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Popular Science
Sony 1000Xm2 headphone review: fantastic and a little finicky There are a lot of over-the-ear noise-canceling headphones on the market right now. Seriously, take a walk down the headphone aisle at the local big box electronics store and you’ll find an embarrassment of ear-cradling riches. Sony’s original 1000X headphones were an important addition to the market, taking a lot of what Bose does well and adding a mix that’s more conducive to bass-heavy music.
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Big Think
How the Cute Pikachu Is a Chocolate Milkshake for the Brain Cute things are usually vulnerable, fragile and weak. But cuteness itself is mighty indeed. Morten L Kringelbach and his colleagues at the University of Oxford recently described cuteness as ‘one of the most basic and powerful forces shaping our behaviour’. And yet, despite its elemental importance, cuteness might be a fluid, evolving concept and trait. The word emerged as a shortened form of t
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NYT > Science
My Most Memorable Interview / 2017: Rules for Reporting a Planned Death: No Photos, No Pad, No Pen More recently, I had begun to clip mentions of it from the obituaries. How was this new form of dying changing the rituals around death, I wondered. Think about it: If you knew you were going to die tomorrow at 9 a.m., what would you do tonight? What would your family and friends do? After hearing a dozen more stories like Mr. Gray’s, I realized the country was quietly undergoing a profound cultu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain lesions, criminal behavior linked to moral decision-making networkWhen brain lesions occur within the brain network responsible for morality and value-based decision-making, they can predispose a person toward criminal behavior, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
85 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2017In 2017, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 85 new plant and animal species to the family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 16 flowering plants, one elephant-shrew, 10 sharks, 22 fish, three scorpions, seven ants, 13 nudibranchs, seven spiders, three wa
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BBC News - Science & Environment
New approach promises early warnings of soggy summers Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Forecasters may soon be able to give a longer term warning of wet UK summers Researchers in the UK have developed a method of improving the long range accuracy of summer weather in the UK and Europe. The scientists found a connection between sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic in March and April and the subsequent summer's rain or shine. The r
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The Atlantic
A Glacier Disappears in Alaska For many people around the world, glacial retreat is an abstract concept—one that exists in photographs and in scientists’ bleak forewarnings of the consequences of ice loss . But filmmakers Raphael Rogers and Paul Rennick got to see it all firsthand. Rogers and Rennick were driving through the back roads of Alaska when they saw a sign for Exit Glacier. Inside the park, it was completely deserted
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flower or flesh? Genetics explain mosquito preferenceNew research is helping explain why most mosquitoes in one species choose flowers over blood meals. The discovery could one day lead to efforts to decrease mosquito-borne illness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected side effect to cleaning up urban air discoveredAs levels of atmospheric nitric oxide decline rapidly due to air quality regulations, North American cities may soon experience higher levels of airborne organic hydroperoxides, with unknown implications for air quality and human health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Achieving sustainable resource use attainable through science of cooperationSocieties can achieve environmental sustainability by nurturing cooperation, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding enzyme cascades key to understanding metabolismA spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but understanding what happens to that sugar in the cell is far more complicated than simple digestion, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heat from below Pacific Ocean fuels Yellowstone, study findsRecent stories in the national media are magnifying fears of a catastrophic eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic area, but scientists remain uncertain about the likelihood of such an event. To better understand the region's subsurface geology, geologists have rewound and played back a portion of its geologic history, finding that Yellowstone volcanism is more far more complex and dynamic than prev
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reproducing higher-order embryonic kidney structures using pluripotent stem cellsIn the embryonic kidney, three types of precursor cells interact with each other to form a three-dimensional structure. Previous studies successfully induced nephron structures via nephron progenitors from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) but have not yet reproduced the well-organized structures of the kidney. Now, a research group has developed a method to induce another important pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In the footsteps of Jacques Cousteau: Researchers unveil the secret of the Blue Hole stalactiteIn 1970, Jacques Cousteau and his team recovered an unusual stalactite from the depths of the Caribbean Sea. Now a geoscientist explains what it reveals about our climate since the last ice age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Promising new citrus varieties for greening toleranceGrafted orange trees may give the Florida's citrus growers new reason to hope the industry can cope with the citrus greening crisis, researchers say.
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Big Think
These 5 Psychological Traits Can Help You Live a Longer, Happier Life In the region of Cilento in Southern Italy, villagers in a constellation of nine communities show remarkable longevity, even though the inhabitance are prone to being overweight, drinking wine, and smoking cigarettes. It has to be more than coincidence, researchers at UC San Diego thought, since hundreds of inhabitance see their 90 th birthday and beyond. They recently looked more closely at the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA solves how a jupiter jet stream shifts into reverse Speeding through the atmosphere high above Jupiter's equator is an east-west jet stream that reverses course on a schedule almost as predictable as a Tokyo train's. Now, a NASA-led team has identified which type of wave forces this jet to change direction. Similar equatorial jet streams have been identified on Saturn and on Earth, where a rare disruption of the usual wind pattern compli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plain cigarette packaging may reduce incorrect impression of product's safety An online survey of 900 consumers of three of the United States' most popular cigarette brands suggests that adopting standardized cigarette packing may reduce consumers' misconceptions that some cigarettes are less harmful than others, reports a team of researchers led by University of California San Diego School of Medicine and published in BMJ Tobacco Control . "Some companies have marketed th
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Feed: All Latest
After Atlanta's Airport Blackout, Airline Operations Struggle Back to Life Imagine your family’s annual game of Risk. Put it on an actually global scale. Add in consequences far more dire than hurt feelings if your strategy doesn’t work perfectly. And now you have a taste of what the men and women stationed at Atlanta’s airport have the joy of playing. Today, that game involves figuring out how to reunite thousands of passengers with their luggage and how to get planes,
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A new kind of spiral wave embraces disorder View the video A type of spiraling wave has been busted for disorderly conduct. Spiral waves are waves that ripple outward in a swirl. Now scientists from Germany and the United States have created a new type of spiral wave in the lab. The unusual whorl has a jumbled, disordered center rather than an orderly swirl, making it the first “spiral wave chimera,” the researchers report online December
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Particle size matters for porous building blocksPorous particles of calcium and silicate show potential as building blocks for a host of applications. A laboratory tested calcium-silicate particles to see how they hold up under pressure and found that size influenced the toughness of individual particles but not assemblies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Routines, practice and mental rehearsal mitigate some risks of armed self-defenseU.S. consumers who buy, keep and carry handguns for self-defense assume legal, moral and safety risks that come along with owning and potentially using a handgun to defend themselves or others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Skeletal muscle created from stem cellsScientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step towards developing a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the US and is t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Westminster Abbey windows help shine light on glass mythGazing through the stained-glass windows of London's Westminster Abbey can evoke memories as diverse and vivid as the windows themselves, but to a glass researcher, the windows sparked a quest to better understand the science behind the iconic portals to history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black hole pair born inside a dying star?Researchers are investigating the properties of gravitational waves and binary black holes to see if they formed inside a collapsing star.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Men gave more talks than women at top 50 universities in US Male professors gave more than twice as many talks as female professors in departments at the country's 50 most prestigious universities during the 2013-2014 academic year, according to new research from Rice University, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the City University of New York. "Gender Disparities in Colloquium Speakers at Top Universities" is published by the Proceed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutational signatures may ID pts with Br Ca most likely to benefit from platinum-based chemo Bottom Line: The presence in advanced breast cancer of mutational signatures characteristic of homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) was associated with improved clinical outcomes to treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Clinical Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author: Steven J.M. Jones, PhD, head of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We overstate our negative feelings in surveysWe tend to overstate our negative feelings and symptoms in surveys, shows a new study. This bias wears off over time, but the results point to the possibility that measurements of health and well-being, which are vital in making medical assessments and in guiding health-related research, may be misinterpreted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Quantum material' has shark-like ability to detect small electrical signalsA 'quantum material' that mimics a shark's ability to detect the minute electric fields of small prey has been shown to perform well in ocean-like conditions, with potential applications from defense to marine biology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel mechanism that protects from glioblastoma identifiedResearchers have identified a protein called RanBP6 as a new regulator of EGFR. They show how silencing of RanBP6 promoted glioma growth, by upregulating EGFR expression. Moreover, reconstitution of RanBP6 in a mouse xenograft model leads to reduction in tumor growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Third of people not taking their prescribed diabetes medication due to side effectsDiabetes patients who take the most commonly prescribed diabetes drug, metformin, are the least likely to follow medical advice regarding their medication due its side effects, a new article reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using viruses to fight viruses: New approach eliminates 'dormant' HIV-infected cellsResearchers have discovered that the Maraba virus, or MG1, can target and destroy the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral therapies can't reach. If this technique works in humans, it might possibly contribute to a cure for HIV.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover gut bacteria in bees spread antibiotic-resistant genes to each other Different gut bacteria in honey bees, whether they are helpful or harmful to the host, spread antibiotic-resistant genes to each other. Credit: Christofer Bang It's the kind of thing you might lose sleep over. How will humans survive serious infections in the future if we're running out of tools today to fight them? Antibiotic resistance among disease-causing bacteria is of global concern, as som
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Routines, practice and mental rehearsal mitigate some – but not all – risks of armed self-defense Credit: CC0 Public Domain U.S. consumers who buy, keep and carry handguns for self-defense assume legal, moral and safety risks that come along with owning and potentially using a handgun to defend themselves or others. In a study published today, Oregon State University researchers have identified ways that handgun owners attempt to mitigate those risks, including developing routines with their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flower or flesh? Genetics explain mosquito preference Anopheles gambiae mosquito, feeding on blood. Credit: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Imagine a world in which mosquitoes choose blossoms over blood. Nice, right? There already exists a mosquito species called Wyeomyia smithii in which most of the bugs refuse blood meals in favor of sweet floral nectar. And new research is helping to explain the evolutionary genetics of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's one-child generation not so selfish after all The study shows that "Little Emperors" are more cooperative than their American or Japanese peers. Credit: Yoshihiko Kadoya Every generation has a tendency to despair at the next one's perceived shortcomings, and Chinese society is no different in this regard. The "Little Emperor" generation - those born during China's strict one-child policy, have been judged by many weary elders as spoilt and t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human societies evolve along similar paths Credit: George Hodan/public domain Societies ranging from ancient Rome and the Inca empire to modern Britain and China have evolved along similar paths, a huge new study shows. Despite their many differences, societies tend to become more complex in "highly predictable" ways, researchers said. These processes of development - often happening in societies with no knowledge of each other - include
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particle size matters for porous building blocks Thin (left) and thick films made of porous nanoparticles of calcium and silicate reacted differently under pressure as tested in a Rice University lab. Particles in the thin films moved out of the way for a nanoindenter and allowed the film to stay intact, while thick films cracked. Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University Porous particles of calcium and silicate show potential as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zero gravity plant growth experiments delivered to space station The Dragon resupply ship is pictured just 10 meters away from the space station’s Canadarm2 as it delivers supplies and research experiments on Dec. 17. Credit: NASA The latest resupply mission to the International Space Station delivered hundreds of seeds to the spacefaring research lab Sunday, Dec. 17, to test how plants grow in the stressful environment of zero gravity. This is the fourth plan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover unexpected side effect to cleaning up urban air Credit: CC0 Public Domain An imbalance between the trends in two common air pollutants is unexpectedly triggering the creation of a class of airborne organic compounds not usually found in the atmosphere over urban areas of North America, according to a new study from Caltech. For decades, efforts to reduce air pollution have led to cleaner air in U.S cities like Los Angeles, with subsequent impr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MiNT protein a fresh target to attack disease An illustration outlines the NEET cycle in cells by which iron-sulfur clusters are delivered by MiNT, mitoNEET (mNT) and NAF-1 proteins in the cytosol or the mitochondria (bottom) to an array of cellular metabolic processes, including the synthesis of ATP. Credit: Patricia Jennings/University of California at San Diego A two-faced protein in a chain that regulates iron and other elements in cells
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designer nanoparticles destroy a broad array of virusesResearchers have designed new anti-viral nanoparticles that bind to a range of viruses. Unlike other broad-spectrum antivirals, the new nanoparticles destroy viruses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient fossil microorganisms indicate that life in the universe is commonA new analysis of the oldest known fossil microorganisms provides strong evidence to support an increasingly widespread understanding that life in the universe is common.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine turtles dying after becoming entangled in plastic rubbishHundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans and on beaches, including plastic 'six pack' holders and discarded fishing gear.
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New Scientist - News
Space-time and gravity might be born from the quantum world Did space-time emerge from quantum effects? Getty By Anil Ananthaswamy We first discovered the laws of gravity, and then those of quantum mechanics. But new work suggests nature might go about it the other way around: space-time, and hence gravity, could emerge from a fundamental quantum mechanical description of the universe. According to Einstein’s general relativity, gravity is the curvatu
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New Scientist - News
Will supersonic air travel’s return be another white elephant? The next generation REUTERS/Boom Supersonic By Paul Marks In December 1967, on an airfield in Toulouse, France, a hangar door swung ceremoniously upward to reveal a wonder of the age: the prototype of Concorde. An Anglo-French creation, this gorgeous, delta-winged, dart of an aircraft was capable of flying at twice the speed of sound. Its revolutionary aluminium alloy skin could expand by a t
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The history of human emotions | Tiffany Watt SmithThe words we use to describe our emotions affect how we feel, says historian Tiffany Watt Smith, and they've often changed (sometimes very dramatically) in response to new cultural expectations and ideas. Take nostalgia, for instance: first defined in 1688 as an illness and considered deadly, today it's seen as a much less serious affliction. In this fascinating talk about the history of emotions,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flower or flesh? Genetics explain mosquito preference COLUMBUS, Ohio - Imagine a world in which mosquitoes choose blossoms over blood. Nice, right? There already exists a mosquito species called Wyeomyia smithii in which most of the bugs refuse blood meals in favor of sweet floral nectar. And new research is helping to explain the evolutionary genetics of the switch from blood sucker to flower fanatic. The species, which lives in bogs and is present
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain lesions and criminal behavior linked to moral decision-making network When brain lesions occur within the brain network responsible for morality and value-based decision-making, they can predispose a person toward criminal behavior, according to new research by Ryan Darby, MD, assistant professor of Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , is the first systemic mapping of bra
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Popular Science
Yes, monkeys are having sex with deer. Why would they do that? Most humans don’t expect all sex to be procreative. There are so, so many ways in which consenting adults can conspire to get freaky without making babies. We’re not the only species that enjoys sex as more than a means to an evolutionary end. Bonobos practically build their (peaceful and matriarchal) society on the exchange of sexual favors. There are gay creatures all over the animal kingdom. S
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Inside Science
History's Greatest El Niño May Have Caused Severe 19th Century Famine History's Greatest El Niño May Have Caused Severe 19th Century Famine An exceptionally strong El Niño may have caused 1876-1878 famine that killed tens of millions. Soil-after-drought.jpg Image credits: CSIRO Rights information: CC BY 3.0 Earth Monday, December 18, 2017 - 15:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- What may be the greatest El Niño ever identified may have caused record
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient fossil microorganisms indicate that life in the universe is common IMAGE: This is a 3.465 billion year-old fossil microorganism from Western Australia. view more Credit: J. William Schopf/UCLA Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life A new analysis of the oldest known fossil microorganisms provides strong evidence to support an increasingly widespread understanding that life in the universe is common. The microorganisms, from Western Austra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designer nanoparticles destroy a broad array of viruses IMAGE: A molecular dynamics model showing a nanoparticle binding to the outer envelope of the human papillomavirus. view more Credit: Petr Kral Viral infections kill millions of people worldwide every year, but currently available antiviral drugs are limited in that they mostly act against one or a small handful of related viruses. A few broad-spectrum drugs that prevent viral entry into heal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Routines, practice and mental rehearsal mitigate some risks of armed self-defense CORVALLIS, Ore. - U.S. consumers who buy, keep and carry handguns for self-defense assume legal, moral and safety risks that come along with owning and potentially using a handgun to defend themselves or others. In a study published today, Oregon State University researchers have identified ways that handgun owners attempt to mitigate those risks, including developing routines with their firearms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MiNT protein a fresh target to attack disease IMAGE: An illustration outlines the NEET cycle in cells by which iron-sulfur clusters are delivered by MiNT, mitoNEET (mNT) and NAF-1 proteins in the cytosol or the mitochondria (bottom) to an... view more Credit: Illustration by Patricia Jennings/University of California at San Diego HOUSTON - (Dec. 18, 2017) - A two-faced protein in a chain that regulates iron and other elements in cells co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oldest fossils ever found show life on Earth began before 3.5 billion years agoResearchers at UCLA and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that microscopic fossils discovered in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old piece of rock in Western Australia are the oldest fossils ever found and indeed the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Direct amygdala stimulation can enhance human memory for a dayThe findings are the first example of electrical brain stimulation in humans giving an event-specific boost to memory lasting until the next day, the scientists say.
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The Atlantic
The Year in Brexit, as Seen Through British Tabloids If Britain’s biggest right-wing tabloids spent the first half of 2016 pushing hard for the idea of Brexit, 2017 was the first full year they had to cover the reality of it. It was a period that kicked off negotiations between the U.K. and the EU over the terms of their divorce, and one that included a surprise snap election in which Prime Minister Theresa May lost her majority in parliament after
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mercury from Industrialized Nations Is Polluting the Arctic The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Scientists have long understood that the Arctic is affected by mercury pollution, but know less about how it happens. Remote, cold and seemingly pristine, why is such an idyllic landscape so contaminated with this highly toxic metal? I recently returned from a two-y
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Juggling bills may be key at-risk indicator for food insecurityPawning family valuables or paying one bill while letting another bill slide may be warning signs that someone is at risk for being food insecure. A new study uses data collected from people who visit food pantries to show that these financial coping strategies can help identify people who are very food insecure or at risk for becoming food insecure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From the omelette to the egg: Reversing protein aggregationsA new study suggests a novel form of protein aggregation that is both reversible and has positive physiological consequences for cells. The discovery may eventually lead to new therapies for neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and 'mad cow' diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Particle size matters for porous building blocks IMAGE: Thin (left) and thick films made of porous nanoparticles of calcium and silicate reacted differently under pressure as tested in a Rice University lab. Particles in the thin films moved... view more Credit: Multiscale Materials Laboratory/Rice University HOUSTON -- (Dec. 18, 2017) -- Porous particles of calcium and silicate show potential as building blocks for a host of applic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists Discover unexpected side effect to cleaning up urban air An imbalance between the trends in two common air pollutants is unexpectedly triggering the creation of a class of airborne organic compounds not usually found in the atmosphere over urban areas of North America, according to a new study from Caltech. For decades, efforts to reduce air pollution have led to cleaner air in U.S cities like Los Angeles, with subsequent improvements in public healt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human societies evolve along similar paths Societies ranging from ancient Rome and the Inca empire to modern Britain and China have evolved along similar paths, a huge new study shows. Despite their many differences, societies tend to become more complex in "highly predictable" ways, researchers said. These processes of development - often happening in societies with no knowledge of each other - include the emergence of writing systems an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
We overstate our negative feelings in surveys, new research shows We tend to overstate our negative feelings and symptoms in surveys, shows a new study by a team of psychology researchers. This bias wears off over time, but the results point to the possibility that measurements of health and well-being, which are vital in making medical assessments and in guiding health-related research, may be misinterpreted. "Understanding the magnitude of this bias is essent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Minorities don't receive same health benefits of college completion as white peers A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds that black and Hispanic young adults from disadvantaged childhoods do not enjoy the same health-promoting benefits of college completion as their upwardly mobile white peers. The paper is the first to document improved mental health but worse physical health risk associated with college completion among disadvantaged minority
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oldest fossils ever found show life on Earth began before 3.5 billion years ago IMAGE: This sample of rock was taken from the Apex Chert, a rock formation in western Australia that is among the oldest and best-preserved rock deposits in the world, in 1982... view more Credit: Courtesy of John Valley, UW-Madison MADISON, Wis. -- Researchers at UCLA and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that microscopic fossils discovered in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can brain lesions contribute to criminal behavior? IMAGE: This is Michael Fox, MD, PhD, Associate Director of the Deep Brain Stimulation Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. view more Credit: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BOSTON - New research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that lesions to brain areas in individuals ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Direct amygdala stimulation can enhance human memory IMAGE: Illustration of the basolateral amygdala (blue), hippocampus (yellow), and perirhinal cortex (pink) and electrical signals from each region during a recognition test trial. 3-D brain model adapted with permission from... view more Credit: Cory Inman, Emory University Direct electrical stimulation of the human amygdala, a region of the brain known to regulate memory and emotional behaviors,
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Science : NPR
Could A Zap To The Brain Derail Destructive Impulses? Marco Jeurissen/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images Marco Jeurissen/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images Picture this: While reaching for the cookie jar — or cigarette or bottle of booze or other temptation — a sudden slap denies your outstretched hand. When the urge returns, out comes another slap. Now imagine those "slaps" occurring inside the brain, protecting you in moments of weakness. In a report
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut bacteria in bees spread antibiotic-resistant genes to each otherResearchers have discovered that antibiotic-resistant genes are spread in honey bee gut bacteria so that all strains of bacteria survive, rather than just one gut bacterium acquiring resistance and outcompeting others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sugar-coated worldGlycans are essential to virtually every biological process in the body. These complex structures -- composed of interlocking sugar molecules -- adorn the surfaces of cells in fuzzy profusion. Now, researchers are probing the deeper mysteries of glycan structure and function. To do this, they have assembled a library of the enzymes necessary to create, modify and degrade glycans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping the global impact of shrinking glaciers on river invertebratesRiver invertebrates react the same way to decreasing glacier cover wherever in the world they are, say scientists who have evaluated more than one million of them in diverse regions with shrinking glaciers, to determine the impact of global environmental change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thermally activated delayed photoluminescence from semiconductor nanocrystalsResearchers have found that the transfer of triplet excitons from nanomaterials to molecules also creates a feedback mechanism that returns some energy to the nanocrystal, causing it to photoluminesce on long time scales. The mechanism can be adjusted to control the amount of energy transfer, which could be useful in optoelectronic applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Illuminated: The mechanism behind shear thinning in supercooled liquidsResearchers have simulated supercooled liquids subjected to Couette shear flow. The rapid drop in viscosity under shear was related to the liquids' two-body structural entropy. The study showed that the structural anisotropy along the extensional direction of the shear flow, measured using the two-body entropy, could fully describe sheared dynamics and shear thinning. These results may uncover the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers repurpose immune-activating cytokine to fight breast cancerThe most lethal form of breast cancer could have a new treatment option, according to new research. Researchers showed triple-negative breast cancer cells are highly vulnerable to interferon-? -- a potent antimicrobial that also activates the immune system. The new study shows interferon-? impairs breast cancer cells' ability to migrate and form tumors. The study also suggests interferon-? treatme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shedding light on a shadowy organizational hub in cellsResearchers have shed light on the role that a large, enigmatic protein plays in assembling microtubules, paving the way for better cancer treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How electroconvulsive therapy relieves depression per animal experimentsIn a study using genetically engineered mice, researchers have uncovered some new molecular details that appear to explain how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) rapidly relieves severe depression in mammals, presumably including people. The molecular changes allow more communication between neurons in a specific part of the brain also known to respond to antidepressant drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approachRecognizing that many large dams are here to stay, a team is investigating an emerging solution to help achieve freshwater conservation goals by re-envisioning the ways in which water is released by dams.
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The Atlantic
Women Are Invited to Give Fewer Talks Than Men at Top U.S. Universities Updated on December 18 at 3:51 p.m. ET A few years ago, Michelle Hebl attended the latest in a series of talks hosted by her department at Rice Univeristy. The speaker was a man, and Hebl realized that she hadn’t heard any female speakers in that series for a while. “Maybe I’m just not thinking about them,” she thought. “Or maybe it’s something we should look at.” * Colloquium talks, where academ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Quantum material' has shark-like ability to detect small electrical signals IMAGE: From left, Purdue University doctoral student Derek Schwanz, professor Shriram Ramanathan and postdoctoral research associate Zhen Zhang, have led work to develop a sensor that mimics a shark's "sixth sense. "... view more Credit: (Purdue University image/Marshall Farthing) WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A "quantum material" that mimics a shark's ability to detect the minute electric fields of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For stroke patients, rating scales predict discharge destination December 18, 2017 - Stroke survivors with higher scores on widely used outcome measures are more likely to be discharged home from the hospital, while those with lower scores are more likely to go to a rehabilitation or nursing care facility, reports a paper in the January issue of The Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy (JNPT) . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . Standardized rati
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Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: Did You Catch the 'Rogue One' Easter Egg in 'The Last Jedi'? Yes, Star Wars: The Last Jedi is in theaters and that’s all you really need to know. Well, that and the fact that it made a lot of money and has been surprisingly divisive amongst fans. (Maybe.) Now you're all caught up. Let’s just get on with things, shall we? Everyone Loves The Last Jedi , Part 1 The Source: The cinemas around the world Probability of Accuracy: Entirely on point. The Real Deal:
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Popular Science
Gear to make your kitchen more like a laboratory Normal kitchen gadgets are fine and all, but you know that cooking—like baking—is a science. Treat it that way. These scientific doodads will elevate your kitchen game with precision measurement and a general air of nerdiness. Give them as gifts to your friends who already spend all their time in the lab, or to your relative who longs for a more accurate way to serve food and drink. Or just buy t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
China's one-child generation not so selfish after allEvery generation tends to despair at the next one's perceived shortcomings, and Chinese society is no different. The 'Little Emperor' generation -- those born during China's strict one-child policy, have been judged by many weary elders as spoilt due to the overwhelming attention bestowed on them by doting families. But new research suggests that -- in the workplace at least -- the one-child gener
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Born under an inauspicious moon, baby fish delay settlement on coral reefsParents' choices about when to breed have lifelong consequences for offspring. For the sixbar wrasse, the flexibility of babies to delay their critical swim towards adulthood frees adults to spawn more often, ecologists report. A delay of a few days could have life long consequences. In a species that can choose its sex, consequences could include which fish grows large enough to compete as a male
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thinking about germs makes people concerned about how they look, study findsPeople who worry a lot about germs appear also to be especially concerned about their physical appearance, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Junk food, energy drinks may pose unique risks for teens, new data showsThe popularity of energy drinks and junk food might have unique risks for teenagers who consume too much of them during the later stages of brain development. These are just two of the factors potentially affecting teen brain development examined in a new special issue of Birth Defects Research: The Teenage Brain, published by the Teratology Society with John Wiley & Sons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoscale super-resonator extends light lifetime Scientists designed the first subwavelength dielectric resonators for light trapping at the nanoscale that appears to be the simple silicon cylinder hundred times thinner than a human hair. Such a structure is capable to trap light ten times longer than any conventional resonator. Along with a simple shape and small size, it makes this new resonator a promising basis for a design of powerful nano
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Science | The Guardian
Hundreds of items from Georgian coffeehouse unearthed in Cambridge Clapham’s Coffeehouse closed down 250 years ago, no doubt to the anguish of its Cambridge regulars who met there to swop news and gossip, as well as drink cups of coffee and delicate china bowls of tea. Against the traditional image of a Georgian coffeehouse, they also drank ale and wine and consumed hearty meals, or revived their drooping spirits with nourishing glasses of calf’s foot jelly. The
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The Atlantic
It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas With only a week left until Christmas, lighted displays, colorful markets, and Santa's helpers are out in force. From Europe to the Americas and Asia, gathered here as an early gift to you is a collection of holiday cheer and light wrapped up in 35 photographs.
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Live Science
The Demon Attacks at Night: Explaining the Incubus Phenomenon If you've ever woken up in the middle of the night feeling as though you're being crushed by a demonic being, you may have just experienced what's called the incubus phenomenon: an "attack" by a male demon. (Its female counterpart, the succubus, usually attacks men.) The phenomenon is, in many ways, the quintessential nightmare. For centuries, the incubus demon has been said to haunt sleepe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Star mergers: A new test of gravity, dark energy theoriesObservations and measurements of a neutron star merger have largely ruled out some theories relating to gravity and dark energy, and challenged a large class of theories.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warmer, wetter climate could mean stronger, more intense stormsHow would today's weather patterns look in a warmer, wetter atmosphere -- an expected shift portended by climate change? Researchers offer new insight into this question -- specifically, how thunderstorms would be different in a warmer world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Theorists propose conditions needed to search for new form of matterA pair of physicists provides a theoretical roadmap that could point to the discovery of an exotic magnetically ordered state of matter dubbed a 'chiral spin liquid.'
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Ofcom to investigate BBC climate change interview Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Interviews with former Chancellor Lord Lawson sparked complaints in 2014 and 2017 Media watchdog Ofcom has launched its first broadcasting standards investigation into the BBC since taking over as its regulator in April. Ofcom will look into why Radio 4's Today programme broke BBC rules twice in two interviews with climate change sceptic Lord Lawson. The
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Science : NPR
Food And Drug Administration Plans Crackdown On Risky Homeopathic Remedies The Food and Drug Administration plans to take action against risky homeopathic remedies under a policy unveiled Monday. Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images The Food and Drug Administration plans to take action against risky homeopathic remedies under a policy unveiled Monday. Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images The Food and Drug
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
China's one-child generation not so selfish after all IMAGE: The study shows that "Little Emperors " are more cooperative than their American or Japanese peers. view more Credit: Yoshihiko Kadoya Every generation has a tendency to despair at the next one's perceived shortcomings, and Chinese society is no different in this regard. The "Little Emperor" generation - those born during China's strict one-child policy, have been judged by man
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover gut bacteria in bees spread antibiotic-resistant genes to each other It's the kind of thing you might lose sleep over. How will humans survive serious infections in the future if we're running out of tools today to fight them? Antibiotic resistance among disease-causing bacteria is of global concern, as some last-resort drugs can no longer cure common illnesses such as urinary tract infections. To make matters worse, researchers from Arizona State University and N
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regulating toxic chemicals for public and environmental health: A PLOS Biology collection Over the past several decades thousands of new chemicals have been approved for commerce, even as evidence of their ability to cause serious harm has emerged. A new collection "Challenges in Environmental Health: Closing the Gap between Evidence and Regulations" publishing 18-21 December in the open access journal PLOS Biology examines the divide between evidence and policy. The Collection was ov
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computing the way to the center of the EarthScientists have been studying high-pressure and- temperature material interactions deep below the surface of the Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The shrinking moose of Isle RoyaleClimate change and predator-prey dynamics with wolves make for smaller moose. Ecologists compare skull measurements spanning four decades gathered at Isle Royale National Park. For the booming moose population of Isle Royale, a key species in the world's longest running predator-prey study on the island, skulls have shrunk by about 16 percent over a 40-year period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotubes go with the flow to penetrate brain tissueCarbon nanotube electrodes are flexible like wet noodles, but researchers have developed a method to implant them in brain tissue. Implanted wires could help patients with neurological diseases and help scientists explore cognitive processes and develop implants to help people to see, to hear and to control artificial limbs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reducing how much nitrogen enters a lake has little impact on algal bloomsLakes suffering from harmful algal blooms may not respond to reduced, or even discontinued, artificial nitrogen loading. Many blue-green algae responsible for algal blooms can fix atmospheric nitrogen dissolved in the water, and therefore water stewards should focus their efforts on removing phosphorus from lakes to combat algal blooms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens who help strangers have more confidenceA new study found that adolescents who exhibited prosocial behavior toward strangers had higher self-esteem a year later. The same was not true for prosocial behavior solely to friends and family.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What factors affect quality of life in older patients with cancer?A new study provides insights on the factors that affect health-related quality of life in older adults with cancer. The findings support the importance of addressing persistent symptoms, managing comorbidities, promoting leisure-time physical activity, and addressing financial challenges.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough sensor for photography, life sciences, securityEngineers have produced a new imaging technology that may revolutionize medical and life sciences research, security, photography, cinematography and other applications that rely on high-quality, low-light imaging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking effects of a food preservative on the gut microbiomeAntimicrobial compounds added to preserve food during storage are believed to be benign and non-toxic to the consumer, but there is 'a critical scientific gap in understanding the potential interactions' they may have with the hundreds of species of microbes in our intestines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Abuse and adversity in childhood linked to more cardiovascular risk in adulthoodChildren and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. Unhealthy responses to stress (such as overeating), mental health problems and disruptions in basic biologic processes may underlie the increased risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are parents doing enough to prepare 'substitute' babysitters over the holidays?Parents may underestimate the importance of preparing new sitters for common scenarios like injuries or more serious emergencies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Quantum material' has shark-like ability to detect small electrical signals The sensor is made from a “quantum material” that, surprisingly, functions well in the cold, ambient temperatures typical of seawater . Credit: Purdue University image/Marshall Farthing A "quantum material" that mimics a shark's ability to detect the minute electric fields of small prey has been shown to perform well in ocean-like conditions, with potential applications from defense to marine bio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Achieving sustainable resource use attainable through science of cooperation IMAGE: Cooperation matters in managing the environment. view more Credit: Photo by Matteo Vistocco on Unsplash A new theory explains how societies can achieve environmental sustainability by nurturing cooperation. It is detailed in a series of articles recently published in a special issue of the journal Sustainability Science . The theory was developed by Tim Waring, associate professor in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA researchers create skeletal muscle from stem cells UCLA scientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step towards developing a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the U.S.
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Science : NPR
Kids Start To Test Surprising Claims By Early Elementary School As many families prepare for a visit from Santa, some are facing questions about the jolly old man in the red suit. The fact that children will (sometimes) accept counterintuitive claims, like the existence of Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy, has led some theorists to marvel at their willingness to take others at their word. "Child brains are gullible," writes Richard Dawkins, "open to almost any
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Orbital mayhem around a red dwarfIn the collective imagination, planets of a solar system all circle around their star, in the equatorial plane of the star. The star also spins, and its spin axis is aligned with the spin axes of the planetary orbits, giving the impression of a well-ordered system. But nature is capricious, as astronomers just found out: they detected a planetary system turned upside down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viruses can transfer genes across the superkingdoms of lifeA new finds that viruses can transfer genes to organisms that they aren't known to infect, suggesting they can influence and interact with a much wider range of organisms than previously thought. The researchers also found that viruses and cellular organisms share a large group of genes that help cells to function, suggesting that viruses may have an ancient cell-like origin.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Interstellar object may hold 'alien' water Image copyright ESO/M. KORNMESSER Image caption Artwork: Observations of 'Oumuamua noted its unusual elongated shape The first known interstellar asteroid may hold water from another star system in its interior, according to a study. Discovered on 19 October, the object's speed and trajectory strongly suggested it originated beyond our Solar System. The body showed no signs of "outgassing" as it
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher uses Westminster Abbey windows to shine light on glass myth Penn State researcher John Mauro snapped this photo of Sainte-Chapelle while vacationing in France. Mauro's recent research shed light on the glass transformation of medieval windows. Credit: John Mauro, Penn State Gazing through the stained-glass windows of London's Westminster Abbey can evoke memories as diverse and vivid as the windows themselves, but to John Mauro, Penn State glass researcher
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Viden
Google lægger stort opsat projekt i graven Teknologigiganterne Facebook, Apple, Google og Microsoft kæmper for at give os nye oplevelser, og for samtidig at blive dem, der opfinder the next big thing . Det er en del af deres natur og derudover godt for både firmaernes brand og bundlinje, når det lykkes. I 2014 blev Tango-projektet lanceret som Googles forsøg på at give os fremtiden i dag. Det lovede, at man på sin tablet eller smartphone
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Restoring aging genes in rats IMAGE: Representative photomicrographs from (A) young control, (B) aged control, (C) aged short-term FKBP1b and (D) aged long-term FKBP1b. Note the substantial increase in FKBP1b expression at both the mRNA and... view more Credit: Gant et al., JNeurosci (2017) Overexpression of a protein that regulates calcium homeostasis in hippocampal neurons can safely and effectively reverse and prevent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altered brain development, cognitive abilities in premies IMAGE: Very preterm born neonates can be exposed to hundreds of skin breaking procedures during the first weeks of life in the neonatal intensive care unit. Thalamic growth, obtained from volumetric... view more Credit: Steven Miller & Emma Duerden Premature babies undergoing hundreds of life-saving procedures exhibit abnormal development of the thalamus and cognitive and motor impairments in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How teens learn about others IMAGE: A. Before each run participants were introduced to the person whose preferences they would subsequently rate. Adults and adolescents rated preferences of persons from their own peer group on a 10-point... view more Credit: Rosenblau, Korn & Pelphrey, JNeurosci (2017) Despite their intense interest in other people, adolescents are slower to learn about the preferences of their peers th
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why Cognitive Manufacturing Matters in ElectronicsCognitive computing is transforming manufacturing, integrating systems for optimal output and interpreting data for greater value
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Live Science
Are Santa's Reindeer Males? Impossible, scientists say. Here's why: Here on the ground, male reindeer shed their antlers at the end of the mating season in early December, while females sport their thinner antlers throughout the winter. [ Album: Animals' Dazzling Headgear ] Sounds like Rudolph and the gang were all gals. "It appears that way," said physiologist Perry Barboza of the Institute of Arctic Biol
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NYT > Science
The Amargosa River Defies the Desert Climate change plays a role, as well. The average temperature in the Mojave has increased some 3 degrees in recent years, and warming of another degree or so could prevent the Devil’s Hole pupfish, which already has poor reproductive capabilities, from propagating at all. The geology of the aquifer that supports these oases is complex and poorly understood. An 8.1 earthquake 1,500 miles away in M
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression?A new study has examined whether cognitive bias modification (CBM) for facial interpretation, a digital health intervention that changes our perception for emotional expressions from negative to positive, might be useful in treating depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The incredible journey of the first African tortoise that arrived in EuropeAbout 95 million years ago, a river turtle adapted to marine environments and made an extraordinary migration from the ancient continent of Gondwana, which grouped what is now Africa and South America, to Laurasia, the Northern continental mass of which Europe, Asia and North America were part. Its remains, found in the town of Algora in Guadalajara (Spain) and in Portugal, are the evidence of the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making larvae count: Genetic barcodes are used to quantify crucial populations in a coral reef ecosystemGenetic barcodes are being used to quantify crucial populations in a coral reef ecosystem, explains a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach for detecting planets in the Alpha Centauri systemAstronomers have taken a fresh look at the nearby Alpha Centauri star system and found new ways to narrow the search for habitable planets there. According to a study, there may be small, Earth-like planets in Alpha Centauri that have been overlooked. Meanwhile, the study ruled out the existence of a number of larger planets in the system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early diagnosis can save babies' lives: A guide to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID)A new article is aimed at pediatricians, family physicians and other doctors who may treat newborns, including those who appear healthy at birth but begin to get severe, repeated infections requiring emergency department visits.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Visual inspection for improved quality in manufacturingIdentify and manage product defects via cognitive visual inspection to reduce manufacturing labor costs, and improve process throughput and product quality.
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Live Science
The Strangest Things That Were 3D-Printed in 2017 A 4-month-old Staffordshire bull terrier puppy became the first patient to use a new 3D-printed mask to help with recovery from serious facial injuries. The puppy's right cheekbone and jawbone, as well as her temporomandibular joint (the joint that connects the jawbone to the skull), were fractured when another dog attacked her. The puppy, named Loca, was lucky it arrived at the University of Cal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher uses Westminster Abbey windows to shine light on glass myth IMAGE: Penn State researcher John Mauro snapped this photo of Sainte-Chapelle while vacationing in France. Mauro's recent research shed light on the glass transformation of medieval windows. view more Credit: John Mauro, Penn State Gazing through the stained-glass windows of London's Westminster Abbey can evoke memories as diverse and vivid as the windows themselves, but to John Mauro, Penn S
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Live Science
Woman Develops Rare Cesarean Scar Condition, 5 Times In a rare occurrence, a pregnant woman's gestational sac — the small vessel that holds the developing embryo — attached not to the lining of her womb but instead to a scar left over from a previous C-section. And it happened five times in a row, according to a recent report of the woman's case. So-called cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are not only rare — occurring in approximately 1 in 1,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds learn from each other's 'disgust,' enabling insects to evolve bright colorsA new study of TV-watching great tits reveals how they learn through observation. Social interactions within a predator species can have 'evolutionary consequences' for potential prey, such as the conspicuous warning colors of insects like ladybirds.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Genius of Things SummitDrive deeper customer relationships, operational excellence and digital transformation with Watson IoT and AI.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warmer, wetter climate could mean stronger, more intense storms Average composite reflectivity over the CONUS (contiguous US) domain in all 13 years of the simulations are shown by season (May-June and July-August) and by simulation type (control and psuedo global warming). Credit: Kristen Rasmussen/NCAR How would today's weather patterns look in a warmer, wetter atmosphere—an expected shift portended by climate change? Colorado State University researcher Kr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
85 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2017 Lavoisiera canastrensis , a new princess flower from Brazil. Credit: Frank Almeda © 1998 California Academy of Sciences In 2017, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 85 new plant and animal species to the family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 16 flowe
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Futurity.org
How to detect Russian bots on Twitter Through an examination of bot activity related to Russian political discussions, researchers have isolated the characteristics of Russian bots operating on Twitter. Their findings provide new insights into how Russian accounts influence online exchanges using bots, which are automated social media accounts, and trolls, which aim to provoke or disrupt. “Russia has been at the forefront of trying t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Star mergers: A new test of gravity, dark energy theories Artist's illustration of two merging neutron stars. The rippling space-time grid represents gravitational waves that travel out from the collision, while the narrow beams show the bursts of gamma rays that are shot out just seconds after the gravitational waves. Swirling clouds of material ejected from the merging stars are also depicted. The clouds glow with visible and other wavelengths of ligh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Born under an inauspicious moon, baby fish delay settlement on coral reefs Author Suzanne Alonzo observes spawning sixbar wrasse (Thalassoma hardwicke) off Moorea Island in French Polynesia (17°30? S, 149°50? W), 17 kilometers (11 miles) northwest of Tahiti. Credit: Jeffrey Shima Parents' choices about when to breed have lifelong consequences for offspring. For the sixbar wrasse, the flexibility of babies to delay their critical swim towards adulthood frees adults to sp
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New on MIT Technology Review
Explore a Model FactoryTo help you better understand the potential of Industry 4.0, we decided to bring our model factory to you.
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The Atlantic
4 Women Economists Reflect on What It’s Meant to Have a Woman Leader at the Fed When Janet Yellen leaves her role as the chair of the Fed at the end of her term in February, she will have a pretty impressive record to tout. She has led the Fed during one of the longest market rallies in modern history and presided over one of the biggest declines in unemployment and most significant periods of job creation ever . Despite these successes, critics had hoped that Yellen, who in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA follows a fading Kai-Tak into the South China SeaTwo NASA satellites provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Kai-Tak when it was moving through the central Philippines and fizzling just west of Palawan in the South China Sea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warmer, wetter climate could mean stronger, more intense storms IMAGE: Average composite reflectivity over the CONUS (contiguous US) domain in all 13 years of the simulations are shown by season (May-June and July-August) and by simulation type (control and psuedo... view more Credit: Kristen Rasmussen/NCAR How would today's weather patterns look in a warmer, wetter atmosphere - an expected shift portended by climate change? Colorado State University re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
85 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2017 IMAGE: This is Lavoisiera canastrensis , a new princess flower from Brazil. view more Credit: (Frank Almeda © 1998 California Academy of Sciences) SAN FRANCISCO (December 18, 2017) - In 2017, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 85 new plant and animal species to the family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our abil
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Big Think
God's Answer to Nietzsche, the Philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard. Existentialism remains one of the more popular philosophies for the layperson to read about, consider, and study. The questions that it asks and the problems it confronts, ones of free will, anxiety, and finding meaning in life; are ones we all face in our daily lives. While the solutions it offers may not work for everyone, existentialism can have a particularly large blind spot when it tries to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alien object 'Oumuama was a natural body visiting from another solar systemScientists have investigated a mysterious object that passed close to Earth after arriving from deep interstellar space.
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Live Science
A Tiny, 'Extinct' Marsupial Re-Emerges in the Australian Desert A species of tiny, adorable marsupial that scientists thought had been locally extinct for more than 100 years has re-emerged in New South Wales, Australia. The crest-tailed mulgara ( Dasycercus cristicauda ), which weighs just 5 ounces (150 grams), was once a common small carnivore in desert inland regions of the continent, according to a statement from the University of New South Wales (U
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The Scientist RSS
Top 10 Retractions of 2017Making the list: a journal breaks a retraction record, Nobel laureates Do the Right Thing, and Seinfeld characters write a paper
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Born under an inauspicious moon, baby fish delay settlement on coral reefs IMAGE: Author Suzanne Alonzo observes spawning sixbar wrasse (Thalassoma hardwicke) off Moorea Island in French Polynesia (17°30? S, 149°50? W), 17 kilometers (11 miles) northwest of Tahiti. view more Credit: Jeffrey Shima Parents' choices about when to breed have lifelong consequences for offspring. For the sixbar wrasse, the flexibility of babies to delay their critical swim towards adultho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star mergers: A new test of gravity, dark energy theories IMAGE: Artist's illustration of two merging neutron stars. The rippling space-time grid represents gravitational waves that travel out from the collision, while the narrow beams show the bursts of gamma rays... view more Credit: NSF/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet When scientists recorded a rippling in space-time, followed within two seconds by an associated burst of light obse
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is Chinese massage an effective and cost-effective treatment for chronic neck pain? IMAGE: JACM provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals, delivery organization leaders, and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies into patient care protocols and research strategies. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 18, 2017-- A new study evaluating a form of Chinese ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA follows a fading Kai-Tak into the South China Sea IMAGE: On Dec. 16 at 12 a.m. EST (0500 UTC) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving through the central Philippines. view more Credit: Credits: NASA/NOAA Two NASA satellites provided a look at Tropical Cyclone Kai-Tak when it was moving through the central Philippines and fizzling just west of Palawan in the South China Sea. On Dec. 16 at 12 a.m. EST
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiosurgery or whole-brain radiation in patients with multiple brain metastases? IMAGE: Tyler Robin, MD, PhD, and colleagues show that radiosurgery may be the appropriate treatment choice to treat brain metastases in a subset of patients with advanced lung cancer, even when... view more Credit: University of Colorado Cancer Center Although targeted therapies have produced dramatic advances in our ability to control some types of advanced lung cancer, growth of the disease
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Juggling bills may be key at-risk indicator for food insecurity Pawning family valuables or paying one bill while letting another bill slide may be warning signs that someone is at risk for being food insecure. A new University of Illinois study uses data collected from people who visit food pantries to show that these financial coping strategies can help identify people who are very food insecure or at risk for becoming food insecure. "It's not just about in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing how much nitrogen enters a lake has little impact on algal blooms Drone shot of Lake 227 at IISD Experimental Lakes Area where the experiment on eutrophication has been taking place since 1969. Credit: IISD Experimental Lakes Area Lakes suffering from harmful algal blooms may not respond to reduced, or even discontinued, artificial nitrogen loading. Many blue-green algae responsible for algal blooms can fix atmospheric nitrogen dissolved in the water, and there
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Negative portrayals of shooting victims lead to victim blaming Negative portrayal of a shooting victim can lead people to blame the victim for his own death and to sympathize with the shooter, says a new study by researchers at Duke University and Simmons College. After reading a negative biographical sketch about the victim of a fatal shooting , study participants favored lighter sentences for the shooter, said study co-author Sarah Gaither, an assistant pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From the omelette to the egg: Reversing protein aggregations Credit: CC0 Public Domain To cook an omelette, you have to scramble an egg, and like Humpty Dumpty it can never be put back together again. This is because the egg undergoes a set of physiological and chemical changes as it cooks, which cause its chemical bonds to break and its proteins to aggregate, restructuring and setting into a new, final—and irreversible—shape. However, a new Tel Aviv Unive
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Feast on these mathematical snacks In my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following three questions: 1) In the image of an equilateral triangle above, what fraction of the whole triangle is the red triangle? Solution: 1/4 You could have shown this in one of at least three ways, illustrated below: by dividing the entire triangle into 8 identical small triangles, and deducing that the red triangle comprises two of them; by co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinking about germs makes people concerned about how they look Simply thinking about potential infection seems to increase people's concerns about their own physical appearance, especially if they are chronic germ worriers, according to new research in Psychological Science . The findings suggest that the possibility of contagion activates the so-called "behavioral immune system," leading individuals to focus not only on their vulnerability to disease but al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Juggling bills may be key at-risk indicator for food insecurityPawning family valuables or paying one bill while letting another bill slide may be warning signs that someone is at risk for being food insecure. A new University of Illinois study uses data collected from people who visit food pantries to show that these financial coping strategies can help identify people who are very food insecure or at risk for becoming food insecure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Teens who help strangers have more confidence IMAGE: Parents should look for ways to help their kids help others this holiday season and throughout the year, says BYU School of Family Life professor Laura Padilla-Walker. Her new research... view more Credit: Jaren Wilkey/BYU Photo Tis the season for helping at a soup kitchen, caroling at a care facility or shoveling a neighbor's driveway. While those gifts of self surely help others, n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavioral intervention improves sleep for hospitalized pregnant women DARIEN, IL - December 18, 2017 - A study shows that a hospital-based behavioral intervention protocol including components of sleep hygiene and cognitive behavioral therapy successfully improved sleep in women who were hospitalized for a high-risk pregnancy. Results show that women in the intervention group had significantly lower sleep disturbance scores than controls. They also had fewer sympto
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Popular Science
Tech gifts for your favorite fitness enthusiast Don't know what to get your macro-counting, spandex-wearing, competition-winning fitness-obsessed friend? We've got some ideas. Hyperice Hypersphere Vibrating Therapy Ball Foam rolling after a beastly workout can help prevent injuries. Typical foam rollers work by using your body weight to loosen sore and overworked muscles. This one has the addition of three vibrating speeds to magnify the effec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Simple, but powerful' model reveals mechanisms behind neuron developmentNew insights have been uncovered into the regulatory network behind neuron growth, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomniaA new method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices has now been tested by researchers.
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Science | The Guardian
Mike Mortimore obituary My friend Mike Mortimore, who has died aged 80, was a pioneering geographer who lived and worked in the dry lands of west Africa. He was motivated by a love of the people in that region, northern Nigeria in particular, believing that human endeavour could build sustainable livelihoods. Mike was the eldest of three children born in Bermuda. His father, John Mortimore, was employed by Cable & Wirel
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Live Science
Do You Want to Believe? Government UFO Search Never Stopped Repeated reports of UFO sightings along Nevada's State Highway 375 — which is close to the top-secret Area 51 government base — led Nevada officials to dub the route "Extraterrestrial Highway" in 1996. Credit: Shutterstock The U.S. government has been secretly investigating unidentified flying objects — UFOs — since 2007. And despite officials' claims that the classified UFO-hunting effort shut
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Live Science
Why People Hear Voices When Climbing Mount Everest The highest mountains can drive those climbing them temporarily mad. Now, researchers say, these psychotic episodes constitute a person's own medical condition and may be distinct from altitude sickness. "Mountains are maddeningly beautiful, but we did not expect that they can drive us to madness," said study co-author Dr. Hermann Brugger, head of the Institute of Mountain Emergency Medicine at E
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing how much nitrogen enters a lake has little impact on algal blooms WINNIPEG, Dec. 18, 2017--Lakes suffering from harmful algal blooms may not respond to reduced, or even discontinued, artificial nitrogen loading. Many blue-green algae responsible for algal blooms can fix atmospheric nitrogen dissolved in the water, and therefore water stewards should focus their efforts on removing phosphorus from lakes to combat algal blooms. This is according to a recently pub
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel technique expands industrial use of advanced high-strength steel alloys The automotive industry's demand for high-performance alloys known as advanced high-strength (AHS) steels has increased in recent years owing to increasingly tough passenger safety, vehicle performance and fuel economy requirements. Characterized by improved formability and collision resilience compared to conventional steel grades, high-strength steels have been used in critical safety locatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny bilirubin-filled capsules could improve survival of transplanted pancreatic cells By encapsulating bilirubin within tiny nanoparticles, researchers from North Carolina State University and the Ohio State University have improved the survival rates of pancreatic islet cells in vitro in a low-oxygen environment. The work has implications for the treatment of Type 1 diabetes in both canine and human patients. Patients with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin natu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From the omelette to the egg: Reversing protein aggregations To cook an omelette, you have to scramble an egg, and like Humpty Dumpty it can never be put back together again. This is because the egg undergoes a set of physiological and chemical changes as it cooks, which cause its chemical bonds to break and its proteins to aggregate, restructuring and setting into a new, final -- and irreversible -- shape. However, a new Tel Aviv University study suggests
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Negative portrayals of shooting victims lead to victim blaming DURHAM, N.C. -- Negative portrayal of a shooting victim can lead people to blame the victim for his own death and to sympathize with the shooter, says a new study by researchers at Duke University and Simmons College. After reading a negative biographical sketch about the victim of a fatal shooting, study participants favored lighter sentences for the shooter, said study co-author Sarah Gaither,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Factors affecting the health of older sexual & gender minorities IMAGE: LGBT Health , published bimonthly online with open access options and in print, brings together the LGBT research, health care, and advocacy communities to address current challenges and improve the health,... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 18, 2017--A special issue of LGBT Health includes the latest research, clinical practice innovatio
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Quanta Magazine
Why Is M-Theory the Leading Candidate for Theory of Everything? It’s not easy being a “theory of everything.” A TOE has the very tough job of fitting gravity into the quantum laws of nature in such a way that, on large scales, gravity looks like curves in the fabric of space-time, as Albert Einstein described in his general theory of relativity. Somehow, space-time curvature emerges as the collective effect of quantized units of gravitational energy — particl
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Ingeniøren
Minister udskyder længe ventet teleaftale igenFørst på et et ikke nærmere bestemt tidspunkt i 2018 får telebranchen svar på hvilke politiske krav, den skal leve op til i fremtiden. Og det er ikke første gang, branchen må væbne sig med tålmodighed.
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New Scientist - News
Six-year-olds will pay to see bad guys get their comeuppance Kumar Sriskandan / Alamy Stock Photo CHILDREN as young as 6 want to see wrongdoers punished , it turns out. Nikolaus Steinbeis of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany, and his team carried out a series of tests involving 72 children. Each of them watched Punch and Judy shows in which one puppet shared a toy with the child, while a second, nastier
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New Scientist - News
Great tits avoid bad food after seeing grossed-out friends BIOSPHOTO/Alamy Stock Photo Great tits that exhibit disgust when they eat a horrible meal may inadvertently be driving their prey to evolve. Many prey animals have evolved deterrents so that predators will be reluctant to eat them: they may have an unpalatable taste or even be poisonous . They often signal this with bright and contrasting colours, like the yellow and black stripes of a wasp.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers repurpose immune-activating cytokine to fight breast cancer The most lethal form of breast cancer could have a new treatment option, according to new research out of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers showed triple-negative breast cancer cells are highly vulnerable to interferon-β--a potent antimicrobial that also activates the imm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'checkpoint' model that could identify potential drugs to treat genetic disorders A new 'checkpoint' model which can be used to identify potential treatments for genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been proposed by a team of Bradford scientists. These disorders can be caused by a particular type of mutation in DNA, called a 'nonsense mutation'. This results in a pre-mature 'stop' instruction being issued to the cellular machinery
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why machines will not replace humans in the labor market Deputy Director of the Centre for Labour Market Studies at the Higher School of Economics Rostislav Kapeliushnikov says that predictions of a 'labour market apocalypse' with mass loss of jobs caused by technological progress are unfounded; despite having been made numerous times throughout modern history, they have never come true. The results of his research were published in the article 'Is Tec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online sponsored ad ban has limited impact on consumer access to foreign pharmacies Key Takeaways: Study of Online Clicks through Search Engines Reveals Vulnerabilities of Sponsored Search Advertising Regulations; despite Google's ban of sponsored search advertising by certain pharmacies, consumers can still use organic links to access cheaper, non-regulated prescriptions from foreign pharmacies online. CATONSVILLE, MD, December 18, 2017 - As American consumers turn to online se
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guide aims to unmask unique challenges women face in getting healthy sleep Washington, DC (Dec. 18, 2017)--Though sleep is essential to health and wellbeing, the unique barriers faced by women in maintaining good sleep health are often misunderstood or overlooked, according to a new resource "Women & Sleep: A Guide for Better Health" developed by the Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR®) Interdisciplinary Network on Sleep. The guide provides an evidence-based over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotubes go with the flow to penetrate brain tissue IMAGE: A microfluidic device delivers a carbon nanotube fiber into agarose, a lab experiment stand-in for brain tissue. The device could provide a gentler method to implant wires into patients with... view more Credit: Robinson Lab/Rice University Rice University researchers have invented a device that uses fast-moving fluids to insert flexible, conductive carbon nanotube fibers int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making larvae count Almost all the wildly varied, colorful fish that populate coral reefs start life as tiny, colorless, tadpole-like larvae. Telling one from the other is nearly impossible - even for experts - and this presents a difficult challenge to those who study the ecology of the reefs. Prof. Rotem Sorek of the Weizmann Institute of Science; Prof. Roi Holzman of the School of Zoology and The Steinhardt Museu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough study reveals new insight into 'immortal' plant cells IMAGE: Dr Xiaoqi Feng - breakthrough study. view more Credit: John Innes Centre A new study has revealed an undiscovered reprogramming mechanism that allows plants to maintain fitness down the generations. The John Innes Centre team led by Dr Xiaoqi Feng made the discovery when studying germ cells - cells specialised for sexual reproduction - in flowering plants. Germ cells are often refe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using gold nanoparticles to destroy viruses IMAGE: This is a cartoon depicting an imaginary attack of the nanoparticles to a virus leading to its loss of integrity. view more Credit: ©SUNMIL/EPFL HIV, dengue, papillomavirus, herpes and Ebola - these are just some of the many viruses that kill millions of people every year, mostly children in developing countries. While drugs can be used against some viruses, there is currently no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding enzyme cascades key to understanding metabolism IMAGE: Like ants, one enzyme follows the trail left behind by the previous one. In this case, the initial substrate is acted upon by enzyme A, leaving a substrate suitable... view more Credit: Ayusman Sen, Penn State A spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but understanding what happens to that sugar in the cell is far more complicated than simple digestion, according to research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heat from below Pacific Ocean fuels Yellowstone, study finds CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Recent stories in the national media are magnifying fears of a catastrophic eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic area, but scientists remain uncertain about the likelihood of such an event. To better understand the region's subsurface geology, University of Illinois geologists have rewound and played back a portion of its geologic history, finding that Yellowstone volcanism is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds learn from each other's 'disgust,' enabling insects to evolve bright colors Many animals have evolved to stand out. Bright colours are easy to spot, but they warn predators off by signalling toxicity or foul taste. Yet if every individual predator has to eat colourful prey to learn this unappetising lesson, it's a puzzle how conspicuous colours had the chance to evolve as a defensive strategy. Now, a new study using the great tit species as a "model pre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Process to transition two-layer graphene into diamond-hard material on impact discovered IMAGE: By applying pressure at the nanoscale with an indenter to two layers of graphene, each one-atom thick, CUNY researchers transformed the honeycombed graphene into a diamond-like material at room temperature. ... view more Credit: Ella Maru Studio NEW YORK, (Dec. 18, 2017) -- Imagine a material as flexible and lightweight as foil that becomes stiff and hard enough to stop a bullet on imp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thermally activated delayed photoluminescence from semiconductor nanocrystals IMAGE: Pyrenecarboxylic acid-functionalized CdSe quantum dots undergo thermally activated delayed photoluminescence. view more Credit: Cedric Mongin Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that the transfer of triplet excitons from nanomaterials to molecules also creates a feedback mechanism that returns some energy to the nanocrystal, causing it to photoluminesce on lon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Orbital mayhem around a red dwarf IMAGE: A stellar regatta around GJ436. Space boaters parked in the equatorial plane of the star wait for the hairy planet to emerge from this plane to 'ride' the planetary wind... view more Credit: © Denis Bajram In the collective imagination, planets of a solar system all circle around their star, in the same plane that is also the equatorial plane of the star. The star also spins, and its
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Undocumented immigrants have higher risk of death with emergency-only dialysis Bottom Line: Undocumented immigrants with end-stage kidney disease were much more likely to die and to spend more time in the hospital when they could access dialysis only as an emergency once they became critically ill. Why The Research Is Interesting: About 6,500 undocumented immigrants with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) live in the United States and these patients are excluded from major fede
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple tool may expedite transplants in kids with kidney failure An easy-to-use tool to predict the likelihood of a child with kidney disease progressing to kidney failure has a high degree of accuracy and could be used to reduce the burden of dialysis and increase transplantations, according to a study led by researchers at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. The tool, known as the kidney failure risk equation (KFRE), is already used for adults wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping the global impact of shrinking glaciers on river invertebrates River invertebrates react the same way to decreasing glacier cover wherever in the world they are, say scientists who have evaluated more than one million of them in diverse regions with shrinking glaciers, to determine the impact of global environmental change. Their findings, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution , indicate that there is a globally consistent pattern in the way river in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar-coated world Glycans are essential to virtually every biological process in the body. These complex structures--composed of interlocking sugar molecules--adorn the surfaces of cells in fuzzy profusion. Glycans are a crucial part of a cell's identity, helping it communicate with other cells and with the external environment. Glycans are also known to play a vital role in cancer, autoimmune disease and countles
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alien object 'Oumuama was a natural body visiting from another solar system Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have led worldwide investigations into a mysterious object that passed close to Earth after arriving from deep interstellar space. Since the object was spotted in October, Professor Alan Fitzsimmons and Dr Michele Bannister from the School of Mathematics and Physics at Queen's University have led an international team of astronomers to piece together a pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new approach for detecting planets in the Alpha Centauri system Yale astronomers have taken a fresh look at the nearby Alpha Centauri star system. Credit: Michael S. Helfenbein. Yale astronomers have taken a fresh look at the nearby Alpha Centauri star system and found new ways to narrow the search for habitable planets there. According to a study led by Professor Debra Fischer and graduate student Lily Zhao, there may be small, Earth-like planets in Alpha Ce
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How much people earn is associated with how they experience happinessPeople who earn more money tend to experience more positive emotions focused on themselves, while people who earn less take greater pleasure in their relationships and ability to connect with others, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Racial disparities in intensity of care at the end of lifeDifferent outcomes exist between blacks and whites receiving care from the same hospice, new research has discovered.
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Big Think
Does Fasting Make You Smarter? Like all diet trends, the current fasting craze is rooted in one part tradition (numerous religious rituals include fasting, though many were the result of resource management, not spiritual ambition), one part science, and many parts overinflated buzz. Metabolic changes associated with fasting predominantly end when the fast does, while the prospect of living in a perpetual state of fasting is n
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Feed: All Latest
'Oumuamua Probably Isn't a Spaceship—But It Could Have Passengers Last Wednesday, at 3:45 pm, scientists from the Breakthrough Listen project trained the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia on 'Oumuamua —the mysterious, oblong space-rock which last month became the first known object to enter our solar system from elsewhere in the universe—and scanned it for signs of intelligent life. For six hours, astronomers interrogated the interstellar asteroid. Green Ba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orbital mayhem around a red dwarf A stellar regatta around GJ436. Space boaters parked in the equatorial plane of the star wait for the hairy planet to emerge from this plane to 'ride' the planetary wind with the help of kite-surfing vessels. As they rise above the poles of the star, they obtain a breathtaking view of the entire planetary system and can glimpse at the mysterious disruptive planet, which appears as a bright spot i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals new insight into 'immortal' plant cells Dr Xiaoqi Feng. Credit: John Innes Centre A new study has revealed an undiscovered reprogramming mechanism that allows plants to maintain fitness down the generations. The John Innes Centre team led by Dr Xiaoqi Feng made the discovery when studying germ cells - cells specialised for sexual reproduction - in flowering plants . Germ cells are often referred to as "immortal" because they can pass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping the global impact of shrinking glaciers on river invertebrates River invertebrate. Credit: Liam Marsh, liammarsh.com River invertebrates react the same way to decreasing glacier cover wherever in the world they are, say scientists who have evaluated more than one million of them in diverse regions with shrinking glaciers, to determine the impact of global environmental change. Their findings, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution , indicate that ther
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Process to transition two-layer graphene into diamond-hard material on impact discovered By applying pressure at the nanoscale with an indenter to two layers of graphene, each one-atom thick, CUNY researchers transformed the honeycombed graphene into a diamond-like material at room temperature. Credit: Ella Maru Studio Imagine a material as flexible and lightweight as foil that becomes stiff and hard enough to stop a bullet on impact. In a newly published paper in Nature Nanotechnolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermally activated delayed photoluminescence from semiconductor nanocrystals Pyrenecarboxylic acid-functionalized CdSe quantum dots undergo thermally activated delayed photoluminescence. Credit: Cedric Mongin Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that the transfer of triplet excitons from nanomaterials to molecules also creates a feedback mechanism that returns some energy to the nanocrystal, causing it to photoluminesce on long time scales. The mech
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds learn from each other's 'disgust,' enabling insects to evolve bright colors Great tit watching the video of another bird experiencing 'disgust' as part of the study. Credit: Liisa Hämäläinen Many animals have evolved to stand out. Bright colours are easy to spot, but they warn predators off by signalling toxicity or foul taste. Yet if every individual predator has to eat colourful prey to learn this unappetising lesson, it's a puzzle how conspicuous colours had the chanc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alien object 'Oumuama was a natural body visiting from another solar system The interstellar object 'Oumuamua (circled) as seen by the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. Background stars and galaxies appear as streaks due to the telescope following 'Oumuamua as it moved across the sky. Credit: A. Fitzsimmons, QUB/Isaac Newton Group, La Palma. Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have led worldwide investigations into a mysterious object that passed close to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sugar-coated world Glycans or polysaccharides adorn cell surfaces and are important for cell communication, immune response and many other vital physiological processes. A new study assembles a library of enzymes responsible for building and modifying glycans. Credit: Jason Drees,Biodesign Institute at ASU Glycans are essential to virtually every biological process in the body. These complex structures—composed of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic barcodes are used to quantify crucial populations in a coral reef ecosystem Close up of polyps are arrayed on a coral, waving their tentacles. There can be thousands of polyps on a single coral branch. Credit: Wikipedia Almost all the wildly varied, colorful fish that populate coral reefs start life as tiny, colorless, tadpole-like larvae. Telling one from the other is nearly impossible - even for experts - and this presents a difficult challenge to those who study the e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designer nanoparticles destroy a broad array of viruses Cartoon depicting an imaginary attack of the nanoparticles to a virus leading to its loss of integrity. Credit: ©SUNMIL/EPFL EPFL researchers have created nanoparticles that attract viruses and, using the pressure resulting from the binding process, destroy them. This revolutionary approach could lead to the development of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. HIV, dengue, papillomavirus, herpes and Eb
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding enzyme cascades key to understanding metabolism Like ants, one enzyme follows the trail left behind by the previous one. In this case, the initial substrate is acted upon by enzyme A, leaving a substrate suitable for enzyme B and on down the line. Credit: Ayusman Sen, Penn State A spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but understanding what happens to that sugar in the cell is far more complicated than simple digestion, according to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study challenges traditional theory of Yellowstone formation From left, geology graduate students Jiashun Hu and Quan Zhou and professor Lijun Liu challenge traditional theories about western US volcanism with new evidence from supercomputer modeling. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Recent stories in the national media are magnifying fears of a catastrophic eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic area, but scientists remain uncertain about the likelihood of such an
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Our first interstellar visitor may be a camouflaged comet An itinerant interstellar asteroid may actually be a comet in disguise. Known as ‘Oumuamua, the object was detected in October and is the first visitor from another star spotted touring our solar system ( SN: 11/ 25/17, p. 14 ). Early observations suggested the vagabond was rocky. But after additional analysis, a team of researchers suggests December 18 in Nature Astronomy that the object might h
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Science | The Guardian
Interstellar object ‘Oumuamua covered in 'thick crust of carbon-rich gunk' The mysterious interstellar object ‘Oumuamua that is shooting through our solar system is wrapped in a thick coating of carbon-rich gunk that built up on its cosmic travels, astronomers have found. New observations of the cigar-shaped body found evidence for a deep surface layer that formed when organic ices – such as frozen carbon dioxide, methane and methanol – that make up the object were batt
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Viden
Klimavenlig julegave? Køb kvalitet og oplevelser Når vi af lutter gavmildhed skruer op for forbrugsfesten og forærer hinanden en masse ting til jul, så koster det ikke alene på bankkontoen. Det er også dyrt på klimaregnskabet at producere de mange gaver. Læs også: Du kan ikke give musik i julegave, for alle streamer. Jo, du kan så! Fx resulterer produktionen af et par jeans i 40 kg CO2-udslip, mens den nye iPhone 10 ”koster” 79 kg CO2 ifølge pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new approach for detecting planets in the Alpha Centauri system New Haven, Conn. - Yale astronomers have taken a fresh look at the nearby Alpha Centauri star system and found new ways to narrow the search for habitable planets there. According to a study led by Professor Debra Fischer and graduate student Lily Zhao, there may be small, Earth-like planets in Alpha Centauri that have been overlooked. Meanwhile, the study ruled out the existence of a numbe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The evolution of the gene responsible for red meat to produce cancer has been revealed IMAGE: The evolution of the gene responsible for red meat to produce cancer has been revealed. view more Credit: Luis Carlos Díaz A sugar called Neu5Gc, present in red meat, some fish and dairy products, is related to the appearance of spontaneous tumors in humans. Researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, led by Spaniard David Álvarez Ponce, have analyzed the evolutionary history of t
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Big Think
Scientists Discover a Gene for Pain Thanks to Some Super-Tough Italians Pain is the body’s way of protecting itself, and communicating to our conscious mind that something is terribly wrong. We all have varying sensitivity to it. Recent research has found that how sensitive or tolerant you are to pain depends on your genetic makeup . Today, 25 million Americans suffer from chronic pain. That’s about 11% of the population. This is moderate to severe pain occurring eve
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Ingeniøren
Dansk arkæolog afdækker ingeniørkunst fra antikkens Korinth Arkæologer fra Danmark og Grækenland har gjort en række usædvanlige fund ved den græske by Korinth, der var et centralt knudepunkt for handel under Romerrigets og Julius Cæsars tid. Det skriver The Guardian . Gennem Lechaion Harbour Project , der blandt andet er støttet af Carlsberg Fondet, har arkæologerne arbejdet på at udgrave byens antikke havn ved Lechaion siden 2013. De nyeste fund tæller 2
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple one-pot synthesis of druggable tricyclic peptidesA new promising class of therapeutics could replace vancomycin and combat MRSA, report scientists at conclusion of a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inner workings of victorious AI revealed by researchersLibratus, an artificial intelligence that defeated four top professional poker players in no-limit Texas Hold'em, uses a three-pronged approach to master a game with more decision points than atoms in the universe, researchers report. They explain how their AI broke the game into computationally manageable parts and fixed potential weaknesses in its strategy during the competition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New RCT shows no benefit from probiotics, xylitol chewing gum in alleviating sore throatsThe use of probiotics and xylitol chewing gum to alleviate sore throat symptoms -- as an alternative to antibiotics -- appears to have no effect, according to a randomized controlled trial (RCT).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dementia with Lewy bodies: Unique genetic profile identifiedDementia with Lewy bodies has a unique genetic profile, distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, according to the first large-scale genetic study of this common type of dementia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers compute their way to the center of the Earth Using JSC's JUQUEEN supercomputer, University of Cologne researchers were able to simulate the structure of silicon dioxide at a variety of different pressures. The image shows how the the shape and structure of the atoms change as pressure increases. Credit: Prescher, C., Prakapenka, V.B., Stefanski, J., Jahn, S., Skinner, L.B., Wang, Y. In order to more fully comprehend the complexities of Eart
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The shrinking moose of Isle Royale The researchers measured the length, width and height of moose skulls to study the impact of climate change on the iconic Northwoods species. The team measured 662 moose skulls and observed a 16 percent decrease in size over 40 years. Credit: Sarah Bird/Michigan Tech Researchers from Michigan Technological University know the smartest way to know a moose is by its brain. Specifically, skull measu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shedding light on a shadowy organizational hub in cells A large protein coordinates cellular components required for microtubule assembly. Credit: James Goldenring, Vanderbilt University On a cellular level, we are all hanging on by delicate threads. All cells are crisscrossed by a network of strands called microtubules, which act as railroad tracks that move cargo around the cell, as winch cables that separate chromosomes during cell division, and as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural enzymes filter hormone-disrupting chemicals from sewage A new filtration system is using natural molecules to remove 95 % of hormone-affecting chemicals from wastewater. Credit: CC0 A new filtration system that uses natural molecules to remove hormone-affecting chemicals from wastewater has succeeded in trapping 95 % of these substances before the water goes back into the environment. It's part of a wave of research into new ways of protecting us agai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter rolls out stricter rules on abusive content This Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, photo shows a Twitter sign outside of the company's headquarters in San Francisco. Twitter will be enforcing stricter policies on violent and abusive content such as hateful images or symbols, including those attached to user profiles, the company announced Monday, Dec. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu) Twitter has begun enforcing stricter policies on violent and abusi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shedding light on a shadowy organizational hub in cells IMAGE: A large protein coordinates cellular components required for microtubule assembly. view more Credit: James Goldenring, Vanderbilt University On a cellular level, we are all hanging on by delicate threads. All cells are crisscrossed by a network of strands called microtubules, which act as railroad tracks that move cargo around the cell, as winch cables that separate chromosomes durin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The shrinking moose of Isle Royale Researchers from Michigan Technological University know the smartest way to know a moose is by its brain. Specifically, skull measurements reveal information about body size, physiology and the conditions of a moose's early life. Put together, measurements through time reveal the health of a population and even changes in their environment. For the booming moose population of Isle Royale, a key s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers compute their way to the center of the Earth IMAGE: Using JSC's JUQUEEN supercomputer, University of Cologne researchers were able to simulate the structure of silicon dioxide at a variety of different pressures. The image shows how the the shape... view more Credit: Prescher, C., Prakapenka, V.B., Stefanski, J., Jahn, S., Skinner, L.B., Wang, Y. In order to more fully comprehend the complexities of Earth's interior, humanity has to d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viruses can transfer genes across the superkingdoms of life New research shows that viruses can transfer genes to organisms that they aren't known to infect - including organisms in different superkingdoms, or domains. The study, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Microbiology , also finds that viruses and cellular organisms share a large group of genes that help cells to function, suggesting that viruses may have an ancient cell-like origin. V
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Ingeniøren
Elektrisk brand henlagde verdens travleste lufthavn i 11 timers mørke I næsten 11 timer var verdens travleste lufthavn, Atlantas Hartsfield-Jackson, i weekenden lagt hen i mørke efter et altomfattende strømsvigt. Trafikken var lammet, og passagerer strandet i både afgangshallerne og flyene. Strømsvigtet begyndte søndag omkring klokken 13 lokal tid og varede helt frem til midnat. Strømsvigtet indtraf ifølge CNN efter at en elektrisk brand var opstået i et underjordi
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The gift of words | Javed Akhtar"Do you know what I mean?" Legendary poet, lyricist and screenwriter Javed Akhtar asks why we seem to be losing our power to use words -- and inspires us to better understand and communicate with one another using this near-magical tool that carries our culture across generations. (In Hindi with English subtitles)
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Startup Uses Quantum Computing to Boost Machine Learning A company in California just proved that an exotic and potentially game-changing kind of computer can be used to perform a common form of machine learning. The feat raises hope that quantum computers, which exploit the logic-defying principles of quantum physics to perform certain types of calculation at ridiculous speeds, could have a big impact on the hottest area of the tech industry: artifici
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Dagens Medicin
Så er det tid at stoppeDagens Medicin bør stoppe sine kåringer af de bedste hospitaler og fagfolk. Kåringer er baseret på et for spinkelt grundlag og fremstår som hån over for de mange, som ikke kommer på forsiden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approach An aerial view of the Navajo Dam and reservoir. Credit: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Thousands of dams built along U.S. rivers and streams over the last century now provide electricity for homes, store water for agriculture and support recreation for people. But they also have significant downstream impacts: They reduce the amount and change the timing of flowing water that fish rely on for spawnin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do you spot a Russian bot? Answer goes beyond Kremlin watching, new research finds A team of researchers has isolated the characteristics of bots on Twitter through an examination of bot activity related to Russian political discussions. Its findings, reported in the journal Big Data , provide new insights into how Russian accounts influence online exchanges using bots, or automated social media accounts, and trolls, which aim to provoke or disrupt. "There is a great deal of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New vaccine technology shows promise as a tool to combat the opioid crisisAn experimental heroin vaccine induced antibodies that prevented the drug from crossing the blood-brain barrier in mice and rats.
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The Atlantic
Wormwood: Obsession, Lies, and a CIA Coverup Errol Morris’s Wormwood , which arrived on Netflix and in some movie theaters Friday, is a mind-boggling story involving LSD-spiked Cointreau, allegations of biological warfare against the U.S. government, Project MKUltra, mind control orchestrated by an allergist and a magician, and a son’s obsessive quest to find out why his father plummeted to his death from a 13th-floor Manhattan hotel room.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast flowing heat in layered material heterostructures IMAGE: Schematic representation of the highly efficient out-of-plane heat transfer from graphene hot electrons (yellow glow), created by optical excitation (red beam), to hyperbolic phonon-polaritons in hBN (wave lines).... view more Credit: ICFO Graphene Flagship scientists, led by researchers at ICFO - The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain, have detected graphene's out-of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the footsteps of Jacques Cousteau IMAGE: Professor Eberhard Gischler and his doctoral researcher Dominik Schmitt with the last piece of the stalactite recovered from the Blue Hole by Jacques Cousteau in 1970. view more Credit: Daniel Parwareschnia FRANKFURT. In 1970, a team led by French ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau recovered an unusual stalactite from the depths of the famous Blue Hole in the Caribbean Sea. In the current
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Futurity.org
Radiation therapy may treat deadly heart rhythm In a small study with five patients, doctors have shown that radiation therapy—aimed directly at the heart—can treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm, called ventricular tachycardia. The patients had not responded to standard treatments and collectively experienced more than 6,500 episodes of ventricular tachycardia in the three months before they were treated with radiation therapy.
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New Scientist - News
Bad colds may have delayed this year’s flu epidemic in UK Are common colds keeping flu at bay? plainpicture/OJO/Tom Merton By Debora MacKenzie News that winter flu is rampaging through Britain and threatening Christmas is premature. While the northern hemisphere’s winter flu season has just begun, it seems that another virus might have been keeping it largely at bay in Europe. Flu is infamous for occasional, deadly pandemics, such as swine flu in 20
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune system: The body's street sweepersThe list of tasks performed by the smallest blood cells known as platelets has now been extended by new research. At sites of infection, actively migrating platelets sweep bacteria into aggregates for disposal by phagocytic cells, scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Development on muon beam analysis of organic matter in samples from spaceResearchers have developed a muon-based approach to non-destructive investigations for unique asteroid samples, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How birds work to sing togetherA new study finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Primitive fossil bear with a sweet tooth identified from Canada's High ArcticResearchers have identified remains of a 3.5-million-year-old bear from a fossil-rich site in Canada's High Arctic. Their study shows not only that the animal is a close relative of the ancestor of modern bears -- tracing its ancestry to extinct bears of similar age from East Asia -- but that it also had a sweet tooth, as determined by cavities in the teeth.
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The Ominous Skyline of a James Bond Villain's Real-Life Lair In the 2012 James Bond film Skyfall , Daniel Craig’s 007 is lured—by a mysterious woman, naturally—to the island lair of the villainous Raoul Silva, a former MI6 agent gone rogue. Silva, the story goes, took over the island after hacking into the computers of the local chemical plant and simulating a leak, forcing the panicked inhabitants to flee overnight. The real story of Hashima Island, which
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Dagens Medicin
Telemedicin skal hjælpe KOL-patienter Kommuner og regioner har søsat million-udbud, der skal hjælpe 10.000 patienter med KOL.
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Dagens Medicin
Depotformuleret paracetamol trækkes af markedetPinex Retard, panodiltabletter med modificeret udløsning og Panodil Retard trækkes af markedet efter ordre fra EMA. Agenturet holder fast i at det er for svært at behandle patienter, der har fået en overdosis af midlerne.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel mechanism that protects from glioblastoma identifiedA group of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have identified a protein called RanBP6 as a new regulator of EGFR. In a paper published in Nature Communications they show how silencing of RanBP6 promoted glioma growth, by upregulating EGFR expression. Moreover, reconstitution of RanBP6 in a mouse xenograft model leads to reduction in tumor growth. Authors state that t
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The body's street sweepers IMAGE: Left: Trajectory of a migrating platelet, depicted (from top to bottom) as a sequence of time-lapse images of the cell's outline. Right: As they migrate, platelets can collect bacteria... view more Credit: F. Gärtner/LMU A new study by medical researchers at LMU extends the list of tasks performed by the smallest blood cells known as platelets: At sites of infection, actively mig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of a microquasar from our galaxy to explain the structure of distant radio galaxies IMAGE: Image obtained with the use of the Jansky Very Large Array using radio waves frequences of 5 GHz at the GRS 1758-258 microquasar. view more Credit: Jusep Martí & Pedro Luis Luque 24/11/2017.- Researchers of the Group "Fuentes de Alta Energía de la Galaxia" of the UJA, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Barcelona and its Institute of Cosmos Sciences, have dis
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Posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth in children and adolescents following earthquake Posttraumatic stress symptoms--including symptoms such as intrusion, avoidance, negative thoughts and feelings, and hyperarousal--can arise among individuals exposed to natural disasters, yet positive psychological changes, such as posttraumatic growth, can also develop. A Journal of Traumatic Stress analysis looks at these processes in 757 children and adolescents who experienced the 2013 Ya'an
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The incredible journey of the first African tortoise that arrived in Europe About 95 million years ago, a river turtle adapted to marine environments and made an extraordinary migration from the ancient continent of Gondwana, which grouped what is now Africa and South America, to Laurasia, the Northern continental mass of which Europe, Asia and North America were part. Its remains, found in the town of Algora in Guadalajara and in Portugal, are the evidence of the fi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian physicists found the temperature at which carbon nanotubes become superconductors IMAGE: This is the geometric structure 'a carbon chain in a tube' before and after optimization. view more Credit: Chi Ho Wong Scientists from Ural Federal University (UrFU) together with their colleagues from Lomonosov Moscow State University found out the mathematical method to calculate the temperature at which single walled carbon nanotubes became superconductors and developed a way to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unleashing ultraviolet brings visible improvement IMAGE: UV-light scattering is used for diffuse line-of-sight optical communications. view more Credit: © 2017 Xiaobin Sun Military and civil authorities could benefit from secure optical communication systems that use light to carry messages between moving vehicles. Researchers at KAUST have now demonstrated rapid data transfer using ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light, which provides many advantages over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black hole pair born inside a dying star? IMAGE: Snapshot of gravitational waves propagating from binary black holes merging inside of a star. view more Credit: Kyoto University, Joseph M. Fedrow Kyoto, Japan -- Far from earth, two black holes orbit around each other propagating waves that bend time and space. The existence of such waves -- gravitational waves -- was first predicted by Albert Einstein over a century ago on the ba
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious new seafloor species sheds light on early animal evolutionResearchers have described a new species of the enigmatic marine worm Xenoturbella, named Xenoturbella japonica. Two specimens of this new species were dredged from the seafloor of the western Pacific. These primitive worms, lacking a centralized nervous system, kidneys, and anus, are important for understanding the early evolution of the Bilateria. MicroCT scanning revealed previously unknown str
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statistical modeling helps fisheries managers remove invasive speciesStatisticians and natural resource management researchers worked together to determine the best time and location to capture and remove carps from lake systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behaviorResearchers report the first direct observation of atoms moving in liquid. Using scanning transmission electron microscopy, they find that gold ions diffuse through ionic liquid by a phenomenon they describe as a 'cage-jump.' Image analysis determined the diffusion coefficient and activation energy of the diffusion. Quantification of liquid at the atomic level is expected to contribute to the desi
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Big Think
Blood on the Map: Charting Australia’s Colonial-Era Massacres It’s hard to argue with a map. These two examples of documentary cartography, shocking though they are, may finally spell the end for Australia’s History Wars. For decades, historians, politicians and just about everyone else with strong opinions on Australian nationhood have argued heatedly about whether or not massacres of the Aboriginal population played a substantial part in the genesis of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers produce breakthrough sensor for photography, life sciences, security Sample photo taken with the 1Megapixel Quanta Image Sensor operating at 1,040 frames per second, with total power consumption as low as 17mW. It is a binary single-photon image, so if the pixel was hit by one or more photons, it is white; if not, it is black. Figure 4 shows how an image in grayscale was created by summing up eight frames of binary images taken continuously. This process is where
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Development on muon beam analysis of organic matter in samples from space IMAGE: An entire view of the MuSIC ( Mu on S cience I nnovative C hannel) beam line at RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University... view more Credit: Osaka University Muon has much higher transmissivity than electrons and X-rays. This feature of muon has enabled us to see through volcanoes, pyramids, and nuclear reactors with cosmic-ray induced natural muons. The
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Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression? IMAGE: Happy face morph (faces 3-5 on 15 face positive-neutral to negative-neutral spectrum) and a sad face (face 12) from Peters et al. (2017)'s CBM for facial interpretation training.... view more Credit: University of Bristol A new study by experimental psychologists from the University of Bristol has examined whether cognitive bias modification (CBM) for facial interpretation, a digital
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new member of laser diode family: Electrically pumped organic semiconductor laser IMAGE: Threshold and light amplification behaviors in organic semiconductor lasers. view more Credit: ©Science China Press Based on diversity and functional design of molecule structures with color covering the entire visible spectrum, organic semiconductors have excellent luminescence and lasing properties as well as good solution processing performance. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) h
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BfR assesses maximum daily level for magnesium in food supplements "Food supplements are in vogue, and many people believe that they can provide health benefits", says BfR President Prof. Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel. "But the consumption of food supplements may also be associated with health risks. The best nutritional strategy basically involves a balanced and varied diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables. Such a diet supplies a healthy body with all essential sub
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illuminated: The mechanism behind shear thinning in supercooled liquids IMAGE: Relationship between a measure of structural disorder and viscosity for a polydisperse hard-sphere-like system. The relationship between the structural measure and the viscosity can be collapsed on their relation in... view more Credit: 2017 Hajime Tanaka, Trong S. Ingebrigtsen, Tanaka Laboratory, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo Tokyo - Researchers at The Uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three out of four Spanish residents buy the Lotería de Navidad (Spanish Christmas Lottery) IMAGE: This is a lottery ticket. view more Credit: UC3M El Sorteo Extraordinario de Navidad (the Special Christmas Lottery Drawing) represents approximately 50 percent of the annual State Lottery sales and involves between 2,400 and 3,000 million euros each year. It is the largest lottery drawing in the world and in Spain its social impact is equivalent to the population participating in ge
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Spectral broadening in clouds is affected by turbulence IMAGE: Shallow cumulus clouds. Photo taken at York University Campus in Toronto, Canada. view more Credit: Haiyang Gao Warm rain accounts for 31% of the total rain amount and 72% of the total rain area in the tropics. Understanding warm rain initiation and cloud droplet size distribution broadening is one of the main challenges of cloud physics due to complicated effects of turbulence on clou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reproducing higher-order embryonic kidney structures using pluripotent stem cells IMAGE: [LEFT] The higher-order structure of the kidney reconstructed from mouse ES cells (low magnification, green: collecting tube, red: nephron progenitor cells). [RIGHT] The nephron connected to the tip of the... view more Credit: Dr. Atsuhiro Taguchi & Professor Ryuichi Nishinakamura In the embryonic kidney, three types of precursor cells, nephron progenitor cells, ureteric buds,
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New data shows junk food, energy drinks may pose unique risks for teens RESTON, VIRGINIA--The popularity of energy drinks and junk food might have unique risks for teenagers who consume too much of them during the later stages of brain development. These are just two of the factors potentially affecting teen brain development examined in a new special issue of Birth Defects Research: The Teenage Brain , published by the Teratology Society with John Wiley & Sons. The
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt studie undersøger sikkerhed ved intravenøs paracetamol til spædbørn Forskningspulje fra regionerne støtter forskning, der skal forbedre smertebehandling af spædbørn.
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Dagens Medicin
Tre ud af fire lægespecialer bruger genetiske analyser 29 af de 38 lægefaglige specialer benytter sig i dag af genetiske analyser, viser en opgørelse fra Danske Regioner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No sign of alien life 'so far' on the mystery visitor from space, but we're still looking An artist’s impression of Oumuamua, assuming it’s a rock. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY The mystery object discovered earlier this year travelling through our solar system is showing no signs of any alien life, despite plenty of efforts to look and listen for a signal. Perhaps it's ironic that the object should arrive in a year when we celebrated the 100th anniversary (on December 16) of the b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How fungi helped create life as we know it Credit: University of Leeds Today our world is visually dominated by animals and plants, but this world would not have been possible without fungi, say University of Leeds scientists. Researchers have carried out experiments where plants and fungi are grown in atmospheres resembling the ancient Earth and, by incorporating their results into computer models, have shown that fungi were essential in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanotubes go with the flow to penetrate brain tissue Fast-moving fluid pulls a fiber through a microfluidic device to be inserted into brain tissue. The device invented at Rice University could provide a gentler method to implant wires into patients with neurological diseases and help scientists explore cognitive processes and develop implants to help people to see, to hear and to control artificial limbs. Credit: Robinson Lab Rice University resea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cheap, sustainable battery made from tree bark tannins (Left) Tannin powder, (center) photo of the researchers, (right) some of the features of tannins when used as a sustainable battery cathode material. Credit: Mukhopadhyay et al. Figures ©2017 American Chemical Society (Phys.org)—Tannins may be best known for their presence in red wine and tea, but in a new study researchers have demonstrated for the first time that tannins from tree bark can also
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The incredible journey of the first African tortoise that arrived in Europe Reconstruction of Algorachelus peregrinus in a coastal environment of Laurasia 95 million years ago. Credit: José Antonio Peñas About 95 million years ago, a river turtle adapted to marine environments and made an extraordinary migration from the ancient continent of Gondwana, which grouped what is now Africa and South America, to Laurasia, of which the Northern continental mass of which Europe,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hyperspectral camera detects counterfeit medicine and traces of blood Specim Oy, a VTT spin-off, has developed the world's first mobile hyperspectral camera for the fast, high-level analysis of a range of samples. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland contributed its own expertise to the development project, in the form of fast measurement data processing algorithms and methods. The extremely high-precision hyperspectral camera, which resembles a normal digicame
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The Scientist RSS
Image Of The Day: Moth ResurrectionEntomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years.
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The Scientist RSS
Federal Officials and Scientists Respond to Purported CDC Word BanThe alleged ban prohibits officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using a list of seven words in agency budget documents.
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The Scientist RSS
Gileads CAR T-Cell Therapy Administered to Just Five Patients in Two MonthsMore than 200 people are on waiting lists for the $373,000 treatment as hospitals try to work around problems with insurers.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny prodekan skal matche forskere og virksomheder 18. december 2017 Ny prodekan skal matche forskere og virksomheder Ansættelse Erik Bisgaard Madsen tiltræder pr. 1 april 2018 som prodekan for erhvervs- og myndighedssamarbejde på SCIENCE - Det Natur- og Biovidenskabelige Fakultet ved Københavns Universitet. Dermed fortsætter han sit arbejde med at bringe den nyeste forskning endnu mere i spil i danske virksomheder til gavn for samfundet. Erik
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is it acceptable to use a brain scan to read a person's mind? Credit: Radboud University Using brain scans to see what a person is thinking? There's still a long way to go, but technologies for 'reading' the mind are developing fast. Could the use of such technology create privacy concerns? Giulio Mecacci and Pim Haselager of Radboud University propose five criteria that might help ethicists and policy makers to assess the potential implications of brain-re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theorists propose conditions needed to search for new form of matter Alexei Tsvelik, a theoretical physicist at Brookhaven Lab, uses his hands to demonstrate two different chiral arrangements of three nearby electrons' magnetic moments. This idea of chirality, or handedness, is also used to describe mirror-image orientations of atoms in molecules, as shown on Tsvelik's computer screen. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory As scientists have explored the structur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine robots detect whales in the deep ocean Credit: University of East Anglia Scientists at the University of East Anglia have been recording the sounds made by whales and porpoises off the coast of northern Scotland – using a fleet of pioneering marine robots. From the metallic clicks of deep-diving sperm whales to the eerie whistles made by pods of pilot whales, the sounds have been collected by a fleet of 11 autonomous marine robots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is mistletoe more than just an excuse for a kiss? Credit: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Viscum album is one of the best known parasitic plants—essentially gaining both water and nutrients from the plant it has made its home. But its unique biology is not the only reason why it is so well known, famed for being both a life saver and a killer. One of the earliest mentions of mistletoe is in Norse mythology. It's reputed that Balder (son of Odin) was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do you spot a Russian bot? Answer goes beyond Kremlin watching, new research finds A team of researchers has isolated the characteristics of bots on Twitter through an examination of bot activity related to Russian political discussions. Its findings, reported in the journal Big Data , provide new insights into how Russian accounts influence online exchanges using bots, or automated social media accounts, and trolls, which aim to provoke or disrupt. "There is a great deal of in
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Dartmouth engineers produce breakthrough sensor for photography, life sciences, security HANOVER, N.H. -- Engineers from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering have produced a new imaging technology that may revolutionize medical and life sciences research, security, photography, cinematography and other applications that rely on high quality, low light imaging. Called the Quanta Image Sensor, or QIS, this next generation of light sensing technology enables highly sensitive, more e
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How much people earn is associated with how they experience happiness WASHINGTON -- People who earn more money tend to experience more positive emotions focused on themselves, while people who earn less take greater pleasure in their relationships and ability to connect with others, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "Higher income has many benefits, including improved health and life satisfaction, but is it associated with g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mysterious new seafloor species sheds light on early animal evolution Tsukuba, Japan - Japanese researchers have discovered a new species of the enigmatic marine worm Xenoturbella , which they have named Xenoturbella japonica , as reported in a new study published in BMC Evolutionary Biology . Xenoturbella lacks certain features common among more complex animals, such as a centralized nervous system, kidneys, and an anus (i.e., its digestive system has only one ope
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KFU astronomer contributed to blazar research Kazan Federal University was represented by Omar Kurtanidze, Chief Research Associate at KFU Near Space Studies Lab and Research Associate at Abastumani Observatory. Blazars are high-energy objects emitting relativistic jets which are perpendicular to their accretion disks. The latter supposedly have supermassive black holes in their centers. Blazars' jets are angularly oriented towards Earth. Bl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New grazing transiting 'hot Jupiter' detected by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey The discovery light curve for Qatar-6b phase folded with the BLS estimated period, as it appears in the QES archive. Credit: Alsubai et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—An international group of astronomers has found a new grazing transiting "hot Jupiter" alien world as part of the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES). The newly discovered extrasolar planet, designated Qatar-6b, is about the size of Jupiter, but le
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans as a model for understanding biological fundamentals Although some scientific disciplines aim at gaining a better understanding of humans, most biologists ultimately try to understand life in general. This raises the question of whether and when humans are acceptable, or even desirable, models of biological fundamentals. Are humans 'too unique' to be informative with respect to biological fundamentals? Or are there areas where we share key componen
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Futurity.org
This keeps older adults from ‘saving’ memories during sleep For older adults, slow and speedy brain waves must sync up at exactly the right moment during sleep to move new memories into long-term storage, according to a new study. While these brain rhythms, occurring hundreds of times a night, move in perfect lockstep in young adults, findings published in the journal Neuron show that, in old age, slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep fail
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Method of layering metals with the 2-D material may lead to brand new properties A "mesa" of dysprosium, draped with a single layer of graphene. Research from Ames Laboratory suggests that this method will work with a wide variety of metal and graphite combinations, opening up the possibility of diverse applications including quantum computing, solar cells, catalysis, and sensing. Credit: Ames Laboratory Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have disco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study answers a long-standing mystery about snake predation Infrared photograph of a rattlesnake. Credit: Hannes Schraft Rattlesnakes experience the world very differently from humans. A specialized pit on the snake's face contains a heat-sensitive membrane which connects to the brain. Together, the snake's visual and heat-sensing systems work together to provide an image that combines both visual and thermal information. That's important to snakes, which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lava-filled blocks on Venus may indicate geological activity Global elevational view of Venus with locations of tectonic blocks circled around the poles. The global regularity and distribution of these blocks possibly indicate the presence of a global systematic geologic process. Credit: Paul Byrne For planetary scientists, Venus's geologic heartbeat flat-lined around 700 million years ago. Now, a global view of some well-known deformation features on Venu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
By slashing environment spending, the government is slashing opportunities At a time of growing human impacts, spending on environmental protection is more important than ever. Australia's native plants and animals are integral to the success of our society. We depend on wildlife to pollinate many of our crops. Most of our cities depend on effective water catchments to provide clean water. And medical scientists are making important breakthroughs in managing disease and
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The Shapa Smart Scale Never Tells You How Much You Weigh The scale of the future does not have numbers or dials. It does not tweet out your body fat percentage, nor does it calculate how much water you're currently retaining. The scale of the future will not scream at you when you’ve come home after a long night of drinking and ordered an entire pizza, fully loaded, to eat by yourself. It knows when you’ve done this, of course. It just doesn’t tell you
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proteins in shark teeth could hint at what they eat The silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis) is named for the smooth texture of its skin, and can be found in tropical waters around the world. Credit: Alex Chernikh Certain molecules found in shark teeth proteins could tell scientists how the predators are connected to other animals in the food web, according to new research. Sharks are top predators in their environments, so their health represen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coastal erosion threatens archaeological sites along Greenland's fjords The distribution of registered archaeological settlements in the Nuuk region in western Greenland. Credit: Google Earth Hundreds of archaeology sites lie along the shores of Greenland's fjords and coasts, revealing the entirety of the country's ancestral cultures from as many as four thousand years ago. Coastal erosion, however, may soon drop many of those ancestral links into the ocean, a group
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Morphogenesis and the development of living forms Credit: Duke University What is morphogenesis? Morphogenesis examines the development of the living organisms' forms. It also is an area of research for Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan, Professor of Applied Mathematics, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Physics at Harvard University. On his presentation in the Public Lectures Unveiling Math (PLUM) series here at Duke, he credited the beginnings
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Piercing the mystery of the cosmic origins of gold Credit: Prawny/Pixabay Where does gold, the precious metal coveted by mortals through the ages, come from? How, where and when was it produced? Last August, a single astrophysical observation finally gave us the key to answer these questions. The results of this research were published on October 16, 2017. Gold pre-exists the formation of Earth: this is what differentiates it from, for example, d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Causes of the great famine, one of the deadliest environmental disasters From 1876-78, droughts cause crop failures around the world, causing millions to die. Credit: dasroofless via Flickr From 1876 to 1878, the Great Famine killed between 30 and 60 million people around the world. Drought enveloped much of the planet, causing food shortages all the way from Brazil to India and China, and wiping out approximately three percent of the global population. Climate scient
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two neuropeptides in zebrafish provide clues to the complex neural mechanisms underlying sleep NPY-expressing neurons, labeled as colored dots, in a larval zebrafish brain. Color-coding indicates the depth of the cells within the tissue, showing that NPY-expressing neurons are found throughout the brain. Credit: The Prober laboratory Sleep is a crucial behavior for a properly functioning mind and body—just ask anyone who has experienced a sleepless night. But the complex neural mechanisms
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Beautiful Insect That Buries Dead Bodies Is in the Middle of a Conservation Battle A Beautiful Insect That Buries Dead Bodies Is in the Middle of a Conservation Battle Oil companies want the American burying beetle to be the first recovered insect taken off the U.S. endangered species list. But scientists say comeback claims are wildly exaggerated The beetle ranch is lovely: slate tile, a Viking range, knotty oak paneling and a wood stove with a preening taxidermy turkey on the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish to benefit if large dams adopt new operating approach IMAGE: An aerial view of the Navajo Dam and reservoir. view more Credit: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Thousands of dams built along U.S. rivers and streams over the last century now provide electricity for homes, store water for agriculture and support recreation for people. But they also have significant downstream impacts: They reduce the amount and change the timing of flowing water that fis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting under graphite's skin: IMAGE: A "mesa " of dysprosium, draped with a single layer of graphene. Research from Ames Laboratory suggests that this method will work with a wide variety of metal and graphite combinations,... view more Credit: U.S. Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a new process to sheathe metal under a single layer of grap
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers developing, testing nanovaccine to protect against the flu virus These nanoparticles average just 300 billionths of a meter across and contain vaccine antigens. Credit: Nanovaccine Institute For many of us, a flu shot is a fall routine. Roll up a sleeve, take a needle to the upper arm and hope this year's vaccine matches whichever viruses circulate through the winter. The most common method to make that vaccine is now more than 70 years old. It requires growin
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New Scientist - News
Wound scanner shows bacteria glowing if your body is infected A glowing red shows bacteria ringing the wound Moleculight By Clare Wilson THE surgeon was poised to carry out a skin graft when he decided to try out an experimental device to check for infection. Called the MolecuLight i:X, it shows the presence of bacteria in real time as an eerie fluorescent glow. The patient was a 47-year-old man whose leg had been amputated above the knee. He had endure
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using viruses to fight viruses: New approach eliminates 'dormant' HIV-infected cells IMAGE: Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered that the Maraba virus, or MG1, can target and destroy the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral... view more Credit: The Ottawa Hospital While Ottawa researchers are known for their work on cancer-fighting viruses, one team is applying these viruses to a new target: HIV. Researchers at T
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New vaccine technology shows promise as a tool to combat the opioid crisis IMAGE: Dr. Gary Matyas' lab at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. view more Credit: MHRP Researchers with the U.S. Military HIV Research Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) report that an experimental heroin vaccine induced antibodies that prevented the drug from crossing the blood-brain barrier in mice and rats. The vaccine was co-developed at the National Inst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Theorists propose conditions needed to search for new form of matter UPTON, NY-- As scientists have explored the structure and properties of matter at ever deeper levels they've discovered many exotic new materials, including superconductors that carry electric current with no resistance, liquid crystals that align to produce brilliant dynamic displays, and materials exhibiting various forms of magnetism. Yet some exotic forms of matter exist only in theory, predi
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How electroconvulsive therapy relieves depression per animal experiments IMAGE: New brain cells develop in the brain's hippocampus after electroconvulsive therapy in a healthy mouse (top) and a mouse lacking the protein Narp (bottom). The new cells from the Narp-less... view more Credit: Irving Reti Laboratory In a study using genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered some new molecular details that appear to explain how electroconvulsi
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Popular Science
Little kids think birthday parties actually make you get older If you could avoid aging by refusing to have a birthday party, most adults would never celebrate again. Balloons and cake are a small price to pay for eternal youth. To grown-ups, this all sounds like a big joke. We all know you can’t manipulate time that way. But to kids , it’s not such a wild idea. Children as old as four and five think that the actual purpose of a birthday party is to increase
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Viden
Bitcoin-stifter blandt verdens 50 rigeste Mens Nationalbankens direktør nu går ud og advarer om, at Bitcoin er en boble, der venter på at briste , så har årets mest omtalte kryptovaluta gjort stifteren ekstremt velhavende. Kursen på 1 bitcoin er i skrivende stund over 120.000 danske kroner, og var søndag kun et par hundrede dollars fra at passere endnu en milepæl i form af 20.000 dollar (126.000 kroner). Læs også: Nationalbanken sammenli
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New Scientist - News
Drone-controlled movie cameras catch stunts from every angle Drone controlled cameras Euan Cherry/WENN.com By Chris Baraniuk Lights, drone swarm, action! Future movies may not be shot by lumbering cameras on rails, but drones that automatically fly around a scene, grabbing the best possible angles, without the need for human intervention. One project that aims to make this happen is by cinematography firm Technicolor and the French Institute for Research i
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New Scientist - News
The world urgently needs critical thinking, not gut feeling Kristian Buus/In Pictures via Getty IN A classic episode of The Simpsons , Marge and Homer’s night out at a class reunion ends in humiliation when one of Homer’s guilty secrets is exposed: he never graduated from high school. To get his diploma, he must pass a science test. As he sits down to retake the exam, he holds one of his trademark dialogues with his brain. “All right, brain. You don’t
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New Scientist - News
Mathematician set to publish ABC proof almost no one understands Is the ABC Conjecture finally proven? Richard Harding / Alamy Stock Photo By Timothy Revell It is a mathematical epic five years in the making . In 2012, Shinichi Mochizuki at Kyoto University in Japan produced a proof of a long standing problem called the ABC conjecture , but no one could understand it. Now the proof may soon be accepted for publication in a mathematical journal, which shoul
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Science | The Guardian
Forget youthquake: here are the real words of the year | Martin Kelner C asper Grathwohl has the rather fine title of president of dictionaries at Oxford University Press, so it was he who chose the much-discussed but rarely used “youthquake” as 2017 word of the year, over some other equally unlikely suggestions. I only mention that in case, in skimming over the story at this busy time of the year, you read Grathwohl alongside Antifa , gorpcore and broflake , and as
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Inside the Bone Lab Where Specimens Prepare for the Afterlife At San Francisco's California Academy of Sciences, there's no shortage of natural wonders. You can visit a dome-encapsulated rainforest, observe the dizzying jellyfish in their tanks, or ponder a wave of sea lion skulls stuck to a wall. But those skulls are really just a taste of what the place has to offer. This is no static natural history museum—it's a place where living, breathing science hap
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Ingeniøren
Berlins skandalelufthavn åbner i 2020 - siger deBerlins kommende superlufthavn har igen fået en åbningsdato. Det er ni år efter den oprindelige, og usikkerheden lurer fortsat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How AI can make us better at arguing Credit: Shutterstock The ability to argue, to express our reasoning to others, is one of the defining features of what it is to be human. Argument and debate form the cornerstones of civilised society and intellectual life. Processes of argumentation run our governments, structure scientific endeavour and frame religious belief. So should we worry that new advances in artificial intelligence are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars and Earth may not have been early neighbors A global view of Mars. Credit: NASA A study published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters posits that Mars formed in what today is the Asteroid Belt, roughly one and a half times as far from the sun as its current position, before migrating to its present location. The assumption has generally been that Mars formed near Earth from the same building blocks, but that conjecture raise
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Scientific American Content: Global
Lizards Learn a Silly Walk after Losing Their Tails Somewhere in the highlands of Afghanistan, a hungry fox pounces on a tasty-looking leopard gecko. But the lizard has a get-out-of-jail-free card: a detachable tail. The dropped appendage flails around long enough to distract the fox, allowing the gecko itself to run off and hide. Leopard geckos are one of a few lizard species that possess this self-amputation ability, known as autotomy. The t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA laser communication payload undergoing integration and testing The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration flight assembly arrived at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, in mid-September. The assembly will serve as the backbone for the payload, to which all of LCRD’s components will attach. Credit: NASA Goddard/Barbara Lambert NASA's Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) mission has begun integration and testing at NASA's Go
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's cosmic firefliesGalaxies glow like fireflies in this spectacular NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. This flickering swarm of cosmic fireflies is a rich cluster of galaxies called Abell 2163.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prescribed fire practitioners have new tools at their fingertips New Texas A&M AgriLife website, RxBurn App now available. Credit: Texas A&M As prescribed fire gains popularity as a range management tool, so does the need for up-to-the-minute information. To meet the growing need, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service developed a prescribed burning handbook funded by the Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute. "Professional prescribed fire practitioners in T
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals de-identified patient data can be re-identified The health data were published to contribute to “research, community information, policy development and policy evaluation.” Credit: iStock In August 2016, Australia's federal Department of Health published medical billing records of about 2.9 million Australians online. These records came from the Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) containing 1 billion li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drones count the costs of the 2017 B.C. wildfires Researchers at the University of British Columbia are using drones to survey the aftermath of the 2017 wildfires in B.C. "Currently, we are testing the use of drones for various forestry applications, including fire burn assessment following the 2017 wildfires," said Nicholas Coops, Canada Research Chair in Remote Sensing and professor in forest resources management at UBC. Coops and his studen
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Science | The Guardian
The tense truce between detectorists and archaeologists T here’s been reason for cheer in metal detecting circles, with the news this month that 2016 saw a record number of finds reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme . This announcement has spawned numerous congratulatory reports – including in the Guardian – detailing the wonderful things found, the back-stories of the lucky finders, and the sometimes extraordinary sums of money their finds hav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Simple, but powerful' model reveals mechanisms behind neuron development IMAGE: This is TSRI Associate Professor Brock Grill, PhD. view more Credit: The Scripps Research Institute JUPITER, Fla. - Dec. 18, 2017 - All things must come to an end. This is particularly true for neurons, especially the extensions called axons that transmit electrochemical signals to other nerve cells. Without controlled termination of individual neuron growth, the efficient and accura
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Flu Season Is Here Early. Why Didn't We See It Coming? If you’ve been putting off your flu shot until the season really gets going, wait no longer. It’s already here—and it’s looking like it’s going to be a doozy. Influenza viruses quietly circulate year-round in the US, but every winter they go big, triggering a seasonal epidemic of sniffles, sweats, and sore throats. And this year it’s come earlier than usual, just in time for a potential peak over
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WeWork’s New Startup Incubator Promises 'Fertile Paradise' If you work in a WeWork co-working space, you are used to seeing New Age versions of vaguely Soviet-era propaganda imploring you to “Hustle Harder” and “Do What You Love.” It’s a place for idealistic strivers, consumed by business success. Now, the real-estate company aims to help some startup founders take their hustling to a new level. WeWork is quietly recruiting startups to a new project call
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK plan to tackle plastic waste threat Image copyright EPA A four-point plan for tackling plastic waste has been outlined by the Environment Secretary Michael Gove. He told BBC News that he wants to reduce the amount of plastic used in the UK, and to make it simpler for people to recycle. Environmentalists fear Mr Gove will be reluctant to set tighter rules for firms which benefit from the current use of plastics. The Environment Secr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reservoir management alters flood frequency at the regional scale Lookout Point Dam in Oregon is seen overhead in this photo. Reservoir operations may challenge the basic assumption of stationarity used in flood frequency analysis. Credit: Rehman Abubakr / CC BY-SA 4.0. Flood frequency curve (FFC)—a mathematical expression of the probability distribution of floods—is an important tool for estimating flood risk, with a conventional assumption of stationary flood
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atoms rearrange in electrolyte and control ion flow under tough conditions The interface between iron-rich hematite (bottom) and water (top) changes as the surface becomes electrically charged. Oxygen atoms (red) re-arrange on the surface, filling in any spots where oxygen atoms were missing. Credit: Nathan Johnson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Minerals that make up rocks and soils are thrown out of equilibrium when the chemistry of their surroundings changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Political reckoning of authoritarians in the face of crises In the years since World War II, as the global geopolitical map was drawn and redrawn along ideological lines, the world witnessed ascension of many authoritarians. They often ruled for long stretches, but eventually most faced a political reckoning. The people they governed no longer accepted their authority and demanded change. The fate of authoritarians in the aftermath of such crises is the s
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Live Science
The 10 Best Science Hashtags of 2017 For peeking into the daily life of working scientists, there's nothing like Twitter. Science Twitter is home to passionate debates, clever quips and many — so many — fantastic images and GIFs. In 2017, the science community on Twitter raised its profile with a steady stream of hashtags, many of which broke into the mainstream. Here are 10 of our favorites. 1. #ScienceMarch The March for
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Live Science
Photos: Oldest Iron Objects Came from Outer Space A new study of many of the oldest iron objects ever found has discovered that they are all made with metal from meteorites. Archaeologists think that the technology of smelting iron from terrestrial iron ores was invented in the Near East around 1200 B.C. But some ancient iron objects are much older than that — including the oldest iron objects known, a handful of iron beads found in a tomb a
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Live Science
King Tut's Dagger Is 'Out of This World' Daggers, axes and jewelry made from rare iron during the Bronze Age are literally out of this world, according to new research finding that ancient artisans crafted these metal artifacts with iron from outer space carried to Earth by meteorites. The finding upends the idea that a few artisans during the Bronze Age in the ancient Near East knew how to make iron by smelting it from Earth's cr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic study uncovers fungal sex secrets, sheds light on candidiasis Candida glabrata . Credit: Ewa Ksiezopolska & Toni Gabaldon, CRG. A new genetic analysis of fungal yeast infections (candidiasis) from around the world has revealed surprising secrets about how these microbes reproduce and cause disease, according to a new study published in Current Biology from researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain. Working together with researcher
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum memory with record-breaking capacity based on laser-cooled atoms Cooled and trapped cloud of cold atoms used to realize the quantum memory protocol. The atoms reside in the center of the vacuum chamber, around which the magnetic coils necessary to trap the atoms are visible. The blue color is caused by two near-infrared lasers illuminating the atoms and driving a two-photon transition, which results in spontaneous emission of visible blue light. (Source: FUW,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new theory to describe conjugated polymer-polyelectrolyte blends Klas Tybrandt at Linköping University with power paper. He has put forward a theoretical model that explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The model has profound implications for applications in printed electronics, energy storage in paper and bioelectronics. Credit: Thor Balkhed LiU researcher Klas Tybrandt has developed a theoretical mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers test intelligence of African grey parrot Credit: CC0 Public Domain To look at him, Griffin doesn't seem like he'd be smarter than your typical 4-year-old—he's a bird, after all. Yet the African grey parrot can easily outperform young children on certain tests, including one that measures understanding of volume. The classic Piagetian test works like this: Show a child two identical glasses of juice and ask which he or she wants. The chi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Tracking aerosols from California's firesThe new Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite captured the presence of elevated absorbing aerosols – caused by fires – in the atmosphere off the west coast of the US on 12 December 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of starspot lifetimes based on light-curve amplitude and spectral typesunspots are regions on the sun's photosphere that appear darker than surrounding areas because they are cooler, usually by one or two thousand degrees Celsius. These spots are temporary phenomena caused by magnetic activity that results from the sun's rotation and the complex circulation of hot gas below its surface, and they are accompanied by solar flares, mass ejections and other energetic phe
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is That Airport Security Scanner Really Safe? The holiday season is upon us, and with millions of Americans expected to be traveling over the next few weeks there will be many more airport body scans than usual done by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Gone are the days of metal detectors and baggage screening alone as the means for airport security: The TSA introduced advanced imaging technology (AIT), better known as f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team proposes new space-weather forecasting method The sequence starts with solar minimum in 1996, shows the progression to solar max in 2001, and the return to solar minimum in 2006. Credit: Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Scientists from Skoltech, the University of Graz and the Royal Observatory of Belgium have developed a method to forecast the strength of the 11-year solar activity cycle. The results of this study may shed light into the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate new concepts for heat management An electron microscope image displaying the regular nanostructure of a photonic crystal. Scale bar: 5 micrometres = 0.005 millimetres. Credit: Markus Retsch For the first time, Prof. Dr. Markus Retsch and his research group at the University of Bayreuth have succeeded in precisely controlling temperature-dependent thermal conductivity with the help of polymer materials. These advanced functional
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ISS oxygen-recycling experiment takes flight Arthrospira is a single-cell microalgae that undergoes photosynthesis or the process by which cells convert light into energy, creating oxygen as a waste product. The biomass of Arthrospira is also edible, and generally known as spirulina. Credit: SCK-CEN When resources are limited, you have to work with what you have – especially in the harsh environment of space. Though the International Space
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vintage film offers new insights about Antarctica An American military C-130 cargo plane converted for Antarctic radar surveys at Williams Field in Antarctica’s McMurdo Sound. Credit: Courtesy SPRI Fifty years ago, a team of scientists crisscrossed Antarctica by plane, collecting radar images of the ice sheets. Now, a multi-continent effort to digitize and analyze that old data – with an assist from Hollywood – is providing invaluable insights a
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Dagens Medicin
Troels Krarup Hansen bliver chef for Steno Diabetes Center i Midtjylland Region Midtjylland henter endokrinologernes formand til at være direktør for Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Does the Flu Actually Kill People? One Sunday in November 20-year-old Alani Murrieta of Phoenix began to feel sick and left work early. She had no preexisting medical conditions but her health declined at a frighteningly rapid pace, as detailed by her family and friends in local media and on BuzzFeed News . The next day she went to an urgent care clinic, where she was diagnosed with the flu and prescribed the antiviral medication
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Science | The Guardian
End of the smashed phone screen? Self-healing glass discovered by accident Japanese researchers say they have developed a new type of glass that can heal itself from cracks and breaks. Glass made from a low weight polymer called “polyether-thioureas” can heal breaks when pressed together by hand without the need for high heat to melt the material. The research, published in Science , by researchers led by Professor Takuzo Aida from the University of Tokyo, promises heal
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Science | The Guardian
If we're going to have two-year degrees, leave them to revived polytechnics F or once there is something in an article by Simon Jenkins with which I agree. He wrote that “Britain’s wiping out of polytechnics in the 1990s and the subsequent suppression of 16-plus technical education was a disaster ... It left industry bereft of trained skills and work ethic, and reliant on foreign migrants.” Leaving aside the negative connotations of that last clause, I concur that lumpin
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Science | The Guardian
Favourite reads of 2017 - as chosen by scientists The Silk Roads; Inferior; Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race; Lila; Mr Shaha’s Recipe for wonders Some of my favourite reads of 2017 were a reminder that even in this information-flooded age there are books that can invert the map of the familiar. Peter Frankopan’s new history of the world, The Silk Roads , did that more or less literally for me – an important book for our Brexi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How fungi helped create life as we know it Today our world is visually dominated by animals and plants, but this world would not have been possible without fungi, say University of Leeds scientists. The researchers have carried out experiments where plants and fungi are grown in atmospheres resembling the ancient Earth, and, by incorporating their results into computer models, have shown that fungi were essential in the creation of an oxy
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Impatient With Colleges, Employers Design Their Own Courses Scott Gordon had just arrived in his job as provost of Eastern Washington University when an alumnus approached him at a meet-and-greet in the Skyline Ballroom of Spokane’s Hotel RL. The event was new, too. Called the Eagle Summit after the public university’s athletics mascot, it was meant to build enthusiasm among the school’s supporters. That has become increasingly crucial at a time when Amer
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #31: Styr computerspil ved tankens kraftPodcast: Kig på en bold. Tænk på at kaste den efter en dræberrobot. Og vupti; det sker. Velkommen til virtual reality styret ved tankens kraft.
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Ingeniøren
Nyt overlydsfly til forretningsfolkFra Los Angeles til Paris i eget overlydsfly bliver nyeste legetøj for milliardærer.
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Ørsted, Aarsleff og Foss har flere ledige jobs Experienced wind turbine engineer Ørsted Sales Manager til Dairy inden for Membrane Filtration GEA Process Engineering A/S Digital IC Designer Widex A/S CFD Engineer GEA Process Engineering A/S Anlægsingeniør til nyt data center team Søren Jensen Rådgivende Ingeniørfirma A/S SRO-Specialist til IT-afdelingens El/SRO-sektion HOFOR A/S Konsulent Danske Regioner Analog Electronics Engineer Widex A/S
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Ingeniøren
Nationalbanken: Det er livsfarligt at investere i bitcoins Det kan vel ikke undre at personer som Lars Rhode, har en stor selvisk interesse i at bevare det system som betaler hans løn? Lars Rohde er 63 år gammel. Han er gået på pension længe inden cryptocurrencies har betydning for økonomien. Det er et latterligt argument. Punkt ét: Bitcoin og de fleste andre crypto'er har væsentligt mere gennemskuelighed end kontanter. USD er stadig den største narkoval
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A model of Mars-like protoplanets shed light on early solar activity A scientist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and his colleagues from Austria and Germany constructed a physical and mathematical model of Mars- and Venus-sized planet formation. The team concluded that Mars had no chances to develop a thick atmosphere and biosphere. In the case of Venus it depended on solar activity: according to the scientists, it managed to keep its atmosphere due to the
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Ingeniøren
OVERBLIK: EU-ministre lægger arm om fremtidens elhandel Når EU's 28 energiministre mødes i Bruxelles i dag, er der lagt op til et langvarigt møde om fire vigtige dele af den såkaldte vinterpakke, som rummer EU Kommissionens mange forslag til et langt mere intenst EU-samarbejde på energifronten. At mødet bliver langvarigt konkluderer flere medier ud fra det faktum, at der er varslet overarbejde til tolkene. Ifølge en oversigt fra brancheorganisationen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists describe the structure of a prospective luminesce substance The structure of the new substance. Credit: Maksim Molokeev. A physicist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and Kirensky Institute of Physics Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS (IF) has described the structure and properties of a new substance obtained by his Chinese colleagues. These are layered crystals of rare earth metal hydroxides Ln 2 (OH) 4 SO 4 (Ln=Eu-Lu, Y) that may be eco-friendly s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal Mini coal-fired CHP plant on the basis of synthesis gas generator (CO + H2) and electrochemical current generator (experiment/factory). Credit: Sergey Shcheklein Bituminous coal comprises over 90 percent of organic fuels in the lithosphere of the Earth. Burning coal and other fossil fuels powers electricity generation (which is mainly happening at HPPs). However, the existing generation methods a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weatherChanges in Arctic sea ice have a direct impact on lower atmospheric conditions in the region. However, possible higher altitude and lower latitude impacts of changing sea ice are less well understood. Assessing such far-flung effects of Arctic sea ice change from observations is hindered by, amongst other things, the shortness of reliable observational data sets and difficulties in inferring cause
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's Huawei to expand in US smartphone market next year In this May 26, 2016 file photo, people walk past an illuminated logo for Huawei at a launch event for the Huawei MateBook in Beijing. An executive of Huawei says the Chinese smartphone brand will start sales in the United States through phone carriers next year 2018, in a move that would dramatically increase the American presence of the No. 3 global handset seller. The president of Huawei Techn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Primitive fossil bear with a sweet tooth identified from Canada's High Arctic December 18, 2017 - Researchers from the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have identified remains of a 3.5-million-year-old bear from a fossil-rich site in Canada's High Arctic. Their study shows not only that the animal is a close relative of the ancestor of modern bears--tracing its ancestry to extinct bears of similar age from East Asia--but that i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking effects of a food preservative on the gut microbiome IMAGE: David Sela and co-authors at UMass Amherst found unexpectedly that a preservative compound, food-grade epsilon (ε)-polylysine, temporarily perturbed the diversity of microbes in the mouse gut, but this change was... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Antimicrobial compounds added to preserve food during storage are believed to be benign and non-toxic to the consumer, but
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abuse and adversity in childhood linked to more cardiovascular risk in adulthoodChildren and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. Unhealthy responses to stress (such as overeating), mental health problems and disruptions in basic biologic processes may underlie the increased risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Primitive fossil bear with a sweet tooth identified from Canada's High Arctic Reconstruction of the mid-Pliocene Protarctos abstrusus in the Beaver Pond site area during the late summer. An extinct beaver, Dipoides , is shown carrying a tree branch in water. Plants include blackcrowberry ( Empetrum nigrum ) with ripened berries along the path of the bear, dwarf birch ( Betula nana ) in foreground; sweet gale ( Myrica gale ) carried by the beaver, sedges in water margins, f
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Science : NPR
Older Adults' Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep As people age they may forget more because their brain waves get out of sync, new research finds. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images As people age they may forget more because their brain waves get out of sync, new research finds. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images Older brains may forget more because they lose their rhythm a
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvad gør man, hvis Storebæltsbroen er ude af drift? Vores læser Leif Neland spørger: Plan B for Storebæltsbroen. Nu har flere gange ’verdens største krydstogtskib’ sejlet under Storebæltsbroen, hvor skibet nærmest skulle listes under med skohorn. Har man en plan B, hvis broen bliver sat ud af drift i en længere periode, f.eks. hvis en lastbil med kunstgødning torpederer en tankvogn og forårsager en eksplosion, eller andre katastrofescenarier? Færg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Bitcoin-based security bounces in trading debut on CME This Dec. 8, 2017, file photo shows the Chicago Board Options Exchange website announcing that bitcoin futures will start trading on the Cboe on Sunday evening Dec. 10. The CME Group, another security based on the price of bitcoin, the digital currency that has soared in value and volatility this year, began trading on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on Sunday, Dec. 17. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, F
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Ingeniøren
Storebæltsaftale gør tog 8 kr. billigere per passagerOPDATERET: Prisen for at køre over Storebælt bliver de kommende fem år sat ned med 25 procent for biler, lastbiler og persontog. For togpassagererne er gevinsten imidlertid til at overse.
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Feast on these mathematical snacks Merry Christmas guzzlers Today’s three morsels are all geometrical: 1) What fraction of the whole triangle is the red triangle? The large triangle is equilateral, meaning that its sides have the same length. The red triangle is constructed using the midpoints of two sides, and a vertex, of the equilateral triangle. Illustration: Geometry Snacks 2) Four semicircles with radius 2 are constructed in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin futures slide after trading debut on CME This Dec. 8, 2017, file photo shows the Chicago Board Options Exchange website announcing that bitcoin futures will start trading on the Cboe on Sunday evening Dec. 10. The CME Group, another security based on the price of bitcoin, the digital currency that has soared in value and volatility this year, began trading on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange on Sunday, Dec. 17. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, F
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota planning 10 purely electric vehicles by 2020sToyota plans to offer more than 10 purely electric vehicle models in its lineup by the early 2020s, marking the Japanese automaker's commitment to that growing technology sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows how birds work to sing together House finchnigel. Credit: Wikimedia Commons A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses. In many group-living animals pairs sing together to defend resources, but such signals can be much more complex than that of the acoustic stimulus on its own. In addition to songs, cooperating animals ma
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Ingeniøren
Fire tegn på at din kollega er narcissist De fleste har oplevet at have en kollega, der altid taler om sig selv. En person, der drukner sine omgivelse i ligegyldige historier, mens vedkommende konstant undgår at lytte til andre. Det kan være frustrerende, men faktisk kan nogle mennesker ikke gøre for det - de er bare utroligt narcissistiske. Forklaringen er ikke en undskyldning for usmagelig opførsel, men kan være med til at skabe forstå
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find racial disparities in intensity of care at the end of life African Americans at the end of life have significantly higher rates of hospital admission, emergency department (ED) visits, and discontinuing (also known as disenrolling from) hospice care than whites, according to a new study by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published today by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . Researchers examined whether race played
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Science | The Guardian
Drug that holds back return of ovarian cancer gets UK licence A pill treatment that holds back ovarian cancer and has the potential to prolong life has been launched in the UK. Trial results have shown that niraparib, taken once daily, can buy months of time before the disease returns after chemotherapy. In women with an inherited BRCA gene mutation, the time to relapse was increased from 5.5 months to 21 months compared with chemotherapy alone. Niraparib w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows how birds work to sing together A new paper published in Behavioral Ecology finds that songbirds may coordinate both vocally and visually to enhance their singing partners' responses. In many group-living animals pairs sing together to defend resources, but such signals can be much more complex than that of the acoustic stimulus on its own. In addition to songs, cooperating animals may produce movements that can be precisely
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What factors affect quality of life in older patients with cancer? A new study provides insights on the factors that affect health-related quality of life in older adults with cancer. Published early online in CANCER , a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings support the importance of addressing persistent symptoms, managing comorbidities, promoting leisure-time physical activity, and addressing financial challenges. Of the 15 million
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are parents doing enough to prepare 'substitute' babysitters over the holidays? IMAGE: National poll finds that less than half of parents left sitters emergency numbers, such as a parent's cell, doctor's office and family member of friend. view more Credit: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- As parents tackle their holiday lists, one item may be especially important- finding a babysitter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early diagnosis can save babies' lives: A guide to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) A new review provides guidance on a deadly, but rare, disease that is potentially curable if identified early. Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), known as the "bubble boy disease" in the 1970s, is treatable with a stem cell transplant, gene therapy and other treatments if identified at birth or soon after. The review, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) , is a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New RCT shows no benefit from probiotics, xylitol chewing gum in alleviating sore throats The use of probiotics and xylitol chewing gum to alleviate sore throat symptoms -- as an alternative to antibiotics -- appears to have no effect, according to a randomized controlled trial (RCT) published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) . "Simple over-the-counter treatments could potentially limit the effects of both bacterial and viral infections and help patients to manage sympto
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New on MIT Technology Review
CRISPR in 2018: Coming to a Human Near You Ever since scientists first used CRISPR to edit living human cells, in 2013, they’ve been saying that the possibilities for using it to treat disease are virtually endless. In just the past few years, advances in CRISPR have been happening at a breakneck speed—and companies have sprung up to commercialize the technology. Now, patients in Europe and the U.S. could be treated with CRISPR-based ther
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Ingeniøren
Mystisk internet-hændelse: Trafik til store netsteder blev routet via Rusland Tidligt onsdag i sidste uge opdagede man mindst to mistænkelige tilfælde, hvor den globale internettrafik til 80 virksomheder eller hjemmesider, herunder Google, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitch, NTT Communications og Riot Games, blev sendt via en russisk aktør. Ifølge BGPmon skete det i to perioder, der begge varede i tre minutter. Qrator Labs oplyser imidlertid, at de to perioder kun var topp
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Ingeniøren
Minister om forsinket it-sikkerhedsstrategi: Ambitionsniveauet var ikke tilstrækkeligt I februar næste år forventer regeringen at kunne præsentere en ny national strategi for cybersikkerhed. Det sker altså cirka 14 måneder efter den foregående strategi – Danmarks første – udløb. Der er ifølge innovationsminister Sophie Løhde flere grunde til, at strategien er forsinket. »De store hackerangreb i foråret viste os, at ambitionsniveauet ikke var tilstrækkeligt i forhold til det aktuell
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Ingeniøren
Selvkørende busser skal køre i gangene under hospital I sidste uge kunne Region Sjælland annoncere, at der var blevet afsat to millioner kroner til et to-årigt forsøg med selvkørende busser. Konkret bliver det trafikselskabet Movia, som kommer til at stå for forsøget, og som samtidig har forpligtet sig til at skyde et tilsvarende beløb ind. Regionsformand Jens Stenbæk (V) ser de selvkørende busser som erstatning for traditionel kollektiv trafik på e
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Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 18. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Over de næste 33 år skal verdens byer finde plads til 2,5 milliarder nye beboere. Hvor stor en del af urbaniseringen forventes at ske i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carnegie Mellon reveals inner workings of victorious AI PITTSBURGH--Libratus, an artificial intelligence that defeated four top professional poker players in no-limit Texas Hold'em earlier this year, uses a three-pronged approach to master a game with more decision points than atoms in the universe, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report. In a paper being published online today by the journal Science , Tuomas Sandholm, professor of computer
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Futurity.org
Bipolar disorder has many causes, not 1 No single genetic change, chemical imbalance, or life event lies at the heart of every case of bipolar disorder, once known as manic depression, researchers report. “There are many routes to this disease and many routes through it…” Rather, each patient’s experience with bipolar disorder—which nearly six million Americans have—varies from that of others with the condition. All of their experience
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Third of people not taking their prescribed diabetes medication due to side effects Diabetes patients who take the most commonly prescribed diabetes drug, metformin, are the least likely to follow medical advice regarding their medication due its side effects, a new article in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism reports. Researchers from the University of Surrey examined in detail how likely 1.6 million people with Type 2 diabetes were to take their medication. The st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of 'dirty' turkey after Brexit if UK strikes a US trade deal Consumers could be eating "dirty" chlorinated turkey at Christmas if the UK agrees a post-Brexit trade deal with the USA, according to a new briefing paper by leading food policy experts. The team - from the University of Sussex, Cardiff University and City, University of London - found US poultry, washed in up to four chemical disinfectants, does not meet EU safety standards. The academics also
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