The Atlantic

The Impossible Task of Remembering the Nanking Massacre The book case in my childhood bedroom contained worlds far from my own. There was my volume of folk tales from the Childcraft encyclopedia series, along with an illustrated Bible. Sandwiched between them was the blood-red spine of Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking . The book had awoken the mainstream Western consciousness to the truth of the Japanese military’s horrific massacre of Chinese soldier
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Futurity.org

To fight child obesity, engage the whole family When trying to help a child lose weight, involving a parent in treatment makes the entire family healthier, a new study shows. Researchers tested a family-based treatment that included weekly meetings over a period of several months. Parents learned how to engineer a home environment that supported healthy eating and activity. They also learned to practice their own healthy behaviors so their kid
21min
Futurity.org

‘Natural killer cells’ prep womb for pregnancy New research identifies how natural killer cells prepare the womb for pregnancy. First the researchers discovered that the uterine natural killer cells remodel and refresh the lining of the womb at the time of embryo implantation. This is the first time a role for uterine natural killer cells in the lining of the womb has been identified outside of pregnancy. In addition, they discovered that thi
35min
Futurity.org

Facial recognition shows Ottoman Empire’s lost handiwork Infrastructure deserves a place in architectural history not just as technology, but also as art, argues an art historian’s new book. Look at a map of roads or railroad tracks—the winding lines suffuse the terrain like veins in a body. That’s no accident, because “they are the stuff of life,” writes Peter Christensen, an assistant professor at the University of Rochester. “Infrastructures make em
35min
Scientific American Content: Global

Radiation Might Help Heart Regain its Rhythm > That beeping sound is the normal beating of a heart. ventricular tachycardia , or VT… the racing beats are caused by an electrical short circuit in the muscle. In a moment, a defibrillator is going to zap the heart , to return it to a slow and steady pace. The root cause of VT? "So the villain inside the heart is almost always a scar from a prior injury." Phillip Cuculich, a cardiac ele
39min
Science : NPR

How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption toggle caption Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project We're on the Bering Land Bridge, where woolly mammoths roamed 20,000 years ago. Today, the land is covered in bright green grass and
44min
Science | The Guardian

The weather in 2017 T he most notable feature of 2017 was the prevalence of westerly winds across the UK. This was probably a factor in making it a year of below average sunshine. It was certainly a factor in giving some very unsettled weather in the north and west at times while the dry anomaly that started in south-eastern Britain in 2016 continued, with only brief interruptions. As in most recent years, temperatu
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Big Think

The Hidden Psychological Heritage of the Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution was the harbinger of the modern way of life. As Yuval Noah Harari eloquently examines in his must-read bestseller Sapiens , it brought along the second agricultural revolution, the unthinkable transformations of entire ecosystems, the collapse of the family and community, and the ethics of consumerism. It is not a stretch to imagine that all of these changes left in th
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Big Think

How to Maximize the Brain Benefits of Storytime for Infants Not all books are created equal. Especially when it comes to the ones parents read to children to aid their development. A new study from the University of Florida points to an important characteristic to look for in children’s books. Scientists have been emphasizing the importance of reading books to kids from a very early age. Reading books to infants has been associated with better vocabul
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vermont's moose population struggles despite hunting cutback An estimated 100 million people around the world are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a parasitic nematode, yet it's likely that many don't know it. The infection can persist for years, usually only causing mild symptoms. ...
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Ingeniøren

Ingeniørens julekalender: 17. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Med hvor mange kilo steg ordineringen af antibiotikaproduktet til svin, colistin, måneden før, at det blev dyrere for landmændene at br
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Big Think

There was No Big Bang, Radical Theory of the Universe States We take it for granted, that the Big Bang created the universe. But did it? Although that’s been the commonly adopted model for the last 50 years, not all scientists back it. In fact, there are other theories for how the universe and everything came into being. (And no, the answer isn’t 42). Could our universe have been born out of an alternate space-time bubble? One Brazilian mathematician think
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Big Think

Space Dust Could Be Bringing Alien Life to Earth Hollywood almost always portrays our first encounter with extraterrestrials as humans confronting a big, shiny spacecraft, piloted by organisms with technology far beyond our own. More likely, it’ll be alien microbes we first encounter. And it may not just be on other moons or planets. It could be right here on Earth. How? They may be hitching a ride on space dust. Typically, 4,000 tons of micr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French aerospace giant Thales acquires SIM maker Gemalto French aerospace and defence group Thales said Sunday it has bought European SIM manufacturer Gemalto in a bid to become a global leader in digital security. The aerospace giant paid 51 euros ($60) a share for Gemalto, a premium of 57 percent over the closing price on December 8, Thales said in a statement. The price was also higher than a 46- euro a share bid offer from French tech firm Atos w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two rookie astronauts, cosmonaut blast off to ISS A three-man space crew featuring American and Japanese rookie astronauts as well as an experienced Russian cosmonaut blasted off on Sunday for a six-month mission at the International Space Station. Scott Tingle of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency powered into the sky in a Soyuz MS-07 spacecraft from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazak
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Big Think

The Universe Doesn’t Need Dark Energy To Expand Faster, Says New Theory “Dark energy” is a mysterious force that is predicted to take up more than 68% of our universe. Since observations in 1990s that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, dark energy has been the leading hypothesis to explain why. Now three mathematicians claim they can show why the expansion is speeding up without the need to invoke dark energy, which they call "a fudge factor". The ide
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NYT > Science

Drug Company Under Fire After Revealing Dengue Vaccine May Harm Some Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University, said, “It’s hard to think of another circumstance when a major public health program was introduced with this much controversy.” The problems with the vaccine rollout have “cast a pall” on other efforts to develop dengue vaccines, he said, and public health experts are worried that the distrust could spill over to other
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Scientific American Content: Global

Surprise Discovered Inside Shaggy, Shimmying Protists [Video] Pseudotrichonympha pearti. Credit: del Campo et al. 2017 There really are an extraordinarily large number of weird things that live in the back sides of insects. Just last week I wrote about amoebas shaped like candy canes and boomerangs that live inside the posteriors of aquatic insect larvae, getting by on whatever they can glean from what the insect didn’t eat. But another incredib
7h
Science : NPR

Astronaut Trio Heads For Space Station To Continue Scientific Research Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, (bottom); Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai, middle; and U.S. astronaut Scott Tingle, above; wave prior to the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sunday. Shamil Zhumatov/AP hide caption toggle caption Shamil Zhumatov/AP Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, (bottom); Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai, middle
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Feed: All Latest

2017 Cookbook Roundup: Pie and Whiskey, Craft Coffee, Dinner in an Instant The cookbooks that resonate this year are the ones that get real. Whether encouraging you to use some kitchen smarts, or employing a brute-force meat-shredding method that relies on a sledgehammer, this season's best cookbooks emphasize technique, authenticity, and the occasional bit of salty language. The fancy kitchen cookbooks are still out there but somehow feel less important, ceding their s
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Science | The Guardian

Playing God: should we revive extinct species? It sounds like something from a sci-fi B-Movie: scientists have moved a step closer to bringing the Tasmanian tiger back from extinction. Also known as the thylacine, or Tasmanian wolf, the world’s largest carnivorous marsupial died out in its native land sometime during the 1930s. Despite almost 4,000 reports of “sightings” since, including tantalisingly inconclusive video footage as recently as
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Scientific American Content: Global

STEM Gifts That Don't Come in Boxes or Need Batteries Black Friday is behind us and the window for last-minute shipping is starting to close. The scramble is on, and so is that niggling notion that in a month so many of the gifts in our carts will be forgotten at the back of a closet or at the bottom of a toy chest. In my own holiday search for the young (and young at heart) in my life, I have come across a few ideas for gifts that don’t necessarily
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Ingeniøren

Årets nyheder i Ingeniørens bogreol I løbet af året modtager redaktionen en del nye bøger, som vi desværre ikke alle har mulighed for at give en større omtale. Her ved udgangen af året er det tid til en opsamling, der viser bredden i den omfangsrige litteratur om videnskab, der udgives, og som måske kan inspirere til et julegaveønske eller to. Vi begynder med en bog, som egentlig udkom i 2016, men så sent i december, at jeg tillade
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Live Science

When Do Children Develop Their Gender Identity? This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . Gender is generally thought of as a stable trait: we are born male or female and we stay that way as we grow from small children to adults. It turns out that for young children, initial concepts about gender are quite flexible. In my own
10h
The Atlantic

The Secret Identity of Marvel Comics’ Editor In late November, C.B. Cebulski lost his secret identity. The longtime editor and talent scout for Marvel Comics had just arrived in the United States to become editor in chief, after spending years working for the company in Shanghai. But the start of his tenure was quickly marred by the resurfacing of an issue he had long tried to conceal. A day before Cebulski’s plane landed in New York, a bra
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Scientific American Content: Global

You Are Probably Washing Your Hands Wrong The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. For my fourth-grade science fair project, I tested different soaps to see which ones were the most effective at keeping my hands clean. Now, nearly 20 years later as a microbiology doctoral candidate, I can’t help but think, “Ugh, the fourth-grade me was such an ama
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Science | The Guardian

Heinz Wolff obituary Heinz Wolff, who has died aged 89, was one of a long line of distinguished British scientists who became even more distinguished television presenters and apostles of science. With his trademark bow tie, quizzical look, characteristic pronunciation patterns and appetite for invention, he hosted a pioneering TV programme called The Great Egg Race from 1979 to 1986 and almost certainly inspired tho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potato blight’s chemical attack mechanism explainedResearchers have deciphered the workings of a cytolytic toxin, which is produced by some of the world’s most devastating crop diseases. The Cytolysin is manufactured by pathogens such as bacteria and fungi and can wipe out entire harvests if chemical protection is not used.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Complete design of a silicon quantum computer chip unveiledResearch teams all over the world are exploring different ways to design a working computing chip that can integrate quantum interactions. Now, engineers believe they have cracked the problem, reimagining the silicon microprocessors we know to create a complete design for a quantum computer chip that can be manufactured using mostly standard industry processes and components.
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Live Science

Honanki Ruins: Photos Reveal Sprawling, Ancient Pueblos Many inhabitants Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Changing habitat Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Amazing ruins Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher The road less traveled Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Erosion made useful Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher House of the bears Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Impressive construction Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Comfortable lives Credit: Linda &
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The Atlantic

More Hurricanes? Prepare for Stormier Pop Charts Over the past half-century, climate scientists have learned that the weather leaves behind a hidden history of itself. Through evidence preserved in tree rings , in the gunk at the bottom of lakes , and in towering stalagmites that rise from cave floors , researchers have learned how to read thousands of years of weather history, inferring the existence of long-forgotten rainstorms, hurricanes, a
11h
Science : NPR

Researching How To Fight Climate Change With Geoengineering NPR's Lulu Garcia Navarro talks with Rep. Jerry McNerney, Democrat of California, about his new bill to research the effects and risks of "geoengineering" the planet as a way to fight climate change.
11h
Live Science

These Quantum Droplets Are the Most Dilute Liquids in the Known Universe This artist's rendering depicts a quantum liquid droplet formed by mixing two condensates of ultracold potassium atoms. Credit: ICFO/ Povarchik Studios Barcelona A team of physicists in Barcelona has created liquid droplets 100 million times thinner than water that hold themselves together using strange quantum laws. In a paper published Dec. 14 in the journal Science, researchers revealed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique could make captured carbon more valuableCarbon capture could help coal plants reduce emissions if economic challenges can be overcome. Turning captured carbon into a useable product is one solution. Scientists have developed an efficient process for turning captured carbon dioxide into syngas that can be used to make fuels and chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Floating solar fuels rig created for seawater electrolysisChemical engineers have developed a novel photovoltaic-powered electrolysis device that can operate as a stand-alone platform that floats on open water. The floating PV-electrolyzer can be thought of as a 'solar fuels rig' that bears some resemblance to deep-sea oil rigs -- but it would produce hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water instead of extracting petroleum from beneath the sea floor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laserScientists have succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. They were able to carefully follow, one x-ray at a time, the decay of nuclei in a perfect crystal after excitation with a flash of x-rays. They observed a dramatic reduction of the time taken to emit the first x-ray as the number of x-rays increased.
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Jeep's New 2018 Wrangler Is Exactly What the Off-Roading Fans Ordered Automakers can learn a lot by breaking down the new Jeep Wrangler—and not just because it’s so easy to put back together afterward. (Seriously: Popping the doors, roof, and windscreen off and on is a breeze.) The newest generation of this emblem of free-spirited exploration—the fourth redesign in its 30-year history—is more than a refresh. It’s a climbing, crawling, and swimming demonstration of
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Ingeniøren

Ugens debat: Kan det betale sig at vaske om natten? En række eldistributionsselskaber herhjemme er begyndt at timeafregne deres netkunder og samtidig opkræve en højere pris for at levere strøm i timerne omkring spisetid. Dermed er vi nemlig så småt begyndt at praktisere en elmarkedsmodel, hvor private forbrugere og mindre virksomheder får mulighed for at bruge strøm mere fleksibelt hen over døgnet – styret af elprissignalerne. Det betyder populært
11h
Dagens Medicin

Misforstået politisk regnestykke er benzin på båletSundhedsministeren dividerer antallet af politianmeldelser op i totalantallet af UTH'er i et forsøg på at legitimere en mere aktivistisk linje fra en overivrig styrelse. Det skaber bekymring hos tusindvis af læger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Second chance for rejected antibiotic candidateAn antibiotic candidate compound shelved in the 1970s in favor of more worthwhile drugs could be worth a second look, new research has found.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Here are our favorite science books of 2017 Have you fallen behind on your reading this year? Or maybe you’ve plowed through your must-reads and are ready for more. Science News has got you covered. Here are the staff’s picks for some of the best science books of 2017. Find detailed reviews from previous issues in the links below or in our Editors pick: Favorite books of 2017 . Against the Grain James C. Scott Armed with the latest archaeo
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Feed: All Latest

Secret Link Uncovered Between Pure Math and Physics Mathematics is full of weird number systems that most people have never heard of and would have trouble even conceptualizing. But rational numbers are familiar. They’re the counting numbers and the fractions—all the numbers you’ve known since elementary school. But in mathematics, the simplest things are often the hardest to understand. They’re simple like a sheer wall, without crannies or ledges
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heavy air pollution shuts schools in Iran (Update) Iran shut primary schools in the capital and other parts of the country on Sunday due to choking levels of air pollution. Local authorities late Saturday announced the closure of all primary schools in the province of Tehran, which is home to 14 million residents, except in two towns. A blanket of smog has covered neighbourhoods in the capital in the past few days. Airborne concentration of f
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The Atlantic

How The Last Jedi Lands So Many Big Twists This story contains spoilers for all of The Last Jedi. “This is not going to go the way you think!” growls Luke Skywalker in a line that was, wisely, selected as the money quote for The Last Jedi ’s trailers. Rian Johnson’s Star Wars sequel is a machine built to startle the audience again and again across two and a half hours, and he’s turned everything from lightsaber duels to celebrity cameos i
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Ingeniøren

En god kemi med chefen er den bedste kur mod stress Om døren til chefens kontor står på vid gab, eller er lukket, når man som projektleder har behov for en snak, kan aflæses direkte på projektlederens stressniveau. Det fremgår af en undersøgelse blandt medlemmerne af IDAs Projektlederpanel. Projektledere: Efterspurgte og udsatte 27 procent af dem, der henvender sig til IDAs erhvervspsykologer med stress, er projektledere, selvom de kun udgør 7 pro
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The Atlantic

Neuroscience Has a Lot To Learn from Buddhism Can training the mind make us more attentive, altruistic, and serene? Can we learn to manage our disturbing emotions in an optimal way? What are the transformations that occur in the brain when we practice meditation? In a new book titled Beyond the Self , two friends—Matthieu Ricard, who left a career as a molecular biologist to become a Buddhist monk in Nepal, and Wolf Singer, a distinguished n
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Science | The Guardian

Are you and your partner a good match? Personality quiz | Ben Ambridge Do opposites attract? The old cliché says they do. But is it true, or do we prefer partners who are similar to ourselves? And if so, similar in what way? To find out, take the quiz below and if possible ask your partner to as well. On a scale of 1 to 7, to what extent are you: a extremely left wing (1) to extremely right wing (7)? b extremely liberal (1) to extremely conservative (7)? c a worrier
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Science | The Guardian

Stunning gene therapy breakthrough driven by great dedication and graft | Robin McKie T here has been a surprising outbreak of the use of the c-word among medical researchers over the past few days. Normally cautious in their language, they have nevertheless been wielding the term “cure” when discussing the long-term potential of two separate treatments for inherited ailments that were announced last week. Such enthusiasm is striking. In one case, scientists based at St Bartholome
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Science | The Guardian

The NHS desperately needs a new vision for the 21st century | Lord Darzi N ext year the NHS will be 70 years old . For seven decades it has been there for us at times of most basic human need, offering care and compassion. The NHS has been a vital friend to millions: it belongs to the people, and is cherished by the public. I want to see it not just survive but thrive: the NHS deserves a secure future that gives us confidence that it will celebrate its centenary in a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient feces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical textsEarliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed?Researchers have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity liquids. They found that concentration fluctuations are enhanced by thermal convection when the two liquids have a large viscosity difference. Such mixtures are ubiquitously observed in nature, daily life, and manufacturing processes, e.g. mantle convection, syrup, polymer products. These
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanostructures control heat transferFor the first time, scientists have succeeded in precisely controlling temperature-dependent thermal conductivity with the help of polymer materials. These advanced functional materials were initially produced for laboratory experiments. The findings are of great relevance to the development of new concepts of thermal insulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happenCommunity screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch Matthew Perry Surprise These CASH CAB Contestants Cash Cab | Sundays 10p Ben Bailey is very excited to have Matthew Perry of Friends fame in the Cash Cab. Will his trivia skills 'be there' for the contestants? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/cash-cab/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From:
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene in zero G promises success in spaceExperiments testing graphene for two different space-related applications have shown extremely promising results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study prompts new ideas on cancers’ originsCancer therapies often target cells that grow and divide rapidly, such as stem cells, but in studying how stomach cancers occur, researchers found that even when the stomach isn't able to make stem cells, other cells in the stomach can begin to divide and contribute to precancerous lesions.
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Big Think

How the Nazis Hijacked Nietzsche, and How It Can Happen to Anybody If there was one philosopher the Fascists of the mid-20 th century loved, it was Nietzsche. He was so adored by them that Hitler gifted Mussolini the complete works of Nietzsche for his birthday. The Nietzschean ideals of anti-egalitarianism, the Superman, and the will to power inspired them to act, and millions died because of it. They adored his ideas, and anointed him as the prophet of their i
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Big Think

Killing Cancer with Spermbots One of the obvious problems with conventional chemotherapy is that it’s essentially poison formulated to kill cancer cells without killing the patient. While chemo is often the only available treatment option, it’s extremely rough on patients, causing debilitating exhaustion, weakness, and nausea. As a result, it can only be administered in limited doses. In addition, chemo can be diluted by body
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Big Think

Is Living Really Better than Never Being Born at All? Is being born worth it? If you weighed life’s pleasure against the suffering and sorrow, do you end up ahead? Gustave Flaubert claimed that he would have cursed himself if he became a father, as he desired to “transmit to no one the aggravations and the disgrace of existence.” Fyodor Dostoyevsky was even more bleak in The Brothers Karamazov , writing, “I'd have let them kill me in the womb, so
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

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