the path of the star as seen from different telescopes on each day; the blank spaces on those lines indicate the few seconds when MU69 blocked the light from the sta
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New on MIT Technology Review
When AI Supplies the Sound in Video Clips, Humans Can’t Tell the Difference Machine learning is changing the way we think about images and how they are created. Researchers have trained machines to generate faces, to draw cartoons, and even to transfer the style of paintings to pictures. It is just a short step from these techniques to creating videos in this way, and indeed this is already being done. All that points to a way of creating virtual environments entirely by
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Chandra reveals the elementary nature of Cassiopeia A Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO Where do most of the elements essential for life on Earth come from? The answer: inside the furnaces of stars and the explosions that mark the end of some stars' lives. Astronomers have long studied exploded stars and their remains—known as "supernova remnants"—to better understand exactly how stars produce and then disseminate many of the elements observed on Earth, and in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Court keeps ban on new mining claims around Grand Canyon Just as rivers move sediment across the land, turbidity currents are the dominant process carrying sediments and organic carbon from coastal areas into the deep sea. Turbidity currents can also destroy underwater cables, ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new model to predict which universities student athletes will commit to Credit: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences With revenue from college football at an unprecedented $3.4 billion annually, universities across the country invest tens of millions each year in recruitment efforts to attract high school athletes to play for their football teams. But with talented players typically receiving scholarship offers from multiple universities, tea
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Live Science
Star Wars Physics: Could the 'Force' Actually Exist? This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . As "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" opens in theaters and its heroine Rey seeks to learn the ways of the Force from an aged and isolated Luke Skywalker, it raises some obvious and ongoing questions: Is there anything in science — particularly i
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New on MIT Technology Review
Lawyer-Bots Are Shaking Up Jobs Meticulous research, deep study of case law, and intricate argument-building—lawyers have used similar methods to ply their trade for hundreds of years. But they’d better watch out, because artificial intelligence is moving in on the field. As of 2016, there were over 1,300,000 licensed lawyers and 200,000 paralegals in the U.S. Research group McKinsey estimates that 22 percent of a lawyer’s job
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New on MIT Technology Review
Farmers Seek to Deploy Powerful Gene Drive Since it first appeared in Northern California in 2008, the spotted-wing drosophila, a type of fruit fly native to Asia, has become the bane of the state’s cherry farms because of the razor-edged “ovipositor” on its tail. Rather than lay eggs in rotting berries, as domestic flies do, the invasive species punches holes in fruit that’s still ripening, spoiling it. The costs to U.S. agriculture: abo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian space agency blames satellite loss on programming error Russia's space agency on Tuesday blamed a failed satellite launch from its new cosmodrome on a programming error, prompting an angry response from the deputy prime minister in charge of space. On November 28 Russia lost contact with its Meteor-M weather satellite after its launch from the new Vostochny cosmodrome—only the second such launch since the facility opened in the country's far east last
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate commitments at the 'One Planet Summit' in Paris A series of initiatives were unveiled at the "One Planet Summit" held in Paris Moving away from using fossil fuels and leaning heavily on businesses to green up their act, the "One Planet Summit" in Paris on Tuesday set out a raft of wide-ranging commitments to turn the tables on climate change. Here are five of the major areas covered during the summit: Oil and gas The World Bank said it wou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research improves understanding of ancient landscapes From left: Tomas Capaldi, Chelsea Mackaman-Lofland, and Professor Brian Horton collecting sand sample from the Lower Rio Mendoza. Credit: Ryan McKenzie Geologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. These microscopic grains, commonly the width of a human hair, record detailed information on when and where they formed, making the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP satellite provides copious information on California's fires The California fires during the nighttime using Suomi NPP's day/night band on the VIIRS instrument. Credit: NOAA/NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team The Thomas fire, the fifth largest in California's history, continues to creep towards Montecito and Santa Barbara, and is currently 234,200 acres in size. That is about 4,200 acres larger than yesterday. Reports today are citing the fire at 20 percent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will people eat relish made from 'waste' ingredients? Study finds they may even prefer it Rescued Relish is an anything-goes condiment made from excess produce that Philabundance, a Philadelphia anti-hunger organization, can't move. The relish is modeled on a Pennsylvania Dutch chowchow recipe -- a tangy mix of sweet, spicy and sour flavors. Credit: Drexel Food Lab A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from disc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hubble's celestial snow globeIt's beginning to look a lot like the holiday season in this Hubble Space Telescope image of a blizzard of stars, which resembles a swirling snowstorm in a snow globe. The stars are residents of the globular star cluster Messier 79 (also known as M79 or NGC 1904), located 41,000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Lepus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boarGrowing populations of wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) are causing more and more damage to agricultural land in Europe, requiring hundreds of thousands of Euros in compensation. A new drone-based method allows estimating crop damage in a fast, standardized and objective manner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How fires are changing the tundra’s faceClimate change takes a heavy toll on the tundra, increasing the probability of extreme droughts. As a result, the frequency of fires in forests, bogs and even wetlands continues to rise. In addition, the northern areas of the tundra have also become more accessible and negatively impacted by human activities in recent years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How honey bee gut bacteria help to digest their pollen-rich dietThe honey bee gut is colonized by specialized bacteria that help digest components of the floral pollen diet and produce molecules that likely promote bee health. Researchers have now uncovered which bacterial species perform which specific digestive functions in the bee gut.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Life's building blocks observed in spacelike environmentWhere do the molecules required for life originate? It may be that small organic molecules first appeared on earth and were later combined into larger molecules, such as proteins and carbohydrates. But a second possibility is that they originated in space, possibly within our solar system. A new study shows that a number of small organic molecules can form in a cold, spacelike environment full of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple test can diagnose two cancer typesA blood test using infrared spectroscopy can be used to diagnose two types of cancer, lymphoma and melanoma, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop new model to predict which universities student athletes will attend Key Takeaway: Using data and insight from Twitter, researchers at the University of Iowa have developed a new model to predict which universities high school athletes will commit to, enabling coaching staff more time and flexibility to adjust their rosters. CATONSVILLE, MD, December 12, 2017 - With revenue from college football at an unprecedented $3.4 billion annually, universities across the co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops novel method to produce renewable acrylonitrile Pictured from left to right are Adam Bratis, Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Todd Eaton, Gregg Beckham, Vassili Vorotnikov, and Eric Karp, part of the NREL team working on a cost-competitive, sustainable process for creating acrylonitrile and carbon fibers from renewable biomass. Credit: Dennis Schroeder / NREL A new study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) establis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plant pathologists discover unusual evolutionary transition in common bacteria A leafy gall caused by the Rhodococcus bacteria grows at the base of a butterfly bush. Credit: Melodie Putnam, OSU. It's the "Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" in a nursery setting. There are mostly benign species in the soil-borne, plant-associated genus of bacteria known as Rhodococcus , but a few species can be pathogenic. A team of researchers at Oregon State University used genome seq
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrical and chemical coupling between Saturn and its ringsA Langmuir probe, flown to Saturn on the Cassini spacecraft, has made exciting discoveries in the atmosphere of the planet. They discovered that there is a strong coupling, both chemically and electrically, between the atmosphere of Saturn and its rings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New maps show shrinking wilderness being ignored at our peril These new maps show shrinking wilderness being ignored at our peril. Credit: James Allan UQ Maps of the world's most important wilderness areas are now freely available online following a University of Queensland and Wildlife Conservation Society-led study published today. The authors have made the maps available to assist researchers, conservationists and policy makers to improve wilderness cons
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suburban ponds are a septic buffet A new study shows that human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds. Researchers at Yale University and Portland State University found that residential, suburban land use is altering the dynamics of the food chain, as well as where nutrients originate and how they move through pond ecosystems. The findings appear in the Canadian Jo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA analyzes short-lived Bay of Bengal cyclone This IMERG rainfall analysis from Dec. 4 to 11 shows the rainfall dropped by former Tropical Cyclone Ockhi in western India, and Tropical Cyclone 04B in eastern India. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce NASA analyzed the rainfall generated by short-lived Tropical Cyclone 04B that formed and faded over a day in the Bay of Bengal. A substantial area of the Northern Indian Ocean was recently covered with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher collaborates with industry to create design tool for syntactic foams Syntactic foams, which have been used for years in aerospace and marine applications, are being employed in a wider and wider array of products. Nikhil Gupta, NYU Tandon professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering has partnered with specialty chemical makers Dixie Chemical and Evonik to create a web-based tool that lets product manufacturers create the right kind of syntactic foam for a spe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops cancer imaging aid from horse chestnuts Molecules derived from horse chestnuts aid cancer imaging. Credit: City College of New York Research at The City College of New York shows that cancer imaging can be simplified by a photonic process utilizing molecules derived from horse chestnuts. The study with potential to better detect the presence of cancer is led by George John, professor in City College's Division of Science, in collaborat
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Live Science
Why We Can't Stop Seeing Zigzags in This Freaky Optical Illusion An example of the curvature blindness illusion. What do you see in the middle: wavy lines, angular lines, or both? Credit: Kohske Takahashi Who would win in a fight: the part of the brain that likes to see curves or the part that prefers corners? This conflict underlies a new kind of optical illusion , dubbed the "curvature blindness illusion" in a new paper published in the November-Decemb
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Science : NPR
Waste Not, Want Not: Drink Beer To Feed Fish And Help Save The Planet Forage fish like these at a Chilean processing plant are often used for fish meal used in aquaculture. But critics consider this inefficient and wasteful and worry it could deplete fish populations. Now several companies are developing protein substitutes to replace fish meal. Julio Etchart/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Julio Etchart/ullstein bild via Getty Images For
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provides copious information on California's fires IMAGE: The ability of Suomi NPP to distinguish different land temperatures helps to show where the hot spots are on the ground and where the edges of the burn scar are. view more Credit: NOAA/NASA The Thomas fire, the fifth largest in California's history, continues to creep towards Montecito and Santa Barbara, and is currently 234,200 acres in size. That is about 4,200 acres larger tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research finds a sweet spot for engineering better cellulose-degrading enzymes Postdoctoral Researcher Antonella Amore and Senior Engineer Brandon Knott work on samples in the lab. The new research on the relationships between small sugars (glycans), their function, and their location could be used to improve enzyme performance to better break down biomass and convert waste plant matter to renewable fuels and products. Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL Researchers from the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visualizing single molecules in whole cells with a new spin The researchers used their SDC-PAINT method to visualize the network of cytoskeletal microtubule filaments (green) and their proximity with two additional proteins called TOM20 (red) and HSP60 (blue). Each image shows the proteins in a different plane of the cell starting from the top, and the magnified images on the bottom compare the resolution achieved with SDC-PAINT (left) to that possible wi
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New on MIT Technology Review
As it Turns Out, the SEC Doesn’t Completely Hate ICOs Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Inside Science
BRIEF: This Ink For 3-D Printers is Alive BRIEF: This Ink For 3-D Printers is Alive Devices made from bacteria-filled hydrogel inks sense chemicals and perform logic operations. LivingInk_topNteaser.jpg An artistic representation of a new kind of 3D printing ink made from genetically programmed living cells. The ink is described in Advanced Materials Image credits: Courtesy of the researchers Rights information: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 Technolog
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beta of Neurodata Without Borders software now available This graphic depicts the the main components of NWB:N 2.0. Credit: Oliver Ruebel, Berkeley Lab Neuroscientists can now explore a beta version of the new Neurodata Without Borders: Neurophysiology (NWB:N 2.0) software and offer input to developers before it is fully released next year. The 2.0 software version was developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Oliver Ruebel
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Popular Science
The mysterious object NASA is visiting in 2019 might have its very own moon MU69 isn’t the most immediately appealing object in our solar system. It’s got a troublesome temporary name , it’s far away—a billion miles past Pluto—and it’s really, really hard to see . But once you take a closer look, this scrappy object (called a cold classical Kuiper Belt Object ) is actually fascinating. It's a good thing the New Horizons spacecraft is already on its way for a visit. MU69
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African immigrants: How race and gender shape the American dreamAfricans represent one of the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the United States, but women far outpace men for securing high-skilled jobs and earnings growth, indicates a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Privacy policies affect quantity of genetic testingDifferent types of privacy laws in US states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Will people eat relish made from 'waste' ingredients? Drexel study finds they may even prefer it IMAGE: Rescued Relish is an anything-goes condiment made from excess produce that Philabundance, a Philadelphia anti-hunger organization, can't move. The relish is modeled on a Pennsylvania Dutch chowchow recipe -- a... view more Credit: Drexel Food Lab A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans, unlike monkeys, turn competitive situation into cooperative one IMAGE: This is Dr. Sarah Brosnan, professor of psychology at Georgia State University. view more Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA--Rhesus macaques and capuchin monkeys can find a stable solution when playing a competitive game in which one opponent always does better than the other, but only humans can find a solution that benefits both competitors equally, turning a competitive situa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research improves understanding of ancient landscapes IMAGE: From left: Tomas Capaldi, Chelsea Mackaman-Lofland, and Professor Brian Horton collecting sand sample from the Lower Rio Mendoza. view more Credit: Ryan McKenzie Geologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. These microscopic grains, commonly the width of a human hair, record detailed information on when an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As science becomes more international, scientific editorial boards lag behind IMAGE: While scientists from an increasing number of countries are represented in scientific publications, the editors of scientific journals are a far less diverse group. view more Credit: Geralt, Pixabay Across the world, countries are investing in science and technology, leading to the emergence of scientific hotspots outside of the traditional centers in the U.S. and Europe. However, a st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How honey bee gut bacteria help to digest their pollen-rich diet IMAGE: Scientists have uncovered which bacterial species in the bee gut allow them to digest their pollen-rich diet. view more Credit: Bob Peterson, Flickr The honey bee gut is colonized by specialized bacteria that help digest components of the floral pollen diet and produce molecules that likely promote bee health. In a study publishing 12 December in the open access journal PLOS Biology
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Facility infrastructure does not indicate healthcare quality in low/middle-income countries While a strong infrastructure is important for healthcare, measures of health facility infrastructure are poorly correlated with health system quality, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Hannah Leslie from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA, and colleagues. Improved quality of care is increasingly recognized as a necessary step toward better health
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New on MIT Technology Review
As it Turns Out, the SEC Doesn’t Hate All ICOs Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D printed microfibers could provide structure for artificially grown body partsMuch as a frame provides structural support for a house and the chassis provides strength and shape for a car, a team of engineers believes they have a way to create the structural framework for growing living tissue using an off-the-shelf 3-D printer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Estrogen discovery could shed new light on fertility problemsEstrogen produced in the brain is necessary for ovulation in monkeys, according to researchers who have upended the traditional understanding of the hormonal cascade that leads to release of an egg from the ovaries. Their findings may reveal the cause of some undiagnosed infertility problems and point the way to new methods of birth control.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer imaging aid developed from horse chestnutsCancer imaging can be simplified by a photonic process utilizing molecules derived from horse chestnuts, research shows.
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Live Science
Feather-Gripping Tick Trapped in Amber Dined on Dinos Preserved inside a piece of amber, a tick clinging to a dinosaur feather provides the first direct evidence that these bloodsuckers parasitized dinosaurs 99 million years ago. Scientists have speculated that feathered dinosaurs likely hosted parasitic pests , as birds do today. And ticks found in amber closely resemble modern ticks, suggesting that they had similar parasitic habits. But the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How honey bee gut bacteria help to digest their pollen-rich diet Scientists have uncovered which bacterial species in the bee gut allow them to digest their pollen-rich diet. Credit: Bob Peterson, Flickr The honey bee gut is colonized by specialized bacteria that help digest components of the floral pollen diet and produce molecules that likely promote bee health. In a study publishing 12 December in the open access journal PLOS Biology , a group of researcher
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As science becomes more international, scientific editorial boards lag behind While scientists from an increasing number of countries are represented in scientific publications, the editors of scientific journals are a far less diverse group. Credit: Geralt, Pixabay Across the world, countries are investing in science and technology, leading to the emergence of scientific hotspots outside of the traditional centers in the U.S. and Europe. However, a study publishing Decemb
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trust in e-cigarette safety varies by worldview, source of messagingPublic health messaging about the safety of e-cigarettes needs to account for the worldviews of the target audience, with different groups displaying varying levels of trust depending on the source of the message, according to a recent study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blueprints for anti-cancer drugs discovered in bacterial genomesNew research suggests bacterial genomes hold the blueprints for designing new, even more effective cancer-targeting compounds.
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The Atlantic
Winners of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest National Geographic has announced the winners of its annual photo competition , with the Grand Prize Winner Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan receiving a prize of $7,500 for his image of an orangutan in Borneo. National Geographic was once again kind enough to let us display the winning images and honorable mentions here from the four categories: Wildlife, Landscapes, Aerials, and Underwater.
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Viden
Selfissimo! Google lancerer tre twistede foto-apps Når et de store internetfirmaer sender en app på markedet, har de normalt gjort sig meget grundige tanker om, hvor i markedet den skal passe. Læs også: Her er årets mest populære apps Men sådan er det ikke med de tre nye foto-apps, Storyboard og Scrubbies, som Google netop har sendt ud. De små fotoprogrammer er udviklet af firmaets research-afdeling og går ifølge folkene bag ud på at “undersøge p
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Live Science
Just How Rare Is That Giant Python Captured in the Everglades? A snake hunter caught a 17-foot-1-inch-long (5 meters) Burmese python near the Big Cypres National Preserve in the Everglades on Dec. 1, breaking the record for the largest python captured as part of the South Florida Water Management District's python-elimination program. But although the slithering beast was a giant — it weighed in at 133 lbs. (60 kilograms) — that's still small for this
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Popular Science
This human-sized penguin isn't even the largest ancient penguin we know about Imagine you’re in New Zealand during the late Paleocene, around 60 million years ago. That means you’re pretty much in Antarctica (thanks, continental drift), but don’t worry: you’re enjoying subtropical climes . Then you hear something large shuffling toward the shore, coming up from behind you. Wow, you think, did two humans time travel to this exact spot at the exact same time? How awkward. Yo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Epigenetic aging linked to bipolar disorderBipolar disorder may involve accelerated epigenetic aging, which could explain why persons with the disorder are more likely to have -- and die from -- age-related diseases, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sweet spot for engineering better cellulose-degrading enzymesNew insights have been gained into how glycosylation -- the natural attachment of sugars to proteins -- affects a key cellulase enzyme. This work could be used to improve enzyme performance to better break down biomass and convert waste plant matter to renewable fuels and products. Namely, the more effective the enzyme, the more efficient and economical the process will be.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel method produces renewable acrylonitrileA novel catalytic method has been created to produce renewable acrylonitrile using 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP), which can be biologically produced from sugars. This hybrid biological-catalytic process offers an alternative to the conventional petrochemical production method and achieves unprecedented acrylonitrile yields.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Suburban ponds are a septic buffetHuman waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds, new research indicates. Researchers found that residential, suburban land use is altering the dynamics of the food chain, as well as where nutrients originate and how they move through pond ecosystems.
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Feed: All Latest
'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Is a Near-Perfect Reinvention of the Franchise Toward the end of Star Wars: The Last Jedi , one of our heroes stares out toward a vast, bleached-out vista that’s peppered with low-slung space-junk (I wouldn’t dare say which character it is, or even what planet they're on; such info would rankle most Force-fans, and a death mark’s not an easy thing to live with). It’s a shot that could have been lifted directly from the original Star Wars tril
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sandia researchers make solid ground toward better lithium-ion battery interfaces LIVERMORE, Calif. - Research at Sandia National Laboratories has identified a major obstacle to advancing solid-state lithium-ion battery performance in small electronics: the flow of lithium ions across battery interfaces. Sandia's three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project investigated the nanoscale chemistry of solid-state batteries, focusing on the region where electrodes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trust in e-cigarette safety varies by worldview, source of messaging IMAGE: This is Dr. Scott Weaver, assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at Georgia State University. view more Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA--Public health messaging about the safety of e-cigarettes needs to account for the worldviews of the target audience, with different groups displaying varying levels of trust depending on the source of the message, according t
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Science | The Guardian
Meet Dracula, the bloodsucking tick which feasted on dinosaurs 99m years ago As if the dinosaurs didn’t have enough to look out for with volcanic eruptions, fearsome predators stalking the land and a huge, unstoppable asteroid hurtling across space to ruin their day. Now scientists have found that the prehistoric beasts also had blood-sucking ticks to contend with, having spotted carcasses of the parasites lodged in 99million-year-old lumps of Burmese amber along with mat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too many nutrients make microbes less responsiveBacteria in lakes play a key role in maintaining water quality by absorbing excess nitrogen and phosphorus. They also help store carbon, which has implications for our climate. But, as it turns out, their ability to do these tasks varies depending on the makeup of the lake in which they live. In short, location matters most.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain structure linked to hallucinations and musical aptitudeNew research links brain structure to an individual's likelihood of experiencing hallucinations and to their musical aptitude. Participants with higher musical aptitude showed lower hallucination proneness.
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The Atlantic
Honest Politicians Won't Fix Corruption The good news is that much of the world is fed up with corruption. The bad news is that the way many are fighting corruption is ineffective. Too often, the remedy centers on finding and empowering an honest leader who promises to stamp out the problem. Worldwide, candidates for elected offices are running on highly personalized anti-corruption platforms, offering themselves as the solution. What
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The Atlantic
A Stunning Cinematic Trip to the Front Lines of California's Wildfires “I’ve been doing this for 12 years and I have never seen anything like this,” says a CAL FIRE crew member as he fights the Blue Cut fire in Los Angeles. “This is crazy fire behavior. Unbelievable.” Netflix’s docu-series Fire Chasers embeds with firefighters at the front lines of the wildfires that continue to decimate California. In the video above, the crew fights a fast-moving fire that burned
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CCNY-led team develops cancer imaging aid from horse chestnuts IMAGE: Molecules derived from horse chestnuts aid cancer imaging. view more Credit: City College of New York Research at The City College of New York shows that cancer imaging can be simplified by a photonic process utilizing molecules derived from horse chestnuts. The study with potential to better detect the presence of cancer is led by George John, professor in City College's Division of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New species of fish displays striking color difference between males and females A new species of freshwater fish in the family Characidae, called Hyphessobrycon myrmex, seized the attention of researchers at the University of São Paulo's Zoology Museum (MZ-USP) in Brazil because of its intriguing sexual dichromatism: adult males are a deep reddish-orange, while females and juveniles are pale yellow. The species has been described in an article published in the Journal of F
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Estrogen discovery could shed new light on fertility problems MADISON, Wis. -- Estrogen produced in the brain is necessary for ovulation in monkeys, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who have upended the traditional understanding of the hormonal cascade that leads to release of an egg from the ovaries. Their findings, published Dec. 11 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science , may reveal the cause of some
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salmonella cases no longer falling in the EU The declining trend of salmonellosis cases in the European Union (EU) has levelled off according to the annual report on zoonotic diseases published today. Cases of Salmonella Enteritidis acquired in the EU have increased in humans by 3% since 2014 says the report, which is compiled by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). In
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Privacy policies affect quantity of genetic testing Different types of privacy laws in U.S. states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. As the research shows, policies that focus on the privacy risks of genetic testing, and ask for patient consent to those risks, lead to a reduction in tests performed. But policies that emphasize li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atoh1, a potential Achilles' heel of Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma IMAGE: This is the corresponding author of this work, Dr. Tiemo Klisch. view more Credit: Baylor College of Medicine Medulloblastoma is the most common type of solid brain tumor in children. Current treatments offer limited success and may leave patients with severe neurological side effects, including psychiatric disorders, growth retardation and cognitive impairment. Sonic Hedgehog, one o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Suburban ponds are a septic buffet New Haven, Conn. - A new study shows that human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds. Researchers at Yale University and Portland State University found that residential, suburban land use is altering the dynamics of the food chain, as well as where nutrients originate and how they move through pond ecosystems. The findings appear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop test that can diagnose two cancer types IMAGE: This is Dr. Unil Perera, Regents' Professor of Physics at Georgia State University. view more Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA--A blood test using infrared spectroscopy can be used to diagnose two types of cancer, lymphoma and melanoma, according to a study led by Georgia State University. Researchers used mid-infrared spectroscopy to analyze blood serum derived from experi
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Jupiter Great Red Spot has deep roots Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption A visualisation shows what it would be like to dive into Jupiter's atmosphere. Scientists are beginning to unlock the secrets of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter - the biggest storm in the Solar System. This spectacular anticyclone has been in existence for more than 150 years. It is wider than the Earth. One of the big puzzles has concerned
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The Atlantic
The Company Working to Make Dance More Inclusive A few minutes into Alex Tetley’s 2008 dance “ To Color Me Different ,” two performers move quickly across the stage—the man gliding in reverse, the wheels of his chair in profile, and the woman sliding into a backward roll. She turns like a wheel, he rotates his chair’s wheel alongside her, and, just like that, a simile merges with reality. The moment is a brief respite in this fraught duet, in w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetics preserves traces of ancient resistance to Inca ruleThe Chachapoyas region was conquered by the Inca Empire in the late 15th century. Inca oral histories, written down after the Spanish conquest, claim that the native population was forcibly resettled out of Chachapoyas and dispersed across the Inca Empire. However, a new study uses genetic evidence to reveal that despite Inca conquest, the population of Chachapoyas has remained genetically distinc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA element may cause rare movement disorderA team of researchers has identified a specific genetic change that may be the cause of a rare but severe neurological disorder called X-linked dystonia parkinsonism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People say they want to live longer -- if in good healthIndividually most people only want to live long lives if they will be healthy, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model for Zika developed to aid in testing vaccines and treatmentsAn alternative animal model that mimics key features of the Zika virus infection, including its lingering presence in bodily fluids, has been developed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet toothAlthough the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Zika virus induces congenital microcephalyEpidemiological studies show that in utero fetal infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV) may lead to microcephaly, an irreversible congenital malformation of the brain characterized by an incomplete development of the cerebral cortex. However, the mechanism of Zika virus-associated microcephaly remains unclear. Scientists have now identified a specific mechanism leading to this microcephaly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More effective photothermal tumor therapy with infrared lightNanorods made of bismuth sulfide kill tumor cells with heat when they are irradiated with near-infrared light (NIR). Scientists are now making these weapons more powerful by remodeling the defect state of the nanorod crystal lattice by adding gold nanodots. This could be a good basis for more effective photothermal treatment of tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multiple health implications of women's early marriage go beyond early childbearingA new study of four South Asian countries argues that early marriage should be considered a major public health issue, due to its complex associations with women's education, health and nutrition -- which may also affect the next generation of children. The study also finds that increased education has had some, but not enough, success in delaying girls' marriage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL research finds a sweet spot for engineering better cellulose-degrading enzymes Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have gained new insights into how glycosylation--the natural attachment of sugars to proteins--affects a key cellulase enzyme. This work could be used to improve enzyme performance to better break down biomass and convert waste plant matter to renewable fuels and products. Namely, the more effective
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL develops novel method to produce renewable acrylonitrile A new study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) establishes a novel catalytic method to produce renewable acrylonitrile using 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP), which can be biologically produced from sugars. This hybrid biological-catalytic process offers an alternative to the conventional petrochemical production method and achieves unprecedented acrylonitrile
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OSU plant pathologists discover unusual evolutionary transition in common bacteria CORVALLIS, Ore. - It's the "Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" in a nursery setting. There are mostly benign species in the soil-borne, plant-associated genus of bacteria known as Rhodococcus , but a few species can be pathogenic. A team of researchers at Oregon State University used genome sequencing to identify species of Rhodococcus that transition between beneficial and pathogenic - sti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA analyzes short-lived Bay of Bengal cyclone NASA analyzed the rainfall generated by short-lived Tropical Cyclone 04B that formed and faded over a day in the Bay of Bengal. A substantial area of the Northern Indian Ocean was recently covered with cloudiness and rain showers as a large tropical low pressure area moved over the warm waters of the Bay of Bengal. After being closely monitored for over a week, the tropical disturbance intensifie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTHealth researchers link epigenetic aging to bipolar disorder HOUSTON - (Dec. 12, 2017) - Bipolar disorder may involve accelerated epigenetic aging, which could explain why persons with the disorder are more likely to have - and die from - age-related diseases, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The findings were published in yesterday's issue of Translational Psychiatry , a Nature Publishing G
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New maps show shrinking wilderness being ignored at our peril IMAGE: These new maps show shrinking wilderness being ignored at our peril. view more Credit: James Allan UQ NEW YORK (December 12, 2017) - Maps of the world's most important wilderness areas are now freely available online following a University of Queensland and Wildlife Conservation Society-led study published today. The authors have made the maps available to assist researchers, conse
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strong relationship between self-efficacy and exercise among women veterans discovered (Boston)--For female Veterans with fibromyalgia (FM) symptoms, the impact of believing in their ability to begin and sustain a long-term exercise program appears to positively influence their results. The findings, which appear in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine , suggest a role for self-efficacy (believing in one's ability to succeed) in exercise adoption and maintenance among female
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visualizing single molecules in whole cells with a new spin IMAGE: The researchers used their SDC-PAINT method to visualize the network of cytoskeletal microtubule filaments (green) and their proximity with two additional proteins called TOM20 (red) and HSP60 (blue). Each image... view more Credit: Florian Schueder, MPI/LMU (BOSTON) --Cell biologists traditionally use fluorescent dyes to label and visualize cells and the molecules within them under
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What do high school athletes, their parents and coaches know about concussion? ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Most high school athletes, their parents and coaches can identify the possible effects of concussion, but only about one-third know that it is a brain injury. Those findings are outlined in a new Mayo Clinic study. Athletes were more likely than parents and coaches to correctly identify a concussion as a brain injury. Identifying trends and gaps in knowledge can guide help edu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beta of Neurodata Without Borders software now available IMAGE: Oliver Ruebel presents NWB:N 2.0 poster at 2017 Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington D.C. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Oliver Ruebel Neuroscientists can now explore a beta version of the new Neurodata Without Borders: Neurophysiology (NWB:N 2.0) software and offer input to developers before it is fully released next year. The 2.0 software version was developed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer-causing mutation suppresses immune system around tumorsA new study shows that mutations in 'Ras' genes, which drive 25 percent of human cancers by causing tumor cells to grow, multiply and spread, can also protect cancer cells from the immune system.The research reveals that mutated Ras genes can suppress the immune system around tumors by increasing levels of a protein called 'PD-L1.' Small amounts of PD-L1 exist naturally in the body to prevent the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer gene plays key role in cystic fibrosis lung infections New York, NY (December 12, 2017)--PTEN is best known as a tumor suppressor, a type of protein that protects cells from growing uncontrollably and becoming cancerous. But according to a new study from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), PTEN has a second, previously unknown talent: working with another protein, CFTR, it also keeps lung tissue free and clear of potentially dangerous infectio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The immune cells that help tumors instead of destroying them Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. One of the most promising ways to treat it is by immunotherapy, a strategy that turns the patient's immune system against the tumor. In the past twenty years, immunotherapies have been largely based on the degree by which immune cells can infiltrate a lung tumor, which has become a major predictor of the patient's overall prognosis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug blocks Zika, other mosquito-borne viruses in cell cultures If there was a Mafia crime family of the virus world, it might be flaviviruses. Dengue, Zika, West Nile and yellow fever virus -- to name the more notorious public health gangsters of this clan -- are all mosquito-borne flaviviruses, and they're notoriously hard to take out. Researchers struggle to find drugs to combat just a single flavivirus at a time. Now, researchers at the Stanford Universit
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Discovery deepens understanding of brain's sensory circuitry IMAGE: Asterisks denote the location of newly found "infrabarrels " in the innermost layer of the cortex of the mouse brain. The thalamus, which connects to the infrabarrels, is the region on... view more Credit: Crandall et. al. PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Because they provide an exemplary physiological model of how the mammalian brain receives sensory information, neural structur
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Live Science
Is the Ice Wall from 'Game of Thrones' Physically Possible? The Wall from the HBO TV series "Game of Thrones" may be impressive, but it's physically unrealistic, one glaciologist says. Credit: HBO NEW ORLEANS—In the HBO TV series "Game of Thrones," a great wall of ice helps repel giants and the undead. But could such a structure be possible here on Earth? A new study suggests that, no, it's not realistic, because without magic, such a barrier would fall
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common psychological traits in group of Italians aged 90 to 101In remote Italian villages nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and mountains lives a group of several hundred citizens over the age of 90. Researchers have identified common psychological traits in members of this group.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time of day affects severity of autoimmune diseaseImmune responses and the regulation of autoimmunity are affected by the time of day when the response is activated. There may be important differences in time-of-day response to drugs used to treat autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot vibrating gases under the electron spotlightScientists have studied the vibration of four gases using electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Combined with simulations, they measured the increased vibration at 1,000°C compared with room temperature. O2 and CH4 showed significant excitation, although the vibration of hot O2 was overestimated by the simulations. N2 and CO showed no increase in vibration, because of rigid bonds. The method can b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate changeThe forests you see today are not what you will see in the future. That's the overarching finding from a new study on the resilience of Rocky Mountain forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quality control is vital for the energy production of cellsResearchers have uncovered a mitochondrial error-correction mechanism, which is vital for the construction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the energy production of cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Personalized blood sugar goals can save diabetes patients thousandsA cost analysis shows treatment plans that set individualized blood sugar goals for diabetes patients, tailored to their age and health history, can save $13,546 in health care costs over their average lifetime when compared with treatment strategies that stick to a uniform national standard.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein Daple coordinates single-cell and organ-wide directionality in the inner earSensory hair cells in the inner ear combine into hair bundles to convert sound waves into electrical signals. Both single-cell and organ-wide directionality are critical for hearing, but these two levels of organization are controlled by largely distinct molecular mechanisms during inner ear development. Researchers have identified a protein, Daple, that interacts with both systems and is a promis
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Live Science
Mystery of Whale and Dolphin Strandings May Hinge on NASA Data Volunteers care for stranded pilot whales on Feb. 11, 2017, at Farewell Spit on New Zealand. Credit: MARTY MELVILLE/AFP/Getty Images Dolphins, whales and other cetaceans are found stranded along coasts worldwide, and now scientists are turning to NASA satellite data to figure out how the animals get off course. The cause of the mass strandings remains a topic of debate. Coronal mass ejectio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Closing in on advanced prostate cancerA team headed by Xavier Salvatella, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), has discovered a new avenue through which to attack prostrate cancer cells that have developed drug resistance.
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Oligonucleotide drug producers coauthor report on drug impurities IMAGE: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal that focuses on cutting-edge basic research, therapeutic applications, and drug development using nucleic acids or related compounds to alter gene expression.... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 12, 2017--A new addition to a series of articles that focus on important top
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tapeworm drug could lead the fight against Parkinson's disease Researchers at Cardiff University, in collaboration with the University of Dundee, have identified a drug molecule within a medicine used to treat tapeworm infections which could lead to new treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that, according to the charity, Parkinson's UK, affects one person in e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What role can schools play in preventing and responding to teen dating violence? IMAGE: Violence and Gender is the only peer-reviewed journal focusing on the understanding, prediction, and prevention of acts of violence. The Journal critically examines biological, genetic, behavioral, psychological, racial, ethnic, and... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 12, 2017-A nationwide study of school principals has shown that while
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Blog » Languages » English
A Visit From St. Grim: Marathon This has been fun, but our time it grows near, Our very last game is finally here. But don’t worry, don’t fret, it’s a great one you’ll see, An Eyewire favorite, we know you’ll agree. For one day we trace in great collaboration, To finish a cell, what cause for celebration! If you’re good you’ll be able, at least we’ve heard tell, To win a shirt, mug, or poster, and pick names for our cell! Marat
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The Atlantic
The Wasp That Paints Its Nursery In Bacteria The moment of birth is the moment we transform from an individual into an entire world. We leave the sterility of the womb, pass through a mother’s vagina, and become lathered in her microbes, taking them into our skin, our mouths, our guts. We begin our life as we will always live it: as a community of trillions, enclosed within a single body. Microbes help their hosts to build their bodies, dig
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NYT > Science
Matter: Ancient Penguins Were Giant Waddling Predators Kumimanu wasn’t just exceptionally big; it also ranks among the oldest penguin fossils yet found. Both its age and its size make Kumimanu important to understanding the astonishing transformation that turned a lineage of flying birds into flightless swimmers. The 18 modern species of penguin, ranging from the coast of Antarctica to the Galápagos Islands at the Equator, are impressively adapted to
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Science | The Guardian
Fossil hunters find man-sized penguin on New Zealand beach The remnants of an ancient penguin that stood as tall as a grown man have been found encased in rock on a beach in New Zealand . Fossil hunters chanced upon the prehistoric bones in sedimentary rock that formed 55 to 60 million years ago on what is now Hampden beach in Otago on the country’s south island. Measurements of the partial skeleton show that the flightless bird weighed about 100 kilogra
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cystic fibrosis: Discovery of a key molecule for improving treatmentsResearchers identify a promising avenue for improving treatments for people with cystic fibrosis. They found that adding molecules called quorum-sensing inhibitors to current drugs not only reduces bacterial production of certain harmful residues but also restores the efficacy of existing treatments, such as Orkambi and Kalydeco, on the cells of cystic fibrosis patients. This breakthrough paves th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African genetic diversity to unlock disease susceptibilityScientists have sequenced the genetic makeup of 24 South African individuals of different ethnolinguistic origins. The first government-funded human genomics research study performed on African soil, aimed at unlocking the unique genetic character of southern African populations, has revealed a high level of genetic diversity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longerA chemical found in marijuana, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, has been found to potentially slow the process in which mental decline can occur in up to 50 percent of HIV patients, says a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using genomics to determine origins of deadly White-Nose SyndromeA new study is trying to definitively answer several questions about White-Nose Syndrome in bats: where did this fungus come from? And more importantly, can a resistance be evolved?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New therapy can help schizophrenia sufferers re-engage sociallyA new therapy aimed at helping young people suffering from schizophrenia to reconnect and engage with the world around them has had promising results, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teaching antibiotics to be more effective killersResearch suggests bond duration, not bond tightness, may be the most important differentiator between antibiotics that kill bacteria and antibiotics that only stop bacterial growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado RiverAgriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal po
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Interstellar asteroid checked for alien technology Image copyright Eso Image caption Artwork: Observations of 'Oumuamua noted its unusual elongated shape A project searching for intelligent life in the cosmos is going to check the first known interstellar asteroid for signs of alien technology. The odd-shaped object was detected as it sped towards the Sun on 19 October. Its properties suggested it originated around another star, making it the fir
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insight into unique plant chemical could inform future drug development Researchers have unearthed new insight into a plant compound that could be used to help develop improved herbicides and treatments for human disease. Their study, published in the journal eLife , addresses the question of how natural plant chemicals called glucosinolates (GSLs) evolve the ability to interact with genes in humans, insects, bacteria and other plants . GSLs are evolutionarily young
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient penguin was as big as a (human) Pittsburgh Penguin This illustration provided by Gerald Mayr shows the size of an ancient giant penguin Kumimanu biceae. On Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017, researchers announced their find of fossils from approximately 60-55 million years ago, discovered in New Zealand, that put the creature at about 5 feet, 10 inches (1.77 meters) long when swimming, and 223 pounds (101 kilograms). (Gerald Mayr/Senckenberg Research Instit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Younger newly-diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes are hit hard by the disease The common view of type 2 diabetes as an old person's disease is becoming seriously outdated in step with the increasing number of persons under the age of 45 who develop the disease. New research from Aarhus University now shows that younger persons newly-diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have significantly poorer health and thus a high risk of delayed complications compared with type 2 diabetes pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Southern Africa's cheetah population much smaller than believedPopulations of cheetahs in southern Africa have declined as farming and other human activities push deeper into the big cats' range, a study led by researchers at Duke University and the Claws Conservancy finds. Fewer than 3,600 adult cheetahs -- 11 percent fewer than estimated in 2015 -- remain in the region, which is home to the largest population of free-roaming cheetahs left on Earth. Farmer-c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematicians crack 44-year-old problem IMAGE: Tarski proved that a circle with a radius of one cannot be completely covered by strips whose combined width is smaller than two -- the circle's diameter. Each of the... view more Credit: MIPT Press Office Zilin Jiang from Technion -- Israel Institute of Technology and Alexandr Polyanskii from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have proved László Fejes Tóth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't mix business with pleasure In working life it's now almost expected that employees answer work-related emails after hours, or take their laptops with them on holiday. But the blurring of boundaries between work and personal life can affect people's sense of well-being and lead to exhaustion. This is according to Ariane Wepfer of the University of Zurich in Switzerland who, together with her colleagues, published a study in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
African immigrants: How race and gender shape the American dream A study led by Michigan State University finds that gender and race play a major role in how African immigrants assimilate into American society. Credit: Michigan State University Africans represent one of the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the United States, but women far outpace men for securing high-skilled jobs and earnings growth, indicates a new study led by a Michigan State University
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Live Science
Why This Explosive, Mars-Like Volcanic Island Fascinates NASA An overhead image, captured by a satellite, reveals the baby island. Credit: NASA A baby island burst out of the South Pacific Ocean three years ago during a volcanic explosion in the Polynesian kingdom of Tonga, and now NASA scientists think it could be here to stay for decades. When the new landmass, dubbed Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, emerged out of a towering, 30,000-foot-high (9,100 mete
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Why do some people hate cilantro? With chitlins about to make their annual appearance on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day menus, scientists have good news for millions of people who love that delicacy of down-home southern cooking, but hate the ...
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Quanta Magazine
Neutrinos Suggest Solution to Mystery of Universe’s Existence From above, you might mistake the hole in the ground for a gigantic elevator shaft. Instead, it leads to an experiment that might reveal why matter didn’t disappear in a puff of radiation shortly after the Big Bang. I’m at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, or J-PARC — a remote and well-guarded government facility in Tokai, about an hour’s train ride north of Tokyo. The experiment her
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New instrument identifies unexploded artillery shellsSociety faces threats through the malicious use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosive (CBRNE) materials. The detection of illicit trafficking or other criminal acts, as well as many security and safety applications, call for novel material analysis techniques and instruments. These detection systems should be non-destructive but still be able to detect and identify the th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pokémon Go could help people who struggle sociallyVideo games may have a reputation for attracting introverts, but when it comes to augmented reality games like Pokémon Go, extroverts tend to be better players. That's the key finding of a new psychology study, the first to look at the impact of players' personalities, social competence and social anxiety when playing the hit mobile game.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Action games expand the brain's cognitive abilities, study suggestsThe human brain learns and adapts. Numerous research studies have focused on the impact of action video games on the brain by measuring cognitive abilities, such as perception and reaction time. An international team of psychologists has assembled data from the last fifteen years to quantify how action video games impact cognition. The research has resulted in two meta-analyses, which reveal a sig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breachComputer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had suffered a data breach during their 18-month study period, regardless of how big the companies' reach and audience are.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscopeScientists were able to demonstrate another way of viewing biological samples at high resolution, explains a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune diseases inflict identical twins differentlyA new study reports which epigenetic factors in certain chromosomes that make one twin more at risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover path to improving game-changing battery electrodeA comprehensive picture has now been gained of how the same chemical processes that give cathodes their high capacity are also linked to changes in atomic structure that sap performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer IMAGE: Norbert Kaminski, director of Michigan State University's Institute for Integrative Toxicology, has found that a chemical in marijuana, known as THC, can potentially slow the process of mental decline that... view more Credit: G.L. Kohuth, Michigan State University EAST LANSING, Mich. -- A chemical found in marijuana, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, has been found to potentially
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Late-breaking hematology abstracts signal new, near-term therapeutic options for patients (Atlanta, December 12, 2017) -- In four clinical trials being presented today during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta, researchers report promising results suggesting patients with blood disorders and several types of cancer will soon have significantly expanded options for treatment. The announcements reflect the latest results from clinical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depression's causal mechanisms identified with new method People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study by the University of Warwick. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, or negative memories, in depression. As the first of its kind, the new stud
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stuttering: Stop signals in the brain disturb speech flow IMAGE: Typically, the right IFG stops the flow of speech, whereas the left one supports it. In people who stutter, these two areas are conversely activated: The right IFG is... view more Credit: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) One per cent of adults and five per cent of children are unable to achieve what most of us take for granted--speaking fluently.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D printed microfibers could provide structure for artificially grown body parts IMAGE: This is an illustration of electrospinning. view more Credit: Justin Brown Much as a frame provides structural support for a house and the chassis provides strength and shape for a car, a team of Penn State engineers believe they have a way to create the structural framework for growing living tissue using an off-the-shelf 3-D printer. "We are trying to make stem-cell-loaded hydroge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't mix business with pleasure In working life it's now almost expected that employees answer work-related emails after hours, or take their laptops with them on holiday. But the blurring of boundaries between work and personal life can affect people's sense of well-being and lead to exhaustion. This is according to Ariane Wepfer of the University of Zurich in Switzerland who, together with her colleagues, published a study in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using computers to detect breast cancerJeffrey Golden, M.D., comments on new research exploring the use of computer algorithms in detecting the spread of breast cancer to lymph nodes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles, Rutgers-led study finds IMAGE: This illustration shows how human breast cancer cells in a mouse model were "chased " with novel rare earth nanoscale probes injected intravenously. When the subject is illuminated, the probes glow... view more Credit: Harini Kantamneni and Professor Prabhas Moghe/Rutgers University New Brunswick Using light-emitting nanoparticles, Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have inven
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life's building blocks observed in spacelike environment IMAGE: Low-energy electron impact mediates the creation of new complex organic molecules, such as ethanol, in astrophysical/planetary model ices containing methane and oxygen; while some of the new species desorb as... view more Credit: The photo of Jupiter's moon Europa, inserted for the Platinum (Pt) substrate (bottom of the graphic), is credited to NASA, public domain images. WASHINGTON,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial intelligence detects diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases among patients Bottom Line: A computing system with artificial intelligence that can learn to do tasks that normally require human intelligence could detect retinal images that did and did not show diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases in multiethnic populations. Why The Research Is Interesting: Diabetic retinopathy is a vision-threatening eye disease. One of the challenges of screening for diabetic r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thyroid medication did not improve pregnancy outcomes for women in China undergoing IVF Bottom Line: Treatment with the thyroid medication levothyroxine did not improve pregnancy outcomes for women in China undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer for infertility. Why The Research Is Interesting: Women who test positive for thyroid autoantibodies are reported to be at higher risk for miscarriage. Limited studies with conflicting results exist on whether levothyroxine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Findings show potential use of artificial intelligence in detecting spread of breast cancer Bottom Line: Computer algorithms detected the spread of cancer to lymph nodes in women with breast cancer as well as or better than pathologists. Why The Research Is Interesting: Digital imaging of tissue sample slides for pathology has become possible in recent years because of advances in slide scanning technology. Artificial intelligence, where computers learn to do tasks that normally requi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone therapy not recommended for prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women Bottom Line: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against the use of combined estrogen and progestin in postmenopausal women, or estrogen alone in postmenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy, to prevent chronic conditions such as heart disease, dementia and stroke. Background: The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care servi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dinosaur parasites trapped in 100-million-year-old amber tell blood-sucking story IMAGE: Hard tick grasping a dinosaur feather preserved in 99 million-year-old Burmese amber. Modified from the open access article published in Nature Communications : 'Ticks parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous... view more Credit: Paper authors. Fossil discovery shows ticks sucked the blood of feathered dinosaurs almost 100 million years ago Amber containing ti
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dracula ticks in amber tell ancient blood-sucking tale Image copyright NAture Communications/E Penalver Image caption The tick is stuck on to a dinosaur feather Feathered dinosaurs were covered in ticks just like modern animals, fossil evidence shows. Parasites similar to modern ticks have been found inside pieces of amber from Myanmar dating back 99 million years. One is entangled with a dinosaur feather, another is swollen with blood, and two were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here's how to shut down the internet: Snip undersea fiber-optic cables Credit: CC0 Public Domain Hundreds of thousands of miles of fiber-optic cable lay on the ocean floors, a crucial part of the global internet's backbone, and only rarely do ship anchors, undersea landslides or saboteurs disrupt them. Still, a few voices now call for stronger global mechanisms and even military action to protect the cables against future malicious activity by states, saboteurs or e
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Science | The Guardian
New Zealand bans vaginal mesh implants New Zealand has become the first major country to effectively ban vaginal mesh implants in response to safety concerns over the surgery. The country’s Ministry of Health announced on Monday that it had written to leading mesh suppliers asking them to stop marketing the products from January – or prove that their products are safe. Ministry of Health spokesman, Stewart Jessamine, told a New Zealan
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Ingeniøren
Endnu en dansk robotvirksomhed klar til verdensmarkedet Sidste år vakte det opsigt, da det lille spin-out fra DTU, Shape Robotics, med risikovillig kapital fra Syddansk Innovation A/S præsenterede den modulopbyggede læringsrobot Fable. Plastdelene i prototypen var 3D-printede, og elektronikken håndloddet, men ideen var, at skolebørn helt ned til 3. klasse kunne få fornemmelsen af, hvad robotbygning – og især robotprogrammering – egentlig er for noget.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Ticks Trapped in Amber Were Likely Sucking Dinosaur Blood Upon further inspection, he and his colleagues concluded that the tick was a nymph, similar in size to a deer tick nymph, and that its host was most likely some sort of fledgling dinosaur no bigger than a hummingbird, which Dr. Grimaldi referred to as a “nanoraptor.” The parasites were most likely unwanted roommates living in the dinosaurs’ nests and sucking their blood. “These nanoraptors were l
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Science : NPR
Arctic's Temperature Continues To Run Hot, Latest 'Report Card' Shows Melt ponds dot a stretch of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland, as seen during an Operation IceBridge flight on July 24. Nathan Kurtz/NASA hide caption toggle caption Nathan Kurtz/NASA Melt ponds dot a stretch of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland, as seen during an Operation IceBridge flight on July 24. Nathan Kurtz/NASA The Arctic is a huge, icy cap on the planet that
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Science : NPR
Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs A tick grasping a dinosaur feather, preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption toggle caption Peñalver et al/Nature Communications A tick grasping a dinosaur feather, preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications Ticks sucked the blood of feathered dinosaurs some 99 million years ago, a new stu
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ticks had a taste for dinosaur blood Ticks once tickled dinosaurs’ feathers. The tiny arthropods have been surreptitiously sucking blood for more than 100 million years, but evidence of early ticks’ preferred hosts has been scant. Now, samples of amber from Myanmar have caught the critters with their spiny mouthparts inside the cookie jar. A hunk of 99-million-year-old amber holds a tick tangled in a dinosaur feather , researchers r
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'Star Wars: The Last Jedi': Building a Better Snoke Star Wars fans met Snoke in The Force Awakens —kinda sorta. The withered baddie was just a fuzzy projection tele-conspiring with his First Order goons. But in December’s sequel, The Last Jedi , the Supreme Leader gets his close-up . “Snoke’s face is no longer a soapy, gelatinous hologram,” says Industrial Light & Magic creative director Ben Morris. “He’s going to be real .” Well, as real as Andy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles This illustration shows how human breast cancer cells in a mouse model were "chased" with novel rare earth nanoscale probes injected intravenously. When the subject is illuminated, the probes glow in an infrared range of light that is more sensitive than other optical forms of illumination. In this case, the probes show the spread of cancer cells to adrenal glands and femur (thigh) bones. Credit:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life's building blocks observed in spacelike environment Low-energy electron impact mediates the creation of new complex organic molecules, such as ethanol, in astrophysical/planetary model ices containing methane and oxygen; while some of the new species desorb as ions, many remain in the surface ices. Credit: The photo of Jupiter's moon Europa, inserted for the Platinum (Pt) substrate (bottom of the graphic), is credited to NASA, public domain images
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dinosaur parasites trapped in 100-million-year-old amber tell blood-sucking story Hard tick grasping a dinosaur feather preserved in 99 million-year-old Burmese amber. Modified from the open access article published in Nature Communications : 'Ticks parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages.' Credit: Paper authors. Fossilised ticks discovered trapped and preserved in amber show that these parasites sucked the blood of feathered dinosaurs almos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NRL researchers advance fleet weather predictions through innovation, collaboration IMAGE: The US Naval Research Laboratory's Marine Meteorology Division in Monterey, California, houses a team of scientists and engineers who work in conjunction with the lab's broader scientific community to provide... view more Credit: (US Naval Research Laboratory) MONTEREY, Calif. - The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Marine Meteorology Division in Monterey, California, houses a team of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African immigrants: How race and gender shape the American dream IMAGE: A study led by Michigan State University finds that gender and race play a major role in how African immigrants assimilate into American society. view more Credit: Michigan State University EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Africans represent one of the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the United States, but women far outpace men for securing high-skilled jobs and earnings growth, indica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do some people hate cilantro? (video) IMAGE: Cilantro is a popular seasoning, adding flavor to tacos and noodle dishes across the globe. But to some people, it just tastes like soap. Why? Research suggests a genetic cause... view more Credit: The American Chemical Society WASHINGTON, Dec. 12, 2017 -- Cilantro is a popular seasoning, adding flavor to tacos and noodle dishes across the globe. But to some people, it just tastes li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Important new aspects are revealed about the control of cell division IMAGE: These are the authors of the study. view more Credit: University of Seville Experts from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (Cabimer) have published a new study on the mechanisms that regulate cell division and guarantee the correct distribution of chromosomes during this process. In particular, they especially highligh
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Scientific American Content: Global
Following the Developing Iranian Cyberthreat Iran is one of the leading cyberspace adversaries of the United States. It emerged as a cyberthreat a few years later than Russia and China and has so far demonstrated less skill. Nevertheless, it has conducted several highly damaging cyberattacks and become a major threat that will only get worse . Like Russia and China, the history of Iran’s cyberspace operations begins with its hackers. Bu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To fend off hackers, local governments get help from states The city of Mill Creek, Wash., has only 55 full-time employees and just one of them—James Busch—is responsible for handling information technology and cybersecurity. He worries about the growing sophistication of hackers and cybercriminals and the city computer network's vulnerabilities. So when the Washington State Auditor's Office started offering local governments a free, in-depth evaluation o
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Live Science
Picture of Health: Can AI Eye Scan Reveal What Ails You? The light-sensitive layer found at the back of a person's eyes contains more than just cells that detect shadows and light — it also contains information about the health of a person's entire body. And now, artificial intelligence can glean this information from a single snapshot, new research suggests. The new AI algorithm, which analyzes images of this light-sensitive layer of the eye, ca
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Scientific American Content: Global
Wind Turbines May Turn Slower in a Warmer World Global warming could be causing long-term shifts in the generation of wind energy. New research published yesterday in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests that future climate change might cause wind resources to decline across the Northern Hemisphere. These losses could be tempered by increases in wind power potential south of the equator, under severe climate change scenarios. The fin
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Free yourself from your filter bubbles | Joan Blades and John GableJoan Blades and John Gable want you to make friends with people who vote differently than you do. A pair of political opposites, the two longtime pals know the value of engaging in honest conversations with people you don't immediately agree with. Join them as they explain how to bridge the gaps in understanding between people on opposite sides of the political spectrum -- and create opportunities
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The Atlantic
The Christmas-Tree Shortage Could Last for Years True for all of those in his line of work, the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving were Casey Grogan’s busiest time of year. Earlier in November, he harvested 70,000 Noble and Nordmann firs at Silver Bells Tree Farm, his Christmas-tree farm in the foothills of Oregon’s Cascade Mountain Range. As the holiday neared, he watched his crop cruise off in the backs of around 100 semi-trucks, following the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A gold-standard cancer treatment is in decline, and money may be why IMAGE: University of Virginia Cancer Center radiation oncologist Timothy Showalter has determined that offering brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer ends up costing hospitals money. This may explain its declining use even... view more Credit: UVA Health System The evidence is clear: Cervical cancer is best treated with brachytherapy, a form of radiation therapy. Yet the use of this po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new technology for producing nano-hydroxyapatite developed by Lobachevsky University chemists Today, deterioration of human health is one of the most pressing problems that modern medicine is facing. First of all, it concerns the widespread degradation of hard tissues - bones and teeth. To solve this problem, it is necessary to create medical materials capable of restoring the structure of hard tissues. The chemical basis of such materials is provided by hydroxyapatite, an inorganic compo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery may enhance chemotherapy's efficiency against leukaemia Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found a mechanism through which certain types of leukaemia resist chemotherapy, thus revealing novel molecular targets that may be used to improve the efficiency of this type of treatment. In patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, cancer cells resist the effects of chemotherapy, many times resulting in disease recurre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Searching for the CRISPR swiss-army knife Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called 'Swiss-army knives' of genome editing. Montoya's research group has visualized the atomic structures of the Cpf1 and Cas9 proteins to analyse each of their properties and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AGU Fall Meeting: Accumulating sediment in Mississippi River threatens course change The following release and accompanying images can be found at: http://news. agu. org/ press-release/ agu-fall-meeting-accumulating-sediment-in-mississippi-river-threatens-course-change-water-supply/ AGU Fall Meeting: Accumulating sediment in Mississippi River threatens course change, water supply Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, Louisiana 11-15 December 2017 AGU Contacts
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'King tides' are rising, so groups span globe to monitor it The tide watchers start patrolling whenever the celestial forces align. From coast to coast, hundreds of tide watchers come out with their cameras to record the latest "king tides," brief episodes of tidal flooding that could become the norm, with expected sea level rise. King tides are a colloquial term for the highest tides of the year. They occur when the moon is closest to the earth at moment
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Big Think
Why Highly Intelligent People Suffer More Mental and Physical Disorders People with high IQ are considered to have an advantage in many domains. They are predicted to have higher educational attainment, better jobs, and a higher income level. Yet, it turns out that a high IQ is also associated with various mental and immunological diseases like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, ADHD as well as allergies, asthma, and immune disorders. Why is that? A new paper pub
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Ingeniøren
3D-printer bruger blæk med levende bakterier Tidligere stejlede de fleste, når de hørte ordet bakterie, der blev forbundet med sygdom, men de senere år er der kommet stadig mere fokus på, at vi ikke kan overleve uden gode bakterier, der holder vores krop i gang. Nu har schweiziske forskere udviklet en metode til at anvende levende bakterier i en biokompatibel blæk – en hydrogel – som kan benyttes i en 3D-printer. Det giver mulighed for at 3
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New on MIT Technology Review
Should We Have a Meat Tax? Call it the modern burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still eat on. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per year in 2015, with that figure expected to rise to nearly 219 pounds by 2025. It’s especially troubling given that, according to the United N
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NYT > Science
Another Human Foot Washes Ashore in Canada. That Makes 13. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police retrieved the remains on Friday, the authorities said, and they are being inspected by the Coroners Service of British Columbia. “We’ll try to get a DNA sample,” said Andy Watson, a spokesman for the service. During winter months, British Columbia experiences what are known as “king tides,” unusually high tides that can cause coastal flooding. The tides, along wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX delivery delayed a day; First reused rocket for NASA (Phys.org)—Astronomers report the detection of new eruptions in two luminous blue variables, known as R 40 and R 110, located in the Magellanic Clouds. The finding, presented December 5 in a paper published on the arXiv ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming, melting Arctic is 'new normal' (Update)An increasingly warm Arctic, where temperatures rise twice as fast as the rest of the planet and ice melts at an alarming pace is the "new normal," warned a global scientific report Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make solid ground toward better lithium-ion battery interfaces Schematic of full battery cell architecture and cross-sectional microscopic image of the actual battery. Credit: Sandia National Laboratories Research at Sandia National Laboratories has identified a major obstacle to advancing solid-state lithium-ion battery performance in small electronics: the flow of lithium ions across battery interfaces. Sandia's three-year Laboratory Directed Research and
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Ingeniøren
Lavere storebæltstakster kan sende 42.000 flere lastbiler på vejene Trængslen på de danske motorveje vil øges som resultat af regeringens og Dansk Folkepartis aftale om at sænke priserne for at passere Storebælt med 25 procent. Ifølge regeringens egne beregninger vil 3.000-4.500 flere køretøjer passere Storebælt hvert døgn, når takstnedsættelsen er fuldt indfaset i 2023. Det svarer til mellem 8,6 og 12,9 procent flere end de 34.882, der dagligt er kørt over broer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists designed an instrument to identify unexploded artillery shells IMAGE: This is a simulated instrument with the artillery shell. view more Credit: Camille Bélanger-Champagne These detection systems should be non-destructive but still be able to detect and identify the threat objects, even from inside a shielding or masking enclosure. Active interrogation methods that use penetrative particle beams can reveal the presence of CBRNE materials. "In prompt ga
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A drug to treat retinal diseases with drops instead of injections IMAGE: Sylentis SYL136001v10 drug is a small interfering RNA capable of penetrating the cells of the retina and blocking the formation of new blood vessels by intravitreal drops. view more Credit: PharmaMar The Spanish firm Sylentis has developed a compound to treat diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, which will be administered by oph
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African genetic diversity to unlock disease susceptibility IMAGE: Wits scientists and partners have sequenced the genetic makeup of 24 South African individuals of different ethnolinguistic origins. The first government-funded human genomics research study performed on African soil, aimed... view more Credit: Shutterstock University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (Wits) scientists and partners have sequenced the genomes of 24 South African indi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mechanism to explain how El Niño influences East Asian and WN Pacific climate IMAGE: Schematic of the anomalous moist enthalpy advection mechanism. Warm SSTAs in the equatorial CEP (red line) enhance local convection (green shading) and thus stimulate cyclonic anomalies to the northwest (black... view more Credit: (Wu et al. 2017a) Western North Pacific anomalous anticyclone (WNPAC, or referred to as Philippine Sea anomalous anticyclone) is the most important anomalous
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells IMAGE: Immunostaining of Trpm5 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) on coronal sections of the trachea of wild-type and Skn-1a-deficient mice. The key point is that compared to the wild-type, no signals for... view more Credit: Junji Hirota Growing evidence shows that sensory cells which enable us to taste sweetness, bitterness and savoriness (umami) are not limited to the tongue. These so-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research could pave the way for pre-hospital treatment for seriously injured patients Scientists hope to have paved the way for the development of potentially new life-saving treatments to be administered to seriously injured patients in the critical first hour of injury. By testing the blood samples of 91 patients taken at the scene of major accidents, scientists were able for the first time to establish how quickly the lining of blood vessels are damaged, which can lead to a ra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pokémon Go could help people who struggle socially Video games may have a reputation for attracting introverts, but when it comes to augmented reality games like Pokémon Go, extroverts tend to be better players. That's the key finding of a new University of British Columbia psychology study, the first to look at the impact of players' personalities, social competence and social anxiety when playing the hit mobile game. "Since Pokémon Go requi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Battling white-nose syndrome in bats Washington, DC - Dec. 12, 2017 - Millions of bats in North America have been wiped out by the disease white-nose syndrome caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans , and scientists worry that a catastrophic reduction in the bat population will have pervasive ecological repercussions. Now, a new study in mBio shines light on where the fungus came from and how it spreads. "Our work suggests
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells Immunostaining of Trpm5 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) on coronal sections of the trachea of wild-type and Skn-1a-deficient mice. The key point is that compared to the wild-type, no signals for Trpm5 and ChAT were observed in the Skn-1a-deficient mice. Thus, Skn-1a is essential for the functional differentiation of Trpm5-positive tracheal brush cells. Credit: Junji Hirota Growing evidence s
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Feed: All Latest
The Physics of Projectile Motion With a Clicky Pen Sometimes, when I'm proctoring an exam, I end up with a little too much time on my hands. So I play with stuff—whatever I've got on hand. In this case, it was one of those clicky pens. It had stopped writing, so I assumed it was out of ink. Of course it might not be out of ink, so I took it apart to look at the ink cartridge and check. That's when I discovered the fun stuff: If I push the empty i
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Popular Science
Nine gifts for the casual gamer You're a casual gamer. Does that mean you're any less entitled to get hyped about Halo 6 than your neighbor who plays World of Warcraft like it's his job? Heck no. Casual gamers can pine after a console releases with the same fervor as BlizzCon attendees, and they certainly wear Zelda T-shirts. Below, a gift guide for you and your chill, video game-liking friends. This console was made for the ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recordings reveal deep credibility gap when doctors and parents discuss outcomes for critically illAn analysis of 16 audiotaped conversations between parents of infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and clinicians found that medical staff routinely downplay quality of life issues and leave families more optimistic about their babies' prognoses than the clinicians intended.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medical marijuana for children with cancer? What providers thinkMost providers willing to consider medical marijuana use in children with cancer, but those with legal eligibility to certify are less likely to approve.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potassium is critical to circadian rhythms in human red blood cells An innovative new study from the University of Surrey and Cambridge's MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications , has uncovered the secrets of the circadian rhythms in red blood cells and identified potassium as the key to unravelling the mystery. Red blood cells, similar to other cells in the body, have 24 hour biological clocks (circadian rh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fold formation of the cerebral cortex requires FGF signaling in the mammalian brain IMAGE: Left: Schematic picture of the brain, a side view. Right: Schematic picture of the brain, a sectional view. view more Credit: Kanazawa University [Background] The human brain is highly developed compared to other animals, thanks to which humans are believed to have acquired special abilities. One of the important factors considered to contribute to the development of the br
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Action games expand the brain's cognitive abilities The human brain is malleable - it learns and adapts. Numerous research studies have focused on the impact of action video games on the brain by measuring cognitive abilities, such as perception, attention and reaction time. An international team of psychologists, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has assembled data from the last fifteen years to quantify how action video games
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach Computer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had suffered a data breach during their 18-month study period, regardless of how big the companies' reach and audience are. "No one is ab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV-1 regulation via protective human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypesHIV-1 regulation by the HLA-B*52:01 allele has been established for some time. However, evidence of regulation by its companion, the HLA-C*12:02 allele, has been difficult to produce due to the strong linkage. Researchers from the Center for AIDS research in Kumamoto University, Japan have produced the first evidence of HLA-C's control of HIV-1, but they note that it comes with a price. Namely, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer scientists develop a simple tool to tell if websites suffered a data breach Some of the code engineers use to develop Tripwire.The entire code is available on GitHub. Credit: University of California San Diego Computer scientists have built and successfully tested a tool designed to detect when websites are hacked by monitoring the activity of email accounts associated with them. The researchers were surprised to find that almost 1 percent of the websites they tested had
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Battling white-nose syndrome in bats Credit: CC0 Public Domain Millions of bats in North America have been wiped out by the disease white-nose syndrome caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans , and scientists worry that a catastrophic reduction in the bat population will have pervasive ecological repercussions. Now, a new study in mBio shines light on where the fungus came from and how it spreads. "Our work suggests that t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing 3-D maps of ground conductivity for power-grid risk assessment It's not often geology and national security wind up in the same sentence. Most people don't think about electrical power in connection to either the ground under their feet or solar flares overhead, but Dr. Adam Schultz of Oregon State University, and EarthScope Magnetotelluric Program Lead Scientist, says that connection presents a clear and present risk that power utilities need to consider. "
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiments show Neolithic Thames beater could be used to kill a person The hand positions used to administer the two types of blow: left) the pommel strike; right) the double-handed strike. Arrows indicate direction of swing . Credit: Meaghan Dyer (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Edinburgh has found evidence that the "Thames Beater" was a weapon that could be used to kill another person—perhaps at times, with a single blow to the head. In thei
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Telescopes team up to study giant galaxyAstronomers have used two Australian radio telescopes and several optical telescopes to study complex mechanisms that are fuelling jets of material blasting away from a black hole 55 million times more massive than the Sun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Personality and mood swings in bacteria Artist impression of an E. coli bacterium that moves by means of flagella. Credit: AMOLF Bacteria can control where they go using a signaling network of protein molecules. Scientists at AMOLF have developed a microscopy method that allows them to see how individual bacteria use this network to make decisions. They discovered that bacteria are surprisingly diverse in personality and mood. The team
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New scientific yardstick to help early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease The European Commission's science and knowledge service, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) released a new scientific yardstick, in the form of a certified reference material, to help early detection of Alzheimer's disease. The certified reference material will serve to calibrate diagnostic tools for amyloid-β 1-42, a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease found in cerebrospinal fluid. Reliable measu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune diseases inflict identical twins differently IMAGE: We can analyze the individual differences in sensitivity to environmental factors using monozygotic twins. view more Credit: Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine It does not matter if you raise them the same, feed them the same, or dress them the same, any parent with identical twins knows their two children are remarkably different. Identical twins
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Role of transcriptional co-factor hints at possible inflammatory bowel disease treatment IMAGE: MKL1-Tg is a novel mouse model for inflammatory bowel disease. view more Credit: Department of Molecular Pathogenesis,Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU) Tokyo - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including the two conditions ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, results in long-term inflammation of the gut and is associated with dysregulation of the immune system. However, it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope IMAGE: Scientists imaged gold nanocrystals (shown here in false-color) using a 300kV electron beam, through 1.3kPa of water vapor. view more Credit: OIST The inside of an electron microscope, which requires vacuum levels similar to those encountered in outer space, can be an extremely inhospitable place for organic materials. Traditionally, life scientists have circumvented this pro
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Big Think
Is Now the Right Time to Invest in Bitcoin, or Should You Stay Away? The cryptocurrency Bitcoin has been making news for its seemingly unstoppable rise in the stock market this year. It has gone from being priced at less than $1000 per coin at the start of the year to currently passing $17,000 per one bitcoin. It also seems to not be slowing down any time soon, with analysts predicting the stock price to rise as high as $20,000 in the short term. Some investors,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New eruptions detected in two luminous blue variables Spectral variation of R 40 seen in the spectra taken from 2002 (top) until 2016 (bottom). We can see the change from a late B/early A-type to a late F-type spectrum, implying a new eruption. The spectrum of HD 54605 (F8Ia) is also shown for comparison. Credit: Campagnolo et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—Astronomers report the detection of new eruptions in two luminous blue variables, known as R 40 and R
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Importance of Fostering Emotional Diversity in Boys You’re given a choice: Would you rather spend your day feeling happy versus happy interspersed with some moments of sadness, frustration, and anxiety? Most of us would choose the first option in a heartbeat. Psychologists, too, long championed the importance of cultivating positive emotions as one path towards optimizing well being, resilience to stressors, and salutary physical health outcomes.
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse har politianmeldt markant flere læger i år end tidligere 12 læger er blevet politianmeldt for grov forsømmelighed i år, mens der de seneste år kun har været dømt to til tre læger for samme overtrædelse, viser ny opgørelse.
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Ingeniøren
Specialisterne taber årets lønkapløb For tredje år i træk får specialisterne den laveste lønregulering blandt IDAs privatansatte medlemmer. Mens IDA lønstatistik 2017 viser en gennemsnitlig stigning på 3,7 procent , bliver der blot 2,6 procent til specialisterne. Med den nuværende inflation på 1,6 procent er der med andre ord tale om en reallønsstigning på blot 1 procent. I en tid, hvor den ene virksomhed efter den anden efterlyser
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Science | The Guardian
Struggling to express your feelings? Get an imaginary friend C omedian and children’s author David Walliams recently said that the make-believe companions of his childhood were still with him . “They’re still my friends – they’re not imaginary, are they?” Being a psychotherapist with no sense of humour, I am going to answer Walliams’s question seriously. Humans are meaning-making creatures. One of the ways we do this is by projecting different parts of our
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Dagens Medicin
Regionerne har otte krav til de kommende overenskomstforhandlinger I dag begynder forhandlingerne om nye overenskomster for regionernes ansatte. Regionerne ønsker at drøfte, hvordan der kan findes en ny fleksibilitet, der i højere grad imødekommer behovet for at kunne bruge personaleressourcerne på en optimal måde.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space weather, EarthScope, and protecting the national electrical grid It's not often geology and national security wind up in the same sentence. Most people don't think about electrical power in connection to either the ground under their feet or solar flares overhead, but Dr. Adam Schultz of Oregon State University, and EarthScope Magnetotelluric Program Lead Scientist, says that connection presents a clear and present risk that power utilities need to consider.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST researchers develop silicon chip-based quantum photonic devices IMAGE: This is a schematic of the integrated InP nanobeam and silicon waveguide. view more Credit: UNIST An international team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has presented a core technology for quantum photonic devices used in quantum information processing. They have proposed combining of quantum dots for generating light and silicon photonic technologies for manipulating li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cystic fibrosis: Discovery of a key molecule for improving treatments Cystic fibrosis: discovery of a key molecule for improving treatments Montreal, December 12, 2017 - Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have identified a promising solution to improving treatments offered to patients with cystic fibrosis. This advancement, published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology , could lead to the development of n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teaching antibiotics to be more effective killers Research from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests bond duration, not bond tightness, may be the most important differentiator between antibiotics that kill bacteria and antibiotics that only stop bacterial growth. While both types of antibiotics are used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, bactericidal antibiotics - those that kill bacteria - can be taken for shorter peri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists suggested a new technology for creating magnet micro-structures IMAGE: This is the configuration of a thin crystal film. view more Credit: Anton Tarasov A team of scientists from Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center (Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences) and Siberian Federal University synthesized thin crystal ferromagnetic films and developed a technology for their shaping. Processed films can be used in electronic and spintronic chips. The resu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pathological mechanisms in congenital myotonic dystrophy unveiled IMAGE: Aberrant CpG methylation upstream of the expanded CTG repeats dysregulates transcription at the repeat locus in both directions, thereby increasing toxic RNA burden. Additionally, enhanced RNA toxicity upregulated the interleukin-6... view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka - Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of genetic muscular dystrophy that begins in adulthood. DM i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shatter-proof mobile phone screens a step closer with ANU research IMAGE: The silicate melt is poured on a graphite plate to make glass (composite image with smashed mobile phone screen as an overlay). view more Credit: Stuart Hay, ANU An international study on glass led by The Australian National University (ANU) and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris in France could lead to the development of shatter-proof mobile phone screens. Lead researc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists sug­gest ti­ta­ni­um nit­ri­de in­ste­ad of gold in op­to­e­lec­tro­nics An international team of scientists from Russia, Sweden and the USA suggested replacing gold and silver, which are used in optoelectronic devices, with an inexpensive material of titanium nitride. The results of the study are published in the journal Applied Physics Letters . "«Titanium nitride has excellent anti-corrosion and thermal stability properties, it is non-toxic and synthesized e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An anthropologist explains why we love holiday rituals and traditions Working together on a once-a-year project feels festive and special. Credit: Flotsam/Shutterstock.com The mere thought of holiday traditions brings smiles to most people's faces and elicits feelings of sweet anticipation and nostalgia. We can almost smell those candles, taste those special meals, hear those familiar songs in our minds. Ritual marks some of the most important moments in our lives,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Italian prosecutors seek to shelve Hacking Team breach caseA legal document obtained by The Associated Press says that Italian prosecutors want to drop their investigation into the 2015 breach of surveillance company Hacking Team, leaving a question mark over a dramatic leak which embarrassed intelligence figures across the globe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation Artist’s view of global teleportation of quantum bits. Credit: Christoph Hohmann, Nanosystems Initiative Munich Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor Gerhard Rempe at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) have now achieved a major breakthrough: they demonstrated the lon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data tool to support the move from fossil fuels to renewable energy launched by IEA Credit: University of Reading The Institute for Environmental Analytics has launched a renewable energy planning tool in the Seychelles, where it has been welcomed by the government as a boost towards its target of 100 percent renewable energy generation. RE-SAT (Renewable Energy Space Analytics Tool) is a powerful renewable energy analytics platform developed by the University of Reading-based I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sexual harassment of girls is widespread in schools, researchers find Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new study carried out by University of Warwick's Institute for Employment Research for the NEU teaching union and campaign group UK Feminista has found that over a third of girls at mixed-sex schools in England and Wales have been sexually harassed while at school. The report, " 'It's just everywhere': Sexism in schools and how we tackle it ," is being launched today i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Risks of manipulating the global thermostat Credit: Allie Nicodemo If someone offered you a magic pill that claimed to cure all health ailments, would you take it? Let's say you did. Perhaps you'd start eating pizza and ice cream for every meal, since proper nutrition would no longer be a concern. Maybe that exercise regimen would fall by the wayside as well. You could forgo all prescribed medications. The risk, of course, is that the pill
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists engineer nanoscale pillars to act like memory foam, paving the way to new nanoelectromechanical devices This scanning electron micrograph (SEM) image shows the nanomechanical testing tip passing over the arrays of custom-made nanopillars as it applies pressure to test elasticity and energy storage potential. The inset shows the structure of an individual hybrid nanopillar. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory A team of scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New procedure for faster detection of environmental impacts from salmon farms These fish are cultivated in large cages off the coast for approximately two years. Credit: Stoeck In order to meet the demands for salmon, many salmon farms have developed along the coasts of Scandinavia and Scotland. These operations are governed by strict environmental regulations. Farms are required to determine how their fish production is affecting the marine benthic ecosystem. Therefore, t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows promoting one woman helps many more UVA economist Amalia Miller co-authored a new study showing how promoting one woman could have “spillover” benefits for many others. Credit: Dan Addison, University Communications In the midst of intense national scrutiny of gender equality and sexual harassment in the workplace, one University of Virginia economist's work offers a glimpse of a solution. Economics professor Amalia Miller and her
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Futurity.org
Why most meteoroids blow up before they hit Earth When a meteoroid enters Earth’s atmosphere, the high-pressure air in front of it seeps into its pores, cracking the meteoroid, pushing its body apart, and causing it to explode, new research suggests. “There’s a big gradient between high-pressure air in front of the meteor and the vacuum of air behind it,” says Jay Melosh, a professor of Earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences at Purdue Univer
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Map of Future Exoplanetary Discovery A Map of Future Exoplanetary Discovery Most of the alien worlds closest to our own are found around the smallest, dimmest nearby stars Advertisement Astronomers know of more than 3,500 exoplanets—worlds orbiting stars other than our sun—and will probably find thousands more in the next few years. Some of these newfound worlds will resemble our own planet in size, composition and temperature. Yet
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Scientific American Content: Global
It's Time for Science and Academia to Address Sexual Misconduct Why do most academic fields, and science in particular, have such significant gender and racial imbalances? This so-called “ leaky pipeline ,” where women disproportionately leave scientific and academic careers, is well documented; but the role played by sexual and racial harassment in this process has received little attention. Sexual misconduct is prevalent in any industry where men hold a dis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seabed landscape crucial for fish conservation Credit: University of Glasgow Conservation and fisheries management strategies should take into account seabed landscape in order to maintain fish conservation. A new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the University of Strathclyde and Marine Scotland Science and that is published in PLOS ONE , demonstrates the importance of protecting different seabed landscapes in orde
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New Scientist - News
Weaponised microwave may be behind alleged sonic attacks in Cuba The US embassy in Cuba Sven Creutzmann/Mambo Photo/Getty By David Hambling When US diplomats based in Cuba reported that they had hearing loss as the result of hearing a strange noise, an investigation kicked off. It found that they had been exposed to “health attacks” by some kind of sonic device . Now it is being posited that the device used microwaves. Those affected reported that the inci
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New Scientist - News
Giant pelicans in danger after spate of wildfires in key wetland Dalmatian Pelican: under threat Drew Buckley/Alamy Stock Photo By Maria Bolevich A protected wetland that is home to hundreds of threatened species, some of them unique, has caught fire for the ninth time since 2011. A new assessment says the entire wetland will be lost by 2050 unless better care is taken. The Hutovo Blato wetland spans 7411 hectares in south-west Bosnia and Herzegovina. It i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain books can increase infant learning during shared reading, study showsParents and pediatricians know that reading to infants is a good thing, but new research shows reading books that clearly name and label people and objects is even better.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How errors affect credibility of online reviewsShoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos, research shows. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer's general tendency to trust others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug suppresses spread of breast cancer caused by stem-like cellsRare stem-like tumor cells play a critical role in the spread of breast cancer, but a vulnerability in the pathway that powers them offers a strategy to target these cells using existing drugs before metastatic disease occurs, report researchers.
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Futurity.org
Butchery marks on bones get more accurate test A new approach accurately measures animal bone cut marks made by prehistoric human butchery. “In archaeology, butchery marks on animal bones are a key piece of evidence…” The combinations of 3D imaging, shape analysis, and Bayesian statistics to identify butchery cut marks with an 88 percent success rate in classifying butchery behaviors. The 3D-imaging technology is similar to what engineers use
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
De-radicalization can work for former ISIS fighters Mubin Shaikh, a Toronto-born de-radicalization expert, speaks during a counter-terrorism event in Germany in May 2015. Credit: U.S. Army Canada's spy agency, CSIS, recently revealed that 60 foreign fighters who joined ISIS and other terror groups in Syria and Iraq are now back and living in Canada. Their fate has sparked fierce debate in Canada's Parliament between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shatter-proof mobile phone screens a step closer The researchers measured the viscosity of molten glass at more than 1,000 degrees Celsius and the density of the glass when cooled and formed. Credit: Australian National University An international study on glass led by ANU and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris in France could lead to the development of shatter-proof mobile phone screens. Lead researcher Dr Charles Le Losq from ANU said
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How stores get you to buy more this holiday season and all year long Need a little help feeling the holiday spirit? Perhaps some festive scents and a little nostalgia can do the trick. Credit: Photo/Stocksy With more and more shoppers doing their buying online, brick-and-mortar stores must find more creative ways to lure you in and keep you. USC's Debbie MacInnis, a marketing professor at the USC Marshall School of Business, says that retailers can use everything
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Lonesome ClamResearchers have undertaken a comprehensive study on the status of giant clams across the world.
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The Scientist RSS
France Announces Winners of Make Our Planet Great Again GrantsFrench President Emmanuel Macron awards millions of euros in research funding to climate scientists who will relocate from the U.S. and elsewhere to France.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tokyo airport to be 'scattered' with robots for 2020 Olympics Visitors to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics can expect to arrive at an airport "scattered" with robots to help them, an official said Tuesday as he unveiled seven new machines to perform tasks from helping with luggage to language assistance. Among the seven robots on show was a fluffy cat mascot that can carry out simultaneous interpretation in four different languages . Visitors speak into a furry mi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Macron calls for 'much stronger mobilisation' on climateFrench President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday called for stronger action in the fight against climate change, as he hosted world leaders for talks two years to the day since the Paris agreement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado River Jars of preserved fish specimens from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography used in this study. Credit: Clive Lau. Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-speed communication systems based on ultraviolet radiation Military and civil authorities could benefit from secure optical communication systems that use light to carry messages between moving vehicles. Researchers at KAUST have now demonstrated rapid data transfer using ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light, which provides many advantages over visible light. Optical communications systems using visible lasers and light emitting diodes (LEDs) suffer from interfere
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists design an instrument to identify unexploded artillery shells Credit: University of Helsinki Society faces threats through the malicious use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosive (CBRNE) materials. The detection of illicit trafficking or other criminal acts, as well as many security and safety applications, call for novel material analysis techniques and instruments. These detection systems should be non-destructive but still be ab
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tree species in Brazil probably the world's heaviest living organism Credit: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Kew scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Brazil and Canada, have recently published a description of a new tree species from the legume family (Leguminosae or Fabaceae). Dinizia jueirana-facao G.P. Lewis & G.S. Siqueira, discovered in Brazil, grows to a whopping 40 metres with an estimated weight of up to 62 tonnes. Dinizia jueirana-facao grows in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia needs a nanosafety authority, say experts New nanomaterials that benefit humanity are being synthesised every day. Researchers want to work with regulators to make sure they are safe. Academics at the University of Sydney have today called for the establishment of a national standards body to monitor the safety of nanomaterials commonly found in food, house paint, supplements and cosmetics sold in Australia. Some of these products, suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The public fear sharks less when they understand their behaviour Credit: University of Sydney Researchers surveyed more than 500 visitors to an aquarium 'shark tunnel' to understand how attitudes to sharks and government shark policies can change. An experiment involving more than 500 visitors to an aquarium 'shark tunnel' has shown the public's fear of sharks reduces when they learn about the species by watching their behaviour. University of Sydney researc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool to help construction industry reduce carbon footprint A team of researchers from the University of Toronto is partnering with the construction industry to help reduce the carbon footprint of buildings, bridges, public transit and other major infrastructure projects. "What we're building is a decision-support tool that can be used in the early stages of design and planning," says Heather MacLean, a professor in the department of civil engineering who
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient weakening of Earth's crust explains unusual intraplate earthquakes The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) hosts a dense pocket of earthquake activity (red dots) in southeastern U.S., thousands of kilometers from the nearest tectonic plate boundary. A new study helps explain why these intraplate seismic zones exist. Credit: USGS New research reveals that mysterious pockets of earthquake activity in the middle of North America all have one thing in common: Earth's cru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distributing control of deep learning training delivers 10x performance improvement A centralized topology compared to a decentralized topology. Credit: IBM Blog Research My IBM Research AI team and I recently completed the first formal theoretical study of the convergence rate and communications complexity associated with a decentralized distributed approach in a deep learning training setting. The empirical evidence proves that in specific configurations, a decentralized appro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A prawn tale—winners and losers in climate change Who booms, and who goes bust? Climate change is never cut and dried (or cut and flooded, depending on where you live). It's complicated, and we don't fully understand how it'll affect our planet. There can be good and bad things that come out of it. Of course, depending on whether you're a delicious crustacean or a human, good and bad outcomes mean entirely different things—I'll get to that i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recordings reveal deep credibility gap when doctors and parents discuss outcomes for critically ill An analysis of 16 audiotaped conversations between parents of infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and clinicians found that medical staff routinely downplay quality of life issues and leave families more optimistic about their babies' prognoses than the clinicians intended. A report of the analysis, published in the Nov. issue of the Journal of Perinatology , highlights a persistent
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Popular Science
The myth of the man-flu: Do men really get sicker, or are they just whinier? Kyle Sue is the only doctor in town—literally—and he has no sympathy for your sniffles. Today he’s too busy providing medical aid to the 3,100 Inuits who live in the hamlet of Arviat, which is roughly 500 miles north of Winnipeg and accessible only by plane. His patients suffer from tuberculosis and other infectious diseases at third-world rates, which is none too surprising given that they’re of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wet plasma makes a nano-sized splash A thin, pancake-shaped plasma cloud formed at oil–water interfaces can be used to synthesize exotic nanomaterials. Credit: AIP Oil and water do not mix, but a KAUST team has exploited the distinct interfaces between these substances to make plasma generation in liquids more efficient. This approach holds promise for high-yield synthesis of nanomaterials from liquid reagents or for controlled elim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beyond our control—an alternative approach to climate change COP23 summit, November 8, 2017. Credit: Patrik Stollarz/AFP The COP23 took place in Bonn, Germany, from November 6-17. Participants in these annual climate conferences are driven by the idea that they can control the global rise in temperatures with resources and willpower. The recent proposal for a Global Pact for the Environment is also founded on this premise. The same belief in control applie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device for the simultaneous measurement of gases that reduce indoor air quality VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd has developed a real-time and reliable device that can be used to measure ammonia and formaldehyde concentrations particularly in indoor air simultaneously, unlike with the meters currently in use. It is also suited to the measurement of emissions reducing outdoor air quality in city centres and traffic. "The device is capable of measuring the concentr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plankton swim against the currentZooplankton are often considered to be a passive source of food for fish and other aquatic animals. But at least one of their representatives, the millimetre-sized copepod (Eurytemora affinis), moves purposefully in turbulent water with "jumps." This fact was discovered by a team of researchers led by Markus Holzner, holder of an SNSF professorship at ETH Zurich. "These jumps enable the plankton t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope Scientists imaged gold nanocrystals (shown here in false-color) using a 300kV electron beam, through 1.3kPa of water vapor. Credit: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology The inside of an electron microscope, which requires vacuum levels similar to those encountered in outer space, can be an extremely inhospitable place for organic materials. Traditionally, life scientists have circumvented
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After a wildfire, attitudes about recovery vary with sense of place and beliefs about fire ecology Credit: Oregon State University How people who live close to burned forests feel about landscape recovery—whether they sense overwhelming loss or see positive signs in the growth of new vegetation—depends largely on their attachment to the area and on their appreciation for the ecological role of fire. In a survey of more than 800 people living in close proximity to 25 wildfires that occurred in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is your Facebook account being targeted by food companies? Want to know if you are being targeted on Facebook by food and beverage companies? Teenagers will be able to see what food and drink companies are targeting them via Facebook thanks to a new browser extension created by the University of Auckland. The AdHealth browser extension has been created by academics at the University's School of Population Health as part of a project called "Exposure of a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal fail-safe structure of enzyme linked to Alzheimer's, cancer Like millions of Americans, Harvard Medical School postdoctoral fellow Tom Seegar struggled as he watched several family members decline from Alzheimer's disease. "Seeing them start to lose what we most value—our minds and ability to think—was especially painful," he said. Seegar's desire to make a difference for people with Alzheimer's helped motivate him during a five-year project to better u
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McLaren's Senna Supercar Delivers Wild Performance, Costs a Million Dollars Usually, when you spend more than a million dollars on something, you get a whole lot of it. A whole lot of diamond necklace, a whole lot of beluga caviar, a whole lot of Instagram followers. But if you’re buying the McLaren Senna, you don’t get much supercar at all. Named for legendary Formula 1 driver Ayrton Senna , McLaren’s latest car is an exercise in million-dollar minimalism. No fancy feat
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Feed: All Latest
D-Orbit’s Self-Destruct Modules for Satellites Could Help Fix the Space Junk Problem Humans have gotten pretty good at launching stuff into space—but way less good at getting stuff back down . Up in lower Earth orbit, along with a thousand-plus productive satellites, there are many more slackers: space junk, cosmic trash, garbage of the highest-orbiting order. According to the European Space Agency’s latest statistics , there are about 29,000 pieces of such junk larger than 10 ce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teaching antibiotics to be more effective killers Research shows prolonged inhibition of protein synthesis leads to cell death. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Research from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests bond duration, not bond tightness, may be the most important differentiator between antibiotics that kill bacteria and antibiotics that only stop bacterial growth. While both types of antibiotics are used
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create molecule of love with less complications Credit: University of Queensland A new and improved version of the 'love hormone' oxytocin has been developed by University of Queensland researchers. The team from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience has created a synthetic form of the hormone which is less likely to have side effects. UQ researcher Dr Markus Muttenthaler said the hormone regulated labour and fundamental social behaviours su
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Dana Foundation
Unlocking the Diseases of the Brain Guest blog by Carl Sherman One evening last week, I met the mini-brain. I was introduced to this intriguing concept by three scientists who know it intimately, at a presentation on “Unlocking Diseases of the Brain with Stem Cells,” at the headquarters of the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF). Melissa J. Nirenberg , M.D., Ph.D., NYSCF’s chief medical officer, introduced the subject from the pe
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Scientific American Content: Global
Jellyfish Have Superpowers--and Other Reasons They Don't Deserve Their Bad Reputation The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. People rarely enjoy meeting a jellyfish. On the beach they appear limp, amorphous, and blistered in the sun. In the water it’s often a brush of a tentacle on exposed skin followed by a sting. They hardly evoke the serene elegance of a turtle or the majesty of a breachin
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Captives Changed the World How Captives Changed the World Stolen people—mostly women and children—were a driving force in the evolution of modern society As the armies of ISIS swept across Syria and northern Iraq in the summer of 2014, they overran villages of Yazidi people, whom they considered infidels. The soldiers killed Yazidi men and seized the girls and women. Girls as young as 12 became “wives”—sex slaves passed ar
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Dagens Medicin
Ny kombinationsbehandling til patienter med leukæmi er langt bedre end nuværende standardKombinationsbehandling med Venetoclax og Rituximab kan blive ny standardbehandling til patienter med tilbagevendende kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi.
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Dagens Medicin
Darzalex viser god effekt som førstelinjebehandlingNyt studie viser, at Darzalex øger effekten med 50 pct., når det gives som tillæg til den normale standardbehandling.
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Dagens Medicin
Regionerne har otte krav til de kommende overenskomstforhandlingerLægerne i regionerne skal sammen med de andre regionsansatte have nye overenskomster i foråret. Regionerne har fremlagt deres krav til forhandlingerne.
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt resultat baner vejen for færre alvorlige bivirkninger ved behandling for børneleukæmiEt enestående internationalt samarbejde har gjort danske forskere i stand til at identificere DNA-variant, der disponerer for alvorlig bivirkning ved behandling for akut lymfoblastær leukæmi.
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Science : NPR
Lack Of Genetic Diversity May Have Doomed Tasmanian Tiger, Scientists Say An illustration of a Thylacine (Photo by: Brown Bear/Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images) Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images An illustration of a Thylacine (Photo by: Brown Bear/Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images) Windmill Books/UIG via Getty Images When it comes to the extinction of modern animal species, humans usually end up tak
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Dagens Medicin
Tegn på leukæmi kan spores i blodet fem år før diagnose Væksten af lymfocytter i patienternes blod er en indikator for udviklingen af kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi.
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Dagens Medicin
Tabletbehandling virker mod blodpropper hos kræftpatienterDaglig pille kan være alternativ til injektioner som blodpropforebyggende behandling hos kræftpatienter.
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Dagens Medicin
Lægemiddel kan dramatisk forbedre behandlingen af patienter med sjælden blodsygdom.Undersøgelse af et nyt lægemiddel mod thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura viser lovende resultater.
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Dagens Medicin
Abildgaard: Her er mine højdepunkter fra ASH Årets ASH-kongres har blandt andet vist nye tegn på, at visse myelomatose-patienter måske kan blive helbredt engang i fremtiden, siger
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Dagens Medicin
El-Galaly: Her er mine ASH-højdepunkter Tarec El-Galaly fra Aalborg Universitetshospital har blandt andet bidt mærke i de nye resultater om obinutuzimab og cirkulerende tumor-dna.
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Science | The Guardian
Can a GM banana solve Uganda's hunger crisis? | Alon Mwesigwa A fter an afternoon drizzle, Ephraim Muhereza carefully scouts his three-acre banana plantation in Gayaza, Wakiso district, plucking male buds from trees. This will stop his plants from catching the notorious banana bacterial wilt , which has destroyed many farms in Uganda. “We have been told that to reduce the spread of the wilt. We have to cut them so that bees that visit them don’t spread the
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Live Science
Ancient Tomb Full of 'Soup Bowls' & Food Vessels Discovered in China Many of the food vessels were found in niches in the wall of the tomb. Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics A 3,100-year-old tomb filled with bronze "soup bowls" and other food vessels covered in incredible designs has been discovered in Baoji City in Shaanxi province, China. Also inside the tomb was a badly decomposed body of an unidentified person, the archaeologists said. "
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Live Science
Photos: Ancient Chinese Tomb Full of Bronze Vessels A 3,100-year-old tomb filled with bronze food vessels that have incredible designs has been discovered in Baoji City in China. This photo shows a "tureen," a vessel that is often used to serve soup. It has four handles and 192 spikes on it. Images of bovine can be seen on the tureen's handles. The vessel is 30 cm (12 inches) in height and the diameter of the opening of the vessel is 34.6 cm (13.6
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado River IMAGE: Jars of preserved fish specimens from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography used in this study. view more Credit: Clive Lau. Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and
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The Atlantic
Joe Wright on Creating a More Realistic Winston Churchill Given that Oscar season is upon us, it’s hardly surprising that Darkest Hour is being pushed, first and foremost, as an awards showcase for Gary Oldman, who excels in the thunderous role of Winston Churchill. But the film works so well because of the care its director Joe Wright ( Pride & Prejudice, Atonement, Anna Karenina ) takes in balancing the British prime minister’s big, theatrical public
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Dagens Medicin
Professor på Rigshospitalet får millionbevilling til diabetesprojekt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to put data to work in your neighborhood Many cities collect valuable data on themselves. Credit: TDKvisuals/shutterstock.com Every day, city governments collect vast amounts of administrative data – local property tax assessments, 911 emergency response calls, social assistance recipients and more. These data have huge potential to enhance residents' quality of life and stimulate economic growth . Many local governments have jumped to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Science from the moon's shadowWhile total solar eclipses happen about once every 18 months somewhere on Earth, the Aug. 21, 2017, eclipse was rare in its long path over land. The total eclipse lasted about 90 minutes, from the time it first reached the Oregon coast to when it left the North American mainland in South Carolina. This long, uninterrupted path over land provided scientists with a rare chance to investigate the sun
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Live Science
'Pokémon' STOP: Experts Find Game Caused Spike in Car Accidents When "Pokémon Go" launched back in July 2016, people took to the streets in swarms to catch Pikachus and train Bulbasaurs. But catching 'em all was harder for people in rural areas, where the augmented-reality game's hotspots were more spread out, and sometimes accessible only by car. So, many players in rural areas got behind the wheel to seek out their favorite Pokémon in the wild — a dec
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Live Science
World of Intricate Muscles Revealed Inside Velvet Worm's Wee Leg Nano-CT images of a velvet worm leg: The image on the left shows the surface of the leg, while the image on the right reveals muscle fibers inside the tissue. Credit: Muller/Pfeiffer/TUM/Reproduced with permission from PNAS When viewed under powerful magnification, tiny organisms whose smallest body parts are too minute to be seen with the naked eye are revealed in breathtaking complexity. And
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Dagens Medicin
Institut for Folkesundhed i Aarhus får ny leder Ole Bækgaard bliver ny leder af Institut for Folkesundhed på Aarhus Universitet.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mini brains may wrinkle and fold just like ours In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS, a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Not all of a cell’s protein-making machines do the same job PHILADELPHIA — Protein-manufacturing factories within cells are picky about which widgets they construct, new research suggests. These ribosomes may not build all kinds of proteins, instead opting to craft only specialty products. Some of that specialization may influence the course of embryo development, developmental biologist and geneticist Maria Barna of Stanford University School of Medicine
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building 3-D models of molecules with RealityConvertDenis Fourches wants to make the search for new drugs faster and less expensive. So he uses powerful computers to help model interactions between chemical compounds and biological targets to predict the compound's effectiveness, thus narrowing the field of potential drug candidates for testing and saving researchers time and money. Now he has a new tool in his arsenal – a computer program that wil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small earthquakes at fracking sites may be early indicators of bigger tremors to come A drill rig at the Fayetteville Shale gas play in Arkansas. The area was shaken by earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 following injections of wastewater from natural gas operations into deep underground wells. Credit: Bill Cunningham/USGS Stanford geoscientists have devised a way of detecting thousands of faint, previously missed earthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." The techniq
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More frequent fires reduce soil carbon and fertility, slowing the regrowth of plants Repeated fires in savannas, which are dominated by grasses, can reduce carbon and nitrogen in soils for decades. The reduction in nutrients can lead to poor plant regrowth. Credit: Carla Staver Frequent burning over decades reduces the amount of carbon and nitrogen stored in soils of savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, in part because reduced plant growth means less carbon being drawn out o
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Live Science
What Are Pyrocumulus Clouds? California Fires Spawn Eerie Formations On Sunday (Dec.10), a massive gray cloud formed over Southern California's Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, filling the sky with dark towers of smoke and shocking onlookers for miles around. The ominous cloud looked like an ash column from a volcanic eruption, but the culprit was a wildfire. The cloud, created by the ongoing Thomas Fire that has scorched more than 230,500 acres (93,280 h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crowding in the skin: Stem cells sense neighborhood density to make decisions Skin cells growing in a petri dish (green: cytoskeleton, red: cell-cell junction protein). Credit: MPI f. Biology of Ageing Human skin is a remarkable organ serving as a barrier protecting us from pathogens, toxic substances and others. Our skin needs to constantly renew throughout our lifetime as well as change its size to perfectly fit and cover the body. To fulfill such a complex and dynamic b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Impressive Geminid Meteors to Peak on December 13–14 This should be a good year for the Geminids. There’s almost no moonlight to interfere with observing, and the shower reliably produces a high meteor count. Start looking for them about 2 hours after sunset. Credit: Sky & Telescope / Gregg Dindermann If it's clear Wednesday night and Thursday before dawn, keep a lookout high overhead for the "shooting stars" of the Geminid meteor shower. That's th
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Ingeniøren
Svindlere udnytter Spotify-forum til at få falske support-numre i toppen af Google Falske tech-supportere bruger Spotify til at SEO-hacke sig frem til sine ofre. Det skriver Bleeping Computer . Over de seneste måneder er svindlere begyndt at spamme Spotifys brugerforum med telefonnumre til diverse tech-selskabers support-afdeling. Alle numrene er dog falske. Spotify’s brugerforum rangerer højt hos Google. Og derfor optræder de falske kontaktoplysninger tæt på toppen af Google-s
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Ingeniøren
Klimaråd til regeringen: Hæv målet til 55 pct. sol og vind i 2030 Politikerne bør hæve ambitionen for en ny energiaftale fra et mål om 50 pct. vedvarende energi i energiforsyningen til 55 pct. i 2030. Det er hovedanbefalingen fra Klimarådet, et rådgivende ekspert-organ etableret som del af en klimalov vedtaget i Folketinget i 2014. »Vores beregninger viser, at det er et fornuftigt niveau, når man tager 2050-målet i betragtning,« sagde Klimarådets formand, Peter
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Juno probes the depths of Jupiter's great red spot Winds around Jupiter's Great Red Spot are simulated in this JunoCam view that has been animated using a model of the winds there. The wind model, called a velocity field, was derived from data collected by NASA's Voyager spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstadt/Justin Cowart Data collected by NASA's Juno spacecraft during its first pass over Jupit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers evaluate certification programs as options for sustaining tropical forests An oil palm plantation in Malaysia. Credit: ROBERT HEILMAYR Forests cover 31 percent of Earth's land mass—for now, anyway. As global demand for agricultural commodities grows, forests are increasingly under threat. In Southeast Asia, for instance, a burgeoning appetite for palm oil is a leading driver of deforestation. However, corporate sustainability programs have the potential to save endanger
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NYT > Science
A Glimpse of Oumuamua It’s not just Einstein’s universe. It’s your universe too. From the cosmic affairs desk, Dennis Overbye takes you on scenic tours through the Milky Way and beyond.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot vibrating gases under the electron spotlight Schematic illustration of dynamic behavior of gaseous molecules observed using electron microscopy. Credit: The University of Tokyo Natural gas is used in refineries as the basis for products like acetylene. The efficiency of gaseous reactions depends on the dynamics of the molecules—their rotation, vibration and translation (directional movement). These motions provide the kinetic energy to driv
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particles in charged solution form clusters that reproduce Credit: Molecular Physics Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. He has shown that particles that become charged in solution, like many biological molecules , can form giant clusters that can reproduce. Reproduction is shown to be driven by simple physics—a balance of forc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quality control is vital for the energy production of cells Mitochondria generate most of the energy cells need through a respiratory chain for which they must produce their own proteins. The research group of Associate Professor Henna Tyynismaa, University of Helsinki, Finland, has discovered a "quality control" mechanism in the mitochondria, which is necessary for the construction of a functional respiratory chain. Tyynismaa's group studied a mitochondr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Targeted creation and control of photons: thanks to a new design for optical antennas Sketch of an optimized optical antenna: A cavity is located inside; the electrical fields during operation are coded by the colour scale. Current patterns are represented by green arrows. Credit: Thorsten Feichtner Atoms and molecules can be made to emit photons. However, without external intervention, this process is inefficient and undirected. If it was possible to influence the process of phot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife Representation of CRISPR protein Cpf1. The class 2 CRISPR Cas complexes, including Cas9 and Cpf1, have great versatility, since a single protein guided by a guide RNA is able to recognize and cut a specific sequence of the genome. Credit: Pablo Alcón / University of Copenhagen Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecul
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Feed: All Latest
FCC Plan to Kill Net Neutrality Rules Could Hurt Students Nichole Williams needed a career reboot. After more than a decade as a web designer in Atlanta, she felt her career was moving backward. She knew she needed to expand her programming skills to stay relevant in the field, so she signed up for Thinkful , an online-education startup that pairs students with one-on-one mentors who work with them over video-chat connections to help them learn to code.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists print 3-D models of children's hearts for urgent operations 3-D model of a children's heart. Credit: Tomsk Polytechnic University Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are creating 3-D-printed models of children's hearts based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of real patients. These models are used as simulators for cardiac surgeons to plan forthcoming operations. The first 3-D-models of adult hearts were printed at TPU last summer. Now, TPU sci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Singapore launches electric car-sharing service BlueSG hopes to eventually provide Singapore with the second-biggest electric car-sharing service in the world, after Paris Singapore on Tuesday launched an electric car-sharing service, the latest transport innovation aimed at encouraging people away from owning vehicles and keeping gridlock at bay in the space-starved city-state. BlueSG, a subsidiary of France's Bollore Group, rolled out the sc
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India says Chinese construction on river dirtying water In this Monday, Dec.11, 2017 photo, Indian women wash their clothes in the river Brahmaputra in Gauhati, India. Officials in India's northeast are complaining that Chinese construction activity on the upper reaches of one of the largest rivers that flows into India are likely turning the waters downstream turbid and unfit for human consumption. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath) Officials in India's northeas
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The Atlantic
The Propulsive Power of Catapult T he 11 stories in Emily Fridlund’s slim collection, Catapult , make her title seem especially apt. They reveal the coiled, uncanny power that propelled her debut novel, History of Wolves , onto the Man Booker Prize shortlist this fall. The teenage loner at the center of that haunted coming-of-age tale (a babysitting arrangement swerves onto grim terrain) turns out to have offbeat kin in the unco
11h
The Atlantic
The Power of Negative Thinking D Espite America’s reputation for optimism, nearly three-quarters of U.S. adults are pessimistic about the country’s future. [1] This may not be all bad, though. Decades of research have found that positive thinking isn’t always so positive. In some cases, pessimists fare better than those with a sunnier disposition. Married couples who were extremely optimistic about their relationship’s future
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Averaging the wisdom of crowds Credit: CC0 Public Domain The best decisions are made on the basis of the average of various estimates, as confirmed by the research of Dennie van Dolder and Martijn van den Assem, scientists at VU Amsterdam. Using data from Holland Casino promotional campaigns, they have researched whether it is true that when people make estimates, the average of their estimates is relatively close to reality.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers successfully demonstrate a quantum gate in silicon The quantum gates of two silicon electrons. Two nano-electrodes (VL and VR) control the angular momentum of both electrons. A third nano-electrode (VM) coordinates the interaction of both electrons. Credit: University of Konstanz Milestone on the path to the quantum computer: Scientists of the University of Konstanz, Princeton University, and the University of Maryland have developed a stable qua
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cascading use of wood to ensure sustainability The illustration shows the concept of cascading the use of wood with its individual stages. Credit: Höglmeier 2015 Another 10 years is approximately how long sustainable forestry will be able to satisfy the continuously growing demand for wood. In Germany and Europe, new concepts are therefore being discussed for more responsible and efficient industrial use of wood, but resources are still limit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How soundscapes and vibrations are helping blind people see the world Glasses with special cameras could enable blind or visually impaired people to build a picture of the world around them. Credit: Eyesynth Glasses that translate images of physical objects into soundscapes and a belt that turns images into vibrations are helping blind people build up a real-time 3-D picture of the world around them, and the technology could hit the market as soon as next year. Acc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover path to improving game-changing battery electrode Electric car makers are intensely interested in lithium-rich battery cathodes that could significantly increase driving range. A new study opens a path to making them live up to their promise. Credit: Stanford University/3Dgraphic If you add more lithium to the positive electrode of a lithium-ion battery - overstuff it, in a sense - it can store much more charge in the same amount of space, theor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetics preserves traces of ancient resistance to Inca rule The fortress of Kuelap, popularly known as 'the Machu Picchu of the north,' dominates the landscape at an elevation of 3,000 meters. Credit: Chiara Barbieri The Chachapoyas region was conquered by the Inca Empire in the late 15th century. Knowledge of the fate of the local population has been based largely on Inca oral histories, written down only decades later after the Spanish conquest. The Inc
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time of day affects severity of autoimmune disease Insights into how the body clock and time of day influence immune responses are revealed today in a study published in leading international journal Nature Communications . Understanding the effect of the interplay between 24-hour day-night cycles and the immune system may help inform drug-targeting strategies to alleviate autoimmune disease. Circadian rhythms or 24-hour rhythms are generated by
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover path to improving game-changing battery electrode Menlo Park, Calif. -- If you add more lithium to the positive electrode of a lithium-ion battery - overstuff it, in a sense - it can store much more charge in the same amount of space, theoretically powering an electric car 30 to 50 percent farther between charges. But these lithium-rich cathodes quickly lose voltage, and years of research have not been able to pin down why - until now. After loo
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetics preserves traces of ancient resistance to Inca rule IMAGE: The fortress of Kuelap, popularly known as 'the Machu Picchu of the north,' dominates the landscape at an elevation of 3,000 meters. view more Credit: Chiara Barbieri The Chachapoyas region was conquered by the Inca Empire in the late 15th century. Knowledge of the fate of the local population has been based largely on Inca oral histories, written down only decades later afte
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot vibrating gases under the electron spotlight IMAGE: Schematic illustration of dynamic behavior of gaseous molecules observed using electron microscopy. view more Credit: CREDIT: c2017 TERUYASU MIZOGUCHI, INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE, THE UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO Tokyo - Gases have been used throughout industry. Natural gas, for example, is "cracked" in refineries to make products like acetylene. The efficiency of gaseous reactions depends on
11h
Ingeniøren
Ny blog på ing.dk: Vil du køre med i vores racerbil? Vi kan lige nå at klemme en ny blog ind før juleferien – og det bliver en blog med fart på. De fire bloggere, der skriver på skift, vil nemlig fortælle om det ambitiøse racerbilprojekt på deres arbejdsplads, DIS. Andi Kurtsen er uddannet automekaniker og maskiningeniør, Jannik Wind Gotthardsen er junioringeniør med fagligt speciale inden for elektriske maskiner, Emil Kennemann Christensen er udda
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cassini may be dead, but a new era of Saturn science has just begun Saturn as seen by the Cassini spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn may have came to a fiery end in September, but observations made by the spacecraft in its final months still have plenty to teach us about the mysteries of the ringed planet. Case in point: A new study finds that the electrically charged region of Saturn's atmosphere, known as the i
11h
The Atlantic
It's Not That Hard To Avoid Normalizing Nazis Why is it that, in America in 2017, the question of how not to normalize Nazis provokes heated debate? Is there a way to discuss the everyday life of fascists without normalizing? Although there are no quick and easy rules to follow, there are lessons—plenty of them—to be gleaned from history. The most powerful lessons emerge from the press coverage of the Third Reich, especially the soft-focus p
12h
Ingeniøren
Nu løbes det fleksible elforbrug omsider i gang Netselskabet Radius i københavnsområdet og NRGI Net i Østjylland er de første netselskaber, der gradvist går over til at opkræve en højere pris for at transportere strøm i visse timer omkring spisetid. Dermed tager man omsider de første skridt mod at få forbrugerne til at flytte deres elforbrug fra spidslastimerne – og dermed er man startet på at tilpasse husstandenes elforbrug til den variable e
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Ingeniøren
Vi bygger en racerbil - vil du køre med? Hvad får du, hvis du samler en masse forskellige ingeniører, som elsker fart og teknologi? Svaret er ufattelig dårlig humor og en meget, meget hurtig racerbil. Vi sigter efter 0-100 på mindre end 2 sekunder, rekorder på Top Gears track og Nordschleife – Nürburgring. Optimistisk vil nogle mene, men vi tror på det. Projektet startede efter, at vores kollegaer havde bygget en relativt avanceret F1-s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook's Messenger Kids: Parents grapple with social media decision Credit: CC0 Public Domain Torn between the benefits and drawbacks of social media, Leigh Turberville Harrell hasn't decided yet whether to let her children use Facebook's new messaging app for kids. On one hand, Messenger Kids allows parents to approve whom their children converse with on the app. But on the other, Harrell, a teacher, worries about cyberbullying and other dangers that lurk online
12h
NYT > Science
ScienceTake: Curious Orangutans, Raised by Humans, Do Better on Cognitive Tests First they exposed them to new foods and plastic snakes and other novelties. The ones who had spent their youth in the forest, learned the lessons of caution well. They didn’t try new foods, avoided the fake snake and in general showed the expected lack of curiosity. Which makes sense. “Imagine you were dropped in the middle of a rain forest,” said Dr. Damerius. It would be unwise to touch all th
12h
NYT > Science
In Captivity, Orangutans Unlock Greater Curiosity and IntelligenceOrangutans become more curious if they spend a lot of time with humans in a safe environment. And that means they are better at solving cognitive puzzles.
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Dagens Medicin
Læger og kommuner behandler ikke yngre diabetespatienter tilstrækkeligt Også yngre patienter under 45 år får type 2-diabetes, men de sundhedsprofessionelle er ikke rustet tilstrækkeligt til at tage sig af den yngre patientgruppe, viser ny forskning.
12h
Viden
Apple køber populær musikgenkendelses-app Den amerikanske teknologigigant Apple bekræfter mandag, at det ønsker at købe appen Shazam, som er i stand til at genkende en sang eller et stykke musik. Det skriver Financial Times. Købsprisen er ikke offentliggjort, men personer med kendskab til transaktionen nævner et beløb på omkring 400 millioner dollar. Det svarer til godt 2,5 milliarder kroner. Det vil i så fald blive Apples største opkøb,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pregnant woman wants seat on Tokyo metro: there's an app for that Tokyo trains are notoriously busy Pregnant women struggling to bag a seat on the famously packed Tokyo subway could find their salvation in a new app connecting them with nearby passengers willing to give up their coveted perch. The digital match-making app being trialled this week on the metro aims to overcome two problems especially prevalent in Japan: passengers generally have their nose burie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California wildfires: what we know FILLMORE, CA - DECEMBER 07: A firefighting helicopter works the Thomas Fire on December 7, 2017 near Fillmore, California. Strong Santa Ana winds are pushing multiple wildfires across the region, expanding across tens of thousands of acres and destroying hundreds of homes and structures. David McNew/Getty Images/AFP It's been a week since southern California has been charred by a devastating wave
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Forskningsprojekt skal skabe sundere modermælkserstatning 12. december 2017 Forskningsprojekt skal skabe sundere modermælkserstatning Bevillinger Mange nyfødte børn får modermælkserstatning, der dog ikke er lige så gavnlig som den naturlige modermælk. Derfor vil en gruppe forskere fra Københavns Universitet sammen med forskere fra Arla Foods Ingredients undersøge, om modermælkserstatninger kan gøres sundere ved at minimere forarbejdningen af de vallepro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast reportedly no longer in deal talks with FoxCiting a Comcast statement, the Wall Street Journal reported that the cable company is no longer in discussions to buy pieces of 21st Century Fox . That could open the door to a Disney bid.
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Science | The Guardian
It's beloved, but Australia's magpie is an international bird of mystery | Leo Joseph T he Australian magpie has been crowned bird of the year but how much do we really know about it? Where do magpies fit in the evolutionary scheme of things? Why do we even call them magpies? DNA sequencing technology has revolutionised biology. Our understanding of the evolutionary tree of bird life – that is how species and groups of birds are related to each other and how their evolution has un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tasmanian tiger doomed long before humans came along Photograph from the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery shows the now extinct Tasmanian tiger or thylacines at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart in 1918 The Tasmanian tiger was doomed long before humans began hunting the enigmatic marsupial, scientists said Tuesday, with DNA sequencing showing it was in poor genetic health for thousands of years before its extinction. Scientists genetically mapped the animal—
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change Historically, forests change over time. In Glacier National Park, some forests are regenerating nicely. Credit: Kerry Kemp The forests you see today are not what you will see in the future. That's the overarching finding from a new study on the resilience of Rocky Mountain forests, led by Colorado State University. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 1,500 sites in five states—Colorado, Wyoming
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews Credit: CC0 Public Domain Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the ty
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Telescopes team up to study giant galaxy The giant radio galaxy Centaurus A as observed by the Murchison Widefield Array telescope. Credit: Credit ICRAR/Curtin. Astronomers have used two Australian radio telescopes and several optical telescopes to study complex mechanisms that are fuelling jets of material blasting away from a black hole 55 million times more massive than the Sun. In research published today, the international team of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopes Henst's goshawk. Credit: Sarah Karpanty/Virginia Tech University of Cincinnati professor Brooke Crowley wanted to know the hunting range of the Henst's goshawk, a large forest-dwelling bird of prey that ambushes small animals. Henst's goshawks are difficult to find because of the rugged, inaccessible forest where they live. Little is known about their population. But because of their limited dist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two holograms in one surface Nanoposts of varying shapes can act as pixels in two different holograms. Credit: Andrei Faraon/Caltech A team at Caltech has figured out a way to encode more than one holographic image in a single surface without any loss of resolution. The engineering feat overturns a long-held assumption that a single surface could only project a single image regardless of the angle of illumination. The techno
13h
Ingeniøren
Tre dårlige chefvaner, som forpester hverdagen Chefen, der ofte vildleder Nogle ledere savner teknisk forståelse, når de skal vejlede deres medarbejdere. Ofte kan det lede til mere forvirring end hjælp og dermed spild af tid. Men du er alligevel nødt til at holde ledelsen informeret og have din leder med på sidelinjen. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. En løsning kan være at lade være med spørge bossen direkte om hjælp. Henvend dig i st
14h
Science-Based Medicine
Freud Was a Fraud: A Triumph of Pseudoscience Psychiatry is arguably the least science-based of all the medical specialties, and Freudian psychoanalysis is arguably the least science-based psychotherapy. Freud’s theories have been widely criticized as unscientific, and treatment of mental disorders has increasingly turned to psychotropic medications and effective therapies like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Freud’s impact on 20 th cent
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change The forests you see today are not what you will see in the future. That's the overarching finding from a new study on the resilience of Rocky Mountain forests, led by Colorado State University. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 1,500 sites in five states -- Colorado, Wyoming, Washington, Idaho, and Montana -- and measured more than 63,000 seedlings after 52 wildfires that burned over the past
14h
Ingeniøren
Leverandør sjusker med Sundhedsplatformens datasikkerhed: “Denne sag er alvorlig” Epic, som levererer Sundhedsplatformen, har ikke overholdt kravene til dokumentation for korrekt håndtering af patientdata, viser aktindsigt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsplatformens-leverandoer-sjusker-garanti-lovlig-databehandling-kasseret-1083672 Version2
15h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 12. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: En ny metode til at rense danske søer vinder indpas i Danmark og er en del af de nye vandområdeplaner. Hvad hedder grundstoffet, som få
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI scans predict patients' ability to fight the spread of cancer A simple, non-invasive procedure that can indicate how long patients with cancer that has spread to the brain might survive and whether they are likely to respond to immunotherapy has been developed by researchers in Liverpool. The technique, which can be done using standard hospital-based Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans, could one day remove the need for patients to undergo life-threate
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Science | The Guardian
Jeremy Hunt launches opt-out organ donation plans in England Health secretary Jeremy Hunt is to launch plans for an opt-out system of organ donation, asking people to overcome their “fatal reluctance” to discuss the issue with family and friends. Under the plans, everybody in England and Wales would be presumed to be happy to donate their organs on their death, unless they have signed up to a register stating that they do not want that to happen. In practi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide onto gold nanorodsResearchers have found a simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods, creating multifunctional nanoparticles with useful magnetic and optical properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopesA study has found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemicsEach year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide. Research now shows that giving a stronger single-dose of a live oral vaccine could be an effective tool in controlling outbreaks more quickly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two holograms in one surfaceEngineers have developed a way to encode more than one hologram in a single surface with no loss of resolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Telescopes team up to study giant galaxy Astronomers have used two Australian radio telescopes and several optical telescopes to study complex mechanisms that are fuelling jets of material blasting away from a black hole 55 million times more massive than the Sun. In research published today, the international team of scientists used the telescopes to observe a nearby radio galaxy known as Centaurus A. "As the closest radio galaxy to Ea
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dementia and cognitive impairment more prevalent in rural than urban seniors Ann Arbor, MI, December 12, 2017 - Americans who live in urban areas tend to be healthier than individuals living in rural settings. While this healthcare disparity has been examined for more than a decade, researchers present the first nationally representative study to find that dementia and cognitive impairment have consistently been more prevalent among rural dwelling seniors than urban dwell
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical marijuana for children with cancer? What providers think A study published in Pediatrics examined interdisciplinary provider perspectives on legal medical marijuana use in children with cancer. It found that 92 percent of providers were willing to help children with cancer access medical marijuana. However, providers who are legally eligible to certify for medical marijuana were less open to endorsing its use. While nearly a third of providers received
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find common psychological traits in group of Italians aged 90 to 101 IMAGE: Study participants and residents of the Cilentro region of southern Italy. view more Credit: University of Rome La Spienza In remote Italian villages nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and mountains lives a group of several hundred citizens over the age of 90. Researchers at the University of Rome La Sapienza and University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientists help capture wild mammals on camera Badgers at night. Credit: Pen-Yuan Hsing, Durham University Data collected by enthusiastic volunteers can be extremely useful for researchers, particularly when studying Britain's little understood mammals. At the 'Ecology Across Borders' conference in Ghent, Belgium this week, researchers will share their experience of working with members of the public to create a network of motion-sensing came
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making 'green Brexit' work for agriculture and the environment Post-Brexit policy should carry out a root-and-branch reform to better address the specific needs of the UK's farming and food sectors whilst protecting the countryside. Speaking at the 'Ecology Across Borders' conference in Ghent, Belgium this week, academics will outline some of the challenges and opportunities that present themselves to deliver on a 'green Brexit' under the current political l
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New on MIT Technology Review
Farmers Seek to Deploy Powerful Gene Drive Since it first appeared in Northern California in 2008, the spotted-wing drosophila, a type of fruit fly native to Asia, has become the bane of the state’s cherry farms because of the razor-edged “ovipositor” on its tail. Rather than lay eggs in rotting berries, as domestic flies do, the invasive species punches holes in fruit that’s still ripening, spoiling it. The costs to U.S. agriculture: abo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wakeEngineers have developed a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traces of historical reindeer grazing can still be observed after 100 yearsWith the holiday season around the corner, most people may first think of reindeer as Santa Claus' trusted helpers. But it turns out that reindeer are not only good at pulling Santa's sleigh; they can also teach us important lessons about the functioning of ecosystems. By studying small meadows in the Swedish mountains, formed by historical traditional reindeer herding practices, researchers revea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anesthetics have the same effects on plants as they have on animals and humansA new study has shown that plants react to anesthetics similarly to the way animals and humans do, suggesting plants are ideal objects for testing anesthetics actions in future.
17h
Ingeniøren
Endnu et milliard-byggeri fra Inabensa er måneder efter tidsplanen Byggeriet af et nyt akuthus til Herlev Hospital bliver tre måneder forsinket, og et nyt kvinde-barn-center på samme matrikel er en måned forsinket. Den dato, hvor patienterne kan rykke ind, kan blive forsinket endnu mere, advarer projektdirektøren, for erfaringerne fra nogle af de andre hospitalsbyggerier viser, at det kan tage lang tid at få tjekket og indreguleret alle systemer, så de lever op
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Live Science
Chinese Culture: Customs & Traditions of China China is an extremely large country — first in population and fifth in area, according to the CIA — and the customs and traditions of its people vary by geography and ethnicity. About 1.4 billion people live in China, according to the World Bank, representing 56 ethnic minority groups. The largest group is the Han Chinese, with about 900 million people. Other groups include the Tibetans
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currentsThe most extensive, long-term effort to monitor turbidity currents ever attempted has just been completed. The results of this two-year project challenge existing paradigms about what causes turbidity currents, what they look like, and how they work.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cold suns, warm exoplanets and methane blanketsThree million years ago, the sun shone weaker, but Earth stayed surprisingly warm. Carl Sagan thought a greenhouse effect must have been to thank. A model built on 359 chemical processes has finally arrived at scenarios with a reasonable chance of producing the needed methane on ancient Earth. The model has broad parameters in hope that it may someday be of use to interpret conditions on exoplanet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Smoke rings' in the ocean could 'suck-up' small creatures and send them 'flying'Researchers have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For women with genetic risk, semi-annual MRI beats mammogramsIntensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram. DCE-MRI every six months performed well for early detection of invasive breast cancer in high-risk women.
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Science : NPR
Macron Awards U.S. Climate Scientists Grants To 'Make Our Planet Great Again' France's President Emmanuel Macron meets with former U.N. Secretary-Generals Kofi Annan (left) and Ban Ki-moon (right) at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Monday. Michel Euler/AP hide caption toggle caption Michel Euler/AP French President Emmanuel Macron, in a not-so-subtle jab at President Trump, has awarded long-term research grants to 18 climate scientists — 13 of them U.S.-based researchers — t
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Golden eagle migration out of sync with climate change Image copyright SPL Golden eagles in North America may have the timing of their migration shifted out of step with a seasonal boom in food they need to raise their young, according to scientists. A project to track the impact of climate change on migrating animals has revealed that adult golden eagles are unable to shift the timing of their migration. Lead researcher Scott LaPoint from Columbia U
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
AML study reports high response rates with combination targeted therapyInitial findings from a multi-national open-label phase Ib study of inhibitory drug therapy for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have demonstrated a complete response in up to 50 percent patients say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence and supercomputers to help alleviate urban traffic problemsResearchers have developed a tool that uses artificial intelligence to recognize objects in raw traffic camera footage and characterize how those objects move and interact. This information can then be analyzed and queried by traffic engineers and officials to improve the safety and performance of the city's transportation network.
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Science | The Guardian
Offer cash incentives to mothers to promote breastfeeding – study Cash incentives should be given to mothers to encourage breastfeeding, according to experts following a pilot study. More than 10,000 new mothers across South Yorkshire, Derbyshire and north Nottinghamshire were involved in the trial, which offered shopping vouchers worth up to £120 if babies received breast milk – either by breastfeeding or with expressed milk – at two days, 10 days and six week
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Futurity.org
How your brain singles out 1 sound among many Researchers have developed a new way to find out how the brain singles out specific sounds in distracting settings, non-invasively mapping sustained auditory selective attention in the human brain. The study lays crucial groundwork to track deficits in auditory attention due to aging, disease, or brain trauma and to create clinical interventions, like behavioral training, to potentially correct o
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Futurity.org
To boost baby’s learning, read these books together Books that clearly name people and label objects help infants learn more and retain information, a new study suggests. “Shared reading is a good way to support development in the first year of life…” “When parents label people or characters with names, infants learn quite a bit,” says Lisa Scott, a psychology professor at the University of Florida and coauthor of the study. “Books with individual
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Popular Science
Earth's most mysterious hums, ranked When all else is quiet, Earth still hums. Scientists have known about this low-frequency droning for years, but last month researchers published the first-ever study to record the not-so-noisy noise on the bottom of the ocean. The paper presents some interesting findings on the hum and its frequencies—the planet’s oscillation clocks in between 2.9 and 4.5 millihertz, which is 10,000 times lower t
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Skinny on Fat Biochemist Sylvia Tara talks about her book The Secret Life of Fat: The Science behind the Body's Least-Understood Organ and What It Means for You . ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S) Steve Mirsky Steve Mirsky has been writing the Anti Gravity column since a typical tectonic plate was about 36 inches from its current location. He also hosts the Scientific American podcast Science Talk. Credit: Nick Higgins Adve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine turtles dying after becoming entangled in plastic rubbish IMAGE: This is a live leatherback turtle entangled in fishing ropes which increases drag, Grenada 2014. view more Credit: Kate Charles, Ocean Spirits Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic 'six pack' holders and disgarded fishing gear. The rise in plastic refuse in the ocean and on beaches is ki
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teenagers with incontinence are at risk of underachieving at secondary school Continence problems are among the most common paediatric health problems. It's commonly believed that continence problems resolve with age in all children. However, severe incontinence in childhood can persist into adolescence. New research has found teenagers with incontinence are at greater risk of underachieving academically, and need more support to remove barriers so they can reach their aca
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The Atlantic
Another Failed ISIS Attack The alleged bomber of the New York subway was inspired by the 2016 ISIS attack on the Berlin Christmas market, in which a Tunisian man drove a truck into a crowd and killed 12 people, according to a New York Times report . Akayed Ullah of Brooklyn saw Christmas posters in the underground corridor connecting the Port Authority Bus Terminal to the Times Square subway lines, and these set him off (o
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Futurity.org
A little zap can bypass senses to prompt motion Very low levels of electrical stimulation delivered directly to an area of the brain responsible for motor function can instruct an appropriate response or action—essentially replacing the signals we would normally receive from the parts of the brain that process what we hear, see, and feel. The brain’s complex network of neurons enables us to interpret and effortlessly navigate and interact with
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Worrying alarm call' for world's birds on brink of extinction Image copyright Ed Marshall Image caption Black-legged kittiwake: Colonies are struggling to feed their chicks Overfishing and changing sea temperatures are pushing seabirds to the brink of extinction, according to new data on the world's birds. Birds that are now globally threatened include the kittiwake and the Atlantic puffin, which breed on UK sea cliffs. Meanwhile, on land, the Snowy Owl is
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Science | The Guardian
Theresa May: It’s Britain’s duty to help nations hit by climate change T ackling climate change and mitigating its effects for the world’s poorest are among the most critical challenges the world faces. That is why I will join other world leaders gathering in Paris today for the One Planet Summit . There is a clear moral imperative for developed economies such as the UK to help those around the world who stand to lose most from the consequences of manmade climate ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine turtles dying after becoming entangled in plastic rubbish Live leatherback turtle entangled in fishing ropes which increases drag, Grenada 2014. Credit: Kate Charles, Ocean Spirits Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic 'six pack' holders and disgarded fishing gear. The rise in plastic refuse in the ocean and on beaches is killing turtles of all species, with a dispro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Omalizumab improves efficacy of oral immunotherapy for multiple food allergies WHAT: Combining a 16-week initial course of the medication omalizumab with oral immunotherapy (OIT) greatly improves the efficacy of OIT for children with allergies to multiple foods, new clinical trial findings show. After 36 weeks, more than 80 percent of children who received omalizumab and OIT could safely consume two-gram portions of at least two foods to which they were allergic, compared
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The Atlantic
'Cat Person' and the Impulse to Undermine Women's Fiction In fiction-writing—before characters can be developed, before plots can be sketched, before tensions can be introduced, and attendant arcs molded and stretched—the author must first make a series of much more basic decisions: How will the story be told? Who, in the context of the story itself, will tell it? Who will be given a person and a voice within this hermetic little universe? Who will not?
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: New Pacific Island Could Resemble Ancient Martian Volcanoes Photo The crater lake from the summit rim at the center of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai, which was formed by an underwater volcanic eruption in 2014. Scientists studying the new land mass hope it can serve as a template for better understanding ancient Mars. Credit NASA/Damien Grouille/Cecile Sabau NEW ORLEANS — How is a little Pacific island like the planet Mars? Let James Garvin count the ways. In
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New Scientist - News
Joke Christmas medical journal papers make unfunny bad science Why is Rudolph’s nose red? Paul Quayle/Alamy Stock Photo By Jessica Hamzelou Christmas is coming, and so are the cheesy seasonal science stories. For most of the year, the BMJ publishes some of the most important medical research conducted today. But at the end of the year, it turns to what it calls “light-hearted fare and satire” – also known as silly tabloid fodder. The work, while “real” a
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Live Science
Full Moon Is Bad, But Supermoon Is Even Worse for Motorcyclists The bright light of a full moon or supermoon may seem inviting to motorcyclists eager for a nighttime ride, but that moonlit trip may also come with deadly consequences, a new study finds. According to data on nighttime motorcycle crashes in the United States from 1975 to 2014, motorcyclists were more likely to die in crashes on nights with full moons. Riders were even more likely to die on
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Live Science
Is 'Man Flu' Real? Men Suffer More When Sick, Study Suggests When a man complains of cold or flu symptoms , it may not be fair to dismiss his laments as simply a case of "man flu." Men may really experience worse symptoms than women after catching a respiratory virus, a new review suggests. The review was published today (Dec. 11) in a special Christmas issue of the medical journal The BMJ; the holiday edition features research that is more lighthear
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Futurity.org
Transfusions for leukemia can preclude hospice Toward the end of their life, some leukemia patients depend on blood transfusions to ease their suffering. But that need may pose a significant barrier to their ability to use hospice, researchers say. Medicare’s hospice benefit provides a flat “per diem” reimbursement for hospice care, which is often not high enough to cover transfusions for leukemia patients. Further, few hospices have the capa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dark side of the moon: Motorcycle deaths linked to full moons PRINCETON, N.J.--Distracted drivers, like those who text behind the wheel, are a danger to themselves and to others. Even a brief, momentary glance away from the road can result in life-threatening consequences. Research published Dec. 11 in The BMJ points toward another potential distraction for motorists: the full moon, gracing the sky with its brightness around 12 times a year, and the dazzlin
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