Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Complete design of a silicon quantum computer chip unveiled Artist's impression of UNSW's complete silicon quantum computer chip in operation. Credit: Tony Melov/UNSW Research teams all over the world are exploring different ways to design a working computing chip that can integrate quantum interactions. Now, UNSW engineers believe they have cracked the problem, reimagining the silicon microprocessors we know to create a complete design for a quantum comp
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Viden
I fremtiden dyrker vi mindre sex med hinandenVirtual reality, kunstig intelligens og robotter betyder, at vi i fremtiden dyrker mindre sex med hinanden og mere sex alene med teknologien, spår fremtidsforsker.
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Ingeniøren
I aftes blev reglerne for netneutralitet rullet tilbage Natten til fredag, dansk tid, stemte den amerikanske telemyndighed FCC for at tilbagerulle et sæt regler, som havde til formål at styrke den såkaldte netneutralitet i USA. Det skete efter mange måneders kraftig modstand fra interesseorganisationer, tech-virksomheder og privatpersoner. Afgørelsen er et foreløbigt punktum for en debat, som har kørt siden begyndelsen af maj, hvor formanden for FCC,
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Science : NPR
Scientists Say Japanese Monkeys Are Having 'Sexual Interactions' With Deer An adolescent female Japanese macaque on the back of a male sika deer. Researchers have looked into some macaques' attraction to the deer. Courtesy of Noëlle Gunst hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Noëlle Gunst An adolescent female Japanese macaque on the back of a male sika deer. Researchers have looked into some macaques' attraction to the deer. Courtesy of Noëlle Gunst Adolescent female
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2017s Science News in ReviewHurricanes, protests, and lifesaving genetic engineering: our picks for the biggest stories of the year
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Easier paths to quantum-based techologyEngineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time. The researchers say this discovery will unlock new capabilities in physics labs working in quantum information science around the world, while providing easier paths to developing quantum-based technologies.
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A Visit From St. Grim: Awards We hope that you had lots of fun and great cheer, Now the end of events is finally here. St. Grimmy has lots of gifts to award, Scroll through this post to see your rewards! Art by Daniela Gamba Swag generously funded by @susi
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Our Favorite Gadgets From 2017 The editors of WIRED talk about some of their favorite products from 2017. Along the way, they also spot a few trends for the year. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes is @pardesoteric , David Pierce is @pierce , Brendan Nystedt is @bnystedt , and Michael Calore is @snackfight . Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab . Our theme song is by Solar Keys . How to Lis
49min
New on MIT Technology Review
IBM Helps Protect Endangered African Rhinos with IoT TechnologyIBM, MTN, a leading African telecommunications provider, Wageningen University (WU) in the Netherlands and Prodapt are harnessing IBM Internet of Things (IoT) technology as part of the MTN Connected Wildlife Solution.
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A Turbulent Year in the Publishing WorldIn 2017, scientists, regulators, and publishers clashed in a series of lawsuits, boycotts, mass resignations, and more.
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The Biggest Science Scandals of 2017This year's controversial news included unethical behavior among politicians, a murder, and multiple accusations of gender discrimination and sexual harassment, in addition to the usual spate of research misconduct.
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The Year in Science PolicyHow a new administration in the U.S. affected scientists around the world throughout 2017
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MobileCoin: A New Cryptocurrency From Signal Creator Moxie Marlinspike In the early bitcoin years, proponents promised that you would soon be able to pay for anything and everything with cryptocurrency. Order pizza ! Buy Etsy trinkets! Use a bitcoin ATM ! While PayPal had existed for more than a decade, frictionless, social payment platforms like Venmo were just first taking off, and cryptocurrency seemed like a legitimate way for digital transactions to evolve. It
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Future of Money Special Report Special Report The Future of Money Computing New financial networks could stop the concentration of wealth and increase participation in the economy—but only if used with care January 1, 2018 — Alexander Lipton and Alex “Sandy” Pentland The first big digital currency gave us a glimpse of a new economic order—one that raises more questions than answers Computing The ulti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins IMAGE: Graduate student Megan Radyk and Jason Mills, M.D., Ph.D., led a study revealing that although many cancer therapies target rapidly dividing stem cells, mature cells also seem to play a... view more Credit: Matt Miller Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer -- a finding tha
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Science | The Guardian
Facebook admits it poses mental health risk – but says using site more can help Facebook has acknowledged that social media use can be bad for users’ mental health, a sign the company is feeling pressure from a growing chorus of critics raising alarms about the platform’s effect on society. Researchers for the social network admitted in a blogpost Friday that studies have found that spending time on Facebook “passively consuming information” can leave people “feeling worse”,
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: An Ancient Step Toward Modern Birds Perhaps it was soft, even fuzzy. But it was also very much a dinosaur. Anchiornis was a four-winged birdlike species that lived about 160 million years ago, and many fossil specimens have been found in China. A number of them were discovered with preserved feathers, but until recently the feathers had not been described in detail. Anchiornis (the name means “near bird”) was about 14 inches long f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Italy says Amazon will pay $118 million to end tax dispute The EU will on Wednesday decide a landmark case against Luxembourg, which stands accused of giving illegal tax breaks to internet shopping giant Amazon, according to two sources familiar with the matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Christmas nearing, retailers feel pressure to deliver In this Tuesday, May 9, 2017, photo, a UPS employee loads packages onto a truck at a company facility in New York. With Christmas on a Monday, most retailers have one less day to get packages delivered on time. UPS said earlier in December that some package deliveries were being delayed because of a surge of orders from online shoppers after Thanksgiving. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) The pressure to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report: NASA should develop US strategy for international space station beyond 2024 Credit: CC0 Public Domain Although NASA has made progress toward the overall space exploration science priorities recommended in a 2011 decadal survey by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the space agency should raise the priority of scientific research that addresses the risks and unknowns of human space exploration. This heightened priority is particularly important
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate Wilson's warbler at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon. Credit: Hankyu Kim, Oregon State University Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found. In a paper published today in Diversity and Distributions , a professional journal, researchers in the Colle
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new theory to describe widely used materialA new theoretical model explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The model has profound implications for applications in printed electronics, energy storage in paper, and bioelectronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery could reduce cost, energy for high-speed Internet connectionsResearchers have developed an optical medium in which multiple beams of light can autocorrect their properties without affecting other beams. This could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and energy consumption of high-speed internet communications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climateOld forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis?Researchers have identified a signaling pathway regulating cell migration and metastasis. Unexpected hair loss in a preclinical model helped them to identify the pathway. When cells within the skin that maintain hair follicles migrate too often, hair follicle maintenance is disrupted. Researchers speculated that this pathway might also play a role in cancer cell migration. Indeed, they showed that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study showsHuman memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect riskHigher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Civil engineer patents integrated sensor and algorithm to monitor stiffness in soils Anand Puppala. Credit: UTA Anand Puppala, associate dean for research in the College of Engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington and a civil engineering professor, recently was awarded a patent for developing a sensor system with an algorithm that will expedite field assessment of stabilization of high sulfate soils near bridges and roads. Patent No. 9,822,504 , titled "Systems, Appara
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery could reduce cost, energy for high-speed Internet connections Michael Vasilyev, left, a UTA electrical engineering professor, speaks with one of his graduate students. Credit: UTA Breakthrough research from The University of Texas at Arlington and The University of Vermont could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and energy consumption of high-speed internet connections. Nonlinear-optical effects, such as intensity-dependent refractive index, can be u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single-photon detector can count to four The image depicts three photons passing through a superconducting nanowire, causing the nanowire to heat up and disrupting the super-current. Credit: Duke University Engineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time. The researchers say this discovery will unlock new capabilities in physics labs working in qua
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google hit with lawsuit alleging fraud in ad-scam refunds Online advertising agency AdTrader has sued Google in federal court, accusing it of fraud and deceit for not refunding or crediting advertisers whose ads were targeted in scams. The agency claims Google made "fraudulent promises" of refunds, while the company just kept the money. None of the claims have been proven. Google said the company had not reviewed the lawsuit. AdTrader claims that af
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Popular Science
China is betting big on electromagnetic railguns and catapults China has been making under-the-radar advances in railguns and other electromagnetic technologies, a move that's particularly notable considering the U.S. Navy has just recently reduced its efforts developing this kind of technology. As opposed to gunpowder, railguns use electromagnetic energy to sling out a projectile, which means there's potential for far greater speed and range—the equivalent
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drinking hot tea every day linked to lower glaucoma riskDrinking a cup of hot tea at least once a day may be linked to a significantly lower risk of developing the serious eye condition, glaucoma, finds a small study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence used to identify bacteria quickly and accuratelyMicroscopes enhanced with artificial intelligence (AI) could help clinical microbiologists diagnose potentially deadly blood infections and improve patients' odds of survival, according to microbiologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handedWhen proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. Now, researchers have obtained a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Error-free into the quantum computer ageIon-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers, research shows. Scientists have introduced trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single-photon detector can count to 4 IMAGE: The image depicts three photons passing through a superconducting nanowire, causing the nanowire to heat up and disrupting the super-current. view more Credit: Duke University DURHAM, N.C. -- Engineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time. The researchers say this discovery will unlock new capabiliti
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTA discovery could reduce cost, energy for high-speed Internet connections IMAGE: Michael Vasilyev, left, a UTA electrical engineering professor, speaks with one of his graduate students. view more Credit: UTA Breakthrough research from The University of Texas at Arlington and The University of Vermont could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and energy consumption of high-speed internet connections. Nonlinear-optical effects, such as intensity-dependent refract
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shoe-box-sized chemical detectorA chemical sensor prototype will be able to detect 'single-fingerprint quantities' of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away, and its developers are working to shrink it to the size of a shoebox.
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Viden
VIDEO VR-porno bliver mere og mere populært Virtual reality er fremtiden. Eller det har vi i hvert fald hørt i nogle år efterhånden. Men hvornår kommer det indhold, som virkelig får os til at suse ud og købe de dyre briller? Måske er det allerede landet for ifølge tal fra verdens største pornoside Pornhub, er forbruget af VR-porno steget voldsomt det sidste år. De fleste har ikke VR-briller liggende. De er dyre. De koster omkring 4000 kron
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BIDMC researchers use artificial intelligence to identify bacteria quickly and accurately BOSTON - Microscopes enhanced with artificial intelligence (AI) could help clinical microbiologists diagnose potentially deadly blood infections and improve patients' odds of survival, according to microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). In a paper published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology , the scientists demonstrated that an automated AI-enhanced microscope syst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new theory to describe widely used material IMAGE: Klas Tybrandt at Linköping University with power paper. He has put forward a theoretical model that explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS.... view more Credit: Thor Balkhed LiU researcher Klas Tybrandt has put forward a theoretical model that explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behavior IMAGE: Schematic illustration of dynamic behaviors of gold ions in an ionic liquid. The yellow spheres and pentagons represent gold ions and molecules in the liquid, respectively. view more Credit: CREDIT: c2017 TERUYASU MIZOGUCHI, INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE, THE UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO Tokyo-Electricity is used to power your car or home, it is also used to power your heart and brain. Batteries
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia IMAGE: The amber lenses used in the insomnia study block out a substantial portion of blue light but do not result in an overall dimming of the light levels reaching the... view more Credit: Ari Shechter How do you unwind before bedtime? If your answer involves Facebook and Netflix, you are actively reducing your chance of a good night's sleep. And you are not alone: 90 percent of Americans u
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Giant Skulls, Leopards, a Space Capsule Landing The Thomas Fire in southern California, leopards in India and New York, unrest in the West Bank and Argentina, an FCC vote on net neutrality in the U.S., Christmas in a Brazilian prison, an upset victory by Doug Jones in a U.S. Senate election in Alabama, and much more.
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Scientific American Content: Global
AIM Brought Instant Messaging to the Masses, Teaching Skills for Modern Communication The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Toward the mid-1990s, America Online (by then going by its nickname, AOL) was the company through which most Americans accessed the internet. As many as half of the CD-ROMs produced at the time bore the near-ubiquitous AOL logo, offering early computer users the opportu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis? IMAGE: Co-localization (yellow) of TBR1 receptor in primary cilia of two adjacent cells (marked by acetylated tubulin) in CerS4-/- mammary tumor cells but not in control cells. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Dr. Besim Ogretmen, Medical University of South Carolina. Results published in Oct. 24, 2017 issue of Science Signaling . Understanding how cancer cells are able to metastasize -- mi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handed ANN ARBOR--When proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. Now, researchers, including University of Michigan biophysicists, have obtained a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level. The researchers hope this kind of detail can help in the search for drugs to target the inco
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Popular Science
Corals grow in patterns, even if we can’t always see them The colorful riot of a coral reef might seem chaotic, but new research indicates that it’s actually far from random. Scientists have created 3D maps of 17,000 square feet of reefs and discovered that corals grow in patterns. Some species huddle close together, while others are less densely packed. These clusters could protect the corals from danger and give conservationists a blueprint for how to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better way to weigh millions of solitary starsAstronomers have come up with a new and improved method for measuring the masses of millions of solitary stars, especially those with planetary systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Six-decade-old space mystery solved with shoebox-sized satellite called a CubeSatA 60-year-old mystery about the source of energetic, potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts has been solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by students. The satellite is called a CubeSat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooksThe world's oldest known fish-hooks have been discovered placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate CORVALLIS, Ore. -- Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found. In a paper published today in Diversity and Distributions , a professional journal, researchers in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University reported that the more sensitive a bird species is
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Live Science
Compound in Marijuana Appears Safe and Nonaddictive, WHO Says A compound in marijuana appears to be relatively safe and nonaddictive, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO). In an initial review of existing research, the WHO found that the compound, called cannabidiol or CBD, is "generally well-tolerated with a good safety profile," according to the November report . In addition, the compound appears to have "no effects ind
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Science : NPR
What If Life On Earth Didn't Start On Earth? This artist's impression shows the first sighted interstellar asteroid, Oumuamua, discovered on Oct. 19, 2017. M. Kornmesser/ESO/NASA hide caption toggle caption M. Kornmesser/ESO/NASA This artist's impression shows the first sighted interstellar asteroid, Oumuamua, discovered on Oct. 19, 2017. M. Kornmesser/ESO/NASA Half a billion years. That's how long the Earth existed as a barren world. Half
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D nanoscale imaging made possibleImaging at the nanoscale is important to a plethora of modern applications in materials science, physics, biology, medicine and other fields. Limitations of current techniques are, e.g. their resolution, imaging speed or the inability to look behind opaque objects with arbitrary shapes. Scientists have now demonstrated a method for meeting this challenge with stunning properties.
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Science | The Guardian
This may be a turning point in treating neurodegenerative diseases T hey are diseases that threaten more than physical health: memories, personality, and the ability to move and speak are incrementally stolen. And until this year neurodegenerative diseases, from Alzheimer’s to ALS , had been entirely unstoppable. However, a breakthrough in Huntington’s disease this week suggests this bleak picture could be about to change. The landmark trial was the first to sho
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The Atlantic
It's Really Hard to Know When a Zoo Animal Is Pregnant Sex at the zoo is a highly managed affair. When zookeepers do not want a species to reproduce, birth control is in order. “Chimps take human birth-control pills, giraffes are served hormones in their feed, and grizzly bears have slow-releasing hormones implanted in their forelegs,” writes The New York Times . When zookeepers do want a species to reproduce—especially an endangered or threatened on
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Viden
USA har afskaffet netneutralitet - men hvad er det? De amerikanske internetbrugere kan i fremtiden risikere, at der bliver enten hurtigere eller langsommere adgang til forskellige internetsider. I går stemte telestyrelsen FCC nemlig et forslag igennem, som fjerner den såkaldte netneutralitet. Det betyder, at store amerikanske tele - og netudbydere som Verizon og AT&T nu kan bestemme, hvor dyrt det skal være at sende den tunge trafik som eksempelvi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development An organ called Kupffer's vesicle, which helps specify the left and right sides of the developing fish, is shaped asymmetrically in a wild-type embryo (left), but is more symmetric in the absence of maternally inherited gdf3 (right). Credit: Pelliccia et al., 2017 A new study indicates an essential role for a maternally inherited gene in embryonic development. The study found that zebrafish that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companies turn your Facebook friends into a sales force Betsy Stover was 17 when her mother asked her to help fax strangers, hawking a service that had the markings of a pyramid scheme. "I always felt like a creep sending unsolicited faxes," said Stover, who hated the chore, but knew the work required cold calls to succeed. Stover, now a 38-year-old comedian based in Los Angeles, had largely forgotten about the experience until about three years ago
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving over the Philippines The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak on Dec. 14 at 12:11 p.m. EST (1711 UTC). Coldest cloud tops and strongest storms appear in purple. Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central Philippines. Infra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene in zero G promises success in space The airplane in which Flagship researchers performed experiment in microgravity. Operated by Novespace, the plane makes special manoeuvres to create zero gravit conditions inside the plane Credit: Graphene Flagship In a successful collaboration between the Graphene Flagship and the European Space Agency, experiments testing graphene for two different space-related applications have shown extremel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much can late Permian ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot. The lush equatorial ecosystem of the late Permian, about 260 milion years ago, as reconstructed in the Dolomites region, Northern Italy. Credit: Drawing by Davide Bonadonna. A whopping two hundred and fifty-two million years ago, Earth was crawling with bizarre animals, including dinosaur cousins resembling Komodo dragons and bulky early mammal-relatives, millions of years before dinosaurs even e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much soil goes down the drain—new data on soil lost due to water The spatial pattern of soil erosion in 2012. Areas classified as having very low, and low erosion rates represent almost 85 percent of the study area. About 7.5 million km2 in total (6.1 percent of the land), exceeds the generic tolerable soil erosion threshold. Credit: European Union, University of Basel According to a new study by the University of Basel, the European Commission - Joint Researc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavy oils and petroleum coke raising vanadium emissions Emissions rise from a tar sands mining and processing facility along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta, Canada. Credit: Garth Lenz Human emissions of the potentially harmful trace metal vanadium into Earth's atmosphere have spiked sharply since the start of the 21st century due in large part to industry's growing use of heavy oils, tar sands, bitumen and petroleum coke for energy, a new Duk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Error-free into the quantum computer age Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age. Credit: H. Ritsch/IQOQI A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocol
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development IMAGE: Compared to a normal zebrafish embryo (right), an embryo lacking gdf3 (left) inherited from mom shows major defects resulting from its inability to form mesoderm and endoderm cells early in... view more Credit: Pelliccia et al., 2017. A new study indicates an essential role for a maternally inherited gene in embryonic development. The study found that zebrafish that failed to inher
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
After searching 12 years for bipolar disorder's cause, U-M team concludes it has many ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Nearly 6 million Americans have bipolar disorder, and most have probably wondered why. After more than a decade of studying over 1,100 of them in-depth, a University of Michigan team has an answer - or rather, seven answers. In fact, they say, no one genetic change, or chemical imbalance, or life event, lies at the heart of every case of the mental health condition once known a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study shows BINGHAMTON, NY- Human memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. "Our ability to think and memorize information arises from our nervous systems," said Binghamton University Distinguished Professor of Psychology Ralph Mi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A shoe-box-sized chemical detector A chemical sensor prototype developed at the University of Michigan will be able to detect "single-fingerprint quantities" of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away, and its developers are working to shrink it to the size of a shoebox. It could potentially be used to identify traces of drugs and explosives, as well as speeding the analysis of certain medical samples. A portable inf
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NYT > Science
Q&A: The Sands of Time Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. How deep is the sand on a typical beach? A. There are so many variables in the evolving natural history of a sandy beach that it would be virtually impossible to identify a typical beach. The depth of the sand can range from a few inches to many feet and can change noticeably with each season, each storm, each tide or even each wave. Often, underneath the loose sa
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New Scientist - News
Hijacked sperm carry chemo drugs to cervical cancer cells Directed delivery Georges Kyrillos / Alamy By Alice Klein There’s a new use for sperm – delivering cancer drugs. Standard chemotherapy is toxic to both cancer cells and normal cells, leading to symptoms like nausea, and limiting the dose a person can receive. But if chemotherapy drugs specifically targeted tumours, we could avoid this. Haifeng Xu at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and M
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New Scientist - News
Does losing net neutrality really mean the end of the internet? By Aaron Mak After the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to repeal net neutrality regulations on Thursday, reactions on Twitter were strong. Many despaired about the possible end of access to a free and open internet, while others urged neutrality supporters to not give up the fight by calling their representatives in Congress and keeping an eye on the various state governments
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space station research explorer on NASA.gov launches phase one The Heart Cells investigation uses human skin cells that are induced to become stem cells, which can then differentiate into any type of cell. Researchers forced the stem cells to grow into human heart cells, which NASA astronaut Kate Rubins cultured aboard the space station for one month. Credit: NASA Researchers, prospective partners, media professionals, students, and space enthusiasts now hav
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The locomotion of hominins in the Pleistocene was just as efficient as that of current humansResearchers have analyzed the influence of body proportions on the cost of locomotion by means of an experimental energetic study with 46 subjects of both sexes, whose results indicate that the walk of Pleistocene hominins was no less efficient energetically than that of current humans.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In marine mammals’ battle of the sexes, vaginal folds can make the difference The battle of the sexes, at least among certain ocean mammals, may come down to well-placed skin folds, suggests research by Patricia Brennan, an evolutionary biologist at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Mass., and colleagues. In some species, enhanced male-female genital fit has evolved over time in ways that make mating easier. This is an example of what scientists call congruent evoluti
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The Atlantic
The Weaponization of Awkwardness “Y oung women say yes to sex they don’t actually want to have all of the time. Why? Because we condition young women to feel guilty if they change their mind.” That was the writer Ella Dawson, in her essay reacting to “ Cat Person ,” the New Yorker short story that went viral, and indeed that is still going viral, this week . Kristen Roupenian’s work of fiction resonated among denizens of the non
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The Atlantic
Everything You Never Thought to Ask About Astronaut Food Days before his return to Earth in 2008, NASA astronaut Daniel Tani told reporters he couldn’t wait to do something very ordinary after spending four months in space. “I’m looking forward to putting food on a plate and eating several things at once, which you can’t do up here,” Tani said. Plates are pretty useless on the International Space Station, where food—along with everything else—floats. M
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Last Jedi' will play a big role as Disney takes on Netflix Few would dare underestimate the cultural and commercial power of "Star Wars." The latest movie in the Skywalker saga, "Star Wars: The Last Jedi," is sure to have one of the biggest opening weekends of the year, with an estimated $425 million in its global premiere. That's another good omen for Walt Disney Co., which has staked a big piece of its future on the enduring appeal of the decades-old s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much can late Permian ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot A whopping two hundred and fifty-two million years ago, Earth was crawling with bizarre animals, including dinosaur cousins resembling Komodo dragons and bulky early mammal-relatives, millions of years before dinosaurs even existed. New research shows us that the Permian equator was both a literal and figurative hotspot: it was, for the most part, a scorching hot desert, on top of having a concen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Error-free into the quantum computer age IMAGE: Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age. view more Credit: H. Ritsch/IQOQI A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum erro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Erectile dysfunction is red flag for silent early cardiovascular disease Cleveland, OH (Dec 15, 2017) - Despite decades long prevention and treatment efforts, cardiovascular (CV) disease continues to be the leading cause of death worldwide. Early detection of CV disease can allow for interventions to prevent heart attack and stroke, including smoking cessation, medications such as a statins, blood pressure control, weight management, exercise, and improved diet. A new
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heavy-petroleum fuels raising vanadium emissions IMAGE: Emissions rise from a tar sands mining and processing facility along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta, Canada. view more Credit: Garth Lenz DURHAM, N.C. -- Human emissions of the potentially harmful trace metal vanadium into Earth's atmosphere have spiked sharply since the start of the 21st century due in large part to industry's growing use of heavy oils, tar sands, bitumen a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water IMAGE: The spatial pattern of soil erosion in 2012. Areas classified as having very low, and low erosion rates represent almost 85 percent of the study area. About 7.5 million km2... view more Credit: European Union, University of Basel According to a new study by the University of Basel, the European Commission - Joint Research Centre and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH, UK), almos
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The Atlantic
Oil Has Cursed Venezuela—But Could Also Save the Country Editor’s Note: What follows is an adapted excerpt from a book co-written by Leopoldo López, a Venezuelan opposition leader, and Gustavo Baquero. López is one of the world’s most prominent political prisoners. His contributions to the book came through handwritten notes on scraps of paper that were delivered by family members to Baquero, an oil professional with extensive international experience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin deficiency in later lifeOne in two persons aged 65 and above has suboptimal levels of vitamin D in the blood and one in four older adults has suboptimal vitamin B12 levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in childrenResearchers report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter — a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber — are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Horrific mating strategy appears to benefit both male and female redback spidersA mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fieldsFarmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions -- but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conserving the forestsCertification programs are being reevaluated as options for sustaining tropical forests, explain scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Revealing the best-kept secrets of proteinsA new approach for identifying important undiscovered functions of proteins has been revealed by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loose skin and 'slack volume' protect Hagfish from shark bitesNew research shows how hagfishes survive an initial attack from predators before they release large volumes of slime to defend themselves. Because the slime is released after they are attacked, this defense strategy is only effective if they survive the initial bite. Results show that hagfish skin is not puncture resistant; it is both unattached and flaccid, which helps avoid internal damage from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food-induced anaphylaxis common among children despite adult supervisionAt least a third of reactions in children with food-induced anaphylaxis to a known allergen occur under adult supervision, according to a new study. The findings reveal that inadvertent exposures to a known food allergen in children are frequent, and in the majority of supervised reactions, adults other than the child's parents were present.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
All politics -- and cannabis marketing -- are localCalifornia's legal cannabis market, opening for business on Jan. 1, is expected to quickly grow to be the largest in the nation and worth more than $5 billion a year. County voting on Proposition 64 that led the state here -- to legalizing sales for recreational use -- can offer insight into how medical marijuana dispensaries will now market themselves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism identified of impaired dendritic cell function that weakens response to cancerThe mechanism implicated in the defective function of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs), a specialized type of immune cells that expose the antigens on their surface to activate the T cells, has now been revealed by researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many women report not feeling completely informed about breast cancer treatment options CHICAGO (Dec. 15, 2017): Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the United States, with more than 230,000 women diagnosed annually.* (Skin cancer remains the most common.) Patients often describe the process of making a treatment decision as worrisome, so one research team wanted to explore how these patients became informed about their treatment options, and why some women
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The Atlantic
How Oriana Fallaci's Writings on Islamism Are Remembered—and Reviled The Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci was born in 1929, before the outbreak of World War II, and died in 2006, after 9/11. These two horrifying events shaped her writing and worldview. Traveling the world, she covered some of its worst conflicts as a war reporter, with a tone fans would call incisive and critics would call caustic. In the process, she developed a deep fear of Islam’s influence in
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Quanta Magazine
Light-Triggered Genes Reveal the Hidden Workings of Memory Susumu Tonegawa ’s presence announces itself as soon as you walk through the door of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. A three-foot-high framed photograph of Tonegawa stands front and center in the high-ceilinged lobby, flanked by a screen playing a looping rainbow-hued clip of recent research highlights. The man in the portrait, however, is an
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Popular Science
California's wildfires are affecting the oceans—and these researchers are the first to study it The Santa Barbara Channel, an 80-mile-long stretch of the Pacific Ocean just off the coast of southern California , is one of the most diverse and vibrant ocean ecosystems in the world. On Saturday, a team of scientists led by Kelsey Bisson and Nicholas Huynh, doctoral students in oceanography at the University of California at Santa Barbara, will board the research vessel Sally Ride and set off
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Scientific American Content: Global
Rescued Radar Maps Reveal Antarctica's Past Glaciologists will soon have a treasure trove of data for exploring how Antarctica’s underbelly has changed over nearly half a century. An international team of researchers has scanned and digitized 2 million records from pioneering aeroplane radar expeditions that criss-crossed the frozen continent in the 1960s and 1970s. “These are the flights that invented this way of doing glaciology,” sa
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Want to get great at something? Get a coach | Atul GawandeHow do we improve in the face of complexity? Atul Gawande has studied this question with a surgeon's precision. He shares what he's found to be the key: having a good coach to provide a more accurate picture of our reality, to instill positive habits of thinking, and to break our actions down and then help us build them back up again. "It's not how good you are now; it's how good you're going to b
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Science | The Guardian
Lost species of bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years A moth that disguises itself as a bee and was previously only identified by a single damaged specimen collected in 1887 has been rediscovered in the Malaysian rainforest by a lepidopterist from Poland. The oriental blue clearwing ( Heterosphecia tawonoides ) was seen “mud-puddling” – collecting salts and minerals from damp areas with its tongue-like proboscis – on the banks of a river in Malaysia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This home-sharing startup is taking on Airbnb, using cryptocurrency instead of dollars Airbnb may be the biggest home-sharing game in town, but a new startup is trying to push its way into the market. Enter CryptoBnB: the online home-sharing platform that wants you to pay for your couch-surfing stays using digital currency. That's right—this startup is combining two of this year's trendiest topics—home-sharing and cryptocurrency—into one buzz-word extravaganza. The CryptoBnB te
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Silicon Valley's Immortalists Will Help Us All Stay Healthy In early 1954, Pope Pius XII summoned a venerable Swiss quack named Paul Niehans to the papal retreat at Castel Gandolfo. The pontiff was nauseated with gastritis, fatigued by his 77 years, and loath to meet his maker. So he had Niehans administer an anti­aging treatment called cell therapy, which would become sought after by midcentury celebrities, artists, and politicians. Fetal cells were take
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Science : NPR
Reinventing The Cheese Wheel: From Farmhouse To Factory And Back Again Bronwen (left) and Francis Percival in the pasture with cows. Their new book traces the transatlantic cheese wars that led to the rise of factory cheeses and loss of traditional varietals. They also look at the farmhouse cheesemakers working to restore that lost legacy. Jon Wyand hide caption toggle caption Jon Wyand Bronwen (left) and Francis Percival in the pasture with cows. Their new book tra
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Offbeat brainwaves during sleep make older adults forgetLike swinging a tennis racket during a ball toss to serve an ace, slow and speedy brainwaves during deep sleep must sync up at exactly the right moment to hit the save button on new memories, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coarse particulate matter may increase asthma riskChildren exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintingsA tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Graspable objects grab attention more than images of objects do, study findsDoes having the potential to act upon an object have a unique influence on behavior and brain responses to the object? That is the question researchers set out to answer in a new report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving over the Philippines IMAGE: The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak on Dec. 14 at 12:11 p.m. EST (1711 UTC). Coldest cloud tops and strongest storms... view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central P
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stuttering: Stop signals in the brain prevent fluent speech IMAGE: Typically, the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) stops the flow of speech, whereas the left one supports it. In people who stutter, these two areas are conversely activated: The right... view more Credit: MPI CBS Roughly, one in a hundred adults has problems with speaking fluently. Not much is known about the causes of persistent developmental stuttering, which is the most frequent
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Scientific American Content: Global
Amazing Summer Research Programs for Science Undergrads College students are taking their finals this week and feverishly checking the online course pages for their final grades to post. They are packing their bags to head home for the holiday break. As a newish faculty member, I know how it feels to be ready for the end of the semester. We all deserve a break. But it’s not too early to ask yourself: what are my plans for next summer? It feels lik
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The Atlantic
Why We Should Be Worried about a War in Space This article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic. F ind out more . One hundred miles above the Earth’s surface, orbiting the planet at thousands of miles per hour, the six people aboard the International Space Station enjoy a perfect isolation from the chaos of earthly conflict. Outer space has never been a military bat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Apple Watch Series 3 has LTE to stay connected without a nearby iPhone Apple has conquered the smart watch market. Don't believe me? Look around. Apple watches are everywhere—even on my wrist—and I'm a guy who hasn't worn a watch in over a decade. My wife bought me a Seiko watch the year before we got married, and I wore it for years, but when my cell phone got small enough to carry in my pocket, I stopped wearing the watch. Skip ahead 20 years, and my wife de
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Inside Science
Secret Origins of Magnetic Explosions Promise Insights into Solar Flares, Fusion Reactors Secret Origins of Magnetic Explosions Promise Insights into Solar Flares, Fusion Reactors Even some of the most powerful explosions in the universe might be explained by the collision of magnetic fields. SolarStorm_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: NASA/SOHO Physics Friday, December 15, 2017 - 10:30 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- When magnetic fields clash, they can rapidly unleash
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech support scams hitting more computer users online For consumers who turn over control of their computers to remote technicians online, the fix may already be in. A growing number of remote tech support scams are popping up, in which users facing "crashed" computers give online access for repairs that do nothing more than drain their wallets, according to a study released Monday by the Better Business Bureau. "We're getting a lot more calls on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitch will stream NBA G League games and let its livestreamers do play-by-play Twitch made its mark as the place to watch video gamers in action. But over the past two years, the Amazon-owned property has expanded its offerings to include livestreams of artists, musicians and even knitters. Now Twitch is experimenting with live professional sports. On Friday, the video platform will begin regularly broadcasting games of the NBA G League, pro basketball's minor league, forme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A shoe-box-sized chemical detector ANN ARBOR--A chemical sensor prototype developed at the University of Michigan will be able to detect "single-fingerprint quantities" of substances from a distance of more than 100 feet away, and its developers are working to shrink it to the size of a shoebox. It could potentially be used to identify traces of drugs and explosives, as well as speeding the analysis of certain medical samples. A p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic study uncovers fungal sex secrets, which shed light on candidiasis IMAGE: This is Candida glabrata . view more Credit: Ewa Ksiezopolska & Toni Gabaldon, CRG. Working together with researchers in the Université Paris-Sud in France and University Medical Centre Göttingen in Germany, ICREA Research Professor Toni Gabaldón and his team at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona read the genetic code of 33 separate strains of the yeast Candida glabrata,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum memory with record-breaking capacity based on laser-cooled atoms IMAGE: This is a cooled and trapped cloud of cold atoms used to realize the quantum memory protocol. The atoms reside in the center of the vacuum chamber, around which the... view more Credit: Source: FUW, Mateusz Mazelanik The emerging domain of parallelized quantum information processing opens up new possibilities for precise measurements, communication and imaging. Precise control of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extending food safety training to other countries could save live Food safety practices that Americans take for granted -- washing hands with soap, refrigeration, and not cutting raw meat and vegetables on the same surface without disinfection -- are not widely practiced in other places around the world, and researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences want to change that. The World Health Organization estimates that every year, 600 million peop
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific achievements during the operation of Lomonosov satellite IMAGE: This is the Lomonosov spasecraft. view more Credit: Mikhail Panasyuk The Lomonosov Project is a large-scale scientific and educational space project of Lomonosov Moscow State University aimed at studying space phenomena. In the course of operation of Lomonosov satellite on the orbit the team of Skobeltsyn Scientific and Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, MSU received new data on
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The Atlantic
Where BoJack Horseman Season 4 Shone Brightest Many years in the future—at a time when much of Los Angeles is underwater and robots teach schoolchildren—a young cat named Ruthie is giving a class presentation about her ancestors. “My mom told me I come from a long line of strong female cats,” Ruthie explains proudly. “Princess Carolyn was the runt of 12 and it made her one of the toughest. Mom said she could take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’
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The Atlantic
Everybody Should Be Very Afraid of the Disney Death Star Disney announced on Thursday that it would acquire most of the entertainment assets of 21st Century Fox for about $60 billion in stock and debt, in what would be the largest-ever merger of two showbiz companies . Already the most storied entertainment empire in the U.S., Disney would become a global colossus through this deal, gaining large stakes in the biggest entertainment companies in both Eu
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The Atlantic
Even Small Amounts of Alcohol Impair Memory “I can’t even remember what happened that night” is a common joke/cry for help among people who recently drank to the point of blacking out. But there’s also evidence that drinking even a little bit can seriously impair learning and memory. Sleep, especially the REM phase when dreams occur, is when memories get cemented into our minds. Alcohol blocks REM sleep, and as a result, says University of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seattle imposes new limits on Airbnb, other short-term rentals By limiting the number of homes that property owners can operate as short-term rentals for visitors, can Seattle preserve its housing stock for locals? The City Council decided to try the strategy Monday, voting 7-0 to enact new regulations for short-term rentals, including those listed on platforms such as Airbnb and HomeAway. Council members said they want to rein in a rapidly growing industr
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Futurity.org
Electric eel-based device could power future medical implants A new flexible, transparent electrical device inspired by electric eels could lead to body-friendly power sources for implanted health monitors and medication dispensers, augmented-reality contact lenses, and countless other applications, researchers report. “The electric organs in eels are incredibly sophisticated; they’re far better at generating power than we are.” The soft cells—made of hydro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D nanoscale imaging made possible Imaging at the nanoscale is important to a plethora of modern applications in materials science, physics, biology, medicine and other fields. Limitations of current techniques are, e.g. their resolution, imaging speed or the inability to look behind opaque objects with arbitrary shapes. However, imaging like this would be useful e.g. for investigating spongy electrodes, thus helping to increase c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More electronic materials opened up with new metal-organic framework IMAGE: This is professor Richard Walton, University of Warwick. view more Credit: University of Warwick More materials for electronic applications could be identified, thanks to the discovery of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays electrical semiconduction with a record high photoresponsivity, by a global research collaboration involving the University of Warwick. Research p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles as a solution against antibiotic resistance?Scientists have succeeded in developing an efficient method to treat mucoviscidosis. Crucial are nanoparticles that transport the antibiotics more efficiently to their destination. First of all, the active particles need to have a certain size to be able to reach the deeper airways and not to bounce off somewhere else before. Ultimately, they have to penetrate the thick layer of mucus on the airwa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real-time observation of collective quantum modes In the ETH-experiment, rubidium atoms were coupled to the light waves in two resonators. In the "energy sombrero" resulting from that coupling, Goldstone and Higgs modes (red dots and arrows) were directly observed. Credit: Tilman Esslinger group / ETH Zurich A cylindrical rod is rotationally symmetric - after any arbitrary rotation around its axis it always looks the same. If an increasingly lar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In first, SpaceX launches recycled rocket and spaceship (Update) For the first time, SpaceX is poised to launch both a rocket and a cargo ship that have flown before, a step forward in the company's goal to lower the cost of spaceflight. The liftoff Friday of the recycled Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled for 10:36 am (1536 GMT) from a NASA launchpad in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The unmanned spaceship is packed with 4,800 pounds (2,200 kilogr
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The Atlantic
The Things Kids Carried Not that long ago, carrying school supplies on one’s back seemed like a crazy concept. Until the 1980s, backpacks were used mostly for hiking and outdoor activities. Students used entirely different (and much less convenient) modes of transportation for their school supplies: Until the 1930s, many students used leather straps to hold together the books they carried. Later, students used mini brie
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Scientific American Content: Global
Spincredible Dreidel Tips and Tricks Spincredible Dreidel Tips and Tricks Become a dreidel “spinologist” and compete for the longest time of spin. Tags: Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now! Spincredible Dreidel Tips and Tricks Become a dreidel “spinologist” and compete for the longest time of spin.
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Science | The Guardian
How do you know if you’re a jerk? | Oliver Burkeman D o you think it’s possible you might be a jerk? It’s a rude question, I know, but not a totally absurd one. After all, we’re surrounded by jerks – if you don’t believe me, glance at the headlines, drive home during rush hour, or check Twitter – so, statistically, it’s entirely plausible that one of them is you. I’m sure you don’t feel like a jerk, of course. But nobody does. Partly that’s becaus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook: Russia spent 97 cents meddling in Brexit vote Facebook's investigation into whether Russia tried to influence Britain's vote to leave the European Union yielded just three suspicious ads viewed no more than 200 times over four days, the social media firm said Wednesday. The three ads created by the Moscow-linked Internet Research Agency, cost 97 cents. They did not feature any direct information about the EU referendum, known as Brexit. Ra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are real or artificial Christmas trees better for the environment? Credit: CC0 Public Domain The question: Is a real Christmas tree better for the environment than a fake one? The answer: It depends on your plans for the future. Every year, 95 million families in America put up a Christmas tree. Deciding whether to go with the real thing or an artificial version involves lots of factors. Some people don't think it's really Christmas unless their living room ha
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The Whirl Is Not Enough: Hundred-Dollar Fidget Spinners By the time Trevor Hirschi decided to make a fidget spinner, the market was already saturated with $2 plastic devices that covered the shelves of toy stores and bodegas. So Hirschi, a machine tool technology instructor at Bridgerland Technical College and men's jewelry designer, got to work on something a little more exciting. After shuffling through a couple different concepts, he settled on an
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The Scientist RSS
Study: Fracking Linked to Low Birth Weight in NewbornsScientist find that living near a hydraulic fracturing site for gas and oil extraction could have adverse effects on infant health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer immunotherapy may work better in patients with specific genesInvestigators have been trying to understand why and have recently found how an individual's own genes can play a role in the response to the immunotherapy drugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hounds and wolves share parasites Wolf (Canis lupus). Credit: Heiko Anders Grey wolves are hosts to a variety of parasites. The presence of grey wolves in German forests has little influence on the parasite burden of hunting dogs. This reassuring conclusion is the result of a new study at the Berlin-based Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW). The study examined the faeces of 78 hunting dogs over several months in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chronic kidney disease audit published Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, Clinical Commissioning Groups and primary care practices must all work together to improve outcomes for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), according to the national Chronic Kidney Disease Audit published today. Recommendations include reviewing practice procedures and monitoring performance to help identify and actively manage patients with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin deficiency in later life One in two persons aged 65 and above has suboptimal levels of vitamin D in the blood. This is the conclusion of an investigation conducted by researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, as part of the population-based KORA-Age study in the region of Augsburg. Moreover, as the authors of the study report in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrients , one in four older adults has suboptimal vitamin B12
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health and spirituality values influence attendance for pelvic-floor dysfunction treatment New research from psychologists and health professionals in Swansea has found that the types of life values that patients hold affect their attendance at medical treatment for pelvic-floor dysfunction, a condition affecting over 25% of all women in the UK. This condition involves incontinence and prolapse, and is treated initially by physiotherapy. Promoting key life values could be important in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Real-time observation of collective quantum modes A cylindrical rod is rotationally symmetric - after any arbitrary rotation around its axis it always looks the same. If an increasingly large force is applied to it in the longitudinal direction, however, it will eventually buckle and lose its rotational symmetry. Such processes, known as "spontaneous symmetry breaking", also occur in subtle ways in the microscopic quantum world, where they a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists developed a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal IMAGE: Mini coal-fired CHP plant on the basis of synthesis gas generator (CO + H2) and electrochemical current generator (experiment/factory). view more Credit: Sergey Shcheklein Bituminous coal comprises over 90% of organic fuels in the lithosphere of the Earth. By burning coal and other fossil fuels one can get electrical power (which is mainly happening at HPPs). However, the existing gene
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Record high photoconductivity for new metal-organic framework material An international team of scientists, from the University of Surrey, University of São Paulo (Brazil), the University of Warwick and the University of Grenoble-Alpes (France), has created a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that has shown record-high photo-conductivity levels for a material of its type. The team published its findings in the Nature Communications journal where it reported that i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distinct human mutations can alter the effect of medicine Every person has a unique DNA sequence in their genome. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge have tried to quantify what these differences in the genome mean in the context of the genes targeted by drugs. In a new study published in the scientific journal Cell they look at certain receptors (GPCRs) in the human cell. These prot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The hazards of antibiotic resistances remain high According to a survey among researchers, it is difficult to quantify the true extent of the hazards of antibiotic resistances to humankind. The survey conducted by Freie Universität Berlin and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) will be introduced on the occasion of the international World Antibiotic Awareness Week on Sunday, November 19. It reveals that among researchers worldwide, there
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Scientific American Content: Global
Electric Eel–Inspired Devices Could Power Artificial Human Organs A flexible and transparent power source inspired by the electric eel could be used to power electrical devices in the body, such as cardiac pacemakers, implantable sensors or even prosthetic organs. The prototype, described in Nature on December 13, runs on a solution of salt and water, but researchers hope that future versions might get their energy from bodily fluids. “Our artificial electr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
7-Eleven testing mobile ordering, delivery and in-store pickup in some Dallas stores 7-Eleven has created its own smartphone app for on-demand ordering and delivery and is testing it first with 10 of its Dallas stores. It plans to roll out the 7-ElevenNow app to other U.S. markets in 2018. The Irving-based convenience store chain is trying to stay as convenient as it can. The use of "Now" is an obvious nod to Amazon's Prime Now, the internet shopping juggernaut's speediest deli
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Popular Science
How to build a structurally sound gingerbread house Gingerbread houses are not unlike human egos: fragile and easily crumbled. Building one that doesn’t collapse into dust when you breathe on it requires a...let’s call it a substance known as “structural gingerbread.” You may want your walls to taste like a frosted cookie, but if you’re constructing the candy home from a grocery-store kit, you’ll be stuck with vaguely ginger-flavored cardboard. Yo
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Gamer laver vilde trafiksimuleringer Går du med en trafik- eller byplanlægger i maven, kan det være, du skal følge i Youtube-brugeren Euverus' fodspor. Gennem spillet Cities: Skyline har spilleren simuleret 30 forskellige trafikkryds og knudepunkter, der får trafikken til at flyde gennem de mærkeligste formationer af veje og rundkørsler. Det skriver Interesting Engineering . Spillet går ud på at opbygge en by, hvor man skal styre sa
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KAIST team develops technology to find optimum drug target for cancer IMAGE: Drug response prediction based on cancer cell molecular network dynamics and clustering of cancer cells by their molecular networks. view more Credit: KAIST A KAIST research team led by Professor Kwang-Hyun Cho of the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering developed technology to find the optimum drug target according to the type of cancer cell. The team used systems biology to an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists describe the structure of a prospective luminesce substanceA physicist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and Kirensky Institute of Physics Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS (IF) described the structure and properties of a new substance obtained by his Chinese colleagues. These are layered crystals of rare earth metal hydroxides Ln2(OH)4SO4 (Ln=Eu-Lu, Y) that may acts as eco-friendly sources of phosphors (substances that transform different energies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A model of Mars-like protoplanets shed light on early solar activity IMAGE: A scientist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and his colleagues from Austria and Germany constructed a physical and mathematical model of Mars- and Venus-sized planet formation. The team concluded that... view more Credit: Nikolai Erkaev A scientist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and his colleagues from Austria and Germany constructed a physical and mathematical model o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavior of millions still shaped by Industrial RevolutionThe Industrial Revolution of 200 years ago, powered by coal and steam engines, laid the foundations of modern society. World-first QUT-led research has found its effects are still felt and not in a good way. It reveals that people living in the former industrial heartlands of the UK and the US are more disposed to negative emotions such as anxiety and depressive moods, more impulsive and more like
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mercury from industrialized nations is polluting the Arctic – here's how it gets there Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska. Plants on the Arctic tundra absorb mercury from the air, then transfer it to soil when they die. Credit: Paxson Woelber, CC BY Scientists have long understood that the Arctic is affected by mercury pollution, but know less about how it happens. Remote, cold and seemingly pristine, why is such an idyllic landscape so contaminated with this highly toxic me
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Industrial Hack Highlights the Cyber Holes in Our Infrastructure Freshly discovered malware called Triton can compromise safety systems that control many kinds of industrial processes. For years, security experts have been warning that hackers can disable systems that control critical infrastructure we all rely on, such as dams and power plants. Now, researchers at Mandiant, which is part of FireEye, a security firm, have revealed that a new form of malwar
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Futurity.org
Tools for spotting chronic child neglect fall short Child welfare workers lack effective assessment tools for identifying the associated risk and protective factors of chronic neglect, according to a new study. The new study suggests that the ineffective assessments are often the result of using instruments that are not specifically designed to include elements predicting chronic neglect. Generally speaking, neglect refers to a lack of adequate ca
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Futurity.org
Here’s when America’s ‘moral combat’ over sex began The true origins of our political and religious divides, argues religious historian R. Marie Griffith, lie in sharp disagreements that emerged among American Christians almost a century ago. Ever since the emergence of the religious right as a political force in the late 1970s, scholars and commentators have sought to explain its origins, and have often depicted it as a reaction to the sexual reb
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why the idea that the English have a common Anglo-Saxon origin is a myth Credit: Witan hexateuch via Wikimedia Commons The idea that there is a common Anglo-Saxon ancestry based on biology is gaining currency among some right-wing and religious groups in the UK and US. In the UK, the new leader of the UK Independence Party, Henry Bolton , suggested in a radio interview in October that "in certain communities the indigenous Anglo-Saxon population is nowhere to be seen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Music streaming sites benefit indie singers at the expense of top 100 artists While free or low cost music streaming sources like Spotify decrease the use of paid music platforms, such as iTunes, a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science , shows they significantly increase exposure for and access to lesser known or indie artists that fall outside the top 100 or even top 500 listings. The study, "Changing Their Tune: How Consumers' Adoption of Online Streaming Af
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings Map of Kisar Island. Credit: ANU A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The team uncovered a total of 28 rock art sites dating from at least 2,500 years ago on the island of Kisar which measures just 81 square kilometres and lies
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Futurity.org
This method uses light to ‘weigh’ solitary stars Astronomers have developed a new, more accurate method for measuring the masses of solitary stars. Getting accurate measurements of how much stars weigh not only plays a crucial role in understanding how stars are born, evolve, and die, but it is also essential in assessing the true nature of the thousands of exoplanets now known to orbit most other stars. The method is tailor-made for the Europe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Krill behaviour takes carbon to the ocean depths Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) are the diet of many animals in the Southern Ocean . Credit: Pete Lens/British Antarctic Survey A new study shows that Antarctic krill behave in a way that could accelerate the transport of atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean. Antarctic krill form some of the highest concentrations of animal biomass in the world's ocean and are the main food for vast numbers o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The locomotion of hominins in the Pleistocene was just as efficient as that of current humans Credit: CENIEH In an article published recently in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology , researchers from the Paleophysiology and Ecology Group of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) analyzed the influence of body proportions on the cost of locomotion by means of an experimental energetic study with 46 subjects of both sexes, whose results indicate th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More electronic materials opened up with new metal-organic framework Professor Richard Walton, University of Warwick. Credit: University of Warwick More materials for electronic applications could be identified, thanks to the discovery of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays electrical semiconduction with a record high photoresponsivity, by a global research collaboration involving the University of Warwick. Research published today in Nature Communic
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Science | The Guardian
Sex between snow monkeys and sika deer may be 'new behavioural tradition' Sexual interactions between snow monkeys and sika deer could be a new behavioural tradition within a group of monkeys observed in Japan, researchers have suggested. While the first report of a male Japanese macaque, or snow monkey, and female sika deer taking to each other was revealed earlier this year , scientists say they are now confident the behaviour is sexual after scrutinising adolescent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research points to second chance for rejected antibiotic candidate An antibiotic candidate compound shelved in the 1970s in favour of more worthwhile drugs could be worth a second look, new research has found. The drug, called pentyl pantothenamide, is able to stop the growth of E. coli but not completely kill the bacteria, so was never taken into clinical use. The wider class of pantothenamides have broad spectrum activity against many bacteria but only this on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser A collaboration of scientists from five of the world's most advanced x-ray sources in Europe, Japan and the US, has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. In the study published in Nature Physics , they were able to carefully follow, one x-ray at a time, the decay of nuclei in a perfect crystal after excitation with a flash of x-rays from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cellular approach found to control progression of chronic kidney disease Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that extracellular vesicles - tiny protein-filled structures - isolated from amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) can be used to effectively slow the progression of kidney damage in mice with a type of chronic kidney disease. The findings, by a research team at the Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, provide new insights about
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Music streaming sites benefit indie singers at the expense of top 100 artists CATONSVILLE, MD, December 14, 2017 - While free or low cost music streaming sources like Spotify decrease the use of paid music platforms, such as iTunes, a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science , shows they significantly increase exposure for and access to lesser known or indie artists that fall outside the top 100 or even top 500 listings. The study, "Changing Their Tune: How Consu
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Offbeat brainwaves during sleep make older adults forget Like swinging a tennis racket during a ball toss to serve an ace, slow and speedy brainwaves during deep sleep must sync up at exactly the right moment to hit the save button on new memories, according to new UC Berkeley research. While these brain rhythms, occurring hundreds of times a night, move in perfect lockstep in young adults, findings published today in the journal Neuron show that, in o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer immunotherapy may work better in patients with specific genes IMAGE: New drugs can help the immune system attack cancer, but the drugs' effectiveness depends on the patient's genetic makeup, a study from Columbia University Medical Center has found. view more Credit: National Institutes of Health Cancer cells arise when DNA is mutated, and these cells should be recognized as "foreign" by the immune system. However, cancer cells have found ways to evad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grammar teaching leaves children confused, research shows Children can be left confused and unable to write accurate sentences because of "uncertain" grammar teaching, experts have warned. But confident teachers can enable students to use their grammar knowledge to help them craft and create their writing and positively support children's development as writers. Teachers concentrate on making sure primary-aged pupils can remember and repeat simple expla
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Dagens Medicin
Kommunerne er klar til at løfte det nære sundhedsvæsen Kommunerne har kompetencerne og de relevante tilbud til at behandle flere borgere i deres nærmiljø. KL kommer i nyt indspark med deres bud på, hvordan udflytningen af opgaver kan ske.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D nanoscale imaging made possible Imaging at the nanoscale is important to a plethora of modern applications in materials science, physics, biology, medicine and other fields. Limitations of current techniques are, e.g. their resolution, imaging speed or the inability to look behind opaque objects with arbitrary shapes. However, imaging like this would be useful e.g. for investigating spongy electrodes, thus helping to increase c
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Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om selvkørende biler, plantebøffer og RFID-cykelmærkning I denne uges udgave af Transformator sætter vi fokus på selvkørende biler. Mange gætter på at de for alvor begynder at trille ud på vejene omkring 2021 – spørgsmålet er så, om det løser vores trafikale problemer eller bare giver os nye udfordringer på halsen. Transformator Ingeniørens fredagspodcast sætter strøm til ugens største nyheder inden for teknologi, forskning og naturvidenskab og analyse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Potato blight's chemical attack mechanism explained A team of international researchers headed by scientists from the University of Tübingen has deciphered the workings of a cytolytic toxin, which is produced by some of the world's most devastating crop diseases. The Cytolysin is manufactured by pathogens such as bacteria and fungi and can wipe out entire harvests if chemical protection is not used. The study—by researchers from Tübingen and their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wounded sea turtle healed with 3-D printing Birch Aquarium teams up with the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Media Lab to 3-D print a brace for its loggerhead sea turtle. Credit: UC San Diego Library Birch Aquarium has teamed up with UC San Diego Library's Digital Media Lab to create what is believed to be the first 3-D-printed brace for a sea turtle's shell. The loggerhead sea turtle was rescued from a New Jersey power plant in 2013 with a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher investigates reflectivity of atmospheric aerosols Nanoparticles from biomass burning. (A) Photograph of a region of biomass burning, taken on March 17, 2006, near Mexico City. Gases emitted from the fires cooled rapidly and condensed or accumulated as nanoparticles. (B) Low-magnification TEM image of biomass-burning particles collected from an airplane and deposited on a substrate of lacey carbon (fibers). The orange arrows indicate particles wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Salmon help their offspring by dying on the spawning grounds Credit: University of Glasgow Spawning salmon that die after migrating home actually do their offspring a favor. The study, published today in Ecology Letters , found that by dying, the decaying bodies of the salmon fertilize the stream and create an environment which favors the growth of the young fish and maintains their genetic diversity. Spawning salmon migrate hundreds of miles across the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weather IMAGE: A visualization of the annual minimum Arctic sea ice from 1979 to 2016 with a graph overlay.(Visualizations by Cindy Starr Released on May 31, 2017. view more Credit: Cindy Starr, NASA Changes in Arctic sea ice have a direct impact on lower atmospheric conditions in the region, however, possible higher altitude and lower latitude impacts of changing sea ice are less well understood. As
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings IMAGE: This is a map of Kisar Island. view more Credit: ANU A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The team uncovered a total of 28 rock art sites dating from at least 2,500 years ago on the island of Kisar which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earwax like ice cores—unlocking the past hidden in whale earplugs Humpback whales like these have a variable diet which could be recorded in stable carbon isotopes layered into the earwax plugs built up over their lives. Credit: Vicky Stein Farzaneh Mansouri's future data collectors are cruising around oceans worldwide, following blooms of productivity and accumulating decades of information—all in their earwax. Mansouri, an environmental scientist at Baylor Un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The continental U.S. is experiencing more flooding, and earlier in the year Members of the U.S. Coast Guard assist residents in a flooded Houston neighborhood on August 30, 2017. Scientists predict flooding in the Texas Gulf region to become more variable because of increased urbanization. Credit: Coast Guard News The frequency of flooding in the continental U.S. is increasing, and seasonality of floods is shifting, according to new research. Flooding causes several mill
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To fight the catastrophic fires of the future, we need to look beyond prescribed burning A large fuel reduction burn off on Hobart’s eastern shore. Credit: Flickr/Mike Rowe, CC BY-NC California is burning – a sentence we've heard far too often this year. Sydney is currently on bushfire alert , as firefighters battle a fire in the Hunter Valley region and temperatures are set to top 40℃. A cocktail of factors, from climate change to centuries of ignoring indigenous burning practises,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Tis the season to redesign and reduce our waste Canadians double their waste output during the holiday season. Credit: Shutterstock The holiday season has a waste problem. On average, each Canadian produces 720 kilograms of municipal waste —more than the per capita output in the United States and double what is produced in Japan . And over the holidays, our waste volumes double . Think about it: We're each throwing out several additional kil
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Avoid "Purchase Regret" Millennials are the largest living generation in the United States, providing them with a guiding influence over the economy. And fortunately, despite cultural misgivings from some critics, many financial experts applaud this generation for its strong personal financial habits. They point to millennials’ tendency to save more than previous generations, value a work-life balance, and spend more on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Legalising rhino horn trade—don't charge in blind Legalising the trade of rhino horns has long been thought of as the solution to the poaching problem. Credit: Shutterstock Between 2008 and 2016, poachers killed more than 7100 rhinos in Africa . South Africa, which has nearly 80% of Africa's rhinos, was the worst affected country, with more than 1000 rhinos killed each year over the last four years. In 2015 and 2016, the total number of rhinos p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study analyzes the peculiar cranial anatomy of howler monkeys Credit: Fiorenza and Bruner (2017) Emiliano Bruner, of the Paleoneurobiology Group of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published an article in the American Journal of Primatology , which analyzes the peculiar cranial structure and variability of the best-known species of South American howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus, using multivariate statistic
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Dagens Medicin
Regeringen arbejder på langsigtet plan for psykiatriområdet Alle Folketingets partier er enige om, at psykiatri er et vigtigt område at opprioritere. Det fremgik af en debat i Folketinget.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cutting-edge motion capture technology could transform creative industries Credit: University of Surrey TotalCapture is a real-time, full-body mocap system that uses standard video cameras, along with inertial measurement units typically found in mobile phones. The new system requires no optical markers or specialised infrared cameras and can be used indoors or out, giving filmmakers and video-game artists unprecedented flexibility not found in existing mocap technologi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combination of warmer water, chemical exposure intensifies harmful effects in a coastal fish A drawing of an adult silverside. Credit: Andrea Dingeldein, Oregon State University Warmer water temperatures, combined with exposure to chemicals already known to be harmful to aquatic life, could threaten organisms that have temperature-sensitive sex determination. Researchers found that inland silversides (Menidia beryllina) exposed to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) exhibited altered s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA scientists embark on extreme Antarctic trek Credit: NASA In temperatures that can drop below -20 degrees Fahrenheit, along a route occasionally blocked by wind-driven ice dunes, a hundred miles from any other people, a team led by two NASA scientists will survey an unexplored stretch of Antarctic ice. They're packing extreme cold-weather gear and scientific instruments onto sleds pulled by two tank-like snow machines called PistenBullys, a
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet overvejer at sende kræftpatienter til LondonVedvarende problemer med den nationale kapacitet til at operere patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen får kirurgisk gastroenterologisk klinik på Rigshospitalet til at overveje at sende patienter til London. Klinikchef håber, at kapacitetsudvidelser vil overflødiggøre muligheden.
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Popular Science
Road salt is actually pretty terrible for the planet M arshes, streams and lakes lie alongside many of the roads and highways that zigzag across North America. Plants and animals inhabit these water bodies and can be exposed to many of the substances we put on those roads, including road salt. Rock salt helps keep roads safe when winter storms hit, reducing winter road accidents. But it can also have serious, negative effects on aquatic ecosystems
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How Ford Build a New Kind of Engine for Its GT Supercar When the Ford GT won its class in the famously grueling 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race last year, it wasn't just a celebration for the team which developed the all new supercar. It was a relief. The victory in the GTE Pro class came 50 years after Ford's historic 1966 win with the GT40, when the American automaker proved (mostly to spite Ferrari) that it could dominate the track in Europe as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows ground-penetrating radar can detect fine roots in crops Credit: Texas A&M University A recent study led Texas A&M AgriLife Research has shown ground-penetrating radar, or GPR, may be effectively used in detecting the fine roots of plants, helping agricultural producers identify what crop varieties are best suited to their field conditions. "To meet the world's growing demand for food, agricultural crop production needs to double by 2050," said Dr. Xue
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The Scientist RSS
Image Of The Day: Sea DinosaurPalaeontologists have discovered the oldest fossil evidence to date for small, stiff-necked, sea-dwelling reptiles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Garlic and fluorine combination shows promise as drug therapy Could the combination of garlic and fluorine be the future of drug therapeutics? Credit: University at Albany There's a lot more to garlic than its distinctive odor and strong, pungent taste. For centuries, the allium root vegetable has been used as a natural medicine. Athletes at the first Olympics in ancient Greece ate it to enhance their strength and stamina. During World War I and II, soldier
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Keck Cosmic Reionization Mapper Credit: W. M. Keck Observatory The design for the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) includes two separate channels to detect light in the blue (350 to 560 nm) and the red (530 nm to 1050 nm) portions of the visible wavelength spectrum. KCWI-Blue was commissioned and started routine science observations in September 2017 and is obtaining superb and exciting new results while operating flawlessly. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The psychology of Christmas shopping—how marketers nudge you to buy Don’t think, just shop. Credit: Heidi Sandstrom Many people see marketing as a form of manipulation, particularly around Christmas and the other retail bonanzas: Easter, Valentine's Day, Mothers' Day and Fathers' Day. But rather than simply trying to trick people, the masters of marketing know it's much easier to understand and work with innate human flaws. By drawing on a plethora of psychologic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Germany extends facial recognition test at rail stationGermany's top security official is extending tests of automatic facial recognition technology after an initial six-month trial showed the system had a good success rate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German government says it backs 'open and free internet' "Net neutrality" regulations, designed to prevent internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T, Comcast and Charter from favoring some sites and apps over others, are on the chopping block. On Thursday, the Federal Communications ...
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Ingeniøren
Vestas indleder samarbejde med ambitiøs batteriproducent Vindmølleproducenten Vestas og batteriproducent Northvolt vil arbejde sammen om at udvikle en lithium-ion-batteriplatform til Vestas vindkraftkraftværker. Ifølge en pressemeddelelse investerer Vestas 75 mio. kroner i den indledende fase af partnerskabet. Northvolt, der ledes af en tidligere Tesla-topfigur, blev grundlagt i 2016 og vil opbygge verdens grønneste batteri med et minimalt CO2-fodaftry
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The Atlantic
Here Comes the Meat Tax There is a “hospital-themed restaurant” in Las Vegas called the Heart Attack Grill. Inside, customers are invited to tempt death with food. The waitresses dress as provocative nurses and deliver “prescriptions,” which are enormous hamburgers. Depending on the number of beef patties between the buns, they’re known as single-, double-, and triple-bypass burgers. The system goes all the way up to oc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How can changing climate affect a civilization? Credit: Columbia University William (Billy) D'Andrea is a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory paleoclimatologist and a Center for Climate and Life Fellow; he studies how environments have changed over time by reconstructing climate history using the molecules preserved in lake sediment cores. Fat molecules from plants and algae are preserved in the sediments that accumulate each year on the bottom o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Epigenetic rheostat uncovers how gene regulation is inherited and maintained Postdoctoral researcher Ben Williams from the lab of Whitehead Member Mary Gehring altered methylation at ROS1 in the Arabidopsis plant. This uncoupled the gene's activity from methylation levels in the genome. As a result, methylation in the plant was haywire, and genes that would normally be silenced in unaltered plants (left) were expressed, including one that makes the plants' leaves curl (mi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A not-quite-random walk demystifies the algorithm Looking at the world through the lens of an algorithm illuminates some aspects but obscures others, says Malte Ziewitz, assistant professor of science and technology studies. Credit: Cornell University The algorithm is having a cultural moment. Originally a math and computer science term, algorithms are now used to account for everything from military drone strikes and financial market forecasts
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Insect biology students learn art of bug-based dyesCochineal bugs use a coloring as a defense mechanism, but humans have learned to use it to dye fabric. Before the advent of synthetic dyes, all dyes were made from insects or plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Corn genetics provides insight into the crop's historical spread across the Americas Credit: Research Square Iowa State University scientists have taken a journey through the past by studying the genetic changes in corn brought about by domestication. A study published in the peer-reviewed academic journal Genome Biology spotlights how demography, or changes in population size, shaped the genetics of corn . The study shows how genetic "bottlenecks" imposed by domestication of cor
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New Scientist - News
Zombie fungus infects fruit flies and turns them into slaves The fungus infects the fruit fly and forces it to adopt strange behaviour, such as attaching itself to a vertical surface before death Carolyn Elya By Michael Le Page There’s no need to travel to exotic rainforests to find mind-warping parasites. They are probably lurking in your own backyard. That, at least, is where Carolyn Elya found a “zombie fungus” that takes control of fruit flies. She
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New Scientist - News
Young female monkeys use deer as ‘outlet for sexual frustration’ By Sam Wong Just monkeying around? Adolescent female monkeys mount deer and rub themselves on the deers’ backs, apparently to practise sex when they are too young to be chosen by adult males. Earlier this year, researchers reported observations of a single male Japanese macaque mounting sika deer and trying to mate with them . In Minoo, Japan, researchers started recording monkey-deer liaison
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Columbia engineers develop floating solar fuels rig for seawater electrolysis New York, NY -- Dec.15, 2017 -- In a single hour, more energy from the sun hits the Earth than all the energy used by humankind in an entire year. Imagine if the sun's energy could be harnessed to power energy needs on Earth, and done in a way that is economical, scalable, and environmentally responsible. Researchers have long seen this as one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. Daniel E
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser The figure shows photon emissions from 57 Fe atoms. The chart shows that as the number of atoms increases from 1 to 5 to 20, the time until the first emission increases, while the energy of the photons increases. Credit: RIKEN A collaboration of scientists from five of the world's most advanced x-ray sources in Europe, Japan and the US, has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mammal long thought extinct in Australia resurfaces The crest-tailed mulgara was once widely distributed across sandy deserts in inland Australia. Credit: Reece Pedler A crest-tailed mulgara, a small carnivorous marsupial known only from fossilised bone fragments and presumed extinct in NSW for more than century, has been discovered in Sturt National Park north-west of Tibooburra. A team from the UNSW Sydney's Wild Deserts project made the unexpec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence of early humans found in the jungles of Borneo Digging in Traders Cave in the iconic Niah Caves archaeological complex. Darren Curnoe excavates while Roshan Peiris observes. Credit: Mhd. S. Sauffi/Darren Curnoe I recently led a team excavating at one of the most iconic archaeological locations in Southeast Asia, Niah Caves in Malaysia. Over a period of three weeks , we dug through what we believe to be around 20,000 years of human history . W
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study thermodynamic processes in an ultra-high temperature molten oxide A molten hanging droplet, or pendant (at center), forms from an aluminum oxide rod under intense heat and light from xenon lamps. Using this process, MIT researchers have demonstrated a new electrochemical method to study thermodynamic processes in a molten oxide melt at temperatures above 2,000 degrees Celsius. Credit: Melody M. Wang The thermodynamic properties of compounds such as aluminum oxi
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The Atlantic
The Student Whose Cockiness Tested My Patience Teacher Jerome White knew from the first moment he met Donald Meyer that the student was a math whiz— and that Meyer was very aware of his natural abilities. White struggled in his first year teaching Donald pre-calculus at New Orleans’ Lusher High School to convince the student to focus in class, do his homework, or recognize that he might have something to learn. “It wasn’t a malevolent act on
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The Hard Math Behind Bitcoin's Global Warming Problem Let me freak you out for a second. You know what bitcoin is, right? I mean, no, but quickly, it’s a “cryptocurrency” that’s basically secret computer money. One bitcoin, which doesn’t actually have a real, physical form, is worth at this moment upwards of $16,000 . But to get one, you either have to buy them from online exchanges or use specialized computing hardware to “mine” it. That last bit i
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Bitcoin and Blockchain Will Reveal What They're Actually Good For in 2018 Every successful new technology undergoes a Cambrian Era-style explosion of growth in which we try to use it for everything. Email, search, social networking—each passed through its “this will solve all our problems!” phase before we figured out what its best applications and limitations were. With the Bitcoin bubble testing astronomical prices every day, cryptocurrencies and the blockchain techn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles as a possible solution to antibiotic resistance Pharmaceutical Ph.D. student Julia Ernst with inhalers of a nanoparticle suspension. Jena researchers are developing an efficient method for treating often deadly respiratory infections. The focus is on nanoparticles that better bring antibiotics to their destination. Credit: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU Around one in 3,300 children in Germany is born with mucoviscidosis. A characteristic of this illness
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers shine a spotlight on illegal wild orchid trade Orchid. Credit: Dr Jacob Phelps Large-scale commercial trade of wild orchids is a pressing, but little-recognised conservation problem, according to researchers. Orchids are one of the largest families of flower plants in the world, and they are among the most well-protected. From edible orchid cake in Tanzania and ornamental orchids in Thailand and Brazil, to medicinal orchids in Nepal, these pl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bicycles reacting to speed for stable cycling Credit: University of Twente A Dutch consortium including the University of Twente developed an electrical bicycle that prevents elderly people from falling. The smart assistive bicycle, called SOFIE, increases stability by via drive-off assistance and by automatically lowering the saddle at low speeds. The UT, Indes and Roessingh Research and Development (RRD) worked together on this science-bas
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Live Science
4 Child Graves Discovered at Ancient Egyptian Site The body of a child between the ages of 6 and 9 found at Gebel el Silsila, an ancient Egyptian quarry site. Credit: The Gebel el Silsila Project 2017 The intact graves of four children, the youngest just 2 or 3, have been discovered at an ancient quarry site in Egypt. Gebel el Silsila was a source of stone for temples and tombs in Upper Egypt during the Thutmosid period, which ran from the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LLNL releases newly declassified nuclear test videos Reminiscent of the sun peeking through the clouds, a high-altitude nuclear detonation dons the frames of a recently declassified nuclear test film. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) released 62 newly declassified videos today of atmospheric nuclear tests films that have never before been seen by the public. The videos are t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oldest cases of breast cancer and myeloma revealed in scans of mummies Credit: University of Granada An international team, including researchers from the UGR's anthropology group led by Prof. Miguel Cecilio Botella López of the Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Physical Anthropology, has discovered the world's oldest known cases of breast cancer and multiple myeloma, a type of bone marrow cancer. The discoveries were made by conducting CT scans of two mu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers design mock galaxies and more to prepare for sky-mapping instrument This plot shows a thin slice through a mock galaxies catalog. The blue and green points are “bright” and “faint” galaxies simulated for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument’s Bright Galaxy Survey, and the red points show galaxies that are brighter than the magnitude limit of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a predecessor sky survey. Credit: Alex Smith/Durham University Seeing is believing, or so
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First mathematical network model for the Battle of the Sexes Why is it easier to bridge conflicting interests in one neighbourhood than in another? Social scientists think that the residents' social networks may play an important role in the answer to this question. Sociologists and theoretical physicists from Utrecht University have recently created a theoretical model for this complex problem. Using the popular game Battle of the Sexes, they have shown h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher precisely tracks movements of a single catalyst particle Credit: Utrecht University Faculty of Science Using fluorescence microscopy, Ph.D. Candidate Frank Hendriks has studied the accessibility, structure and reactivity of individual catalyst particles. His work has resulted in several technological breakthroughs, as well as two important publications. Hendriks will defend his dissertation in the University Hall on 20 December. "In my first project, I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid Pattern evolution during thermal convection in a mixture of two silicone oils, with viscosities 1cs and 100cs. An immobile region is formed and the macroscopic flow of the entire system changes drastically. Because temperature-dependence on viscosity is very small, a pillar-shaped stagnant domain is formed over the whole region where the fluid wells upwards. Credit: Kazuya U. Kobayashi and Rei Ku
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GAMBIT project suggests theoretical particles are too massive for LHC detection For 80 million working hours, the GAMBIT Collaboration tracked possible clues of 'new physics' with the Cracow supercomputer Prometheus, confronting the predictions of several models of supersymmetry with data collected by the most sophisticated contemporary scientific experiments. (Source: Cyfronet, AGH) Credit: Cyfronet, AGH The elementary particles of new theoretical physics must be so massive
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Science : NPR
Avocado Hand Injuries Are Real. Is A Seedless Fruit The Answer? Cocktail avocados: adorable, seedless — safer for those who can't cut the kind with a pit? Maanvi Singh/for NPR hide caption toggle caption Maanvi Singh/for NPR Cocktail avocados: adorable, seedless — safer for those who can't cut the kind with a pit? Maanvi Singh/for NPR Behold, the cocktail avocado. No, that's not a weird cucumber. It's the latest in avocado innovation, on offer at British reta
10h
Ingeniøren
Rock’n roll: Pedalfabrikant udskifter DSP med ARM-chips DSP-kredse (Digital Signal Processor) er blevet for dyre for den danske virksomhed, T-Rex Engineering, der producerer guitarpedaler på enogtyvende år. Erstatningen er processorer, der bygger på ARM-teknologien. Guitarpedaler benyttes til at ændre lyden af en elektrisk guitar eller en anden lydkilde, der udsender et signal med høj impedans, ofte ved en kombination af elementer, man normalt prøver
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Even brain images can be biased An astonishing number of things that scientists know about brains and behavior are based on small groups of highly educated, mostly white people between the ages of 18 and 21. In other words, those conclusions are based on college students . College students make a convenient study population when you’re a researcher at a university. It makes for a biased sample, but one that’s still useful for s
10h
Science-Based Medicine
Vaccine Post Updates: the Good, the Bad, and the Crooked? I don’t want to point fingers, but a very recent post covered something that I was planning to write about today. Let’s just call the mysterious author S. Gavura. Wait, that’s too obvious. Let’s call him Scott G. Thankfully I’ve got a couple of vaccine related updates to previous posts of mine, plus one of the most amazing anti-vaccine conspiracy theories I’ve ever encountered, as a backup. New n
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers develop floating solar fuels rig for seawater electrolysis Two mesh electrodes are held at a narrow separation distance (L), and generate H2 and O2 gases concurrently. The key innovation is the asymmetric placement of the catalyst on the outward facing surfaces of the mesh, such that the generation of bubbles is constrained to this region. When the gas bubbles detach, their buoyancy causes them to float upward into separate collection chambers.Image cred
10h
Dagens Medicin
Her er de 91 dygtigeste inden 68 behandlinger Se alle resultaterne fra Danmarks Bedste Hospitaler
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Major Report: Some Extreme Weather Can Only Be Blamed on Humans Wildfires are still raging across southern California, marking the end of a destructive year of extreme weather events around the world. In the U.S. alone historic floods hit Missouri and Arkansas in May, drought parched the Dakotas and Montana from spring through fall and autumn hurricanes ravaged the U.S. Gulf Coast, Florida and the Caribbean. Scientists have long predicted such extreme eve
10h
Live Science
Photos: Aerial Views of Ancient Stone Structures in Saudi ArabiaBetween Oct. 27 and Oct. 29, 2017, an archaeological team took nearly 6,000 photographs of ancient stone structures and other types of archaeological sites in Saudi Arabia.
10h
Live Science
What Force Created These Bizarre Cubes in Antarctica's Ice? Antarctica isn't just a land of ice — sometimes, in some places, it appears to be a land of giant ice cubes. But why? How do these huge, rectangular formations appear in the inhuman, irregular landscape of the southern continent? The image above, titled "Icy Sugar Cubes," was taken in Antarctica in 1995, over the English Coast on the southern Antarctic Peninsula. The British Antarctic Surve
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Do Brain-Wiring Differences Make Women More Vulnerable to Concussions? Researchers have known for some time that female athletes experience higher rates of concussion than their male counterparts, and also often suffer harsher symptoms and take longer to recover. But why women seem more vulnerable to such injuries has long remained a puzzle. Concussion symptoms range from headache, dizziness and confusion to memory loss, noise or light sensitivity, and irritabil
10h
Dagens Medicin
Kliniske kvalitetsdata bliver lægernes fyrtårn De kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser skal ikke længere være henvist til et dunkelt hjørne af lægernes bevidsthed. Står det til direktør for Regionernes Kliniske Kvalitetsudviklingsprogram, Jens Winther Jensen, skal de snarere agere som fyrtårne, der kan guide lægerne i deres kliniske arbejde med at forbedre kvaliteten af udredning og behandling.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children. A report of the findings, published Dec. 15 in the American Journal of Re
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Neonicotinoids at 'chronic levels' in UK rivers, study finds Image copyright Geograph/Adrian Cable Image caption River Waveney's pollution limit was exceeded for a whole month, the report said Rivers across the country are "chronically polluted" with pesticides believed to pose a threat to bee populations, a report has found. The River Waveney on the Norfolk/Suffolk border was found to have the highest levels of neonicotinoids in the UK. The River Wensum i
11h
NYT > Science
Here’s What Oil Drilling Looks Like in the Arctic Refuge, 30 Years Later Here’s What Oil Drilling Looks Like in the Arctic Refuge, 30 Years Later These satellite images of a small part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge show the site of what, so far, is the only oil well ever drilled in the refuge, an exploratory well known as KIC-1 that was completed in the mid-1980s. The well was plugged and abandoned, and the drilling equipment and a special timber pad it sat o
11h
Dagens Medicin
VINDER: »Det er vigtigt, at registreringer giver mening for patienten«Jens Grønlund, ledende overlæge, hjerte-lungekirurgisk afdeling, Aalborg Universitetshospital. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af isoleret aortaklapoperation.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Vinder: »Det er min drøm at få geriatriske modtagelser over hele landet«Hanne Elkjær Andersen, overlæge, geriatrisk afdeling, Glostrup Hospital. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til geriatri.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Vinder: »Indtastninger må vente, til når man får god tid – og det får man ikke«Peter de Nully Brown, overlæge på hæmatologisk klinik, Rigshospitalet. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af lymfom.
11h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Forsvaret søger arkitekt til 'security by design' På dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, ledere, specialister, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-2 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
11h
Dagens Medicin
Vinder: »Kirurgien har generelt en sund skepsis til databaser«Christina Tinghus, ledende overlæge på kirurgisk afdeling på Sydvestjysk Sygehus i Esbjerg. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til fedmekirurgi.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Vinder: »Vi støtter os op ad de kvalitetsdata, vi selv producerer«Stinne Kvist, ledende overlæge, nyresygdomme, Aarhus Universitetshospital. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til nyretransplantation.
11h
Ingeniøren
Boss på cyberlandsholdet: Billedet af en ensom hacker i en mørk kælder er en myte "Reverse engineering", "network sniffing" og "protokolanalyse" Sådan lyder et lille udpluk af de discipliner, som det danske cyberlandshold dystede i ved European Cyber Security Challenge (ECSC) i Spanien i november. Det var første gang Danmark var med ved ”EM i IT-sikkerhed” som man mere mundret kan kalde mesterskaberne, og det danske cyberlandshold kom hjem med en fin 8.-plads. »Der var tæt løb
11h
Dagens Medicin
Vinder: »Hvis du har et barn med kræft, så rejser du gerne til Nordpolen«Peder Skov Wehner, overlæge, H.C. Andersen Børnehospital, OUH. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til at behandle børnecancer.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Færre genindlæggelserDanmarks bedste til intensiv behandling 2017
11h
Ingeniøren
Slippe rattet? Nej tak! Hvert år omkommer cirka 1,25 millioner mennesker på grund af trafikulykker, og et langt større antal kommer til skade i mere eller mindre alvorlig grad. I næsten overvældende grad er der kun én, der er skyld i al den ulykke: vi mennesker. Vi er ubetinget den farligste faktor ude i trafikken; vi kører for hurtigt, falder i søvn, overser vigepligt og tror nærmest, vi er usårlige bag et rat. Derfor
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Dagens Medicin
Brug for nye kvalitetsmålDanmarks bedste til behandling af kronisk nyresvigt
11h
Dagens Medicin
Anæstesi har fået helt nyt sæt af indikatorerDanmarks bedste til anæstesi 2017
11h
Ingeniøren
Amazon lancerer webplatform til VR- og AR-udvikling Nem og ubegrænset adgang til at designe sine egne apps til virtual reality- og augmented reality-applikationer med avatarer, der kan interagere via talegenkendelsessoftware. Det er den cocktail, Amazon har rystet i bestræbelserne på at komme ind på markedet for software til VR- og AR-udvikling. På den årlige Amazon Web Services-konference i Las Vegas i slutningen af november præsenterede Amazon s
11h
Dagens Medicin
Den etårige graftoverlevelse er stigendeDanmarks bedste til nyretransplantation 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet får ny centerdirektør Merete Lange skal stå i spidsen for Juliane Marie Centret på Rigshospitalet, der tager sig særligt af børn, fødsler og fertilitet.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Der foretages stadig for mange reoperationerDanmarks bedste til behandling af lyskebrok
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brittle stars inspire new generation robots able to adapt to physical damageResearchers at Tohoku University and Hokkaido University have, for the first time, succeeded in developing a robot capable of immediately adapting to unexpected physical damage. This is a significant breakthrough, as robots are increasingly expected to function in tough environments under hazardous conditions.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research linking cancer-inhibiting proteins to cell antennae Normal cell (left) and when cbl proteins and the antennae are degraded (right). Credit: University of Copenhagen Danish researchers have just presented a previously unknown mechanism that inhibits the ability of cells to develop into cancer cells. Their findings have important implications for the understanding of how cancer starts, and how to improve the treatment of illness in the future. The d
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
T-Mobile taking over Dutch arm of Tele2 mobile providerThe Dutch arm of T-Mobile says it is taking over telecom and internet provider Tele2's operations in the Netherlands, in a move T-Mobile says is aimed at competing with local heavyweights KPN and VodafoneZiggo.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stroke patients receive clot-busting medication more than twice as fast as national rates Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California are delivering clot-busting medication to new stroke patients more than twice as fast as the national average. This follows the regionwide adoption of an integrated telemedicine program, according to new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Stroke . This is the among the first peer-reviewed, published studies to show how the successful imple
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Complete design of a silicon quantum computer chip unveiled Research teams all over the world are exploring different ways to design a working computing chip that can integrate quantum interactions. Now, UNSW engineers believe they have cracked the problem, reimagining the silicon microprocessors we know to create a complete design for a quantum computer chip that can be manufactured using mostly standard industry processes and components. The new chip de
12h
Dagens Medicin
Der indsættes stadig for få meshDanmarks bedste til behandling af navle- og arbrok
12h
Dagens Medicin
Stabilt fald i andel af patienter med nye blødningerDanmarks bedste til behandling af blødende mavesår
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft updates bing search to highlight reputable results Microsoft on Wednesday rolled out new features on its Bing search engine powered by artificial intelligence, including one that summarizes the two opposing sides of contentious questions, and another that measures how many reputable sources are behind a given answer. Tired of delivering misleading information when their algorithms are gamed by trolls and purveyors of fake news, Microsoft and its
12h
The Atlantic
‘The Basic Grossness of Humans’ Lurking inside every website or app that relies on “user-generated content”—so, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, among others—there is a hidden kind of labor, without which these sites would not be viable businesses. Content moderation was once generally a volunteer activity, something people took on because they were embedded in communities that they wanted to maintain. But as s
12h
Dagens Medicin
Svært at leve op til krav om hurtig operationDanmarks bedste til behandling af hul i mavesækken 2017
12h
Dagens Medicin
Flere laparoskopiske indgrebDanmarks bedste til behandling af tidlig graviditet 2017
12h
Dagens Medicin
Forsøgsordning med medicinsk cannabis bliver en realitet106 ud af 106 mulige stemte for lovforslaget om en forsøgsordning med medicinsk cannabis. Dermed kan udvalgte patientgrupper fra årsskiftet få medicinsk cannabis på recept.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Øget brug af trombolyse kræver hurtigt præhospitalt beredskab og offentlig bevågenhedDanmarks bedste til behandling af apopleksi 2017
12h
Dagens Medicin
For få patienter MR-scannesDanmarks bedste til behandling af sclerose 2017
12h
Dagens Medicin
Bedre sekundær profylakse sikrer relativt lav recidivrateDanmarks bedste til behandling af forbigående blodprop i hjernen 2017
12h
Ingeniøren
Afsmeltning fra 'Verdens tag' får havet til at stige Kunlun-bjergkæden i Tibet rummer isgletsjere, hvor isen er mere end 600.000 år gammel. Nu hjælper blandt andet fem stks. 300 meter lange iskerner udboret fra Guliya Ice Cap til forståelsen af, hvordan afsmeltning fra sådanne ældgamle isgletsjere kan bidrage til havvandsstigning i takt med den globale opvarmning. Den og fire andre iskerner er de ældste iskerner, der til dato er boret ud uden for A
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles as a solution against antibiotic resistance? (Jena, Germany) Around one in 3,300 children in Germany is born with Mucoviscidosis. A characteristic of this illness is that one channel albumen on the cell surface is disturbed by mutations. Thus, the amount of water of different secretions in the body is reduced which creates a tough mucus. As a consequence, inner organs malfunction. Moreover, the mucus blocks the airways. Thus, the self regul
13h
Viden
Fra damp- til designerdildo: Vibratorens historieScroll gennem vibratorens historie og se udviklingen.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Højeste komplethed nogensindeDanmarks bedste til skulderalloplastik 2017
13h
Dagens Medicin
Færre patienter genindlægges efter operationDanmarks bedste til knæalloplastik 2017
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ændring i celler styrer sårheling i tarmen 14. december 2017 Ændring i celler styrer sårheling i tarmen Celleforskning Et stort internationalt samarbejde ledet af forskere fra Københavns Universitet har for første gang fundet frem til den mekanisme, som styrer sårheling i tarmen. Den nye opdagelse viser, at cellerne i tarmen bliver omprogrammeret til en forsterlignende tilstand, hvilket er afgørende for, at tarmceller kan hele sår i tarme
13h
Dagens Medicin
Komplethedsgraden for reoperationer er fortsat for lavDanmarks bedste til hoftealloplastik 2017
13h
Dagens Medicin
Behandling af hoftebrud får massiv kritikDanmarks bedste til hoftenære lårbensbrud 2017
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Sumatran rhino 'hanging on by a thread' Image copyright Tom Uhlman Image caption Ipuh at the Cincinnati Zoo Scientists have decoded the genome of the Sumatran rhinoceros - one of the most threatened mammals on Earth. Its genetic blueprint shows that populations have been in decline for a very long time. The rhino's troubles began during the last Ice Age, when its habitat shrunk, says a US team. Since then, human pressures have caused n
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Dagens Medicin
Historisk lav regional variationDanmarks bedste til KOL 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Markant stigning i komplethedsgradenDanmarks bedste til rekonstruktion af korsbånd 2017
14h
Dagens Medicin
Akutte kejsersnit af grad I bruges nu kun i nødstilfældeDanmarks bedste til fødsler 2017
14h
Dagens Medicin
Alt for mange indlagte ældre får ikke vurderet BMIDanmarks bedste til geriatri 2017
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan firm says it will pay part of salaries in Bitcoin A Japanese company will start paying part of its employees' salaries in Bitcoin, as it aims to get better understanding of the virtual currency, a spokeswoman said on Friday. GMO Internet, which operates a range of web-related businesses including finance, online advertising and internet infrastructure , will start paying up to 100,000 yen ($890) monthly by Bitcoin to its employees in Japan from
14h
Dagens Medicin
Fremgang i registreringen af PRO-dataDanmarks bedste til rygsøjlegigt 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Flere leddegigtpatienter med let sygdomsaktivitetDanmarks bedste til leddegigt 2017
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What the FCC rollback of 'net neutrality' means to you After a meeting voting to end net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai answers a question from a reporter, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) Now that the federal government has rolled back the internet protections it put in place two years ago, the big question is: What does the repeal of "net neutrality' rules mean to you? In the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding a lethal parasite's vulnerabilities Unlike other nematode parasites, Strongyloides stercoralis has the unique ability to carry out its entire life cycle within a human host, a state known as autoinfection. Researchers identified a way to suppress this potentially lethal form of infection in a mouse model. Credit: James Lok An estimated 100 million people around the world are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a parasitic nema
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control Chemical oscillator. Credit: Ella Maru Studio and Cody Geary DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors. Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique could make captured carbon more valuable The electrolysis setup that could allow efficient production of syngas from captured carbon. Credit: Idaho National Laboratory Carbon capture could help the nation's coal plants reduce greenhouse gas emissions, yet economic challenges are part of the reason the technology isn't widely used today. That could change if power plants could turn captured carbon into a useable product. Scientists at th
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Dagens Medicin
Situationsrapport fra Roskilde to uger efter indførelse af SundhedsplatformenEn forsigtig forhåbning om det nok alligevel skal gå godt, er foreløbig gjort til skamme.
14h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 15. decemberVær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2017. Hver dag med et nyt teknisk spørgsmål fra året, der gik. Hver dag med præmier.
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Ingeniøren
Forskning: Computerspil holder hjernen rask Computerspil kan hjælpe med at holde hovedet sundt og aktivt, viser canadisk hjerneforskning. »Vi fandt ud af, at 3D-platformspil giver vækst i hippocampus,« skriver Gregory West, lektor i psykologi ved Université de Monetréal i en mail til Version2, og han tilføjer: Kort om hippocampus : Hippocampus er en del af hjernen, der kædes sammen med mental sundhed Jo mere grå substans i hippocampus, jo
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Geminid meteor shower dazzles over northern hemisphereIf you missed the annual Geminid meteor shower, cameras captured the celestial display over China.
16h
Ingeniøren
Dansk databeskyttelseslov ignorer borgeres ret til at blive informeret Det kan ikke være rigtigt, at administrative problemer skal tilsidesætte en grundlæggende ret til oplysning om databehandling Den nye danske databeskyttelseslov, som lige nu behandles i Folketinget, vil give ministre mulighed for at tillade helt nye samkøringer af registerdata – uden om Folketingssalen og uden pligt til at oplyse borgerne. Pligten til at oplyse borgerne, hvis data bruges til nye
16h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Stik teleselskaberne en tudekiks Et nyt slagsmål om fremtidens mobile netværk, 5G udfolder sig nu – foreløbig mest bag kulisserne. På den ene side står teleselskaberne, som ønsker at udrulle teknologien så billigt som muligt. På den anden står myndighederne med Energi­styrelsen i spidsen, som vil sikre flest muligt danskere adgang til de høje båndbredder. Næste slag udkæmpes om en række auktioner vedr. benyttelse af nogle af de
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique could make captured carbon more valuable IMAGE: The electrolysis setup that could allow efficient production of syngas from captured carbon. view more Credit: Idaho National Laboratory IDAHO FALLS -- Carbon capture could help the nation's coal plants reduce greenhouse gas emissions, yet economic challenges are part of the reason the technology isn't widely used today. That could change if power plants could turn captured carbon into
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed? IMAGE: Pattern evolution during thermal convection in a mixture of two silicone oils, with viscosities 1cs and 100cs. An immobile region is formed and the macroscopic flow of the entire system... view more Credit: Kazuya U. Kobayashi and Rei Kurita Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The study will be published online Dec. 15 in The Journal of Pediatrics . For many years, physicians have known that women with diabetes face an increased risk of giving birth
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coarse particulate matter may increase asthma risk IMAGE: Coarse particulate matter increases asthma risk in children. view more Credit: ATS Dec. 12, 2017--Children exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine .
17h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Putin, Russia, and the End of History Vladimir Putin just announced, to the surprise of no one, that he will run for reelection as President of Russia. In her January/February 2018 Atlantic cover story, Julia Ioffe writes that Americans misunderstand the man ruling the former Soviet empire: he’s not a master tactician playing three-dimensional chess, he’s a gambler who won big. "Over the past year, Russian hackers have become the stu
17h
Dagens Medicin
2018 kan blive et magisk år for kvalitetsbaserneData strander i bermudatrekanten mellem regionsledelser, sygehusledelser og afdelingsledelser uden at nå retur til klinikerne.
17h
Dagens Medicin
Amerikanske tilstandeVi skal revidere lovene og bekendtgørelserne, så vi ikke ender med journaler, der primært er domineret af fraser og ligegyldigheder.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Roomba to Rule the Smart Home Smart homes are one of those technology ideas that never seem to catch on, despite the efforts of technology heavyweights like Amazon and Google parent Alphabet. Could Roomba , the popular robotic vacuum cleaner, be the missing link that finally makes home automation useful and convenient? That’s what Roomba maker iRobot claims. The key technology isn’t the device’s dirt-sucking aptitude, but its
17h
Dagens Medicin
Jeg er oprigtigt ked af at slutte min karriere på denne mådeTanker fra en virksomhedsindskrænket praktiserende læge, som har tabt et slag mod Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed om primært dokumentation og journalføring. Og som må stoppe to måneder før planlagt pension og må konstatere, at defensiv medicin nu er virkelighed.
17h
Dagens Medicin
Ankeinstans for Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed?Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed burde slet ikke være dannet! Hvis man forbedrer det system, man tidligere havde for at forebygge lægefejl, ville det være tilstrækkeligt
17h
Dagens Medicin
Fagforening accepterer bortvisning af speciallægeMin fagforening syntes, at min bortvisning var i orden. Jeg havde blot sagt, at jeg ikke så mig i stand til at leve op til lægeløftet, hvis jeg skulle arbejde under Sundhedsplatformen.
17h
Live Science
Russian Culture: Facts, Customs & Traditions Russian culture has a long and rich cultural history, steeped in literature, ballet, painting and classical music. While outsiders may see the country as drab, Russia has a very visual cultural past, from its colorful folk costumes to its ornate religious symbols. Here is a brief overview of Russian customs and traditions. The Homeland Russian culture places a high value on the home
18h
Ingeniøren
Et spørgsmål vinder din chefs venskab Dit forhold til din chef spiller en stor rolle for din hverdag og ikke mindst din fremtidige karriere. Derfor er det godt at vide, hvordan du etablerer et solidt samarbejde - måske endda venskab - med din leder. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/spoergsmaal-goer-dig-bedre-venner-med-chefen-11615 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
18h
Ingeniøren
Drømmer du om selvkørende biler, må du styre dig lidt endnu Læser man amerikanske teknologimedier, får man nemt det indtryk, at vi om få år kan slippe rattet og overlade al transport til den selvkørende bil. Den vil ‘forandre alt’ og bliver bakket op af en række virksomheder med Tesla og Google i spidsen, som gerne vil fortælle os, at de næsten har styr på teknologien og kun venter på, at myndighederne får reglerne på plads. Året 2021 synes at være den ma
18h
New Scientist - News
NASA has discovered our solar system’s twin with 8 planets A sun-like star with 8 planets scrunched around it NASA/Ames Research Center/Wendy Stenzel NASA has found our solar system’s twin more than 2500 light-years away. Using data from the Kepler space telescope, researchers have found an eighth planet at the Kepler-90 system, tying our own system for the highest number of known planets. Before the NASA announcement, online rumours had swirled spec
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bioluminescent succinate detection monitors dioxygenases and JMJC demethylases Demethylation of DNA and Histone in the Nucleosome by Demethylases. Credit: Promega Corporation A new (and freely available) original research article published ahead-of-print at SLAS Discovery Online describes a new methodology that enables the investigation of a large number of structurally conserved enzymes belonging to the Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. This superfam
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Supermarket Snacking Boosts Sales Behavior & Society 60-Second Science Supermarket Snacking Boosts Sales Noshing while shopping convinces consumers to buy the featured product more often than does simply seeing end-of-aisle displays. Karen Hopkin reports. If you’ve spent any time hitting up the giant wholesalers or other markets this holiday season, you’ve probably figured out that you can make a full meal out of the tasty little
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapiesThe efficacy of many FDA-approved cancer drug combinations is not due to synergistic interactions between drugs, but rather to a form of "bet hedging," according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coalition seeks to increase transparency on life science career prospectsNine U.S. research universities and a major cancer institute today announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Charting how brain signals connect to neuronsScientists have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical's pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.
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The Scientist RSS
Final GOP Tax Bill Wont Ding Graduate StudentsA provision to tax tuition waivers was dropped during the reconciliation process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapyIn the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient's immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors. A flu vaccine might look and feel like applying a small, round bandage to your skin. These are examples of how innovative biomaterials could enhance vaccines against HIV and other infectious diseases and immunotherapies for patients with cancer or dampen responses in a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How defeating THOR could bring a hammer down on cancerResearchers have uncovered a novel gene they named THOR. It's a highly conserved long non-coding RNA that plays a role in cancer development. Knocking it out can halt the growth of tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To sleep or not: Researchers explore complex genetic network behind sleep durationScientists have identified differences in a group of genes they say might help explain why some people need a lot more sleep -- and others less -- than most. The study, conducted using fruit fly populations bred to model natural variations in human sleep patterns, provides new clues to how genes for sleep duration are linked to a wide variety of biological processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern enginesResearchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computational strategies overcome obstacles in peptide therapeutics developmentRecently developed computational strategies could help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Researchers were able to sample the diverse landscape of shapes that peptides can form as a guide for designing the next generation of stable, potent, selective drugs. They compiled a library of peptide scaffolds upon which drug candidates might be designed. Their methods also can be used to design a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violenceWhen communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Valley fever cases see major spike in November, experts sayAn uptick in reported cases of Valley fever indicates a likely sharp increase in infections next year. At the same time, federal clearance for a rapid assay test developed with assistance from the University of Arizona should help reduce delays in diagnosing the respiratory fungal disease caused by spores found in area soils.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One in five materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggestsCan companies rely on the results of one or two scientific studies to design a new industrial process or launch a new product? In at least one area of materials chemistry, the answer may be yes -- but only 80 percent of the time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High success rate reported for diabetic Charcot foot surgeryNearly four out of five diabetic patients with severe cases of a disabling condition called Charcot foot were able to walk normally again following surgery, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking planned experiments online could spot ways to improve animal testingAn online database of study summaries could be systematically evaluated to uncover new information about animal testing, including potential targets for efforts to minimize harm to lab animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers develop mouse model to study Pteroptine ortheovirusIn the past decade, the first cases of respiratory tract infection caused by bat-borne Pteropine ortheovirus (PRV) have been reporting in humans. To help shed light on the clinical course of PRV infection, researchers have now used a mouse model of the infection to study its virulence, pathology and pathogenesis.
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Popular Science
Is hand sanitizer bad for my microbiome? Bacteria used to be the enemy. Before the invention of antibiotics , most of our dealings with bacteria—that we were aware of—ended in death. Because of that, most of us feel like hand sanitizer , being a pretty powerful bacterial annihilator, is something we should use liberally without fear of health consequences. But is that really true? Over the past decade, microbes have taken on a new, posi
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Latest Headlines | Science News
AI has found an 8-planet system like ours in Kepler data Our solar system is no longer the sole record-holder for most known planets circling a star. An artificial intelligence algorithm sifted through data from the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope and discovered a previously overlooked planet orbiting Kepler 90 — making it the first star besides the sun known to host eight planets. This finding, announced in a NASA teleconference December 14, sho
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Live Science
No, Scientists Haven't Found a 512-Year-Old Greenland Shark A Greenland shark ( Somniosus microcephalus ), swims under ice near northern Baffin Island, in the Canadian Arctic. Credit: Photoshot/Zuma Headlines circulating on the internet today (Dec. 14) breathlessly described the discovery of a 512-year-old shark — but they're a little off the mark. The creature in question — a Greenland shark — does, in fact, live to be several centuries old, accord
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Science current issue
Erratum for the Research Article Loci associated with skin pigmentation identified in African populations The version published on 17 November incorporates subsequent proof corrections and author corrections. The text and Figures 1A and 2 were updated to reflect a revision to the melanin index (MI) formula used to analyze the data, which was changed from MI = 100 A- log10[1/( x /100)] to MI = 100 A- log10[1/( x /255)], where x is the value for red reflectance. Thus, the MI values shift proportionally
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Live Science
Poop Proof: Ancient Greeks Suffered from Gut Parasites Eggs of whipworms (left) and roundworms (right), intestinal parasites that likely plagued people in ancient Greece. Credit: Reproduced with the permission of Elsevier publishing. Thousands of years ago, the Greek physician Hippocrates, widely considered to be the father of modern medicine, wrote about diseases he and his students observed and treated, including intestinal parasites. Modern
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Futurity.org
Climate change made Harvey’s rainfall more intense Human-caused climate change made the record rainfall that fell over Houston during Hurricane Harvey roughly 3 times more likely and 15 percent more intense, researchers report. “The takeaway from this paper is that Harvey was more intense because of today’s climate, and storms like Harvey are more likely in today’s climate,” says study coauthor Antonia Sebastian, a postdoctoral research associate
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer systems predict objects' responses to physical forcesNew research examines the fundamental cognitive abilities that an intelligent agent requires to navigate the world: discerning distinct objects and inferring how they respond to physical forces.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlockThe debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight. Now, an international team is working to break the policy stalemate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Software enables robots to be controlled in virtual realityResearchers have developed software that lets users control robots over the internet with off-the-shelf virtual reality hardware.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence helps accelerate progress toward efficient fusion reactionsBefore scientists can effectively capture and deploy fusion energy, they must learn to predict major disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage the walls of doughnut-shaped fusion devices called tokamaks. Timely prediction of disruptions, the sudden loss of control of the hot, charged plasma that fuels the reactions, will be vital to triggering steps to avoid or mitigate such large-scal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women, with nearly 450,000 deaths per year from the disease worldwide. However, women aged 15-39 at diagnosis h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient feces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts Eggs of whipworm intestinal parasites from ancient Greek samples analysed in the study. Credit: Elsevier Ancient faeces from prehistoric burials on the Greek island of Kea have provided the first archaeological evidence for the parasitic worms described 2,500 years ago in the writings of Hippocrates - the most influential works of classical medicine. University of Cambridge researchers Evilena An
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visitor patterns and emerging activities in Finish national parks revealed by social media postsSocial media data provide a reliable information to support decision-making in national parks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular controlResearchers successfully constructed a first-of-its-kind chemical oscillator that uses DNA components. DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.
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