Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laser-driven technique for creating fusion is now within reach, say researchers Credit: ORNL A laser-driven technique for creating fusion that dispenses with the need for radioactive fuel elements and leaves no toxic radioactive waste is now within reach, say researchers. Dramatic advances in powerful, high-intensity lasers are making it viable for scientists to pursue what was once thought impossible: creating fusion energy based on hydrogen-boron reactions. And an Australi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans can feel molecular differences between nearly identical surfacesHow sensitive is the human sense of touch? Sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, a team of researchers has shown. Researchers say this fundamental knowledge will be useful for developing electronic skin, prosthetics that can feel, advanced haptic technology for virtual and augmented reality and more.
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Ingeniøren
S-tog bliver førerløse - privat selskab overtager fra DSB Københavns S-tog skal i fremtiden køre helt uden lokofører ligesom metroen. Det er ifølge Danmarks Radio konsekvensen af en aftale, som regeringen har indgået med Dansk Folkeparti og de Radikale. Transportministeriet har indkaldt til pressemøde kl. 10 onsdag formiddag om 'fremtidens togtrafik i hovedstadsområdet'. Relateret jobannonce: Studentermedhjælp til Metroselskabet og Hovedstadens Letbane
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The Atlantic
A Hypnotic Descent Into Dehumanization Dehumanization can take many forms, but its end result is always the same: The extinguishment of all that dignifies an individual. Irregulars , a powerful short film by Fabio Palmieri, is the story of one teenager’s dehumanization. His experience unfolds against the hypnotic backdrop of a mannequin factory. “We had lost our history and our identity,” says the teenager, a recent refugee from West
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The toxic sugar tree: Mapping the evolutionary history of a cancerous sugar gene The gene CMAH, that allows for the synthesis of a sugar called Neu5Gc, is missing from humans. This sugar is present in red meats, some fish and dairy products. When humans consume an animal with that gene, the body has an immune reaction to the foreign sugar, which can cause inflammation, arthritis, and cancer. University of Nevada, Reno researchers, have analyzed 322 animal genome sequences loo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three papers help to crack the code of coenzyme Q biosynthesis Dave Pagliarini, director of metabolism at the Morgridge Institute for Research; and professor of biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Credit: Morgridge Institute for Research Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a vital cog in the body's energy-producing machinery, a kind of chemical gateway in the conversion of food into cellular fuel. But six decades removed from its discovery, scientists still
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Live Science
Lose Water Weight, Grow an Inch? It Happened for These Mountains The Sierra Nevada range rose almost an inch during California's recent drought due to loss of water from within fractured rocks. Credit: Trailkrum/CC BY-NC 2.0 Wouldn't you love to grow an extra inch taller — by sweating? According to NASA scientists, it is possible to grow an inch or more in height just by displacing water weight. The caveat: It only works if you're an actual mountain. Res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three papers help to crack the code of coenzyme Q biosynthesis IMAGE: This is Dave Pagliarini, director of metabolism at the Morgridge Institute for Research; and professor of biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. view more Credit: Morgridge Institute for Research Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a vital cog in the body's energy-producing machinery, a kind of chemical gateway in the conversion of food into cellular fuel. But six decades removed from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The toxic sugar tree: Mapping the evolutionary history of a cancerous sugar gene RENO, Nev. - Around two million years ago, a genetic change occurred that differentiated humans from most other primates that both protected humans from diseases, yet made red meat a health risk. At this point in human evolution, a certain gene, known as CMAH, that allows for the synthesis of a sugar called Neu5Gc, went missing. This sugar is present in red meats, some fish and dairy products. Wh
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The Mirai Botnet Was Part of a College Student Minecraft Scheme The most dramatic cybersecurity story of 2016 came to a quiet conclusion Friday in an Anchorage courtroom, as three young American computer savants pleaded guilty to masterminding an unprecedented botnet—powered by unsecured internet-of-things devices like security cameras and wireless routers—that unleashed sweeping attacks on key internet services around the globe last fall. What drove them was
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate conditions affect solar cell performance more than expectedResearchers can now predict how much energy solar cells will produce at any location worldwide. Surprisingly, they identified that two types of solar cells can vary in energy output by 5 percent or more in tropical regions. This gap occurs because solar energy can shift depending on local temperature and water in the atmosphere. Their work emphasizes that solar products may behave differently depe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased air pollution linked to bad teenage behaviorA new study linking higher levels of air pollution to increased teenage delinquency is a reminder of the importance of clean air and the need for more foliage in urban spaces. The study suggests ambient air pollution may increase delinquent behavior among 9- to 18-year-olds in urban neighborhoods in Greater Los Angeles. The insidious effects are compounded by poor parent-child relationships and pa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Human chronobiome' study informs timing of drug delivery, precision medicine approachesA pilot study collected physiological information from six healthy young male volunteers as they went about their normal daily lives. Thousands of indicators were measured with wearable devices and smart phone apps. The study showed the feasibility to detect the chronobiome of an individual -- a collection of physiological traits in a 24-hour rhythmic pattern -- despite the 'noise' of everyday lif
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sorghum cultivars can produce thousands of gallons of ethanolSweet sorghum is not just for breakfast anymore. Although sorghum is a source for table syrup, scientists see a future in which we convert sorghum to biofuel, rather than relying on fossil fuel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic study defies 'one-size-fits-all' approach to prescribing opioids for chronic painResearchers are assessing clinical and genetic characteristics of a large patient cohort suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain and receiving prescription opioids. With this information, the multidisciplinary team will derive a clinical and genetic profile of prescription opioid-use disorder and use this knowledge to develop an “addiction risk score.” Findings from this study will be key in i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny globetrotters: Bacteria which live in the Arctic and the AntarcticGeoscientists have compared micro-organisms in the polar regions, noting that some bacteria can be found in both regions of Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug to treat retinal diseases with drops instead of injectionsA new compound has been developed to treat diseases of the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, with the ability to be administered by ophthalmic drops instead of intraocular injections. The drug, which has been tested in animals, is a small interfering RNA capable of penetrating the cells of the retina and blocking the formation of new blood vessels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ANU astronomers create best map of the southern sky Astronomers at ANU have created the most comprehensive map of the southern sky that can be viewed online by anyone around the world. The map includes about 70,000 individual images, capturing nearly 300 million stars and galaxies. Lead researcher Dr Christian Wolf from ANU said the map was created using SkyMapper, a 1.3-metre telescope at the ANU Siding Spring Observatory that is creating a full
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global, Asian heat waves in 2016 due purely to climate change: study Credit: CC0 Public Domain Last year's global heat record, extreme heat in Asia and unusually warm waters off the coast of Alaska happened purely because the planet is getting warmer due to human activities like burning fossil fuels, a study said Wednesday. The findings mark the first time that global scientists have identified extreme weather events that could not have happened without climate ch
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Great Red Spot Descends Deep Into Jupiter But no one knew what was happening below the clouds. Scientists wondered whether the storm was shallow and confined to that slice of the atmosphere or if it descended hundreds or thousands of miles into the planet. An instrument on Juno measures microwave emissions, which pass through the clouds into space. Warmer regions generate more microwaves, and the region below the Great Red Spot was warme
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Target buys same-day delivery service for $550 mn Target said Wednesday it was acquiring same-day grocery delivery service Shipt for $550 million, helping the US retail titan step up its challenge to Amazon and its recently acquired Whole Foods supermarket chain. The retailer said it planned to combine its network of stores with Shipt technology to quickly delivery its array of products. "With Shipt's network of local shoppers and their curren
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three plead guilty in Mirai botnet attacks US officials unveiled criminal charges Wednesday against a former university student and two others in the Mirai botnet attacks which shut down parts of the internet in several countries starting in mid-2016. The Justice Department announced plea agreements for Paras Jha, 21—a former Rutgers University computer science student who acknowledged writing the malware code—and Josiah White, 20, and Da
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook accused of inaction over Russian ads in Brexit vote A senior British MP on Wednesday accused Facebook of failing to seriously investigate possible Russian influence in the Brexit vote, after it found just three adverts linked to a known propaganda group. Damian Collins, chairman of parliament's culture and media committee, repeated his request for information as part of an investigation into the impact of " fake news " in last year's referendum vo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers trace the potato's origins, learn about its untapped potential Parker Laimbeer (left) and Richard Veilleux examine specimens in their greenhouse. Laimbeer, an expert in endoreduplication, is working to alter genes in order to control the size of potatoes and to potentially increase yields. Credit: Virginia Tech The comfort food we know and love today as the potato was domesticated between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago from a wild species native to the Andes Mou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for US Illinois atmospheric sciences researchers Zach Zobel, left, and professor Donald Wuebbles led a team that developed new, high-resolution models that may help direct climate policy initiatives at the local level. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Approaching the second half of the century, the United States is likely to experience increases in the number of days with extreme heat, the frequency and durati
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The Atlantic
Is the New Way to Give a Better Way to Give? Most people think of charitable donations as happening in one of two ways. In one scenario, people decide how much they want to donate, then select a charity that will be the recipient of the funds. In the other scenario—one only available to the wealthy—a donor can take their money and set up their own foundation, transfer money over to it, have it grow, and then give away money over time, perha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees developing system 96W affecting central Philippines On Dec. 13 at 0412 UTC (Dec. 12 at 11:12 p.m. EST) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of System 96W as its western quadrant moved over the east central Philippines. The low pressure area appeared elongated from southwest to northeast. Credit: NASA/NOAA/NRL A developing area of tropical low pressure designated System 96W was affecting the central Philippines when NASA-NOAA's
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Popular Science
You once again have to register your drone—yes, even the little ones You have to register your drone if you want to fly it outside. It costs $5, you can do it online here , and there are penalties if you take to the air without doing it. Now you know. Here’s some background. Not since Ross and Rachel on Friends has there been a more epic will-they-or-won’t-they story than the US has with drone registration. Up until 2015, casual pilots could send their drones skyw
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Monkeys infected by mosquito bites further Zika virus research MADISON, Wisconsin -- Monkeys who catch Zika virus through bites from infected mosquitoes develop infections that look like human Zika cases, and may help researchers understand the many ways Zika can be transmitted. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison infected rhesus macaques at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center with Zika virus one of two ways: by allowing mosquitoes
55min
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Virginia Tech researchers trace the potato's origins, learn about its untapped potential IMAGE: Parker Laimbeer (left) and Richard Veilleux examine specimens in their greenhouse. Laimbeer, an expert in endoreduplication, is working to alter genes in order to control the size of potatoes and... view more Credit: Virginia Tech The comfort food we know and love today as the potato was domesticated between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago from a wild species native to the Andes Mountains
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instabilityThe East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet). It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland shrink. New research has found that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet may not be as stable as it seems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The oldest plesiosaur was a strong swimmerPlesiosaurs were especially effective swimmer. These long extinct 'paddle saurians' propelled themselves through the World's oceans by employing 'underwater flight' -- similar to sea turtles and penguins. The find comes from the youngest part of the Triassic period and is about 201 million years old.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells turn back time to achieve memoryWhat distinguishes memory CD8 T cells from untrained naive cells is that they can respond rapidly, within minutes or hours. The new research illuminates how they do it -- their genes are poised to respond, even years after initial activation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosisBiochemists have used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the detailed architecture of the chloride channel TMEM16A. This protein is a promising target for the development of effective drugs to treat cystic fibrosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoesScientists provide evidence, for the first time, that a subtle tipping point of the chemistry of magmas clearly separates effusive from explosive eruptions worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory T cells responsible for long-term immunity have been cross-trained IMAGE: Ben Youngblood, Ph.D., pictured with Hazem Ghoneim, Ph.D., and colleagues showed how memory CD8 T cells arise from a small subset of effector CD8 T cells in laboratory models.... view more Credit: Seth Dixon / St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Like employees cross-trained for different jobs, scientists have the strongest evidence yet that memory T cells responsible for long-term
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How well will the flu vaccine work this winter? GALVESTON, Texas -- The most effective way of preventing seasonal influenza is to be vaccinated each autumn. The reason that people are encouraged to get vaccinated annually is because flu virus can cause severe disease. One of the problems is that there are many different flu viruses circulating around the world and which ones circulate changes over time. Each year, pharmaceutical companies prod
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Futurity.org
Mini-tremors at fracking sites may predict big earthquakes Geoscientists have come up with a way to detect thousands of faint, previously missed earthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.” The technique can be used to monitor seismic activities at fracking operations to help reduce the likelihood of bigger, potentially damaging earthquakes from occurring, a new study reports. “These small earthquakes may act like canaries in a coal mine
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New on MIT Technology Review
Hedge Funds Are Increasingly Turning to AI—and That Might Be a Problem Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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New Scientist - News
Robot that’s the width of a hair masters Pac-Man and cuts cheese Tiny robots play Pac-Man EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty By Niall Firth You’d need your glasses on to play this version of Pac-Man. Tiny metal robots can plot their own route around a maze modelled on the iconic video game. Similar devices could one day be used to travel around the body, delivering drugs or performing surgery. Sarthak Misra from the University of Twente, the Netherlands, and collea
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New Scientist - News
TB, or not TB? At last, a urine test can diagnose it quickly Assessing symptoms Description:Andrew Aitchison/Getty By Andy Coghlan A urine test for tuberculosis could make it much easier to identify the disease and treat it before it kills. There were more than 10 million new TB infections in 2016 , and the condition killed 1.7 million people. In around 40 per cent of cases, the infection isn’t identified until symptoms become obvious. TB is currently
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New Scientist - News
This is the oldest fossil of a plesiosaur from the dinosaur era The skeleton of Rhaeticosaurus Georg Oleschinski By Michael Le Page The long-necked marine reptiles known as plesiosaurs are one of the icons of the dinosaur age. But all the fossil skeletons found so far come from the Jurassic period. Now we’ve found a nearly complete fossil from the earlier Triassic period. It is the oldest plesiosaur ever found. The fossil shows that, as predicted, plesios
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Borrowing a leaf from biology to preserve threatened languagesBiodiversity scientists are using a language tree to help guide efforts to preserve threatened languages, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Voices and emotions: Forehead is the keyHow does intonation allow us to decode emotions? By observing neuronal activity in the brain, researchers have been able to map the cerebral regions we use to interpret vocal emotional representations. The results underline the essential role played by the frontal regions in interpreting emotions communicated orally. When the process does not function correctly -- following a brain injury -- an in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thermal 'skin' designed to maintain temperature of satellitesIf a satellite's temperature is not maintained within its optimal range, its performance can suffer which could mean it could be harder to track wildfires or other natural disasters, your Google maps might not work and your Netflix binge might be interrupted. This might be prevented with a new material recently developed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Health risks linked to electromagnetic field exposureA study of real-world exposure to non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields in pregnant women found a significantly higher rate of miscarriage, providing new evidence regarding their potential health risks.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Can AI Win the War Against Fake News? It may have been the first bit of fake news in the history of the Internet: in 1984, someone posted on Usenet that the Soviet Union was joining the network. It was a harmless April’s Fools Day prank , a far cry from today’s weaponized disinformation campaigns and unscrupulous fabrications designed to turn a quick profit. In 2017, misleading and maliciously false online content is so prolific that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What keeps stem cells in their undifferentiated state? IMAGE: These are red, stem cells. Green, differentiated cells view more Credit: Cook Lab, UNC School of Medicine CHAPEL HILL, NC - A special cluster of proteins that helps unwind DNA during cell division plays a key role in keeping stem cells in their immature state, according to a new study by UNC School of Medicine researchers. The study, published in the online journal eLife , illumina
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Unique sensory responses to the pediatric HIV medication Kaletra IMAGE: Dr. Mennella ia a developmental psychobiologist at the Monell Center. view more Credit: Sabina Louise Piece/Monell Center PHILADELPHIA (Dec. 13, 2017) - Bad taste can lead to rejection of life-saving medicines by infants and young children, who require liquid formulations because they are unable to swallow pills yet lack the language to explain why something does not taste good. Seekin
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Live Science
Hard to Imagine: What Is Aphantasia? Imagine you are on a beach. The rays of the setting sun color the sea surface orange and golden. Now, what do you see in your mind? If you're among the approximately 1 to 3 percent of people with a recently discovered condition called "aphantasia," chances are you see absolutely nothing in your imagination . Now, a new small study from Australia is trying to understand why some people seem unable
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The Atlantic
Will Ukraine Be Hit by Yet Another Holiday Power-Grid Hack? The holiday season has not been a joyful time with respect to Ukraine’s power grid. Days before Christmas in 2015, remote hackers wrested control from Ukrainian grid operators, and, by digitally commandeering substations, shut off power for 225,000 customers for several hours. Then, in mid-December of last year, hackers developed a malicious code that, without any real-time human support, disrupt
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Science | The Guardian
Rise of the robots and all the lonely people | Letters Two connected stories in Monday’s Guardian: Tom Watson asks us to “embrace an android” while Rachel Reeves describes society’s sixth giant evil as a “ crisis of loneliness ”. Replacing people with machines decreases opportunities for social interactions helping many feel integrated. Self-service in shops, libraries, banks and other places means people can go all day without conversation with a “r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
1 in 5 young colon cancer patients have genetic link ANN ARBOR, Michigan -- As doctors grapple with increasing rates of colorectal cancers in young people, new research from the University of Michigan may offer some insight into how the disease developed and how to prevent further cancers. Researchers found that 20 percent of young people diagnosed with colorectal cancer have an inherited genetic abnormality that predisposes to its development - a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins and blood-brain barrier in Niemann-Pick Disease type C1The rare, chronic, autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disease Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) is characterized by progressively debilitating and ultimately fatal neurological manifestations. There is an urgent need for disease-modifying therapies that address NPC1 neurological pathophysiology; and passage through the blood-brain barrier represents an important consideration for novel NPC1 d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for US IMAGE: Illinois atmospheric sciences researchers Zach Zobel, left, and professor Donald Wuebbles led a team that developed new, high-resolution models that may help direct climate policy initiatives at the local level.... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Approaching the second half of the century, the United States is likely to experience increases in the number
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Lyme bacteria survive 28-day course of antibiotics months after infection Portola Valley, California, Dec. 13, 2017 --- Bay Area Lyme Foundation , a leading sponsor of Lyme disease research in the US, today announced results of two papers published in the peer-reviewed journals PLOS ONE and American Journal of Pathology , that seem to support claims of lingering symptoms reported by many patients who have already received antibiotic treatment for the disease. Based on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genomic blood test predicts survival rates after surgery for advanced heart failure IMAGE: This is Dr. Mario Deng. view more Credit: UCLA Health FINDINGS An experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices. BACKGROUND Mechanical circulatory support devices, such as ventricul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The oldest plesiosaur was a strong swimmer IMAGE: This is the skeleton of Rhaeticosaurus on exhibit at the LWL-Museum für Naturkunde in Münster (Germany). The disintegrated skull and neck can be seen on the left.... view more Credit: Photo: Georg Oleschinski Plesiosaurs were especially effective swimmer. These long extinct "paddle saurians" propelled themselves through the World's oceans by employing "underwater flight" - simila
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Impacts of local exposure to fracking sites on Pennsylvania infants Based on a decade of data from Pennsylvania, researchers report that babies born to mothers living within 1 kilometer of active "fracking" wells are 25% more likely to exhibit low birthweight - a risk factor for infant mortality, ADHD, asthma, and other negative outcomes. The results reflect a possible health consequence of exposure to fracking pollutants. To date, concerns about the impact of th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant healthHealth risks increase for infants born to mothers living within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site, according to a study published Dec. 13 in Science Advances.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monkey study shows a path to monitoring endangered species MADISON, Wis. -- A Brazilian-American research group has just published an unusual study outlining data needs for monitoring the survival of monkeys called muriquis that live in patches of forest in Brazil. "If you want to preserve the muriquis, exactly what do you need to know?" asks Leandro Jerusalinsky, one of the authors of a report published today (Dec. 13, 2017) in the journal PLOS ON
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
At long last, a urine test for accurate tuberculosis detectionScientists have finally developed a noninvasive tuberculosis test for a pool of people for whom such assessments have previously been difficult: people who don't have HIV.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Micro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environments IMAGE: Figure 1 of article depicting the PacMan™-like maze. view more Credit: Ongaro et al (2017) Micro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environments and could help reduce risk during surgeries, according to a study published December 13, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Federico Ongaro from the University of Twente, The Netherlands and colleagues. Microrobotic technolog
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
House mice may modulate their vocalizations depending on the sex of the receiver Wild-derived house mice call at higher rates and frequencies during interactions with the opposite sex than with the same sex, according to a study published December 13, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Zala from Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Austria, and colleagues. During social and sexual interactions, house mice make surprisingly complex ultrasonic vocalizations with
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The Atlantic
New, Major Evidence That Fracking Harms Human Health Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, may pose a significant—but very local—harm to human health, a new study finds. Mothers who live within two miles of a fracking well are more likely to give birth to a child with a low birth weight—which has been linked to poorer health throughout a person’s life. The research , published Wednesday in Science Advances , is one of the largest studies done thus far
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chimpanzee deaths in Uganda pinned on human cold virusIn the wild, chimpanzees face any number of dire threats, ranging from poachers to predators to deforestation. That’s why scientists, investigating an outbreak of respiratory disease in a community of wild chimpanzees in Uganda’s Kibale National Park, were surprised and dismayed to discover that a human “common cold” virus known as rhinovirus C was killing healthy chimps.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells sense their environment to explore itThe process through which cells are able to sense their environment is regulated by force detection, concludes new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Converting waste water from dairies to animal feed and aviation fuelScientists have developed a bioprocess that enables conversion of acid whey, a dairy by-product, without the use of additional chemicals. Scientists used microbiome cultures similar to those in the human gut. The new bio-oil can be used in animal feed or, after further refinement, as a fuel for airplanes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disordersDid you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behavior, including checking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Default choices matter, especially for poorer, less educated individuals, study showsResearchers took advantage of a resulting federal lawsuit against a fraudulent company to test default choice architecture when the optimal choice was clear: end the subscriptions.
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New Scientist - News
Restarting dead people’s hearts lets doctors reuse their organs Pierre-Philippe Marcou/AFP/Getty Images By Clare Wilson ORGAN transplants may seem almost routine procedures nowadays, but they remain mired in anxieties and ethical challenges. The number of people needing a new organ vastly outweighs the supply, because less than 1 per cent of all deaths take place in a manner that makes organ donation medically possible. That’s why some doctors are now see
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monkey study shows a path to monitoring endangered species A muriqui mother with infant. Counting infants is a necessity for projecting future populations. Credit: Pablo Fernicola A Brazilian-American research group has just published an unusual study outlining data needs for monitoring the survival of monkeys called muriquis that live in patches of forest in Brazil. "If you want to preserve the muriquis, exactly what do you need to know?" asks Leandro J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health Locations of births and fractured wells in Pennsylvania. Credit: Currie, Greenstone, Meckel, Sci. Adv . 2017;3: e1603021 From North Dakota to Ohio to Pennsylvania, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, has transformed small towns into energy powerhouses. While some see the new energy boom as benefiting the local economy and decreasing U.S. reliance on foreign oil, others fear the potentia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environments Figure 1 of article depicting the PacMan™-like maze. Credit: Ongaro et al (2017) Micro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environments and could help reduce risk during surgeries, according to a study published December 13, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Federico Ongaro from the University of Twente, The Netherlands and colleagues. Microrobotic technologies such as micro-g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
House mice may modulate their vocalizations depending on the sex of the receiver House mice may modulate their vocalizations depending on the sex of the receiver. Credit: Bettina Wernisch Wild-derived house mice call at higher rates and frequencies during interactions with the opposite sex than with the same sex, according to a study published December 13, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Zala from Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Austria, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lactic acid bacteria can protect against influenza a virusLactic acid bacteria, commonly used as probiotics to improve digestive health, can offer protection against different subtypes of influenza A virus, resulting in reduced weight loss after virus infection and lower amounts of virus replication in the lungs, according to a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Women in Science are a Force of Nature Last fall, the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics issued five posters featuring five great women who changed science , but whose pivotal roles have long been underplayed in favor of their much more famous male counterparts. Credit: Gabriela Secara, Perimeter Institute The response was so great—according to Perimeter, the free posters have been downloaded and displayed by scho
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Science : NPR
Winemakers Worry Wildfires Will Leave Whiff Of Ashtray In Their Wine Smoke from wildfires, like this lingering cloud in Sonoma County, Calif., in October, may be responsible for creating an off taste in wine. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption George Rose/Getty Images Smoke from wildfires, like this lingering cloud in Sonoma County, Calif., in October, may be responsible for creating an off taste in wine. George Rose/Getty Images This has been to
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Big Think
Even If Genes Affect Intelligence, We Can’t Engineer Cleverness First, let me tell you how smart I am. So smart . My fifth-grade teacher said I was gifted in mathematics and, looking back, I have to admit that she was right. I’ve properly grasped the character of metaphysics as trope nominalism, and I can tell you that time exists, but that it can’t be integrated into a fundamental equation. I’m also street-smart. Most of the things that other people say are
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Popular Science
So you’ve been bitten by a leech. What’s the worst that could happen? Several years ago, emergency physician Jeremy Joslin found himself overseeing an ultramarathon in the backcountry of Cambodia. Once they’d finished the event, many of the athletes wanted to cool off and noticed an inviting stream nearby. “After a few minutes, the screams started,” says Joslin, who is based at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. It was not long before people began hurryin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees developing system 96W affecting central PhilippinesA developing area of tropical low pressure designated System 96W was affecting the central Philippines when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male virgins can still acquire HPV, study findsMen who have never engaged in sexual intercourse are still at risk for acquiring HPV, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humans, unlike monkeys, turn a competitive situation into cooperative oneRhesus macaques and capuchin monkeys can find a stable solution when playing a competitive game in which one opponent always does better than the other, but only humans can find a solution that benefits both competitors equally, turning a competitive situation into a cooperative one, according to a study.
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The Atlantic
Bon Jovi and Nina Simone, Rock and Roll Hall of Famers at Last In Joe Hagan’s recent biography of Jann Wenner , the co-founder of Rolling Stone and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, it becomes clear that the Hall of Fame has been largely shaped by the preferences of just a few guys. The self-made gatekeeper “especially disliked Jon Bon Jovi, who Wenner said campaigned unsuccessfully to get himself inducted into the Hall of Fame by enlisting billionaire investo
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Electric eels provide a zap of inspiration for a new kind of power source New power sources bear a shocking resemblance to the electricity-making organs inside electric eels. These artificial electric eel organs are made up of water-based polymer mixes called hydrogels. Such soft, flexible battery-like devices, described online October 13 in Nature , could power soft robots or next-gen wearable and implantable tech. “It’s a very smart approach” to building potentially
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease of the lung, for which there is currently no cure. The underlying cause of the disease is a malfunction of the chloride channel CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride in certain body cells. This leads to dehydration of the mucus layer in the lung. A promising approach for treating cystic fibrosis is the activation of the calcium-activated chl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Melting of east Antarctic ice sheet could cripple major US cities IMAGE: National Science Foundation-funded research concludes melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet could raise the sea level 15 feet. view more Credit: Steffen Saustraup/The University of Texas at Austin TAMPA, Fla (December 13, 2017)- The world's largest ice sheet may be less stable than previously thought, posing an even greater threat to Florida's coastline. The first ever marine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory Memory T cells earn their name by embodying the memory of the immune system - they help the body remember what infections or vaccines someone has been exposed to. But to become memory T cells, the cells go backwards in time, relinquishing their status as immune foot soldiers. This is a key finding of two Nature papers, scheduled for publication on December 13. Their results inform a debate amon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major space mystery solved using data from student satellite IMAGE: Dozens of CU Boulder students designed and built the CSSWE CubeSat satellite, which was used to study energetic particles in the Van Allen radiation belts. view more Credit: University of Colorado Dec. 13, 2017 - A 60-year-old mystery regarding the source of some energetic and potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts is now solved using data from a shoebox-sized satell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability IMAGE: The researchers deployed marine seismic technology from the back of an ice breaker near Antarctica's Sabrina Coast. The equipment captured images of the seafloor, including geological formations created by the... view more Credit: Sean Gulick/University of Texas at Austin The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eruptions explosive and effusive Some rhyolitic volcanos erupt abruptly and violently, while others are far more sedate in their eruptive behavior. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich geoscientist Professor Donald Dingwell has now discovered why that is so. The chemistry of rhyolitic magmas is the key. Many volcanic eruptions are highly dramatic, others are comparatively unspectacular. So-called effusive eruptions sp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electricity, eel-style: Soft power cells could run tomorrow's implantables Inspired by the electric eel, a flexible, transparent electrical device could lead to body-friendly power sources for implanted health monitors and medication dispensers, augmented-reality contact lenses and countless other applications. The soft cells are made of hydrogel and salt, and they form the first potentially biocompatible artificial electric organ that generates more than 100 volts. It
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes IMAGE: This is bubbly magma in laboratory used as starting material for the viscosity experiments. view more Credit: Danilo Di Genova Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular expression of the processes acting in the interior of any active planet. Effusive eruptions consist of a gentle and steady flow of lava on the surface, while explosive eruptions are violent phenomena that can
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mars mission sheds light on habitability of distant planetsInsights from NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission about the loss of the Red Planet's atmosphere can help scientists understand the habitability of rocky planets orbiting other stars.
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The Atlantic
Why Toddlers Deserve More Respect In The Emotional Life of the Toddler , the child-psychology and psychotherapy expert Alicia F. Lieberman details the dramatic triumphs and tribulations of kids ages 1 to 3. Some of her anecdotes make the most commonplace of experiences feel like they should be backed by a cinematic instrumental track. Take Lieberman’s example of what a toddler feels while walking across the living room: When John
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The Atlantic
A New Kind of Soft Battery, Inspired by the Electric Eel In 1799, the Italian scientist Alessandro Volta fashioned an arm-long stack of zinc and copper discs, separated by salt-soaked cardboard. This “voltaic pile” was the world’s first synthetic battery, but Volta based its design on something far older—the body of the electric eel . This infamous fish makes its own electricity using an electric organ that makes up 80 percent of its two-meter length.
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The Atlantic
The Egotism of Explorers in The Lost City of Z Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. Next up is James Gray’s The Lost City of Z . (Read our previous entries here .) The Lost City of Z is a film about the siren song of the unknown—the chance that just around every bend of the Amazon R
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Human chronobiome' study informs timing of drug delivery, precision medicine approaches IMAGE: Study participants were equipped with remote sensing devices to collect behavioral and environmental data including activity, communication, mobility, sleep-wake times, dietary intake, and light exposure. view more Credit: Scientific Reports; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Symptoms and efficacy of medications - and indeed, many aspects of the human body itsel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosis Structure of the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A. The channel, which consists of two identical subunits, is shown in the center. The position of the membrane is indicated by lines. The ion conduction pore is highlighted (grey rectangle) and shown in detail on the right. The picture on the left shows the movement of an α-helix leading to channel opening. Bound calcium ions are depicted
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability The researchers deployed marine seismic technology from the back of an ice breaker near Antarctica's Sabrina Coast. The equipment captured images of the seafloor, including geological formations created by the ice sheet. This allowed the scientists to reconstruct how glaciers in the area have advanced and retreated over the past 50 million years. Credit: Sean Gulick/University of Texas at Austin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Major space mystery solved using data from student satellite Dozens of CU Boulder students designed and built the CSSWE CubeSat satellite, which was used to study energetic particles in the Van Allen radiation belts. Credit: University of Colorado A 60-year-old mystery regarding the source of some energetic and potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts is now solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes Bubbly magma in laboratory used as starting material for the viscosity experiments. Credit: Danilo Di Genova Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular expression of the processes acting in the interior of any active planet. Effusive eruptions consist of a gentle and steady flow of lava on the surface, while explosive eruptions are violent phenomena that can eject hot materials up to several kil
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Quanta Magazine
New Bird Species Arises From Hybrids, as Scientists Watch It’s not every day that scientists observe a new species emerging in real time. Charles Darwin believed that speciation probably took place over hundreds if not thousands of generations, advancing far too gradually to be detected directly. The biologists who followed him have generally defaulted to a similar understanding and have relied on indirect clues, gleaned from genomes and fossils, to inf
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Mystery of How Babies Experience Pain The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Before the 1980s, clinicians actually performed surgery on newborns without giving them anaesthetics or pain medications . This wasn’t because they thought babies were completely incapable of feeling pain. But they didn’t know how much pain the newborns could experience
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venezuelans seeing bitcoin boom as survival, not speculationIn the last month, John Villar has bought two plane tickets to Colombia, purchased his wife's medication and paid the employees of his startup business in Venezuela—all in bitcoin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use WWII code-breaking techniques to interpret brain data Credit: CC0 Public Domain Cracking the German Enigma code is considered to be one of the decisive factors that hastened Allied victory in World War II. Starting with clues derived from espionage, computer scientists were able to work out the rules that turned a string of gibberish characters into plain German, providing life-saving and war-shortening intelligence. A team of researchers from the U
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
175 years on, study finds where you live still determines your life expectancyResearchers revisited a study carried out 175 years ago which compared life expectancy in different areas of the UK. They found there is still a link between where you live, your social class and the age you live to and that people living in Liverpool still have lower life expectancy than those living in the rural area of Rutland.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism therapy: Social behavior restored via brain stimulationScientists are examining the feasibility of treating autistic children with neuromodulation after a new study showed social impairments can be corrected by brain stimulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A single sand grain harbors up to 100,000 microorganisms from thousands of speciesJust imagine, you are sitting on a sunny beach, contentedly letting the warm sand trickle through your fingers. Millions of sand grains. What you probably can't imagine: at the same time, billions upon billions of bacteria are also trickling through your fingers. Between 10,000 and 100,000 microorganisms live on each single grain of sand, as revealed in a new study. This means that an individual g
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New Scientist - News
Children are becoming problem gamblers due to a legal loophole The line between what is and isn’t gambling is becoming increasingly hazy Piero Cruciatti/Alamy Stock Photo By Timothy Revell Huge numbers of children are gambling online, the UK Gambling Commission reports . Around 25,000 children aged between 11 and 16 meet the definition of a problem gambler, according to a psychological questionnaire. And around 370,000 children in England, Scotland and W
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Picture book empowers children, families to tackle climate change Cover of "The Tantrum that Saved the World." Credit: Michael Mann, Penn State and Megan Herbert. One day a polar bear shows up at Sophia's house asking if it can come inside. Its habitat melted and the bear needs a new home. So starts "The Tantrum that Saved the World," a new children's book about climate change's effects on creatures and communities around the world, by Penn State researcher Mic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Habitat counts when predators lurk Nick Keiser. Credit: Alex DeMarco Take it from the lowly snail: If you're on a beach and threatened by predators, run for that nearby forest. Your chance of survival will rise, if only a little bit. That may be a plot point in many a bad B-movie, but its strategy has a basis in reality. Nick Keiser, a Rice Academy postdoctoral fellow in the Department of BioSciences at Rice University, demonstrat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Project to give public access to high-resolution 3-D models of vertebrate anatomy The oVert project will make it possible to generate 3-D models for education and outreach. Credit: University of Kansas A new endeavor among 16 research institutions will create high-resolution, digital three-dimensional images of internal anatomy across a host of vertebrate biodiversity, making the data freely available to researchers and the public. Using the images, educators, scientists and a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small increases in complications when knee replacement done as outpatient procedure December 13, 2017 - Some complications are more common when total knee replacement surgery is done as an outpatient or same-day procedure, reports a study in the December 6, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery . The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer . Compared to conventional inpatient surgery, patients undergoing outpatient total knee arthroplasty (TKA) expe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sepsis kills most in ICUs, with 55.7 percent mortality rate Brazil has an extremely high rate of mortality from sepsis in intensive care units (ICUs), surpassing even mortality due to stroke and heart attack in ICUs. According to a survey conducted by researchers at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) and the Latin American Sepsis Institute (LASI), more than 230,000 adults die from sepsis in ICUs every year. Even more alarmingly, 55.7% of sepsis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use WWII code-breaking techniques to interpret brain dataA team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Northwestern University have used cryptographic techniques to decode the activity of motor neurons. Their approach has allowed them to predict, from brain data, and with only generic knowledge of typical movements, which direction monkeys will move their arms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars mission sheds light on habitability of distant planets To receive the same amount of starlight as Mars receives from our sun, a planet orbiting an M-type red dwarf would have to be positioned much closer to its star than Mercury is to the sun. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center How long might a rocky, Mars-like planet be habitable if it were orbiting a red dwarf star? It's a complex question but one that NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimpanzee deaths in Uganda pinned on human cold virus A two-year-old chimp named Betty, who succumbed to the virus. Credit: Richard Wrangham In the wild, chimpanzees face any number of dire threats, ranging from poachers to predators to deforestation. That's why scientists, investigating an outbreak of respiratory disease in a community of wild chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park, were surprised and dismayed to discover that a human "common
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Live Science
Icy Images: Antarctica Will Amaze You in Incredible Aerial ViewsNASA's Operation IceBridge continues to snap gorgeous images of the planet's chilly bottom, revealing the beauty and dynamics of Antarctica's expansive ice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Layering in cafe lattes yields insights for engineering, medicine and environment Princeton researchers explore the nature of tiered fluids such as cafe latte. Credit: Sameer Khan/Fotobuddy For anyone who has marveled at the richly colored layers in a cafe latte, you're not alone. Princeton researchers, likewise intrigued, have now revealed how this tiered structure develops when espresso is poured into hot milk. "The structure formation in a latte is surprising because it evo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spanning disciplines in the search for life beyond Earth Left, an image of Earth from the DSCOVR-EPIC camera. Right, the same image degraded to a resolution of 3-by-3 pixels, similar to what researchers will see in future exoplanet observations. Credit: NOAA/NASA/DSCOVR The search for life beyond Earth is riding a surge of creativity and innovation. Following a gold rush of exoplanet discovery over the past two decades, it is time to tackle the next st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant storms cause palpitations in Saturn's atmospheric heartbeat Saturn as seen by the Cassini spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Immense northern storms on Saturn can disturb atmospheric patterns at the planet's equator, finds the international Cassini mission in a study led by Dr Leigh Fletcher from the University of Leicester. This effect is also seen in Earth's atmosphere, suggesting the two planets are more alike than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advance in light filtering technology has implications for LCD screens, lasers and beyond Credit: American Institute of Physics Vector polarizers are a light filtering technology hidden behind the operation of many optical systems. They can be found, for instance, in sunglasses, LCD screens, microscopes, microprocessors, laser machining and more. Optical physicists from Nanjing and Nankai University, China, and the University of Central Florida, U.S., published details of their new ve
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Blog » Languages » English
Sledding Vs Skating: Sledding Wins! It was a great battle of two winter sports As members of each team all took to their forts In the snowy white weather we all had our fun But in the end there could only be one! Our winner is sledding a time of great joy As you shoot down a hill with other girls and boys. Best to find a big one, get up really quite high And over powdery snowbanks you surely will fly! Leaderboard:
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Live Science
The Arctic Ice Is Dying The Arctic "shows no sign of returning to [the] reliably frozen region of past decades," according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) annual Arctic Report Card. The 2017 report card primarily covers the period from October 2016 to September 2017. NOAA releases its report card each December to sum up the previous October-to-September year in the northern latitude
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Steroid study sheds light on long term side effects of medicines Fresh insights into key hormones found in commonly prescribed medicines have been discovered, providing further understanding of the medicines' side effects. The study in immune cells may help to explain why some people develop resistance to these drugs, which have powerful anti-inflammatory benefits. Its findings are significant because glucocorticoid hormones - also known as steroids - are also
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PrEP could make US easily hit its 2020 HIV prevention goal, Drexel U. study finds If just a quarter of men who have same-sex intercourse and are at a high risk for HIV used daily preventive medicine, three out of every 10 HIV infections could be averted, according to a new Drexel University study. Michael T. LeVasseur, PhD, and Neal D. Goldstein, PhD, from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, used a 10,000 person model of high-HIV-risk men who have sex with men (a term u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advance in light filtering technology has implications for LCD screens, lasers and beyond WASHINGTON, D.C., December 13, 2017 -- Vector polarizers are a light filtering technology hidden behind the operation of many optical systems. They can be found, for instance, in sunglasses, LCD screens, microscopes, microprocessors, laser machining and more. Optical physicists from Nanjing and Nankai University, China, and the University of Central Florida, U.S., published details of their new v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mars mission sheds light on habitability of distant planets How long might a rocky, Mars-like planet be habitable if it were orbiting a red dwarf star? It's a complex question but one that NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission can help answer. "The MAVEN mission tells us that Mars lost substantial amounts of its atmosphere over time, changing the planet's habitability," said David Brain, a MAVEN co-investigator and a professor at the Labor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spanning disciplines in the search for life beyond Earth The search for life beyond Earth is riding a surge of creativity and innovation. Following a gold rush of exoplanet discovery over the past two decades, it is time to tackle the next step: determining which of the known exoplanets are proper candidates for life. Scientists from NASA and two universities presented new results dedicated to this task in fields spanning astrophysics, Earth science, h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malignant mitochondria as a target Killing malignant mitochondria is one of the most promising approaches in the development of new anticancer drugs. Scientists from the UK have now synthesized a copper-containing peptide that is readily taken up by mitochondria in breast cancer stem cells, where it effectively induces apoptosis. The study, which has been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , also highlights the powerful th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzee deaths in Uganda pinned on human cold virus MADISON, Wis. -- In the wild, chimpanzees face any number of dire threats, ranging from poachers to predators to deforestation. That's why scientists, investigating an outbreak of respiratory disease in a community of wild chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park, were surprised and dismayed to discover that a human "common cold" virus known as rhinovirus C was killing healthy chimps. "This w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A lithium-ion battery inspired by safety glass Researchers in the United States have modified the design of lithium-ion batteries to include slits along the electrodes, a feature which may mitigate the risk of battery failure during automobile accidents. The prototype, presented December 13 in the journal Joule , could allow manufacturers to scale down the housing materials that commonly protect batteries in electric cars from mechanical dama
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate conditions affect solar cell performance more than expected IMAGE: This GIF shows how the difference in performance between the two solar cells vary over time. view more Credit: Ian Marius Peters Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers can now predict how much energy solar cells will produce at any location worldwide. Surprisingly, they identified that two types of solar cells (silicon and cadmium telluride) can vary in energy output by 5% or mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuel IMAGE: This is a photograph of bio-oil, made of caproic acid and caprylic acid, phase separates out at mildly acidic conditions. view more Credit: Lars Angenent, University of Tübingen Consumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now research
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tasting colors? Synesthesia induced with hypnosisHypnosis can alter the way certain individuals information process information in their brain. A new phenomenon was identified by researchers who have successfully used hypnosis to induce a functional analogue of synesthesia. The discovery can open a window into the previously unexplored domains of cognitive neuroscience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Few California retailers offer pharmacist-prescribed birth control, despite lawA new law took effect in California last year allowing pharmacists to prescribe birth control, but few of the state's pharmacies are actually offering this service, according to new research.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Batteries That Crack Like Safety Glass BRIEF: Batteries That Crack Like Safety Glass Researchers create safer batteries with perforations that prevent full-scale failures. safety-glass_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Violetbonmua via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Technology Wednesday, December 13, 2017 - 12:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee have
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuel Photograph of bio-oil, made of caproic acid and caprylic acid, phase separates out at mildly acidic conditions. Credit: Lars Angenent, University of Tübingen Consumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now researchers in the United States an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate conditions affect solar cell performance more than expected This GIF shows how the difference in performance between the two solar cells vary over time. Credit: Ian Marius Peters Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers can now predict how much energy solar cells will produce at any location worldwide. Surprisingly, they identified that two types of solar cells (silicon and cadmium telluride) can vary in energy output by 5% or more in tropical re
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cognitive science
A paper in PSPB makes it clear how hard it is to measure psychological aspects of religious experience across cultures. A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Latest Headlines | Science News
These are the most-read Science News stories of 2017 In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Downside of Net Neutrality “Treating everyone and everything in the same manner,” sounds fair and seems like the right thing to do—except when you’re talking about wireless networks. Here many different types of services are competing for the same limited amount of bandwidth to reach their respective audiences. When we apply net neutrality principles of the 2015 regulatory framework to wireless networks, such proposed equa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even smokers may benefit from targeted lung cancer treatments IMAGE: Dara Aisner, M.D., Ph.D., and collaborators in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium show that, when available, targeted treatments benefit smokers and non-smokers alike. view more Credit: University of Colorado Cancer Center Smokers are less likely than non-smokers to have lung cancers caused by targetable genetic changes. But a study published this week in the journal Clinical Cancer Resea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coffee physics For anyone who has marveled at the richly colored layers in a cafe latte, you're not alone. Princeton researchers, likewise intrigued, have now revealed how this tiered structure develops when espresso is poured into hot milk. "The structure formation in a latte is surprising because it evolves from the chaotic, initial pouring and mixing of fluids into a very organized, distinct arrangement of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism therapy: Social behavior restored via brain stimulation IMAGE: A magnified image of a mouse cerebellar section shows multiple layers. New research shows this part of the brain may be a target for treating autism through brain stimulation. view more Credit: UTSW Scientists are examining the feasibility of treating autistic children with neuromodulation after a new study showed social impairments can be corrected by brain stimulation. The res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disorders Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behaviour, including checking. Although more traditional types of fear -- think snakes, s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Giant storms cause palpitations in Saturn's atmospheric heartbeat Immense northern storms on Saturn can disturb atmospheric patterns at the planet's equator, finds the international Cassini mission in a study led by Dr Leigh Fletcher from the University of Leicester. This effect is also seen in Earth's atmosphere, suggesting the two planets are more alike than previously thought. Despite their considerable differences, the atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Laser-boron fusion now 'leading contender' for energyScientists argue that the path to hydrogen-boron fusion is now viable, and may be closer to realization than other approaches, such as the deuterium-tritium fusion approach currently being pursued.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Urban Cooper's hawks outcompete their rural neighborsDepending on whether a species flourishes in a city environment, urban wildlife populations can be 'sources' or 'sinks,' either reproducing so quickly that individuals leave to colonize the surrounding area or needing constant immigration from outside to stay viable. A new study examines the population dynamics of Cooper's hawks in urban Albuquerque, N.M., and finds that city-born birds aren't jus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stellar nursery blooms into viewThe OmegaCAM camera on ESO's VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29. Many astronomical phenomena can be seen in this giant image, including cosmic dust and gas clouds that reflect, absorb, and re-emit the light of hot young stars within the nebula.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Father's rejection may increase child's social anxiety, lonelinessHealthy relationships with their parents are vital for adolescents' development and well-being, according to researchers who say rejection from fathers may lead to increases in social anxiety and loneliness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High relationship quality in same-sex couplesA new Family Relations study provides robust evidence against deep-rooted social perceptions of same-sex relationships being conflictual, unhappy, and dysfunctional.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health testsResearchers have developed a biosensor that enables creating a range of new easy-to-use health tests similar to home pregnancy tests. The plasmonic biosensor can detect diseased exosomes even by the naked eye. A rapid analysis by biosensors helps recognize inflammatory bowel diseases, cancer and other diseases rapidly and start relevant treatments in time. In addition to using discovery in biomedi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
North Sea water and recycled metal combined to help reduce global warmingScientists have used sea water collected from Whitby in North Yorkshire, and scrap metal to develop a technology that could help capture more than 850 million tons of unwanted carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving cyber security in harsh environmentsMany people don't worry about the security of their personal information until it's too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme environmental conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Batteries: Catching radical molecules before they disappearResearchers have managed to stabilize short-lived radical ions which could be used for rechargeable batteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers develop new model to predict which universities student athletes will attendWith revenue from college football at an unprecedented $3.4 billion annually, universities across the country invest millions each year in recruitment efforts for high school football players. But with talented players typically receiving multiple scholarship offers, team rosters are in limbo until student athletes commit to a university. However, a new study shares how social media can provide un
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New Scientist - News
Sad ‘pigs’ have been filmed apparently mourning a dead friend Social bonds in peccaries appear to survive beyond death Dante de Kort/Mariana Altrichter/Sara Cortez & Micaela Camino By Elizabeth Preston PIG-LIKE animals called peccaries have been seen apparently mourning their dead. The discovery adds to the growing list of species that have exhibited signs of grief. It came from a science fair project. Peccaries are hoofed mammals found in the Americas.
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The Atlantic
The Environmental Cost of Internet Porn Online streaming is a win for the environment. Streaming music eliminates all that physical material—CDs, jewel cases, cellophane, shipping boxes, fuel—and can reduce carbon-dioxide emissions by 40 percent or more . Video streaming is still being studied , but the carbon footprint should similarly be much lower than that of DVDs. Scientists who analyze the environmental impact of the internet tou
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Live Science
Firefighters May Face Additional Foe: Increased Skin Cancer Risk Firefighters may have a higher risk of skin cancer than the general public, a new study finds. The study analyzed information from about 2,400 firefighters in South Florida. Participants answered questions about whether they had past skin-cancer diagnoses, as well as what kind of sun protection (including sunscreen) they used and whether they had been screened for skin cancer or had other skin ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTHealth study finds that male virgins can still acquire HPV IMAGE: Alan Nyitray, Ph.D. view more Credit: UTHealth HOUSTON - (Dec. 13, 2017) - Men who have never engaged in sexual intercourse are still at risk for acquiring HPV, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. The study included 87 male virgins betwe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Habitat counts when predators lurk Take it from the lowly snail: If you're on a beach and threatened by predators, run for that nearby forest. Your chance of survival will rise, if only a little bit. That may be a plot point in many a bad B-movie, but its strategy has a basis in reality. Nick Keiser, a Rice Academy postdoctoral fellow in the Department of BioSciences at Rice University, demonstrated as much in a study of predator-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ultra-thin diamond membrane is a radiobiologist's best friendMeasuring dosage of radiation can be challenging, especially when working with low-energy protons, but researchers have now developed an ultra-thin diamond membrane that can measure the number of protons in a radiation dose with almost perfect accuracy. The detector attaches to a charged-particle microbeam and enables the delivery of radiation to an area less than 2 micrometers wide. The study, pu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers create plants that glow IMAGE: Illumination of a book ('Paradise Lost,' by John Milton) with the nanobionic light-emitting plants (two 3.5-week-old watercress plants). The book and the light-emitting watercress plants were placed in front of... view more Credit: Seon-Yeong Kwak CAMBRIDGE, MA -- Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your des
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertilityResearchers at IRB Barcelona unravel the role of the histone BigH1 in the development of male sex cells from stem cells.The study, which was performed in Drosophila melanogaster, paves the way to a greater understanding of male infertility. Published in Cell Reports, the work sheds light on the mechanisms through which histones regulate how stem cells give rise to differentiated cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
175 years on, study finds where you live still determines your life expectancy Researchers at the University of Liverpool revisited a study carried out 175 years ago which compared the health and life expectancy of people in different parts of the United Kingdom, including Liverpool, to see if its findings still held true. They found that stark differences still exist and that people living in Liverpool still had lower life expectancy than those living in the rural area of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New MRI tech could help doctors detect heart disease with better accuracy IMAGE: This is Amber Doiron, research assistant professor in the biomedical engineering department at Binghamton University. view more Credit: Binghamton University, State University of New Yor BINGHAMTON, NY- Doctors might be able to better detect any disease or disorder that involves inflammation thanks to a new MRI imaging technology co-developed by faculty at Binghamton University, Stat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human-caused warming likely intensified Hurricane Harvey's rainsNew research shows human-induced climate change increased the amount and intensity of Hurricane Harvey's unprecedented rainfall.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flight speed of birds is more complex than previously thoughtThe flight speed of birds is more complex than research has previously managed to show. Researchers have found that birds use multiple -- each one simple yet effective -- methods to control their speed in the air and compensate for tailwind, headwind and sidewind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noise sens­it­iv­ity vis­ible in brain struc­turesA new study suggests that noise sensitivity can be seen in the grey matter volume of brain structures linked to emotional and interoceptive processing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cocktail effects of pesticides and environmental chemicalsResearchers have addressed an international environmental problem by developing a model that can predict how certain chemicals amplify the effects of pesticides and other chemical compounds. Pesticide expert hopes that it will make environmental legislation easier.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop new artificial ovary prototypeResearchers have taken important steps towards creating transplantable artificial ovaries. Once successful, these could be of value to women struggling with infertility or cancer patients who cannot conceive after undergoing radiation or chemotherapy. The research team has identified a protein formulation that closely resembles the structure and rigidity of the natural tissue lining a woman's ovar
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anti-stress compound reduces obesity and diabetesFor the first time, scientists could demonstrate that a stress protein found in muscle has a diabetes promoting effect. This finding could pave the way to a completely new treatment approach.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells sense neighborhood density to make decisions on their behaviorHuman skin is a remarkable organ serving as a barrier protecting us from pathogens, toxic substances and others. Our skin needs to constantly renew throughout our lifetime as well as change its size to perfectly fit and cover the body. To fulfill such a complex and dynamic behavior every cell within the skin has a specific task dependent on its position. Scientists have now shown that cell density
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does eclipse equal night in plant life?As the Aug. 21 eclipse approached, researchers prepared to understand plants' response to light and temperature. The varied results have left the researchers with interesting questions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular self-digestion process triggers autoimmune diseaseAutophagy allows cells to degrade and recycle their cellular components. Researchers have now demonstrated that the autophagy machinery in certain immune cells leads to the immune system attacking the central nervous system. The researchers are using these findings as a basis to look into new approaches to treating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
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New Scientist - News
Giant tortoises are rare today but once roamed four continents Its ancestors roamed the continents for millions of years Frans Lanting/FLPA By Colin Barras TORTOISES evolved into giants on at least seven occasions and on four continents. The finding undermines the long-standing idea that tortoises become enormous only if they are stranded on remote islands. There are more than 40 species of tortoise , the most spectacular being the giant tortoises. On th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alexa, can I do my holiday shopping through you? In this Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, file photo, an Amazon Echo Dot is displayed during a program announcing several new Amazon products by the company, in Seattle. A test by an AP reporter finds that the virtual assistant Alexa inside the Echo Dot is good at reordering stuff bought previously on Amazon. But asking it to order new items was trickier, and it's definitely not for browsing. (AP Photo/
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ultra-thin diamond membrane is a radiobiologist's best friend The ultra-thin diamond membrane detects individual protons as they pass through, allowing researchers to irradiate micron-sized areas on living cells for radiobiology experiments. Credit: Philippe Barberet Depending on the dose and the target, radiation can cause incredible damage to healthy cells or it can be used to treat cancer and other diseases. To understand how cells respond to different d
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Big Think
Why China Isn't Taking America's Garbage Anymore—Literally Most of us don’t think of what happens to the plastic items we put in the recycling bin. It’s a matter of out of sight, out of mind. Some believe manufacturers turn them all into new products, but is that the case? What really happens after that plastic bottle leaves your hand? In truth, only 9.5% of all plastic in the U.S. is recycled . Surprisingly, 15% is burned for electricity or heat. Abou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Specially designed protein fights several species of bacteriaAs resistance to existing antibiotics increases, new approaches to serious bacterial infections are needed. Now researchers have investigated one such alternative.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modulating immune responsesThe protein Roquin plays a key role in the regulation of immune reactions. Researchers have now uncovered details of the mechanism by which it controls the function of regulatory T cells in the adaptive arm of the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New active ingredients from the toolbox: Design, biotechnological production of new peptide-based active ingredientsMicroorganisms often produce natural products in a step-by-step manner similar to an assembly line. Examples of such enzymes are non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. Researchers have now succeeded in designing these enzymes in such a way that they can produce completely new natural products.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dinosaur parasites trapped in 100-million-year-old amber tell blood-sucking storyFossilized ticks discovered trapped and preserved in amber show that these parasites sucked the blood of feathered dinosaurs almost 100 million years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Efforts of bacteria to defend against predators is so great that few resources left for offspringEven bacteria have enemies -- in water, for example, single-celled ciliates preferably feed on microbes. The microbes protect themselves against predators by employing a variety of tricks, which the ciliates, in turn, attempt to overcome. There ensues an evolutionary competition for the best attack and defense mechanisms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UVB radiation influences behavior of sticklebacksFish cannot see ultraviolet B rays but still change their behavior when they grow up under increased UVB intensity. According to studies by biologists, on three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) increased UVB leads to a smaller body size and more risk-seeking behavior when faced with predators. Climate change is likely to increase UVB intensity, possibly with consequences for ecosystems
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pictures in your head -- the secret of beautiful poemsThe more a poem evokes vivid sensory imagery, the more we like it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regionsThe oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regions may contain ice that formed during the Stone Age -- more than 600,000 years ago, long before modern humans appeared.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing 'Avatar'-like glowing plants to the real worldThe 2009 film 'Avatar' created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report a way to infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fossil orphans reunited with their parents after half a billion yearsEveryone wants to be with their family over the holidays, but spare a thought for a group of orphan fossils that have been separated from their parents since the dawn of animal evolution, over half a billion years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Mannequin Skywalker' rides Blue Origin's new crew capsule (Update) (Phys.org)—Astronomers report the detection of new eruptions in two luminous blue variables, known as R 40 and R 110, located in the Magellanic Clouds. The finding, presented December 5 in a paper published on the arXiv ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
T-Mobile unveils plans for US pay TV service US wireless carrier T-Mobile said Wednesday it would launch a pay TV service in 2018, aiming to disrupt the dominant cable and satellite providers. The number three US wireless firm, controlled by German-based Deutsche Telekom, said it had acquired Layer3 TV, a startup offering cable and internet service in five cities. T-Mobile offered no financial terms of the acquisition. It provided few d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective Researchers created a prototype smart glass that is retroreflective (left) and becomes clear (right) when a liquid with optical properties similar to the reflective structure is pumped into a chamber in front of the structure. Credit: Keith Goossen, University of Delaware Researchers have demonstrated prototype windows that switch from reflective to clear with the simple addition of a liquid. The
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Science | The Guardian
Baby survives after being born with heart outside her body - video Vanellope Hope Wilkins, who had her first surgery within an hour of delivery, is believed to be the first baby in the UK to survive the extremely rare condition ectopia cordis, where she is born with her heart and part of her stomach growing externally. Her parents, Naomi Findlay and Dean Wilkins, were advised to consider terminating the pregnancy, but they decided against it. Vanellope has had t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do bacteria adapt? IMAGE: To survive a changing supply of nutrients, bacteria developed strategies to adapt their metabolism. Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD)... view more Credit: Johannes Wiedersich / TUM A fundamental prerequisite for life on earth is the ability of living organisms to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Phy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective WASHINGTON -- Researchers have demonstrated prototype windows that switch from reflective to clear with the simple addition of a liquid. The new switchable windows are easy to manufacture and could one day keep parked cars cool in the sun or make office buildings more energy efficient. The technology can also be used to make roof panels that keep houses cool in the summer and warm in the winter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your smartphone's next trick? Fighting cybercrime. IMAGE: Like bullets fired from a gun, photos can be traced to individual smartphones, opening up new ways to prevent identity theft. view more Credit: Douglas Levere, University at Buffalo. BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Not comfortable with Face ID and other biometrics? This cybersecurity advancement may be for you. A University at Buffalo-led team of researchers has discovered how to identify smartp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Structure of channelrhodopsin determined Optogenetics enables specific nerve cells to be turned on and off using special light-sensitive 'protein switches'. One of the most important of these switches is Channelrhodopsin 2, the first 'light switch protein' to have been successfully expressed in nerve cells. Today it is used in laboratories worldwide, having played a key role in launching the field of optogenetics, an indispensable techn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research letter examines firefighters and skin cancer risk What: Report of survey data collected from firefighters about skin cancer Why: To examine skin cancer history, skin cancer screening and sun protection habits among active Florida firefighters Why This Is Interesting: Research on risk factors and occupational hazards related to skin cancer in firefighters is limited. Results: Overall, 109 cases of skin cancer were reported among 2,399 firef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medication helps decrease opioid use following surgery Bottom Line: Patients who received the nonopioid pain medication gabapentin before and after surgery were somewhat more likely to stop using opioids after surgery. Why The Research Is Interesting: Millions of Americans undergo surgery each year and most are prescribed opioids for pain management. Some of these patients become chronic users of opioids. Who and When : Patients scheduled for sur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explores use of ADHD medications during pregnancy and risk of birth defects Adults, including women of reproductive age, are increasingly being prescribed medications to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) but little evidence has been available about whether exposure to these drugs during early pregnancy may increase the risk of birth defects. A new study conducted by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in collaboration with investigat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased air pollution linked to bad teenage behavior A new study linking higher levels of air pollution to increased teenage delinquency is a reminder of the importance of clean air and the need for more foliage in urban spaces, a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher said. Tiny pollution particles called particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) -- 30 times smaller than a strand of hair -- are extremely harmful to your health, according to Diana Younan,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds links between deforestation and fisheries yields in the Amazon IMAGE: A fisherman holds a tambaqui, a large species of freshwater fish that is highly prized. It feeds mainly on tree fruits found in floodplain forests. Photo by Leandro Castello. view more Credit: Leandro Castello, Virginia Tech The conversion of tropical forests to crop and pastureland has long been a concern for scientists, as forest loss can lead to decreased rainfall, increased dro
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Ingeniøren
Transportministeriet: 25 procents rabat til lastbiler over Storebælt flytter ikke gods fra bane til vej Selv om prisen for at køre over Storebælt med en lastbil bliver sat ned med 25 procent over de næste fem år, vil det ikke få en eneste af de virksomheder, der i dag sender deres gods over bæltet på skinner, til at vælge asfalt i stedet. Sådan lyder vurderingen fra Transport-, Bygnings- og Boligministeriet. »Der er i beregningerne af de trafikale effekter af lavere Storebæltstakster ikke indregnet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vehicles could get 'nerves' that sense damage with new research Oliver Myers (right) and mechanical engineering master's student Brandon Williams work with some of the smart material they are developing at Clemson University. Credit: Clemson University Helicopters, tanks and other vehicles could someday be made of "smart material" that senses damage, similar to how nerves tell the body it has been injured, with the help of new research based at Clemson Univer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Residual strain despite mega earthquake The Nazca plate moves eastwards with a rate of 6.6 cm per year. Off the Chilean coast it collides with the South American plate and is submerged beneath it. In this process, strains build up between the plates - until they break and the earth trembles. Credit: Image reproduced from the GEBCO world map 2014, gebco.net On Christmas Day 2016, the earth trembled in southern Chile. In the same region,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Every grain of sand is a metropolis for bacteria The green spots are stained bacteria, which have mainly colonized depressions on the grain. Credit: MPIMM/CC-SA BY 4.0 Just imagine, you are sitting on a sunny beach, contentedly letting the warm sand trickle through your fingers. Millions of sand grains. What you probably can't imagine: at the same time, billions upon billions of bacteria are also trickling through your fingers. Between 10,000 a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creating surfaces that repel water and control its flowTo prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it's pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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New Scientist - News
Mars overdue a planet-wide dust storm that could harm the rovers Malin space science systems, MGS, JPL, NASA By Shannon Hall Temperature differences spawned this storm at Mars’s north pole LARGE dust storms on Mars might have far-reaching effects. They can affect the entire atmosphere, possibly seeding new weather systems that can combine to form planet-wide storms unlike anything we see on Earth. Dust storms are not uncommon on Mars . Local ones are those
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New Scientist - News
England’s shift to opt-out organ donation will save many lives More donations needed Stephen Barnes/Medical/Alamy Hundreds of people die each year in England simply because of a lack of organs available for transplant. That’s why the organisation I work for, the British Medical Association (BMA), welcomes the government’s announcement of a “soft” opt-out system, something we have spent 18 years campaigning for. It could save many of those lives. Our hope
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows default choices matter, especially for poorer, less educated individuals Between 2000 and 2007, the telemarketing firm Suntasia charged hundreds of thousands of customers an average of $239 each for essentially worthless subscriptions. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Indiana University and U.S. government agencies took advantage of a resulting federal lawsuit against the company to test default choice architecture when the optimal choice was clear: End the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers capture oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regions Lonnie Thompson, Distinguished University Professor in the School of Earth Sciences at The Ohio State University, cuts an ice core retrieved from the Guliya Ice Cap in the Kunlun Mountains in Tibet in 2015. Credit: Giuliano Bertagna, the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center. The oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regions may contain ice that formed during the Stone Age—more than 600
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The Atlantic
2017 in Pop: Revenge of the Strummer Boy When Prince Charles awarded Ed Sheeran membership in the Order of the British Empire last week , it underscored what an extraordinary year the 26-year-old singer has had. His 2017 hit “Shape of You” is the most streamed song ever on Spotify. His album Divide , is the second-best-selling album of the year, certified Double Platinum by the RIAA. His recent duet with Beyoncé just gave her her first
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Feed: All Latest
The Only Place You Can Legally Climb a Redwood Dangling like a piñata from a polyester rope, I’m inching up a 1,000-year-old tree named Grand­father. This forest in Northern California’s Santa Cruz Mountains is said to be the only place where one can legally climb a redwood. I’ve covered about 100 feet in 30 minutes, halfway to the top. Suspended in my saddle—a sort of swing-meets-­diaper—I try to maneuver around a thick branch and accidental
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover mechanism that allows rapid signal transmission between nerve cells The manner in which individual nerve cells communicate is fundamental to human brain function. Signal transmission occurs via highly complex contact points called 'synapses'. Here, incoming signals effect the release of transmitters from stores known as 'vesicles', which fuse with the adjoining cell membranes in order to transmit the signal. This fusion is only possible once vesicles and membrane
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers induced a form of synesthesia with hypnosisHypnosis can alter the way certain individuals information process information in their brain. A new phenomenon was identified by researchers from the University of Skövde in Sweden and the University of Turku in Finland, who have successfully used hypnosis to induce a functional analogue of synesthesia. The discovery can open a window into the previously unexplored domains of cognitive neuroscien
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows default choices matter, especially for poorer, less educated individualsResearchers took advantage of a resulting federal lawsuit against a fraudulent company to test default choice architecture when the optimal choice was clear: end the subscriptions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Every grain of sand is a metropolis for bacteria IMAGE: The green spots are stained bacteria, which have mainly colonized depressions on the grain. view more Credit: MPIMM/CC-SA BY 4.0 Just imagine, you are sitting on a sunny beach, contentedly letting the warm sand trickle through your fingers. Millions of sand grains. What you probably can't imagine: at the same time, billions upon billions of bacteria are also trickling through your fingers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Residual strain despite mega earthquake On 22 May 1960, an earthquake shook the southern Chilean continental margin on a length of about 1,000 kilometers. Estimates suggest that around 1,600 people died as a direct result of the quake and the following tsunami, leaving around two million people homeless. With a strength of 9.5 on the moment magnitude scale, the Valdivia earthquake from 1960 still ranks number one on the list of stronge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Creating surfaces that repel water and control its flow (video) IMAGE: Repelling water droplets and controlling their flow depends on water maintaining its spherical shape. Watch this Headline Science video .... view more Credit: American Chemical Society. To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Success stories from Kenya's first makerspace | Kamau GachigiAfrica needs engineers, but its engineering students often end up working at auditing firms and banks. Why? Kamau Gachigi suspects it's because they don't have the spaces and materials needed to test their ideas and start businesses. To solve this problem, Gachigi started Gearbox, a makerspace and hardware accelerator that provides a rapid prototyping environment for both professionals and people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds links between deforestation and fisheries yields in the Amazon A fisherman holds a tambaqui, a large species of freshwater fish that is highly prized. It feeds mainly on tree fruits found in floodplain forests. Photo by Leandro Castello. Credit: Leandro Castello, Virginia Tech The conversion of tropical forests to crop and pastureland has long been a concern for scientists, as forest loss can lead to decreased rainfall, increased droughts, and degraded fresh
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Popular Science
What to do if you're in a crowd of panicking people On December 11, 2017, a pipe bomb detonated at the Port Authority bus station in New York City. Five people were injured from the blast, but no one was seriously harmed in the quick evacuation that followed. That’s not always the case. In 2005 reports of a bomber in Baghdad left 960 people crushed on to death on a bridge. A 2015 stampede in Mina, Saudi Arabia, the city where pilgrims stay while v
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Ingeniøren
Her er hovedpunkterne i ny togaftale S-togene skal automatiseres og driften skal privatiseres i et såkaldt Offentligt-Privat Partnerskabs-udbud (OPP). Det er de væsentligste dele af den nye aftale mellem Regeringen, Dansk Folkeparti og Radikale Venstre. Desuden skal Kystbanen udskilles fra Øresundstrafikken. Aftalen betyder, at i alt 68 procent af DSB's passagerer fremover skal køre med privatejede tog. Introduktionen af førerløse t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Technology detecting RNase activityScientists have developed new technology to detect the activity of RNase H, a RNA degrading enzyme. The team used highly efficient signal amplification reaction termed catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) to effectively analyze the RNase H activity. Considering that RNase H is required in the proliferation of retroviruses such as HIV, this research finding could contribute to AIDS treatments in the fu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synchrony of waves: Collective dynamicsResearchers report that endocytosis, which was previously thought to be a random process, actually occurs in a coordinated manner through collective dynamics. The work showed how a major endocytic pathway mediated by the protein clathrin, was found to commence with periodic traveling waves of clathrin, which were coupled temporally and spatially to downstream cortical actin waves. Clathrin endocyt
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Perking up and crimping the 'bristles' of polyelectrolyte brushesA molecular-sized brush that looks like a shoe brush has properties with great potential for the materials industry and medicine, but polyelectrolyte brushes can be sensitive, and getting them to work right tricky. New research shows what can make them break down, but also what can get them to systematically recover.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NHS could save £200m a year and improve patient satisfaction, new research reveals New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) suggests that NHS Trusts in England could save more than £200 million a year by managing staff well. The report, published today by the What Works Centre for Wellbeing, found Trusts that made the most extensive use of good people management practices were over three times more likely to have the lowest levels of staff sickness abs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AGU Fall Meeting: Human-caused warming likely intensified Hurricane Harvey's rains The following release and accompanying images can be found at: http://news. agu. org/ press-release/ agu-fall-meeting-human-caused-warming-likely-intensified-hurricane-harveys-rains/ AGU Fall Meeting: Human-caused warming likely intensified Hurricane Harvey's rains Ernest N. Morial Convention Center New Orleans, Louisiana 11-15 December 2017 AGU Contacts: Nanci Bompey +1 (914) 552-5759 nbompey@ag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing 'Avatar'-like glowing plants to the real world IMAGE: Plants infused with the luminescence of fireflies could help reduce our dependence on conventional lighting. view more Credit: American Chemical Society The 2009 film "Avatar" created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report in ACS'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Defence at almost any price IMAGE: The predatory ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila feeds on bacteria. view more Credit: L. Becks Even bacteria have enemies - in water, for example, single-celled ciliates preferably feed on microbes. The microbes protect themselves against predators by employing a variety of tricks, which the ciliates, in turn, attempt to overcome. There ensues an evolutionary competition for the best at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers capture oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regions New Orleans--The oldest ice core ever drilled outside the polar regions may contain ice that formed during the Stone Age--more than 600,000 years ago, long before modern humans appeared. Researchers from the United States and China are now studying the core--nearly as long as the Empire State Building is tall--to assemble one of the longest-ever records of Earth's climate history. What they'v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial minorities less likely to see a doctor for psoriasis IMAGE: A case of severe psoriasis. view more Credit: Penn Medicine PHILADELPHIA - Despite the fact that their disease may be more severe, a new study shows minorities are less likely than white Americans to see a doctor for psoriasis treatment. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that black, Asian, and other non-Hispanic minorities are about 40
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pictures in your head -- the secret of beautiful poems IMAGE: Vivid language gives readers the opportunity to see, hear or feel things through their imagination and thus to experience a quasi-sensual dimension when reading. view more Credit: public domain A new study by New York University and the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics shows that vivid pictorial language has the greatest influence on the aesthetic appeal of poetry. The results
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UVB radiation influences behavior of sticklebacks Fish cannot see ultraviolet B rays but still change their behavior when they grow up under increased UVB intensity. According to studies by biologists at the University of Bonn on three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), increased UVB leads to a smaller body size and more risk-seeking behavior when faced with predators. Climate change is likely to increase UVB intensity, possibly with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crowding in the skin Human skin is a remarkable organ serving as a barrier protecting us from pathogens, toxic substances and others. Our skin needs to constantly renew throughout our lifetime as well as change its size to perfectly fit and cover the body. To fulfill such a complex and dynamic behavior every cell within the skin has a specific task dependent on its position. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial usesWhile human-made devices inspired by gecko feet have emerged in recent years, enabling their wearers to slowly scale a glass wall, the possible applications of gecko-adhesion technology go far beyond Spiderman-esque antics. A researcher is looking into how the technology could be applied in a high-precision industrial setting, such as in robot arms used in manufacturing computer chips.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The public fear sharks less when they understand their behaviorResearchers surveyed more than 500 visitors to an aquarium 'shark tunnel' to understand how attitudes to sharks and government shark policies can change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotexturing creates bacteria-killing spikes on stainless steel surfacesBy using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteria while not harming mammalian cells. If additional research supports early test results, the process might be used to attack microbial contamination on implantable medical devices and on food processing equipment made with the metal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish and ships: Vessel traffic reduces communication ranges for Atlantic cod, haddockScientists studying sounds made by Atlantic cod and haddock at spawning sites in the Gulf of Maine have found that vessel traffic noise is reducing the distance over which these animals can communicate with each other. As a result, daily behavior, feeding, mating, and socializing during critical biological periods for these commercially and ecologically important fish may be altered, according to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Voices and emotions: The forehead is the key Gestures and facial expressions betray our emotional state but what about our voices? How does simple intonation allow us to decode emotions - on the telephone, for example? By observing neuronal activity in the brain, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have been able to map the cerebral regions we use to interpret and categorise vocal emotional representations. The res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doctor re-examines evidence on UTIs in patients with spinal cord injury IMAGE: Dr. Andrei Krassioukov is a professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia and chair in rehabilitation research with ICORD. view more Credit: UBC and ICORD People with spinal cord injuries rely on catheters to empty their bladder. When a well-respected publication concluded that catheters could be reused without an increased risk of infection, it didn't sit right with a Vancou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-stress compound reduces obesity and diabetes For the first time, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich could prove that a stress protein found in muscle has a diabetes promoting effect. This finding could pave the way to a completely new treatment approach. For some time, researchers have known that the protein FKBP51 is associated with depression and anxiety disorders. It is involved in the regulation of the st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop new artificial ovary prototype Belgian researchers have taken important steps towards creating transplantable artificial ovaries. Once successful, these could be of value to women struggling with infertility or cancer patients who cannot conceive after undergoing radiation or chemotherapy. The research team has identified a protein formulation that closely resembles the structure and rigidity of the natural tissue lining a wom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Laser-boron fusion now 'leading contender' for energy A laser-driven technique for creating fusion that dispenses with the need for radioactive fuel elements and leaves no toxic radioactive waste is now within reach, say researchers. Dramatic advances in powerful, high-intensity lasers are making it viable for scientists to pursue what was once thought impossible: creating fusion energy based on hydrogen-boron reactions. And an Australian physicist
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'The mountains can drive us to madness' IMAGE: Researcher Hermann Brugger of Eurac Research (Italy). view more Credit: Katharina Huefner A mountaineer thinks he is being pursued, starts talking nonsense or changes his route without rhyme or reason. That alpinists can suffer psychotic episodes at extreme altitudes is relatively well known, and has been frequently mentioned in mountain literature. Up to now, doctors have generally associ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model makes us wiser on cocktail effects The ability of chemical combinations to precipitate a cocktail effect is acknowledged. We can also calculate the impacts of various chemical products ranging from shampoos to pesticides. However, critical exceptions add uncertainty to these calculations. One group of chemicals, known as synergistic chemicals, makes it hard to accurately calculate chemical effects. Simply put, synergistic chemical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise sens­it­iv­ity vis­ible in brain struc­tures Recent functional studies conducted at the University of Helsinki and Aarhus University suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. Now, the researchers have found that noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in selected brain structures previous
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insilico to present the recent advances in AI for aging research at the 25th annual A4M Conference IMAGE: Insilico Medicine will give a lecture at at 25th Annual World Congress, 14-16 Dec 2017, organized by American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M) on the latest advances in artificial... view more Credit: Insilico Medicine Wednesday, 13th of December, 2017, Baltimore, MD - Insilico Medicine, a Baltimore-based company specializing in the application of artificial intelligence for drug
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World e-waste rises 8 percent by weight in 2 years as incomes rise, prices fall: UN-backed report IMAGE: It is expected that the following three EEE categories, which already constitute 75 percent of global e-waste by weight (33.6 Mt of 44.7 Mt), will also see the fastest growth.... view more Credit: Global E-waste Monitor 2017 A new report on global e-waste - discarded products with a battery or plug - shows a staggering 44.7 million metric tonnes (Mt) generated in 2016 - up 3.3 Mt or 8% fro
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Popular Science
Welcome to the smart speaker power war By now, we’ve become accustomed to smart speakers shaped vaguely like cans. The original Google Home, the upcoming Apple HomePod, the Amazon Echo and Echo Plus, the UE Blast , the Harmon Kardon Invoke , and a whole pile of others all opt for life as a cylinder. The Google Home Max , however, looks like a traditional speaker, and that leaves lots of room inside for sonic power. What is it? The $40
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Futurity.org
Bee census turns up a new ‘cuckoo’ The first complete bee census has confirmed a new species and revealed that the actual number of bee species in Michigan exceeded earlier estimates. Identifying potential pollinators, including the 38 new bees recorded in the state, is crucial, especially in the face of declining honey bee populations. All pollinators make an estimated $14 billion annual contribution to US agriculture, so it’s im
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Ingeniøren
Samlet folketing afsætter 302 millioner kroner til at bekæmpe husdyr-MRSA Der skal sættes 302 millioner kroner af til at bekæmpe udbredelsen af husdyr-MRSA, og samtidig styrke det veterinære beredskab. Det fremgår af en pressemeddelelse fra Miljø- og Fødevareministeriet. Veterinærforliget er indgået mellem regeringen og alle de øvrige partier i Folketinget. Det forrige veterinærforlig afsatte 220,8 mio. kr. til indsatsen mellem 2013 og 2016. Overvågning af bestandene F
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The Science of When: Hack Your Timing to Optimize Your Life Schedule surgeries, earnings calls, and therapy appointments before noon. Score the biggest bucks by switching jobs every three to five years. The ideal age to get hitched (and avoid divorce): 32. In his new book, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing , Daniel Pink scours psychological, biological, and economic studies to explore what he calls the overlooked dimension. “Timing exerts an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oh my stars! Stage set for 'spectacular' meteor show Geminids Meteor Shower in northern hemisphere. Credit: Asim Patel/ Wikipedia/ CC BY-SA 3.0 A thin, waning moon should allow for uninterrupted views Wednesday night of the annual Geminid shooting star show, set to be "spectacular" this year, astronomers say. At its height, the meteor shower should yield a shooting star every minute, offering plenty of opportunity for wish-making, they said. Peak
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU agrees to catch more fish sustainably in 2018European Union nations have agreed to set quota levels that ensure more sustainable fishing in the northeastern Atlantic and the North Sea, but environmentalists insist the bloc is behind in its schedule to end overfishing by 2020.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN warns of surging e-waste, little recycling The UN warned Wednesday that waste from discarded electronics like mobile phones, laptops and refrigerators is piling up worldwide, and it urged far better recycling of the often hazardous rubbish. A full 44.7 million tonnes of so-called e-waste was generated around the world in 2016, up eight percent from two years earlier, according to a report from the UN's International Telecommunication Unio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studies: Warming made Harvey's deluge 3 times more likelyGlobal warming's fingerprints were all over the record rainfall from Hurricane Harvey this year, confirming what scientists suspected, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian nuclear plant says it emits leaked nuclear isotope In this file photo taken on Friday April 8, 2016, a sign warns people not to enter the town of Ozersk, Chelyabinsk region, Russia, which houses the Mayak nuclear facility. Mayak is a nuclear complex that has been responsible for at least two of the country's biggest radioactive accidents. Russian authorities denied Friday that a radioactivity spike in the air over Europe resulted from a nuclear f
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The Scientist RSS
Women Surveyed About Sexual Harassment Tell Their StoriesMarie Claire speaks with researchers who'd reported abuse in studies of harassment in the field.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals high relationship quality in same-sex couplesA new Family Relations study provides robust evidence against deep-rooted social perceptions of same-sex relationships being conflictual, unhappy, and dysfunctional.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish and ships: Vessel traffic reduces communication ranges for Atlantic cod, haddock NOAA scientists studying sounds made by Atlantic cod and haddock at spawning sites in the Gulf of Maine have found that vessel traffic noise is reducing the distance over which these animals can communicate with each other. As a result, daily behavior, feeding, mating, and socializing during critical biological periods for these commercially and ecologically important fish may be altered, accordi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans can feel molecular differences between nearly identical surfaces Credit: CC0 Public Domain How sensitive is the human sense of touch? Sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has shown. "This is the greatest tactile sensitivity that has ever been shown in humans," said Darren Lipomi, a professor of nanoengineering and member of the C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sniffer dog research could save lives Potentially life-saving sniffer dog research . Credit: University of Lincoln A team of scientists has provided the first evidence that dogs can learn to categorise odours and apply this to scents they have never encountered before. The research reveals how the animals process odour information and is likely to have a profound impact on how we train sniffer dogs . The study, led by researchers a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Instability of antarctic ice makes projecting future sea-level rise difficult IMAGE: Rob DeConto of UMass Amherst offers a new study that combines a well-established sea-level rise projection framework plus a model of Antarctic ice-sheet instability. He and lead author Robert Kopp of... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Authors of a new study that combine a well-established sea-level rise projection framework plus a model of Antarctic ice-sheet instabili
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The flight speed of birds is more complex than previously thought The flight speed of birds is more complex than research has previously managed to show. In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers have found that birds use multiple - each one simple yet effective - methods to control their speed in the air and compensate for tailwind, headwind and sidewind. Last year, biologists Anders Hedenström and Susanne Åkesson showed that the flight spee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New active ingredients from the toolbox FRANKFURT. Microorganisms often produce natural products in a step-by-step manner similar to an assembly line. Examples of such enzymes are non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). Researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have now succeeded in designing these enzymes in such a way that they can produce completely new natural products. Many important therapeutics, such as antibiotics or immun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modulating immune responses The RNA-binding protein Roquin plays a central role in the regulation of the immune system. Among other things, it orchestrates the activation and differentiation of T cells, and prevents immune responses from overshooting. Consequently, loss of Roquin is associated with autoimmune and auto-inflammatory disorders. Detailed knowledge of Roquin's functions is therefore vital for a full understandin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specially designed protein fights several species of bacteria As resistance to existing antibiotics increases, new approaches to serious bacterial infections are needed. Now researchers at Lund University in Sweden, together with colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) in the US, have investigated one such alternative. "We were able to show that a tailor-made protein which previously worked against various kinds of Gram-negative
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology detecting RNase activity Nanoscale (Issue 42, 2017). Credit: KAIST A KAIST research team of Professor Hyun Gyu Park at Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering developed a new technology to detect the activity of RNase H, a RNA degrading enzyme. The team used highly efficient signal amplification reaction termed catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) to effectively analyze the RNase H activity. Considering that RNas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers design thermal 'skin' to maintain temperature of satellites Think keeping your coffee warm is important? Try satellites. If a satellite's temperature is not maintained within its optimal range, its performance can suffer which could mean it could be harder to track wildfires or other natural disasters, your Google maps might not work and your Netflix binge might be interrupted. This might be prevented with a new material recently developed by USC Viterbi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reprogramming bacteria instead of killing them could be the answer to antibiotic resistance Acinetobacter baumannii. Credit: Shutterstock Changing someone's genetic programming is easier than you might think. While techniques for altering DNA at the molecular level are becoming more widely used, it's also possible to simply turn genes on or off without permanently changing the underlying genetic material. That means we can affect the genetic instructions that get sent to an organism's b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple has its investment shoes on this week This Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, file photo shows the Apple logo at a store in Miami Beach, Fla. Apple is investing $390 million in Finisar, a company that makes the lasers used in facial recognition. The investment announced Wednesday, Dec. 13, is the latest from Apple's $1 billion Advanced Manufacturing Fund, dedicated to investments in U.S. manufacturers and creating jobs in the U.S. (AP Photo/Alan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The flight speed of birds is more complex than previously thought Credit: CC0 Public Domain The flight speed of birds is more complex than research has previously managed to show. In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers have found that birds use multiple – each one simple yet effective—methods to control their speed in the air and compensate for tailwind, headwind and sidewind. Last year, biologists Anders Hedenström and Susanne Åkesson showe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New active ingredients from the toolbox Schematic diagram of the “toolbox system” of the NRPS enzymes for the production of new active ingredients. Fragments from natural systems (green, magenta, blue) are reassembled in a new order (centre) and then produce a natural product which has not formed like this in nature before (right). Credit: Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main Microorganisms often produce natural products in a step-by-s
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Scientific American Content: Global
Do Money, Social Status Woes Fuel the U.S. Gun Culture? The U.S. has more guns per person than any other country, a ranking that is unlikely to drop even in the wake of the latest high-casualty mass shootings. Why are guns so pervasive here when they take so many lives (more than 36,000 in 2015)? Which Americans are the most strongly tied to their guns—and why? Baylor University sociologists F. Carson Mencken and Paul Froese tackled these questions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
North Sea water and recycled metal combined to help reduce global warming Scientists at the University of York have used sea water collected from Whitby in North Yorkshire, and scrap metal to develop a technology that could help capture more than 850 million tonnes of unwanted carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. High levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are a major contributor to greenhouse gases and global warming. Carbon overload is mainly the result of burning f
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher pioneers solar sintering for crucial steel component IMAGE: Hockaday used a 2-meter diameter dish-type heliostat that generates highly focused intense heat at 955°C within a small solar furnace containing sample ores about a meter above the heliostat. A small... view more Credit: Lina Hockaday, Mintek Lina Hockaday, Senior Engineer in Pyrometallurgy at Mintek's New Technology Group in South Africa, proposes that solar thermal reactors, able to r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests IMAGE: The carriers containing Ag nanoparticles are covered with various dielectrics of AlN, SiO2 and the composites thereof that are placed on a black background to enhance the reflectivity contrast of... view more Credit: Aalto University Researchers at Aalto University, Finland, have developed a biosensor that enables creating a range of new easy-to-use health tests similar to ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular self-digestion process triggers autoimmune disease Autophagy refers to a fundamental recycling process of cells that occurs in yeast, fungi, plants, as well as animals and humans. This process allows cells to degrade their own components and thus activate energy resources to be able to adapt to nutritional needs. In addition, autophagy plays a central role in steering an organism's immune response. Autoimmune diseases arise from an abnormal immun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mechanism of action for DISC1, psychiatric disorder agent, revealed by scientists IMAGE: This is a human brain organoid specimens derived from fibroblast of a healthy person. view more Credit: Division of Life Science, HKUST DISC1 (disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1), originally identified in a large Scottish family suffering from multiple psychiatric disorders due to a chromosomal translocation-induced disruption, has been established as a genetic risk factor for a wide array
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals high relationship quality in same-sex couples A new Family Relations study provides robust evidence against deep-rooted social perceptions of same-sex relationships being conflictual, unhappy, and dysfunctional. In the study of 25,348 individuals in the United Kingdom and 9,206 individuals in Australia, the level of relationship quality reported by gay/lesbian people was as high as that reported by heterosexual people in the United Kingdom,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catching radical molecules before they disappear While in most molecules, each electron finds a partner to pair up with, some electrons in radical molecules are left alone and unpaired. This configuration grants radicals with some unusual and interesting properties, which disappear as soon as the radicals react or interact with other molecules. It has been difficult to generate relatively stable radicals, because they react and change in the bl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synchrony of waves IMAGE: An artist's impression of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis (CME) occurring as periodic traveling waves on the membrane. Clathin coated vesicles (blue) bud off from wave peaks. Clathrin waves require intermediate PIP3... view more Credit: Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore, report that endoc
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humans can feel molecular differences between nearly identical surfacesHow sensitive is the human sense of touch? Sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has shown. Researchers say this fundamental knowledge will be useful for developing electronic skin, prosthetics that can feel, advanced haptic technology for virtual and augmented realit
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
USC Viterbi faculty design thermal 'skin' to maintain temperature of satellites Think keeping your coffee warm is important? Try satellites. If a satellite's temperature is not maintained within its optimal range, its performance can suffer which could mean it could be harder to track wildfires or other natural disasters, your Google maps might not work and your Netflix binge might be interrupted. This might be prevented with a new material recently developed by USC Viterbi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Technology detecting RNase activity IMAGE: Cover for Nanoscale (Issue 42, 2017). view more Credit: KAIST A KAIST research team of Professor Hyun Gyu Park at Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering developed a new technology to detect the activity of RNase H, a RNA degrading enzyme. The team used highly efficient signal amplification reaction termed catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) to effectively analyze the RNase H acti
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish and ships: Vessel traffic reduces communication ranges for Atlantic cod, haddock NOAA scientists studying sounds made by Atlantic cod and haddock at spawning sites in the Gulf of Maine have found that vessel traffic noise is reducing the distance over which these animals can communicate with each other. As a result, daily behavior, feeding, mating, and socializing during critical biological periods for these commercially and ecologically important fish may be altered, accordi
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Ingeniøren
Valg, vejr og vild med dans. Det googlede danskerne mest i 2017 Nu kan du se, hvad danskerne har googlet mest i 2017. Det er kategorierne Danskere , Kultur og underholdning , Sport , Spørgsmål , Søgninger og Udenlandske personer , der afslører, hvad danskerne godt vil vide mere om. Top trending spørgsmål 1) Hvem skal jeg stemme på 2) Hvordan bliver vejret 3) Hvordan laver man slim 4) Vild med dans hvem røg ud 5) Hvornår spiller Caroline 6) Er jorden flad 7) H
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potassium is critical to circadian rhythms in human red blood cellsThe secrets of the circadian rhythms in red blood cells have been identified by researchers who have also identified potassium as the key to unraveling the mystery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plankton swim against the currentCopepods swim together in a swarm even in turbulent currents. Researchers have observed the behavior of fish food with high-speed cameras.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A better understanding of ancient landscapesGeologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. A new study suggests that scientists may be able to better leverage zircon data to understand how landscapes have evolved over time by considering a suite of factors that can skew zircon geochronologic data and interpretation of the origin of sediments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers make solid ground toward better lithium-ion battery interfacesNew research has identified a major obstacle to advancing solid-state lithium-ion battery performance in small electronics: the flow of lithium ions across battery interfaces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geoscientists compare micro-organisms in the polar regions Tübingen geoscientist Julia Kleinteich takes fresh water samples near Research Station Rothera in Antarctic. Credit: Daniel Farinotti Although the Arctic and Antarctic regions are at opposite ends of the earth, they have a similar diversity of bacteria and other microscopic life. These are the findings of an international team of researchers headed by the University of Tübingen, the EMBL Heidelbe
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Last chance to save the 'panda of the sea' from extinctionA last-ditch effort to save the world's rarest marine mammal from extinction has been launched.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving cyber security in harsh environments Credit: American Chemical Society Many people don't worry about the security of their personal information until it's too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme envir
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Futurity.org
Ask an expert: How unusual were hurricanes in 2017? The United States just suffered the most intense hurricane season in more than a decade, and possibly the costliest ever. Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in mid-August. Hurricane Irma struck Florida in early September, and just two weeks later, Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Shuyi Chen, a professor in the atmospheric sciences department at the University of Washington, tal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea-level rise projections made hazy by antarctic instability Ice loss from the Thwaites Glacier in the Amundsen Sea Embayment, West Antarctica, has doubled since the 1990s. The glacier appears to be collapsing due to marine ice-sheet instability. Credit: NASA It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led analysis. The study is the first to link global
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating the self-assembly of nanoscale patterns for next-generation materials Materials scientist Gregory Doerk preparing a sample for electron microscopy at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials. The scanning electron microscope image on the computer screen shows a cross-sectional view of line patterns transferred into a layer of silicon dioxide. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory The ability to quickly generate ultra-small, well-ordered nanopatterns ov
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists show feasibility of building a trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer Using lasers, the researchers excited a strontium ion to the Rydberg state, which they then used to demonstrate a single-qubit Rydberg gate—one of the basic elements of the proposed trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer. Credit: Higgins et al. ©2017 American Physical Society (Phys.org)—Physicists have built one of the first basic elements of a trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer: a single-qubit R
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals racial inequality in Mexico, disproving its 'race-blind' rhetoric That's not the case in Mexico. Mexicans have divergent ancestry, including Spanish, African, indigenous and German. And while skin color in Mexico ranges from white to black , most people – 53 percent – identify as mestizo, or mixed race . In Mexico, inequality, though rampant , has long been viewed as a problem related to ethnicity or socioeconomic status, not race. Our new report suggests t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Sea water and recycled metal combined to help reduce global warming Scientists at the University of York have used sea water collected from Whitby in North Yorkshire, and scrap metal to develop a technology that could help capture more than 850 million tonnes of unwanted carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. High levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are a major contributor to greenhouse gases and global warming. Carbon overload is mainly the result of burning f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even wild mammals have regional dialects Credit: Cardiff University Researchers from Cardiff University's Otter Project have discovered that genetically distinct populations of wild otters from across the UK have their own regional odours for communicating vital information to each other. The findings could have implications for wild mammal conservation efforts. The study, which profiled chemical secretions from the Eurasian otter, sugg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does Chagas disease present a health risk to Canadians? IMAGE: This is the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (causing Chagas disease) among human red blood cells. view more Credit: Dr. Momar Ndao, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre Montreal/Winnipeg, December 13, 2017 - Believe it or not, a tropical blood parasite native to Latin America could be harmful to Canadians. Infectious diseases like malaria or Zika may have domi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kaiser Permanente study links health risks to electromagnetic field exposure A study of real-world exposure to non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields in pregnant women found a significantly higher rate of miscarriage, providing new evidence regarding their potential health risks. The Kaiser Permanente study was published today in the journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group). Non-ionizing radiation from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotexturing creates bacteria-killing spikes on stainless steel surfaces IMAGE: This is a close-up image shows an untreated stainless steel sample (left), and a sample that has been electrochemically treated to create a nanotextured surface. The sample was prepared by... view more Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The public fear sharks less when they understand their behaviour: Study An experiment involving more than 500 visitors to an aquarium 'shark tunnel' has shown the public's fear of sharks reduces when they learn about the species by watching their behaviour. University of Sydney researchers conducted a randomised experiment in Shark Valley at SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium in November 2013, by setting up iPads running survey software at the entrance and exit of a 'shark t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UVB radiation influences behavior of sticklebacks Fish cannot see ultraviolet B rays, but still change their behavior when they grow up under increased UVB intensity. According to studies by biologists at the University of Bonn on three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), increased UVB leads to a smaller body size and more risk-seeking behavior when faced with predators. Climate change is likely to increase UVB intensity, possibly with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate-smart agriculture requires radical policy changes At all levels of agricultural regulation – national, European, and international – important changes are required to be able to address the challenges of climate change. Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is crucial, on the one hand, to mitigate climate damage to the agricultural sector and, on the other hand, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as increase the food production for the growing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ILL D20's neutron beam yields important clues to the unconventional origins of superconductivity Credit: ILL / Max Alexander Iron-based superconductors contain layers of iron and a pnictogen – such as arsenic or phosphorus – or a chalcogen, like oxygen or selenium. Previously dismissed eas weak candidates for superconductivity, iron-based superconductors took the science community by surprise when it was discovered that the new iron arsenide family had very high transition temperatures. Sinc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air pollution project harnesses the power of backyard science enthusiasts The CEAMS team tapped an existing network of volunteer precipitation data-takers from the CSU-led Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network. Credit: Colorado State University Right now, a handful of motivated Fort Collins citizens are doing something a little out of the ordinary. They're collecting cutting-edge scientific data from their backyards that may soon help NASA create maps of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study on redback spiders finds seemingly abhorrent mating strategy appears to benefit both males and females Credit: Ken Jones A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new University of Toronto study has found. "There's no evidence to suggest this behaviour is costly to females in terms of survivorship and reproductive output," says Luciana Baruffaldi, post-doctoral researcher and director of the Andrade lab at U of T Scarborough and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new algorithm helps retailers make better inventory decisions Offering multiple, similar items can complicate inventory decisions. Credit: MIT Sloan School of Management Stocking too much of a product, or not enough, costs retailers hundreds of billions of dollars annually. If they stock too little and run out, the customer will likely take their businesses elsewhere, costing the retailer money. If they stock too much, though, the retailer ends up with exce
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Futurity.org
To fight drug resistance, make germs compete Harnessing competition among pathogens inside a patient could help fight drug resistance, new research suggests. Researchers found that limiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and both extend the life of existing drugs to which pathogens are already resistant and prevent resistance to new drugs from emerging. “Drug resistance is hindering efforts to control HIV, tu
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Ingeniøren
Ny tank blev testet kort før eksplosion på østrisk gasanlæg Tirsdag morgen opstod der af endnu ukendte årsager en voldsom eksplosion på et gasanlæg i den østrigske by Baumgarten. Eksplosionen dræbte en person fra et inspektionsfirma (TÜV), kvæstede en anden person alvorligt og efterlod tyve andre med mindre kvæstelser. Anlægget i Baumgarten er Østrigs største. Der er forbindelser til resten af landet, til Ungarn og Italien. Eksplosionen betød, at al gastr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Father's rejection may increase child's social anxiety, loneliness Healthy relationships with their parents are vital for adolescents' development and well-being, according to Penn State researchers who say rejection from fathers may lead to increases in social anxiety and loneliness. The study -- conducted by Hio Wa "Grace" Mak, doctoral student of human development and family studies -- examined how parental rejection, as well as the overall well-being of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic saw second warmest year, smallest winter sea ice coverage on record in 2017 Credit: NOAA Headquarters An NOAA-sponsored report shows that the warming trend transforming the Arctic persisted in 2017, resulting in the second warmest air temperatures, above average ocean temperatures, loss of sea ice, and a range of human, ocean and ecosystem effects. Now in its 12th year, the Arctic Report Card , released today at the annual American Geophysical Union fall meeting in New O
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Dagens Medicin
Regionernes medicinudgifter er steget markant Udgifterne til medicin på sygehusene er steget betydeligt det seneste år, viser nye tal. Regionsformand kalder stigningen voldsom, men forventelig.
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Dagens Medicin
Esbjerg forbliver nummer etDanmarks bedste til fedmekirurgi 2017
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Good and Bad of Empathy Last year a striking video made its way around the Internet. In it, male sports fans sat, one at a time, opposite a female sports reporter who had been the target of abusive, misogynist tweets. Each man had to read the messages aloud to the woman who received them. One of the few printable examples was, “I hope your boyfriend beats you.” The goal of the project, created by a Web site called Just
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What the robots of Star Wars tell us about automation, and the future of human work BB-8 is an “astromech droid” who first appeared in The Force Awakens. Credit: Lucasfilm/IMDB Millions of fans all over the world are eagerly anticipating this week's release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi , the eighth in the series. At last we will get some answers to questions that have been vexing us since 2015's The Force Awakens . Throughout the franchise, the core characters have been accompani
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Latest Headlines | Science News
2017 delivered humility, and proved our potential The Top 10 science stories of 2017 , selected by Science News staff and presented in this year-end issue, have the potential to make you feel small and certainly humble. Our No. 1 story of the year takes place an unfathomably distant 130 million light-years away, where a neutron star smashup produced, by some estimates, 10 Earth masses worth of gold — wow! That’s enough for many trillions of tril
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Precision nanomaterials may pave new way to selectively kill cancer cells, study shows Dendrimers loaded with organic sulfure compounds (OSC) accumulate in cancer cells, where they are broken down and release reactive oxygen radicals (ROS). The elevation of ROS levels eventually spells death for the cancer cell. Credit: KTH The Royal Institute of Technology Researchers in Sweden have succeeded in taking the next step toward using man-made nanoscale compounds in the fight against ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Young workers are most likely to use their phones while driving – here's how we can change that At any given moment, roughly 1-2% of Australian drivers are estimated to be using their mobile phone while driving. Credit: shutterstock Distracted driving is a significant contributor to road accidents and fatalities. Mobile phone use while driving is a particularly important form of driver distraction. It can increase the risk of traffic accidents by up to four times . At any moment, roughly 1-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The government is miscounting greenhouse emissions reductions Some projects shouldn’t be receiving funding from the government. Yet, lack of proper monitoring has caused huge amounts of wasted money. Credit: www.goodfreephotos.com The Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF), established in 2014 with funding of A$2.55 billion, is mostly spent. With just A$200 million left to be allocated, the Climate Change Authority this week released a report on the fund's progress
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital space isn't replacing public space, and might even help make it better Telstra and the City of Joondalup have joined forces in a trial of ‘smart park’ applications at Tom Simpson Park. You're on the train on your daily commute, head bowed, peering at your phone. A cavalcade of news stories, friends' holiday snaps and random promoted images of trending slippers pops up on your social media feed, which you idly push along in search of something fresh. You look up. Mos
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Futurity.org
Lemurs share gut bacteria when they cuddle Members of the same lemur family have very similar gut microbiomes due to their close proximity and physical interactions, such as grooming and huddling together in social bonding, a new study suggests. These results could help researchers better understand how social behaviors impact the health of lemurs and potentially other species as well, even humans. In the human body, there are about the s
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Colliding neutron stars, gene editing, human origins and more top stories of 2017 In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS, a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This year’s neutron star collision unlocks cosmic mysteries Thousands of astronomers and physicists. Hundreds of hours of telescope observations. Dozens of scientific papers. Two dead stars uniting into one. In 2017, scientists went all in on a never-before-seen astronomical event of astounding proportions: a head-on collision between two neutron stars, the ultradense remnants of exploded stars. The smashup sent shivers of gravitational waves through Eart
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Latest Headlines | Science News
CRISPR gene editing moved into humans in 2017 Scientists reported selectively altering genes in viable human embryos for the first time this year. For nearly five years, researchers have been wielding the molecular scissors known as CRISPR/Cas9 to make precise changes in animals’ DNA. But its use in human embryos has more profound implications, researchers and ethicists say. “We can now literally change our own species,” says Mildred Solomon
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The Larsen C ice shelf break has sparked groundbreaking research In 2015, glaciologist Daniela Jansen reported that a large rift was rapidly growing across one of the Antarctic Peninsula’s ice shelves, known as Larsen C. When the shelf broke, she and colleagues predicted, it would be the largest calving event in decades. It was. In July, a Delaware-sized iceberg split off from Larsen C ( SN: 8/5/17, p. 6 ). And researchers knew practically the moment it happen
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The story of humans’ origins got a revision in 2017 Human origins are notoriously tough to pin down. Fossil and genetic studies in 2017 suggested a reason why: No clear starting time or location ever existed for our species. The first biological stirrings of humankind occurred at a time of evolutionary experimentation in the human genus, Homo . Homo sapiens ’ signature skeletal features emerged piece by piece in different African communities start
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Seven Earth-sized planets entered the spotlight this year Discoveries of planets around distant stars have become almost routine. But finding seven exoplanets in one go is something special. In February, a team of planet seekers announced that a small, cool star some 39 light-years away, TRAPPIST-1, hosts the most Earth-sized exoplanets yet found in one place: seven roughly Earth-sized worlds , at least three of which might host liquid water ( SN: 3/18/
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A quantum communications satellite proved its potential in 2017 During the world’s first telephone call in 1876, Alexander Graham Bell summoned his assistant from the other room, stating simply, “Mr. Watson, come here. I want to see you.” In 2017, scientists testing another newfangled type of communication were a bit more eloquent. “It is such a privilege and thrill to witness this historical moment with you all,” said Chunli Bai, president of the Chinese Aca
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Dagens Medicin
Færdigbehandlede patienter tilbringer mindre unødig tid på hospitalerne Sundhedsministeren mener, at faldet i unødige dage på hospitalerne hænger sammen med en fordoblet takst til kommunerne. KL er uenige i sammenhængen.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Worries grow that climate change will quietly steal nutrients from major food crops 2017 was a good year for worrying about nutrient losses that might come with a changing climate. The idea that surging carbon dioxide levels could stealthily render some major crops less nutritious has long been percolating in plant research circles. “It’s literally a 25-year story, but it has come to a head in the last year or so,” says Lewis Ziska, a plant physiologist with the U.S. Agricultura
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Approval of gene therapies for two blood cancers led to an ‘explosion of interest’ in 2017 This year, gene therapy finally became a clinical reality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved two personalized treatments that engineer a patient’s own immune system to hunt down and kill cancer cells. The treatments, the first gene therapies ever approved by the FDA, work in people with certain blood cancers, even patients whose cancers haven’t responded to other treatments. Called C
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Brains of former football players showed how common traumatic brain injuries might be There have been hints for years that playing football might come at a cost. But a study this year dealt one of the hardest hits yet to the sport, detailing the extensive damage in football players’ brains, and not just those who played professionally. In a large collection of former NFL players’ postmortem brains, nearly every sample showed signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a dis
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Zika cases are down, but researchers prepare for the virus’s return One of the top stories of 2016 quietly exited much of the public’s consciousness in 2017. But it’s still a hot topic among scientists and for good reasons. After Zika emerged in the Western Hemisphere, it shook the Americas, as reports of infections and devastating birth defects swept through Brazil and Colombia, eventually reaching the United States. In a welcome turn, the number of Zika cases i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea-level rise projections made hazy by Antarctic instability It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led analysis. The study is the first to link global and local sea-level rise projections with simulations of two major mechanisms by which climate change can affect the vast Antarctic ice sheet. The Earth faces a broad range of possible outcomes with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving cyber security in harsh environments Many people don't worry about the security of their personal information until it's too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme environmental conditions. According to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting molten history on the map How metals melt at high temperatures and pressures was clarified with a new x-ray scattering technique. A metal is sandwiched between two high-pressure diamond anvils. A laser melts the sample (right), while the structure is monitored with x-ray diffraction. The metal microstructure (green granular structure and yellow heated regions) at different temperatures is shown schematically on the left.
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Science-Based Medicine
Medical Profession is Underutilizing Computer Technology Computers were just being introduced in a significant way in the late 1980s when I started medical school. Essentially I began my career with entirely paper charts for documenting and ordering and now these functions are entirely electronic. Back in school if I wanted to find a published article I would have to find the reference, then go to the library and make a photocopy of it. Today I go to P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there structure in glass disorder? Simulations show that bulk metallic glasses do not have similar structures from atomic to intermediate length scales, as previously believed. In the figure from a simulation, the pink and blue balls represent nickel and phosphorous atoms in a bulk metallic glass. Credit: US Department of Energy Stronger than steel yet easily fabricated, bulk metallic glasses are metals that lack an ordered atomic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NIST forensic tests to ensure high-quality copies of digital evidence Credit: Hanacek/NIST, Brian A Jackson/Shutterstock Data found on a suspect's computer, cell phone or tablet can prove to be crucial evidence in a legal case. A new set of software tools developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) aims to make sure this digital evidence will hold up in court. The software suite, referred to collectively as federated testing tools , is de
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Bots and Form Letters Make It Nearly Impossible to Find Real FCC Net Neutrality Comments The Federal Communications Commissions' public comment period on its plans to repeal net neutrality protections was bombarded with bots , memes, and input from people who don't actually exist. The situation's gotten so bad that FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel , as well as several members of Congress, including one Republican , have called for the FCC to postpone its December 14 net neutralit
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Live Science
Spectacular Geminid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight! How to Watch Online The Geminids will shine brightly this year with almost no obscuring moonlight. The most meteors will appear in the hours after midnight, although you can see a good show earlier, too. Credit: Gregg Dinderman/Sky & Telescope If it's clear outside on Wednesday night (Dec. 13) and Thursday morning (Dec. 14) before dawn, be sure to go outdoors. One of the year's top meteor showers, the Geminids, wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical 'pressure' tuning magnetic propertiesUnusual, tiny vortexes spinning on the surface of certain magnets could offer a way to reduce the energy demands of computers. Controlling the vortexes is key. Scientists found that chemical substitution in a well-studied magnet acted as an effective knob in tuning the magnetic properties. Adding just a few slightly larger atoms to the magnet expanded the crystal lattice, or atomic arrangement. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stirring up a quantum spin-liquid with disorder An elusive state of matter—quantum spin liquid—may actually be enhanced rather than suppressed by disorder as seen in a compound that contains praseodymium, zirconium, and oxygen (Pr2Zr2O7). In this material, the praseodymium ions with magnetic moments (green arrows in right image) occupy a lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. The signature of a quantum spin liquid is the persistence of inelasti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Catching radical molecules before they disappearWhile in most molecules, each electron finds a partner to pair up with, some electrons in radical molecules are left alone and unpaired. This configuration grants radicals with some unusual and interesting properties, which disappear as soon as the radicals react or interact with other molecules. It has been difficult to generate relatively stable radicals, because they react and change in the bli
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Image of the Day:99-Million-Year-Old Blood SuckerScientists have found the oldest known specimen of a blood-sucking insect together with the remains of its host.
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Dana Foundation
Sticker Design Contest Winners We are pleased to announce the winners of our first Sticker Design Contest for Brain Awareness Week (BAW) 2018! The submissions we received showcased talent and creativity from brain enthusiasts all around the world, and the first, second, and third place winners were chosen by online polls open to the public. Marianne Claire Bacani from Vancouver, Canada, created the first place design, which wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A milk protein could be used to give foods cancer-fighting, immune-boosting properties Scientists from A*STAR have developed a system to transport a functional protein to the tissues of the digestive tract where it may confer a range of health benefits. This overcomes previous obstacles where the molecules broke down before they could reach their target receptors. Lactoferrin, found naturally in breastmilk, is a biologically active protein that provides vital support during early i
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Is It Safe to Eat Moldy Food? When Is It Safe to Eat Moldy Food? When is it still okay to eat moldy food? Are any molds edible? How important is it to follow those "sell by" dates printed on my egg carton? Credit: Perry Gerenday Getty Images Advertisement Imagine 30% of all of the food produced in the U.S. each year, a total amount of food worth $48.3 billion. No, that’s not how much we consume over the holidays. That is ho
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Scientific American Content: Global
Tax "Reform" Could Harm Graduate Students, Delay Scientific Advancement Curious and full of optimism, aspiring scientists arrive at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center to take part in interviews, with the hopes of being admitted to the Neuroscience Graduate Program. These interviewees are asked a simple question: “Why do you want to pursue neuroscience research?” One person wants to discover a cure for Parkinson’s disease; another wants to uncover better trea
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Live Science
Ancient Jellyfish Embryos Curled Up Like Accordions These images show Pseudooides, a fossil embryo smaller than a grain of sand. Long thought to represent the embryonic stage of an arthropod, this fossil is now revealed to be the first stage of development of an ancestor of today's jellyfish. Credit: University of Bristol A set of spherical fossils, each fossil tinier than a grain of sand, is not what it seemed. For years, researchers mistoo
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Science | The Guardian
The Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight – here's how to see it The latest chapter of events in a galaxy far, far away isn’t the only thing worth staying up late for tonight in the UK. Just as cinema goers are pouring out of the midnight Star Wars showing, up in the (hopefully clear) skies above, the Geminid meteor shower will be reaching its climax in a solar system very, very close to us – our own, in fact. Meteors burn up between 80 and 120km above our hea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what 'dark energy' is Artist s impression of merging neutron stars. Credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick, CC BY-SA There was much excitement when scientists witnessed the violent collision of two ultra-dense, massive stars more than 100m light years from the Earth earlier this year. Not only did they catch the resulting gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of spacetime – they also saw a practically instan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New CERN facility can help medical research into cancer As in the ISOLDE facility, the targets at MEDICIS have to be handled by robots because they are radioactive. Credit: Maximilien Brice/CERN Today, the new CERN-MEDICIS facility has produced radioisotopes for medical research for the first time. MEDICIS (Medical Isotopes Collected from ISOLDE) aims to provide a wide range of radioisotopes, some of which can be produced only at CERN thanks to the un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using satellites to improve crop yield estimates It was easy to collect soil moisture data from this soybean field near the UAH campus. New techniques developed by Vikalp Mishra, right, in UAH's Earth System Science Center, may soon use data from satellites to improve crop forecasts around the world. Credit: Phil Gentry | UAH A team that includes a graduate student who received his Ph.D. on Sunday from The University of Alabama in Huntsville (U
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drug blocks Zika and dengue viruses in study The Zika virus in blood with red blood cells. Credit: stock.adobe.com A small-molecule inhibitor tested by researchers at Yale and Stanford may be the answer to blocking the spread of harmful mosquito-borne pathogens, including Zika and dengue viruses, according to a new study published in Cell Reports . The molecule, dubbed NGI-1, was identified by co-author Joseph Contessa, M.D., an associate p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of new protein shape could impact cancer and neurodegenerative disease therapies A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has discovered a new conformation of a common protein group with links to cancer metastasis and neurodegenerative diseases. Qinglian Liu, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at VCU School of Medicine, recently found a third variation in the structure of the protein type Hsp70, which is responsible for the growt
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Dagens Medicin
Ni nye projekter får støtte til forbedring af patientbehandlingenNovo Nordisk Fonden bevilger 77,7 mio. kr. til ni kliniske forsøg, der skal forbedre patientbehandlingen.
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Chance for Real Congressional Support for Science On November 2, Congressman Lamar Smith (R-Texas), announced he will not be seeking re-election. Rep. Smith has chaired the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology since 2013. Unfortunately, he used his position as chair not to seriously advance science policy, but as a cudgel against perceived political enemies—including scientists. He proudly boasted that he had issued more subpoenas un
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New Scientist - News
Fentanyl considered for execution cocktail by two US states Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty TWO US states are considering using the synthetic painkiller fentanyl as part of the cocktail of drugs used to execute prisoners on death row. Many pharmaceutical firms have stopped supplying prisons with the drugs used in lethal injections. Nevada and Nebraska are both proposing to add fentanyl to the mix to get around this, as it is much easier to access.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover proteins keeping stem cells in their undifferentiated state Red, stem cells. Green, differentiating cells. Credit: Cook Lab A special cluster of proteins that helps unwind DNA during cell division plays a key role in keeping stem cells in their immature state, according to a new study by UNC School of Medicine researchers. The study, published in the online journal eLife , illuminates the basic biology of stem cells , and suggests a new molecular handle f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA biology experiments are space station-bound Interior view of an incubator cassette from the Bioculture System. Credit: NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart Several bioscience experiments developed at NASA's Ames Research Center, in California's Silicon Valley are about to launch to the International Space Station on SpaceX's 13th commercial resupply services mission for NASA This resupply mission, which is targeted to launch no earlier t
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How Social Research Is Evolving in the Digital World Figuring out how human beings do human things is one of the most exciting things that science—psychology, sociology, economics , anthropology—can do. It’s also one of the hardest. Reliable, meaningful methods that distill real-world behavior into experimental variables have been, let’s say, elusive . That might be part of the reason the “ reproducibility crisis ,” concerns about the validity of s
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How to Be a Television Futurist in Four Simple Steps It’s that time of year again! Every December, like clockwork, a sloshed colleague sidles up next to you at the office holiday party, armed with a hostile question. It’s practically a yuletide tradition, predictable as Starbucks cups turning red. Right before spilling spiked eggnog all over your new cardigan, the coworker slurs the same seasonal inquiry at your face: “Hey smartass, what is the fut
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NYT > Science
Baby Born With Heart Outside Her Body Is Saved by U.K. Surgeons “In the end, I just said that termination is not an option for me,” she said. “If it was to happen naturally then so be it.” Hospital officials in Leicester said the medical team knew that other physicians had tried to perform the same procedure at intervals of roughly two to three years, but none had been successful in Britain. The baby was delivered by cesarean section on Nov. 22, about a month
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flowing toward cleaner rivers Credit: Tian Zhou, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory What does a river researcher look like? The question may conjure images of people leaning over the sides of boats to gather water samples or standing in swirling currents with large nets to catch debris, chest-high waders almost entirely submerged. You're probably not picturing someone sitting at a computer, writing code and devising comple
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: With climate change, are we like the whale in 'The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy?' One of many strange scenes in Douglas Adams's novel "Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy" involves a sperm whale "suddenly … called into existence several miles above the surface of an alien planet" with little time to contemplate its "identity as a whale" or its perilous situation in midair before going "splat." That's analogous to the situation today with climate change, says paleobiologist Charles
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers create plants that glow Illumination of a book (“Paradise Lost,” by John Milton) with the nanobionic light-emitting plants (two 3.5-week-old watercress plants). The book and the light-emitting watercress plants were placed in front of a reflective paper to increase the influence from the light emitting plants to the book pages. Credit: Kwak Seonyeong Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Defence at almost any price The predatory ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila feeds on bacteria. Credit: L. Becks Even bacteria have enemies – in water, for example, single-celled ciliates preferably feed on microbes. The microbes protect themselves against predators by employing a variety of tricks, which the ciliates, in turn, attempt to overcome. There ensues an evolutionary competition for the best attack and defence mechan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: 3-D-printed satellite imager designWeirdly organic in appearance, this prototype is the first outcome of an ESA project to develop, manufacture and demonstrate an optical instrument for space with 3D printing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A metallopeptide targets and disrupts mitochondrial function in breast cancer stem cells Credit: Wiley Killing malignant mitochondria is one of the most promising approaches in the development of new anticancer drugs. Scientists from the UK have now synthesized a copper-containing peptide that is readily taken up by mitochondria in breast cancer stem cells, where it effectively induces apoptosis. The study, which has been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie , also highlights t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biological age explains variation of responses to stress Credit: Shutterstock Do the flight or fight mechanisms triggered by responses to stress, diminish with age? And if so, is there a difference between biological and chronological ageing? Questions new research is answering. Our response to acute stress prioritises behavioural and physiological processes to maximise our survival when we are faced with an immediate threat. This change in priorities
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Upper body strength key factor in men's bodily attractiveness Credit: CC0 Public Domain What makes a man's body attractive? In many mammalian species, females evolved to prefer the strongest males. According to research from Griffith University, the same is true of humans. Dr Aaron Sell from the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice said cues of upper body strength make a man attractive, including having wider shoulders, being physically fit and having
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Scientific American Content: Global
Social Notworking: Is Generation Smartphone Really More Prone to Unhappiness? Mobile devices have become our alarm clocks and newspapers and, via platforms like Facebook and Instagram, portals to our social lives. With smartphones inhabiting the pockets of roughly three quarters of all Americans and tablets borne by half, a pale blue glow silhouettes modern life. As screens have become ubiquitous, so has the phenomenon of depressed or suicidal teens, notes Jean Twenge,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon floodplain trees emit as much methane as all Earth's oceans combined Uncontacted indigenous tribe in the brazilian state of Acre. Credit: Gleilson Miranda / Governo do Acre / Wikipedia Environmental scientists from The Open University (OU) have discovered that trees growing in the Amazon floodplains surrounding the Amazon River emit as much methane (CH 4 ) into the atmosphere as all of the world's oceans. These trees growing in seasonal wetland areas of the Amazon
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Ingeniøren
Norsk datatilsyn til smartwatch-producent: Stop al persondata-behandling nu Datatilsynet i Norge har pålagt smartwatch-producenten Gator AS at standse al behandling af persondata, fordi selskabet sjusker med datasikkerheden. Det fortæller tilsynet selv på deres hjemmeside . Beslutningen kommer blot en måned efter, at det norske forbrugerråd sammen med sikkerhedsselskabet Mnemonic i en undersøgelse afslørede, at smartwatches rettet mod børn har ekstremt ringe privacy-besk
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Ingeniøren
Banedanmark får frataget ansvaret for S-banen Banedanmark kommer til at afhænde ansvaret for infrastrukturen i den københavnske S-bane. Det bliver resultatet af dagens aftale mellem VLAK-regeringen, Dansk Folkeparti og Radikale Venstre om togtrafikken i hovedstadsområdet. Ansvaret for togdriften og for Banedanmarks infrastruktur på S-banen bliver udbudt og lagt sammen i én organisation i forbindelse med den omstilling til førerløs togdrift,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clathrin assembly defines the onset and geometry of cortical patterning An artist’s impression of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis (CME) occurring as periodic traveling waves on the membrane. Clathin coated vesicles (blue) bud off from wave peaks. Clathrin waves require intermediate PIP3 levels (red) and also feedback from downstream components of cortical wave machinery such as FBP17 (green). Credit: National University of Singapore Researchers from the Mechanobiology
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanotexturing creates bacteria-killing spikes on stainless steel surfaces Close-up image shows an untreated stainless steel sample (left), and a sample that has been electrochemically treated to create a nanotextured surface. The sample was prepared by using a potentiostat in Professor Preet Singh's laboratory at Georgia Tech. Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Star Wars' last Jedi may use the Force of quantum science Rey, played by Daisy Ridley, trains in the ways of the Force in Star Wars: The Last Jedi. As Star Wars: The Last Jedi opens in theatres and its heroine Rey seeks to learn the ways of the Force from an aged and isolated Luke Skywalker, it raises some obvious and ongoing questions: Is there anything in science—particularly in quantum physics—that resembles the Force? Can objects be manipulated inst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bright areas on Ceres suggest geologic activity The bright areas of Occator Crater -- Cerealia Facula in the center and Vinalia Faculae to the side -- are examples of bright material found on crater floors on Ceres. This is a simulated perspective view. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI If you could fly aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, the surface of dwarf planet Ceres would generally look quite dark, but with notable exceptions. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of fish displays striking color difference between males and females A new species of freshwater fish in the family Characidae, called Hyphessobrycon myrmex, exhibits an intriguing sexual dichromatism: Adult males are a deep reddish-orange, while females and juveniles are pale yellow. The species has been described in an article published in the Journal of Fish Biology . H. myrmex is approximately 2 cm long and lives in the waters of the Formiga River, a tributary
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Scientific American Content: Global
Oddball Object Tumbling among the Stars Could Disrupt Planetary Science Our solar system’s first-known visitor from another star, the recently discovered object called ‘Oumuamua, could be a bonanza for researchers. With only a brief window of time to observe the cigar-shaped wanderer before it zooms beyond the reach of our best telescopes, astronomers have crammed in observations with the hopes of learning more about this interstellar interloper. Not only is the fast
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Science | The Guardian
What if the interstellar body Oumuamua really was sent by aliens? | Notes and queries The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts OK, so a mysterious, cigar-shaped, 400m-long object is speeding through the solar system and astronomers are checking it for evidence of alien technology. So what do we do if it turns out that Oumuamua , as they have named it, is broadcasting e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematicians crack 44-year-old problem Tarski proved that a circle with a radius of one cannot be completely covered by strips whose combined width is smaller than two -- the circle's diameter. Each of the strips in the image has its own length and color. Credit: MIPT Israel Institute of Technology and Alexandr Polyanskii from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have proved László Fejes Tóth's zone conjecture. Formul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report findings about the control of cell division Experts from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (Cabimer) have published a new study on the mechanisms that regulate cell division and guarantee the correct distribution of chromosomes. In particular, they especially highlight the fundamental role that an organelle, the nucleolus, plays in the coordination of these processes. The nu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stellar nursery blooms into view IMAGE: The OmegaCAM imager on ESO's VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29. Many astronomical phenomena can be seen in this giant image,... view more Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser The OmegaCAM camera on ESO's VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29. Many astronomical phenomena ca
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Ingeniøren
Stor efterspørgsel på stærk- og svagstrømsingeniører Program Manager - Instrument Development FOSS Head of Electrical Engineering Syddansk Universitet Lead assessors Ricardo Certification Denmark ApS Analog Electronics Engineer Widex A/S SRO-Specialist til IT-afdelingens El/SRO-sektion HOFOR A/S Digital IC Designer Widex A/S Experienced Signalling and Interlocking Engineers Rambøll Group Academic Technician at the Department of Chemistry Aarhus Uni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New mechanism to explain how El Nino influences East Asian and NW Pacific climate Schematic of the anomalous moist enthalpy advection mechanism. Warm SSTAs in the equatorial CEP (red line) enhance local convection (green shading) and thus stimulate cyclonic anomalies to the northwest (black solid line). The northerly component of the western flank of the cyclonic anomalies advects off-equatorial dry (low moist enthalpy) air into the tropical WNP and thus suppresses convection
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The Atlantic
Turning Piglets Into Personalized Avatars for Sick Kids When Charles Konsitzke and Dhanu Shanmuganayagam first met, they were both just trying to get some peace and quiet. It was early 2014, and they were representing the University of Wisconsin-Madison at a fancy event to promote the university’s research to local politicians. After hours of talking to senators, Shanmuganayagam was fried, and went for a walk to clear his head. That’s when he bumped i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stellar nursery blooms into view The OmegaCAM imager on ESO's VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29. Many astronomical phenomena can be seen in this giant image, including cosmic dust and gas clouds that reflect, absorb, and re-emit the light of hot young stars within the nebula. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser The OmegaCAM camera on ESO's VLT Survey Telescope has captured th
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Ingeniøren
Britisk komite: Twitter, Google og Facebook skal straffes for ulovligt indhold Storbritannien bør introducere lovgivning, der giver virksomheder som Facebook, Google og Twitter ansvaret for ulovligt indhold på deres platforme. Det anbefaler den britiske regerings 'Committee on Standards in Public Life'. Virksomhederne bag de sociale medier har på nuværende tidspunkt ikke selv ansvaret for indholdet på deres platforme, selv hvis det er ulovligt, siger komiteen, der anbefaler
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Ingeniøren
KRONIK: Glem alt om bredbåndspuljen Rasmus Helmich er administrerende direktør i Nianet Foto: Nianet Ikke alene bliver du, hvad du spiser, du browser også, som du bor. Der er nemlig i dag store geografiske forskelle i internethastigheden, og Danmarks yderområder har fortsat ondt i internettet. Bor du i København eller Aarhus, hvor der er nem adgang til fibernet, reagerer browseren som et lyn. Er du derimod bosat i Lohals på Langela
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Ingeniøren
Nu ruller bredbåndsmillionerne: 3.900 adresser får hver 24.000 kr. Den statslige bredbåndspulje, der i år beløber sig i 102 mio. kr., er nu blevet uddelt til modtagere over hele landet, som har søgt om hjælp til at forbedre dårlige internetforbindelser. Foto: Nanna Skytte Tilskud til bredbånd Staten bruger i år 102 mio. kr. på at støtte bredbåndsprojekter landet over. Ordningen uddelte sidste år 80 mio. kr. Ordningen forventes at uddele yderligere 80 mio. kr. ov
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop silicon chip-based quantum photonic devices Schematic of the integrated InP nanobeam and silicon waveguide. Credit: UNIST An international team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has presented a core technology for quantum photonic devices used in quantum information processing. They have proposed combining of quantum dots for generating light and silicon photonic technologies for manipulating light on a single device. This breakthrough
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thailand hides big numbers when it comes to its fish catches in neighbouring waters Fish catches by Thailand's distant-water fleet fishing throughout the Indo-Pacific are almost seven times higher than what the country reports to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, a new study by the Sea Around Us reveals. In 2014 alone, the Asian country caught 3.7 million tonnes of fish outside its Exclusive Economic Zone but reported only 247,000 tonnes. This figure,
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MWA radio telescope expansion complete—Exploration of the universe's first stars beginsWhen and how were the first stars in the universe born? The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope in the desert of Western Australia, one of the largest of its kind, was constructed to clarify this and many other mysteries. The MWA is an international radio-astronomy project conducted by seven countries including Japan and Australia. In Japan, Kumamoto University (main), Nagoya Universit
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Poles apart: how do we save society? - Science Weekly podcastDivisions between left and right, young and old, metropolitan and rural have never been greater. How can we connect with those we disagree with? And what happens if we fail?
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Science | The Guardian
Poles apart: how do we save society? - Science Weekly podcast Divisions between left and right, young and old, metropolitan and rural have never been greater. How can we connect with those we disagree with? And what happens if we fail? Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In October 2017, the Pew Research Center in America published a report showing that the partis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists sug­gest ti­ta­ni­um nit­ri­de in­ste­ad of gold in op­to­e­lec­tro­nics Credit: Siberian Federal University An international team of scientists from Russia, Sweden and the U.S. suggested replacing the gold and silver used in optoelectronic devices with an inexpensive material of titanium nitride. The results of the study are published in the journal Applied Physics Letters . "Titanium nitride has excellent anti-corrosion and thermal stability properties, it is non-to
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists propose a new technology for creating magnet micro-structures The configuration of a thin crystal film. Credit: Anton Tarasov A team of scientists from Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center (Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences) and Siberian Federal University synthesized thin crystal ferromagnetic films and developed a technology for their shaping. Processed films can be used in electronic and spintronic chips. The results of the study were published
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Dagens Medicin
Danmark tabte 49 mio. kr. på husleje ved tabt EMA-værtsskab Tabt EMA-værtsskab kostede Danmark 49 mio. kr. i husleje Efter København tabte kampen om at blive ny EMA-vært, står det nu klart, hvor meget Danmark tabte på at reservere en bygning i forsøget på at vinde værtsskabet. Rikke Gundersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind 49,2 mio. kr. Så meget tabte Danmark alen
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How fires are changing the tundra's face Credit: CC0 Public Domain Climate change takes a heavy toll on the tundra, increasing the probability of extreme droughts. As a result, the frequency of fires in forests, bogs and even wetlands continues to rise. In addition, the northern areas of the tundra have also become more accessible and negatively impacted by human activities in recent years. Two young ecologists from the University of Mü
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Show me your leaves—Health check for urban trees Trees are known to provide a whole range of benefits to people living in cities. For instance, they reduce air pollution and provide cooling through respiration and shade. When trees become unhealthy, these benefits decline and disease-ridden, unstable trees can even become dangerous to people. However, the traditional field inventories to check on trees are labour-intensive and expensive. This w
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boar Growing populations of wild boar ( Sus scrofa L.) are causing more and more damage to agricultural land in Europe, requiring hundreds of thousands of Euros in compensation. A new drone-based method allows estimating crop damage in a fast, standardised and objective manner. Anneleen Rutten, PhD student at the University of Antwerp and the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO, Brussels) w
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Dagens Medicin
Almen praksis skal dele viden om hovedpine Et nyt videnscenter for hovedpine skal samle og udbrede ny viden i samarbejde med almen praksis. Almen praksis kan bidrage med det brede fokus, mener DSAM-formand.
11h
Ingeniøren
CT-scanning sikrer hurtigere indkøring af 3D-printede metalemner En af de helt store barrierer for at anvende 3D-printede emner som kritiske komponenter i færdige produkter eller produktionsanlæg er den ofte mangelfulde kvalitetskontrol og dokumentation. Det gælder i særdeleshed for metalemner, idet metallernes termiske egenskaber er markant anderledes fra eksempelvis plast og kræver fuldstændig styr på procesparametre, nedkølingstider osv. Derfor er Teknologi
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Dagens Medicin
Klinisk Institut på SDU får ny viceinstitutlederSygeplejersker, lektor ph.d. Karin Brochstedt Dieperink er ansat som viceinstitutleder ved Klinisk Institut på Syddansk Universtet.
11h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Regeringen fremlægger ny plan for S-togRegeringen præsenterede her til formiddag sin plan for førerløse S-tog og privatisering af driften. Se pressemødet her.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Blade runner' legs give maimed Thai dog new lease on life The lightweight legs were tailor made for the high-energy hound Just over a year after he was maimed for gnawing on someone's shoes, Cola is romping across a beach on new sleek paws: curved "blade runner" prosthetics modelled on those used by Paralympian sprinters. The former street pup nearly lost his life last year after a Bangkok man hacked off his front legs with a sword in revenge for chewin
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Britain must obey EU environment rules for post-Brexit air deal: campaigners As part of the European aviation area, Britain's industry has soared, with low-cost EasyJet battling with the UK's historic carrier British Airways. The EU must make Britain's air industry sign up to the bloc's environment rules if it wants to keep access to European skies after Brexit, a campaign group warned in a report Wednesday. Airlines should stay in the EU's emissions trading scheme and fo
12h
Ingeniøren
Kræftlæge: Finanslov kan øge viden om immunterapi på meget syge De seneste år har nye kræftbehandlinger med immunterapi fået stadig større opmærksomhed, fordi resultaterne er meget lovende, blandt andet for patienter med modermærkekræft. Ved immunterapi anvender man forskellige strategier for at aktivere patienternes egne dræberceller mod infektioner (T-celler) til specifikt at angribe kræftceller. Man ligesom ’vækker’ immunforsvaret til at genkende kræft og
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storm-hit Puerto Rico starving for tourists Jose Figueroa (R) and two others clean kayaks and equipment used for tours to the bioluminescent bay in Fajardo, Puerto Rico—one of many tourist sites suffering after Hurricane Maria Until Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, Jose Figueroa did brisk business renting kayaks to tourists itching to see a lagoon that lights up by night thanks to millions of microorganisms. Today, things are so dire he's
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The vengeful sea devouring Albania's coast Environmentalists say a dangerous mix of climate change and rampant, unregulated urban development are behind the rapid disappearance of the shoreline in impoverished Albania Asim Krasniqi watches anxiously as the Adriatic Sea creeps ever closer to his beach bar in Albania, a country faced with an alarming pace of coastal erosion. "I'm nostalgic for how this place used to be," the septuagenarian
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Zealand space launch scrubbed from remote launch site In this photo released by Rocket Lab, the Electron rocket, "Still Testing" is prepared for launch on the Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. The launch was scrubbed after an engine glitch on launch caused engineers to abort the flight. (Rocket Lab via AP) A space launch was scrubbed Tuesday from a remote launch site in New Zealand after an engine glitch caused engineers to abort
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toshiba, Western Digital make peace on sale of chip unit In this Oct. 24,2017 photo, the logo of Toshiba Corp., is seen at the venue for the company's stockholders' meeting in Chiba near Tokyo. Toshiba and Western Digital have resolved a dispute that was preventing the embattled Japanese electronics giant from selling its flash memory unit to raise cash to stay afloat. The companies said Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, that the deal allows Western Digital to
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google opens AI centre in China as competition heats up (Update) Google announced Wednesday that it will open a new artificial intelligence research centre in Beijing, tapping China's talent pool in the promising technology despite the US search giant's exclusion from the country's internet. Artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, has been an area of intense focus for American tech stalwarts Google, Microsoft and Facebook, and their Chinese compe
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shark-spotting drones on patrol at Australian beaches A shark-spotting drone with safety flotation device attached flies over Bilgola beach, Sydney High-tech shark-spotting drones are patrolling dozens of Australian beaches this summer to quickly identify underwater predators and deliver safety devices to swimmers and surfers faster than traditional lifesavers. As hundreds of people lined up in early morning sun to take part in a recent ocean swimmi
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In tax shift, Facebook to declare ad revenues locally The social networking giant said the move was in response to pressure from governments and policy makers for greater visibility into sales made in their countries Facebook, in a bow to transparency, has announced it plans to declare certain ad revenues in the country where they are made and not in Ireland, where it has a greater tax advantage. The social networking giant said the move was in resp
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Science | The Guardian
Why do I push people away? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Jay Watts There are few things as difficult to navigate as the space between ourselves and others. Get too close, and we feel suffocated; move too far apart, and we feel abandoned. Pushing people away takes many forms. It might involve being verbally or physically aggressive, or, just as destructively, shutting them out emotionally. Pushing people away shows someone still matters to us. Indifference, after
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to save tigers? Better have your numbers straight Camera trap photo captures tiger in India. Credit: Ullas Karanth/WCS A new book co-edited by tiger biologist Dr. Ullas Karanth of (WCS) Wildlife Conservation Society and Dr. James Nichols, an Emeritus statistical ecologist from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), provides an authoritative text on monitoring tigers, their prey, and many other similarly endangered species. The volume is co-
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mosquito sex protein could provide key to controlling disease Aedes aegypti couple mating in flight. Credit: Alex Wild If you thought the sex lives of humans were complicated, consider the case of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito, bringer of Zika, dengue, and yellow fever: She mates but once, in seconds and on the wing, with one lucky male; spurns all further advances from other potential suitors; and stores enough sperm from that single encounter to lay m
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Racial, political identities influence how people view cause of deadly police encounters People's racial and political identities strongly shaped how they viewed the causes of several recent widely publicized police encounters that resulted in the deaths of African American men, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers. The KU political science professors found that racial and political identities shape our understanding of these events; African Americans, lib
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses A study at Georgia Institute of Technology looked at characteristics of gecko adhesion technology. Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech A gecko scampering up a wall or across a ceiling has long fascinated scientists and encouraged them to investigate how to harness lizard's mysterious ability to defy gravity. While human-made devices inspired by gecko feet have emerged in recent years, enabling their w
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does eclipse equal night in plant life? Researchers test plant rhythms during solar eclipse During the eclipse (L-R) Mimosa previously exposed to 72 hours of dark showed no response to totality. Mimosa exposed to 72 hours of light was partially closed during totality. Mimosa with prior normal light exposure closed completely during totality. Oxalis leaves opened up and the flowers did not fold. Credit: University of Missouri Academic Support / Stephanie L. Sidoti. On August 21, 2017, ab
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NYT > Science
Belgium’s Lavish Energy Use Sheds Light on More Than Just Its Roads Belgium’s system rewards local politicians for keeping the bulbs blazing, said Peter Reekmans, speaking from his experience as the mayor of the town of Glabbeek. Streetlight consumption translates into profits for electricity producers, distributors and the state, he said. The profits of electricity distribution companies are paid out “in dividends to the local municipalities that own shares in t
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does eclipse equal night in plant life? On August 21, 2017, about 215 million American adults watched one of nature's most dramatic events: a total solar eclipse. However, most of the country could only see a partial eclipse. The path of the total eclipse was a strip just 70 miles wide, arcing across the country from Oregon to South Carolina. The University of Missouri-Columbia lies directly on that path of totality. Scientists there k
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial, political identities influence how people view cause of deadly police encounters LAWRENCE -- People's racial and political identities strongly shaped how they viewed the causes of several recent widely publicized police encounters that resulted in the deaths of African American men, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers. The KU political science professors found that racial and political identities shape our understanding of these events; African Am
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video game improves doctors' recognition and triage of severe trauma patients PITTSBURGH, Dec. 13, 2017 - Playing an adventure video game featuring a fictitious, young emergency physician treating severe trauma patients was better than text-based learning at priming real doctors to quickly recognize the patients who needed higher levels of care, according to a new trial led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The results, published today by The BMJ , held e
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation PISCATAWAY, NJ - State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs . Raising those taxes, according to the authors, represents an opportunity for states to increase revenues while simultaneously improving public health outcomes and costs related to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Urban Cooper's hawks outcompete their rural neighbors IMAGE: Cooper's Hawks in urban Albuquerque, New Mexico, are so successful that they're outcompeting their rural neightbors. view more Credit: B. Millsap Depending on whether a species flourishes in a city environment, urban wildlife populations can be "sources" or "sinks," either reproducing so quickly that individuals leave to colonize the surrounding area or needing constant immigration fro
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Science | The Guardian
Running repairs on the moon - archive, 13 December 1972 The Apollo 17 astronauts, Eugene Cernan and Jack Schmitt, carrying a makeshift replacement mudguard for their lunar rover, late last night (British time), returned to a dusty canyon hoping to find the oldest rocks man has ever seen amid the rubble of a nearby landslide. They were also looking for proof on their second moon walk that the floor of the canyon is blanketed by relatively young ash fro
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban Cooper's hawks outcompete their rural neighbors Cooper's Hawks in urban Albuquerque, New Mexico, are so successful that they're outcompeting their rural neightbors. Credit: B. Millsap Depending on whether a species flourishes in a city environment, urban wildlife populations can be "sources" or "sinks," either reproducing so quickly that individuals leave to colonize the surrounding area or needing constant immigration from outside to stay via
16h
Ingeniøren
Børn på nettet: SoMe-giganternes regler brydes konstant Det sker nok ofte, at børn og unge lyver sig ældre for at få adgang til sociale medier og andre digitale platforme, selvom reglerne, der ellers ville holde dem ude, er lavet for at beskytte dem. Det er i virkeligheden nok en meget lille brøkdel af forældre og børn, der læser tjenesternes betingelser, skriver Pernille Tranberg, dataetisk rådgiver, på SamfundsDesign . Reglerne for både SnapChat og
16h
Ingeniøren
Forskning: EPJ-platforme giver ulæselige copy-paste-notater EPJ-systemer som Epic, der har leveret Sundhedsplatformen, har skadelig virkning på kvaliteten af patientjournalerne, viser amerikansk forskning. Forskellige undersøgelser estimerer, at mellem 50 og 80 procent af alle notater er produceret ved hjælp af copy-paste. Og det har direkte betydning for, hvor brugbar journalen er, fortæller professor i datalogi ved Københavns Universitet Jørgen Bansler.
17h
Ingeniøren
Brexit bremser digitalisering i Danmark Mens forhandlingerne om skilsmissen mellem Storbritannien og EU fortsat befinder sig i sin spæde første runde, venter danske virksomheder i spænding. Faktisk i så stor spænding, at de største firmaer i landet sætter digitaliseringsprojekter på pause eller nedlægger dem på grund af usikkerheden, der omsvøber Brexit. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Det viser en ny rappor
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Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 13. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Hvor stor en mængde mikroplast blev fundet pr. liter i drikkevandsprøverne i det forsøg, som Cphbusiness foretog i september? Klik her
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Face of climate change'? Image copyright Caters News Image caption Campaigners filmed the starving bear searching for food It is harrowing footage. An emaciated polar bear searches for food on Baffin Island, north-eastern Canada. Exhausted, it drags one leg slowly behind it, eventually trying to eat some discarded seating foam among rubbish humans have left. Polar bears hunt from the sea ice, which is diminishing every y
18h
New Scientist - News
The tiny space rock New Horizons is headed for may have a moon Maybe there’s a mini moon NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI By Leah Crane NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is on its way to a tiny rock in the outer reaches of the solar system. We don’t know much about that rock, but now we think it might have a moon. The New Horizons probe flew past Pluto in 2015 and started heading toward a Kuiper belt object called 2014 MU69, a billion miles further away. Because MU69 is so
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New Scientist - News
Ancient black holes ruled out as source of all dark matter Are primordial black holes dark matter? FL collection / Alamy Stock Photo By Leah Crane Dark matter may not be found in primordial black holes after all. After the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) watched a pair of black holes collide for the first time in 2015, speculation swirled that the black holes might be causing the strange gravitational effects that we attrib
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New Scientist - News
Mysterious streaks seen on Saturn’s moons could be ancient rings How did Dione get those marks? NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute By Adam Mann Looking like claw marks from some giant space bird, peculiar parallel tracks on Saturn’s moons Dione and Rhea have researchers baffled. “I feel like I’m going crazy trying to come up with an explanation,” says Emily Martin , a planetary scientist at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C., who presented
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New Scientist - News
Anti-vax views must not derail France’s compulsory vaccine law France has the world’s worst anti-vaccination attitudes GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty By Laura Spinney A new law takes force in France on 1 January to up the number of mandatory childhood vaccines to 11 from three. It has provoked a polemic, but the law is sound. If there is a problem here, it is the neglect by officials of the main drivers of vaccine hesitancy. France isn’t the first nation to get
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spinal cord injury affects the heart Spinal cord injury affects the heart, that's what research published in Experimental Physiology and carried out by researchers from University of British Columbia, Canada has found. The heart undergoes changes after spinal cord injury that are dependent on how severe the spinal cord injury is but only a small amount of "sparing" (i.e., a small number of nerve fibers preserved) in the spinal cord
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Popular Science
This tiny South Pacific Island should be dead by now, but it’s still alive and kicking We all thought it would only survive for a few months when it was born in a blast of ash in January 2015. The island, Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, emerged from the waters in the Kingdom of Tonga, rising nearly 400 feet above the sea, directly between the islands Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai. Researchers quickly directed satellites to take pictures of the new land, certain that it would suffer the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shatter-proof mobile phone screens a step closerAn international study on glass could lead to the development of shatter-proof mobile phone screens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportationScientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.
20h
NYT > Science
Tiny Moon May Orbit Distant Object That NASA’s New Horizons Probe Will Visit Eventually their efforts enabled Dr. Buie to piece together hints of MU69’s shape — not circular but perhaps elongated like a potato or two separate objects in close orbit around each other. But the story still was not quite right. During an attempt in July to view an occultation from NASA’s Sofia observatory, a modified 747 jet that carries a 100-inch telescope, the astronomers did not see anyth
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Science | The Guardian
Polish up your pecs: women prefer strong men, say scientists Some women may claim that chiselled abs and giant biceps are not what they are seeking in a man. But a scientific study suggests that if your female partner tells you this, she is probably just being kind. The study, on the subject of male bodily attractiveness, has found that the most Herculean bodies were universally the most appealing, according to the 160 women doing the rating. “We weren’t s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Night-flyers or day-trippers? Study sheds light on when moths, butterflies are activeButterflies fly during the day while moths travel at night - or so you might think. In reality, their behavior is much more complicated. A new study offers the first comprehensive overview of the surprisingly complex question of when butterflies and moths are active.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mosquito sex protein could provide key to controlling diseaseA protein transferred from male to female mosquitoes during sex influences female mating behavior -- a phenomenon that could be exploited to limit the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika and dengue.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Winter months most likely to lead to tragedy for men who disappear on a night out Men are more likely to go missing on a night out and be found dead in December than at any other time of the year, according to a sobering new report from the University of Portsmouth. Christmas revellers are being urged to look out for each other as researchers identify the winter months from December to February as a high risk period for party-going males. Taking a route home near water poses a
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses IMAGE: This is a microscopic image showing the walls formed to mimic the adhesion characteristics of gecko feet. view more Credit: Georgia Tech A gecko scampering up a wall or across a ceiling has long fascinated scientists and encouraged them to investigate how to harness lizard's mysterious ability to defy gravity. While human-made devices inspired by gecko feet have emerged in
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Borrowing a leaf from biology to preserve threatened languages IMAGE: Austronesian languages with the highest EDGE scores, based on linguistic distinctiveness and degree of global endangerment. view more Credit: M. Farrell et al/McGill University One of the world's 7,000 languages vanishes every other week, and half - including scores of indigenous North American languages -- might not survive the 21st century, experts say. To preserve as much linguistic
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fossil orphans reunited with their parents after half a billion years IMAGE: This is an image of Pseudooides. view more Credit: University of Bristol Everyone wants to be with their family for Christmas, but spare a thought for a group of orphan fossils that have been separated from their parents since the dawn of animal evolution, over half a billion years ago. For decades, paleontologists have puzzled over the microscopic fossils of Pseudooides, which are
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heartResearchers have discovered how high glucose levels -- whether caused by diabetes or other factors -- keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers create artificial graphene in a nanofabricated semiconductor structureExperts at manipulating matter at the nanoscale have made an important breakthrough in physics and materials science. They have engineered "artificial graphene" by recreating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene in a semiconductor device.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Borrowing a leaf from biology to preserve threatened languages Austronesian languages with the highest EDGE scores, based on linguistic distinctiveness and degree of global endangerment. Credit: M. Farrell et al/McGill University One of the world's 7,000 languages vanishes every other week, and half - including scores of indigenous North American languages—might not survive the 21st century, experts say. To preserve as much linguistic diversity as possible i
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossil orphans reunited with their parents after half a billion years Pseudooides. Credit: University of Bristol Everyone wants to be with their family for Christmas, but spare a thought for a group of orphan fossils that have been separated from their parents since the dawn of animal evolution, over half a billion years ago. For decades, paleontologists have puzzled over the microscopic fossils of Pseudooides, which are smaller than sand grains. The resemblance
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Futurity.org
Marijuana chemical may keep HIV patients sharp Researchers have found that a chemical in marijuana, called tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, could potentially slow the process of mental decline that affects up to 50 percent of HIV patients. “It’s believed that cognitive function decreases in many of those with HIV partly due to chronic inflammation that occurs in the brain,” says Norbert Kaminski, director of the Institute for Integrative Toxicol
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Daniel Colon-Ramos (Yale/HHMI) 3: Actuating memory: how C. elegans remembers How is the neuronal synapse assembled to produce specific behaviors and store memories? Dr. Colon-Ramos studies C. elegans to address this fundamental question. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-synapse/ Talk Overview: A fundamental question in neuroscience is how synapses are assembled in living animals to produce behaviors and store memories. Dr. Daniel Colón-Ramos and his lab addr
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Daniel Colon-Ramos (Yale/HHMI) 2: Mechanisms of neuronal synapse assembly and function How is the neuronal synapse assembled to produce specific behaviors and store memories? Dr. Colon-Ramos studies C. elegans to address this fundamental question. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-synapse/ Talk Overview: A fundamental question in neuroscience is how synapses are assembled in living animals to produce behaviors and store memories. Dr. Daniel Colón-Ramos and his lab addr
21h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Daniel Colon-Ramos (Yale/HHMI) 1: Cell biology of the synapse and behavior in C. elegans How is the neuronal synapse assembled to produce specific behaviors and store memories? Dr. Colon-Ramos studies C. elegans to address this fundamental question. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-synapse/ Talk Overview: A fundamental question in neuroscience is how synapses are assembled in living animals to produce behaviors and store memories. Dr. Daniel Colón-Ramos and his lab addr
21h
Big Think
Humans Have Been Drinking Wine for 8,000 Years Wine’s influence on human culture cannot be overstated. Sacrament, entheogen, commodity, social lubricant, dinner accompaniment—innumerable instances for drinking this beloved beverage exist. Archaeology has produced many examples of fermentation’s importance throughout history; before refrigeration it was the means for storing food. Just so happens wine is the most pleasing example of this pro
21h
Futurity.org
Big data makes poverty maps more accurate Researchers are creating more-detailed maps of poverty using computational tools that bring together cellphone records, satellite data, and geographic information systems. For years, policymakers have relied upon surveys and census data to track and respond to extreme poverty. While effective, assembling this information is costly, time-consuming, and often lacks detail that aid organizations and
21h
Futurity.org
How frequent fires change ecosystems over time Over decades, frequent fires can reduce the amount of stored carbon in nitrogen savanna grassland and broadleaf forest soils, partially because of reduced plant growth, researchers report. These findings are important for worldwide understanding of fire’s impact on the carbon cycle and for modeling the future of global carbon and climate change. The results offer a new perspective on the impact o
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New Horizons’ next target might have a moon NEW ORLEANS — The New Horizons team may get more than it bargained for with its next target. Currently known as 2014 MU69, the object might, in fact, be two rocks orbiting each other — and those rocks may themselves host a small moon. MU69 orbits the sun in the Kuiper Belt, a region more than 6.5 billion kilometers from Earth. That distance makes it difficult to get pictures of the object directl
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Popular Science
Is it too late to buy Bitcoin? Right now, the value of a Bitcoin is north of $17,000. Considering that that price was around $1,000 at the very start of the year, you can be forgiven for having a vague sense of regret: after all, if you’d bought $100 worth of the cryptocurrency back then, you’d have about $1,700 now if you cashed out today. The ride has gotten even crazier over the past month or so, with Bitcoin more than doub
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Futurity.org
Dads stress out more than moms when preemies get home Fathers of premature babies are more stressed than mothers during the tense transition between the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and home, according to a new study. Researchers found that fathers and mothers of these very low birth weight babies had high levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their saliva prior to their discharge from the hospital. But fathers experienced an increase in t
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Futurity.org
Can middle-class support ease Medicaid’s stigma? Medicaid is now seen as an important part of the middle-class social safety net, thanks to nearly 60 percent of Americans being connected to the program directly or through a family member or close friend, a new study indicates. Earlier this year, a concerted effort by Republicans in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hit a surprising road block: strong pushback against cuts t
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Big Think
Decriminalising Sex Work Is Better for Everyone Amnesty International and The Economist are very different organisations, but they have reached similar conclusions on policies regarding sex markets. Last August, the International Council of Amnesty International decided to back the complete decriminalisation of prostitution . Decriminalising prostitution, they reasoned, would better protect the human rights of sex workers, and be better for th
21h
Big Think
Teen Use of Marijuana May Lead to Bipolar-Like Symptoms Later on in Life While the effects of marijuana use on fully grown adults is still being debated, the impact on teens is becoming clearer. For decades, researchers have been trying to discover if marijuana use has any negative effects on adolescents. This is important because the teen years are when people usually start to experiment with it. One in three high school students use the drug, a recent survey found.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Nasa's New Horizons probe strikes distant gold Image copyright NASA Image caption Artwork: The moonlet may be about 200-300km from the main object The American space agency's New Horizons mission has struck gold again. After its astonishing flyby of Pluto in 2015, scientists have just discovered that the probe's next target is not one object but very likely two. Earth-based observations suggest the small icy world, referred to simply as MU69,
22h
Science : NPR
Giant Prehistoric Penguins Once Swam Off The Coast Of New Zealand An illustration comparing the giant penguin to an average person. Kumimanu biceae weighed about 220 pounds and was a bit shorter than 6 feet in height. It swam around off the coast of New Zealand between 55 and 60 million years ago. Gerald Mayr hide caption toggle caption Gerald Mayr An illustration comparing the giant penguin to an average person. Kumimanu biceae weighed about 220 pounds and was
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
In Russia, There’s an AI Helper That Makes Fun of You—and It’s Wildly Popular Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bright areas on Ceres suggest geologic activityIf you could fly aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, the surface of dwarf planet Ceres would generally look quite dark, but with notable exceptions. These exceptions are the hundreds of bright areas that stand out in images Dawn has returned. Now, scientists have a better sense of how these reflective areas formed and changed over time -- processes indicative of an active, evolving world.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mosquito sex protein could provide key to controlling disease IMAGE: This is an Aedes aegypti couple mating in flight. view more Credit: Photo by Alex Wild If you thought the sex lives of humans were complicated, consider the case of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito, bringer of Zika, dengue, and yellow fever: She mates but once, in seconds and on the wing, with one lucky male; spurns all further advances from other potential suitors; and stores enough
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
In Russia, AI Helpers Make Fun of You Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
23h
Science : NPR
Astronomers Want To Know: Does This Interstellar Visitor Have A Message For Us? An artist's illustration of 'Oumuamua, a cigar-shaped interstellar object discovered in October. Now, astronomers want to know if this interloper might harbor life. ESO/M. Kornmesser hide caption toggle caption ESO/M. Kornmesser An artist's illustration of 'Oumuamua, a cigar-shaped interstellar object discovered in October. Now, astronomers want to know if this interloper might harbor life. ESO/M
23h
Ingeniøren
Nul lægemiddelagentur: Danmark tabte 49,2 millioner kroner på husleje Nu står det sort på hvidt og er offentligt tilgængeligt: Danmark har tabt mange millioner kroner i forsøget på at sikre sig Det Europæiske Lægemiddelagentur – alene i husleje til noget, som aldrig blev aktuelt. I september kunne Politiken på baggrund af en aktindsigt fortælle, at regeringen havde lavet en aftale med Copenhagen Towers i Ørestad om reservation af lokaler, der skulle kunne huse Det
23h

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