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Sumatran rhinos never recovered from losses during the Pleistocene, genome evidence shows The Sumatran rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) is one of the most threatened mammals on earth. By 2011, only about 200 of the rhinos were thought to remain living in the wild. Now, an international team of researchers has sequenced and analyzed the first Sumatran rhino genome from a sample belonging to a male made famous at the Cincinnati Zoo. This study reported in Current Biology on Decem
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Ingeniøren
Førerløse S-tog: Danmark bliver igen first mover på stort jernbaneprojekt Belært af erfaringerne med DSB’s enfant terrible, IC4, har det i årevis været et mantra i dansk transportpolitik, at Danmark ikke igen skal rodes ud i et udviklingsprojekt, og at fremtidige jernbaneinvesteringer skulle gå til sikre, velafprøvede hyldevarer. Få år senere vedtog et flertal i Folketinget imidlertid at gennemføre den landsdækkende udrulning af det nye digitale signalsystem ERTMS som
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Ulækre skoletoiletter giver børn inkontinens kl. 05.00 opdateret kl. 07.21 - Ej, der lugter helt vildt herude, fortæller Liv Sofia Schleisner-Meyer på 13 år, da DR Nyhederne er forbi toiletterne på Skelgårdsskolen i Tårnby, København. Hun er blevet vant til at holde sig. Børn med inkontinens er flove, har dårligt selvværd og nedsat livskvalitet Søren Rittig, Aarhus Universitetshospital Hun er ikke alene. Blandt de elever, der holder sig hel
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: An 8th Planet Is Found Orbiting a Distant Star, With A.I.’s Help With eight planets whirling around its sun, our solar system has held the galactic title for having the most known planets of any star system in the Milky Way. But on Thursday NASA announced the discovery of a new exoplanet orbiting a distant star some 2,500 light years away from here called Kepler 90, bringing that system’s total to eight planets as well. The new planet, known as Kepler-90i, is
4min
Futurity.org
Is kratom safe enough for the fight against opioids? A review of 57 years of international scientific evidence may help change the perception of kratom and restore its potential as a public health tool that deserves more research. As the nation grapples for solutions to the opioid epidemic—now claiming more than 33,000 American lives each year—the potential of the psychoactive plant kratom to become a useful tool in the battle has been the subject
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Futurity.org
Watch: VR lets users control robots from miles away New software allows people using virtual reality hardware to control robots over the internet. Even as autonomous robots get better at doing things on their own, there will still be plenty of circumstances where humans might need to step in and take control. The new software allows remote control over the robots and helps users to become immersed in a robot’s surroundings despite being miles away
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factorsKids who regularly eat takeaway meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite removal of many obstacles, UK child organ donation rates remain lowDespite the removal of many logistical/professional obstacles, and clear guidance from national bodies, UK child organ donation rates remain lower than in other comparable countries, say experts in a leading article published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drinking hot tea every day linked to lower glaucoma riskDrinking a cup of hot tea at least once a day may be linked to a significantly lower risk of developing the serious eye condition, glaucoma, finds a small study published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
9min
Live Science
Brewing Health Benefits: Hot Tea May Lower Glaucoma Risk Hot tea may do more than warm your insides: Drinking at least one cup of caffeinated tea a day may lower a person's risk for glaucoma , a new study suggests. Researchers found that daily hot-tea drinkers were 74 percent less likely to be diagnosed with glaucoma, compared with those who drank no tea, according to the study, which was published today (Dec. 14)in the British Journal of Ophthal
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Futurity.org
Star Wars-inspired robotic hand lets pianist play again Just as Luke Skywalker does with his robotic hand in the Star Wars film series, a new ultrasonic sensor allows amputees to control each of their prosthetic fingers individually, researchers report. The device provides fine motor hand gestures that aren’t possible with current commercially available devices. Jason Barnes, a musician who lost part of his right arm five years ago, was the first ampu
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Science | The Guardian
Could drinking tea really be linked to a lower risk of glaucoma? Drinking hot tea could be linked to a lower risk of having an eye condition that can lead to blindness, research has suggested – although experts say the study does not show that the brew offers any protective effect. Glaucoma is an eye condition in which the pressure of fluids inside the eye damages the optic nerve – and can lead to blindness if left undetected. Many are unaware they have the co
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Futurity.org
Going to the salon may be bad for your health More needs to be done to protect both salon clients and workers from a variety of health risks, two new studies suggest. In the first of two studies, researchers surveyed 90 hair and nail salon clients in three New Jersey counties to assess their experience with respiratory, fungal, and dermal symptoms—which often present as skin rashes or nail disfigurements—after visiting salons. The researcher
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Big Think
NASA's A.I. Discovers a Second Solar System With 8 Planets, Just Like Ours Humans in the Western world for a long time thought that Earth was the center of the universe. At one point, it was heresy not to think so. After the heliocentric universe was adopted, we felt smaller and less self-important. But we’d also gained something, new knowledge and a new avenue in which to explore the heavens. That was a paradigm shift in our understanding and now, it’s happening again.
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Popular Science
Artificial intelligence just discovered two new exoplanets A machine learning technique called a neural network has identified two new exoplanets in our galaxy, NASA scientists and a Google software engineer announced today, meaning that researchers now know about two new worlds thanks to the power of artificial intelligence. Discovering new exoplanets—as planets outside our solar system are called—is a relatively common occurrence, and a key instrument
21min
Live Science
Record Breaker! 8th Alien Planet Found Around Distant Star Our solar system is not alone atop the planet-harboring heap anymore. Scientists have discovered another world orbiting the star Kepler-90, bringing that system's tally of confirmed planets to eight — the same number as in Earth's solar system (at least according to the International Astronomical Union, which stripped Pluto of its "ninth planet" status back in 2006). That's one more tha
21min
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ESMO publishes new position paper on supportive and palliative careESMO, the leading professional organization for medical oncology, published a position paper on supportive and palliative care in its leading scientific journal, Annals of Oncology today.
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Zulu Healing is Astonishing | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Christie van Zyl, a devoted South African sangoma (shaman) with a front row seat to the incredible ceremonies and rituals of her Zulu ancestors. Experience the magic of her ancient traditions with music, ocean and sacred animals. Akin to a healer, the process to become sangoma is a mysterious one, and she and her elders
52min
Live Science
Teen Cigarette Use Drops, But Marijuana & Vaping Rates Stay High Teen use of many drugs is on the decline, but U.S. officials remain concerned about teen marijuana use — which actually increased in the past year — and vaping, which is common, according to a new survey. The government-backed annual survey, called Monitoring the Future , gathered data from more than 43,000 U.S. students in the eighth, 10th and 12th grades. This year's findings included
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stressed-out worms hit the snooze buttonWhen you catch a nasty cold, curling up in bed to sleep may be the only activity you can manage. Sleeping in response to stress isn't a uniquely human behavior: many other animals have the same reaction, and it's not clear why. While the circadian sleep that follows the pattern of the clock has been studied extensively, sleep that's triggered by stress is far less understood.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sumatran rhinos never recovered from losses during the Pleistocene, genome evidence showsAn international team of researchers has sequenced and analyzed the first Sumatran rhino genome from a sample belonging to a male made famous at the Cincinnati Zoo. This study shows that the trouble for Sumatran rhinoceros populations began a long time ago, around the middle of the Pleistocene, about one million years ago.
1h
Popular Science
Net neutrality: where do we go from here? The Federal Communications Commission just voted to approve the Restoring Internet Freedom Act, which repeals the net neutrality rules that have been in place since 2015. By most reasonable accounts, this is a very bad thing . That vote is over and the act passed, so what happens next? Will the internet be totally ruined starting tomorrow? The short answer is no, but what comes next is important.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds studyKetamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers. They also found that ketamine's anti-suicidal effects occurred within hours after its administration.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New antbird species discovered in PeruLSU describes a distinctive new species of antbird from humid montane forest of the Cordillera Azul, Martin Region, Peru.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagementSupervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds graspable objects grab attention more than images of objects do IMAGE: The research findings of Jacqueline Snow (left) and Michael Gomez, a graduate student in her lab at the University of Nevada, Reno, show that real, graspable objects hold more interest... view more Credit: Anne McMillin, APR Does having the potential to act upon an object have a unique influence on behavior and brain responses to the object? That is the question Jacqueline Snow, assist
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Latest Headlines | Science News
These weather events turned extreme thanks to human-driven climate change NEW ORLEANS — For the first time, scientists have definitively linked human-caused climate change to extreme weather events. A handful of extreme events that occurred in 2016 — including a deadly heat wave that swept across Asia — simply could not have happened due to natural climate variability alone, three new studies find. The studies were part of a special issue of the Bulletin of the America
1h
Live Science
Gone Fishing? 11,500-Year-Old Fishhooks Discovered in Woman's Grave The four circular, rotating fishhooks (A, B, C and E) found within the burial. Credit: Photograph by Sofía Samper Carro; as featured in Antiquity Deep in a cave on the Indonesian island of Alor lies the roughly 11,500-year-old remains of a high-status woman buried with fishhooks crafted out of seashells. The finds represent the oldest known fishhooks used in a human burial, a new study reports.
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Live Science
Photos: Ancient Woman Buried with Handmade Fishhooks About 11,500 years ago, a high-status woman was buried in a cave with handmade fishhooks fashioned out of seashells. These artifacts, unearthed on the Indonesian island of Alor, are the oldest fishhooks on record found in a human burial, a new study reports. The discovery suggests that women participated in fishing activities thousands of years ago. It also shows that the culture likely valued
2h
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Finding a lethal parasite's vulnerabilities IMAGE: Unlike other nematode parasites, Strongyloides stercoralis has the unique ability to carry out its entire life cycle within a human host, a state known as autoinfection. Researchers identified a way... view more Credit: James Lok An estimated 100 million people around the world are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a parasitic nematode, yet it's likely that many don't know it. T
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First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular controlUT researchers successfully constructed a first-of-its-kind chemical oscillator that uses DNA components. DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.
2h
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NSF-funded researchers find that ice sheet is dynamic and has repeatedly grown and shrunk IMAGE: Sunset on the Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica. view more Credit: Steffen Saustraup, University of Texas Institute for Geophysics The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet), more than any other ice sheet on the planet. It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A better way to weigh millions of solitary stars Vanderbilt astronomers have discovered a better way to weigh solitary stars and planets. Credit: Michael Smelzer, Vanderbilt University Astronomers have come up with a new and improved method for measuring the masses of millions of solitary stars, especially those with planetary systems. Getting accurate measurements of how much stars weigh not only plays a crucial role in understanding how stars
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computational strategies overcome obstacles in peptide therapeutics development An artist's conception of the power of computational design to explore and illuminate structured peptides across the vast energy landscape. Credit: Vikram Mulligan/University of Washington Insittute for Protein Design New computational strategies reported this week in Science might help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Peptides are similar to protein molecules, but differ in their smal
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study New York, NY (Dec. 14, 2017) - Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine's anti-suicidal effects occurred within hours after its administration. The findings were published online last week in the American Journal o
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Six-decade-old space mystery solved with shoebox-sized satellite called a CubeSatA 60-year-old mystery about the source of energetic, potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts has been solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by students. The satellite is called a CubeSat.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A better way to weigh millions of solitary stars IMAGE: Vanderbilt astronomers have discovered a better way to weigh solitary stars and planets. view more Credit: Michael Smelzer, Vanderbilt University Astronomers have come up with a new and improved method for measuring the masses of millions of solitary stars, especially those with planetary systems. Getting accurate measurements of how much stars weigh not only plays a crucial role in
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the University at Albany has found. The study, which published online and appea
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computational strategies overcome obstacles in peptide therapeutics development IMAGE: An artist's conception of the power of computational design to explore and illuminate structured peptides across the vast energy landscape. view more Credit: Vikram Mulligan/University of Washington Insittute for Protein Design New computational strategies reported this week in Science might help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Peptides are similar to protein mole
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Live Science
18th-Century Jesus Statue Hid a Secret Note in a Surprising Place Las chicas de @davincirestauro sellando el trasero del Cristo del Miserere de #SotilloDeLaRibera en el que, hace unos días, se descubrió una cápsula del tiempo. Muy pronto en @la8burgos pic.twitter.com/6FRoRGLT5h — Gerardo de Mateo (@gerardodemateo) December 1, 2017 An 18th-century wooden statue of Jesus harbored a surprise —time capsule letters hidden in the buttocks, researchers r
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NASA’s Latest Kepler Exoplanet Discovery Fueled by AI Saturn's rings sure are pretty, and Matt Damon’s been to Mars, but our eight-planet solar system may not be that special after all. Today, scientists using data from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft announced they’d discovered an eighth planet orbiting a star 2,500 light years away. They’ve named the planet Kepler-90i after the star it orbits, Kepler-90, which is slightly hotter and more massive than our
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Scientific American Content: Global
Interstellar Visitor Stays Silent: for Now, No Signs of Aliens on 'Oumuamua The first interstellar asteroid ever discovered in our solar system remains silent, at least for now. An initial search for artificial signals coming from 'Oumuamua , the needle-shaped interloper that zoomed past Earth two months ago, have come up empty, scientists with the $100 million Breakthrough Listen project announced today (Dec. 14). But researchers aren't done analyzing the data t
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Scientific update on cells mapped by Mystics! Check out these new images featuring some of the cells our Mystic players have been mapping! These cells are from our “zfish” dataset, and come from the hindbrain of a zebrafish . In these first two images the cells of interest are colored blue. The other cells in the image are cells that connect synaptically to the blue cell. In this last image we have isolated 22 cells of interest. We’ll be map
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beachesA study conducted in 2015 shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowersResearchers have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, found to have ferritin with the fastest catalytic performance ever described.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intervention offered in school readiness program boosts children's self-regulation skillsAdding a daily 20 to 30 minute self-regulation intervention to a kindergarten readiness program significantly boosted children's self-regulation and early academic skills, a researcher has found.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hope for one of the world's rarest primates: First census of Zanzibar Red Colobus monkeyA team of scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus kirkii) an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scrap the stethoscope: engineers create new way to measure vital signs with radio wavesEngineers have demonstrated a method for gathering blood pressure, heart rate and breath rate using a cheap and covert system of radio-frequency signals and microchip 'tags,' similar to the anti-theft tags department stores place on clothing and electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticle staircase: Atomic blasting creates new devices to measure nanoparticlesA standard machining technique has been used to fabricate a 'nanofluidic staircase' that allows precise measurement of the size of nanoparticles in a liquid, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Falling faster: The surprising leap of Felix BaumgartnerFive years ago the Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner broke the sound barrier during his free fall from an altitude of almost 39 kilometers. Now researchers have analyzed the fluid dynamics of his descent. The surprising result: Baumgartner, with his irregularly shaped equipment, fell faster than a smooth, symmetrical body would have.
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Horrific mating strategy appears to benefit both male and female redback spiders IMAGE: New U of T Scarborough research on redback spiders finds their seemingly abhorrent mating strategy appears to benefit both males and females. view more Credit: U of T Scarborough A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found. "There's no evidence to suggest this behaviour is costly
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New on MIT Technology Review
Artificial Intelligence Just Discovered New Planets Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Popular Science
Scientists are enrolling trees in a wet bark contest to understand the effects of ice storms Lindsey Rustad is an ice sculptor. But she doesn’t make the swans you see at weddings or corporate events. She makes ice storms in forests. Her designs, like those in nature, glisten and evoke wonder. But they also foretell danger. With increasing evidence that climate change is driving more frequent and severe weather events, likely including ice storms , she wants to find out what that means fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vanderbilt researchers win an R&D100 Award for MultiWell MicroFormulator VIIBRE’s first 96-Channel MicroFormulator as it is being prepared for shipment to AstraZeneca in January 2016. Credit: Vanderbilt University A team of Vanderbilt University scientists and engineers led by Professor John P. Wikswo has won an R&D 100 Award for their MultiWell MicroFormulator. The MultiWell MicroFormulator, developed at Vanderbilt and commercialized by CN Bio Innovations in the Unit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hope for one of the world's rarest primates: First census of Zanzibar Red Colobus monkey A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey ( Piliocolobus kirkii an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa. Credit: (c)Tim R.B. Davenport A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey ( Piliocol
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New antbird species discovered in Peru The Cordillera Azul Antbird. Credit: Andrew Spencer/Macaulay Library It was July 10, 2016 when Dan Lane, Fernando Angulo, Jesse Fagan, and I rolled into the coffee-growing town of Flor de Café in north-central Peru. This town lies in the Cordillera Azul—a picturesque series of outlying Andean ridges hardly explored by ornithologists. In fact, the first ornithological inventory in the region was o
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Loose skin and 'slack volume' protect Hagfish from shark bites Chapman University has published new research showing how hagfishes survive an initial attack from predators before they release large volumes of slime to defend themselves. Because the slime is released after they are attacked, this defense strategy is only effective if they survive the initial bite. Results show that hagfish skin is not puncture resistant; it is both unattached and flaccid, whi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealing the best-kept secrets of proteins LA JOLLA -- (Dec. 14, 2017) In the bustling setting of the cell, proteins encounter each other by the thousands. Despite the hubbub, each one manages to selectively interact with just the right partners, thanks to specific contact regions on its surface that are still far more mysterious than might be expected, given decades of research into protein structure and function. Now, Salk Institute sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hope for one of the world's rarest primates: First census of Zanzibar Red Colobus monkey IMAGE: A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey ( Piliocolobus kirkii an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off... view more Credit: (c)Tim R.B. Davenport STONE TOWN, Zanzibar, Tanzania (Dec.14, 2017) - A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population ce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop new approach to identify important undiscovered functions of proteins Salk scientists (from left) John Lubin, Vicki Lundblad and Tim Tucey develop new approach to identify important undiscovered functions of proteins. Credit: Salk Institute In the bustling setting of the cell, proteins encounter each other by the thousands. Despite the hubbub, each one manages to selectively interact with just the right partners, thanks to specific contact regions on its surface th
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Ny Apple-computer koster op til 113.000 kroner Hvis du synes, den nye iPhone X er dyr, så skal du bare se prisen på Apples nyeste desktop-computer. Firmaet har i dag lanceret sin første pro-udgave af alt-i-et computeren iMac, som får en startpris på 42.999 kroner. Det er altså for den mest skrabede udgave af iMac Pro, der, som navnet antyder, er designet til professionel brug. Læs også: Er iPhone X pengene værd? Her er 3 argumenter for - og 3
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic blasting creates new devices to measure nanoparticles A nanofluidic staircase machined with subnanometer precision by a focused ion beam separates nanoparticles by size. The device is also a reference material to accurately measure nanoparticle size and compare it to optical brightness, which could aid in the quality control of consumer products. Credit: NIST Like sandblasting at the nanometer scale, focused beams of ions ablate hard materials to fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks at rainfall in developing Tropical Storm Kai-tak The GPM satellite traveled over the Philippine Sea on Dec. 12, 2017, at 7:38 a.m. EST (1238 UTC) and showed that a few of the most intense storms in developing Kai-tak were dropping rain at a rate of greater than 143 mm (5.6 inches) per hour where cloud tops were greater than 16 km (9.92 miles). Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce Tropical Storm Kai-tak developed near the east central Philippines as th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-century Nature lovers beware, environmental models used by researchers at the University of New Hampshire are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future. If carbon dioxide emissions continue at the current rate, they report that scenarios of future
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One in five materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests A new study that compared the results reported in thousands of papers published about the properties of metal organic framework (MOF) materials -- which are prominent candidates for carbon dioxide adsorption and other separations -- suggests the replicability problem should be a concern for materials researchers. Credit: Georgia Tech Can companies rely on the results of one or two scientific stud
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Saturn’s rings are surprisingly young and may be from shredded moons NEW ORLEANS — Saturn’s iconic rings are a recent addition. Final data from the Cassini spacecraft, which flew between the planet and the rings this year before plunging into the gas giant’s atmosphere, show the rings are around a few hundred million years old and less massive than previously thought. Those findings suggest the rings are probably the remnants of at least one moon, rather than anci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate scientists study the odds of a US megadrought To help untangle fact from speculation, Cornell climate scientists and their colleagues have developed a "robust null hypothesis" to assess the odds of a megadrought - one that lasts more than 30 years - occurring in the western and southwestern United States. The research was published online in the Journal of Climate . "We're establishing a baseline. We're looking for the normal pulse of a mega
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers share perspective on key elements of ozone layer recovery A composite image of the Western hemisphere of the Earth. Credit: NASA Each year, ozone-depleting compounds in the upper atmosphere destroy the protective ozone layer, and in particular above Antarctica. The ozone layer acts as Earth's sunscreen by absorbing harmful ultraviolet radiation from incoming sunlight that can cause skin cancer and damage plants, among other harmful effects to life on Ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowers Parchment tubeworm captured in the field. Credit: Dr. Evelien De Meulenaere, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, the marine invertebrate Chaetopterus sp., that resides in muddy coastal seafloors. A new stud
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fields Farmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions - but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper published in the journal Climatic Change . "Climate change can easily intensify agricultural susceptibility, but also presents fresh, surprising opportunities," said David
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
The FCC Has Now Done Its Part to Kill Net Neutrality Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Intervention offered in school readiness program boosts children's self-regulation skills IMAGE: Megan McClelland is the Katherine E. Smith Healthy Children and Families Professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. view more Credit: Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. - Adding a daily 20 to 30 minute self-regulation intervention to a kindergarten readiness program significantly boosted children's self-regulation and early academi
3h
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Mechanism identified of impaired dendritic cell function that weakens response to cancer PHILADELPHIA -- (Dec. 14, 2017) -- A new study from The Wistar Institute revealed the mechanism implicated in the defective function of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs), a specialized type of immune cells that expose the antigens on their surface to activate the T cells. The new findings explain why DCs are not effective in executing a specialized process that is required for inducing antit
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loose skin and 'slack volume' protect hagfish from shark bites Chapman University has published new research showing how hagfishes survive an initial attack from predators before they release large volumes of slime to defend themselves. Because the slime is released after they are attacked, this defense strategy is only effective if they survive the initial bite. Results show that hagfish skin is not puncture resistant; it is both unattached and flaccid, whi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists It was July 10, 2016 when Dan Lane, Fernando Angulo, Jesse Fagan, and I rolled into the coffee-growing town of Flor de Café in north-central Peru. This town lies in the Cordillera Azul -- a picturesque series of outlying Andean ridges hardly explored by ornithologists. In fact, the first ornithological inventory in the region was only in 1996, when a team of researchers from the Louisiana Sta
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer systems predict objects' responses to physical forces Josh Tenenbaum, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT, directs research on the development of intelligence at the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, a multiuniversity, multidisciplinary project based at MIT that seeks to explain and replicate human intelligence. Presenting their work at this year's Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, Tenenbaum and one of his stu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover how cells remember infections decades later 3D rendering of a T cell. Credit: CC BY 3.0, Blausen.com staff. "Blausen gallery 2014". Wikiversity Journal of Medicine. DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.010. ISSN 20018762. A perplexing question in immunology has been, how do immune cells remember an infection or a vaccination so that they can spring into action decades later? Research led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, in collabo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify way to weaken malaria parasites against popular drug treatment Credit: CDC Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a way to block the ability of parasites that cause malaria to shield themselves against drug treatments in infected mice—a finding that could lead to the development of new approaches to combat this deadly disease in humans. Malaria continues to be one of the most devastating diseases in the world. According to the Worl
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Inside Science
Melting Glaciers Release Pollutants Frozen Decades Ago Melting Glaciers Release Pollutants Frozen Decades Ago People who eat fish from glacial meltwater may be at risk from persistent organic pollutants produced in the 20th century. Alps-Reservoir.jpg Reservoir in the Austrian Alps Image credits: Shutterstock Earth Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 15:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- An alpine glacier may seem like the epitome of purity -
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The Atlantic
Beyond Sexual Harassment The much-discussed stream of sexual harassment allegations against famous men has left many people wondering just how common such problems are in American culture. The answer, it seems, is pretty common. The allegations and subsequent firings, coupled with new data about how women experience discrimination in the workplace, paint a pretty disturbing picture of what it’s like to be a woman at work
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How China is changing the future of shopping | Angela WangChina is a huge laboratory of innovation, says retail expert Angela Wang, and in this lab, everything takes place on people's phones. Five hundred million Chinese consumers -- the equivalent of the combined populations of the US, UK and Germany -- regularly make purchases via mobile platforms, even in brick-and-mortar stores. What will this transformation mean for the future of shopping? Learn mor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers scrap the stethoscope, measure vital signs with radio waves A radio frequency identification tag. Credit: Cornell University No visit to the doctor's office is complete without a blood-pressure cuff squeezing your arm and a cold stethoscope placed on your chest. But what if your vital signs could be gathered, without contact, as you sit in the waiting room or the comfort of your own home? Cornell University engineers have demonstrated a method for gatheri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagement Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business. Credit: iStock Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ul
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-centuryEnvironmental models are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toxic chemicals in salons, lack of education lead to adverse health effectsClients who frequent hair and nail salons exhibit more skin and fungal diseases than those who visit less often and nail salon technicians are receiving inadequate training in the use of chemicals, suggest two recent studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug discovery could accelerate hugely with machine learningDrug discovery could be significantly accelerated thanks to a new high precision machine-learning model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA researchers share perspective on key elements of ozone layer recoveryEach year, ozone-depleting compounds in the upper atmosphere destroy the protective ozone layer, and in particular above Antarctica. While different compounds each release either reactive chlorine or bromine, the two active ozone-destroying ingredients, during a series of chemical reactions, the molecules have a range of different lifetimes in the atmosphere that can affect their ultimate impact o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social workers lack tools to identify potential chronic child neglect, study suggestsNeglect accounts for the majority of all child protection cases in the United States, yet child welfare workers lack effective assessment tools for identifying the associated risk and protective factors of chronic neglect. The ineffective assessments are often the result of using instruments that are not specifically designed to include elements predicting chronic neglect, according to a new study
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insectsWhile engineers have had success building tiny, insect-like robots, programming them to behave autonomously like real insects continues to present technical challenges. Engineers have recently been experimenting with a new type of programming that mimics the way an insect’s brain works, which could soon have people wondering if that fly on the wall is actually a fly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drug discovery could accelerate hugely with machine learning Drug discovery could be significantly accelerated thanks to a new high precision machine-learning model, developed by an international collaboration of researchers, including the University of Warwick. The algorithm - partly devised by Dr James Kermode from Warwick's School of Engineering - can accurately predict the interactions between a protein and a drug molecule based on a handful of referen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence helps accelerate progress toward efficient fusion reactions Plasma disruption in experiment on JET, left, and disruption-free experiment on JET, right. Training the FRNN neural network to predict disruptions calls for assigning weights to the data flow along the connections between nodes. Data from new experiments is then put through the network, which predicts "disruption" or "non-disruption." The ultimate goal is at least 95 percent correct predictions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NRL updates tropical cyclone weather predicting model Firefighters assigned to the Commander, Naval Region Japan Fire Department provide simulated care to Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Michael Foster during a Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness exercise. The event is part of Exercise Reliant Gale, designed to maintain Fleet Activities Yokosuka's level of emergency preparedness, personnel accountability, and evacuation and recovery operations during
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Popular Science
14 Star Wars products to get you pumped for 'The Last Jedi' This week, thousands of scruffy-looking nerf herders will be enjoying Star Wars: The Last Jedi, many of whom will be dressed up, many of whom will be standing in line for hours hoping to get a primo seat. If you know someone like that, they’ll be sure to love of these gifts for the holidays (or, really, any time): Lenovo Last Jedi Augmented Reality This is definitely the priciest item on the list
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coloring books make you feel better, but real art therapy much more potentMany adult coloring books claim to be art therapy and can reduce negative feelings, but art therapists are significantly more impactful, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly declassified nuclear test videos releasedResearchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) released 62 newly declassified videos today of atmospheric nuclear tests films that have never before been seen by the public.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The peculiar cranial anatomy of howler monkeysA new study analyzes the peculiar cranial structure and variability of the best-known species of South American howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus, using geometric models in three dimensions and multivariate statistics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spaghetti-like, DNA 'noodle origami' the new shape of things to come for nanotechnologyScientists have invented a major new advance in DNA nanotechnology. Dubbed 'single-stranded origami,' their new strategy uses one long, thin noodle-like strand of DNA, or its chemical cousin RNA, that can self-fold -- without even a single knot -- into the largest, most complex structures to date. The strands forming these structures can be made inside living cells, opening up the potential for na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fieldsFarmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions -- but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper published in the journal Climatic Change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single-stranded DNA and RNA origami go live IMAGE: Single-stranded origami technology is based on design rules that can be used to cross DNA strands in and out of single stranded regions to build large nanostructures. view more Credit: Molgraphics (BOSTON) -- Nanotechnologists are using DNA, the genetic material present in living organisms, as well as its multifunctional cousin RNA, as the raw material in efforts to build miniscule dev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowersResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, found to have ferritin with the fastest catalytic performance ever described.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All politics -- and cannabis marketing -- are local California's legal cannabis market, opening for business on Jan. 1, is expected to quickly grow to be the largest in the nation and worth more than $5 billion a year. County voting on Proposition 64 that led the state here -- to legalizing sales for recreational use -- can offer insight into how medical marijuana dispensaries will now market themselves, according to research from the University
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food-induced anaphylaxis common among children despite adult supervision IMAGE: This is Dr. Moshe Ben-Shoshan, pediatric allergist and immunologist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and at the Montreal Children's Hospital of the MUHC.... view more Credit: McGill University Health Centre MONTREAL, QC (Dec. 14, 2017) - At least a third of reactions in children with food-induced anaphylaxis to a known allergen occur under adul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ANU archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooks An archaeologist from The Australian National University (ANU) has uncovered the world's oldest known fish-hooks placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor. The five fish hooks were among items carefully placed under the chin, and around the jaws of a female from the Pleistocene era, dating back 12,000 years. Distinguished Professor Sue O'Connor from the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggestsCan companies rely on the results of one or two scientific studies to design a new industrial process or launch a new product? In at least one area of materials chemistry, the answer may be yes -- but only 80 percent of the time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA experts: Valley fever cases see major spike in November IMAGE: This is Dr. John Galgiani. view more Credit: University of Arizona Valley fever cases in November saw a 50-percent spike over the previous month, leading experts at the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence to predict a significant increase in cases in 2018. Fortunately, the recent -- and timely -- approval of a new rapid assay test for Valley fever, developed with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conserving the forests Forests cover 31 percent of Earth's land mass -- for now, anyway. As global demand for agricultural commodities grows, forests are increasingly under threat. In Southeast Asia, for instance, a burgeoning appetite for palm oil is a leading driver of deforestation. About 20 percent of global palm oil production is now certified as sustainable by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). Such c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects IMAGE: RoboBees manufactured by the Harvard Microrobotics Lab have a 3 centimeter wingspan and weigh only 80 milligrams. Cornell engineers are developing new programming that will make them more autonomous and... view more Credit: Harvard Microrobotics Lab ITHACA, N.Y. - While engineers have had success building tiny, insect-like robots, programming them to behave autonomously like real insec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beachesTara C. Smith, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology in Kent State's College of Public Health, published the findings of a study her lab conducted in 2015 that shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baylor study: Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagement IMAGE: This is Meredith David, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing in Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business. view more Credit: Baylor University Marketing & Communications WACO, Texas (Dec. 14, 2017) - Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, acc
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The Atlantic
The 'Eternality' of Graffiti In an abandoned housing project in New Orleans, graffiti artist Brandan “Bmike” Odums evokes the legacy of iconic figures alongside urban residents struggling to recover from Hurricane Katrina. “I like the juxtaposition of painting someone like Muhammad Ali and then painting someone right across the room—a regular person from New Orleans,” Odums says in a new video from The Atlantic , in which he
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence, NASA data used to discover eighth planet circling distant starOur solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light years from Earth. The planet was discovered in data from NASA's Kepler Space Telescope.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An ultradilute quantum liquid made from ultra-cold atomsResearchers have created a novel type of liquid one hundred million times more dilute than water and one million times thinner than air. The experiments exploit a fascinating quantum effect to produce droplets of this exotic phase of matter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do bullies have more sex?Adolescents who are willing to exploit others for personal gain are more likely to bully and have sex than those who score higher on a measure of honesty and humility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Allergens widespread in largest study of US homesAllergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation's largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers report that over 90 percent of homes had three or more detectable allergens, and 73 percent of homes had at least one allergen at elevated levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Womb natural killer cell discovery could lead to screening for miscarriage riskFor the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified. Researchers have discovered the role that they play in preparing the womb for pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into battery charging supports development of improved electric vehiclesA new technique provides a unique insight into how the charging rate of lithium ion batteries can be a factor limiting their lifetime and safety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dawn of a galactic collisionA riot of color and light dances through this peculiarly shaped galaxy, NGC 5256. Its smoke-like plumes are flung out in all directions and the bright core illuminates the chaotic regions of gas and dust swirling through the galaxy's center. Its odd structure is due to the fact that this is not one galaxy, but two -- in the process of a galactic collision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clearing the airA greater understanding of the dynamics of chemical reactions is leading to better models of atmospheric chemistry. Through this work, scientists are gaining insight into a key chemical able to break down some major air pollutants.
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Scientific American Content: Global
First Snapshot of Zika-Affected Toddlers Portends a Life of Struggle Most toddlers who were exposed to Zika in the womb and born with birth defects still suffer from many long-term problems at age two, according to the first report characterizing the longer-term health effects of prenatal exposure to the virus. These children often continue to have seizures as well as an inability to respond to noises in their surroundings or follow objects with their eyes, resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GAMBIT narrows the hiding places for 'new physics' The elementary particles of 'new physics' must be so massive that their detection in the LHC, the largest modern accelerator, will not be possible. This none- too-optimistic conclusion comes from the most comprehensive review of observational data from many scientific experiments and their confrontation with several popular varieties of supersymmetry theory. The complicated, extremely com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA researchers share perspective on key elements of ozone layer recovery Each year, ozone-depleting compounds in the upper atmosphere destroy the protective ozone layer, and in particular above Antarctica. The ozone layer acts as Earth's sunscreen by absorbing harmful ultraviolet radiation from incoming sunlight that can cause skin cancer and damage plants, among other harmful effects to life on Earth. While these different compounds each release either reactive chlor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate scientists study the odds of a US megadrought ITHACA, N.Y. - To help untangle fact from speculation, Cornell climate scientists and their colleagues have developed a "robust null hypothesis" to assess the odds of a megadrought - one that lasts more than 30 years - occurring in the western and southwestern United States. The research was published online in the Journal of Climate . "We're establishing a baseline. We're looking for the normal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug discovery could accelerate hugely with machine learning IMAGE: Dr. James Kermode, University of Warwick. view more Credit: University of Warwick Drug discovery could be significantly accelerated thanks to a new high precision machine-learning model, developed by an international collaboration of researchers, including the University of Warwick. The algorithm - partly devised by Dr James Kermode from Warwick's School of Engineering - can accurately p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial intelligence helps accelerate progress toward efficient fusion reactions IMAGE: Image of plasma disruption in experiment on JET, left, and disruption-free experiment on JET, right. Training the FRNN neural network to predict disruptions calls for assigning weights to the data... view more Credit: Image and explanation courtesy of Eliot Feibush. Before scientists can effectively capture and deploy fusion energy, they must learn to predict major disruptions that can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests social workers lack tools to identify potential chronic child neglect BUFFALO, N.Y. - Neglect accounts for more than 75 percent of all child protection cases in the United States, yet, despite this alarming frequency, child welfare workers lack effective assessment tools for identifying the associated risk and protective factors of chronic neglect, according to Patricia Logan-Greene, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. Logan-G
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Toxic chemicals in salons, lack of education lead to adverse health effects IMAGE: This is Lindsey Milich. view more Credit: Lindsey Milich Clients who frequent hair and nail salons exhibit more skin and fungal diseases than those who visit less often and nail salon technicians are receiving inadequate training in the use of chemicals, suggest two Rutgers School of Public Health studies. These studies highlight the need for beauty salon clients and workers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA looks at rainfall in developing Tropical Storm Kai-tak Tropical Storm Kai-tak developed near the east central Philippines as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall. The GPM core observatory satellite carries the first space-borne Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Little understood cell helps mice see color AURORA, Colo. (Dec. 14, 2017) - Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that color vision in mice is far more complex than originally thought, opening the door to experiments that could potentially lead to new treatments for humans. The study was published this week in the journal Neuron . The scientists, led by Maureen Stabio, PhD, assistant professor of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover how cells remember infections decades later A perplexing question in immunology has been, how do immune cells remember an infection or a vaccination so that they can spring into action decades later? Research led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, in collaboration with investigators at Emory University, has found an answer: A small pool of the same immune cells that responded to the original invasion remain alive for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify way to weaken malaria parasites against popular drug treatment IMAGE: This is Min Zhang, PhD. view more Credit: Indiana University School of Medicine Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a way to block the ability of parasites that cause malaria to shield themselves against drug treatments in infected mice--a finding that could lead to the development of new approaches to combat this deadly disease in humans. Malaria co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNH researchers find effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-century DURHAM, N.H. - Nature lovers beware, environmental models used by researchers at the University of New Hampshire are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future. If carbon dioxide emissions continue at the current rate, they report that scena
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The Atlantic
Child Marriage in the Rohingya Camps in Bangladesh In November, photographer Allison Joyce , working for Getty Images, spent time with several Rohingya families in crowded refugee camps in Bangladesh, as they prepared their young daughters for weddings, hoping to secure more food for them and their families. Joyce: “Early marriage is a common cultural practice within the Rohingya Muslim communities in Myanmar with child marriages being extremely
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New on MIT Technology Review
The FCC Has Killed Net Neutrality Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Viden
Netneutralitet afskaffet: 5 ting du skal vide For fremtiden kan store amerikanske tele - og netudbydere som Verizon og AT&T bestemme, hvor hurtigt eller hvor langsomt, man kan få adgang til forskellige internetsider. Det er virkeligheden i USA, efter den amerikanske telestyrelse, FCC, torsdag aften dansk tid har stemt et forslag igennem, der fjerner den såkaldte netneutralitet. I USA har emnet været diskuteret været voldsomt, og i de seneste
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The Atlantic
The Horrors of a Broken Kitchen Sink in mother! Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. Next up is Darren Aronofsky’s mother! (Read our previous entries here .) Halfway through mother! , the unnamed woman played by Jennifer Lawrence comes downstairs to any homeowner’s worst nightmare: u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Falling faster: The surprising leap of Felix BaumgartnerFive years ago the Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner broke the sound barrier during his free fall from an altitude of almost 39 kilometers. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich have analyzed the fluid dynamics of his descent. The surprising result: Baumgartner, with his irregularly shaped equipment, fell faster than a smooth, symmetrical body would have.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Software enables robots to be controlled in virtual reality IMAGE: Brown University undergraduate Eric Rosen operates a Baxter robot using a virtual reality interface developed in Brown's Humans to Robots lab. view more Credit: Nick Dentamaro / Brown University PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Even as autonomous robots get better at doing things on their own, there will still be plenty of circumstances where humans might need to step in and take
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High success rate reported for diabetic Charcot foot surgery MAYWOOD, IL. -- Nearly four out of five diabetic patients with severe cases of a disabling condition called Charcot foot were able to walk normally again following surgery, a Loyola Medicine study has found. The study by orthopaedic surgeons Michael Pinzur, MD, and Adam Schiff, MD, is published in Foot & Ankle International , the official journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticle staircase: Atomic blasting creates new devices to measure nanoparticles Like sandblasting at the nanometer scale, focused beams of ions ablate hard materials to form intricate three-dimensional patterns. The beams can create tiny features in the lateral dimensions--length and width, but to create the next generation of nanometer-scale devices, the energetic ions must precisely control the features in the vertical dimension--depth. Now, researchers at the National Ins
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Action video games to fight dyslexia Many years ago, researchers began to discover the properties of action videogames for the improvement of visual attention and learning processes. What was not so clear were the specific benefits that could be derived from this form of entertainment, nor that the specific action videogames contribute to combat dyslexia, an alteration of the reading ability that causes changes in the order of words
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coloring books make you feel better, but real art therapy much more potent IMAGE: Pieces of art made during the art therapist-aided session of the study. view more Credit: Courtesy of Drexel University. A new study shows that while those adult coloring books can reduce stress, they're still not art therapy. Often, the now-ubiquitous adult coloring books will advertise themselves as "art therapy." But actual art therapists contend that such a claim is misleading, that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Active surveillance of low-risk PMC of the thyroid proposed as first-line management IMAGE: Thyroid , the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, publishes original articles and timely reviews that reflect the rapidly advancing changes in our understanding of thyroid physiology and pathology, from... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 14, 2017--A 10-year study of more than 1,200 patients with low-risk papillary microc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scrap the stethoscope -- engineers create new way to measure vital signs with radio waves ITHACA, N.Y. - No visit to the doctor's office is complete without a blood-pressure cuff squeezing your arm and a cold stethoscope placed on your chest. But what if your vital signs could be gathered, without contact, as you sit in the waiting room or the comfort of your own home? Cornell University engineers have demonstrated a method for gathering blood pressure, heart rate and breath rate usin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Critical toxic species behind Parkinson's Disease is glimpsed at work for the first time IMAGE: The study found that a structural core within a toxic tangle of alpha-synuclein protein molecules allows it to insert itself into the wall of a neuron. view more Credit: Alfonso De Simone Researchers have glimpsed how the toxic protein clusters that are associated with Parkinson's Disease disrupt the membranes of healthy brain cells, creating defects in the cell walls and eventually ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlock IMAGE: Elephant near Kruger National Park. view more Credit: Duan Biggs The debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight. Now, an international team including researchers from The University of Queensland and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spaghetti-like, DNA 'noodle origami' the new shape of things to come for nanotechnology IMAGE: A DNA origami with an emoji-like smiley face. view more Credit: Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University For the past few decades, scientists have been inspired by the blueprint of life, DNA, as the shape of things to come for nanotechnology. This burgeoning field is called DNA origami. Scientist borrowed its moniker from the paper artists who conjure up birds, flowers and planes fr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An ultradilute quantum liquid made from ultra-cold atoms IMAGE: Artistic view of a quantum liquid droplet formed by mixing two gases of ultracold potassium atoms. view more Credit: ICFO/ Povarchik Studios Barcelona Liquids and gases are two different phases of matter that are part of our everyday life. While gases are dilute, compressible and take the size of their container, liquids are dense, have a fixed volume and in small quantitie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coalition seeks to increase transparency on life science career prospects Nine U.S. research universities and a major cancer institute today announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects. The institutions formed the Coalition for Next Generation Life Science in response to the focus of many new Ph.D.s. solely on a limited number of traditional faculty p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in 5 patients report discrimination in health care Almost one in five older patients with a chronic disease reported experiencing health care discrimination of one type or another in a large national survey that asked about their daily experiences of discrimination between 2008 and 2014. The analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco, Stanford University, and UC Berkeley found that discrimination reported by Black patients declined significantly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMass Amherst, Peking University scientists advance knowledge of plant reproduction IMAGE: UMass Amherst plant molecular biologist Alice Cheung says the male plant's pollen tube transports sperm to female target cells. She and colleagues identify two new receptors essential to this communication... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Two groups of plant molecular biologists, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Peking University, China, have long stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines IMAGE: Researchers at WSU, PNNL and the University of New Mexico have developed a better catalyst for catalytic converters that change vehicle pollutants to relatively benign forms of nitrogen, carbon dioxide... view more Credit: Cortland Johnson, PNNL PULLMAN, Wash. - As cars become more fuel efficient, less heat is wasted in the exhaust, which makes it harder to clean up the pollutants bein
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Knot' your average nanostructure: Single-stranded molecules that fold into big shapes IMAGE: Model of unravelling ssOrigami under simulated gravity. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the 15 December 2017, issue of Science , published by AAAS. The paper, by D.... view more Credit: D. Han et al., Science (2017) Helping to make creation of nano-sized structures more user-friendly, scientists have designed single-stranded DNA and RNA (ssDNA and ssRNA) that can fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding a less poopy solution for fecal transplant regulation IMAGE: Diane Hoffmann et al . outline a number of issues with current regulations surrounding fecal matter transplants, an important stand-of-care for certain bacterial infections of the gut, and provide a framework... view more Credit: Val Altounian / AAAS As fecal matter transplants (FMTs) continue to be more widely adopted, it is critical to have an appropriate regulatory framework in place, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two groups that want to save elephants need to find common ground IMAGE: Duan Biggs et al. discuss ways in which two groups of people who want to help protect elephants from poaching - but disagree on the means - can find ways... view more Credit: (c) Art Wolfe / www.artwolfe.com In this Perspective, Duan Biggs et al. discuss ways in which two groups of people who want to help protect elephants from poaching - but disagree on the means - can achieve their
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A complex genetic network controls whether fruit flies need to sleep in Some humans just need more sleep than others, and it turns out that the same is true in fruit flies. In a new study, published December 14, 2017 in PLOS Genetics , Susan Harbison of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health) in Bethesda, Maryland, and colleagues, identified numerous genetic variations in wild fruit flies that can contribute to unusuall
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To sleep or not: Researchers explore complex genetic network behind sleep duration IMAGE: NHLBI researcher Dr. Susan Harbison displays a device used to record sleep and activity in fruit flies. view more Credit: Yazmin Serrano Negron, NHLBI. Scientists have identified differences in a group of genes they say might help explain why some people need a lot more sleep--and others less -- than most. The study, conducted using fruit fly populations bred to model natural varia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop mouse model to study Pteroptine ortheovirus IMAGE: This is a lab mouse. view more Credit: Understanding Animal Research, Flickr In the past decade, the first cases of respiratory tract infection caused by bat-borne Pteropine ortheovirus (PRV) have been reporting in humans. To help shed light on the clinical course of PRV infection, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now used a mouse model of the infection to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking planned experiments online could spot ways to improve animal testing IMAGE: The AnimalTestInfo database could be used to uncover new information about animal testing, including potential targets for efforts to minimize harm to lab animals. view more Credit: Understanding Animal Research, Flickr An online database of study summaries could be systematically evaluated to uncover new information about animal testing, including potential targets for efforts to mini
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Science | The Guardian
Nasa find first alien solar system with as many worlds as our own Scientists on Nasa’s Kepler mission have spotted an eighth planet around a distant star, making it the first alien solar system known to host as many planets as our own. The newfound world orbits a star named Kepler 90 which is larger and hotter than the sun and lies 2,500 light years from Earth in the constellation of Draco. Known as Kepler 90i, the freshly-discovered world is smallest of the ei
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Live Science
If You Suck at Dating, It's Not You: It's Evolution All animals reproduce, but only humans swipe left. For many people, rejection and disappointment are necessary evils of dating . These feelings can be discouraging, but a new study suggests that the emotions may be far more common than they seem on those loneliest of nights. In the study, the researchers found that roughly 50 percent of people have trouble finding or keeping a romantic
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Patients Want Poop Transplants. Here's How to Make Them Safe Neill Stollman has been called the Tupac of poop transplants. The Oakland-based, board-certified gastroenterologist didn’t invent the treatment. But he did bring it to the west coast. His first patient was a woman in her 80s with a horrible case of Clostridium difficile , a gut infection that can strike patients after a course of antibiotics clears out their existing bacterial community. It’s als
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spaghetti-like, DNA 'noodle origami' the new shape of things to come for nanotechnology Two DNA "noodle" Origami structures in the shape of a heart and rhombus. Credit: Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University For the past few decades, scientists have been inspired by the blueprint of life, DNA, as the shape of things to come for nanotechnology. This burgeoning field is called DNA origami. Scientist borrowed its moniker from the paper artists who conjure up birds, flowers and p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coalition seeks to increase transparency on life science career prospects Credit: Petr Kratochvil/Public Domain Nine U.S. research universities and a major cancer institute today announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects. The institutions formed the Coalition for Next Generation Life Science in response to the focus of many new Ph.D.s. solely on a l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines Researchers at WSU, PNNL and the University of New Mexico have developed a better catalyst for catalytic converters that change vehicle pollutants to relatively benign forms of nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water. The catalyst, which uses single atoms of platinum on a cerium oxide surface, is stable at the high exhaust temperatures of a working engine but is active at the lower "cold-start" temper
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To sleep or not: Researchers explore complex genetic network behind sleep duration Graph showing sleep duration (in minutes) of wild fruit flies -- long sleepers, normal sleepers, and short sleepers - artificially bred across 13 generations. Credit: Susan Harbison, NHLBI Scientists have identified differences in a group of genes they say might help explain why some people need a lot more sleep—and others less—than most. The study, conducted using fruit fly populations bred to m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify a pair of receptors essential to male-female plant communications UMass Amherst plant molecular biologist Alice Cheung says the male plant's pollen tube transports sperm to female target cells. She and colleagues identify two new receptors essential to this communication and other molecules whose interactions regulate the process. Credit: UMass Amherst Two groups of plant molecular biologists, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Peking University, Ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking planned experiments online could spot ways to improve animal testing An online database of study summaries could be systematically evaluated to uncover new information about animal testing, including potential targets for efforts to minimize harm to lab animals. A demonstration of this approach is publishing 14 December in the open access journal PLOS Biology . AnimalTestInfo is a website that enables scientists who work with lab animals in Germany to communicate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An ultradilute quantum liquid made from ultra-cold atoms Artistic view of a quantum liquid droplet formed by mixing two gases of ultracold potassium atoms. Credit: ICFO/ Povarchik Studios Barcelona ICFO researchers created a novel type of liquid 100 million times more dilute than water and 1 million times thinner than air. The experiments, published in Science , exploit a fascinating quantum effect to produce droplets of this exotic phase of matter. Li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlock Elephant near Kruger National Park. Credit: Duan Biggs The debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight. Now, an international team including researchers from The University of Queensland and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) is working t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forty years after first Ebola outbreak, survivors show signs they can stave off new infectionSurvivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks. Researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in the same small, remote villages in the forests of the Équateur Province of northwestern Democrati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to terror may increase risk of migraine, other headachesSurvivors of a terror attack have an increased risk of frequent migraine and tension headaches after the attack, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graphic anti-smoking posters may encourage some teens to begin smoking cigarettesOne anti-smoking strategy promoted by tobacco opponents is the display of graphic posters depicting the consequences of tobacco-caused diseases. However, a new study finds that exposing teens to such graphic anti-smoking posters actually may increase the risk that some start smoking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What keeps stem cells in their undifferentiated state?A special cluster of proteins helps unwind DNA during cell division and plays a key role in keeping stem cells in their immature state, scientists have discovered. This study also points to a better understanding of how cancer cells manage to sustain rapid cell division without triggering cell death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monkeys infected by mosquito bites further Zika virus researchMonkeys who catch Zika virus through bites from infected mosquitoes develop infections that look like human Zika cases, and may help researchers understand the many ways Zika can be transmitted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cracking the code of coenzyme Q biosynthesisCoenzyme Q (CoQ) is a vital cog in the body's energy-producing machinery, a kind of chemical gateway in the conversion of food into cellular fuel. But six decades removed from its discovery, scientists still can't describe exactly how and when it is made.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?Scientists have predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season. The results published suggest that the current flu vaccine will work better during the 2018 US flu season than the 2017 Australian flu season.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World e-waste rises 8 percent by weight in 2 years as incomes rise, prices fall: UN-backed reportThe world's e-waste -- discarded products with a battery or plug -- reached a staggering 44.7 million metric tonnes in 2016 -- up 3.3 Mt or 8 percent from 2014. In 2016 world e-waste -- everything from end-of-life refrigerators and television sets to solar panels, mobile phones and computers -- equaled in weight almost nine Great Pyramids of Giza, or 1.23 million fully loaded 18-wheel 40-ton truck
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treatable Condition Could Be Mistaken for Schizophrenia or Bipolar DisorderResearchers believe that a significant number of people diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may actually have a treatable immune system condition. A new research study could have a significant impact on the millions diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, including many homeless.
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NYT > Science
As Zika Babies Become Toddlers, Some Can’t See, Walk or Talk The new study, conducted with the Brazilian Ministry of Health and other organizations, evaluated children in Paraíba state, part of Brazil’s northeastern region, which became the epicenter of the Zika crisis. The researchers initially studied 278 babies born in Paraíba between October 2015 and the end of January 2016. Of those, 122 families agreed to participate in follow-up evaluations this yea
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News at a glance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Satellites trace Afghanistan's lost empires AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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France nabs foreign climate science talent AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Ice-shrouded life sees daylight AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Swedish plastics study fabricated, panel finds AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Sudan seeks a science revival AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Not So Fast Summary While developers amass data on the sensors and algorithms that allow cars to drive themselves, research on the social, economic, and environmental impacts of autonomous vehicles (AVs) is sparse. Truly autonomous driving is still decades away, according to most transportation experts. And because it's hard to study something that doesn't yet exist, the void has been filled by speculation t
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A Matter of Trust Summary Automobile companies and technology firms are racing to deploy autonomous vehicles (AVs). But they could face one key obstacle: consumer distrust of the technology. Unnerved by the idea of not being in control—and by news of semi-AVs that have crashed, in one case killing the owner—many consumers are apprehensive. In a recent survey by AAA, for example, 78% of respondents said they were a
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Breaking the deadlock on ivory Summary Poaching for ivory has caused a steep decline in African elephant ( Loxodonta africana , see the photo) populations over the past decade ( 1 ). This crisis has fueled a contentious global debate over which ivory policy would best protect elephants: banning all ivory trade or enabling regulated trade to incentivize and fund elephant conservation ( 2 ). The deep-seated deadlock on ivory pol
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Closing the tubulin detyrosination cycle AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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How plants differ in toxin-sensitivity AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Rethinking digital manufacturing with polymers AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Speeding up crystallization AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Fotis Kafatos (1940-2017) AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A new data effort to inform career choices in biomedicine AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Improving regulation of microbiota transplants AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Arthur C. Clarke at 100 AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Speak out against tuition waiver taxes AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Retinoic acid's reproducible future AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Lessons learned from cetacean tragedies AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Why aging attenuates antiviral responses AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Bacteria go the distance in cancer AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Stable catalysts through steaming AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Fast phase change with no preconditions AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Tuning the scattering of light AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A structural look at {alpha}-synuclein oligomers AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A CRISPR device to record time AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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How to survive a mass extinction AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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An extra sugar protects AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Finding correlations in a Dirac-cone material AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Wired for success AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A rationally designed DNA-based oscillator AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Large origami from a single strand AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Breaking the symmetry in a supersolid AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Phase transition of scattered light AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Dispersing small, bimetallic nanoparticles AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A little zinc makes the rings all link AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Tubulin carboxypeptidase identity revealed AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Macrocycles by design AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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How to save the African elephant AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Restraining intestinal lymphocyte migration AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Status is not everything AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Too much alike to be receptive MHC-similar stallions reduce pregnancy rate in mares. PHOTO: PHOTO-EQUINE/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM Female choice exerts important selective forces and has shaped many obvious phenotypic traits. Cryptic female choice is choice after insemination and generally has less obvious, but no less important, impacts. Burger et al. showed that cryptic female choice may play a role in a well-known mechanism of mate
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Mechano-induced mitochondrial fission The inside of a cell is crowded with lots of different organelles that need to be accommodated in a constrained environment. What happens when different organelles bump into one another? Dynamic reticular organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, are continually being remodeled. The fusion and fission of mitochondria is essential for their efficient function and healthy main
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Editing genomes without breaks By introducing DNA doublestrand breaks (DSBs), most genome-editing technologies initiate endogenous DNA repair mechanisms that modify the sequences at target sites. DSBs are often toxic, and their repair is usually inefficient, thereby limiting the accuracy and scalability of these technologies. Bypassing DSBs completely, Barbieri et al. developed a new editing platform in budding yeast. DNA olig
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It just takes one "like" The power of using social media to target ads was demonstrated in a study of 3.7 million women. Matz et al. first used data from myPersonality, an app that provides users with psychological tests, to generate a set of Facebook “likes” that would appeal to different people based on their level of extroversion or openness to the unusual. Graphic designers then created ads that would appeal to these
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Trehalose confers superpowers Trehalose provides Acinetobacter with high temperature resistance. PHOTO: DENNIS KUNKEL MICROSCOPY/SCIENCE SOURCE Trehalose is a disaccharide that can endow organisms with extraordinary survival abilities. It is implicated in desiccation resistance, osmoprotection, and heat and cold tolerance, as well as acting as a radical scavenger. Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a notably stress-tolera
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When intuition overrides reason Given two paths to winning, our choice under time pressure often differs from what we would opt for after deliberation, especially if the decision requires a numerical calculation of probabilities. Walco and Risen show that a third to a half of us will elect to rely on gut feelings even after having demonstrated an accurate understanding of which choice is more likely to pay off. This pattern of
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Fiber-optic earthquake detection The seismic networks used to detect earthquakes are limited spatially because they require expensive seismometers to be placed, monitored, and maintained. Lindsey et al. show how fiber optics can be used for seismic recording, using a technique known as distributed acoustic sensing (DAS). Three examples show how DAS can detect ground motions—in Alaska, in the Geysers Geothermal Field in Californi
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Anomalous spin correlations and excitonic instability of interacting 2D Weyl fermions The Coulomb interaction in systems of quasi-relativistic massless electrons has an unscreened long-range component at variance with conventional correlated metals. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to reveal unusual spin correlations of two-dimensional Weyl fermions in an organic material, causing a divergent increase of the Korringa ratio by a factor of 1000 upon cooling, in
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Purcell effect for active tuning of light scattering from semiconductor optical antennas Subwavelength, high–refractive index semiconductor nanostructures support optical resonances that endow them with valuable antenna functions. Control over the intrinsic properties, including their complex refractive index, size, and geometry, has been used to manipulate fundamental light absorption, scattering, and emission processes in nanostructured optoelectronic devices. In this study, we har
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Disorder-induced optical transition from spin Hall to random Rashba effect Disordered structures give rise to intriguing phenomena owing to the complex nature of their interaction with light. We report on photonic spin-symmetry breaking and unexpected spin-optical transport phenomena arising from subwavelength-scale disordered geometric phase structure. Weak disorder induces a photonic spin Hall effect, observed via quantum weak measurements, whereas strong disorder lea
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Science current issue
Monitoring and manipulating Higgs and Goldstone modes in a supersolid quantum gas Higgs and Goldstone modes are collective excitations of the amplitude and phase of an order parameter that is related to the breaking of a continuous symmetry. We directly studied these modes in a supersolid quantum gas created by coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate to two optical cavities, whose field amplitudes form the real and imaginary parts of a U(1)-symmetric order parameter. Monitoring th
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Activation of surface lattice oxygen in single-atom Pt/CeO2 for low-temperature CO oxidation To improve fuel efficiency, advanced combustion engines are being designed to minimize the amount of heat wasted in the exhaust. Hence, future generations of catalysts must perform at temperatures that are 100°C lower than current exhaust-treatment catalysts. Achieving low-temperature activity, while surviving the harsh conditions encountered at high engine loads, remains a formidable challenge.
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Science current issue
Reducing the stochasticity of crystal nucleation to enable subnanosecond memory writing Operation speed is a key challenge in phase-change random-access memory (PCRAM) technology, especially for achieving subnanosecond high-speed cache memory. Commercialized PCRAM products are limited by the tens of nanoseconds writing speed, originating from the stochastic crystal nucleation during the crystallization of amorphous germanium antimony telluride (Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 ). Here, we demonstrate
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Science current issue
Synthesis of ultrasmall, homogeneously alloyed, bimetallic nanoparticles on silica supports Dispersing small, bimetallic nanoparticles For applications of nanoparticles in sensing and catalysis, smaller nanoparticles are often more effective because they expose more active surface sites. The properties of metallic nanoparticles can also be improved by creating bimetallic alloys, but typical synthetic methods yield larger nanoparticles where the metals are poorly mixed. Wong et al. show
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Eudicot plant-specific sphingolipids determine host selectivity of microbial NLP cytolysins Necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1–like (NLP) proteins constitute a superfamily of proteins produced by plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Many NLPs are cytotoxins that facilitate microbial infection of eudicot, but not of monocot plants. Here, we report glycosylinositol phosphorylceramide (GIPC) sphingolipids as NLP toxin receptors. Plant mutants with altered GIPC composition
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Poly[n]catenanes: Synthesis of molecular interlocked chains As the macromolecular version of mechanically interlocked molecules, mechanically interlocked polymers are promising candidates for the creation of sophisticated molecular machines and smart soft materials. Poly[ n ]catenanes, where the molecular chains consist solely of interlocked macrocycles, contain one of the highest concentrations of topological bonds. We report, herein, a synthetic approac
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Structural basis of membrane disruption and cellular toxicity by {alpha}-synuclein oligomers Oligomeric species populated during the aggregation process of α-synuclein have been linked to neuronal impairment in Parkinson’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. By using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in conjunction with other structural methods, we identified the fundamental characteristics that enable toxic α-synuclein oligomers to perturb biolo
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Analysis of Fusobacterium persistence and antibiotic response in colorectal cancer Colorectal cancers comprise a complex mixture of malignant cells, nontransformed cells, and microorganisms. Fusobacterium nucleatum is among the most prevalent bacterial species in colorectal cancer tissues. Here we show that colonization of human colorectal cancers with Fusobacterium and its associated microbiome—including Bacteroides , Selenomonas , and Prevotella species—is maintained in dista
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Vasohibins/SVBP are tubulin carboxypeptidases (TCPs) that regulate neuron differentiation Reversible detyrosination of α-tubulin is crucial to microtubule dynamics and functions, and defects have been implicated in cancer, brain disorganization, and cardiomyopathies. The identity of the tubulin tyrosine carboxypeptidase (TCP) responsible for detyrosination has remained unclear. We used chemical proteomics with a potent irreversible inhibitor to show that the major brain TCP is a compl
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Vasohibins encode tubulin detyrosinating activity Tubulin is subjected to a number of posttranslational modifications to generate heterogeneous microtubules. The modifications include removal and ligation of the C-terminal tyrosine of -tubulin. The enzymes responsible for detyrosination, an activity first observed 40 years ago, have remained elusive. We applied a genetic screen in haploid human cells to find regulators of tubulin detyrosination.
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Multiplex recording of cellular events over time on CRISPR biological tape Although dynamics underlie many biological processes, our ability to robustly and accurately profile time-varying biological signals and regulatory programs remains limited. Here we describe a framework for storing temporal biological information directly in the genomes of a cell population. We developed a "biological tape recorder" in which biological signals trigger intracellular DNA production
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Comprehensive computational design of ordered peptide macrocycles Mixed-chirality peptide macrocycles such as cyclosporine are among the most potent therapeutics identified to date, but there is currently no way to systematically search the structural space spanned by such compounds. Natural proteins do not provide a useful guide: Peptide macrocycles lack regular secondary structures and hydrophobic cores, and can contain local structures not accessible with -a
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New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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My children help my science When I turned 28 years old, midway through my Ph.D., my biological clock went “BRRRRING!” My rational self thought, “Hmm, not a good time. Fact A: I love research and want a career in academia. Fact B: There are only two female faculty members in my department, and neither has children.” So, I put off having children, planning to secure a tenured position and publish at least a dozen papers befor
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Enzyme-free nucleic acid dynamical systems Chemistries exhibiting complex dynamics—from inorganic oscillators to gene regulatory networks—have been long known but either cannot be reprogrammed at will or rely on the sophisticated enzyme chemistry underlying the central dogma. Can simpler molecular mechanisms, designed from scratch, exhibit the same range of behaviors? Abstract chemical reaction networks have been proposed as a programming
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Single-stranded DNA and RNA origami Self-folding of an information-carrying polymer into a defined structure is foundational to biology and offers attractive potential as a synthetic strategy. Although multicomponent self-assembly has produced complex synthetic nanostructures, unimolecular folding has seen limited progress. We describe a framework to design and synthesize a single DNA or RNA strand to self-fold into a complex yet u
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The nanoscale circuitry of battery electrodes Developing high-performance, affordable, and durable batteries is one of the decisive technological tasks of our generation. Here, we review recent progress in understanding how to optimally arrange the various necessary phases to form the nanoscale structure of a battery electrode. The discussion begins with design principles for optimizing electrode kinetics based on the transport parameters an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synthetic protein packages its own genetic material and evolvesScientists have created computationally designed protein assemblies, that display some functions normally associated with living things, in the search for ways to transport therapeutic cargo into specific types of cells without using viruses as vehicles. These encapsulate their own RNA genomes and evolve new traits in complex environments. They are synthetic versions of the protein shells that vir
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vaping popular among teens; opioid misuse at historic lowsNearly one in three 12th-graders report past year use of some kind of vaping device, raising concerns about the impact on their health. What they say is in the device, however, ranges from nicotine, to marijuana, to 'just flavoring.' The survey also suggests that use of hookahs and regular cigarettes is declining. These findings come from the 2017 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey of eighth, 10th
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Live Science
Spy Satellites Reveal Ancient Lost Empires in Afghanistan The lost caravanserais of the Silk Road in Afghanistan have recently been uncovered using satellite imagery. Here, a satellite image of a 17th century carvanserai, or waystation. Credit: Digitalglobe, Inc. Spy satellite imagery is revealing lost Silk Road outposts and the traces of vanished empires in the forbidding desert regions of Afghanistan, new research reveals. The new archaeological
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Live Science
Strange Sea Swirls: What's Behind Speedy 'Smoke Ring' Vortices? Typically, ocean waters flow gently westward, in part driven by the massive, slow waves generated by the Earth's spin. Even when whirlpools or eddies pop up, they tend to flow along with the rest of the water. But sometimes two eddies can combine into something called a modon, a massive vortex that can break off from the ocean's regular flow. Nine of these modons, which were spotted around
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Live Science
Unusual 'Blob' of Hot Rock Found Beneath New England A hot blob of rock seems to be rising toward the surface beneath the North American tectonic plate, under a part of New England. Credit: Shutterstock The continental rock underlying the east coast of North America is pretty boring, tectonically speaking. The last dramatic geological goings-on there happened around 200 million years ago, and most change since then has been from glacial, wind and
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Disney’s Acquisition of Fox Could Change Streaming Forever Well, it’s finally happening. After weeks, if not years, of speculation, the Walt Disney Company announced this morning that it is acquiring nearly all of 21st Century Fox. The $52.4 billion (yes, with a b ) acquisition is one of the largest in media history and brings Fox—which controls everything from The Simpsons to the X-Men, Fantastic Four, and Deadpool—into the same house as Pixar, Star War
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Popular Science
Now we know why Hurricane Harvey's rainfall was so intense Houston is a city accustomed to flooding. There have been 30 major floods there since the 1940s, with three massive surges in the past three years alone. But when Hurricane Harvey hit the Houston, Texas area in August, it dealt a blow much harder than expected . It lingered on the coast dumping massive quantities of water on the region. The storm ultimately killed 82 people, displaced tens of tho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of new planet reveals distant solar system to rival our own The Kepler-90 planets have a similar configuration to our solar system with small planets found orbiting close to their star, and the larger planets found farther away. In our solar system, this pattern is often seen as evidence that the outer planets formed in a cooler part of the solar system, where water ice can stay solid and clump together to make bigger and bigger planets. The pattern we se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No alien 'signals' from cigar-shaped asteroid: researchers Artist's impression of ʻOumuamua. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser No alien signals have been detected from an interstellar, cigar-shaped space rock discovered travelling through our Solar System in October, researchers listening for evidence of extraterrestrial technology said Thursday. The object, dubbed Oumuamua, was spotted by several Earthly telescopes two months ago. Given its weird trajectory,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FCC votes along party lines to end 'net neutrality'The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit or charge more for faster speeds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will US companies put overseas cash to work? Don't bet on it The Republican tax plan seems about to hand a bow-tied holiday gift to some of America's richest multinational companies, from Apple and Microsoft to Google's parent Alphabet: Tens of billions in tax breaks on profits they've parked overseas. Republicans say they're confident the companies will spend their windfall on new plants, equipment, jobs and higher pay—investments that would energize the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers taking optical device out of the lab and into the clinic to detect cancer at its earliest stages From left, Yao Shen, a master's candidate in mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Yuxiang "Shawn" Liu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and PhD candidate Chaoyang Ti with the apparatus they are using to test optical tweezers that employ optical fibers instead of lenses. Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute In a paper published in Nature Scientific Repo
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Star system has record eight exoplanets Image copyright NASA Image caption Artwork: The Kepler telescope was launched to detect new worlds using the "transit method" Nasa finds a distant star circled by eight planets, equal to the complement in our own Solar System. It's the largest number of worlds ever discovered in a planetary system outside our own. The star known as Kepler-90, is just a bit hotter and larger than the Sun; astronom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Allergens widespread in largest study of US homes Allergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation's largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that over 90 percent of homes had three or more detectable allergens, and 73 percent of homes had at least one allergen at elevated levels. The findings were published November 30 in the Journal of Allergy and C
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WPI team taking optical device from the lab to the clinic to detect cancer much earlier Worcester, Mass. - In a paper published in Nature Scientific Reports , a team of researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has demonstrated how a device that uses beams of light to grip and manipulate tiny objects, including individual cells, can be miniaturized, opening the door to creating portable devices small enough to be inserted into the bloodstream to trap individual cancer cel
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Futurity.org
Inequality grew as ancient people domesticated animals An analysis of 63 archeological sites across North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa links increasing wealth inequality and the rise of animal domestication. Published in Nature , the study used house size as a measure of wealth. The sites included a range of economic systems—from ancient cities to hunter-gatherer communities—and spanned the past 11,000 years. Coauthor Elizabeth Stone, professor
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Science | The Guardian
Is ‘Oumuamua an alien spacecraft? First scans show no signs of technology The first scans for alien technology aboard a mysterious object that is barreling through the solar system have found no evidence it is the work of an intelligent civilisation. The cigar-shaped object was spotted hurtling through the solar system in October and while astronomers suspected it was an interstellar asteroid, its curious shape led them to propose sweeping it for radio signals in case
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New Scientist - News
Venice may be almost 200 years older than anyone thought Over 1000 years of history alxpin/Getty By Colin Barras Deep beneath the elaborate mosaic floor of Venice’s Saint Mark’s Basilica , archaeologists have discovered two 1300-year-old peach stones. The find may add 180 years to the history of the iconic floating city. Most of Italy’s great cities date back to the Romans, but Venice is an exception, says Albert Ammerman at Colgate University in H
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient genetic mutation helps explain origin of some human organsA genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. This change, a random error in the evolutionary process, facilitated the connection of the gene networks involved in animal embryogenesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracing a plant's steps: Following seed dispersal using chloroplast DNAResearchers have developed a new tool to sequence chloroplast DNA from hundreds of plants at once, to learn more about how plant populations move. This tool, CallHap, makes it cheaper and easier to sequence the chloroplast genomes of large numbers of plants and accurately track seed dispersal across landscapes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobialsAntibodies are proteins produced by the human immune system to ward off foreign invaders. Our bodies mount this defense rapidly, especially if they have seen the invader before, producing the needed antibody within days of infection. But to make them in the lab, antibodies specific for just one invader can take months, and be an expensive proposition. New research looks at mimicking nature's appro
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Guide to the World Bitcoin Created Bitcoin. Cryptocurrencies. Smart contracts. Many people have now heard of the rapidly changing ecosystem of financial technology, but few have wrapped their heads around it. Hundreds of central banks and corporations are incubating a game-changing technology called blockchain—and investors are betting billions on it. Yet only 24 percent of global financial services professionals surveyed in 2017
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists solve speed surprise in stratospheric stuntScientists say they've figured out why an Austrian who became the first skydiver to break the speed of sound fell faster than the drag of his body should have allowed.
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Ingeniøren
Sørgeligt: Ikke alle har forstået, at videnskab også kan være humor Hvert år opfordrer det seriøse og anerkendte tidsskrift BMJ – tidligere kendt som British Medical Journal – forskere til at indsende videnskabelige artikler i den lettere og humoriske genre til deres julenummer . Redaktøren understreger dog, at »skønt vi byder et letfordøjelig indtag og satire velkommen, offentliggør vi ikke jokes, fup eller fabrikerede data.« Julenummeret giver anledning til, at
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skye high impact: Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strikeGeologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within the British Paleogene Igneous Province (BPIP), opens questions about the impact and its possible connection to Paleogene volcanic activity across the North Atlanti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Journaling inspires altruism through an attitude of gratitudeGratitude does more than help maintain good health. New research finds that regularly noting feelings of gratitude in a journal leads to increased altruism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robotics researchers track autonomous underground mining vehiclesRobotics researchers have developed new technology to equip underground mining vehicles to navigate autonomously through dust, camera blur and bad lighting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brittle Stars inspire new generation of robots able to adapt to physical damageThe invention of a robot made to adapt to unexpected physical damage is a significant breakthrough for machines made to function in tough environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Frequent sun exposure may cue gene fusion found in skin cancerResearchers have determined that a particular fusion gene has a tendency to be found in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) lesions on skin exposed frequently to the sun. The fusion gene is unique to cSCC and appears to be related to frequent sun exposure. It is believed that the work will open doors to a new form of personalized cSCC treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mild traumatic brain injury causes long-term damage in miceA new study in mice found that mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can precipitate not only acute damage but also a lifelong degenerative process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fox looks to wrap up Sky takeover in UK, hand over to Disney This Friday, July 25, 2014, file photo shows a view of the headquarters of the Italian Sky television broadcaster in Milan, Italy. Disney announced Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, that it is buying a large part of Fox. Under the deal, Disney will get at least a 39 percent stake in European satellite-TV and broadcaster Sky. Fox is hoping to acquire the remainder of Sky before the deal closes, giving Disn
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Big Think
How Clever Is It to Dismiss IQ Tests? ‘IQ tests just measure how good you are at doing IQ tests.’ This is the argument that is almost always made when intelligence-testing is mentioned. It’s often promoted by people who are, otherwise, highly scientifically literate. You wouldn’t catch them arguing that climate change is a myth or that vaccines might cause autism. But saying that IQ tests are useless is just as wrong as these notions
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Cryptocurrency Without a Blockchain Has Been Built to Outperform Bitcoin Bitcoin isn’t the only cryptocurrency on a hot streak—plenty of alternative currencies have enjoyed rallies alongside the Epic Bitcoin Bull Run of 2017. One of the most intriguing examples is also among the most obscure in the cryptocurrency world. Called IOTA its total value has jumped from just over $4 billion to more than $10 billion in a little over two weeks. But that isn’t what makes it int
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sumatran rhinos never recovered from losses during the Pleistocene, genome evidence shows Photograph of Ipuh, the Sumatran rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) at the Cincinnati Zoo. Credit: Tom Uhlman The Sumatran rhinoceros ( Dicerorhinus sumatrensis ) is one of the most threatened mammals on earth. By 2011, only about 200 of the rhinos were thought to remain living in the wild. Now, an international team of researchers has sequenced and analyzed the first Sumatran rhino genome f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dawn of a galactic collision NGC 5256 is a pair of galaxies in its final stage of merging. It was previously observed by Hubble as part of a collection of 59 images of merging galaxies, released on Hubble's 18th anniversary on April 24, 2008. The new data make the gas and dust being whirled around inside and outside the galaxy more visible than ever before. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA A riot of colour and light dances through t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrogen production: protein environment makes catalyst efficientThe interaction of protein shell and active center in hydrogen-producing enzymes is crucial for the efficiency of biocatalysts. A team specifically analyzed the role of hydrogen bonds in certain enzymes from green algae, the hydrogenases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Doing without dark energyThree mathematicians have a different explanation for the accelerating expansion of the universe that does without theories of 'dark energy.' Einstein's original equations for General Relativity actually predict cosmic acceleration due to an 'instability,' they argue in a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lizards of Oz take toll on turtle eggsGoannas have overtaken foxes as the number one predator of the endangered loggerhead turtle at its second largest Queensland nesting beach. A new study has found that since feral red foxes were controlled in the 1980s, there has been an increase in the number goanna raids on loggerhead turtle nests at Wreck Rock beach, south of Agnes Waters.
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The Scientist RSS
New Resource Ranks Chemical Probes for Human ProteinsWith many probes being seriously flawed, Probe Miner helps researchers find those that are most specific and effective for manipulating their chosen proteins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers track muscle stem cell dynamics in response to injury and aging La Jolla, Calif., December 14, 2017 - A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) describes the biology behind why muscle stem cells respond differently to aging or injury. The findings, published in Cell Stem Cell, have important implications for therapeutic strategies to regenerate skeletal muscle in response to the normal wear and tear of aging, o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins scientists chart how brain signals connect to neurons Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical's pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications. It's long been known that brain neurons use glutamate as a way to communicate wit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapies At a glance: Survival benefits of many cancer drug combinations are not due to drug synergy, but to a form of "bet hedging." Combination treatment gives each patient multiple chances of responding to at least one drug, increasing overall measures of survival within patient populations. Computational models of combinations in which drugs act independently of each other accurately predict survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How defeating THOR could bring a hammer down on cancer IMAGE: This is a conceptual image of Thor's hammer. view more Credit: Ella Maru Studio, Inc. and Yashar Niknafs ANN ARBOR, Michigan -- It turns out Thor, the Norse god of thunder and the Marvel superhero, has special powers when it comes to cancer too. Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center uncovered a novel gene they named THOR while investigating previously
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapy IMAGE: This figure depicts strategies involving biomaterials for engineering immune function. view more Credit: Bookstaver et al./Trends in Immunology In the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient's immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors. A flu vaccine might look and feel like applying a small, round Band-Aid to your skin. These are examples of how inn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA: Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibresAs it squeezes down the chromatin fiber, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA -- a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein? A team of scientists has found that the driving force could be the supercoiling of upstream DNA. Their research is thereby adding a key piece to the puzzle of gene expression regulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bicycles reacting to speed for stable cyclingA Dutch consortium has developed an electrical bicycle that prevents elderly people from falling. The smart Assistive Bicycle, called SOFIE, increases stability by, amongst others, a drive off assistance and by automatically lowering the saddle at low speeds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CT scans of Egyptian mummies reveal oldest known cases of breast cancer and multiple myelomaAn international team has discovered the world’s oldest known cases of breast cancer and multiple myeloma (a type of bone marrow cancer). The discoveries were made by conducting CT scans of two mummies found in the pharaonic necropolis of Qubbet el-Hawa in Aswan, Egypt.
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NYT > Science
How Global Warming Fueled Five Extreme Weather Events Over the past few years, a large patch of unusually warm water has appeared off the coast of Alaska, popularly known as “the blob.” These warm waters have allowed toxic algae blooms to spread across the region , killing seabirds by the thousands and forcing local fisheries to close. A new study, led by John E. Walsh of the University of Alaska, called the blob “unprecedented” and argued that it “
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The Atlantic
Interstellar Object Shows No Signs of Alien Technology So Far Astronomers have completed their first round of telescope observations of ‘Oumuamua, the first known interstellar object to enter our solar system, to check the asteroid for signs of alien technology. So far, they have found no evidence of artificial signals coming from the asteroid, they said Thursday—but the search isn’t over yet. “Indeed, nothing has popped up, but we’re busy churning through
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Big Think
Airbus Draws Christmas Tree in Skies Over Germany Making the most of a test flight over Germany and Denmark earlier this week, an Airbus A380 drew a giant Christmas tree on the map – ornaments included. The five and a half hour flight started and ended at Hamburg Finkenwerder airport. The A380 flew in a straight line towards the southwest, making a loop just south of Bremen. After a zig in easterly direction and a zag to resume its southwest
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Big Think
10 Schools of Philosophy and Why You Should Know Them For your reading pleasure, here are ten schools of philosophy you should know about. Some of them are commonly misunderstood, and we correct that problem here. The leading philosophy among angsty teens who misunderstand Nietzsche. The root of the word 'nihilism' is derived from the Latin nihil , meaning "nothing", and it is a more of a series of related positions and problems than a single school
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
That Feeling in Your BonesRainy weather has long been blamed for achy joints and back pain. Past research has yielded mixed results. New analysis tracking visits to the doctor with daily rainfall found no relationship between the two.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New material lowers the energy consumption associated with ethylene productionResearchers are developing a zeolite which will allow users to separate ethylene using 25 per cent less energy than with current methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers shine a spotlight on illegal wild orchid tradeLarge-scale commercial trade of wild orchids is a pressing, but little-recognized conservation problem, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breathing exercises help asthma patients with quality of lifeA new study has found that people who continue to get problems from their asthma, despite receiving standard treatment, experience an improved quality of life when they are taught breathing exercises. The majority of asthma patients have some degree of impaired quality of life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insight into how infants learn to walkTen-week-old babies can learn from practicing walking months before they begin walking themselves, say researchers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
U.S. religion is increasingly polarized There’s both inspiring and troubling news for holiday worshippers. Unlike other historically Christian Western nations, the United States is not losing its religion, say sociologists Landon Schnabel of Indiana University Bloomington and Sean Bock of Harvard University. But America is becoming as polarized religiously as it is politically , the researchers report online November 27 in Sociological
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Big Think
Ultrafast Holographic Printer Creates 3D Objects in Mere Seconds Imagine this, you see something online you just have to have, like a rugged smartphone case emblazoned with your favorite character. You order it and instead of waiting for it to be delivered, your 3D printer fashions it for you, to your exact specifications, in seconds. Why don’t we have this right now? 3D printers can take hours or even days to create an object, making such a scenario difficult
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The Atlantic
First Responders to Mass Shootings Speak Up “When we hear about the next [mass shooting] tragedy, it’s heartbreaking, and it rips open the scabs from December 14,” says Dr. William Begg in Kim A. Snyder’s We Are All Newtown . Begg was a first responder when—five years ago today—a gunman took the lives of 20 children and six teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School. “I want to recognize the valiant efforts of the first responders,” Begg con
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate scientists study the odds of a U.S. megadroughtTo help untangle fact from speculation, scientists have developed a 'robust null hypothesis' to assess the odds of a megadrought -- one that lasts more than 30 years -- occurring in the western and southwestern United States.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The wet road to fast and stable batteriesAn international team of scientists has discovered an anode battery material with superfast charging and stable operation over many thousands of cycles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapyRadiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors have shown that radiation therapy -- aimed directly at the heart -- can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. They treated five patients with irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachycardia, who had not responded to standard treatments. The therapy resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon Sunlight v subversion What to do about China’s “sharp power” China is manipulating decision-makers in Western democracies. The best defence is transparency
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week The Federal Reserve lifted the range for its benchmark interest rate by a quarter of a percentage point to between 1.25% and 1.5%, the third rise this year. Data showing that 228,000 jobs had been created in November, which was more than had been expected, underlined the robustness of the American economy, sealing the decision. The rate-setters’ median forecast was for another three quarter-point
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid biopsy results differed substantially between 2 providers Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers. Liquid biopsy is a new and noninvasive alternative to tumor tissue sequencing, and it is intended to specifically detect and sequence tumor DNA circulating in patients' blood. The results are used to help guide doctors to ta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Testing the accuracy of FDA-approved and lab-developed cancer genetics tests Cancer molecular testing can drive clinical decision making and help a clinician determine if a patient is a good candidate for a targeted therapeutic drug. Clinical tests for common cancer causing-mutations in the genes BRAF, EGFR and KRAS abound, and include U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved companion diagnostics (FDA-CDs) as well as laboratory-developed tests (LDTs). LDTs are te
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Live Science
Surgeon Signs Initials into Patients' Livers: What Is an 'Argon Beam'? A photo of Simon Bramhall taken in November. Credit: Richard Vernalls/PA Wire/Zuma A British surgeon has pleaded guilty to charges that he marked his initials into patients' organs using a medical instrument called an "argon beam coagulator," according to news reports. But what exactly is this instrument, and are its effects permanent? The surgeon, Simon Bramhall, admitted to the charge of
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Big Think
A Bot Wrote a New Harry Potter Chapter, and It Is Utterly Crazy "Harry could tell Voldemort was standing right behind him. He felt a great overreaction. Harry tore his eyes from his head and threw them into the forest. Voldemort raised his eyebrows at Harry, who could not see anything at the moment." Thus transpires the confrontation between Harry Potter and He Who Must Not Be Named in a just-published new chapter, 'The Handsome One', from Harry Potter
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Live Science
Glass-Shattering! How Wineglass Size Has Changed Since 1700 This holiday season, will you view the glass as half full or half empty? Well, that might depend on the size of the glass. A new study from England finds that over the past three centuries, wineglasses in England have ballooned in size, from holding the equivalent of a double shot of liquor to holding nearly two cups of liquid. In the study, researchers at the University of Cambridge looked
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Ingeniøren
Se førerassistenten i aktion på Volvo XC90 Biler Kunstig intelligens Selvkørende biler
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Science : NPR
Science Speed-Dating Aims To Boost Accuracy In TV And Film bestdesigns/Getty Images/iStockphoto bestdesigns/Getty Images/iStockphoto Have you ever walked out of a movie theater and said to your companion, "Wow, the science in that film was awesome?" You might think, here, of Jodie Foster searching for extraterrestrial intelligence in the now-classic movie Contact . Or, more recently, Matt Damon sciencing his way out of trouble when stranded in The Martia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetics may play role in chronic pain after surgery CHICAGO - Genetics may play a role in determining whether patients experience chronic pain after surgery, suggests a study published today in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology , the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Aside from genetic factors, the study also found patients younger than 65 years old, males and those with a prior history of c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clearing the air Residents in some areas of the developing world are currently coping with dangerous levels of air pollution. Recent research, co-led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, is leading to a new understanding of a key chemical able to break down some major air pollutants. Argonne's Stephen Klippenstein and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania examined th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Womb natural killer cell discovery could lead to screening for miscarriage risk Previously unknown functions of natural killer cells identified Cells remodel and 'refresh' the lining of the womb in preparation for pregnancy Process isn't always balanced in each cycle Could lead to screening and treatment for women at risk of miscarriage For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified. Researchers at the University of Warwick and Univ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insight into battery charging supports development of improved electric vehicles Oxford, December 14, 2017 - A new technique developed by researchers at Technische Universität München, Forschungszentrum Jülich, and RWTH Aachen University, published in Elsevier's Materials Today , provides a unique insight into how the charging rate of lithium ion batteries can be a factor limiting their lifetime and safety. State-of-the-art lithium ion batteries are powering a revolution in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dawn of a galactic collision IMAGE: NGC 5256 is a pair of galaxies in its final stage of merging. It was previously observed by Hubble as part of a collection of 59 images of merging galaxies,... view more Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA A riot of colour and light dances through this peculiarly shaped galaxy, NGC 5256. Its smoke-like plumes are flung out in all directions and the bright core illuminates the chaotic regions of gas a
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Scientific American Content: Global
For Baby's Brain to Benefit, Read the Right Books at the Right Time The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Parents often receive books at pediatric checkups via programs like Reach Out and Read and hear from a variety of health professionals and educators that reading to their kids is critical for supporting development. The pro-reading message is getting through to pare
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A new weapon in the fight against superbugs | David BrennerSince the widespread use of antibiotics began in the 1940s, we've tried to develop new drugs faster than bacteria can evolve -- but this strategy isn't working. Drug-resistant bacteria known as superbugs killed nearly 700,000 people last year, and by 2050 that number could be 10 million -- more than cancer kills each year. Can physics help? In a talk from the frontiers of science, radiation scient
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do bullies have more sex? Adolescents who are willing to exploit others for personal gain are more likely to bully and have sex than those who score higher on a measure of honesty and humility. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psychological Science which was led by Daniel Provenzano of the University of Windsor in Canada. Researchers believe that bullying might be more than just objectionabl
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Futurity.org
Can targeting inflammation ease chemo brain? In a new pilot study, researchers have confirmed that inflammation in the blood plays a key role in “chemo brain.” The finding could lead to a new way of identifying inflammatory biomarkers in cancer patients and then treating inflammation with medications or exercise to improve cognition and other symptoms, says senior author Michelle C. Janelsins, associate professor of surgery in the Cancer Co
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ohio Passes Law Barring Abortion over Down Syndrome Diagnosis CLEVELAND (Reuters) - Women in Ohio would be prohibited from receiving abortions because of a fetal Down syndrome diagnosis under a bill that passed the state senate on Wednesday and is heading to Republican Governor John Kasich’s desk. Lawmakers voted 20-12 in favor of the law, which criminalizes abortion if the physician has knowledge that the procedure is being sought due to a diagnosis of
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Ingeniøren
Lovende resultater for grøn fremstilling af nanomaterialer En grønnere og mere præcis metode til fremstilling af nanomaterialer, der kan anvendes som bæremateriale i katalysatorer, til elektriske ledningsbaner og udstødnings- systemer. Det er slutmålet med det forskningsarbejde, der i disse år foregår i regi af en forskningsalliance kaldet Green Chemistry for Advanced Materials (GCAM), som forsker i nanomaterialer fremstillet via superkritisk syntese. Ov
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Futurity.org
DNA screening device held together with a breath An accident was key to the creation of a new device that can detect DNA biomarkers associated with disease. “It was like a really high-tech temporary tattoo that I created by accident; lick and stick!” Greg Madejski held his breath as he looked into the microscope, trying to weld two fingernail-sized chips together: a tiny chip containing a nanofilter on top of another chip with a DNA sensor. It
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ultra-thin diamond membrane is a radiobiologist's best friendMeasuring dosage of radiation can be challenging, especially when working with low-energy protons, but researchers have now developed an ultra-thin diamond membrane that can measure the number of protons in a radiation dose with almost perfect accuracy. The detector attaches to a charged-particle microbeam and enables the delivery of radiation to an area less than 2 micrometers wide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover blood sample detection method for multiple sclerosis A METHOD for quickly detecting signs of multiple sclerosis has been developed by a University of Huddersfield research team. The discovery, using advanced mass spectrometry techniques, offers a diagnostic tool that enables the detection of multiple sclerosis (MS) to be made simply using blood samples. The current procedure for detection requires the invasive, often painful, process of collecting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Paediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact of overusing technology on people's wellbeing. However, new Oxford University research suggests that existing guidance managing children's digital media time may not be as bene
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insight into how infants learn to walk Ten-week-old babies can learn from practising walking months before they begin walking themselves say researchers. They gave the infants experience at "reflex walking" which is a primitive instinct in babies which disappears around 12 weeks of age. When held by an adult at a slightly forward angle, and with the soles of their feet touching a flat surface, the infants will reflexively walk by plac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visitor patterns and emerging activities in national parks revealed by social media posts Researchers from the Digital Geography at the University of Helsinki have been studying whether social media data could be used to understand visitor's activities in national parks and most recent results are presented in Scientific reports: Instagram, Flickr, or Twitter: Assessing the usability of social media data for visitor monitoring in protected areas. National parks are the cornerstone o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydrogen production: Protein environment makes catalyst efficient The interaction of protein shell and active centre in hydrogen-producing enzymes is crucial for the efficiency of biocatalysts. A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion in Mülheim an der Ruhr specifically analysed the role of hydrogen bonds in certain enzymes from green algae, the hydrogenases. The groups, which cooperate in the Excellence Cl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change made Harvey rainfall 15 percent more intense A team of scientists from World Weather Attribution, including researchers from Rice University and other institutions in the United States and Europe, have found that human-caused climate change made the record rainfall that fell over Houston during Hurricane Harvey roughly three times more likely and 15 percent more intense. The study is available online in Environmental Research Letters . "The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Canada can help protect Canadians from obesity and chronic disease University of Toronto nutritional scientists are leading a study with national experts calling on the Canadian government to outlaw junk food marketing to children, impose stricter limits on unhealthy nutrients added to foods, and impose a "sugary drink tax." Professor Mary L'Abbé, chair of the Department of Nutritional Sciences and Banting postdoctoral fellow Lana Vanderlee, made the recommend
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Viden
Hvor meget holder videnskaben i Star Wars? Et af de mest karakteristiske elementer i Star Wars-universet er lyssværdet. Selvom navnet antyder det, er der dog ikke meget lys over klingen. Den består i stedet af brandvarm plasma, der bliver dannet af fiktive krystaller. Ifølge Jens Juul Rasmussen, professor ved DTU Fysik, plasmafysik og fusionsenergi, er det ikke helt urealistisk at lave noget, der ligner et lyssværd. Men det vil ikke blive
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Viden
40 års målinger: Det gik allerede galt med indlandsisen i 2003 kl. 07.01 Indlandsisen smelter, og det skyldes klimaforandringerne. Det bliver endnu engang slået fast af ny dansk forskning, der har undersøgt isen fra 1975 til 2014 - længere tid end nogensinde før. Og målingerne tyder på, at noget var riv rav ruskende galt i Arktis helt tilbage i 2003 - og er accelereret siden. Vi kan se, at der siden 2003 er kommet flere kraftige højtryk over indlandsisen, so
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Viden
USA vil afskaffe reglerne om netneutralitet Der er nogle grundlæggende principper på spil, når Federal Communications Commission (FCC), den amerikanske telestyrelse, torsdag formentlig vedtager et omstridt forslag, der afskaffer reglerne om netneutralitet. Begrebet dækker over, at internetudbydere ikke må blokere, begrænse eller på anden måde gøre forskel på adgang til forskellige hjemmesider og tjenester på internettet. Kritikerne mener,
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Viden
Enorme mængder elektronikskrot bliver ikke genbrugt 13. dec. 2017 kl. 20.28 opdateret kl. 09.25 Køleskabe, airconditionanlæg, vaskemaskiner, mobiltelefoner og computere bliver skrottet i stor stil verden over. I 2016 blev der produceret hele 44,7 millioner tons elektronikaffald, hvilket svarer til 4.500 Eiffeltårne. Og mængden forventes at stige til 52,2 millioner ton i 2021. Hvad er elektronikskrot? Elektronikskrot defineres i rapporten fra FN-un
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Viden
Spiller Googles computer skak som et rumvæsen? Googles brætspillende kunstige intelligens AlphaGo er god til at spille brætspil. Rigtig, rigtig god. Tidligere på året trænede en ny udgave af programmet sig selv op til et overmenneskeligt niveau i det komplicerede brætspil Go, kun ved at spille mod sig selv. Dernæst vandt den hundrede kampe i streg mod verdens bedste Go-spiller - den oprindelige AlphaGo. Den lærte spillet ved at tygge igennem
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Viden
Næste års mobillås? Fingeraftryk scannes gennem skærmen I takt med at smartphones er ved at udvikle sig til at blive en stor glasskærm, er den populære fingeraftryksscanner, som rigtig mange bruger til at låse telefonen op med, blevet forvist fra fronten af telefonen. Læs også: Ny mobilmode: Nu bliver telefonerne rammeløse De fleste nye Android-flagskibstelefoner, har flyttet fingerscanneren om på bagsiden, mens Apple med iPhone X helt har valgt at sl
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Viden
Professor: Ufattelig dumt at afskære studerende fra slinger i studiet Den bedste forskning med størst wow-effekt kommer fra folk, der har fået mulighed for at følge deres egen vej. Derfor er det en ”ufattelig dårlig ide” at afskære studerende fra svinkeærinder i et stadig mere kasseagtigt uddannelsessystem. Det mener professor Andreas Roepstorff , der selv både er uddannet antropolog og biolog. Nu leder han det tværvidenskabelige ” Interacting Minds Centre ” på Aar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is net neutrality and why does it matter? This June 19, 2015, file photo, shows the entrance to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) building in Washington. "Net neutrality" regulations, designed to prevent internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T, Comcast and Charter from favoring some sites and apps over others, are on the chopping block. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, on Tuesday, Dec. 12
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Ingeniøren
Fuldmånen øger antallet af fatale motorcykelulykker For halvanden uge siden blev mange af os nok betaget af årets eneste supermåne, hvor Månen var så tæt på Jorden, som den kan komme, samtidig med at det var fuldmåne. Over Danmark lyste og blændede Månen fuldt op på den klare aften- og nattehimmel. Det var så smukt. Men skal man tro amerikanske forskere også et farligt døgn i trafikken. Forskere fra Princeton University konkluderer i en videnskabe
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Triton Malware Targets Industrial Safety Systems In the Middle East Since Stuxnet first targeted and destroyed uranium enrichment centrifuges in Iran last decade, the cybersecurity world has waited for the next step in that digital arms race: Another piece of malicious software designed specifically to enable the damage or destruction of industrial equipment. That rare type of malware has now reappeared in the the Middle East. And this time, it seems to have the
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'Okami': Capcom Revives the Watercolor Masterpiece For Modern Consoles More than a decade later, the thing I most remember about Okami is how color follows you wherever you go. Released in 2006, by the now-defunct Clover Studios, the game starred a wolf-god named Amaterasu in a vibrant world inspired by Japanese ink wash painting. The folkoric Japanese landscape Ameratsu finds herself in, though, is dying—empty and colorless. The eight-headed demon Orochi has been u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon will stream AVP beach volleyball tour next 3 summers Amazon is going shopping for TV content, and it's putting some beach volleyball in its cart. The internet retail giant has an agreement with the AVP tour to livestream almost every match from every tournament for the next three summers. The domestic beach circuit joins NFL Thursday night games and some men's tennis on Amazon Prime Video, which sends shows to TVs, phones, tablets, game consoles an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New bird species named for Harvard 'father of biodiversity' The comfort food we know and love today as the potato was domesticated between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago from a wild species native to the Andes Mountains in southern Peru. During the 16th century, Spanish conquistadors ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Bitcoin, other currencies soar, regulators urge caution In this Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, file photo, people use a Bitcoin ATM in Hong Kong. The public's intense interest in all things bitcoin, and efforts by entrepreneurs to fund their businesses with digital currencies, has begun to draw attention from regulators. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File) The public's interest in all things bitcoin and efforts by entrepreneurs to fund their businesses with digital cu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research highlights need for new approach to crippling horse disease A new review 'Paradigm shifts in understanding equine laminitis' published in The Veterinary Journal , demonstrates how University of Liverpool led research has changed the way we think about a crippling disease of horses. Laminitis is one of the most serious diseases of horses, ponies and donkeys. It is a painful condition of the tissues (lamellae) that bond the hoof wall to the pedal (coffin) b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracing a plant's steps: Following seed dispersal using chloroplast DNA California goldfields ( Lasthenia californica ) growing in southern Oregon, USA. Credit: Monica Grasty Plants spread their seeds across the landscape to colonize new areas, but it's difficult and expensive for biologists to trace their movements. Now, researchers at Portland State University have developed a new technique to sequence chloroplast DNA from hundreds of plants at once, to learn more
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robotics researchers track autonomous underground mining vehicles Credit: Queensland University of Technology QUT robotics researchers have developed new technology to equip underground mining vehicles to navigate autonomously through dust, camera blur and bad lighting. Using mathematics and biologically-inspired algorithms, the technology uses vehicle-mounted cameras to track the location of the vehicle in underground tunnels to within metres. The research has
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Futurity.org
What earlier springs mean for forests New research that combines satellite data with on-the-ground measurements, suggests that as global temperatures rise, spring in the Northeastern United States is starting earlier. And that shift has major implications for how carbon, a main player in global climate change, cycles through the ecosystem. Mark Friedl, professor of earth & environment at Boston University, and doctoral candidate Mink
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New on MIT Technology Review
Andrew Ng Says Factories Are AI’s Next Frontier Every day, in factories around the world, thousands of people spend hours squinting at tiny circuit boards and other electronic components, looking for imperfections. It’s painstaking work, and Andrew Ng, a leading artificial-intelligence expert who’s already spent years helping tech giants Google and Baidu spread AI across their companies, thinks computers can do it better. Ng, formerly the head
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The impact of naming winter storms Students are overwhelmed with snow. Credit: University of Connecticut Adam Rainear '16 MA is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undergraduate degree in meteorology who served as a research assistant in the Office of the New Jersey State Climatologist. He also completed meteorology internships at the News 12 Networks and at C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars upside down This stunning image swath was taken by ESA’s Mars Express during camera calibration as the spacecraft flew over the north pole (bottom) towards the equator (top). Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO Which way is up in space? Planets are usually shown with the north pole at the top and the south pole at the bottom. In this remarkable image taken by ESA's Mars Express, the Red Planet is see
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solid start in the quest for an elusive particle The SoLid detector. Credit: Imperial College London A collaboration of Belgian, French and British scientists, including researchers from Imperial College London, have developed a technology to detect a new kind of elementary particle: the sterile neutrino. The new detector has been successfully installed and has started taking data. Dr Antonin Vacheret, from the Department of Physics at Imperial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geologists report new discoveries about Kansas, Oklahoma earthquakes The number of earthquakes striking south-central Kansas has skyrocketed. This map shows the 2,522 earthquakes that occurred from May 2015 to July 2017 in all of Sumner County, small segments of Sedgwick County to the north and a portion of Harper County to the west. During this period, Sumner County alone experienced about 2,400 earthquakes, ranging from 0.4 to 3.6 magnitude. A 3.0 magnitude eart
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canada's aging population signals need for more inclusive, accessible transportation system IMAGE: Older Canadians on the Move addresses key obstacles faced by today's older travellers and explores innovative and technological solutions for adapting Canada's transportation system to meet future needs. view more Credit: Council of Canadian Academies As the number of Canadians aged 65 and older continues to grow faster than any other age group, so too does the need for a more inclusive an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brittle stars inspire new generation robots able to adapt to physical damageThe invention of a robot made to adapt to unexpected physical damage is a significant breakthrough for machines made to function in tough environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A genetic mutation in the evolution helps to explain the origin of some human organs IMAGE: A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. view more Credit: Universitat de Barcelona. A neutral genetic mutation--a fluke in the evolutionary process that had no apparent biological purpose--that appeared over 700 million years ago in biological evolution could help explain th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research highlights need for new approach to crippling horse disease A new review 'Paradigm shifts in understanding equine laminitis' published in The Veterinary Journal , demonstrates how University of Liverpool led research has changed the way we think about a crippling disease of horses. Laminitis is one of the most serious diseases of horses, ponies and donkeys. It is a painful condition of the tissues (lamellae) that bond the hoof wall to the pedal (coffin) b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research linking cancer-inhibiting proteins to cell antennae CANCER RESEARCH Danish researchers have just presented a previously unknown mechanism that inhibits the ability of cells to develop into cancer cells. Their findings have important implications for the understanding of how cancer starts, and how to improve the treatment of illness in the future. The discovery is published today in the internationally recognized Journal of Cell Biology . Under
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequent sun exposure may cue gene fusion found in skin cancer IMAGE: (A) Upper: Schematic of EGFR (red) and PPARGC1A (blue) gene structures as related to EGFR-PPARGC1A fusion transcript formation. Lower: Predicted amino acid sequence and EGFR-PPARGC1A fusion transcript partial sequence at... view more Credit: Dr. Masatoshi Jinnin A fusion gene is a single composite gene that is the result of the combination of two formerly independent genes. Researchers
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Mild traumatic brain injury causes long-term damage in mice A new Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology study in mice found that mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can precipitate not only acute damage but also a lifelong degenerative process. At 24 months, animals exposed to repetitive mild TBI showed clear evidence of learning and working memory impairment with a lack of spatial memory and certain motor deficits. There was also evidence of ongoi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibers As it squeezes down the chromatin fibre, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA - a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein? A team of SIB scientists has found that the driving force could be the supercoiling of upstream DNA. Their research, published in Nucleic Acids Research , is thereby adding a key piece to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tailgating doesn't get you there faster: StudyWe've all experienced "phantom traffic jams" that arise without any apparent cause. Researchers recently showed that we'd have fewer if we made one small change to how we drive: no more tailgating.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Groundbreaking gene therapy trial set to cure hemophiliaA 'cure' for hemophilia is one step closer, following results of a groundbreaking gene therapy trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steroid study sheds light on long term side effects of medicinesFresh insights into key hormones found in commonly prescribed medicines have been discovered, providing further understanding of the medicines' side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Creating surfaces that repel water and control its flowTo prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it's pushed away.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Residual strain despite mega earthquakeOn Christmas Day 2016, the earth trembled in southern Chile. In the same region, the strongest earthquake ever measured occurred in 1960. A comparison of data from seismic and geodetic measurements during and after both earthquakes shows that the energy released by the 2016 quake accumulated over more than 56 years. According to this, the 1960 quake, despite its immense strength, must have left so
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structure of molecular light switch -- channelrhodopsin -- determinedResearchers discover structure and mechanism of action of molecular light switch, paving the way for new applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflectiveResearchers have demonstrated prototype windows that switch from reflective to clear with the simple addition of a liquid. The new switchable windows are easy to manufacture and could one day keep parked cars cool in the sun or make office buildings more energy efficient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial control mechanism for adjusting to changing conditionsA fundamental prerequisite for life on earth is the ability of living organisms to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Physicists have now determined that the regulation mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to different environments are based on a global control process that can be described in a single equation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social housing found to provide the same emotional and practical benefits as home ownership Credit: University of Birmingham New research from the University of Birmingham and VIVID Housing Association has found for the first time a link between well-being and housing tenure – with social renters more likely than homeowners to have lower levels of anxiety. The study conducted among 2,000 social renters, found that Social housing could provide the same practical and emotional benefits as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research points to second chance for rejected antibiotic candidate Credit: University of Leeds An antibiotic candidate compound shelved in the 1970s in favour of more promising drugs could be worth a second look, new research has found. The drug , called pentyl pantothenamide, is able to stop the growth of E.coli but not completely kill the bacteria , so was never taken into clinical use. The wider class of pantothenamides have broad spectrum activity against
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change causes alterations in marine phanerogamous populations Credit: Universidad de Cádiz Marine angiospermas are a unique group of flowering plants that have adapted to live completely submerged in the sea for 40 million years. They form dense, productive grasslands and provide a wide range of ecosystem functions and services such as nutrient regeneration, improved water quality, coastal protection, breeding habitats (including economically relevant speci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibres Figure 1. Quick-lacing system illustrating the mechanism of chromatin loop extrusion. Left: the cohesin complex (black buckle) tightly embracing the chromatin fibres, thereby trapping a loop of DNA. Right: DNA supercoiling pushing the cohesin complex along the chromatin. Credit: SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics Gene regulation relies on complex structural arrangements and processes at the mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic mutation explains the origin of some human organs A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. Credit: Universitat de Barcelona A neutral genetic mutation—a fluke in the evolutionary process that had no apparent biological purpose—that appeared over 700 million years ago in biological evolution could help explain the origin of complex
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The Researcher Who Wants to Bring AI to Factories Gargantuan Taiwanese manufacturer Foxconn employs more than 1 million people and tens of thousands of robots making iPhones and other electronics. It has a reputation for cost cutting, including at the expense of its workers . Now, it’s teaming up with an artificial-intelligence researcher who helped trigger Google’s reorientation around machine learning in order to make its own factories more ef
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Popular Science
Speed up your phone with 'lite' versions of apps DIY Five apps that ditch the bloat. If you own an Android device, you can save storage space, battery life, and memory usage by replacing your favorite apps with lightweight alternatives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visitor patterns and emerging activities in national parks revealed by social media posts Continous social media feed allows real-time monitoring visitation patterns, emerging activities and changes in preferences of tourists in national parks. Credit: Vuokko Heikinheimo Social media data provide a reliable information to support decision making in national parks. Researchers from the Digital Geography at the University of Helsinki have been studying whether social media data could be
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting algae and seaweed on the menu could save our seafood Credit: Shutterstock If we have to feed 9.8 billion people by 2050, food from the ocean will have to play a major role. Ending hunger and malnutrition while meeting the demand for more meat and fish as the world grows richer will require 60% more food by the middle of the century. But around 90% of the world's fish stocks are already seriously depleted. Pollution and increasing levels of carbon d
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HKBU scholars develop new generation of tumor-specific aptamer-drug conjugate IMAGE: Comparison of the therapeutic effect between nucleolin aptamer-paclitaxel conjugate and other types. view more Credit: HKBU The toxic nature of chemotherapy poses a great challenge to clinical treatment of cancer. A team of scholars from the School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) devoted their efforts to the development of a new generation of smart anti-can
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Skye high impact: Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strike IMAGE: Site 1 is above the treeline in the mid-ground far side of Loch Slapin. view more Credit: Simon Drake. BOULDER, CO, USA: Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within the British Paleogene
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Study: Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change The forests you see today are not what you will see in the future. That's the overarching finding from a new study on the resilience of Rocky Mountain forests, led by Colorado State University scientists. University of Montana fire ecology Professor Philip Higuera is a coauthor of the study. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 1,500 sites in five states - Colorado, Wyoming, Washington, Idaho an
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Journaling inspires altruism through an attitude of gratitude IMAGE: Image captured with functional MRI shows the location in the brain's ventromedial prefrontal cortex where an increase in neural altruism occurred for a group of women who wrote about gratitude... view more Credit: Courtesy of Christina Karns EUGENE, Ore. - Dec. 14, 2017 - Gratitude does more than help maintain good health. New research at the University of Oregon finds that regularly n
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Robotics researchers track autonomous underground mining vehicles QUT robotics researchers have developed new technology to equip underground mining vehicles to navigate autonomously through dust, camera blur and bad lighting. Using mathematics and biologically-inspired algorithms, the technology uses vehicle-mounted cameras to track the location of the vehicle in underground tunnels to within metres. The research has been led by a team from the Australian Cent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracing a plant's steps: Following seed dispersal using chloroplast DNA Plants spread their seeds across the landscape to colonize new areas, but it's difficult and expensive for biologists to trace their movements. Now, researchers at Portland State University have developed a new technique to sequence chloroplast DNA from hundreds of plants at once, to learn more about how plant populations move. The ability to establish new populations is vital for plant species l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forty years after first Ebola outbreak, survivors show signs they can stave off new infection Survivors of the first known Ebola outbreak, which occurred in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1976, may be key to development of vaccines and therapeutic drugs to treat future outbreaks, according to a new study led by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. UCLA researchers located the 14 Ebola survivors of the 1976 outbreak who, in January 2016, were still living in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lizards of Oz take toll on turtle eggs Goannas have overtaken foxes as the number one predator of the endangered loggerhead turtle at its second largest Queensland nesting beach. A University of Queensland study has found that since feral red foxes were controlled in the 1980s, there has been an increase in the number goanna raids on loggerhead turtle nests at Wreck Rock beach, south of Agnes Waters. UQ School of Biological Sciences r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotics researchers track autonomous underground mining vehicles QUT robotics researchers have developed new technology to equip underground mining vehicles to navigate autonomously through dust, camera blur and bad lighting. Using mathematics and biologically-inspired algorithms, the technology uses vehicle-mounted cameras to track the location of the vehicle in underground tunnels to within metres. The research has been led by a team from the Australian Cent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel fMRI applications in childhood epilepsy increase understanding of seizure impacts WASHINGTON - (December 11, 2017) - Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed researchers to map the memory functions that are often impaired within the brains of children with epilepsy. Additionally, a separate study of a novel application of resting-state fMRI, where the patient does not have to complete tasks, demonstrated the potential for clinicians to use non-invasive fMRI for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doing without dark energy Three mathematicians have a different explanation for the accelerating expansion of the universe that does without theories of "dark energy." Einstein's original equations for General Relativity actually predict cosmic acceleration due to an "instability," they argue in paper published recently in Proceedings of the Royal Society A . About 20 years ago, astronomers made a startling discovery: Not
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eating together as a family helps children feel better, physically and mentallyChildren who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits, a new study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-grown meat could let humanity ignore a serious moral failing Credit: nevodka / shutterstock Lab-grown meat is being hailed as the solution to the factory farming of animals. The downside of factory farming for the cows, chickens and pigs themselves is obvious enough. But it is also bad for human health, given the amount of antibiotics pumped into the animals, as well as for the environment, given the resources required to provide us with industrial quantit
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The Scientist RSS
CRISPR to Debut in Clinical TrialsThe first industry-sponsored CRISPR therapy is slated to be tested in humans in 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The amazing diversity – and possible decline – of mushrooms and other fungi Autumn edible mushrooms, mostly Boletus edulis. Credit: www.shutterstock.com "Whatever dressing one gives to mushrooms…they are not really good but to be sent back to the dungheap where they are born." French philosopher Denis Diderot thus dismissed mushrooms in 1751 in his " Encyclopedie ." Today his words would be dismissed in France, where cooks tuck mushrooms into crepes, puff pastry and boeu
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Dagens Medicin
11 forslag fra Lægeforeningen skal forbedre behandlingen af akutte patienter Kvaliteten for den akutte indsats kan blive endnu bedre, mener Lægeforeningen. Derfor har den udgivet et oplæg med 11 forslag (pdf) til, hvordan man kan forbedre behandlingen for akutte patienter. For ti år siden kom anbefalingerne om en styrket akutbehandling, og siden er der kommet 21 akutmodtagelser. »Selv om det har været et stort kvalitetsløft, specielt at vi har fået de fælles akutmodtagels
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Futurity.org
System spots tweets from people who weren’t really there Researchers have developed a framework to determine whether a tweet is from a witness of an event with first-hand experience or not. “If news organizations in particular had access to a framework like ours… we could all trust our news a little bit more.” “The most obvious starting point is to determine whether a tweeter is at an event using their georeference, or location information found in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-intensity exercise delays Parkinson's progression High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson's disease and decreases worsening of the disease's symptoms, according to results of a study published in the Dec. 11 issue of JAMA Neurology . Participants enrolled in the Study in Parkinson Disease of Exercise (SPARX) were at an early stage of the disease and not taking Parkinson's disease medication,
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Synthetic protein packages its own genetic material and evolves Protein assemblies, designed and built from scratch to carry molecular cargo, are advancing both synthetic life research and engineering efforts for targeted drug delivery. Scientists have succeeded in developing the first reported synthetic protein assemblies that encapsulate their own genetic materials and evolve new traits in complex environments. The project is reported this week in the scien
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Exercise does not seem to increase bone marrow edema in healthy people A recent study published in Rheumatology finds that osteitis/bone marrow edema as measured by magnetic resonance imaging was present in healthy people. However, it did not significantly increase due to intense physical activity. In the last decade, considerable efforts have been made to shorten the diagnostic delay in axial spondyloarthritis, a chronic inflammatory disease predominantly affecti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Student drug use in Ontario, Canada, at historic lows but new concerns over fentanyl emerge TORONTO, December 14, 2017 - By almost every measure, students in grades 7 through 12 in Ontario, Canada are drinking, smoking, and using drugs at the lowest rates since the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) began in 1977. This according to new numbers released today by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). But new data on fentanyl use, included for the first time i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not just heat—even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development In recent years, scientists have successfully identified the human fingerprint on hot years, heatwaves, and a range of other temperature extremes around the world. But as everyone knows, climate change affects more than just temperature. The "signal" of human-induced climate chang
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Israeli drugmaker Teva to cut quarter of global work force Israeli flag flies outside Teva Pharmaceutical facility building in Neot Hovav, Israel, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., the world's largest generic drugmaker, says it is laying off 14,000 workers as part of a global restructuring. The company said Thursday that the layoffs represent over 25 percent of its global work force. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov) Teva Pharmaceutic
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Futurity.org
These proteins keep stem cells ‘immature’ Proteins central to cell division may also play a key role in keeping stem cells in their immature, undifferentiated state and allowing cancer’s spread. The study illuminates the basic biology of stem cells, and suggests a new molecular handle for controlling them. Stem cells have regenerative properties with the potential to revolutionize medicine, but that potential is still far from being real
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2016 extreme weather events and ties to climate change Credit: NOAA Headquarters According to a new research report published today in a special edition of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , the 2016 global average temperature and extreme heat wave over Asia occurred due to continued long-term climate change. The report included research from NOAA scientists. Additionally, climate change was found to have influenced other heat even
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tackling the missing miner problem with wireless sensor networks A matchbox-sized circuit board with a short aerial could save lives by transmitting the vital statistics and location of miners missing underground. This fledgeling wireless sensor network technology is the result of collaboration between the Wits Mining Institute, the School of Electrical and Information Engineering at Wits, and the Communication Networks Laboratory at the University of Bremen i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dark energy survey offers new view of dark matter halos, physicists report This artist’s impression shows the Milky Way galaxy. The blue halo of material surrounding the galaxy indicates the expected distribution of the mysterious dark matter, which was first introduced by astronomers to explain the rotation properties of the galaxy and is now also an essential ingredient in current theories of the formation and evolution of galaxies. Credit: ESO/L. Calçada Dark matter,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A stressed-out boss is a bad boss, research concludes Credit: Nik Shuliahin, CC0 It's tough to be the boss. You can't make everyone happy all the time, and the job can be defined by stress. However, the stress that a leader experiences can also have serious effects on an organization's overall work culture . Many people become less effective under stress, and bosses and organizational leaders are no exception. Dr. Peter Harms, an assistant profess
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More ambitious climate targets could save coastal ecosystems Credit: Institute of Physics The difference between the Paris climate agreement's two alternative temperature targets – 1.5°C (2.7°F) and 2.0°C (3.6°F) above pre-industrial levels – may be the difference between life and death for some coastal ecosystems threatened by sea-level rise. That is a key finding of new research from Tufts University, Rutgers University–New Brunswick, and the Potsdam Ins
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In a tally of nerve cells in the outer wrinkles of the brain, a dog wins If more nerve cells mean more smarts, then dogs beat cats, paws down, a new study on carnivores shows. That harsh reality may shock some friends of felines, but scientists say the real surprises are inside the brains of less popular carnivores. Raccoon brains are packed with nerve cells, for instance, while brown bear brains are sorely lacking. By comparing the numbers of nerve cells, or neurons,
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Ingeniøren
Ny kryptovaluta-feber er begyndt: Grafikkort flyves til Island I sommer fløj flere Boeing 747 til Island. Med sig om bord havde de udelukkende AMD- og Nvidia-grafikkort, som med lynets hast skulle transporteres til Island – så hurtigt, at de almindelige fragtmuligheder ikke var tilstrækkelige. »Tiden er meget, meget kritisk. Alt andet, såsom at fragte til havs, tager alt for lang tid. Du risikerer at miste muligheden for at mine i de dage, du er forsinket,«
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The truth about bioplastics Biodegradable bioplastic made from starch. Credit: Wikimedia Commons Bioplastics are often touted as being eco-friendly, but do they live up to the hype? The world has produced over nine billion tons of plastic since the 1950s. 165 million tons of it have trashed our ocean, with almost 9 million more tons entering the oceans each year. Since only about 9 percent of plastic gets recycled, much of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should you get your child an AI doll this holiday? The Luvabella robotic dolls are reportedly one of this season’s most wanted toys. It’s time to pause and ask about its impact on children. The technological revolution has hit the doll aisle this holiday season in the form of artificial intelligence dolls. The dolls blend a physical toy with either a mobile device and app, or technological sensors, to simulate signs of intelligence. As an educati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new way to deliver mRNA genomes: Nucleocapsids with evolutionary properties A hairpin loop from a pre-mRNA. Highlighted are the nucleobases (green) and the ribose-phosphate backbone (blue). Note that this is a single strand of RNA that folds back upon itself. Credit: Vossman/ Wikipedia (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the University of Washington has created microscopic assemblies for packaging genetic material that they call synthetic nucleocapsids. The team hopes th
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Evolution of Trust in a Digital Economy To participate in today’s global economy, ordinary people must accept an asymmetrical bargain: their lives are transparent to states, banks and corporations, whereas the behavior and inner workings of the powerful actors are kept hidden. The boundaries between the consumer and the citizen have irreversibly blurred. Harvard University social scientist Shoshana Zuboff has called this one-sided, ext
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fungus relies on bacteria to regulate key components of its reproductive machinery Sexual reproduction in Rhizopus microspores: (a) Successful mating between fungi harboring bacteria; (b) Lack of sex between mates cured of endobacteria. Credit: Stephen Mondo To better understand how beneficial organisms (symbionts) are transmitted between host generations, researchers investigated the role of bacterial that lives within its host (endosymbionts) has on fungal host reproduction,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building hurricane-proof roofs Credit: Florida International University An FIU professor has a plan to get rid of the blue tarps that inevitably appear on rooftops after a hurricane. Arindam Gan Chowdhury has patented a concrete roofing system that aims to replace the hundreds of individual shingles or barrel tiles, not to mention thousands of nails as well as plywood sheathing and wooden trusses, that often put housetops at r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designer proteins that package genetic material could help deliver gene therapy Delivering genetic material is a key challenge in gene therapy. Credit: Kstudio, CC BY If you've ever bought a new iPhone, you've experienced good packaging. The way the lid slowly separates from the box. The pull tab that helps you remove the device. Even the texture of the paper inserts matters to Apple. Every aspect of iPhone packaging has been meticulously designed for a pleasing aesthetic ex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists combine high-pressure research with NMR spectroscopy A look into the open half of a diamond anvil cell. A trimmer condenser (green) is attached underneath. Credit: Thomas Meier For the first time, researchers at the University of Bayreuth and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have succeeded in applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in experiments analysing material samples under very high pressure that is similar to the pr
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Science | The Guardian
Lung experts 'deeply concerned' by low flu jab uptake in England Fewer than half those eligible for a free winter flu jab have had one, despite high-profile warnings that this winter could bring the biggest flu outbreak in years, NHS figures reveal. Brain drain: our default responses to flu | Daniel Glaser The low uptake, which will alarm NHS bosses, come as many hospitals showed clear signs of starting to buckle under the extra demand for care caused by the c
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Live Science
Why There's No Place Like Home for the Holidays While Christmas playlists often include cheesy favorites like "Rockin Around the Christmas Tree" and "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus," there are also a handful of wistful tracks that go a little bit deeper. Listen closely to "I'll be Home for Christmas" or "White Christmas," and you'll hear a deep yearning for home, and sorrow at having to spend the holidays somewhere else. Strip away
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein environment makes catalyst efficient for hydrogen production The Bochum scientists Martin Winkler, Oliver Lampret and Thomas Happe (from left to right) together with Olaf Rüdiger (in the background) from the Max Planck Institute. Credit: RUB, Marquard The interaction of protein shell and active centre in hydrogen-producing enzymes is crucial for the efficiency of biocatalysts. A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical En
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strike Site 1 is above the treeline in the mid-ground far side of Loch Slapin. Credit: Simon Drake Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within the British Paleogene Igneous Province (BPIP), opens questions about t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New material lowers energy consumption associated with ethylene production ExxonMobil and Polytechnic University of Valencia's ITQ researchers are developing a zeolite to separate ethylene using 25 percent less energy than with current methods. Scientists from ExxonMobil and the Institute of Chemical Technology (ITQ) of Valencia's Polytechnic University and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have developed a new, potentially revolutionary material that could s
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Ingeniøren
Folketinget godkender kampflyindkøb Det danske indkøb af nye kampfly af typen F-35 er her til eftermiddag blevet godkendt af Folketingets finansudvalg. Det bekræfter flere kilder, der er involveret i forhandlingerne over for DR Nyheder . Dermed er vejen endeligt banet for det omstridte indkøb, der udgør Danmarks største militære investering nogensinde. Selve godkendelsen af det såkaldte aktstykke 31 i finansudvalget rummer imidlert
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The Scientist RSS
Image Of The Day: Plant BulbsScientists infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.
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The Scientist RSS
Urine Test for TB Yields Results in 12 HoursThe new test could improve upon current methods to diagnose tuberculosis-a skin test or culturing bacteria from saliva, both of which take days.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of sea creatures suggests nervous system evolved independently multiple times Proporus sp., a xenacoelomorph. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY 2.5 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Norway, Sweden and Denmark has found evidence that suggests the nervous system evolved independently in multiple creatures over time—not just once, as has been previously thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature , the group describes their study of tiny sea creatures they collected fro
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why One Med School Embraces DACA Recipients I watched news coverage of the 2016 presidential election results sitting beside my roommate, a medical student at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. He has been in this country since he was a kid, but he is undocumented. Now, with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on life support, I have a much more intimate understanding of the fear on his face tha
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Popular Science
The world's fastest shark is no match for a sack of flaccid hagfish skin Animals Immense globs of slime are only their second line of defense. What’s like a loose, slippery, surprisingly tough old sock? You guessed it: hagfish skin.
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Live Science
Mummified Egyptian Woman's Portrait Mapped in Incredible Detail The original Egyptian painting (left) next to images produced using hyperspectral reflectance, luminescence and X-ray fluorescence. Credit: National Gallery of Art (left); National Gallery of Art/UCLA More than 1,800 years ago, an artist in ancient Egypt painted the portrait of a large-eyed woman wearing a red tunic — a painting that ended up resting on the woman's dead, mummified body. The exa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIT scientists prove tailgating doesn't get you there faster IMAGE: This is Berthold Horn and Liang Wang. view more Credit: Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL We've all experienced "phantom traffic jams" that arise without any apparent cause. Researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) recently showed that we'd have fewer if we made one small change to how we drive: no more tailgating. Specifically, the team's new jou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eating together as a family helps children feel better, physically and mentally Children who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits, a new Canadian study shows. Université de Montréal doctoral student Marie-Josée Harbec and her supervisor, pyschoeducation professor Linda Pagani, made the finding after following a cohort of Quebec children born between 1997 and 1998. The study is pub
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Science | The Guardian
Size does matter: wine glasses are seven times larger than they used to be Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors may have enjoyed a Christmas tipple but judging by the size of the glasses they used they probably drank less wine than we do today. Scientists at the University of Cambridge have found that the capacity of wine glasses has ballooned nearly seven-fold over the past 300 years, rising most sharply in the last two decades in line with a surge in wine consumption.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Despite public outrage, web access for prisoners isn't a luxury item – here's why Credit: Shutterstock The UK's prisons are slowly catching up with the digital age. But in an era of austerity and turmoil, introducing inmates to technologies that many of us take for granted is – for some – alarming. My research shows that digital progress in prisons allows offenders to order their own meals, book visits, contact home, undertake e-learning, manage their finances, improve their h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking data records bit by bit Magnetic tapes, retrieved by robotic arms, are used for long-term storage. Credit: Julian Ordan/CERN This year CERN's data centre broke its own record, when it collected more data than ever before. During October 2017, the data centre stored the colossal amount of 12.3 petabytes of data. To put this in context, one petabyte is equivalent to the storage capacity of around 15,000 64GB smartphones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Structuring thought and imagination brick by brick, Lego is more than child's play Lego is not just a toy. The bricks are designed as a universal tool to make anything we can imagine. Credit: www.shutterstock.com, CC BY-ND You might think Lego is just a kids' toy – one you played with as a child and now step on as you walk through the house as a parent. These days, however, the bricks are showing up in all sorts of unexpected places – on display in museums, in street art, in ho
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Math Says You're Driving Wrong and It's Slowing Us All Down Ah, the phantom traffic jam. You know, that thing where the flow suddenly slows to a halt and you inch forward for a half hour and then things pick up again and you look around for an accident or construction or anything at all for Pete’s sake that might justify the time you just wasted. But no, nothing. It's as if the fates chose this particular time and place to screw with you. The question is,
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Dagens Medicin
Hospitalerne har ikke tillid til de kommunale rehabiliteringstilbudDe kommunale indsatser i kræftrehabilitering er ukendte for mange på hospitalerne. Derfor bør kendskabet og samarbejdet på tværs af sektorer styrkes, fastslår ny rapport.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Proposed CVS–Aetna Merger Could Threaten Patient Privacy The proposed merger between pharmacy chain CVS and insurer Aetna would give the new combined company greater leverage to engage in a commercial trade in patient data that is largely hidden from the public but completely legal. Prior to the proposed merger, Aetna was notable among leading insurers for not selling anonymized patient data. By contrast, CVS, like many pharmacy chains, has long so
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Ingeniøren
Kalundborg Kommune: Tusindvis af fortrolige filer lagt op usikret på server Kalundborg Kommune har ved en fejl lagt 50.000 filer med blandt cpr-numre, administratorkoder og lønoplysninger op usikret på en ftp-server. Det skriver Børsen. Serveren er blandt andet blevet brugt af kommunens jurister til at kommunikere med borgere, der har søgt aktindsigt, og virksomheder, der har skullet aflevere store mængder data til kommunen. Kommunaldirektør Jan Lysgaard Thomsen understr
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Live Science
Antarctic Microbes Can Survive on Air Alone A rock outcropping on Fleming Glacier, which feeds one of the accelerating glaciers in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA/OIB Talk about an extreme diet. Antarctic microbes are capable of surviving on air, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. Soil microbes that live in polar deserts must contend with extremely dry conditions, nutrient-poor d
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Dagens Medicin
Regionerne mangler operationskapacitet til bugspytkirtelkræftIndberetninger til Sundhedsstyrelsen peger på, at regionerne generelt mangler kapacitet til at operere kritisk syge patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds new light on production of hydroxyl radicals, which help break down air pollutants A research team that included Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein examined the production of hydroxyl radicals, which help break down air pollutants, in a new light. Credit: LALS STOCK / Shutterstock Residents in some areas of the developing world are currently coping with dangerous levels of air pollution. Recent research, co-led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laborat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The wet road to fast and stable batteries By heating the anode material to a much lower temperature (less than 260°C), scientists could remove the water near the surface, but retain the water in the bulk of the material, which enhanced its characteristics. Credit: Nature Communications and study authors. Licensed here. Image was resized. Credit: Argonne National Laboratory An international team of scientists—including several researchers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change made Harvey rainfall 15 percent more intense Hurricane Harvey over the Gulf of Mexico Aug. 24. Credit: NASA A team of scientists from World Weather Attribution, including researchers from Rice University and other institutions in the United States and Europe, have found that human-caused climate change made the record rainfall that fell over Houston during Hurricane Harvey roughly three times more likely and 15 percent more intense. The stu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: NASA's Aqua satellite captures smoke billowing off California coastThe huge amounts of smoke tumbling off the coast of California is also an indicator of how active the Thomas Fire still is. The grayish brown smoke shows that the fire is continuing to find fuel to burn. The billows of smoke coming off the Thomas Fire reach from the Santa Barbara all the way up the coast into Oregon and Washington.
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Dagens Medicin
Leverandør trækker sig fra EPJ-udbud i SyddanmarkRegion Syddanmark har kun to mulige bud tilbage, når den til foråret skal vælge nyt epj-system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research suggests budget reminders cause unexpected consumer behavior Consumers might be more naughty than nice when shopping this holiday season and facing a "should I or shouldn't I" purchase. Soon-to-be-published research from the University of Wyoming suggests monetary reminders—or nudges—telling consumers to stick to their budgets might lead to unexpected results from some consumers. Additional research has found most people in a study could not accurately say
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bee-mimicking clearwing moth buzzes back to life after 130 years The rediscovered Oriental blue clearwing. Credit: Marta Skowron Volponi An entomologist from the University of Gdansk in Poland has rediscovered a striking blue-and-white species of clearwing moth known only from a single faded and damaged museum specimen collected in 1887. The Oriental blue clearwing (Heterosphecia tawonoides) looks more like a bee, behaves more like a bee, and may even buzz lik
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New book examines what religious Americans think about science What do religious Americans really think about science? A new book from Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund and West Virginia University (WVU) sociologist Christopher Scheitle explores and debunks widespread and consequential myths about the intersection of science and religion. "Religion vs. Science: What Religious People Really Think" (Oxford University Press, 232 pages, $29.95) f
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Science : NPR
Here Come The Penitent Penguins: The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards Are Back Hide caption In a photo titled "Kung Fu Training — Australian Style," a red kangaroo starts his day with some martial arts in Fowlers Gap, Australia. Previous Next Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards/Andrey Giljov / CWPA / Barcroft Images Hide caption In a photo titled "Mom, do we always have to be the first ones at church?" three king penguins approach the only church on South Georgia Island, nea
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Ingeniøren
Parat til test: Stelnumre skal erstattes af RFID-chips på cykler Hvis det står til en større arbejdsgruppe, skal cyklers stelnumre i fremtiden erstattes af to RFID-chips, der ligesom stelnummeret kan identificere hver enkelt cykel, men på elektronisk vis. »Brikkerne skal kunne identificere cyklen effektivt, ikke kunne spore os rundt. Det vil løse rigtigt mange problemer: En kommunal medarbejder kan hurtigt identificere, om en cykel ejes og bruges eller står ef
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study impact of space radiation on bone and muscle health Credit: Virginia Commonwealth University New research by Henry J. Donahue, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and School of Engineering Foundation Professor at the VCU School of Engineering, suggests that space radiation may cause astronauts in outer space to lose additional bone but not more muscle. The findings raise intriguing questions about the relationship between bone
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New map reveals landscape beneath Greenland's ice sheet Greenland Basal Topography BedMachine v3 is published by British Antarctic Survey. Credit: British Antarctic Survey A new map of what lies beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet is published this week (Thursday 14 December 2017). By providing scientists with the most comprehensive, high resolution and accurate picture of the bedrock and coastal seafloor, it reveals how the glaciers that drain from the G
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australian lizards take toll on turtle eggs Yellow-spotted goanna at Wreck Rock beach. Credit: University of Queensland Goannas have overtaken foxes as the number one predator of the endangered loggerhead turtle at its second largest Queensland nesting beach. A University of Queensland study has found that since feral red foxes were controlled in the 1980s, there has been an increase in the number goanna raids on loggerhead turtle nests at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Doing without dark energy: Mathematicians propose alternative explanation for cosmic acceleration “Dark energy,” a mysterious force that counters gravity, has been proposed to explain why the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. Mathematicians at UC Davis and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, argue for an alternative. Galaxy cluster image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: UC Davis Three mathematicians have a different explanation for the accelerating expansion of the uni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The fault in our MarsThis image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) of northern Meridiani Planum shows faults that have disrupted layered deposits. Some of the faults produced a clean break along the layers, displacing and offsetting individual beds (yellow arrow).
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Bacteria May Help Regulate Blood Pressure From Quanta Magazine ( find original story here ). Some years ago, when Jennifer Pluznick was nearing the end of her training in physiology and sensory systems, she was startled to discover something in the kidneys that seemed weirdly out of place. It was a smell receptor , a protein that would have looked more at home in the nose. Given that the kidneys filter waste into urine and maintain t
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The Atlantic
40 Years Later, Some Survivors of the First Ebola Outbreak Are Still Immune In August 1976, a 44-year-old headmaster named Mabalo Lokela arrived back in the town of Yambuku in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, after two weeks spent touring with a local mission. A few days after his return, he checked into the local hospital with nosebleeds, dysentery, and a fever. The doctors treated him for malaria, but to no avail. Lokela got worse. In early September, two weeks af
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Next-generation GRACE satellites arrive at launch site A crate containing one of the twin Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) satellites is offloaded from an air freighter at California's Vandenberg Air Force Base Dec. 12 following a transcontinental flight from Germany. GRACE-FO is scheduled for launch next spring. Credit: USAF A pair of advanced U.S./German Earth research satellites with some very big shoes to fill is now a
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The Best 2017 Holiday Tech Deals: Audio, Gaming, TVs, Cameras Black Friday, Cyber Monday, Green Monday … they’re over and done, but the holiday deals continue. If you’re still on the hunt for affordable gift ideas, or just want to treat yo’ self to some new gear, look no further. We’ve gathered our favorite deals from around the web. Also be sure to read our many Holiday Gift Guides . Gaming 1 Year of PlayStation Plus - $40 ($20 off) Buy on Amazon If you ow
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Latest Headlines | Science News
An abundance of toys can curb kids’ creativity and focus The holiday onslaught is upon us. For some families with children, the crush of holiday gifts — while wonderful and thoughtful in many ways — can become nearly unmanageable, cluttering both rooms and minds. This year, I’m striving for simplicity as I pick a few key presents for my girls. I will probably fail. But it’s a good goal, and one that has some new science to back it. Toddlers play longer
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Scientific American Content: Global
Beyond Bitcoin: How Technology Could Help Fix Our Broken Financial System On a spring day more than 5,000 years ago in the Mesopotamian city of Ur, a foreign merchant sold his wares in exchange for a large bundle of silver. He didn't want to carry the bundle home because he knew he'd be back in Ur again to buy grain at the end of harvest season. Instead the merchant walked to the local temple, where valuables were often stored, and asked the priest to hold onto the sil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science explains the colour of your Christmas Credit: University of Western Sydney When we think of Christmas, what colour comes to mind? For most people, that colour is probably red. Even Santa himself is red. It's a colour reminiscent of family, good food, Santa and his gifts and festive holidays. The Christmas table is laid out with fresh crab, the vibrant red of holly berries and the delicate pinks and intense reds of Poinsettia on the t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bringing space technology to water needs in California vineyards ARS hydrologist Bill Kustas measures grapevine canopy width at a California vineyard to help evaluate satellite data used in models of vine water use. Credit: Jessica Griffiths ARS scientists are saving water in California's vineyards by using satellite data and computer models to better manage water resources. Bill Kustas and Martha Anderson are fine-tuning computer models at the ARS Hydrology a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery clears way for human body to work as robust communication network for electronic devices Smart wearable devices allow for the exchange of information using the human body as a robust communication medium for networking electronic devices. In this photo, a researcher wears devices that allow for the exchange of information using the body to communicate instead of sending a signal through the airwaves that could be hacked. Credit: Purdue University A group of Purdue University research
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NeuWrite San Diego
Star Wars Science: Sci-Fi Syndrome, Neuroprosthetics, and Luke Skywalker’s Hand Star Wars Science: Sci-Fi Syndrome, Neuroprosthetics, and Luke Skywalker’s Hand Posted by Alie Astrocyte on December 14, 2017 in Uncategorized | Leave a comment It’s that time of year, friends. Holiday lights are going up, snow is starting to fall, and a new Star Wars movie is about to come out! We’re all amped up to see the next chapter in Rey’s journey, this time with an experienced mentor by h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Historic finds unearthed in Medieval cemetary Archaeologists thought they were going to find a layer of beer brewing stones from the Viking age, but instead they found a "Viking import" from Ireland. Credit: NTNU University Museum What was supposed to be a simple excavation to allow for the expansion of a church cemetery turned into a treasure trove of historic artefacts, including a decorative fitting from a book "imported" by Vikings from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fully screen-printed monoPoly silicon solar cell technology Front image of a fully screen-printed monoPoly solar cell. The Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has reached a new cell efficiency milestone in the development of its low-cost screen-printed bifacial monoPoly silicon solar cell technology, recording an average cell efficiency of 21.5% in pilot-scale production using commercially ava
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells sense and explore their environments In order to carry the research out, researchers developed some low-rigidity gel substrates to which a pattern of gold nanospheres covered by a protein are adhered, and which can control its separation. Credit: R. Oria et al. The process through which cells are able to sense their environment is regulated by force detection. This is the main conclusion of a study published in the journal Nature ,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sorghum cultivars can produce thousands of gallons of ethanol UF/IFAS scientists like sorghum because it can be cultivated twice a year in Florida, requires little fertilizer, uses water efficiently and can be drought resistant. Credit: UF/IFAS-Developed Sorghum Cultivars Can Produce Thousands of Gallons of Ethanol Sweet sorghum is not just for breakfast anymore. Although sorghum is a source for table syrup, scientists see a future in which we convert sorgh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Project seeks sustainable blueprint for hydropower dams A young fisher prepares to go out on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake. Credit: Jonathan Armstrong/Oregon State University In the Pacific Northwest, the conversation about hydroelectric dams is complicated: Dams hamper the natural migration of salmon, yet they are an important source of cheap, renewable energy for the region. In other parts of the world, gray areas still exist, but the conversation about
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Listening in: Acoustic monitoring devices detect illegal hunting and logging Populations of large cats such as jaguars and pumas are in global decline due to habitat loss and indiscriminate hunting of them and their prey by humans. Newly developed acoustic loggers are able to record sounds of shotguns and chainsaws, shedding light on the frequency and patterns of illegal exploitation. The results, presented today at the 'Ecology Across Borders' conference in Ghent, Belgiu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New flood risk identified by FIU researcher Flooded streets in Arch Creek-North Miami. Credit: Shadaina Dessalines As South Florida raises groundwater levels to fight salt water intrusion, the threat of flooding from within will only increase, according to Florida International University research . Current groundwater levels in South Florida are a major contributor to inland flood damages, especially during the wet season or extreme rain
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Ingeniøren
Aarsleff skal opføre nyt naturhistorisk museum i København Statens Naturhistoriske Museum skal samles i et nyt bygningskompleks, der skal opføres og delvist nedgraves i Botanisk Have i København. Hovedentreprisen på det 950 mio. kroner dyre og primært fondsfinansierede byggeri er gået til Per Aarsleff A/S. Det fremgår af en pressemeddelelse fra Bygningsstyrelsen. Opgaven blev tilbudt efter udbud med forhandling med de tre prækvalificerede bydere. Statens
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists uncover burial sites, statue in Egypt's AswanEgypt's Antiquities Ministry says archaeologists have uncovered four intact burial sites, part of a cemetery and an incomplete statue in different areas in the southern city of Aswan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space capsule with 3 astronauts returns to Earth The Russian Soyuz MS-05 space capsule lands about 150 km (90 miles) south-east of the Kazakh town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. Three astronauts on Thursday landed back on Earth after nearly six months aboard the International Space Station. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, Pool) Three astronauts on Thursday landed back on Earth after nearly six months aboard the International Spa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery finds starving white dwarfs are binge eaters An artistic representation showing the system the researchers observed during its "binge eating" phase. Credit: Helena Uthas University of Canterbury astrophysicist Dr Simone Scaringi has made an unexpected and exciting new discovery related to the way white dwarfs grow in space. The New Zealand-based researcher and astrophysics lecturer's co-authored paper, titled "Magnetically gated accretion i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid-response program to explore a double neutron star merger The blue regions show the localization by the two LIGO detectors, and the much smaller white region includes the Virgo network of detectors. Credit: GRECO, ARNAUD, BRANCHESI, VICERE Two years ago, scientists from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected gravitational waves for the first time, proving Einstein's theory of relativity and his prediction of their existe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why corals do not always pass on symbionts to their offspring Reef coral Goniastrea releasing egg-sperm bundles free of symbiotic algae into the water. Credit: Andrew BAIRD An NUS ecologist has discovered why, paradoxically, corals do not always receive symbiotic algae from their parents, even though these symbionts are likely to be well adapted to the environment. Corals have a close and mutualistic relationship with microalgae symbionts (organisms that ar
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Science | The Guardian
New underwater discoveries in Greece reveal ancient Roman engineering New archaeological excavations at the ancient port of Corinth have uncovered evidence of large-scale Roman engineering. Named Lechaion, the port was one of a pair that connected the city of ancient Corinth to Mediterranean trade networks. Lechaion is located on the Gulf of Corinth, while Kenchreai is positioned across the narrow Isthmus of Corinth on the Aegean Sea. These two strategic harbours m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist describes fundamental process when ice is compressed Credit: Canadian Light Source Almost three-quarters of the earth's surface is covered by water. Almost two-thirds of the human body is made up of it. We drink it. We use it in our homes and in industry. As a solid, it's ice. As a gas, it's steam. "Nobody understands water, the structure of water. Water has a lot of anomalies," says John Tse, University of Saskatchewan physics professor and Canada
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BigH1—the key histone for male fertility In red, BigH1 expressed in germ stem cells and spermatocytes. In blue, the cell nuclei. Credit: Albert Carbonell, IRB Barcelona. Researchers in the Chromatin Structure and Function Lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified the histone BigH1 as a key protein in stem cell differentiation to male sex cells. Histones are basic proteins that confer order and stru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial control mechanism for adjusting to changing conditions To survive a changing supply of nutrients, bacteria developed strategies to adapt their metabolism. Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have now determined that these regulation mechanisms are based on a global control process that can be described in a single equation. Credit: Johannes Wiedersich / TUM A fundamental prerequisit
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Ingeniøren
Snart kan din nummerplade få dig over Storebælt Fremover vil det ikke være nødvendigt at hive dankortet frem, når du vil krydse Storebæltsbroen. Fra april 2018 indfører Sund & Bælt , som bestyrer Storebæltsbroen og Brobizz, nummerpladegenkendelse. Det sker, efter man hen over efteråret har kørt tests med et nyt nummerpladegenkendelsessystem. Relateret jobannonce: Embedded Software Application Engineer Bommen er der stadig Kort fortalt kommer d
12h
Ingeniøren
Datatilsynet om SKAT: Kritisabelt at persondata lå frit fremme på nettet Datatilsynet har efter dialog med Skat forholdt sig til, hvor problematisk det er, at der 9. marts 2017 lå data om personnumre, økonomiske forhold, familieforhold og religiøs overbevisning tilgængeligt om 103 borgere. Tilsynet har allerede i august sendt en udtalelse til Skat, der dog siden har ændret forklaring på, hvad der skete. Skat mente bl.a., at Datatilsynet ikke gjorde det tydeligt nok, a
12h
Dagens Medicin
Tæt løb i toppen i kåringen af Danmarks Bedste HospitalerAarhus og Vejle er bedst blandt de store og mellemstore hospitaler, men bliver hårdt presset af Odense og Randers. Silkeborg bliver atter bedst blandt de mindste.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The oldest plesiosaur was a strong swimmer Paleontologists Tanja Wintrich and Martin Sander from the University of Bonn inspect the skeleton of Rhaeticosaurus in the laboratory of the LWL-Museum für Naturkunde in Münster (Germany). Credit: Yasuhisa Nakajima Plesiosaurs were especially effective swimmers. These long extinct "paddle saurians" propelled themselves through the oceans by employing "underwater flight"—similar to sea turtles and
13h
Ingeniøren
Vulkanø i Stillehavet kan afsløre Mars' hemmeligheder I starten af 2015 kom en lille, ny vulkanø til syne i Stillehavet efter et undersøisk vulkanudbrud nær øriget Tonga øst for Australien. Mod forventning står vulkanøen stadig, og derfor kan forskere fra Nasa studere den langsomme erosion, der kan bidrage til forståelsen af de geologiske forhold på Mars. Det skriver BBC . Grundtanken er, at Mars' overflade kan være formet af vand på samme måde, som
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials IMAGE: ASU scientists have recently met a challenge of developing a new class of antimicrobials, called synbodies, to safeguard the population against infectious threats -- all within a week. view more Credit: Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University With hospitals more often reaching for antibiotics of last resort to fight infections and recent Ebola and Zika outbreaks crossin
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making climate models simple For many years, climate change has been a looming threat on the minds of infrastructure engineers. But recently, this threat has become much more apparent to the general public. Many effects of climate change can be damaging to infrastructure: changes in extreme temperatures, variations in precipitation, severe weather, increased sea levels, and in some areas, a decrease of clean water availabili
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials ASU scientists have recently met a challenge of developing a new class of antimicrobials, called synbodies, to safeguard the population against infectious threats -- all within a week. Credit: Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University With hospitals more often reaching for antibiotics of last resort to fight infections and recent Ebola and Zika outbreaks crossing borders like never before, th
13h
The Atlantic
What It's Like to Evacuate a Museum in a Natural Disaster The journalist was not having it. He tailed the museum director out the door. “Are you looting the museum for your own personal means?” he demanded. “I totally saw you slip something into your car earlier today.” Obviously, the emergency evacuation of the state museum of “Smithsonia” was not going according to plan. This scene played out at the Smithsonian on a recent Wednesday afternoon, during
14h
Ingeniøren
Fejldesignet ventilation udskyder Aarhus-hospital 40 operationsstuer i Det Nye Universitetshospital (DNU) i Skejby ved Aarhus skal bygges om, efter at designet af ventilationen på operationsstuerne er dumpet ved tests. »At konstruere en operationsstue er naturligvis ikke bare en standardløsning, men det kom som en overraskelse, at det design, som der er bygget efter, ikke holdt,« siger Carsten Kronborg, projektdirektør ved Projektafdelingen for
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As 'net neutrality' vote nears, some brace for a long fight In this Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, file photo, demonstrators rally in support of net neutrality outside a Verizon store in New York. The Federal Communications Commission is voting Thursday, Dec. 14 to undo Obama-era "net neutrality" rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet. The industry promises that the internet experience isn't going to change, but the issue has struck a nerve. Protests
15h
Ingeniøren
Nyt partnerskab skal give Nilfisk succes med rengøringsrobotter Med en helt ny type partnerskab har Blue Ocean Robotics og Nilfisk taget hul på en ny æra. Målet er at udvikle robotter til rengøring i de segmenter, hvor Nilfisk i dag er verdens største producent. Faktisk forventer Nilfisk, at robotter kommer til at udgøre ti procent af virksomhedens omsætning inden for fem-syv år. Grundtanken i det nye strategiske RoBi-X-partnerskab er, at de to virksomheder k
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ng aims to bring AI 'electricity' to manufacturing Consumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now researchers in ...
15h
Science | The Guardian
In 10 years' time trains could be solar powered Last week, my 10:10 colleague Leo Murray co-authored a new report on solar-powered trains with Nathaniel Bottrell, an electrical engineer at Imperial College. It’s exciting stuff. We think solar could power 20% of the Merseyrail network in Liverpool, as well as 15% of commuter routes in Kent, Sussex and Wessex. There’s scope for solar trams in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Nottingham, London and Manchester
16h
Science | The Guardian
‘A different dimension of loss’: inside the great insect die-off T he Earth is ridiculously, burstingly full of life. Four billion years after the appearance of the first microbes, 400m years after the emergence of the first life on land, 200,000 years after humans arrived on this planet, 5,000 years (give or take) after God bid Noah to gather to himself two of every creeping thing, and 200 years after we started to systematically categorise all the world’s li
17h
NYT > Science
Marijuana and Vaping Are More Popular Than Cigarettes Among Teenagers Still, Dr. Compton continued, “we don’t yet know about the health problems in vaping.” Vaping devices, which typically vaporize substances into an inhalant, are perceived by some experts as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes because they do not include carcinogens that come with burning tobacco. But Dr. Compton said, “The concern is that it may represent a new route for exposure to
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Groundbreaking gene therapy trial set to cure hemophilia A 'cure' for haemophilia is one step closer, following results published in the New England Journal of Medcine of a groundbreaking gene therapy trial led by the NHS in London. Clinical researchers at Barts Health NHS Trust and Queen Mary University of London have found that over one year on from a single treatment with a gene therapy drug, participants with haemophilia A (the most common type) ar
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism traits increase thoughts of suicide in people with psychosis IMAGE: Professor Stephen Wood, researcher at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Australia. view more Credit: Orygen People with autism traits who have psychosis are at a greater risk of depression and thoughts of suicide, new research has found. The research, led by Professor Stephen Wood at Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, showed
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vaping popular among teens; opioid misuse at historic lows IMAGE: This is the Monitoring the Future Logo. view more Credit: University of Michigan Nearly one in three 12th graders report past year use of some kind of vaping device, raising concerns about the impact on their health. What they say is in the device, however, ranges from nicotine, to marijuana, to "just flavoring." The survey also suggests that use of hookahs and regular cigarettes is de
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
AOL Instant Messenger Made Social Media What It Is Today It’s the year 2000, I’m just about eight years old, and it’s my first day on AOL Instant Messenger. My fingers move clumsily across the plastic keyboard as I try to type fast enough to keep up with two cousins who are already seasoned AIM pros, sending me rapid-fire missives of excitement in our little online chat room. I’m in Boston and they’re in New York, but “omg we can talk all the time!!!1!
18h
Ingeniøren
IoT-ekspert: Danske firmaer risikerer at tabe IoT-eventyr på gulvet Alverdens virksomheder vil mangle dygtige folk til følge udviklingen inden for Internet of Things i fremtiden. Den påstand lancerer Klaus Elk, der er ansvarlig for research og development hos Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration A/S, tidligere underviser på DTU og forfatter til en bog om problematikken. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Estimater peger på, at der i 2020 vil væ
19h
Ingeniøren
Sådan vil regeringen lade myndigheder analysere borgerdata i smug Regeringens nye databeskyttelseslov giver helt nye og udvidede beføjelser til ministre, der vil lade myndigheder bruge borgerdata til nye og urelaterede formål. En paragraf i lovteksten , der lige nu behandles i Folketinget, giver samtlige ministre lov til at underskrive bekendtgørelser, der tillader myndigheder at samkøre data fra borgere – uden pligt til at informere selv samme borgere om, at d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health, study findsHealth risks increase for infants born to mothers living within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site, according to a new study.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A metallopeptide targets and disrupts mitochondrial function in breast cancer stem cellsKilling malignant mitochondria is one of the most promising approaches in the development of new anticancer drugs. Scientists have now synthesized a copper-containing peptide that is readily taken up by mitochondria in breast cancer stem cells, where it effectively induces apoptosis. The study also highlights the powerful therapeutic potential of the metallopeptides.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spanning disciplines in the search for life beyond EarthFollowing a gold rush of exoplanet discovery, the next step in the search for life is determining which of the known exoplanets are proper candidates for life -- and for this, a cross-disciplinary approach is essential.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Micro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environmentsMicro-grippers may be able to navigate unstructured environments and could help reduce risk during surgeries, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ADHD med use during pregnancy and risk of birth defectsA new study leverages data from multiple large cohorts to define and quantify what, if any, increased risk may be posed by taking the most commonly used ADHD medications. The team found that one medication, methylphenidate, increased risk of heart defects by a small amount while another medication, amphetamines, did not.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for USApproaching the second half of the century, the United States is likely to experience increases in the number of days with extreme heat, the frequency and duration of heat waves, and the length of the growing season. In response, it is anticipated that societal, agricultural and ecological needs will increase the demand on already-strained natural resources like water and energy.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
House mice may modulate their vocalizations depending on the sex of the receiverWild-derived house mice call at higher rates and frequencies during interactions with the opposite sex than with the same sex, according to a new study.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women get less credit than men in the workplaceNew research suggests that women receive less credit for speaking up in the workplace than their male counterparts.
19h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 14. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Vejdirektoratet har gennemgået samtlige 182 dødsulykker i trafikken fra 2014 og konkluderet, at en betydelig andel af dem kunne have væ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mistletoe and (a large) wine: Seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 yearsOur Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today -- if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers have found that the capacity of wine glasses has increased seven-fold over the past 300 years, and most steeply in the last two decades as wine consumption rose.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alleviating complications of babies born smaller: Is a growth factor injection the answer?Researchers have found a new potential treatment that may alleviate complications of babies born smaller than they should be, also called fetal growth restriction, which refers to poor growth of the fetus in the mother's womb during pregnancy.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Healthy eating linked to kids' happinessHealthy eating is associated with better self-esteem and fewer emotional and peer problems, such as having fewer friends or being picked on or bullied, in children regardless of body weight, according to a new study. Inversely, better self-esteem is associated with better adherence to healthy eating guidelines.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists call for improved technologies to save imperiled California salmonScientists working to protect California's most endangered salmon say that key improvements in tracking Sacramento River winter-run Chinook through California's complex water delivery system would help recover the species while the water continues to flow.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant storms cause palpitations in Saturn's atmospheric heartbeatImmense northern storms on Saturn can disturb atmospheric patterns at the planet's equator, finds the international Cassini mission.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coffee physics: Layering in cafe lattes yields insights for engineering, medicine and environmentFor anyone who has marveled at the richly colored layers in a cafe latte, you're not alone. Researchers, likewise intrigued, have now revealed how this tiered structure develops when espresso is poured into hot milk. Honing techniques for yielding sought-after layers by flowing liquids into each other could reduce costs and complexity in a range of applications.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Something Clicks for Dolphin Identification Light doesn't travel well underwater. So dolphins and other toothed whales navigate like bats , using echolocating clicks. "They're like lasers of sound they produce out of their forehead, and they bounce them off things the same way bats do, to interpret their environment." Kait Frasier is an oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. And her studies of underwater clicks i
21h
Big Think
When Narwhals Encounter Humans, Terror Pushes Them to the Limit When a deer freezes in your car’s headlights it’s because the pupils of their eyes are wide-open from being in the dark and they don’t know what to do but wait until they adjust. Presumably this is a similar phenomenon in rabbits — a terrified state referred to in Watership Down as going tharn . But what narwhals do when scared by humans combines going tharn with the opposite — flight — as they d
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Next Moon Mission Might Be Sponsored by a Soda Company Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most of us still chow down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that the average American consumed 211 pounds of meat per… Read more Call it the burger lover’s dilemma: we know deep down that it’s awful for the planet, but the beef patty tastes so damn good. Most o
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Feed: All Latest
The Alabama Senate Election Was Decided 100 Million Years Ago They say victory has a hundred fathers, and Doug Jones' upset win in the Alabama Senate race Tuesday night is no exception. Maybe it was the mounting accusations of child molestation facing Republican opponent Roy Moore that sealed Jones' victory. Maybe this was just the latest swell in the blue wave that washed over Virginia last month. Maybe it was the work of a small, but mighty, group of Jone
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alleviating complications of babies born smaller: Is a growth factor injection the answer? Researchers have found a new potential treatment that may alleviate complications of babies born smaller than they should be, also called fetal growth restriction, which refers to poor growth of the fetus in the mother's womb during pregnancy. The findings were published in the Journal of Physiology . Sheep fetuses received weekly injections of a growth factor (IGF1). There is always a risk that
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Hurricane Harvey rainfall 'weighed 127bn tonnes' Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Roads turned to rivers across Houston as Harvey hit Scientists have weighed the water that fell on Texas during the record-breaking Hurricane Harvey in August. They calculate, by measuring how much the Earth was compressed, that the Category 4 storm dropped 127 billion tonnes, or 34 trillion gallons. "One person asked me how many stadia i
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How Greenland would look without its ice sheet Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption The map reveals a hidden world of mountains and canyons Scientists have produced a stunning visualisation of Greenland – without its ice cover. It is made from decades of survey data that show the position and shape of the territory’s bedrock, and the surrounding seafloor. This is critical information needed to understand how the huge isl
22h
Science | The Guardian
Leap forward towards gene therapy cure for haemophilia A Scientists believe they are on the way to finding a cure for haemophilia A, the bleeding disorder that currently requires sufferers to inject themselves every other day to avoid life-threatening complications. One dose of a gene therapy given experimentally to 13 patients by NHS doctors in the UK has allowed them all to come off treatment. These were men – most sufferers are – who would not only
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene mutation causes low sensitivity to pain A UCL-led research team has identified a rare mutation that causes one family to have unusually low sensitivity to pain. The researchers hope the findings, published today in Brain , could be used to identify new treatments for chronic pain. They studied an Italian family, the Marsilis, which includes six people who have a distinctive pain response that has not been identified in any other pe
23h
Futurity.org
For prey escaping predators, location matters Habitat complexity can be an important factor for prey trying to escape hungry predators, researchers report. “…reducing habitat complexity, often associated with human developments, could alter all sorts of ecological interactions…” Nick Keiser, postdoctoral fellow in the biosciences department at Rice University, demonstrated as much in a study of predator-prey combinations that tested the effe
23h
Futurity.org
Hyperlens crystal could show us living cells in new detail Researchers report an advance in the quality of an optical material used in hyperlensing, a method of creating lenses that can resolve objects much smaller than the wavelength of light. The work opens up new possibilities. For example, imagine an optical lens so powerful that it lets you view features the size of a small virus on the surface of a living cell in its natural environment. The optica
23h
Science | The Guardian
'High-status' portrait of bearded woman bought by Wellcome Collection On 15 September 1657 the diarist John Evelyn had a conversation with an intelligent, cultured German woman, dressed in the height of fashion, who played beautifully to him on the harpsichord. She also had “a most prolix beard, & mustachios, with long locks of haire growing on the very middle of her nose, exactly like an Island Dog.” The Wellcome Collection in London has acquired a remarkable port
23h
New Scientist - News
A family in Italy doesn’t feel pain because of a gene mutation Going unnoticed Peter Dazeley/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou An Italian family that is barely able to sense pain has had the genetic root of their shared disorder uncovered. Understanding this gene may lead to new painkiller drugs. The affected family members include a 78-year-old woman, her two middle-aged daughters, and their three children. All of them fail to sense pain in the way most of us d
23h
Live Science
That 'Feeling in Your Bones' Has Nothing to Do with the Weather Some people say their joint or back pain changes with the weather, but a new study finds no link between achy joints and rainfall patterns. The study analyzed Medicare insurance claims from more than 1.5 million Americans ages 65 and older, along with daily rainfall data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Using the insurance claims, the researchers looked at the number of p
23h
cognitive science
I debate somebody who is opposed to AI in this podcast. What's your opinion? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
23h
Popular Science
Anti-smoking tactics might help us fight climate change J ust before the delegates for the annual Conference of the Parties on climate change started meeting in Bonn this month, the Lancet, the leading British medical journal, published yet another major study showing that climate change is a growing health hazard. The study revealed that hundreds of millions of people around the world are already suffering due to climate change. Infectious diseases a
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breathing exercises help asthma patients with quality of life A study led by the University of Southampton has found that people who continue to get problems from their asthma, despite receiving standard treatment, experience an improved quality of life when they are taught breathing exercises. The majority of asthma patients have some degree of impaired quality of life. Researchers, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), also found
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mistletoe and (a large) wine: Seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 years Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today - if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that the capacity of wine glasses has increased seven-fold over the past 300 years, and most steeply in the last two decades as wine consumption rose. Both the types of
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Futurity.org
Scientists sequence extinct Tasmanian tiger’s genome Using techniques never imagined when the last Tasmanian tiger died in the Hobart Zoo in the last century, scientists have sequenced the marsupial’s entire genome. For Andrew Pask, associate professor in the School of Biosciences at the University of Melbourne, the Tasmanian tiger (also known as Thylacinus cynocephalus , or the thylacine) is a labor of love. Over 10 years ago, he and an internatio
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Futurity.org
Light-up specks find and track tiny tumors Scientists have created a method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread using light-emitting nanoparticles. “You can treat the tumors intelligently because now you know the address of the cancer.” The technology could lead to earlier cancer detection, more precise treatments, and even improvement in patient cure rates and survival times. “We’ve always had this dream that we can track the pr
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NYT > Science
A ‘Game Changer’ for Patients With Irregular Heart Rhythm Dr. Roderick Tung, director of cardiac electrophysiology at the University of Chicago Medicine, described the new procedure as “a paradigm shift.” The treatment requires weeks to take full effect, so it cannot be used for cardiac patients who need immediate help. And the method must be studied in larger groups of patients over longer times, an effort that has already begun. “The worst thing we ca
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New on MIT Technology Review
Data Mining Reveals the Way Humans Evaluate Each Other The way we evaluate the performance of other humans is one of the bigger mysteries of cognitive psychology. This process occurs continuously as we judge individuals’ ability to do certain tasks, assessing everyone from electricians and bus drivers to accountants and politicians. The problem is that we have access to only a limited set of data about an individual’s performance—some of it directly
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Blog » Languages » English
A Visit From St. Grim: Marathon Results Atani’s lovely decorations on the December marathon neurotree. Congratulations, Eyewirers, on finishing the marathon cell in 9 hours and 27 minutes! It was a very Relicky cell, and Grim is most pleased. Keep the cubes going till the marathon scoring window ends! And be sure to join us for the Visit From St. Grim closing ceremony on Friday at 4 PM EDT.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Fracking linked to low birth weight in Pennsylvania babies Living near a fracking site appears to be detrimental to infant health, a study eyeing the gas production practice in Pennsylvania suggests. Babies of moms living within one kilometer of a hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, site in the state had a 25 percent greater chance of being born underweight than did babies whose moms lived at least three kilometers away, researchers report online December
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Driving Abu Dhabi (360 Video) Buckle up for an adventurous ride through sand dunes, cityscapes and tour some of the most cherished landmarks of Abu Dhabi. #inabudhabi For a more immersive experience and other amazing 360 content, download the Discovery VR app: https://www.discoveryvr.com/get-the-app.html From: Discovery
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The Atlantic
Why Do American Schools Have Such Long Hours? U.S. students spend more time in K-12 schools than their peers in many other countries. In fact, in Japan and South Korea, kids spend an average of about 150 fewer instructional hours per year in school, yet these students consistently score higher on international tests. How is that possible? In this episode of School Myths by The Atlantic , we delve into the reasoning behind the structure of Am
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google’s Return to China Foretells a Global Race to Deliver AI When Google abandoned the Chinese search market over government censorship in 2010, it seemed a remarkably principled act of self-sabotage. The company’s decision to return to China today, by establishing a new AI research center in Beijing, is all about safeguarding its future. The center was announced at an event in Shanghai today by Fei-Fei Li , a prominent AI researcher and the chief scientis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the kidneys produce concentrated urine IMAGE: Cross-sections of two collecting ducts are shown. Tissue proteins are colored with fluorescent dyes: aquaporin 2 (red), F-actin (yellow), tight junction protein 1 (green) and cell nuclei (DAPI, blue).... view more Credit: Credit: Janett Ruffert, Kai Schmidt-Ott, MDC When we drink little, we produce less urine. But how is this process regulated? An international team of scientists
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Loss of water in drought caused Sierra Nevada to rise Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch (2.5 centimeters) in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday. The study also found that in the following two years of increased snow and rain, the rocks in the range regained about half as much water as was lost during the drought and the return of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists call for improved technologies to save imperiled California salmon Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program biologists count, measure, and collect tissue samples from juvenile salmon outmigrating from the San Francisco Bay-Delta. The tissue sample will be analyzed in a genetic laboratory to determine whether juveniles are winter, spring or fall/late-fall Chinook salmon. Credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service Scientists working to protect California's most endangered
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Popular Science
Air pollution can make kids behave badly When wildfires started raging through southern California this month, Diana Younan warned her family members living in the path of the smoke to stay inside, as much as possible. Fires send air pollution levels soaring, filling the air with tiny particles. Younan, who studies environmental health at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, knows the damage those tiny p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuelConsumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now researchers have found a way to use bacteria to turn the leftover sugars and acids from Greek yogurt into molecules that could be used in biofuels or safe feedstock additives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A lithium-ion battery inspired by safety glassResearchers have modified the design of lithium-ion batteries to include slits along the electrodes, a feature which may mitigate the risk of battery failure during automobile accidents. The prototype could allow manufacturers to scale down the housing materials that commonly protect batteries in electric cars from mechanical damage, improving the overall energy density and cost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electricity, eel-style: Soft power cells could run tomorrow's implantablesInspired by the electric eel, a flexible, transparent electrical device could lead to body-friendly power sources for implanted health monitors and medication dispensers, augmented-reality contact lenses and countless other applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video game improves doctors' recognition and triage of severe trauma patientsPlaying an adventure video game featuring a fictitious, young emergency physician treating severe trauma patients was better than text-based learning at priming real doctors to quickly recognize the patients who needed higher levels of care, according to a new trial. The game tackles the annual problem of 30,000 preventable deaths occurring after injury, in part because severely injured patients a
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Science : NPR
3 Reasons Why California's Fire Risk Won't Dampen Anytime Soon A man watches the Thomas Fire in the hills above Carpinteria, California. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images A man watches the Thomas Fire in the hills above Carpinteria, California. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images Wildfires in December are the new norm for California. In the West, they are burning hotter and more intensely than ever due to climate cha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists call for improved technologies to save imperiled California salmon IMAGE: Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program biologists count, measure, and collect tissue samples from juvenile salmon outmigrating from the San Francisco Bay-Delta. The tissue sample will be analyzed in a genetic... view more Credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service Scientists working to protect California's most endangered salmon say in a new report that key improvements in tracking Sacrament
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Live Science
Health Stats: The Best and Worst States Massachusetts is the overall healthiest state in the union, according to the 2017 America's Health Rankings Report by the United Health Foundation. Mississippi is the least healthy. But on individual metrics, the states vary widely. Here are the highest- and lowest-ranking states for each of the 35 different measures of public health used in the report. [Full story: Massachusetts Unseats Hawaii
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Live Science
Massachusetts Unseats Hawaii As Healthiest State Chilly Massachusetts has bumped sunny Hawaii from the top spot as the healthiest state in the nation, a new report finds. The Bay State is the healthiest state in the union, according to the new report from the United Health Foundation . Hawaii, which held the No. 1 spot for five years, is now the runner-up, followed by Vermont, Utah and Connecticut. (The United Health Foundation is affilia
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Dansk forskning trækker EU-milliard til København 13. december 2017 Dansk forskning trækker EU-milliard til København Eliteforskning Dansk forskning er i europæisk topklasse. Københavns Universitet er blandt de bedste i konkurrencen om EU forskningsstøtte. Med over en milliard kroner i EU-støtte fra Horizon 2020 er KU’s forskning den femte mest støttede blandt universiteter i Europa. Københavns Universitets forskere har nu modtaget over 1 millia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lactic acid bacteria can protect against Influenza A virus, study finds IMAGE: This is Dr. Sang-Moo Kang, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. view more Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA -- Lactic acid bacteria, commonly used as probiotics to improve digestive health, can offer protection against different subtypes of influenza A virus, resulting in reduced weight loss after virus infection and lower amounts of vi
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Sea reptile fossil gives clues to life in ancient oceans Image copyright Yasuhisa Nakajima Image caption Paleontologists Tanja Wintrich and Martin Sander examine the fossil A new fossil is shedding light on the murky past of the sea reptiles that swam at the time of the dinosaurs. With tiny heads on long necks and four pointed flippers, plesiosaurs have been likened to Scotland's mythical Loch Ness monster. The German discovery proves that these sea cr
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.