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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of ruins of ancient Turkic monument surrounded by 14 pillars with inscriptions IMAGE: Drone aerial shot of the ancient Turkish ruins on Dongoin shiree. (North at the top.) Segments of the inscriptions and sarcophagus excavated from the hole at the center of the... view more Credit: Osaka University and Institute of History and Archaeology, Mongolian Academy of Science A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oldest fossils ever found show life on Earth began before 3.5 billion years ago This sample of rock was taken from the Apex Chert, a rock formation in western Australia that is among the oldest and best-preserved rock deposits in the world, in 1982 and was soon found to contain evidence of early life on Earth. A study published by UCLA and UW-Madison scientists in 2017 used sophisticated chemical analysis to confirm the microscopic structures found in the rock are indeed bio
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Ingeniøren
Italienske entreprenører vinder milliardentreprise på fynsk supersygehus Opgaven med at bygge den såkaldte vidensakse og behandlings- og sengeafsnit på det nye universitetshospital i Odense (Nyt OUH) er gået til et jointventure bestående af de to store italienske entreprenører CMP og Itinera. Det fortæller Region Syddanmark i en pressemeddelelse. Sådan tjekkes entreprenørerne Den ene af deltagerne på byggeriet, Initera er også en del af det konsortium, der har vundet
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LATEST

Popular Science
21 science books that make excellent gifts Even the biggest know-it-all on your gift list can't know everything. Give your science-hungry friends something fun for their brain to chew on with these engaging (and sometimes enraging) books about scientific topics. Your friend more a science fiction lover? We've got a list for those folks as well . Does chicken even taste like chicken anymore? Maryn McKenna dives deep into the world of antib
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change may favor large plant eaters over small competitorsIn the drive to survive changing climates, larger herbivores may fare slightly better than their smaller competitors, according to new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.
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cognitive science
Why Words Matter: What Cognitive Science Says About Prohibiting Certain Terms submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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Futurity.org
Medical stats have excluded the ‘invisible infertile’ The historical omission of certain groups from medical statistics casts doubt on the quality and accuracy of infertility research. Men, women of color, single and divorced women, and those who self-identify as LGBTQ are among the “invisible infertile,” say coauthors Liberty Barnes, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oregon, and Jasmine Fledderjohann of Lancaster University in the United
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Popular Science
If you're sad you're not Bitcoin rich, it's because your brain is wired for regret “Boy, I wish I had bought some Bitcoins .” That’s a sentence I’ve encountered from dozens of people in the past few months. I’ve heard it from friends, internet commenters, and people at the gym. But this time, it came from my dad. This is a guy who doesn’t have a credit card and often asks me to order stuff on Amazon for him, then pays me back in cash, yet here he was lamenting the fact that he
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Big Think
MyGoodness: Making charitable giving more effective It’s the holiday season, which to many people means a season of giving — to loved ones, colleagues, public radio and television, or to any number of the countless charities seeking support. Nearly a third of all annual charitable giving occurs in December, and many nonprofits raise as much as half of their annual funds from this year-end burst of giving. With so many charities relying on thes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing of regulatory stick and supportive carrot may keep businesses focused Coordinating the stick of regulation with the carrot of technical assistance may help small companies perform better environmentally and economically, according to a team of researchers. The researchers found in a study that when punitive measures from regulatory agencies were followed by help from business support organizations, companies were more likely to stick to voluntary improvement projec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH study uncovers clues about why common cancer drug causes hearing loss Scientists have found a new way to explain the hearing loss caused by cisplatin, a powerful drug used to treat many forms of cancer. Using a highly sensitive technique to measure and map cisplatin in mouse and human inner ear tissues, researchers found that forms of cisplatin build up in the inner ear. They also found a region in the inner ear that could be targeted for efforts to prevent hearing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silky secrets to make bones IMAGE: XSEDE supercomputers Stampede at TACC and Comet at SDSC helped study authors simulate the head piece domain of the cell membrane protein receptor integrin in solution, based on molecular dynamics... view more Credit: Davoud Ebrahimi Some secrets to repair our skeletons might be found in the silky webs of spiders, according to recent experiments guided by supercomputers. Scienti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotic device improves balance and gait in Parkinson's disease patients New York, NY--December 19, 2017--Some 50,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) every year. The American Institute of Neurology estimates there are one million people affected with this neurodegenerative disorder, with 60 years as average age of onset. Falls and fall-related injuries are a major issue for people with Parkinson's?up to 70 percent of advanced PD patients
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acoustic device makes piezoelectrics sing to a different tune WASHINGTON, D.C., December 19, 2017 -- In today's "internet of things," devices connect primarily over short ranges at high speeds, an environment in which surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have shown promise for years, resulting in the shrinking size of your smartphone. To obtain ever faster speeds, however, SAW devices need to operate at higher frequencies, which limits output power and can d
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cognitive science
WWII Code-Breaking Techniques Inspire Interpretation of Brain Data -- Enigma and motor neurons (GT, NU, UPenn) submitted by /u/benbrum [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new twist in the dark matter tale Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXO/Oxford University/J. Conlon et al. Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF/Univ. of Montreal/Gendron-Marsolais et al. Optical: NASA/ESA/IoA/A. Fabian et al.; DSS An innovative interpretation of X-ray data from a cluster of galaxies could help scientists fulfill a quest they have been on for decades: determining the nature of dark matter. The finding involves a new explanation for a set of res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby bongo born, more likely soon at Species Survival Center A bouncing baby bongo has been born in New Orleans. The 46-pound female is from a highly endangered antelope subspecies. It's the first calf conceived at the Species Survival Center created by the Audubon Nature Institute and San Diego Zoo Global. And more baby antelope are on their way, including two or three more Eastern bongo, curator Michelle Hatwood said Monday. That's an excellent sign
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny red animals dart in the dark under the ice of a frozen Quebec lake Copepods (Leptodiaptomus minutus) from Lake Simoncouche, (a) under the ice in winter (27 January 2017) and (b) in summer (18 September 2017). Photos were obtained from an inverted microscope with phase-contrast. From figure 2 of the paper. Credit: Guillaume Grosbois In a frozen lake in Quebec, tiny red creatures zip about under the ice. Guillaume Grosbois and Milla Rautio, researchers at Universi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storming the castle: New discovery in the fight against bacteria Colorized scanning electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria. Credit: NIAID, Flickr Bacteria must sense and respond to changes in their environment to survive, and their exterior membranes are their first line of defense. Exciting new research reveals a previously unappreciated aspect of this defense, which could be exploited to render antibiotic-resistant bacteria beatable. The research, publishin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines insecticide's effects on honey beesNeonicotinoid insecticides, including Syngenta's insecticide thiamethoxam, have been used globally on a wide range of crops through seed, soil, and foliage treatments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA calculated Philippines rainfall from Tropical Storm Kai-Tak A rainfall accumulation analysis of Tropical Cyclone Kai-Tak was created from Dec. 13 to 18, 2017. Tropical Cyclone Kai-Tak's approximate locations and positions are shown overlaid in white on this analysis. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moved through the central and southern Philippines over several days and weakened to a remnant low pressure area in the South China Sea. A
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The Atlantic
The People Who Read Your Airline Tweets Ten years ago, someone was wrong on the internet. And Morgan Johnston, sitting at his desk with the JetBlue communications team, wanted to set that person straight. These were the early days of Twitter, and JetBlue had begun to monitor the platform, even if they weren’t hopping in yet to tell weary travelers, “We hear you.” But here was this guy on Twitter mistaking JetBlue for ... EasyJet, the l
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The power of citizen video to create undeniable truths | Yvette Alberdingk ThijmCould smartphones and cameras be our most powerful weapons for social justice? Through her organization Witness, Yvette Alberdingk Thijm is developing strategies and technologies to help activists use video to protect and defend human rights. She shares stories of the growing power of distant witnesses -- and a call to use the powerful tools at our disposal to capture incidents of injustice.
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Science | The Guardian
Creation history: brilliant ideas build on the past | David Eagleman and Anthony Brandt T o understand one of the secrets of creativity, just peek into an art classroom in Denver, Colorado. The teacher asks her pupils to imitate the style of Vassily Kandinsky. The students mimic Kandinsky’s geometric abstractions, mastering brushwork and learning colour theory. If that was all there were to the lesson, it would be a hands-on class in art history. But the art teacher asks the student
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Popular Science
Four ways natural history museums can skew reality N atural history museums are magical places. They inspire awe and wonder in the natural world and help us understand our place within the animal kingdom. Behind the scenes, many of them are also undertaking world-changing science with their collections . But they are places for people, made by people. We might like to consider them logical places, centered on facts, but they can’t tell all the fa
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Gay, lesbian and bisexual high schoolers report ‘tragically high’ suicide risk High school students who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual are more likely to report planning or attempting suicide compared with their heterosexual peers, a new study finds. In a nationwide survey in 2015, 40 percent of adolescents who identified as one of these sexual minorities or said they were unsure of their orientation reported seriously considering suicide. Thirty-five percent reported
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ludwig researchers uncover mechanism behind metabolic vulnerability of some breast cancers DECEMBER 19, 2017, New York -- Scientists have known since the 1980s that many cancer cells are relatively sensitive to the deprivation of an essential amino acid known as methionine. It has, however, long been unclear what causes such marked dependency on methionine. Now, a Ludwig Cancer Research study published in the journal Science Signaling and led by Alex Toker, an investigator in the Ludwi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines insecticide's effects on honey bees Neonicotinoid insecticides, including Syngenta's insecticide thiamethoxam, have been used globally on a wide range of crops through seed, soil, and foliage treatments. A large-scale study, carried out in close coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency and published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry , demonstrates that residue levels in pollen and nectar from thiamethoxam-treated
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In delaying aging, caloric restriction becomes powerful research tool in human studies " Caloric Restriction and Restrictive Diets: Interventions that Target the Biology of Aging ," as the latest special issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences is titled, contains a collection of articles with new research on a proven method for increasing longevity in many organisms -- including the results of the first-ever clinical trial of caloric
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Big Think
Could We Use the Biological Clock to Fight Cancer? Our circadian rhythms control everything from our digestion to sleep to mood to our immune system. Yet, it’s been a big mystery, up until recently. In October in fact, three American scientists shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for uncovering how each cell coordinated with the internal body clock, which in turn is synchronized with the rotation of the Earth. Science is beginning to unravel the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The cyanide defense: How one bacterium inhibits predators with poisonA bacterium produces cyanide when under attack from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, a microbial predator found in rivers and soils that ingests its prey from the inside out, a new study has found. The researchers discovered that the prey produced levels of cyanide high enough to inhibit, but not kill, the B. bacteriovorus HD100.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA solves how a Jupiter jet stream shifts into reverseSpeeding through the atmosphere high above Jupiter's equator is an east-west jet stream that reverses course on a schedule almost as predictable as a Tokyo train's. Now, a research team has identified which type of wave forces this jet to change direction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quality of contact with grandparents is key to youths' views of ageismA new study from Belgium sought to identify the factors underlying ageism. It found that ageist stereotypes in children and adolescents generally decrease around ages 10 to 12, and that young people who say they have very good contact with their grandparents have the lowest levels of ageism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowersA wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat, a new study has discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expanding solar energy without encroaching on potential farmland and conservation areasAs the world tries to combat climate change, sustainable forms of energy are on the rise. Solar energy is of particular interest, but arrays of photovoltaic panels take up a lot of space and can compete for prime food-producing land. Now researchers have found plenty of places to install solar devices without taking up arable land, while generating enough power to help regions meet their energy go
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum trick blocks background 'chatter' in sensing devicesA new protocol has solved a common problem in quantum sensing devices, which should enable a new generation of ultra-sensitive sensors with application in medical imaging and defense.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity can add five weeks of asthma symptoms per year in preschoolersAsthma affects almost 1 in 10 children in the US and is a leading cause of emergency room visits and hospitalizations in preschoolers. According to new research, symptoms may be worse for children ages 2 to 5 who are overweight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gaining insight into the molecular mechanisms behind squamous cell cancerResearchers report a new molecular mechanisms regulating cellular fate of squamous cell carcinomas.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Walmart’s Food Safety Solution Built on the IBM Blockchain PlatformFrank Yiannas, Walmart’s Vice President of Food Safety, explains how Walmart can track food products through its supply chain using the IBM Blockchain Platform.
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The Atlantic
The Soviet Era's Deadliest Scientist Is Regaining Popularity in Russia Although it’s impossible to say for sure, Trofim Lysenko probably killed more human beings than any individual scientist in history. Other dubious scientific achievements have cut thousands upon thousands of lives short: dynamite, poison gas, atomic bombs. But Lysenko, a Soviet biologist, condemned perhaps millions of people to starvation through bogus agricultural research—and did so without hes
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New on MIT Technology Review
IoT Voices with WIREDListen to Angela Ruggerio, CEO and Co-founder of the Sports Innovation Lab and four time Olympic Ice Hockey player share her vision of sports and technology.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Retail Sector Is in Upheaval, and Women Are Taking the Brunt of the Job Losses A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Won’t Even Say What It Costs When the U.S. government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the U.S. government says a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are bones discovered under an Exeter street from the first turkey dinner in England?Bones dug up from under an Exeter street may be the remains of the first ever turkey dinner in England, archaeologists believe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New methods reveal the biomechanics of blood clottingThe ability to map both the magnitude and orientation of forces on a cell provides a powerful tool for investigating not just blood clotting but a range of biomechanical processes, from immune cell activation and embryo development to the replication and spread of cancer cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New type of quantum materialPhysicists searching for an explanation for high-temperature superconductivity were surprised when their theoretical model pointed to the existence of a never-before-seen material in a different realm of physics -- that of topological quantum materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New evidence supports HIV screening in young adulthoodA new study suggests that the most beneficial age for a one-time screening HIV test of the general population would be age 25.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Images of the brain refute a theory of the 60s on the domain of languageA region of the brain that extends through both hemispheres, the planum temporale, is larger in the left than in the right hemisphere. The finding was linked in the 1960s with the hosting of language processing in the left hemisphere, but now researchers show that this asymmetry is not a marker of language lateralization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More complex biological systems evolve more freelyEvolution acts on changes in the phenotype, which occur when mutations change the underlying genotype. But the changes to the phenotype that can be produced by mutations is not without bounds. Researchers found that in a gene regulatory system in the bacterium Escherichia coli, the more components that are mutated, the more freely the system can evolve.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Couple up for long-term happinessBeing married has a lifelong effect on how content people are, according to a new study that investigated people's levels of well-being based on their marital status. Using data from two UK surveys, researchers showed that an even greater sense of well-being was reported by people who think of their spouse as their best friend.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Clarifying results and prevailing models for the evolution of Puf proteins and their RNA targets [Biological Sciences] Clarifying results and prevailing models for the evolution of Puf proteins and their RNA targets The PNAS paper “Recurrent rewiring and emergence of RNA regulatory networks” by Wilinski et al. ( 1 ) has a number of flaws. The paper incorrectly interprets the data underlying its major, novel claim about target rewiring. The paper also presents models that conflict with previous results and does no
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Hogan: Direct evidence of RNA-protein interactions and rewiring [Biological Sciences] Reply to Hogan: Direct evidence of RNA–protein interactions and rewiring Daniel Wilinski a , Natascha Buter b , Andrew D. Klocko c , Christopher P. Lapointe d , Eric U. Selker e , Audrey P. Gasch f , and Marvin Wickens g , 1 a Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI 48109; b Promega Corp , Madison, WI 53711; c Department of Chemistry an
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
No reason to reconsider HIF-2 as an oncogene in neuroblastoma and other cancer forms [Biological Sciences] No reason to reconsider HIF-2 as an oncogene in neuroblastoma and other cancer forms Sofie Mohlin a , Kristoffer von Stedingk a , 1 , Alexander Pietras b , and Sven Påhlman b , 2 a Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University , 22185 Lund, Sweden; b Translational Cancer Research, Lund University Cancer Center at Medicon Village, Lund University , 22381 Lund, Sweden Westerlund et a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Mohlin et al.: High levels of EPAS1 are closely associated with key features of low-risk neuroblastoma [Biological Sciences] Reply to Mohlin et al.: High levels of EPAS1 are closely associated with key features of low-risk neuroblastoma Isabelle Westerlund a , Yao Shi a , Konstantinos Toskas a , Stuart M. Fell a , Shuijie Li a , b , Erik Södersten a , Susanne Schlisio a , b , and Johan Holmberg a , 1 a Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Karolinska Institutet , 171 77 Stockho
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Extending density functional embedding theory for covalently bonded systems [Chemistry] Extending density functional embedding theory for covalently bonded systems Kuang Yu a , 1 and Emily A. Carter b , 2 a Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University , Princeton, NJ 08544-5263; b School of Engineering and Applied Science, Princeton University , Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 Contributed by Emily A. Carter, November 1, 2017 (sent for review July 18, 2017; revie
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of removing Kupffer cells on nanoparticle tumor delivery [Engineering] Effect of removing Kupffer cells on nanoparticle tumor delivery Anthony J. Tavares a , b , 1 , Wilson Poon a , b , 1 , Yi-Nan Zhang a , b , 1 , Qin Dai a , b , Rickvinder Besla c , Ding Ding a , b , 2 , Ben Ouyang a , b , d , Angela Li c , Juan Chen e , Gang Zheng e , f , Clinton Robbins c , g , and Warren C. W. Chan a , b , h , i , j , 3 a Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering , U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Development and validation of a high-throughput transcriptomic biomarker to address 21st century genetic toxicology needs [Applied Biological Sciences] Development and validation of a high-throughput transcriptomic biomarker to address 21st century genetic toxicology needs Heng-Hong Li a , b , 1 , Renxiang Chen a , b , c , Daniel R. Hyduke a , b , Andrew Williams d , Roland Frötschl e , Heidrun Ellinger-Ziegelbauer f , Raegan O’Lone g , Carole L. Yauk d , Jiri Aubrecht h , and Albert J. Fornace, Jr. a , b , 1 a Department of Biochemistry and Mol
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into how GTP-dependent conformational changes in a metallochaperone UreG facilitate urease maturation [Biochemistry] Structural insights into how GTP-dependent conformational changes in a metallochaperone UreG facilitate urease maturation Man Hon Yuen a , 1 , Yu Hang Fong a , 1 , Yap Shing Nim a , 1 , Pak Ho Lau a , and Kam-Bo Wong a , 2 a School of Life Sciences, Centre for Protein Science and Crystallography, Partner State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong , Hong Kong, C
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Aminoglycoside interactions and impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome [Biochemistry] Aminoglycoside interactions and impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome Irina Prokhorova a , 1 , Roger B. Altman b , 1 , Muminjon Djumagulov a , Jaya P. Shrestha c , Alexandre Urzhumtsev a , d , Angelica Ferguson b , e , Cheng-Wei Tom Chang c , Marat Yusupov a , 2 , Scott C. Blanchard b , e , 2 , and Gulnara Yusupova a , 2 a Department of Integrated Structural Biology, Institut de Génétique et de Biol
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
pH-sensitive vibrational probe reveals a cytoplasmic protonated cluster in bacteriorhodopsin [Biophysics and Computational Biology] pH-sensitive vibrational probe reveals a cytoplasmic protonated cluster in bacteriorhodopsin Victor A. Lorenz-Fonfria a , b , c , 1 , Mattia Saita a , Tzvetana Lazarova d , Ramona Schlesinger e , and Joachim Heberle a a Experimental Molecular Biophysics, Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin , 14195 Berlin, Germany; b Institute of Molecular Science, Universitat de València , 46980 Pater
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular chaperones maximize the native state yield on biological times by driving substrates out of equilibrium [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Molecular chaperones maximize the native state yield on biological times by driving substrates out of equilibrium Shaon Chakrabarti a , b , Changbong Hyeon c , Xiang Ye d , George H. Lorimer e , f , 1 , and D. Thirumalai g , 1 a Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute , Boston, MA 02115; b Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
STRIP1, a core component of STRIPAK complexes, is essential for normal mesoderm migration in the mouse embryo [Developmental Biology] STRIP1, a core component of STRIPAK complexes, is essential for normal mesoderm migration in the mouse embryo Hisham Bazzi a , b , c , 1 , Ekaterina Soroka b , c , Heather L. Alcorn a , and Kathryn V. Anderson a , 1 a Developmental Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute , New York, NY 10065; b Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital of Cologne , 50937 Cologne, Germany;
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mapping local and global variability in plant trait distributions [Ecology] Author contributions: E.E.B., A.D., H.F.-M., M.C., K.R.W., F.F., A.B., O.K.A., J.K., and P.B.R. designed research; E.E.B. and A.D. performed research; E.E.B., A.D., H.F.-M., and J.K. analyzed data; and E.E.B., A.D., H.F.-M., M.C., K.R.W., A.B., O.K.A., J.K., B.A., B.B., G.B., B.B.-L., K.A.B., C.B., G.C., B.E.L.C., J.H.C.C., J.M.C., D.C., F.T.d.V., S.D., T.F.D., E.F., A.G.-M., N.G., W.H., W.N.H.,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kras mutant genetically engineered mouse models of human cancers are genomically heterogeneous [Genetics] Kras mutant genetically engineered mouse models of human cancers are genomically heterogeneous Wei-Jen Chung a , 1 , 2 , Anneleen Daemen a , 1 , Jason H. Cheng b , Jason E. Long b , Jonathan E. Cooper b , Bu-er Wang b , Christopher Tran b , Mallika Singh b , 3 , Florian Gnad a , 4 , Zora Modrusan c , Oded Foreman d , and Melissa R. Junttila b , 5 a Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Genentec
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CD1b-restricted GEM T cell responses are modulated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid meromycolate chains [Immunology and Inflammation] CD1b-restricted GEM T cell responses are modulated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid meromycolate chains Andrew Chancellor a , b , Anna S. Tocheva a , 1 , Chris Cave-Ayland c , Liku Tezera a , Andrew White b , Juma’a R. Al Dulayymi d , John S. Bridgeman e , Ivo Tews f , g , Susan Wilson a , h , Nikolai M. Lissin i , Marc Tebruegge a , g , j , k , l , m , Ben Marshall a , g , j , Sally Sh
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Point-of-care device to diagnose and monitor neonatal jaundice in low-resource settings [Medical Sciences] Point-of-care device to diagnose and monitor neonatal jaundice in low-resource settings Pelham A. Keahey a , Mathieu L. Simeral a , Kristofer J. Schroder a , Meaghan M. Bond a , Prince J. Mtenthaonnga b , Robert H. Miros c , Queen Dube b , and Rebecca R. Richards-Kortum a , 1 a Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77030; b Department of Pediatrics, Queen Elizabeth Central Ho
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA replication timing alterations identify common markers between distinct progeroid diseases [Medical Sciences] DNA replication timing alterations identify common markers between distinct progeroid diseases Juan Carlos Rivera-Mulia a , Romain Desprat b , Claudia Trevilla-Garcia a , Daniela Cornacchia c , Hélène Schwerer d , Takayo Sasaki a , Jiao Sima a , Tyler Fells a , Lorenz Studer c , Jean-Marc Lemaitre b , d , 1 , and David M. Gilbert a , e , 1 a Department of Biological Science, Florida State Univers
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epigenetic therapy activates type I interferon signaling in murine ovarian cancer to reduce immunosuppression and tumor burden [Medical Sciences] Epigenetic therapy activates type I interferon signaling in murine ovarian cancer to reduce immunosuppression and tumor burden Meredith L. Stone a , 1 , 2 , Katherine B. Chiappinelli a , 1 , 3 , Huili Li a , Lauren M. Murphy a , Meghan E. Travers a , Michael J. Topper a , Dimitrios Mathios b , Michael Lim b , Ie-Ming Shih c , Tian-Li Wang d , Chien-Fu Hung d , Vipul Bhargava e , Karla R. Wiehagen
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
An endogenous retroviral envelope syncytin and its cognate receptor identified in the viviparous placental Mabuya lizard [Microbiology] An endogenous retroviral envelope syncytin and its cognate receptor identified in the viviparous placental Mabuya lizard Guillaume Cornelis a , b , 1 , 2 , Mathis Funk a , b , 1 , Cécile Vernochet a , b , Francisca Leal c , 3 , Oscar Alejandro Tarazona c , 4 , Guillaume Meurice d , Odile Heidmann a , b , Anne Dupressoir a , b , Aurélien Miralles e , Martha Patricia Ramirez-Pinilla c , and Thierry
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enigmatic origin of the poxvirus membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum shown by 3D imaging of vaccinia virus assembly mutants [Microbiology] Enigmatic origin of the poxvirus membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum shown by 3D imaging of vaccinia virus assembly mutants Andrea S. Weisberg a , Liliana Maruri-Avidal a , Himani Bisht a , Bryan T. Hansen b , Cindi L. Schwartz b , Elizabeth R. Fischer b , Xiangzhi Meng c , Yan Xiang c , and Bernard Moss a , 1 a Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseas
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lipid bilayer mediates ion-channel cooperativity in a model of hair-cell mechanotransduction [Neuroscience] Lipid bilayer mediates ion-channel cooperativity in a model of hair-cell mechanotransduction Francesco Gianoli a , Thomas Risler b , c , 1 , 2 , and Andrei S. Kozlov a , 1 , 2 a Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London , London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom; b Laboratoire Physico Chimie Curie, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, 75005 Paris, France; c Sorbonne Universités, UPMC
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Disease onset in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism correlates with expansion of a hexameric repeat within an SVA retrotransposon in TAF1 [Neuroscience] Disease onset in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism correlates with expansion of a hexameric repeat within an SVA retrotransposon in TAF1 D. Cristopher Bragg a , b , 1 , Kotchaphorn Mangkalaphiban a , b , Christine A. Vaine a , b , Nichita J. Kulkarni a , b , David Shin a , b , Rachita Yadav a , c , Jyotsna Dhakal a , b , Mai-Linh Ton a , b , Anne Cheng a , b , Christopher T. Russo a , b , Mark Ang d
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence for sortilin modulating regional accumulation of human tau prions in transgenic mice [Neuroscience] Evidence for sortilin modulating regional accumulation of human tau prions in transgenic mice Noah R. Johnson a , 1 , Carlo Condello a , b , 1 , Shenheng Guan c , Abby Oehler a , Julia Becker a , Marta Gavidia a , George A. Carlson a , b , Kurt Giles a , b , and Stanley B. Prusiner a , b , d , 2 a Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of Californi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Encoding model of temporal processing in human visual cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Encoding model of temporal processing in human visual cortex Anthony Stigliani a , Brianna Jeska a , and Kalanit Grill-Spector a , b , 1 a Department of Psychology, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305 Edited by Thomas A. Carlson, University of Sydney, and accepted by Editorial Board Member Marlene Behrmann November
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crystal structure of human IRAK1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Crystal structure of human IRAK1 Li Wang a , b , Qi Qiao a , b , Ryan Ferrao a , b , Chen Shen a , b , John M. Hatcher a , c , Sara J. Buhrlage a , c , Nathanael S. Gray a , c , and Hao Wu a , b , 1 a Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02115; b Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital , Boston, MA 02115;
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SCWISh network is essential for survival under mechanical pressure [Cell Biology] SCWISh network is essential for survival under mechanical pressure Morgan Delarue a , b , 1 , Gregory Poterewicz b , Ori Hoxha a , Jessica Choi a , Wonjung Yoo a , Jona Kayser a , Liam Holt b , 1 , 2 , and Oskar Hallatschek a , 1 , 2 a Department of Physics and Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720; b Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone Medical
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protein kinase C and calcineurin cooperatively mediate cell survival under compressive mechanical stress [Cell Biology] Protein kinase C and calcineurin cooperatively mediate cell survival under compressive mechanical stress Ranjan Mishra a , b , Frank van Drogen a , Reinhard Dechant a , Soojung Oh c , Noo Li Jeon c , d , Sung Sik Lee a , e , 1 , and Matthias Peter a , 1 a Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, ETH Zürich , 8093 Zürich, Switzerland; b Molecular Life Science PhD Program, Life Science Zür
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
G{alpha}s protein binds ubiquitin to regulate epidermal growth factor receptor endosomal sorting [Cell Biology] Gα s protein binds ubiquitin to regulate epidermal growth factor receptor endosomal sorting Xuezhi Li a , Danny Létourneau b , Brian Holleran a , Richard Leduc a , Pierre Lavigne b , and Christine Lavoie a , 1 a Department of Pharmacology-Physiology, Institut de Pharmacologie de Sherbrooke, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke , Sherbrooke, QC, Canada J1H 5N4; b Depar
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Superhydrophobic diving flies (Ephydra hians) and the hypersaline waters of Mono Lake [Chemistry] Superhydrophobic diving flies ( Ephydra hians ) and the hypersaline waters of Mono Lake Floris van Breugel a , 1 and Michael H. Dickinson a a Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA 91125 Edited by Jerrold Meinwald, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and approved October 18, 2017 (received for review August 22, 2017) Significance Superhydrophobic surfaces have been o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Terminal attack trajectories of peregrine falcons are described by the proportional navigation guidance law of missiles [Engineering] Terminal attack trajectories of peregrine falcons are described by the proportional navigation guidance law of missiles Caroline H. Brighton a , Adrian L. R. Thomas a , and Graham K. Taylor a , 1 a Department of Zoology, University of Oxford , OX1 3PS, United Kingdom Edited by David Lentink, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and accepted by Editorial Board Member Neil H. Shubin October 25, 2017
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rapid diagnostic testing platform for iron and vitamin A deficiency [Engineering] Rapid diagnostic testing platform for iron and vitamin A deficiency Zhengda Lu a , Dakota O’Dell b , Balaji Srinivasan c , Elizabeth Rey a , Ruisheng Wang d , Sasank Vemulapati a , Saurabh Mehta c , e , 1 , and David Erickson a , c , e , 1 a Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY 14853; b Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University , Ithaca,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rapid adaptive evolution in novel environments acts as an architect of population range expansion [Evolution] Rapid adaptive evolution in novel environments acts as an architect of population range expansion M. Szűcs a , b , 1 , 2 , M. L. Vahsen a , c , d , 1 , B. A. Melbourne e , C. Hoover a , C. Weiss-Lehman e , and R. A. Hufbauer a , c , f a Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University , Fort Collins, CO 80523-1177; b Department of Entomology, Michigan State Un
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Islet cells share promoter hypomethylation independently of expression, but exhibit cell-type-specific methylation in enhancers [Medical Sciences] Islet cells share promoter hypomethylation independently of expression, but exhibit cell-type–specific methylation in enhancers Daniel Neiman a , 1 , Joshua Moss a , 1 , Merav Hecht a , Judith Magenheim a , Sheina Piyanzin a , A. M. James Shapiro b , Eelco J. P. de Koning c , d , Aharon Razin a , Howard Cedar a , Ruth Shemer a , 2 , and Yuval Dor a , 2 a Department of Developmental Biology and Ca
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
An inclusive Research Education Community (iREC): Impact of the SEA-PHAGES program on research outcomes and student learning [Microbiology] Author contributions: D.I.H., M.J.G., S.G.C., R.A.G., D.J.-S., W.H.P., D.A.R., V.S., D.J.A., and G.F.H. designed research; D.I.H., SEA-PHAGES, L.B., A.B., N.K., and W.H.P. performed research; D.I.H., S.-P., L.B., A.B., and N.K. analyzed data; S.G.C., R.A.G., D.J.-S., W.H.P., D.A.R., D.J.A., and G.F.H. performed program development and support; D.I.H., SEA-PHAGES, L.B., and N.K. collected and anal
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MotI (DgrA) acts as a molecular clutch on the flagellar stator protein MotA in Bacillus subtilis [Microbiology] MotI (DgrA) acts as a molecular clutch on the flagellar stator protein MotA in Bacillus subtilis Sundharraman Subramanian a , b , Xiaohui Gao a , b , Charles E. Dann, III a , 1 , and Daniel B. Kearns c , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Indiana University , Bloomington, IN 47405; b Biochemistry Graduate Program, Indiana University , Bloomington, IN 47405; c Department of Biology, Indiana University ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into the roles of the IcmS-IcmW complex in the type IVb secretion system of Legionella pneumophila [Microbiology] Structural insights into the roles of the IcmS–IcmW complex in the type IVb secretion system of Legionella pneumophila Jianpo Xu a , 1 , Dandan Xu a , 1 , Muyang Wan a , Li Yin a , Xiaofei Wang a , Lijie Wu b , Yanhua Liu c , d , Xiaoyun Liu c , d , Yan Zhou a , 2 , and Yongqun Zhu a , 2 a Life Sciences Institute and Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, Zhejiang University , Hangzhou, Zh
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Contributions of primate prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe to temporal-order memory [Neuroscience] Contributions of primate prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe to temporal-order memory Yuji Naya a , b , c , d , e , 1 , He Chen b , f , Cen Yang b , f , and Wendy A. Suzuki g a School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University , Beijing 100805, China; b Center for Life Sciences, Peking University , Beijing 100805, China; c International Data Group (IDG)/McGovern Institute f
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
TRPV1 is a physiological regulator of {mu}-opioid receptors [Pharmacology] TRPV1 is a physiological regulator of μ-opioid receptors Paul C. Scherer a , 1 , Nicholas W. Zaccor a , 1 , Neil M. Neumann b , Chirag Vasavda a , Roxanne Barrow a , Andrew J. Ewald b , Feng Rao c , Charlotte J. Sumner a , d , and Solomon H. Snyder a , e , f , 2 a The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, MD 21205; b Department of C
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Efficient targeted DNA editing and replacement in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using Cpf1 ribonucleoproteins and single-stranded DNA [Plant Biology] Efficient targeted DNA editing and replacement in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using Cpf1 ribonucleoproteins and single-stranded DNA Aron Ferenczi a , Douglas Euan Pyott a , Andromachi Xipnitou a , and Attila Molnar a , 1 a Institute of Molecular Plant Sciences, University of Edinburgh , Edinburgh EH9 3BF, United Kingdom Edited by Sabeeha S. Merchant, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, and a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Recurring infection with ecologically distinct HPV types can explain high prevalence and diversity [Population Biology] Recurring infection with ecologically distinct HPV types can explain high prevalence and diversity Sylvia L. Ranjeva a , 1 , Edward B. Baskerville a , Vanja Dukic b , Luisa L. Villa c , Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce d , Anna R. Giuliano e , Greg Dwyer a , and Sarah Cobey a a Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637; b Department of Applied Mathematics, University of C
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Musical training sharpens and bonds ears and tongue to hear speech better [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Musical training sharpens and bonds ears and tongue to hear speech better Yi Du a , b , c , 1 and Robert J. Zatorre b , d a CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing, China 100101; b Montréal Neurological Institute, McGill University , Montréal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4; c Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early childhood stress exposure, reward pathways, and adult decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Early childhood stress exposure, reward pathways, and adult decision making Rasmus M. Birn a , 1 , Barbara J. Roeber b , and Seth D. Pollak b , c , 1 a Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison , WI 53719; b Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison , WI 53705; c Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison , WI 53706 Edited by Valerie
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Kang et al., Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations prevent membrane localization of PH domains through the formation of Ca2+-phosphoinositides [Correction]BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations prevent membrane localization of PH domains through the formation of Ca2+-phosphoinositides,” by Jin Ku Kang, Ok-Hee Kim, June Hur, So Hee Yu, Santosh Lamichhane, Jin Wook Lee, Uttam Ojha, Jeong Hee Hong, Cheol Soon Lee, Ji-Young Cha, Young Jae Lee, Seung-Soon lm, Young...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
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Correction for Giang et al., Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus,” by Erick Giang, Marcus Dorner, Jannick C. Prentoe, Marlène Dreux, Matthew J. Evans, Jens Bukh, Charles M. Rice, Alexander Ploss, Dennis R. Burton, and Mansun Law, which was first published April 4, 2012;...
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Correction for Gerth et al., Intersectin associates with synapsin and regulates its nanoscale localization and function [Correction] Correction for Gerth et al., Intersectin associates with synapsin and regulates its nanoscale localization and function NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Intersectin associates with synapsin and regulates its nanoscale localization and function,” by Fabian Gerth, Maria Jäpel, Arndt Pechstein, Gaga Kochlamazashvili, Martin Lehmann, Dmytro Puchkov, Franco Onofri, Fabio Benfenati, Alexander G. Nikonenko,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue How alkali flies thrive in Mono Lake To feed and lay their eggs, alkali flies ( Ephydra hians ) crawl down calcium carbonate rocks into California’s Mono Lake, where the water is both highly alkaline and three times as salty as the Pacific Ocean. The flies stay dry during their descent into this harsh environment within a protective air bubble that coalesces around their hydrophobic
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How T cells grasp mycobacterial lipid antigens [Immunology and Inflammation] How T cells grasp mycobacterial lipid antigens D. Branch Moody a , 1 a Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02115 Solving the mechanism by which MHC I and II proteins capture protein fragments represented a triumph for T cell biologists. This discovery highlighted the peptidic nature of antigens
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Function of a retroviral envelope protein in the placenta of a viviparous lizard [Microbiology] Function of a retroviral envelope protein in the placenta of a viviparous lizard Retroviruses are enveloped RNA viruses able to integrate their genome as a DNA copy into the genome of the infected cell. For this, two viral enzymes are required: the reverse transcriptase producing a DNA copy from the RNA genome and the integrase. When a retrovirus infects an oocyte or a sperm cell, the integrated
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Country-by-genotype-by-environment interaction in childhood academic achievement [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Country-by-genotype-by-environment interaction in childhood academic achievement Why children differ in their cognitive abilities, including their academic achievement, is a function of their environment and genotype, and this function may be complex, involving gene–environment (GxE) interaction and gene–environment (GE) covariation. The paper by Figlio et al. ( 1 ) in PNAS on academic achievemen
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chemical physics of water [Introductions] Chemical physics of water Pablo G. Debenedetti a , 1 and Michael L. Klein b , 1 a Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University , Princeton, NJ 08544; b Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Temple University , Philadelphia, PA 19122 There is hardly any aspect of our lives that is not profoundly influenced by water. From climate to commerce and agriculture to he
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Water is an active matrix of life for cell and molecular biology [Biological Sciences] Water is an active matrix of life for cell and molecular biology Philip Ball a , 1 a Private address, London SE22 0PE, United Kingdom Edited by Pablo G. Debenedetti, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved May 1, 2017 (received for review March 7, 2017) Abstract Szent-Győrgi called water the “matrix of life” and claimed that there was no life without it. This statement is true, as far a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Supercooled and glassy water: Metastable liquid(s), amorphous solid(s), and a no-man’s land [Physical Sciences] Supercooled and glassy water: Metastable liquid(s), amorphous solid(s), and a no-man’s land Philip H. Handle a , b , 1 , 2 , Thomas Loerting b , 1 , 2 , and Francesco Sciortino a , 1 , 2 a Department of Physics, Sapienza University of Rome , I-00185 Roma, Italy; b Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck , A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria Edited by Pablo G. Debenedetti, Princeton Univers
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Solar thermochemical splitting of water to generate hydrogen [Physical Sciences] Solar thermochemical splitting of water to generate hydrogen C. N. R. Rao a , 1 and Sunita Dey a a Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Centre of Excellence, Sheikh Saqr Laboratory, International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research , Bangalore 560064, India Edited by Michael L. Klein, Temple Unive
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Companies seek food safety using a microbiome approach [Applied Biological Sciences] Inner Workings: Companies seek food safety using a microbiome approach In a pet food factory in Reno, NV, researchers from IBM Research and Mars, Inc. are conducting an experiment that may someday revolutionize food safety. For more than two years, they’ve taken regular samples of poultry meal—a protein-rich mash of chicken parts—as it enters the factory on its way to becoming pet food. Each samp
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conserved salt-bridge competition triggered by phosphorylation regulates the protein interactome [Biochemistry] Conserved salt-bridge competition triggered by phosphorylation regulates the protein interactome John J. Skinner a , b , 1 , 2 , Sheng Wang c , d , 1 , 3 , Jiyoung Lee a , Colin Ong a , Ruth Sommese e , Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan e , Wolfgang Koelmel f , Maria Hirschbeck f , Hermann Schindelin f , Caroline Kisker f , Kristina Lorenz g , h , i , Tobin R. Sosnick b , 4 , and Marsha Rich Rosner a , 4
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
XFEL structures of the influenza M2 proton channel: Room temperature water networks and insights into proton conduction [Biophysics and Computational Biology] XFEL structures of the influenza M2 proton channel: Room temperature water networks and insights into proton conduction Jessica L. Thomaston a , Rahel A. Woldeyes b , Takanori Nakane c , Ayumi Yamashita d , Tomoyuki Tanaka d , Kotaro Koiwai e , Aaron S. Brewster f , Benjamin A. Barad b , Yujie Chen g , Thomas Lemmin a , Monarin Uervirojnangkoorn h , i , j , k , l , Toshi Arima d , Jun Kobayashi d
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metabolic activity induces membrane phase separation in endoplasmic reticulum [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Metabolic activity induces membrane phase separation in endoplasmic reticulum Yihui Shen a , Zhilun Zhao a , Luyuan Zhang a , Lingyan Shi a , Sanjid Shahriar b , c , Robin B. Chan b , c , Gilbert Di Paolo b , c , and Wei Min a , d , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Columbia University , New York, NY 10027; b Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center , New York, NY 1
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamics of translation can determine the spatial organization of membrane-bound proteins and their mRNA [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Dynamics of translation can determine the spatial organization of membrane-bound proteins and their mRNA Elgin Korkmazhan a , Hamid Teimouri b , c , Neil Peterman b , c , and Erel Levine b , c , 1 a Harvard College , Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138; b Department of Physics, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; c FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hydrophobicity of proteins and nanostructured solutes is governed by topographical and chemical context [Chemistry] Hydrophobicity of proteins and nanostructured solutes is governed by topographical and chemical context Erte Xi a , 1 , Vasudevan Venkateshwaran b , c , 1 , Lijuan Li b , c , Nicholas Rego a , Amish J. Patel a , 2 , and Shekhar Garde b , c , 2 a Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104; b Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and B
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular characterization of water and surfactant AOT at nanoemulsion surfaces [Chemistry] Molecular characterization of water and surfactant AOT at nanoemulsion surfaces Jennifer K. Hensel a , Andrew P. Carpenter a , Regina K. Ciszewski a , Brandon K. Schabes a , Clive T. Kittredge a , Fred G. Moore b , and Geraldine L. Richmond a , 1 a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oregon , Eugene, OR 97401; b Department of Physics, Whitman College , Walla Walla, WA 99362 Ed
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Specific cation effects at aqueous solution-vapor interfaces: Surfactant-like behavior of Li+ revealed by experiments and simulations [Chemistry] Specific cation effects at aqueous solution−vapor interfaces: Surfactant-like behavior of Li + revealed by experiments and simulations Kathryn A. Perrine a , 1 , Krista M. Parry a , 1 , Abraham C. Stern a , Marijke H. C. Van Spyk a , Michael J. Makowski a , J. Alfredo Freites a , Bernd Winter b , Douglas J. Tobias a , 2 , and John C. Hemminger a , 2 a Department of Chemistry, University of Califo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism of ion adsorption to aqueous interfaces: Graphene/water vs. air/water [Chemistry] Mechanism of ion adsorption to aqueous interfaces: Graphene/water vs. air/water Debra L. McCaffrey a , b , 1 , Son C. Nguyen a , c , 1 , Stephen J. Cox b , 1 , Horst Weller c , d , A. Paul Alivisatos a , e , f , g , Phillip L. Geissler a , b , 2 , and Richard J. Saykally a , b , 2 a Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720; b Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berk
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Microscopic dynamics of charge separation at the aqueous electrochemical interface [Chemistry] Microscopic dynamics of charge separation at the aqueous electrochemical interface John A. Kattirtzi a , b , David T. Limmer c , d , e , 1 , and Adam P. Willard a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02138; b College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University , Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China; c Department of Chemistry, Unive
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Self-healing catalysis in water [Chemistry] Self-healing catalysis in water Cyrille Costentin a , 1 and Daniel G. Nocera b , 1 a Laboratoire d'Electrochimie Moléculaire, Unité Mixte de Recherche Université–CNRS 7591, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité , 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France; b Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 Edited by Michael L. Klein, Temple University, Philadelphia
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electrostatic confinement and manipulation of DNA molecules for genome analysis [Chemistry] Electrostatic confinement and manipulation of DNA molecules for genome analysis Kristy L. Kounovsky-Shafer a , Juan P. Hernandez-Ortiz b , Konstantinos Potamousis c , d , e , Gene Tsvid c , d , e , Michael Place c , d , e , Prabu Ravindran c , d , e , Kyubong Jo f , Shiguo Zhou c , d , e , Theo Odijk g , Juan J. de Pablo h , i , and David C. Schwartz c , d , e , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Unive
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unusual zinc-binding mode of HDAC6-selective hydroxamate inhibitors [Chemistry] Unusual zinc-binding mode of HDAC6-selective hydroxamate inhibitors Nicholas J. Porter a , Adaickapillai Mahendran b , Ronald Breslow b , 1 , and David W. Christianson a , 2 a Roy and Diana Vagelos Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323; b Department of Chemistry, Columbia University , New York, NY 10027 Edited by Stephen J. Benkovic, The P
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Percolative core formation in planetesimals enabled by hysteresis in metal connectivity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Percolative core formation in planetesimals enabled by hysteresis in metal connectivity Soheil Ghanbarzadeh a , Marc A. Hesse b , c , 1 , and Maša Prodanović d a Unconventional Reservoirs Technology, BP America Inc , Houston, TX 77079; b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin , Austin, TX 78712; c Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Core Concept: Role player or cellular rubbish? Biologists debate the function of neutrophil extracellular traps [Immunology and Inflammation] Core Concept: Role player or cellular rubbish? Biologists debate the function of neutrophil extracellular traps Thirteen years ago, microscopy researcher Volker Brinkmann spotted a bizarre behavior while peering at immune cells called neutrophils to study how they killed bacteria. Like the quick flick of a frog’s tongue, neutrophils shot out strands of nuclear DNA to trap passing microbes. In thi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
What Chern-Simons theory assigns to a point [Mathematics] What Chern–Simons theory assigns to a point André G. Henriques a , 1 a Mathematical Institute, Oxford University, Oxford OX2 6GG, United Kingdom Edited by Robion C. Kirby, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and approved October 19, 2017 (received for review June 28, 2017) Significance There are two main classes of 3D topological field theories: Turaev–Viro theories, associated to fusion cate
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple oscillatory rhythms determine the temporal organization of perception [Neuroscience] Multiple oscillatory rhythms determine the temporal organization of perception Luca Ronconi a , 1 , Nikolaas N. Oosterhof a , Claudia Bonmassar a , and David Melcher a a Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento , 38068 Rovereto, Italy Edited by David J. Heeger, New York University, New York, NY, and approved November 7, 2017 (received for review August 17, 2017) Significance To reduce
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transverse fields to tune an Ising-nematic quantum phase transition [Physics] Transverse fields to tune an Ising-nematic quantum phase transition Akash V. Maharaj a , b , 1 , Elliott W. Rosenberg c , 1 , Alexander T. Hristov a , b , 1 , 2 , Erez Berg d , e , 1 , Rafael M. Fernandes f , 1 , Ian R. Fisher b , c , 1 , and Steven A. Kivelson a , b , 1 , 2 a Department of Physics, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Socioeconomic status and genetic influences on cognitive development [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Socioeconomic status and genetic influences on cognitive development David N. Figlio a , Jeremy Freese b , 1 , Krzysztof Karbownik c , and Jeffrey Roth d a School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208; b Department of Sociology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305; c Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208; d Department
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evaluating the environmental impacts of dietary recommendations [Sustainability Science] Evaluating the environmental impacts of dietary recommendations Paul Behrens a , b , 1 , Jessica C. Kiefte-de Jong b , c , d , Thijs Bosker a , b , João F. D. Rodrigues a , Arjan de Koning a , and Arnold Tukker a , e a Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University , Einsteinweg 2, 2333 CC, Leiden, The Netherlands; b Leiden University College The Hague , 2595 DG, The Hague, The Neth
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Relationship between season of birth, temperature exposure, and later life wellbeing [Sustainability Science] Relationship between season of birth, temperature exposure, and later life wellbeing Adam Isen a , 1 , Maya Rossin-Slater b , c , d , 1 , 2 , and Reed Walker c , d , e , f , 1 a Office of Tax Analysis, Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC 20220; b Department of Health Research & Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305; c Institute of Labor Economics, Bonn, Germany
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Nontraditional sites for future solar farmsIn a study published today in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of California, Davis, explored the possibility of developing solar installations on a variety of unconventional sites in California's Central Valley.
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Life on the edge prepares plants for climate changeIn the first study to predict whether different populations of the same plant species can adapt to climate change, scientists find that central European ones die first.
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Major measurement issues found in emergency department patient experience dataThere are major measurement issues in patient experience data collected from US emergency departments, including high variability and limited construct validity, according to an analysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using DNA strands to design new polymer materialsResearchers have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands -- a technique that could lead to new materials for applications ranging from biomedicine to the promising field of 'soft robotics.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel combination therapy shown to be effective in ovarian cancerCombining PARP inhibitors, recently approved for the treatment of BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer, with another small molecule inhibitor was effective to treat ovarian cancers without BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of unsuspected flexibility offers new pathway to cancer drug developmentBlood vessels are the supply lines of the human body, bringing nutrients and oxygen to cells and carrying away waste. Controlling the growth of these supply lines can be an effective tactic to combat several different types of disorders, including cancer, stroke, and injury. A new study has added layer of nuance to our understanding of the signals that direct blood vessel growth.
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People with rare diseases are at more risk for poor quality of life, study finds CORVALLIS, Ore. - People with rare diseases are at high risk for experiencing poor quality of life, including increased levels of anxiety, depression, pain, fatigue and limited ability to participate in society, a new study from an Oregon State University shows. The study is believed to be the first large-scale study of adults living in the U.S. that are diagnosed with a rare disease or disorder,
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Tiny red animals dart in the dark under the ice of a frozen Quebec lake In a frozen lake in Quebec, tiny red creatures zip about under the ice. Guillaume Grosbois and Milla Rautio, researchers at Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Saguenay, Québec, Canada report the discovery of active life in a winter lake today in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology . Grosbois and Rautio did not expect to find bright red zooplankton buzzing in the dark wat
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Songbirds may hold the secret to how babies learn to speak The explanation for how people learn complex behaviors, such as speech, might be found in a new study of songbirds by scientists at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. "One hypothesis to explain speech development is that the sound of each word creates a memory, or template in the brain," says Sarah Bottjer, a professor of biological sciences and psychology at USC Dornsife Col
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NASA calculated Philippines rainfall from Tropical Storm Kai-Tak Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moved through the central and southern Philippines over several days and weakened to a remnant low pressure area in the South China Sea. As it moved over the country, NASA found that the storm generated heavy amounts of rainfall. Tropical storm Kai-Tak was nearly stationary at times as it drenched the Philippines from Dec. 14 through 18. The storm caused major flooding and
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A functional genomics database for plant microbiome studies As the global population rises, estimated to hit nearly 10 billion by 2050, so does the need to boost crop yields and produce enough plant material for both food and sustainable alternative fuels. To help improve crop breeding strategies and overcome challenges such as making plants more tolerant of marginal lands, and stresses such as drought and low nutrient availability, researchers are focusi
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Paving the way for a non-electric battery to store solar energy IMAGE: First author Seung Pyo Jeong at UMass Amherst, with his doctoral advisor Dhandapani Venkataraman and others, are developing a polymer-based method of storing solar energy in a battery that will... view more Credit: UMass Amherst AMHERST, Mass. - Materials chemists have been trying for years to make a new type of battery that can store solar or other light-sourced energy in chemical bon
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UNH research finds increase in number of babies born drug exposed in NH DURHAM, N.H. - From 2005 to 2015 the number of infants diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the Granite State increased fivefold, from 52 to 269, according to new research by the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. In 2015, newborns diagnosed with NAS remained in the hospital 12 days on average, compared to three days for newborns not born exposed. "
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Underactive thyroid within normal range may affect woman's ability to conceive WASHINGTON--New research suggests that a slightly underactive thyroid may affect a women's ability to become pregnant--even when the gland is functioning at the low end of the normal range, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism . The study found women who have unexplained infertility were nearly twice as likely to have higher leve
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Storming the castle: New discovery in the fight against bacteria IMAGE: This is a colorized scanning electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria. view more Credit: NIAID, Flickr Bacteria must sense and respond to changes in their environment to survive, and their exterior membranes are their first line of defense. Exciting new research reveals a previously unappreciated aspect of this defense, which could be exploited to render antibiotic-resistant bacteria
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Salvaging blood during cesarean section may have potential in emergency procedures Using cell salvage, the reinfusion of red blood cells lost during surgery, did not lead on average to a statistically significant reduction in the rates of blood transfusion needed by all women undergoing caesarean section, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Khalid Khan from Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues. Excessive hemorrhage during caesarean sectio
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Won’t Even Say What It Costs A Newly Approved Gene Therapy is So Expensive, The Company Behind It Won’t Even Say What it Costs When the U.S. government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost—not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the U.S. government says a n
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hibernating squirrels and hamsters evolved to feel less coldThe ground squirrel and the Syrian hamster, two rodents that hibernate in the winter, do not feel cold in the same way as non-hibernators, such as rats or mice. Researchers have discovered that hibernating rodents evolved cold-sensing neurons with diminished ability to detect temperatures below 20 degrees Celsius.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monocytes have many facesWhen the immune system mobilizes its troops, antigen-presenting cells play an important role. They can emerge from white blood cells (monocytes) that circulate in the blood. Scientists have now taken a closer look at these important helpers. The monocyte-derived cells are not identical descendants, but rather a very diverse mixture. This finding is important for the development of tailor-made immu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New measurements to guide radiation therapyWhen ionizing radiation passes through living tissue, it interacts with molecules present in the cells, stripping away electrons and producing charged species known as ions. The electrons produced by this process, known as secondary electrons, can themselves go on to wreak further havoc, causing even more dramatic changes. Investigators now report studies of the impact of secondary electrons on a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Knockout mice help find gene for bad breathResearchers have identified a cause for chronic bad breath (halitosis), with the help of gene knockout mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells in the uterus help nourish fetus during early pregnancyNatural killer cells are among the most abundant immune cells in the uterus during the first trimester of pregnancy, but their numbers decline substantially after the placenta forms. A new study shows that this cell population helps to optimize maternal nourishment of the fetus at early stages of development. The researchers identified uterine natural killer cells that secrete growth-promoting fac
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Technique makes NMR more useful for nanomaterials, exotic matter researchResearchers show how nuclear magnetic resonance probes can be optimized for studying the properties of nanomaterials and strange states of matter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurological assessment in the blink of an eye?Novel technology was able to measure the blink response comparably to electromyography in a validation study of ten healthy college students. The blink response can be an important indicator of neurological status.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into how our bodies maintain a beneficial relationship with our gut microbesOur gut hosts a community of trillions of microbes, called the gut microbiota, and we are becoming increasingly aware that this has significant effects on many aspects of our health. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning this interaction remain elusive. New research has identified some of the molecules used to ensure bacteria in the gut microbiota maintain healthy populations, in the corr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MiNT protein a fresh target to attack diseaseA potent protein that resides in a cell's mitochondria is the most recent link to be detailed in a cycle that manages iron and reactive oxygen species. Because the process can be hijacked by cancer and other diseases, the research could lead to new disease-fighting strategies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook improves how blind can "see" images using AI In this photo taken Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, engineer Matt King, who is blind, demonstrates facial recognition technology via a teleconference at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook is unveiling a new AI-powered feature just in time for alcohol-filled holiday parties: you can now see untagged pictures of your face on your friend's news feeds and ask the poster to remove them. (AP P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Idaho lands nation's first International Dark Sky Reserve In the collective imagination, planets of a solar system all circle in the equatorial plane of their star. The star also spins, and its spin axis is aligned with the spin axes of the planetary orbits, giving the impression ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snowfall has billion-dollar effect on business, Olympians This photo taken from a 4K video and dated Monday, Oct. 16, 2017 shows Jon Lillis, the men's aerial skiing world champion from the United States, posing during an Associated Press interview on the glacier above Saas-Fee, Switzerland. Because snow is no longer guaranteed early in the season at their headquarters in Park City, Utah, she and other members of the US aerials national team went to trai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mice help find gene for bad breath Prof. Kent Lloyd, director of the UC Davis Mouse Biology Program, in the lab. Gene-edited and “knockout” mice have become a vital tool in biomedical research. Credit: Karin Higgins/UC Davis An international team of researchers has identified a cause for chronic bad breath (halitosis), with the help of gene knockout mice from the UC Davis Mouse Biology Program. The results are published Dec. 18 in
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Live Science
Stratolaunch's Monster Jet Completes First Test-Drive Down Runway The Stratolaunch double-bodied jet underwent its first test down the runway recently at the Mojave Air and Space Port in California Credit: Stratolaunch Stratolaunch's rocket-launching mothership was driven down the runway for the first time this past weekend. The double-bodied jet —which has the largest wingspan of any aircraft in the world —has been undergoing tests at Stratolaunch's faci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are bones discovered under an Exeter street from the first turkey dinner in England? Malene Lauritsen with turkey bones. Credit: University of Exeter Bones dug up from under an Exeter street may be the remains of the first ever turkey dinner in England, archaeologists believe. The 16th century bones - two femurs (thigh bones) and an ulna (wing) - have been analysed by University of Exeter archaeologists and identified as among some the first turkeys to be brought to England from
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Live Science
Jesus in 2017: Biblical Archaeologists Had a Big YearFrom Jesus' tomb to his forbidden teachings, here are some of the biggest biblical archaeology findings from 2017.
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Science : NPR
Facebook Expands Use Of Facial Recognition To ID Users In Photos Facebook will soon begin alerting users of photos that feature them, based on facial recognition technology. Facebook hide caption toggle caption Facebook Facebook is expanding its use of facial recognition software to alert users when photos of them are posted on the platform — whether or not they are tagged in the photo. By default, Facebook users in the U.S. will be signed up for these face re
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Science : NPR
Sorry Folks, Climate Change Won't Make Chocolate Taste Better A cocoa farmer opens cacao pods with a stick to collect cocoa beans at his farm in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images A cocoa farmer opens cacao pods with a stick to collect cocoa beans at his farm in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images Two years ago, news he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Couple up for long-term happiness Credit: CC0 Public Domain Being married has a lifelong effect on how content people are. This is according to a study in Springer's Journal of Happiness Studies that investigated people's levels of well-being based on their marital status. Using data from two UK surveys, its authors, Shawn Grover and John Helliwell of the Vancouver School of Economics in Canada, showed that an even greater sense
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How great is the influence and risk of social and political 'bots?' Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers The role and risks of bots, such as automated Twitter accounts, in influencing public opinion and political elections continues to provoke intense international debate and controversy. An insightful new collection of articles focused on "Computational Propaganda and Political Big Data" examines how these bots work, approaches to better detect and control
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using DNA strands to design new polymer materials McGill University researchers have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands -- a technique that could lead to new materials for applications ranging from biomedicine to the promising field of 'soft robotics.' Credit: The Sleiman Lab/McGIll University McGill University researchers have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands - a technique that could lead to new mater
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electromagnetic emissions from smartphones analyzed for security vulnerabilityResearchers are developing a tool that enables cell phones to be analyzed in order to determine if they could undergo a cyber-attack to obtain encryption keys through their electromagnetic emanations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should uninfected patients accept hepatitis C-infected livers to reduce waiting time? A modeling study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators finds that the availability of directly-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could allow the transplantation of livers from HCV-positive donors into HCV-negative recipients without posing undue risk. The team's report will appear in the journal Hepatology and has been released online. "The av
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Siting solar, sparing prime agricultural lands IMAGE: The floating solar panels at Napa Valley winery Far Niente were among the world's first "floatovoltaic " installations. (Wikipedia/SolarWriter) view more Credit: By SolarWriter via Wikimedia Commons Unconventional spaces could be put to use generating renewable energy while sparing lands that could be better used to grow food, sequester carbon and protect wildlife and watersh
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Are bones discovered under an Exeter street from the first turkey dinner in England? IMAGE: This is Malene Lauritsen with turkey bones. view more Credit: University of Exeter Bones dug up from under an Exeter street may be the remains of the first ever turkey dinner in England, archaeologists believe. The 16th century bones - two femurs (thigh bones) and an ulna (wing) - have been analysed by University of Exeter archaeologists and identified as among some the first tur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique makes NMR more useful for nanomaterials, exotic matter research Researchers have shown how flat NMR probes, as apposed to cylindrical ones, can be made useful in studying the properties of nanomaterials. Credit: Mitrovic lab / Brown University Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful scientific tool used in medical imaging and in probing the chemical structure of molecules and compounds. New research from Brown University shows a technique that helps ad
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vengeance is sweet and expensiveLiving together in communities requires mutual cooperation. To achieve this, we punish others when they are uncooperative. Scientists have discovered now that even six-year-old children feel the need to reprimand antisocial behavior, and that they are willing to take risks and make an effort to be present when the guilty one is punished.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arthritis drug could help treat advanced skin cancerTreatment for the most deadly form of skin cancer could be more effective if combined with a well-known drug for rheumatoid arthritis, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conservation study uses tiny treadmills to test sea turtle hatchling staminaA newly hatched sea turtle should be able to crawl from its nest to the ocean in a couple of minutes. Speed is key and survival depends on their swimming ability. Disoriented hatchlings who make it to the ocean expend massive amounts of energy because what was supposed to take a couple of minutes takes hours to accomplish. This is the first study to test the physiological effects of crawling and s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
AI insights could help reduce injuries in construction industryArtificial intelligence (AI) is giving researchers new insights to help reduce wear-and-tear injuries and boost the productivity of skilled construction workers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patterns of elephant poaching in East Africa uncovered by scientistsScientists analyzing data from aerial surveys carried out over one of East Africa’s most important nature reserves have uncovered clusters of elephant carcasses close to some ranger posts. The team made the discovery while working together to address the problem of elephant poaching in the Ruaha-Rungwa ecosystem.
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New Scientist - News
People without electricity could end up living the energy dream Bloomberg via Getty Images By Michael Le Page MORE than 100 million people around the world now have access to electricity for the first time thanks to simple solar power systems that typically provide LED lights and a phone charger. More powerful versions include radios and even televisions. The LEDs provide a clean and cheap alternative to the kerosene lamps normally used by those with no e
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New Scientist - News
The body’s killer immune cells also feed fetuses in the womb Natural killer cells may stop babies from being born underweight Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty By Andy Coghlan The immune system’s aggressive natural killer cells – which normally kill cancer cells and infectious pathogens – also help nourish early fetuses , helping them grow. This discovery was made by Zhigang Tian of the University of Science and Technology of China, in Hefei, and his team
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Popular Science
10 gift ideas that don't take up any space Maybe your brother hates clutter , or your best friend lives in a shoebox-size city apartment . Or maybe your New Age aunt has announced that she is eschewing materialism and won't accept physical gifts this year. When you're shopping for recipients like these, you can't go wrong with a present that takes up zero square feet. Instead, focus on giving experiences instead of stuff . And if the expe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
China's scholastic success could begin with storybooks, research suggestsThe lessons taught in Chinese schools could start early, with childhood storybooks, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New findings clarify thyroid's role in mammalian seasonal changes Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers Researchers now have a better understanding of the role that thyroid hormones, the tissues that produce them, and the biochemical pathways on which they act have in driving seasonal reproduction in some mammals, and how this new information may help explain seasonal changes in metabolism and mood that affect humans. The review article entitled "Seasonal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New measurements to guide radiation therapy One of many experimental systems for studying LEE-induced damages to condensed biomolecules in the research group of Leon Sanche at the Université de Sherbrooke. In this illustration, we can see a low energy electron gun (top) and a cylindrical multidetector (bottom). This system is used to irradiate (with low energy electrons) short DNA strands condensed onto a cylinder inner surface. The irradi
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The sun’s outer atmosphere is far more complex than previously thought NEW ORLEANS — Despite its smooth appearance, the sun’s wispy outer atmosphere is surprisingly full of knots, whorls and blobs. Newly analyzed observations from NASA’s STEREO spacecraft show that the sun’s outer corona is just as complicated as the highly structured inner corona , solar physicists reported December 12 at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. That previously unseen st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Knockout mice help find gene for bad breath An international team of researchers has identified a cause for chronic bad breath (halitosis), with the help of gene knockout mice from the UC Davis Mouse Biology Program. The results are published Dec. 18 in the journal Nature Genetics . While most cases of bad breath are linked bacteria growing in the mouth, up to 3 percent of the population have chronic halitosis of no obvious cause. "It'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurological assessment in the blink of an eye? IMAGE: The positions of the right (red) and left (blue) eyelids during a stimulated blink are tracked over time using image processing. The technique produces rapid, non-invasive, and objective measurements of... view more Credit: Reproduced with permission from Tsai NT, et al, IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine , Epub Dec. 12, 2017. doi: 10.1109/JTEHM.2017.2782669.
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Screening could prevent a quarter of hip fractures in older women Community screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women, according to new research. A new study, published in The Lancet , has shown that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture. The research, involving more than 12,000 older women and carried out in colla
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Researchers find possible markers for earlier diagnosis of aggressive tongue cancer Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, also known as oral tongue cancer, is an aggressive form of cancer that generally affects older people. Patients with the disease often find it difficult to eat, swallow food, or speak. Reasons for its generally poor prognosis include late detection, before pain usually starts and only when physical symptoms such as lesions are present, and a propensity for s
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Discovery of unsuspected flexibility offers new pathway to cancer drug development IMAGE: University of Illinois Assistant Professor of Bioengineering Princess Imoukhuede is a member of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology. view more Credit: Kathryn Faith Blood vessels are the supply lines of the human body, bringing nutrients and oxygen to cells and carrying away waste. Controlling the growth of these supply lines can be an effective tactic to combat several dif
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Hibernating Rodents Feel Less ColdSyrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel.
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Study resolves controversy about electron structure of defects in graphene A study conducted at the University of São Paulo's Physics Institute (IF-USP), Brazil, has resolved a longstanding controversy dogging the international community of researchers dedicated to investigating defects in graphene. The controversy is related to the calculation of the overall electronic structure of defects. This configuration, which comprises many variables, was described in different
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Monocytes have many faces IMAGE: Dr. Branko Cirovic, Jil Sander, Prof. Dr. Joachim Schultze and Dr. Andreas Schlitzer at the LIMES-Institute of University of Bonn. view more Credit: © Foto: Barbara Frommann/Uni Bonn When the immune system mobilizes its troops, antigen-presenting cells play an important role. They can emerge from white blood cells (monocytes) that circulate in the blood. An international research team un
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Novel combination therapy shown to be effective in ovarian cancer PHILADELPHIA -- (Dec. 19, 2017) -- Researchers at The Wistar Institute have found that combining PARP inhibitors, recently approved for the treatment of BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer, with another small molecule inhibitor was effective to treat ovarian cancers without BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. This study was published online in Cell Reports . Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological mal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using DNA strands to design new polymer materials IMAGE: McGill University researchers have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands -- a technique that could lead to new materials for applications ranging from biomedicine to the promising field of... view more Credit: The Sleiman Lab/McGIll University McGill University researchers have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands - a technique that could lead to
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Science | The Guardian
Dennis Bidwell obituary My father-in-law, Dennis Bidwell, who has died aged 88, played a crucial part in the development in 1976 of the microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa), a laboratory tool that has had a lasting impact on the diagnosis of disease. The microplate consists of an eight-by-12 plastic grid of 96 small indentations numbered A1 to H12, which enables multiple tests to be carried out at the sa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Farmers in Kenya willing, able to ramp up croton nut output for biofuel Croton trees are very common in Kenya. Until recently, local people valued them only for the firewood and shade they provide. The nuts they produce went to waste. Credit: Eco Fuels Kenya Small-holder farmers in Kenya have the capacity and desire to play a major role in the scale-up of biofuel production from agroforestry, according to a Penn State forest economist, who led a study in the East Afr
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Big Think
MIT Scientists Engineer Incredible Glowing Plants New research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy may produce plants that will eventually be able to provide enough light to replace street lamps. This could lead to serious energy savings given the fact that lighting currently accounts for about 20% of worldwide energy consumption. In a paper published in the journal Nano Letters , scientists from MIT, University of California Riverside,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approaches in medical genomics: A step forward in Parkinson's disease It is widely known that genomics has already begun to influence medicine and that bioinformatics holds the key for developing new medical approaches, but how does medical genomics really work? Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, in collaboration with scientists at the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC) and the Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i S
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Technique makes NMR more useful for nanomaterials, exotic matter research IMAGE: Researchers have shown how flat NMR probes, as apposed to cylindrical ones, can be made useful in studying the properties of nanomaterials. view more Credit: Mitrovic lab / Brown University PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful scientific tool used in medical imaging and in probing the chemical structure of molecules and compounds. New re
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How great is the influence and risk of social and political 'bots?' IMAGE: Big Data , published quarterly online with open access options and in print, facilitates and supports the efforts of researchers, analysts, statisticians, business leaders, and policymakers to improve operations, profitability, and... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, Dec. 19, 2017 -- The role and risks of bots, such as automated Twitter accounts, in
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Key to immune system's memory revealed IMAGE: This is Dr Jasmine Li, Professor Stephen J Turner, Dr Moshe Olshansky, Dr Brendan Russ. view more Credit: Monash University Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute scientists have defined a novel molecular 'blueprint' that plays a pivotal part in the immune system's ability to fight disease by 'remembering' infections. Understanding the fine detail of immunological memory
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Dysfunctional gene may be culprit in some Crohn's disease cases IMAGE: The study was led by TSRI Graduate Student Mei Lan Chen and biologist Mark Sundrud view more Credit: Jeremy Pyle / The Scripps Research Institute JUPITER, Fla. - Dec. 19, 2017 - This holiday season, millions of people will gather at airports ready to board planes for destinations around the world. Depending on the environment at their destination, their suitcases may be filled with sun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hibernating squirrels and hamsters evolved to feel less coldThe ground squirrel and the Syrian hamster, two rodents that hibernate in the winter, do not feel cold in the same way as non-hibernators, such as rats or mice. Yale researchers have discovered that hibernating rodents evolved cold-sensing neurons with diminished ability to detect temperatures below 20 degrees Celsius. The work appears Dec. 19 in the journal Cell Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells in the uterus help nourish fetus during early pregnancy IMAGE: An artistic representation of how decidual NK cells promote fetal growth during early pregnancy. view more Credit: Binqing Fu Natural killer cells are among the most abundant immune cells in the uterus during the first trimester of pregnancy, but their numbers decline substantially after the placenta forms. A study published December 19th in the journal Immunity shows that this transient c
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Specialized protein helps these ground squirrels resist the cold The hardy souls who manage to push shorts season into December might feel some kinship with the thirteen-lined ground squirrel. The critter hibernates all winter, but even when awake, it’s less sensitive to cold than its nonhibernating relatives, a new study finds. That cold tolerance is linked to changes in a specific cold-sensing protein in the sensory nerve cells of the ground squirrels and an
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Scientific American Content: Global
FDA Approves First Gene Therapy Targeting Rare Form of Inherited Blindness A first-of-its-kind gene therapy received approval from the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday to treat a rare, inherited form of childhood blindness. The FDA marketing clearance of Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna is historic for scientific and financial reasons. Luxturna is the first gene therapy approved in the U.S. that targets a disease caused by mutations in a specific gene. A S
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon The year of Hurricane Harvey Accusations of harassment have felled some powerful men But will that lead to a permanent change in behaviour?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hibernating squirrels and hamsters evolved to feel less cold Photograph of a 13-lined ground squirrel. Credit: Gracheva Lab The ground squirrel and the Syrian hamster, two rodents that hibernate in the winter, do not feel cold in the same way as non-hibernators, such as rats or mice. Yale researchers have discovered that hibernating rodents evolved cold-sensing neurons with diminished ability to detect temperatures below 20 degrees Celsius. This adaptation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New findings clarify thyroid's role in mammalian seasonal changes IMAGE: Thyroid, the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, publishes original articles and timely reviews that reflect the rapidly advancing changes in our understanding of thyroid physiology and pathology, from... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 19, 2017--Researchers now have a better understanding of the role that thyroid horm
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Live Science
How to Temporarily Undo the Universe's Endless Chaos with Chloroform Things spread out. They cool down, disintegrate and die. Disorder is going to kill the universe . Chaos increases. It's everywhere, and it's growing. Scientists know this. And yet, researchers have now demonstrated that there are certain circumstances in which disorder is beat back briefly. In a paper published Nov. 9 on the online preprint journal arXiv , researchers showed that heat could
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The Atlantic
Could Positive Train Control Have Prevented the Washington Wreck? Early indications suggest a train that derailed Monday morning near Dupont, Washington, killing several people, was traveling about 50 miles over the speed limit on the stretch of track where it crashed. If that proves correct, it will be the latest example of delayed implementation of a safety failsafe in the United States leading to a fatal train wreck. The Amtrak Cascades train was traveling f
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Major measurement issues found in emergency department patient experience data WASHINGTON (Dec. 19, 2017) -- There are major measurement issues in patient experience data collected from U.S. emergency departments, including high variability and limited construct validity, according to an analysis published by researchers at the George Washington University (GW) and US Acute Care Solutions. Patient experience data is becoming increasingly important in healthcare. The data is
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New supermarket in food desert may trigger economic and health gains, study finds Opening a new supermarket in a low-income neighborhood may improve residents' economic well-being and health, even if residents don't necessarily buy healthier food from the store, according to a new RAND Corporation study. Studying a low-income neighborhood in Pittsburgh where a new supermarket opened after decades of absence, researchers found that residents reported improvements across a num
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A non-invasive method to detect Alzheimer's disease New research has drawn a link between changes in the brain's anatomy and biomarkers that are known to appear at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), findings that could one day provide a sensitive but non-invasive test for AD before cognitive symptoms appear. Scientists have known for some time that one of the first signs of AD is buildup of amyloid-Beta and tau proteins in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly zero-energy buildings: A difficult challenge for Southern Europe IMAGE: This is a thermal image of a Basque Country building in the 70s, where heat loss is evidenced due to lack of insulation. view more Credit: (Juan María Hidalgo / UPV/EHU) Over the coming years there is a legal commitment for all the countries of Europe to improve the energy efficiency of buildings, which boils down to constructing nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEBs), in other words,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life on the edge prepares plants for climate change IMAGE: Mustard cress, Arabidopsis thaliana , growing on a sandy beach at the Baltic Sea in southern Sweden. view more Credit: MPI f. Developmental Biology/ M. Exposito-Alonso In the first study to predict whether different populations of the same plant species can adapt to climate change, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology find that central European ones die fi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Farmers in Kenya willing, able to ramp up croton nut output for biofuel IMAGE: Croton nuts are the source of an oil that can power generators, water pumps and other internal combustion engines and, with processing, can be used in place of diesel fuel... view more Credit: Eco Fuels Kenya Small-holder farmers in Kenya have the capacity and desire to play a major role in the scale-up of biofuel production from agroforestry, according to a Penn State forest
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Science : NPR
No Eggnog, But Rescued Animals Enjoy Holiday Celebrations, Too A snowy owl female named LaGuardia at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science. Allegra Boverman/Courtesy of VINS hide caption toggle caption Allegra Boverman/Courtesy of VINS A snowy owl female named LaGuardia at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science. Allegra Boverman/Courtesy of VINS In my house, we celebrate Christmas. In preparation, we selected a beautiful, aromatic Fraser Fir tree for ou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Friend or foe? How the unconscious mind picks out faces in a crowdImagine you're walking down a busy street like Times Square in New York. There are tons of people around. As you make your way through the crowd, your brain notices several faces but ignores the rest. Why is that? What are the processes that determine which faces our brain 'chooses' to see and those it allows to fade into the background? Researchers observed that the facial dimensions that were mo
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Quanta Magazine
The End of the RNA World Is Near, Biochemists Argue Four billion years ago, the first molecular precursors to life emerged, swirling about in Earth’s primordial soup of chemicals. Although the identity of these molecules remains a subject of fractious debate, scientists agree that the molecules would have had to perform two major functions: storing information and catalyzing chemical reactions. The modern cell assigns these responsibilities to its
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The Atlantic
The Magic of Titanic's Ending, 20 Years Later When Titanic hit theaters 20 years ago, the widely held view in Hollywood was that it would be a financial disappointment. James Cameron’s long-planned project about the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic had gone over budget (it cost $200 million, at that time a record, after being green-lit for $109 million ). Filming had taken weeks longer than expected, and the final cut of the movie came in at
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Ingeniøren
Styrelse: Vikingeskibsmuseet skal renoveresEfter nye undersøgelser afviser Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen at ophæve fredningen af Vikingeskibshallen i Roskilde, og det indebærer, at hallen skal renoveres. Samtidig gives tilladelse til udvidelse af museet på tre sider.
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Popular Science
New York City isn't ready for the catastrophic floods in its future New York City was not built to withstand an onslaught of floodwater. Much of the city is protected only by sand dunes, vegetation, or low walls. New York’s flood zones are packed with more than 400,000 residents and $129 billion worth of real estate. The aging sewer system handles both storm water and waste and is easily overwhelmed; Hurricane Sandy sent 1.6 billion gallons of raw sewage spilling
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New Scientist - News
Genital parasite crabs are struggling to find sex partners By Joshua Rapp Learn Castrator pea crabs live up to their name. They live inside the sex organs of marine molluscs and prevent them from reproducing. But it turns out the pea crabs’ parasitic ways also make it terribly tricky for them to find a mate. Castrator pea crabs ( Calyptraeotheres garthi ) are tiny parasitic crustaceans found off the east coast of South America, from southern Brazil d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New methods reveal the biomechanics of blood clotting IMAGE: A scanning electron micrograph shows a red blood cell, an activated platelet (in yellow) and a white blood cell. The ability to map the magnitude and orientation of forces on... view more Credit: National Cancer Institute Platelets are cells in the blood whose job is to stop bleeding by sticking together to form clots and plug up a wound. Now, for the first time, scientists have measur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers isolate biting, non-biting genes in pitcher plant mosquitoes IMAGE: This is Michael Pfrender, director of the Genomics & Bioinformatics Core Facility at the University of Notre Dame, which processed the genetic data for the study. view more Credit: Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame Mosquito bites can be an itchy nuisance but they can also be deadly. Diseases such as malaria, Dengue fever and West Nile virus can spread with a single bite. Unders
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice U. physicists discover new type of quantum material IMAGE: Rice University physicists (from left) Hsin-Hua Lai, Qimiao Si and Sarah Grefe have made predictions that could help experimental physicists create the first "Weyl-Kondo semimetal. " view more Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University U.S. and European physicists searching for an explanation for high-temperature superconductivity were surprised when their theoretical model pointed to the exi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Images of the brain refute a theory of the 60s on the domain of language A region of the brain that extends through both hemispheres, the planum temporale, is larger in the left than in the right hemisphere. The finding was linked in the 1960s with the hosting of language processing in the left hemisphere, but today European researchers show that this asymmetry is not a marker of language lateralization. In 1968, when there were no techniques to observe how the brain
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some newborns with chronic illness show signs of serious sleep problems at birth ANN ARBOR, Mich. - New parents often hear about how important sleep is for their babies' development -- but some newborns may have more serious sleep challenges than others. A research team at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and Michigan Medicine is studying infants at the highest risk of sleep disorders, including those with chronic illnesses. The team's latest researc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence supports HIV screening in young adulthood A new study suggests that the most beneficial age for a one-time screening HIV test of the general population would be age 25. The report - led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) working with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health - will be published in the Journal of Adolescent Health and has been issued onl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New measurements to guide radiation therapy IMAGE: One of many experimental systems for studying LEE-induced damages to condensed biomolecules in the research group of Leon Sanche at the Université de Sherbrooke. In this illustration, we can see... view more Credit: Vincent Lemelin, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada WASHINGTON, D.C., December 19, 2017 -- When ionizing radiation passes through living tissue, it interacts with m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA annotations predict patient outcomes in childhood leukemia UC San Francisco physician-scientists have developed a test that can predict how patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) will respond to treatment, and may also be able to identify patients who are likely to recover spontaneously with little to no treatment. The researchers are currently optimizing the test for more routine clinical use in the United States. JMML is an aggressive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LGBQ adolescents at much greater risk of suicide than heterosexual counterparts Adolescents who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or questioning are much more likely to consider, plan or attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California, San Diego, and San Diego State University published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association . Specifically, of a nationally representa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sexual minority young people are at a higher risk for suicide Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) young people are at substantially higher risk of suicidal behavior than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study published in JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association. As part of the most recent National Youth Risk Behavior Survey -- the largest national survey on adolescent health -- 15,624 high school students were asked whether in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cervical device reduces rate of preterm birth Bottom Line: Pregnant women with a short cervix who used a small silicone ring called a cervical pessary to keep their cervix closed had a lower rate of preterm birth at less than 34 weeks. Why The Research Is Interesting: Preterm birth is a major cause of illness, disability and death for infants. A cervical pessary is intended to keep the cervix closed and to change the inclination of the cervi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electric fields therapy improves survival for patients with brain tumor Bottom Line: Patients with glioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor who received a type of electric fields therapy that interferes with cell division had better overall survival and survival without progression of the tumor compared to standard chemotherapy. Why The Research Is Interesting: Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive brain tumor, with only 1 in 4 patients surviving two years af
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Isolating blood-feeding and non-biting genes in mosquitoesResearchers have taken the first step on a path that eventually could result in female mosquitoes that no longer bite and spread diseases. A nine-member team of scientists at five institutions methodically sorted out 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding from the mosquito Wyeomyia smithii.
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Feed: All Latest
Augmented Reality's Real Power Will Be Helping With Everyday Tasks Last week the pilot light for my water heater went out. I tried to relight it by following the instructions pasted on the side of the heater, but they were as inscrutable as hieroglyphs. So I did what everyone does when they need to learn something: I went to YouTube. Bingo. Someone had posted a video showing how to relight my exact model. I crouched down near the heater, holding my phone at arm’
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Feed: All Latest
Why the International Space Station Is the Single Best Thing Humanity Did The International Space Station is one of the few nonstellar things up there that we can see from down here without instruments. It’s a prefab home the size of a football field, 462 tons and more than $100 billion worth of pressurized roomlike modules and gleaming solar arrays, orbiting 250 miles above the surface of the Earth. Its flight path is available online, and you can find out when it wil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mild obsessive-compulsive symptoms in healthy children are linked with cerebral changesA new study links mild obsessive-compulsive symptoms to characteristics and specific alterations of the cerebral anatomy. The work provides a new perspective regarding prevention strategies for long-term mental health disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The virus that conquered the world: 100 years laterNearly a century after the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919 ravaged communities worldwide, the threat of another pandemic looms large as the scientific and global health communities find ways to prepare for, and battle, future outbreaks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New molecular printing technology could recreate complex chemical environments that resemble the human bodyNew patterning technology which could open opportunities to recreate complex biological environments has been developed.
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Futurity.org
Sensor mimics shark’s ‘sixth sense’ organ A new quantum material mimics a shark’s ability to detect the minute electric fields of small prey. Such a technology might be used to study ocean organisms and ecosystems and to monitor the movement of ships for military and commercial maritime applications, says Shriram Ramanathan, professor of materials engineering at Purdue University. “So, it has potentially very broad interest in many disci
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Futurity.org
Male professors give 69% of invited talks on campus Male professors gave more than twice as many invited talks as female professors in departments at the 50 most prestigious American universities during the 2013-2014 academic year, according to new research. Departmental talks (or colloquia) are academic presentations in which researchers are invited to a university to present and discuss their work with colleagues and students. Christine Nittroue
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular printing technology could recreate chemical environments resembling human body '3DEAL' is a simple and inexpensive fabrication technique able to generate complex molecular patterns within soft matter, such as hydrogels, with microscale resolution and up to centimetres in depth. This capacity enables the possibility to engineer 3D hydrogel environments with spatial control of the chemical composition, opening the opportunity to recreate biological scenarios s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University researchers study the effects of bee venom on living organisms Despite a centuries-old history of studies of bee venom as a therapeutic agent, this field of research remains quite relevant today, when the use of synthetic drugs is not always effective and has a great number of side effects. In addition to analgesic properties of bee venom that are well known, a number of other useful properties have been established experimentally such as the ability to redu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Couple up for long-term happiness Being married has a lifelong effect on how content people are. This is according to a study in Springer's Journal of Happiness Studies that investigated people's levels of well-being based on their marital status. Using data from two UK surveys, its authors, Shawn Grover and John Helliwell of the Vancouver School of Economics in Canada, showed that an even greater sense of well-being was reported
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treasure trove of highly detailed fossils uncovered by Uppsala researchers IMAGE: From left; the oldest known pterobranch hemichordate; teeth from a priapulid, a sediment dwelling predatory worm; the carapace of a tiny arthropod. view more Credit: Slater, Willman, Budd and Peel A team of researchers from Uppsala University have uncovered a hidden diversity of microscopic animal fossils from over half a billion years ago lurking in rocks from the northern tip o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More complex biological systems evolve more freely IMAGE: First author Mato Lagator is analyzing the phenotype of a sample of E.Coli mutants. view more Credit: IST Austria Our genes (aka. the genotype) determine our characteristics (aka. the phenotype). Evolution acts on changes in the phenotype, which occur when mutations change the underlying genotype. But what changes to the phenotype can be produced by mutations is not without bounds - an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German cartel office says Facebook abusing data collectionGermany's cartel office said Tuesday that Facebook is acting in an abusive fashion by collecting data on the way people use third-party websites.
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Live Science
Tiny Fossils May Be Oldest Evidence of Life on Earth Ancient, preserved microbes that are too small to be seen with the naked eye, dating to billions of years ago, may represent the oldest known evidence of life on Earth, according to a new study. First unearthed in western Australia in 1982 and described in 1993, these microfossils are so tiny that eight of them lined up one after another would span the width of a human hair. The researchers
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A vehicle built in Africa, for Africa | Joel JacksonJoel Jackson wants to reimagine transportation around the needs of the African consumer. He's designed an SUV that's rugged enough for long stretches of uneven terrain and affordable enough to be within reach of those who need it most. Learn more about the challenges of mobility and manufacturing in Africa -- and what a localized motor industry could mean for the future of the continent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conservation study uses tiny treadmills to test sea turtle hatchling stamina To determine how well the sea turtle hatchlings could perform after their walk on the treadmill, the hatchlings swam in a small tank using a specially designed swimsuit. Researchers measured oxygen consumption and lactate accumulation as well as their breathing rates and stroke rates -- that is how fast they were paddling their flippers. Credit: Florida Atlantic University If everything goes as p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers steer the flow of electrical current with spinning light False-colored electron microscope image of the University of Minnesota device. The blue area marks the topological insulator on top of the optical waveguide in red. Credit: University of Minnesota Light can generate an electrical current in semiconductor materials. This is how solar cells generate electricity from sunlight and how smart phone cameras can take photographs. To collect the generated
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Science : NPR
GOP Tax Bill Leaves Health Savings Accounts Untouched Some Republicans see HSAs as a great way of helping consumers deal with mounting medical costs. It's still possible a change to the rules governing who can have an HSA and what they are allowed to cover could be added to another bill, some analysts say. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Some Republicans see HSAs as a great way of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccines The Dengue virus and mosquito. Credit: Paul Young and Daniel Watterson Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental drug interferes with different mechanisms associated to Alzheimer's diseaseThe chemical compound 'anle138b' eases cognitive deficits and normalizes gene expression in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, the drug seems to close harmful openings in the membrane of nerve cells. An international collaboration reports these findings in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The scientists suggest that anle138b should be validated in clinical trials for its potent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vengeance is sweet and expensive When we see somebody suffering, we normally feel uneasy and want to help. However, this feeling can be reversed. When we know someone behaved in an antisocial manner, we can remain unsympathetic even though we know they are hurt. It is known from previous studies that we perceive the perpetrator's pain as a just punishment and a tool to penalise misbehaviour. Moreover, we feel a sense of spite wh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biofilms as construction workersBiofilms are generally seen as a problem to be eradicated due to the hazards they pose for humans and materials. However, these communities of algae, fungi, or bacteria possess interesting properties both from a scientific and technical standpoint. A team describes processes from the field of biology that utilize biofilms as 'construction workers' to create structural templates for new materials t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rarity of disease-causing IGF mutationsScientists are conducting research on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), a family of proteins that are crucial in early human growth and development. IGF mutations have been tied to dire health problems, like growth failure, intellectual deficiencies, and other developmental abnormalities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warming seas double snowfall around North America's tallest peaksResearch finds dramatic increases in snowfall since the beginning of the Industrial Age and explains global climate connections linking northern mountains with tropical oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Santa's workshop could be on snowy moon Enceladus. Credit: University of Warwick Santa's winter workshop might be in space, as University of Warwick researchers are exploring whether snowy moons over a billion kilometres away from Earth are potentially habitable. According to Dr David Brown, and colleagues at Warwick's Centre for Exoplanets and Habitability, life could be supported on moons of ice and snow with vast oceans under their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New molecular printing technology could recreate complex chemical environments that resemble the human body Fluorescently-labeled protein patterns within different types of 3D hydrogels 1. Credit: Queen Mary, University of London New patterning technology which could open opportunities to recreate complex biological environments has been developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). '3DEAL' is a simple and inexpensive fabrication technique able to generate complex molecular patter
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NYT > Science
What Eats What: A Landlubber’s Guide to Deep Sea Dining You’ll never go to dinner in the deep sea. It’s dark, vast and weird down there. If the pressure alone didn’t destroy your land-bound body, some hungry sea creature would probably try to eat you. Fortunately for you, something else has spent a lot of time down there, helping to prepare this guide to deep sea dining. For nearly three decades, robots with cameras deployed by the Monterey Bay Aquari
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A hidden diversity of half-billion-year-old microscopic animal fossils Credit: Uppsala universitet A team of researchers from Uppsala University have uncovered a hidden diversity of microscopic animal fossils from over half a billion years ago lurking in rocks from the northern tip of Greenland. The Cambrian explosion of animal diversity beginning ~541 million years ago is a defining episode in the history of life. This was a time when the seas first teemed with ani
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Facebook Can Now Find Your Face, Even When It's Not Tagged Facebook just loosened the leash a little on its facial-recognition algorithms. Starting Tuesday, any time someone uploads a photo that includes what Facebook thinks is your face, you’ll be notified even if you weren’t tagged. The new feature rolled out to most of Facebook’s more than 2 billion global users this morning. It applies only to newly posted photos, and only those with privacy settings
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What is the best policy for reducing the impact of alcohol on the road accident rate?Researchers have analyzed alcohol consumption in traffic accident fatalities in the European Union.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccinesResearchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The study identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengue virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of ruins of ancient Turkic monument surrounded by 14 pillars with inscriptionsA joint excavation team has discovered the ruins of a unique monument surrounded by 14 large stone pillars with Turkic Runic inscriptions arranged in a square on the steppe called Dongoin shiree in eastern Mongolia during their three-year (2015 ~ 2017) joint excavation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make research 'jelly' grow more like biological tissuesScientists have found a way to direct the growth of hydrogel, a jelly-like substance, to mimic plant or animal tissue structure and shapes. The team's findings suggest new applications in areas such as tissue engineering and soft robotics where hydrogel is commonly used.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Steering electrical current with spinning lightLight can generate an electrical current in semiconductor materials. This is how solar cells generate electricity from sunlight and how smart phone cameras can take photographs. To collect the generated electrical current, called photocurrent, an electric voltage is needed to force the current to flow in only one direction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The missing link between exploding stars, clouds, and climate on EarthThe study reveals how atmospheric ions, produced by the energetic cosmic rays raining down through the atmosphere, helps the growth and formation of cloud condensation nuclei -- the seeds necessary for forming clouds in the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some monkeys prone to isolationSome individual animals are prone to social isolation, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insight into 'immortal' plant cellsA new study has revealed an undiscovered reprogramming mechanism that allows plants to maintain fitness down the generations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Tokyo International Research Center for Neurointelligence holds first annual symposium IMAGE: Group photo of some of the participants attending the University of Tokyo's International Research Center for Neurointelligence's (IRCN's) first annual symposium. view more Credit: 2017 The University of Tokyo. Tokyo, Japan -- Despite centuries of inquiry, we still don't know how our intelligence came about. On Sunday, December 17, 2017, researchers at the new University of T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The not so sweet side of Christmas A new video by the University of Warwick highlights a bitter side to our sugar consumption at Christmas. Available to view online https:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?time_continue= 1&v= IDKj-0vvFeg the short film highlights how excessive consumption of sugar can affect our health - and how the sugar trade in the past and today has caused inequality and bloodshed. Today Britons eat too much sugar,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electromagnetic emissions from smartphones analyzed for security vulnerability IMAGE: This study of the UC3M and the CSIC analyzes the vulnerabilities of smartphones. view more Credit: UC3M This platform, whose objective is to improve smartphone security and that of other electronic devices, was recently presented in Canada in an international conference on security and privacy on the Internet of Things (Workshop on Security and Privacy on Internet of Things). This
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Santa's workshop could be on snowy moon IMAGE: This is Enceladus. view more Credit: University of Warwick Santa's winter workshop might be in space, as University of Warwick researchers are exploring whether snowy moons over a billion kilometres away from Earth are potentially habitable. According to Dr David Brown, and colleagues at Warwick's Centre for Exoplanets and Habitability, life could be supported on moons of ice and sno
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mild obsessive-compulsive symptoms in healthy children are linked with cerebral changes IMAGE: This photo shows Maria Suñol, Oren Contreras and Carlos Soriano-Mas. view more Credit: IDIBELL A new study carried out by the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Institute of Global Health of Barcelona (ISGlobal), a centre supported by "la Caixa" Foundation, associates for the first time mild obsessive-compulsive symptoms, which are present in a much higher perc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercising at own pace boosts a child's ability to learn IMAGE: This is Josie Booth. view more Credit: University of Edinburgh A child's attention and memory improves after exercise according to new research conducted by primary school pupils and supported by the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh. Researchers found that pupils' best responses to tests came after physical activity that was set at their own pace, as opposed to exhaus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Friend or foe? How the unconscious mind picks out faces in a crowd IMAGE: Imagine you're walking down a busy street like Times Square in New York. There are tons of people around. As you make your way through the crowd, your... view more Credit: Hebrew University Imagine you're walking down a busy street like Times Square in New York. There are tons of people around. As you make your way through the crowd, your brain notices several faces but ignores the r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What is the best policy for reducing the impact of alcohol on the road accident rate? A study by the research group Applied Economics & Management, which is based at the University of Seville, has analysed, from a sample of the 28 countries of the European Union, the existing relationship between alcohol and road safety. Specifically, it looked at the impact both of social habits and legal regulation of alcohol consumption, such as the legislation that controls drink-driving,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The cyanide defense: How one bacterium inhibits predators with poison Washington, DC - December 19, 2017 - Microbiologists in South Korea report this week in mBio that the bacterium Chromobacterium piscinae produces cyanide when under attack from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 , a microbial predator found in rivers and soils that ingests its prey from the inside out. The researchers found that the prey produced levels of cyanide high enough to inhibit, but not ki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden bridge between quantum experiments and graph theory uncovered The algorithm Melvin, developed by researchers of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna, is used to calculate technical solutions of experiments in quantum physics. Credit: Mehul Malik/University of Vienna An answer to a quantum-physical question provided by the algorithm Melvin has uncovered a hidden link between quantum experiments and the mathematical field of Graph The
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Big Think
The Stunning Rise in Plastic Surgery Shows a Psychological Crisis Over a billion phones in China are equipped with apps produced by Meitu, Inc. Launched in 2008, the signature app, also named Meitu (“beautiful picture”), is a basic photo-editing program. The inventors originally imagined it as a general-purpose app until they noticed user data. Teenage girls were by far the most engaged audience. Today the company is worth more than $6 billion. Meitu not on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indigenous languages must feature more in science communication Introducing rural and indigenous communities to science, through experiments and communication, is vital. Credit: Felipe Figueira There is no denying that English is one of the world's major languages. It's the mother tongue of nearly 370 million people . English is also very frequently used by scientists in academic journals and book chapters, along with other common languages like French, Spani
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cellular division strategy shared across all domains of life SEAS researchers have found that these pink-hued archaea — called Halobacterium salinarum — use the same mechanisms to maintain size as bacteria and eukaryotic life, indicting that cellular division strategy may be shared across all domains of life. Credit: Alexandre Bison/Harvard University The three domains of life—archaea, bacteria, and eukarya—may have more in common than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Globe had third-warmest year to date, fifth warmest November on record Credit: NOAA Headquarters With a warm start to the year and only one month remaining, the globe remains on track to go down as the third warmest year in the 138-year climate record. So let's get straight to the data and dive deeper into NOAA's monthly analysis to see how the planet fared for November, the season and the year to date: Climate by the numbers November 2017 The average global t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NOAA's GOES-16 ready to improve forecasts even more Credit: NOAA Headquarters Now in its new GOES-East position, the advanced GOES-16 satellite has officially joined NOAA's operational observation network, providing forecasters with sharper, more defined images of severe storms, hurricanes, wildfires and other weather hazards in near real-time 24/7. "The GOES-16 satellite provided invaluable data on deadly hurricanes long before they touched the s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyclically changing environments could be the key to Earth's diversity Credit: University of Glasgow A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in PNAS , found that cyclical changes in nature, such as seasons and tides, may create suitable conditions for the coexistence of a large number of species. The study, conducted in collaboration with ecologists from Texas A&M University and The University of the Aegean, focused on phytoplankton – micro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
If past life on Mars existed, it co-evolved with the Martian environment Credit: SETI Institute A new article in Astrobiology , "The Coevolution of Life and Environment on Mars: An Ecosystem Perspective on the Robotic Exploration of Biosignatures," is available online today and in the January, 2018 issue. Written by Nathalie Cabrol, Director of the Carl Sagan Center for Research at the SETI Institute and SETI Institute scientist, it puts forth a proposition about poss
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Major technology developments boost LCLS X-ray laser's discovery power Two methods independently invented by scientists in SLAC’s Accelerator Directorate have produced the world’s first attosecond hard X-ray laser pulses at the lab’s LCLS facility. In one method, the shapes of electron bunches used to generate X-rays were manipulated with a radiofrequency field so that part of each bunch (dense area on the left) emits X-ray pulses with shorter-than-ever pulse length
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treasure trove of highly detailed fossils uncoveredResearchers have uncovered a hidden diversity of microscopic animal fossils from over half a billion years ago lurking in rocks from the northern tip of Greenland.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic changes caused by environmental factors linked to suicide riskResearchers have linked genetic changes in the so-called CRH gene, which affects the regulation of the body’s stress system, to suicide risk and psychiatric illness. The study of epigenetic changes in the body’s hormone-based stress system has shown that stress-related changes in the CRH gene are linked to both serious suicide attempts in adults and psychiatric illness in adolescents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercising at own pace boosts a child’s ability to learnA child’s attention and memory improves after exercise according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A radical approach to methane oxidation into methanolResearchers have converted methane into valuable chemicals. The reaction occurs under ambient conditions in a novel two-phase system. Chlorine radicals are generated by light irradiation in water solvent, while methane is dissolved in perfluorohexane. Methyl radicals then react with oxygen, producing industrially useful methanol and formic acid. This is the first aerobic oxidation of methane witho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change will displace millions in coming decades—nations should prepare now to help them People displaced by drought in Somalia queue to register at a refugee camp in neighboring Ethiopia, July 26, 2011. Credit: UK-DFID, CC BY Wildfires tearing across Southern California have forced thousands of residents to evacuate from their homes. Even more people fled ahead of the hurricanes that slammed into Texas and Florida earlier this year, jamming highways and filling hotels. A viral socia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate scientists and policymakers need to trust each other (but not too much) Credit: oneinchpunch/Shutterstock.com At a time when the effects of climate change are accelerating and published science overwhelmingly supports the view that humans are responsible for the rate of change, powerful groups remain in denial across politics, the media, and industry. Now more than ever, we need scientists and policymakers to work together to create and implement effective policy whi
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Feed: All Latest
2017 Was the Year the Robots Really, Truly Arrived The world seemed different this year, yes? Like something strange has been walking and rolling among us? Like we’re now sharing the planet with a new species of our own creation? Well, we are, because 2017 was the year that the robots really, truly arrived. They escaped the factory floor and started conquering big cities to deliver Mediterranean food . Self-driving cars swarmed the streets . And
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Feed: All Latest
How to Run Up a Wall—With Physics! I can't decide if this looks like something from a super hero movie or from a video game. In this compilation video of crazy stunts, a guy somehow finds a way to bound up between two walls by jumping from one to the other. "Somehow," of course, means with physics: This move is based on the momentum principle and friction. Could you pull it off? Probably not. But you can at least do the math. VIDE
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Dagens Medicin
Dansk professor får millionbevilling til forskning i fluorstoffer Philippe Grandjean får bevilling til forskning i skadelige effekter ved fluorstoffer.
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Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Lifts Moratorium on Funding Controversial, High-Risk Virus Research The federal government announced on Tuesday that it is lifting a three-year moratorium on funding controversial research that involves genetically altering viruses in ways that could make them more contagious, more deadly, or both—and that critics say risks triggering a catastrophic pandemic. Called gain-of-function experiments, the studies aim to understand genetic changes that can make vi
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Scientific American Content: Global
On Gender and Concussion Recovery: Let's not Jump to Conclusions Do girls take longer than boys to recover after a concussion? A recent study of middle- and high school athletes they found that the female athletes took twice as long to be symptom-free as the male athletes. Shockingly, the female athletes took nearly a full month to report being symptom-free, while the male athletes took less than two weeks. It was reported widely across the media as evidence t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A functional genomics database for plant microbiome studies Phylogenetic tree of over 3,800 high quality and non-redundant bacterial genomes. Outer ring denotes the taxonomic group, central ring denotes the isolation source, and inner ring denotes the root-associated genomes within plant-associated genomes. Taxon names are color-coded based on phylum: green – Proteobacteria, red – Firmicutes, blue –Bacteroidetes, purple – Actinobacteria. Credit: Asaf Levy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How your diet can improve animal welfare A systematic approach to quantify impacts of food consumption on animal welfare has been developed by researchers of the Institute of Environmental Sciences, Leiden University in collaboration with ETH Zurich, and effective altruism organizations. The scientific paper was recently published in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment . "With an increasing consumption of animal products
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The cyanide defense: How one bacterium inhibits predators with poison Microbiologists in South Korea report this week in mBio that the bacterium Chromobacterium piscinae produces cyanide when under attack from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 , a microbial predator found in rivers and soils that ingests its prey from the inside out. The researchers found that the prey produced levels of cyanide high enough to inhibit, but not kill, the B. bacteriovorus HD100 . Expe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A type of semi-transparent polymer that can be mended at room temperature using small pressure A small team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has created a polymer that can be repaired when broken into two parts by applying a small amount of pressure at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Science , the group describes how they came upon the polymer, how it was made, and how well it can be repaired. Engineers around the world have been working hard to find a ty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Co-nonsolvency explained: Researchers publish ground-breaking findings Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Leipzig have created a model which enables the timely and effective prediction of polymer behavior in mixed solvents. This is the first scientific work to explain, using statistical mechanics, the effect of suppression of co-nonsolvency at high pressures. The findings have been published in the journal Soft Matter : http://pubs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New configuration of DNA discovered DNA is stretched between two (polystyrene) beads (blue) that are held in laser beams (red). Intercalators (green) make hyperstretched DNA visible. Credit: Iddo Heller / VU Amsterdam Pulling sufficiently hard on DNA may cause it to unfold, doubling its total length. This new state of DNA is announced today by researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the Vrije Universiteit Ams
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Futurity.org
Tiny details in photos identify your unique phone Researchers have discovered how to identify smartphones by examining just one photo taken by the device. The advancement opens the possibility of using smartphones—instead of FaceID or other biometrics—as a form of identification to deter cybercrime. “It’s kind of like matching bullets to a gun, only we’re matching photos to a smartphone camera.” “Like snowflakes, no two smartphones are the same.
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The Scientist RSS
NIH Revises Funding Strategy for Young ResearchersThe agency plans to ease restrictions on grants to a narrowly defined group of early- and mid-career researchers.
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The Scientist RSS
PerkinElmer: 7-Color Multispectral Imaging with Vectra PolarisAnalyze seven fluorophores at once with the Vectra Polaris.
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The Atlantic
When Will the North Pole Melt? In the near future, the North Pole could truly be relegated to the realm of history. Since scientists started measuring winter sea ice, we’ve lost half a million square miles of it—and for every additional ton of carbon dioxide in the air, about 32 square feet of summer sea ice disappears. In this episode of You Are Here, The Atlantic writer Robinson Meyer details the history of the mythical Nort
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Science : NPR
Being Different Helped A NASA Roboticist Achieve Her Dream When Ayanna Howard was a little girl, her favorite TV show was the Bionic Woman. Growing up, Howard was obsessed with creating robots. She earned her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and by the time she was 27 she landed her dream job at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Howard leads a small team of engineers and scientists tasked with advancing the intelligence of robots for future Mars mis
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Futurity.org
Fast fluids pull ‘wet noodle’ electrodes into brain A new device uses fast-moving fluids to insert flexible, conductive carbon nanotube fibers into the brain, where they can help record the actions of neurons. The microfluidics-based technique promises to improve therapies that rely on electrodes to sense neuronal signals and trigger actions in patients with epilepsy and other conditions. Eventually, the researchers say, the nanotube-based electro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arthritis drug could help treat advanced skin cancer Treatment for the most deadly form of skin cancer could be more effective if combined with a well-known drug for rheumatoid arthritis, new research has shown. The study, by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA), found that in mice, using the two treatments together almost completely stopped the growth of a melanoma tumour. Although only five per cent of skin cancer cases involve melan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special issue: Natura 2000 appropriate assessment and derogation procedure IMAGE: This is a coal power plant and railroad near Halle (Saale), Germany. view more Credit: Stefan Möckel With over 27,500 sites, Natura 2000 is the greatest nature conservation network in the world. It covers more than 18 percent of the land area in the European Union and around 395,000 km2 of its marine territory. Projects and plans within those sites or in their vicinity require
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biofilms as construction workers Biofilms are generally seen as a problem to be eradicated due to the hazards they pose for humans and materials. However, these communities of algae, fungi, or bacteria possess interesting properties both from a scientific and a technical standpoint. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes processes from the field of biology that utilize biofilms as 'construction workers' t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with Type 2 diabetes need more support, say researchersResearch shows the old adage 'teach someone to fish' instead of giving them a fish, rings true when it comes to helping people with Type 2 diabetes. The objective was to identify the behavior change techniques used in 54 dietary interventions to determine what works when it comes to helping people control their diabetes and lose weight, explains UBC Okanagan's Heather Gainforth, the study's senior
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
China's scholastic success could begin with storybooks, research suggests RIVERSIDE, Calif. - The lessons from childhood storybooks are decidedly different in China and the United States, and align with the lessons the respective countries impart in the classroom, UC Riverside research finds. There is a widely held perception - and some research to affirm it - that East Asian schools outperform schools in North America. A recent study published by UC Riverside psycholo
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Dagens Medicin
Brandmænd rykker ud som første assistance ved hjertestopNyt samarbejde mellem Hovedstadens Beredskab og Region Hovedstaden skal give bedre førstehjælp ved hjertestop.
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NYT > Science
A Federal Ban on Making Lethal Viruses Is Lifted Now, a government panel will require that researchers show that their studies in this area are scientifically sound and that they will be done in a high-security lab. The pathogen to be modified must pose a serious health threat, and the work must produce knowledge — such as a vaccine — that would benefit humans. Finally, there must be no safer way to do the research. “We see this as a rigorous p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Both chimps and children found to be willing to pay to see bad players punished Credit: CC0 Public Domain An international team of researchers has found that both chimpanzees and human children are willing to pay to see the punishment of someone who has behaved badly. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior , the group describes two series of experiments they carried out, one with chimpanzees in a zoo, the other with children aged four to six in a labor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sandia computer modeling aids solder reliability in nuclear weapons Materials scientist Paul Vianco peers through an experimental setup of printed wiring assemblies used to validate modeling in a Sandia National Laboratories project to study solder failure. Vianco said computational modeling of solder joint fatigue is critical to Sandia’s role in life extension programs for nuclear weapons. Credit: Randy Montoya Solder isn't the first thing that comes to mind as
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Ingeniøren
Efter Version2-artikel: DR flytter nu julekalender, så børn ikke støder på upassende indhold Efter Version2s artikel om, at DR anbefalede voksent indhold direkte efter julekalenderen , skifter DR nu mening. På twitter skriver DR Presse , at julekalenderen Snefald nu bliver en del af Ultra-universet, der er dækket af dr.dks regler om at beskytte børn og unge mod upassende indhold. Se DRs tweet : I har helt ret @version2dk og @kokkegaard – tak for at bringe det frem. Snefald er nu en del a
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Live Science
Navy Pilot Was 'Pretty Weirded Out' by Encounter with Unidentified Object in 2004 "What people sometimes don't get about science is that we often have phenomena that remain unexplained," said an astrophysicist at MIT https://t.co/Z8UdjWmVCg — The New York Times (@nytimes) December 18, 2017 The U.S. Defense Department had a secret program to investigate reports of unidentified flying objects – in which former Navy pilots say they had a stunning encounter with a UFO in
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Science : NPR
NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark a pandemic outbreak. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption toggle caption Vincent Yu/AP Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark
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Ingeniøren
Underskrift på kontrakt for ny Storstrømsbro udsat på grund af korruptionstvivl Er de rene? Det spørgsmål stillede flere folketingspolitikere sig selv, efter Fagbladet 3F i flere artikler har dokumenteret, at to ud af tre deltagere i det italienske konsortium, der vandt udbuddet om at bygge en ny Storstrømsbro er involveret i sager om korruption i hjemlandet. Kontrakten med konsortiet, der består af entreprenørerne Initera, Condotte og Grandi Lavori Fincosit, skulle have vær
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cognitive science
A paper in JEP:G explores how having answers available affects problem solving performance. The results are more complicated to interpret than they seem at first glance. A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene-based wearable e-textiles move closer to commercial production Demonstration of laboratory-scale pad-dry unit and illustration of the pad-dry unit process. Illustration by Daniel Wand. Credit: Karim et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society (Phys.org)—The market for e-textile clothing is forecasted to reach $5 billion by 2027, according to the market research firm IDTechEX. And while graphene is expected to be one of the most prominent materials in wearable e-t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists control superconductivity using spin currents The spin-polarized chromium (Cr) tip being scanned over the superconducting area of C 2 magnetism, represented in the background (the right and bottom areas of the image) with electron pairs shown as as coupled red spheres. Just beneath the tip, the spin-polarized current locally induces C 4 antiferromagnetic order (illustrated with yellow and blue plaquettes), which remains stable as shown recor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical decision support app helps improve quality of life and longevity for heart failure patients IMAGE: A clinical decision support application developed by Intermountain Healthcare researchers that more quickly identifies when heart failure becomes advanced and a heart patient's care needs have changed is successful in... view more Credit: Intermountain Medical Center A clinical decision support application developed by Intermountain Healthcare researchers that more quickly identifies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make research 'jelly' grow more like biological tissues IMAGE: Scientists from NTU and CMU created a leaf-like hydrogel structure through a process similar to how real leaf tissues grow. view more Credit: CMU and NTU Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have found a way to direct the growth of hydrogel, a jelly-like substance, to mimic plant or animal tissue structur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chinese scientists reveal a novel signaling pathway for chilling tolerance in rice IMAGE: OsMAPK3-OsbHLH002-OsTPP1 pathway mediates the chilling tolerance in rice. view more Credit: XU Yunyuan The ability of plants to tolerate chilling stress is fundamental in determining the growing season and geographical distribution of plants. Local temperature anomalies caused by global climate change directly threaten crop production. Improvement of chilling tolerance in rice vari
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conservation study uses tiny treadmills to test sea turtle hatchling stamina If everything goes as planned, a newly hatched sea turtle should be able to crawl from its nest to the ocean in a couple of minutes. This trek happens in the first 24 hours when they emerge from their nests and is referred to as the "frenzy" period. Just like biathletes, these hatchlings sprint from the beach to the surf and then swim a long distance to reach their home. Unfortunately, things don
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A radical approach to methane oxidation into methanol IMAGE: Chlorine dioxide radical (ClO 2 • ) was found to act as an efficient oxidizing agent in the aerobic oxygenation of methane to methanol and formic acid under photoirradiation. The yields of methanol... view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka -- Free radicals don't get the best press. However, while they are known as harmful oxidants in the body, these ultra-reactive chemicals are indispe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccines IMAGE: This is the Dengue virus and mosquito. view more Credit: Paul Young and Daniel Watterson Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on rarity of disease-causing IGF mutations IMAGE: Peter Rotwein, M.D., was recently spotlighted by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) for a study he conducted on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), a family of proteins... view more Credit: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso Peter Rotwein, M.D., was recently spotlighted by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (AS
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers begin isolating blood-feeding and non-biting genes in mosquitoes IMAGE: Pitcher plant mosquitoes (Wyeomyia smithii) rest on their favorite habitat, pitcher plants. Scientists have sorted out which genes are associated with biting and non-biting in this mosquito species. Eventually, the... view more Credit: University of Oregon EUGENE, Ore. - Dec. 19, 2017 - Researchers have taken the first step on a path that eventually could result in female mosquitoes th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers steer the flow of electrical current with spinning lightLight can generate an electrical current in semiconductor materials. This is how solar cells generate electricity from sunlight and how smart phone cameras can take photographs. To collect the generated electrical current, called photocurrent, an electric voltage is needed to force the current to flow in only one direction.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can We Agree to Outlaw War--Again? After binge-watching the 18-hour PBS documentary series The Vietnam War , by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, I was left emotionally emptied and ethically exhausted from seeing politicians in the throes of deception, self-deception and the sunk-cost bias that resulted in a body count totaling more than three million dead North and South Vietnamese civilians and soldiers, along with more than 58,000 Ame
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Scientific American Content: Global
Science Is Solutions: Improving Finance, Helping Coral Reefs, Advancing Discoveries As a member of an editorial team covering the international endeavor known as science, I often find myself on airplanes. Recently my seatmate was a bright young woman. She spoke passionately about her specialty areas of design and marketing and was also eager to hear about my career. “Science?” she asked. “Why would you write about that instead of, say, culture or design?” I was surprised by
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The Scientist RSS
Image Of The Day: Hunter PlateletsResearchers explore how blood platelets sweep bacteria into aggregate bundles at sites of infection to help phagocytic cells dispose of them.
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The Scientist RSS
Bioanalytical Pharmacokinetics: The Intrinsic Value of AffimersAvacta presents a look at Affimers, and how they are changing R&D for the better.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Best of Last Year—The top Phys.org articles of 2017 A sketch of the timeline of the holographic Universe. Time runs from left to right. The far left denotes the holographic phase and the image is blurry because space and time are not yet well defined. At the end of this phase (denoted by the black fluctuating ellipse) the Universe enters a geometric phase, which can now be described by Einstein's equations. The cosmic microwave background was emit
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New Scientist - News
Exclusive: NASA has begun plans for a 2069 interstellar mission The launch is decades away, and the journey will take even longer ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2 By John Wenz IF A small, scrappy group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, get their way, the 100th anniversary of Apollo 11 – the first crewed moon landing – will see a spacecraft launched to a nearby exoplanet to look for life. The project is so new it doesn’t have a n
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New Scientist - News
Exclusive: Most premature baby ever to survive born at 22 weeks By Alice Klein A BABY born more than four months before her due date has become the youngest premature baby to survive. The girl was born after only 21 weeks and 5 days’ gestation, at Samsung Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea, and is now a healthy 5-year-old. In 2012, the girl’s 38-year-old mother was rushed to hospital because the membrane sac encasing her unborn twins had burst – a sign
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse og regioner vil sikre mere brugbare indberetninger af utilsigtede hændelser En række pilotprojekter skal i begyndelsen af 2018 afklare, hvordan UTH-rapporteringen kan understøtte det lokale patientsikkerhedsarbejde bedst muligt.
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Popular Science
Cell phones aren’t a public health risk, no matter what California says The California Department of Public Health recently released guidelines for decreasing one's exposure to cell phone radiation. This seems, at first, like a reasonable thing to offer. But the problem with a government body issuing guidelines on how to avoid something is that it implies the thing should be avoided. And there’s no evidence that cell phones are dangerous to your health. Period. Why w
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Viden
Ny viden: Gletsjere i Grønland smelter med rekordfart Grønlandske gletsjere smelter ekstremt hurtigt i disse år sammenholdt med tidligere målinger. Det viser et nyt studie, hvor danske forskere har kortlagt 350 gletsjere og dokumenteret deres historie. Tidligere var kun 77 gletsjere kortlagt. - Den periode, vi er i nu, smelter isen ekstremt hurtigt, og gletsjerne rykker sig hurtigt tilbage, siger postdoc Anders Anker Bjørk, Statens Naturhistoriske M
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make research hydrogel grow more like biological tissues Scientists from NTU and CMU created a leaf-like hydrogel structure through a process similar to how real leaf tissues grow. Credit: CMU and NTU Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have found a way to direct the growth of hydrogel, a jelly-like substance, to mimic plant or animal tissue structure and shapes. The team's fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious alien cigar 'asteroid' is actually an interstellar lump of ice (not a space ship) ESO/M. Credit: Kornmesser, CC BY-SA The fundamental job of astrophysicists and astronauts is to explore the universe, and find what is out there. This year, the universe explored us. On October 19, the Pan-STARRS 1 survey telescope in Hawaii captured a faint streak of light during its nightly search for asteroids and comets. Astronomer Rob Weryk realised it had a trajectory unlike anything seen b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A radical approach to methane oxidation into methanol Fig.1: Chlorine dioxide radical (ClO2•) was found to act as an efficient oxidizing agent in the aerobic oxygenation of methane to methanol and formic acid under photoirradiation. The yields of methanol and formic acid were 14% and 85%, respectively, with a methane conversion of 99% under ambient conditions (298 K, 1 atm) in a two-phase system comprising perfluorohexane and water. Credit: Osaka Un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Major threats to soil ecosystems from a combination of invasive species and climate change Springtails, such as this neanurid species, play a key role in terrestrial ecosystems. Credit: ChownLab, Monash University Soil ecosystems are critical for agriculture, biodiversity and human well-being. Poor soil health means a poor planetary outlook. A study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by a Monash University team shows that a new threat faces soil sust
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology ready, but acceptance pending for distributed energy systems A network of energy producers and consumers. Credit: Sandro Bösch / ETH Zurich Will we be able to do away with the classic centralized energy supply in the future? From a technological perspective: yes. Distributed multi-energy systems are feasible. But from an economic and societal perspective, many questions remain unanswered, blogs Roman Seidl. Thermal solar energy systems heat the floor and w
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Studie: Systematiske hverdagsvaner kan være nøglen til varigt vægttab 19. december 2017 Studie: Systematiske hverdagsvaner kan være nøglen til varigt vægttab Vægttab Nye forskningsresultater fra et mindre studie på Københavns Universitet tyder på, at folk, som laver deres egne, systematiske regler for spisning og overholder dem uanset kroppens signaler om sult og mæthed, er markant bedre i stand til at vedligeholde deres vægttab i forhold til folk, der følger særli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Weyl-Kondo semimetal': Physicists discover new type of quantum material Rice University physicists (from left) Hsin-Hua Lai, Qimiao Si and Sarah Grefe have made predictions that could help experimental physicists create the first “Weyl-Kondo semimetal.” Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University U.S. and European physicists searching for an explanation for high-temperature superconductivity were surprised when their theoretical model pointed to the existence of a never-befo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Thomas fire continues to grow but weather may assist effortsThe Thomas Fire in Ventura County California continues to burn despite the best efforts of firefighters. The extended Santa Ana wind event is a factor adding to the problem of fighting the Thomas Fire. Coupled with high temps and low humidity, the weather conditions have provided the fire a perfect environment for fire development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists uncover patterns of elephant poaching in East Africa Poaching leads to an increase in elephants without tusks, a genetic trait more common in females than males. Credit: University of York Scientists analysing data from aerial surveys carried out over one of East Africa's most important nature reserves have uncovered clusters of elephant carcasses close to some ranger posts. The team, from the University of York and the Tanzania Wildlife Research I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists go 'back to the future' to untangle quantum dot mystery Quantum dots fluoresce in a range of colors under UV light in the lab of chemistry professor Todd Krauss. Credit: University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster For more than 30 years, researchers have been creating quantum dots—tiny, crystalline, nanoscale semiconductors with remarkable optical and electronic properties. They've applied them to improve television sets, for example, to greatly e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virus stamping—a versatile new method for genetic engineering of single cells Credit: Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research Research groups led by Botond Roska at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) and Daniel Müller at the ETH Zurich Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D BSSE) have developed a novel method that allows them to efficiently deliver genes into single cells in whole tissues. This not only facilitates the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galaxy 8 billion light years away offers insight into supermassive black holes Credit: Nate Edwards/BYU Photo In December 2016, what appears on digital telescopic images to be a star among stars became around 250 times brighter than usual. Nearly 8 billion light years away, CTA 102 is a supermassive black hole surrounded by a disc of swirling matter and jets of material shooting away from it (collectively known as a blazar). And when it brightened, astronomers took note.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Seeing an X-plane's sonic boom In the collective imagination, planets of a solar system all circle in the equatorial plane of their star. The star also spins, and its spin axis is aligned with the spin axes of the planetary orbits, giving the impression ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's scholastic success could begin with storybooks, research suggests Students in the United States and Mexico are likely to encounter storybooks that stress happiness as a goal. Credit: University of California - Riverside The lessons from childhood storybooks are decidedly different in China and the United States, and align with the lessons the respective countries impart in the classroom, UC Riverside research finds. There is a widely held perception – and some
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How tall trees move sugars Michael Knoblauch (right) and son, Jan, are co-authors on a study that has answered a multidecade debate about how sugars are transported in trees. Credit: Noel Michele Holbrook Scientists have long assumed that the sugars that nourish trees are pushed by water pressure from the leaves where they are created to the stems and roots where they are needed. But how do taller trees accomplish that tas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The missing link between exploding stars, clouds, and climate on Earth Cosmic rays interacting with the Earth's atmosphere producing ions that helps turn small aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei -- seeds on which liquid water droplets form to make clouds.A proton with energy of 100 GeV interact at the top of the atmosphere and produces a cascade of secondary particles who ionize molecules when traveling through the air. One 100 GeV proton hits every m2 at the t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mystery of the Star of Bethlehem unlikely to be resolved For many years some astronomers, working under the assumption that the Star of Bethlehem was in fact an actual celestial object, have suggested possible astrophysical explanations. In doing so, they do not only have to find the right kind of object, but also the one which had the significance that made the wise men go and seek the infant Jesus. Two-thousand years ago, astronomy and astrology were
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity can add five weeks of asthma symptoms per year in preschoolersAsthma affects almost 1 in 10 children in the US and is a leading cause of emergency room visits and hospitalizations in preschoolers. According to new research from Duke Health and collaborators, symptoms may be worse for children ages 2 to 5 who are overweight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Molecular knot wins record for 'world's tightest' X-ray crystal structure of a molecular knot with eight crossings. Credit: Jean-Francois Lemonnier, University of Manchester Scientists at The University of Manchester are celebrating after becoming record breakers and officially being awarded a Guinness World Record for tying the tightest knot ever produced. The record was given to researchers at Manchester's School of Chemistry, led by Professor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Statistical modeling helps fisheries managers remove invasive species South Dakota Game Fish and Parks biologists Dave Lucchesi and Todd St. Sauver, front; South Dakota State University graduate student Matt Hennen, in orange cap, and crew members from the Dave Raw Fish Company in Minnesota, remove carp from Lake Norden in Hamlin County, South Dakota. Credit: South Dakota State University Reeling in a big fish and discovering it's a common carp is often a disappoin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Travel back in time to see iconic St Andrews building as it appeared 500 years ago Historic buildings at the heart of St Andrews have been digitally reconstructed to reveal how they looked nearly 500 years ago before the Reformation changed the face of the town forever. St Salvator's Quad and Chapel, at the heart of the University of St Andrews, can now be seen in a virtual recreation which reveals how these historic buildings appeared before the religious changes of the Reform
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple one-pot synthesis of druggable tricyclic peptides Structure of vancomycin and a tricyclic peptide format inspired by its multicyclic structure. Credit: HIMS Chemists at the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS) and Pepscan (Lelystad) have developed a new methodology for locking linear peptides into highly rigidified tricyclic structures with pharmaceutical potential. Their findings have just been reported
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic variability supports plant survival during droughts Mustard cress, Arabidopsis thaliana, growing on a sandy beach at the Baltic Sea in southern Sweden. Credit: MPI f. Developmental Biology/ M. Exposito-Alonso In the first study to predict whether different populations of the same plant species can adapt to climate change, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology find that central European ones die first. The researchers f
11h
The Atlantic
Why the GOP Tax Cut Will Make Wealth Inequality So Much Worse Within a week, Republicans will probably pass a corporate tax cut that is one of the most unpopular major pieces of legislation in modern American history. This is a rather curious distinction for a bill that cuts taxes for nearly every American family. How can a trillion-dollar tax cut be so unpopular? One possibility is that Americans don’t like the bill because they don’t understand what it do
11h
The Atlantic
The Icy Secrets of an Interstellar Visitor To telescopes, ‘Oumuamua, the interstellar asteroid that made itself known to Earth in October, looks like a point of light in the dark, much like a star in the night sky—a perhaps underwhelming picture of a significant discovery. But for astronomers, the tiny speck—the sunlight reflected by the asteroid—can reveal a trove of information. They can break down the light from an object into a spectr
11h
The Atlantic
Reconstructing Lost Worlds With Poop Forty years ago, the great tropical ecologist Dan Janzen noticed something funny about the plants in Costa Rica. Many species invested a lot of their energy in producing huge fruits with tough seeds and seed pods, which no animals seemed to eat. With nothing to consume them, the seeds and pods just fell to the jungle floor and rotted, or died in the shade of their parent trees. In a now legendary
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel technique expands industrial use of advanced high-strength steel alloys The automotive industry's demand for high-performance alloys known as advanced high-strength (AHS) steels has increased in recent years owing to increasingly tough passenger safety, vehicle performance and fuel economy requirements. Characterized by improved formability and collision resilience compared to conventional steel grades, high-strength steels have been used in critical safety locations
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black hole pair born inside a dying star? Snapshot of gravitational waves propagating from binary black holes merging inside of a star. Credit: Kyoto University, Joseph M. Fedrow Far from earth, two black holes orbit around each other, propagating waves that bend time and space. The existence of such waves—gravitational waves—was first predicted by Albert Einstein over a century ago on the basis of his Theory of General Relativity. And a
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In 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi', the Resistance Keeps Making the Same Tactical Mistake Over the course of the Star Wars franchise, we’ve been treated to some epic battles: dogfights between X-Wings and TIE fighters at Yavin-4, AT-ATs on the frozen wastes of Hoth, jungle warfare on Endor, and Rogue One ’s epic battles on the beaches of Scarif. The Last Jedi offers no shortage of skirmishes, either. Except this time, the Resistance’s consistently bad military tactics finally catch up
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Lab-Grown Meat Is On the Way It used to be limited to sci-fi fantasies and futurist predictions: one day, went the story, humanity would discover how to divorce meat production from livestock-raising and simply grow meat without the need for the massive resources it takes to raise farm animals. As early as 1894, then-famed French chemist Pierre-Eugène-Marcellin Berthelot claimed that by 2000, humans would dine on meat gr
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Science | The Guardian
Glow in the dark sharks: new species discovered in Hawaii – and it glows Earlier this year a new species of deep water shark, Etmopterus lailae , was discovered in waters surrounding the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean. Measurements of external features, teeth, vertebrae and intestines, along with specific external markings and patterns confirmed that it was indeed a new species – a member of the lanternshark family. Lanternsharks ( Etmopteridae ) a
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
An Electrical Brain Switch Shuts Off Food Cravings The brain's reward system learns the actions that produce positive outcomes, such as obtaining food or sex. It then reinforces the desire to initiate those behaviors by inducing pleasure in anticipation of the relevant action. But in some circumstances this system can become oversensitized to pleasurable but harmful behaviors, producing pathological impulses like drug addiction, binge eating and
11h
Ingeniøren
Vi fyrer løs i private træpillefyr som aldrig før Hele 2,6 mio. ton træpiller havnede i danske kraftvarmeværker, fjernvarmeværker, træpillefyr og industrielle anlæg i 2016, viser en ny rapport fra Energistyrelsen. Træpilleforbruget er vokset markant, viser ny opgørelse. *Kilde. Energistyrelsen* Foto: Energistyrelsen Det svarer til en stigning på 22 pct. sammenlignet med den seneste undersøgelse fra 2014, og det er især forbruget i de private træ
11h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Tørt juletræ i stuen brænder som en fakkelVand til juletræet kan redde boligen, viser video fra amerikanske brandmyndigheder.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Italienere skal bygge nyt supersygehus på Fyn Italiensk totalentreprenør skal færdigprojektere og bygge vidensakse og behandlings- og sengeafsnit på det nye universitetshospital i Odense. Det har et bredt flertal i regionsrådet vedtaget.
12h
Live Science
The 10 Strangest Medical Cases of 2017 A 24-year-old model experienced serious complications after she got an “ eyeball tattoo ," a procedure that experts say is unsafe. The model, Catt Gallinger, had purple tattoo ink injected into the white part of her eye, a practice known as "sclera tattooing." But she soon experienced serious symptoms, including blurry vision, eye pain, swelling and the oozing of purple liquid (colored by the t
12h
Live Science
The 10 Weirdest Sea Monsters of 2017 A new species of ghost shark discovered near South Africa set records this January. At nearly 3 feet (about 1 meter) in length, the creature is the second-largest species of ghost shark ever discovered, according to researchers at the Pacific Shark Research Center at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories in California. The species, Hydrolagus erithacus , marked the 50th recorded species of ghost
12h
Live Science
How Does the Flu Actually Kill People? One Sunday in November 20-year-old Alani Murrieta of Phoenix began to feel sick and left work early. She had no preexisting medical conditions but her health declined at a frighteningly rapid pace, as detailed by her family and friends in local media and on BuzzFeed News . The next day she went to an urgent care clinic, where she was diagnosed with the flu and prescribed the antiviral medicatio
12h
Ingeniøren
Holder juletræer længere på en kodimagnyl? For nogle år siden gik rygtet i alle medier - hold nålene på juletræet ved at smutte et par hovedpinepiller i vandet i juletræsfoden, som træet står i. Men gør det virkelig den store forskel? På Danske Juletræers hjemmeside kan man læse, at et par brusetabletter med acetylsalicylsyre (det smertestillende stof i f.eks. magnyler, red .) i vandet hjælper med at holde træet frisk, og der er billeder
12h
Live Science
Interstellar Object 'Oumuamua Could Be a Comet in Disguise Although it looks like an asteroid, the first interstellar object spotted passing through the solar system, called 'Oumuamua, may be more like a comet in disguise. When astronomers first spotted the oblong, tumbling interstellar object 'Oumuamua passing through the solar system in October, they were surprised — not only did it come from outside the solar system, according to its trajectory,
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spectral broadening in clouds is affected by turbulence Shallow cumulus clouds. Photo taken at York University Campus in Toronto, Canada. Credit: Haiyang Gao Warm rain accounts for 31 percent of the total rain amount and 72 percent of the total rain area in the tropics. Understanding warm rain initiation and cloud droplet size distribution broadening is one of the main challenges of cloud physics due to complicated effects of turbulence on cloud micro
12h
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The Digital Puppy That Keeps Seniors Out of Nursing Homes Arlyn Anderson grasped her father’s hand and presented him with the choice. “A nursing home would be safer, Dad,” she told him, relaying the doctors’ advice. “It’s risky to live here alone—” “No way,” Jim interjected. He frowned at his daughter, his brow furrowed under a lop of white hair. At 91, he wanted to remain in the woodsy Minnesota cottage he and his wife had built on the shore of Lake Mi
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious new seafloor species sheds light on early animal evolution Credit: University of Tsukuba Japanese researchers have discovered a new species of the enigmatic marine worm Xenoturbella, which they have named Xenoturbella japonica, as reported in a new study published in BMC Evolutionary Biology . Xenoturbella lacks certain features common among more complex animals , such as a centralized nervous system, kidneys, and an anus (i.e., its digestive system has
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists found the temperature at which carbon nanotubes become superconductors The geometric structure 'a carbon chain in a tube' before and after optimization. Credit: Chi Ho Wong Scientists from Ural Federal University (UrFU) together with their colleagues from Lomonosov Moscow State University, have discovered a mathematical method to calculate the temperature at which single-walled carbon nanotubes became superconductors and developed a way to increase it, thus opening
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerators, fab labs and hackathons—the tech tools being co-opted for social good Using innovation tools in the humanitarian sector can help flip the top-down model of aid. Credit: UNWFP Picture the humanitarian aid sector and you don't immediately think of start-up accelerators and hackathons. But aid agencies are co-opting these tools of innovation to help solve global issues – and a new EUR 5 million prize from the EU is designed to boost this even further. Olivier Delarue
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The mechanism behind shear thinning in supercooled liquids Relationship between a measure of structural disorder and viscosity for a polydisperse hard-sphere-like system. The relationship between the structural measure and the viscosity can be collapsed on their relation in a quiescent state. The inset shows the shear-rate dependence of the viscosity for various densities ρ. Shear thinning takes place for a lower shear rate for a liquid with higher densi
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Muon beam analysis of organic matter in samples from space Concept of Muonic Characteristic X-ray. Credit: Osaka University Muon has much higher transmissivity than electrons and X-rays. This feature of muon has enabled us to see through volcanoes, pyramids, and nuclear reactors with cosmic-ray induced natural muons. The artificial muon beam in acceleration facilities also has huge potential for material science. It has already been shown that the muon b
12h
Ingeniøren
Facebook går til kamp mod bait-opslagDer findes mange opslag på Facebook, der opfordrer læserne til at like, dele eller kommentere, men det er et trick for at udnytte Facebooks algoritme, og derfor vil Facebook nu aktivt bekæmpe det.
12h
Science | The Guardian
Rubber and plastic bullets too dangerous for crowd control, says study Rubber and plastic bullets should not be used for crowd control, researchers have said, pointing out that such weapons are often inaccurate and can cause death, disabilities or severe injuries. Bullets made of plastic, rubber, or other materials such as metal shot in a fabric bag, are used as a “less lethal” means of crowd control the world over, from the US to India. While they can leave a gun w
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crew of three docks at International Space Station ISS. Credit: NASA A three-man space crew made up of American and Japanese rookie astronauts and an experienced Russian cosmonaut successfully docked at the International Space Station to begin a six-month mission Tuesday. NASA TV footage showed the Soyuz MS-07 capsule containing Scott Tingle of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency dock
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming seas double snowfall around North America's tallest peaks Time series shows the dramatic doubling of snowfall around North America's highest peaks since the beginning of the Industrial Age. Inset shows summer (red) and winter (blue) snowfall since 1870. Credit: Figure provided by Dominic Winski. December 19, 2017 - Snowfall on a major summit in North America's highest mountain range has more than doubled since the beginning of the Industrial Age, accord
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum trick blocks background 'chatter' in sensing devices An ion trap in Professor Michael J. Biercuk's laboratory in the Sydney Nanoscience Hub. Credit: University of Sydney A University of Sydney team has solved a common problem in quantum sensing devices, which are used in biomedical imaging and have defence applications. Industrial sensors are everywhere in our technology and in order to function successfully they must be able to identify tiny signa
12h
Dagens Medicin
Syddanskere med psykisk sygdom vil fortsat få gennemgået medicinRegion Syddanmark vil gøre satspuljeprojektet Psykiatriens Medicinrådgivning permanent, så farmaceuter fortsat vil gennemgå medicinlister for at undgå fejlmedicinering med psykofarmaka.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some monkeys prone to isolation Rhesus macaques. Credit: Lauren Brent Some individual animals are prone to social isolation, new research suggests. The study of rhesus macaques showed some of the monkeys remain socially isolated for much of their lives, suggesting their isolation is caused by a persistent trait or traits. The researchers - from the universities of Exeter, Puerto Rico and Pennsylvania - believe the cause is a
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Negative capacitance' could bring more efficient transistors A new type of transistor (a) harnesses a property called negative capacitance. The device structure is shown with a transmission electron microscopy image (b) and in a detailed “energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry” mapping (c). Credit: Purdue University photo/Mengwei Si Researchers have experimentally demonstrated how to harness a property called negative capacitance for a new type of transistor
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warming seas double snowfall around North America's tallest peaks IMAGE: Time series shows the dramatic doubling of snowfall around North America's highest peaks since the beginning of the Industrial Age. Inset shows summer (red) and winter (blue) snowfall since 1870.... view more Credit: Figure provided by Dominic Winski. HANOVER, N.H. - December 19, 2017 - Snowfall on a major summit in North America's highest mountain range has more than doubled since the
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some monkeys prone to isolation IMAGE: These are Rhesus macaques. view more Credit: Lauren Brent Some individual animals are prone to social isolation, new research suggests. The study of rhesus macaques showed some of the monkeys remain socially isolated for much of their lives, suggesting their isolation is caused by a persistent trait or traits. The researchers - from the universities of Exeter, Puerto Rico a
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum trick blocks background 'chatter' in sensing devices IMAGE: An ion trap in Professor Michael J. Biercuk's laboratory in the Sydney Nanoscience Hub. view more Credit: University of Sydney A University of Sydney team has solved a common problem in quantum sensing devices, which are used in biomedical imaging and have defence applications. Industrial sensors are everywhere in our technology and in order to function successfully they must b
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The missing link between exploding stars, clouds, and climate on Earth IMAGE: Cosmic rays interacting with the Earth's atmosphere producing ions that helps turn small aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei -- seeds on which liquid water droplets form to make clouds. A proton... view more Credit: Illustration: H. Svensmark/DTU The study reveals how atmospheric ions, produced by the energetic cosmic rays raining down through the atmosphere, helps the growth an
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lizard, turtle among more than 100 new species found in Mekong region A Vietnamese 'crocodile lizard' and a Thai turtle found on sale in a local market are among more than 100 new species discovered in the ecologically diverse but threatened Mekong region last year, researchers said Tuesday. The Southeast Asian countries flanking the Mekong river, which snakes down from the Tibetan plateau to the South China Sea, are among the most biodiverse in the world. Each y
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A donkey's tale: Nigeria becomes key hide export hub Abubakar Ya'u digs sand from vast, sweeping dunes and loads heavy hessian sacks of the fine, golden bounty onto the backs of donkeys which carry it to market. Rampant demand for the beasts of burden in China, where their skins are believed to have medicinal properties, has caused prices to soar—creating a dilemma for Ya'u and his fellow excavators in Kano, northern Nigeria. "Two years ago we we
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers Floral heat patterns from daisies. Credit: University of Bristol A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat. In the hidden world of flower-pollinator interactions, heat can act not only as life-sustaining warmth, but can also be part of the r
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers IMAGE: Floral heat patterns from rock rose. view more Credit: University of Bristol A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat. In the hidden world of flower-pollinator interactions, heat can act not only as life-sustaining warmth, but can
15h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Ubemandet fly styrer uden ror Jeg ville heller ikke kalde det styring via flaps. Flaps er normalt det man kalder ‘high-lift devices’ og bruges til at øge vingens opdrift under langsommere flyvning. Der findes dog fly som er udstyret med såkaldes flaperons, hvor samme rorflade virker som kombineret flap og aileron (krængeror)
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nest of endangered giant softshell turtle found in Cambodia In this undated photo released by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), an endangered Asian giant softshell turtle is seen near a nest of eggs on a sandbar in the Mekong river between Kratie and Stung Treng, northeastern Cambodia. Conservationists have found a nest of the endangered Asian turtle eggs in northeastern Cambodia, while 115 new species of various other animal and plant life were al
15h
Science-Based Medicine
New Blood Pressure Guidelines: Why Are Previously Normal BPs Now Classified as High Blood Pressure? The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology recently released new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure. The highlights are reported here . Previously, high blood pressure (HBP) was classified as 140/90 mm Hg or above. Under the new guidelines, more people are now being diagnosed with HBP, not because their blood pressure has changed, but just
15h
Ingeniøren
Ny teknologi gør livet på Jorden ældre 11 mikroskopiske fossiler opdaget i en næsten 3,5 milliarder år gammel klippe i det vestlige Australien kan (atter) kræve en omskrivning af historien om livets opståen på Jorden. Ifølge amerikanske forskere er fossilerne de ældste fossiler, der er fundet til dato og samtidig de tidligste direkte beviser for liv på Jorden. For godt nok har danske forskere for fire år siden fundet kulstof i sedimen
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists hope to inject robo-cat with AI to help seniors In this Friday Dec. 1, 2017, photo, 93-year-old Mary Derr sits on her bed near her robot cat she calls "Buddy" in her home she shares with her daughter Jeanne Elliott in South Kingstown, R.I. Buddy is a Hasbro's "Joy for All" robotic cat, aimed at seniors and meant to act as a "companion," it has been on the market for two years. Derr has mild dementia, and Elliott purchased a robot earlier this
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Men gave more talks than women at top 50 universities in US Credit: CC0 Public Domain Male professors gave more than twice as many talks as female professors in departments at the country's 50 most prestigious universities during the 2013-2014 academic year, according to new research from Rice University, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the City University of New York. "Gender Disparities in Colloquium Speakers at Top Universities" i
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI insights could help reduce injuries in construction industry Artificial intelligence (AI) is giving researchers at the University of Waterloo new insights to help reduce wear-and-tear injuries and boost the productivity of skilled construction workers. Studies using motion sensors and AI software have revealed expert bricklayers use previously unidentified techniques to limit the loads on their joints, knowledge that can now be passed on to apprentices in
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA solves how a Jupiter jet stream shifts into reverse Climate patterns on Jupiter can have striking similarities to those on Earth, making the gas giant a natural laboratory for understanding planetary atmospheres. Credit: NASA SVS/CI, Dan Gallagher Speeding through the atmosphere high above Jupiter's equator is an east-west jet stream that reverses course on a schedule almost as predictable as a Tokyo train's. Now, a NASA-led team has identified wh
15h
Live Science
Continental Drift: Theory & Definition Tectonic plates of the Earth. Credit: USGS Continental drift was a theory that explained how continents shift position on Earth's surface. Set forth in 1912 by Alfred Wegener, a geophysicist and meteorologist, continental drift also explained why look-alike animal and plant fossils, and similar rock formations, are found on different continents. The theory of continental drift Wegener t
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Brain-on-a-chip' to test effects of biological and chemical agents, develop countermeasuresScientists and engineers have developed a 'brain-on-a-chip' device that could be used to test and predict the effects of biological and chemical agents, disease, or pharmaceutical drugs on the brain over time without the need for human or animal subjects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do you spot a Russian bot? Answer goes beyond Kremlin watching, new research findsA team of researchers has isolated the characteristics of bots on Twitter through an examination of bot activity related to Russian political discussions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plain cigarette packaging may reduce incorrect impression of product's safetyAn online survey of 900 consumers of three of the United States' most popular cigarette brands suggests that adopting standardized cigarette packing may reduce consumers' misconceptions that some cigarettes are less harmful than others, researchers report.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Process to transition two-layer graphene into diamond-hard material on impact discoveredScientists worked to theorize and test how two layers of graphene -- each one-atom thick -- could be made to transform into a diamond-like material upon impact at room temperature.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC researchers identify nontraditional sites for future solar farms IMAGE: A floatovoltaic installation at Far Niente Winery in Oakville, Calif., comprises nearly 1,000 solar panels floating on pontoons on the vineyard irrigation pond. view more Credit: Far Niente Winery RIVERSIDE, Calif . -- There's a tradeoff when sprawling solar farms pop up on agricultural land: farmland disappears, perhaps forever, in return for growth in the promising renewable en
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Science | The Guardian
Cervical cancer deaths in over-50s predicted to rise sharply in England – study Cervical cancer diagnoses and deaths in England are predicted to rise steeply among women over the age of 50 in the next two decades, even though deaths from the disease among the young who have been vaccinated are likely to be almost eradicated, according to a new study. The HPV jab is radically changing the outlook for cervical cancer among women living in countries where it is routinely given
17h
Ingeniøren
Et år uden strategi for cybersikkerhed: Hvor mange gange kan skindet sælges?Gang på gang har regeringen lovet en national cybersikkerhedsstrategi. Men det er blevet ved løfterne, som til gengæld giver masser af PR for ministrene.
17h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 19. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: Produktionen af 73 grønlandske søkort skulle være færdig i 2018. Men arbejdet er gået i stå, efter at Geodatastyrelsen mistede næsten a
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gaining insight into the molecular mechanisms behind squamous cell cancer IMAGE: Hypothetical model of NUP62 action in regulating cell fate. * Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) A kinase (that is, an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of phosphate groups) involved in regulating the shape... view more Credit: Kanazawa University [Background] Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)*1 is a lethal cancers arising from the stratified epithelia of skin, esophagus, cervix,
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AI insights could help reduce injuries in construction industry Artificial intelligence (AI) is giving researchers at the University of Waterloo new insights to help reduce wear-and-tear injuries and boost the productivity of skilled construction workers. Studies using motion sensors and AI software have revealed expert bricklayers use previously unidentified techniques to limit the loads on their joints, knowledge that can now be passed on to apprentices in
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consumer choices for the climate Individual consumers can make conscious choices that are climate friendly and that will help with achieving the Paris Climate goals. But a secondary benefit of adopting a greener lifestyle -- extra money from efficiency savings -- has to be handled wisely to avoid undermining the carbon savings gained from the initial green choices. A team of Norwegian researchers, led by Richard Wood from the No
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cigarette smoking is increasing among Americans with drug problems While cigarette smoking has declined in the U.S. for the past several decades, since 2002 the prevalence of smoking has increased significantly among people with an illicit substance use disorder, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the City University of New York. Until now, little was known about whether the decline in smoking was
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expanding solar energy without encroaching on potential farmland and conservation areas As the world tries to combat climate change, sustainable forms of energy are on the rise. Solar energy is of particular interest, but arrays of photovoltaic panels take up a lot of space and can compete for prime food-producing land. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have found plenty of places to install solar devices without taking up arable land, wh
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genitourinary health problems worse for sexually abused girls MONTREAL, Dec. 19, 2017 - For years, scientists and clinicians have been documenting the significant psychological effects on child victims of sexual abuse. But what about the physical impact? Pascale Vézina-Gagnon, a Ph.D. student researcher at the Department of Psychology of Université de Montréal, has examined the issue as part of her doctoral thesis. Her conclusions have just been published i
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guidelines say no special precautions needed for flu shots for people allergic to eggs ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL (December 19, 2017 - 12:01 am ET) - For years, people with an egg allergy have been told to avoid or take special precautions when getting a flu shot because most influenza vaccines are grown in eggs and contain a tiny amount of egg protein. An updated practice parameter from the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters stresses that people with egg allergy should receive the
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cooperative learning aids in preventing alcohol use in rural middle schools Adolescents' use of alcohol is a risk factor for educational problems, diminished work capacity, disease, and later substance abuse and dependence. Many alcohol-prevention programs exist, but research has generally found their efficacy to be limited. In addition, these programs generally require schools to give up instructional time, which can negatively affect student achievement. A new study lo
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality of contact with grandparents is key to youths' views of ageism Ageism - stereotypes that lead to prejudice and discrimination against older people - occurs frequently in young adults and can be seen in children as young as 3. A new study from Belgium sought to identify the factors underlying this form of discrimination. It found that ageist stereotypes in children and adolescents generally decrease around ages 10 to 12, and that young people who say they hav
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Editing Could Rewrite the GMO Debate Decades of fretting over the safety and virtue of genetically modified organisms have led to a perverse outcome. Plant scientists in academia and startup companies have largely shied away from creating new GM crop varieties because it takes, on average, more than a hundred million dollars and over a decade to get such a plant approved by regulators in the United States, and also because the idea
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New on MIT Technology Review
These Are Not Your Father’s GMOs When I visited Jason McHenry’s farm in South Dakota, the young farmer, dressed in worn jeans and sunglasses, led me up a slippery steel ladder on the side of a grain bin. We tumbled through the manhole into a shifting mountain of soybeans. You could sift them through your fingers and taste their sweet, cloudy flavor. The U.S. soybean crop is four billion bushels a year, about 240 billion pounds.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify nontraditional sites for future solar farms Credit: CC0 Public Domain As the world tries to combat climate change, sustainable forms of energy are on the rise. Solar energy is of particular interest, but arrays of photovoltaic panels take up a lot of space and can compete for prime food-producing land. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have found plenty of places to install solar devices without
18h
Ingeniøren
Fem ting må du aldrig gøre til julefrokost En af de vigtigste regler i forhold til den årlige julefest i firmaet er, at du skal møde op. Dit fremmøde vil blive bemærket, og det er en fantastisk måde at skabe nye forbindelser på din arbejdsplads. Modsat vil din manglende tilstedeværelse også blive opdaget. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Sociale arrangementer er dog ellers en oplagt mulighed for at netværke inte
19h
Ingeniøren
‘Den sorte boks’ er den største hindring for at bruge AI Der er store forventninger til kunstig intelligens (AI) – teknologien, der skal skabe en superhjerne, der ræsonnerer og tager beslutninger på samme måde som mennesker. Grand View Research estimerer, at det direkte salgstal for AI lander på 35,87 milliarder dollars i 2025 – fra blot 641,9 millioner dollars i 2016. Hvis man derudover medtager salgstallene for alle tilknyttede brancher, bliver marke
19h
The Scientist RSS
Study Pinpoints Potential Master Regulator of Age-Related Cognitive DeclineUpping a gene's expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
Repetitive Sounds Are Music to the Brain Music includes a lot of repetition. What would your favorite song be without a chorus ? But the connection runs even deeper than that. Because the very act of repeating something can render that thing melodious—even the sound of a shovel being dragged across the pavement. That’s according to a study to be published soon in the journal Music & Science . [Rhimmon Simchy-Gross and Elizabeth Hellmuth
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Science | The Guardian
Checkmate: how do climate science deniers' predictions stack up? When the global temperature readings are in for 2017, it’s going to be a very hard sell for climate science deniers. 2017 will likely be ranked either side of 2015 as the second or third hottest year on record , with 2016 still in top spot. The hottest five-year period recorded in the modern era, will be the one we’ve just had. Communities around the world, and the flora and fauna we share it wit
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With a little help from my friends: Ending social isolation could lower diabetes risk In a study involving 2861 participants, socially isolated individuals were found to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes more often than individuals with larger social networks. The findings are published in the open access journal BMC Public Health . Promoting social integration and participation may be a promising target in prevention strategies for type 2 diabetes, researchers at Maastricht Unive
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Science | The Guardian
Where does cancer come from? We must talk about preventable risk | Ranjana Srivastava A lthough my patient constantly and laughingly referred to himself as a “vegetable”, I never got used to it. I cringed at the expression, often wondering how he really felt beneath the smiles. Short in height and morbidly obese, he hated moving and told everyone how much he loved fat and sugar, preferably together. The first time I met him he struggled to walk the few metres to my room before cra
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Big Think
Scientists Create New Method of Fusion Energy, Without the Old Complications Australian physicists have devised a technique for creating fusion with lasers that doesn’t need radioactive fuel elements and leaves no radioactive waste. A new paper from scientists at UNSW Sydney and their international colleagues shows that advances in high-intensity lasers makes what was once impossible a reality - generating fusion energy from hydrogen-boron reactions. Lead author Heinr
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Popular Science
Interstellar visitor doesn’t appear to be an alien ship, does appear to be covered in organic gunk It’s only been two months since astronomers first spotted the long, thin object hurtling through space, coming in at an angle that could only mean one thing: it wasn’t from this solar system, and it wouldn’t be coming back. The weird object now has a name —‘Oumuamua—but we’re still not entirely sure what it is. Yes, last week researchers at the Green Bank Observatory in West Virginia checked to s
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Futurity.org
Restless leg linked to risk of death from cardiovascular disease In a new study, researchers found that women diagnosed with restless leg syndrome (RLS) had a 43 percent higher likelihood of death due to cardiovascular disease during a ten-year period, compared to those without physician-diagnosed RLS. “This study suggests that RLS could be a novel risk factor for CVD-related death,” says Xiang Gao, associate professor of nutritional sciences at Penn State and
23h
Futurity.org
How black teens express feeling depressed Black adolescents may express depression symptoms differently than people from other age or racial groups—something clinicians need to keep in mind when planning treatment—a new study suggests. “Adolescent depression is a dire public concern in the United States, and even greater concern among black adolescents, where, if left untreated, can disproportionately lead to an escalation of various men
23h
Futurity.org
Vaping young adults more likely to smoke cigarettes Young adults who vape are more than four times as likely to start smoking cigarettes within 18 months as their peers who don’t vape, researchers report. The findings demonstrate that e-cigarettes are serving as a gateway to traditional smoking, contrary to their purported value as a smoking cessation tool. “This supports policy and educational interventions designed to decrease the use of e-cigar
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Futurity.org
To save dying languages, use ‘evolutionary trees’ To save as much linguistic diversity as possible in the face of many languages rapidly going extinct, researchers propose using “evolutionary trees,” a tool from conservation biology. “…we must choose carefully where to focus our efforts…” One of the world’s 7,000 languages vanishes every other week, and half—including scores of indigenous North American languages—might not survive the 21st centu
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cervical cancer diagnoses and deaths to rocket in older women Incidence of cervical cancer in young women is set to decline 75 per cent by 2040 with deaths close to eradicated, however older women will face greater risk according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, published today in The Lancet Public Health . Women aged 50-64 will see a 62 per cent increase in incidence which could lead to a 143 per cent rise in mortality (183 in 2015 to 44
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindfulness training reduces stress during exam time, Cambridge study finds Mindfulness training can help support students at risk of mental health problems, concludes a randomised controlled trial carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge. While the prevalence of anxiety and depression among first year undergraduates is lower than the general population, it increases to overtake this during their second year. The number of students accessing counsellin
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Science | The Guardian
Natural selection may favour younger mothers and higher BMI in men As humans continue to evolve, natural selection appears to be favouring higher body mass index in men and an earlier age for starting a family in women, research has revealed. Researchers used data from the UK Biobank, a large genetic and health database of half a million British people aged 45 and over, to look at how numerous traits from body mass index to height and birth weight, as well as pa
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cognitive science
Evolutionary Account of Vigilance in Grief A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Tony Beets's All-Woman Crew Gets To Work | Gold Rush #GoldRush | Friday 9p Monica Beets has recruited an all female crew. Can she lead them to paydirt or are they bound to make rookie mistakes? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.c
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