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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Tis the season to be vigilant: Risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs peaks at Christmas Credit: CC0 Public Domain University of Liverpool researchers are warning of a "significant peak" in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats. Most people know that chocolate can be poisonous to dogs but may not know why. The toxic ingredient is a caffeine-like stimulant called theobromine that can lead to an upset stomach, a racin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most dog treats exceed recommended daily energy allowance Credit: CC0 Public Domain Most commercially available dog treats contain a range of undefined ingredients, including sugars, and often exceed the recommended daily energy allowance for treats ('complementary feed'), warn researchers in the Vet Record today. They say treat labels should be more explicit and provide more detailed information on ingredients and energy content to prevent dogs becomin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts advise using benchmarking to identify farms with high antibiotic use Credit: CC0 Public Domain A number of British dairy farms are using extremely high levels of antibiotics in their cattle, finds a study published by Vet Record today. The findings from a large sample of farms across the UK, indicate that while most dairy farms exhibit lower antibiotic use than the UK livestock average, there are several outlying farms with high levels of use. The researchers say
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Futurity.org

China’s Great Famine ‘haunts’ cognition at midlife Hunger and malnutrition in infancy may lead to poor cognitive performance in midlife, according to a new study. Researchers have found that child survivors of China’s 1959-61 famine that killed millions appear to be haunted by their past, as their cognitive performances go downhill in their early 50s. Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology , the study is among the first to investi
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Futurity.org

Try these tips for getting kids to eat healthy food To promote healthy eating among children, research shows that parents should expose them to a variety of foods and remain persistent, starting during pregnancy. “The goal was to review the literature in order to make recommendations to parents and caregivers on how they can best encourage children’s healthy eating starting as early as possible,” says lead author Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, assistant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After obesity surgery, general practice should do more follow-up with patients on key areas such as nutrition and pregnancy advice The number of obesity (bariatric) surgery operations performed yearly worldwide has increased by five times over the past 15 years, peaking close to 200,000 procedures in 2017. New guidelines released by the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO), published in its journal Obesity Facts , say that the only way for countries to cope with this increased demand is for general practices
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Big Think

If Work Dominated Your Every Moment Would Life Be Worth Living? Imagine that work had taken over the world. It would be the centre around which the rest of life turned. Then all else would come to be subservient to work. Then slowly, almost imperceptibly, anything else – the games once played, the songs hitherto sung, the loves fulfilled, the festivals celebrated – would come to resemble, and ultimately become, work. And then there would come a time, itself l
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Sporting Abu Dhabi (360 Video) From wakeboarding to cycling, ice skating to martial arts, Abu Dhabi offers endless opportunities for avid sports enthusiasts. #inabudhabi For a more immersive experience and other amazing 360 content, download the Discovery VR app: https://www.discoveryvr.com/get-the-app.html From: Discovery
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eggs improve biomarkers related to infant brain developmentFeeding eggs to infants could provide them with key nutrients for better brains. A study has found that infants who were in introduced to eggs beginning at 6 months showed significantly higher blood concentrations of choline, other biomarkers in choline pathways, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key link between mitochondria, cocaine addiction discoveredScientists have identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them.
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Popular Science

Whoa, that’s not what we were expecting the Magic Leap headset to look like The Magic Leap augmented reality headset is the sasquatch of the tech world. We’ve all heard lots about it, and it sounds pretty cool, but no one had really seen it, despite a hype machine that has been turning since 2015 . Today, however, we got our first look at the Magic Leap One, a pair of goggles with integrated cameras that would look right at home on the head of an Overwatch character or m
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The Atlantic

The Ambitious Plan to Fly a Drone Over Saturn’s Moon Hundreds of millions of miles away, in the orbit of Saturn, on the surface of Titan, the planet’s largest moon, rests a piece of human-made technology. Huygens, a nine-foot-wide, saucer-shaped probe, was dropped by the passing Cassini spacecraft and parachuted down to the surface in 2005. For a precious 72 minutes after it landed, Huygens transmitted data back to Earth, including image after imag
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Science : NPR

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness In Mice Scientists have now edited genes inside mice to prevent a form of inherited deafness. While cautioning that much more research is needed, the scientists said they hope the technique might someday be used to prevent deafness in children born in families with a history of genetic hearing loss. Before that could happen, however, extensive tests would be needed to determine whether the treatment is s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two surgical approaches equal in treating infection-caused hydrocephalus IMAGE: These are CT scans of infant brains. Scan on the left shows infant's brain before endoscopic surgery (ETV-CPC). Scan on the right shows 12-month postoperative scan of the... view more Credit: Steven Schiff, Penn State Implanting a shunt or endoscopically reducing intracranial pressure and reducing fluid production are equally effective in treating infants with hydrocephalus cause
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More tumor mutations equals higher success rate with cancer immunotherapy drugs IMAGE: More tumor mutations equals higher success rate with cancer immunotherapy drugs. view more Credit: The New England Journal of Medicine The mutational burden, or the number of mutations present in a tumors DNA, is a good predictor of whether that cancer type will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Canc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-time hydrocephalus operation brings good outcomes for babies Hydrocephalus, an abnormal build-up of cerebrospinal fluid within the brain, is typically treated by surgically placing a shunt to continually drain cerebrospinal fluid into the abdomen, protecting the brain from excess pressure. However, shunts nearly always fail over time and must be replaced, requiring emergency neurosurgery -- which is not readily available in many areas. A randomized trial i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Poor oral health may put older individuals at increased risk of frailtyThe presence of oral health problems was linked with greater risks of being frail and developing frailty in older age in a recent study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The biological clock of plantsOn December 10, 2017, the Americans Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology for their research on the biological clock. They discovered the molecular mechanisms controlling biological rhythms. A new report describes how scientists are also advancing research on the biological clock.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effects of tramadol on cognitive, sports performance studiedThe first randomized controlled trial of the effects of tramadol on cognitive and sports performance has been completed, explain investigators.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Automation Is Creeping into Journalism, but Human Reporters Don’t Have Much to Fear (Yet) A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overlooked immune cells hold breakthrough for treating aggressive cancersInvestigators report that adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapy, using CD4 T cells expressing elevated levels of the protein CD26, effectively regresses solid tumors. CD8 T cells are more commonly used for ACT therapy, because they are thought to be better cancer fighters. However, this study showed that CD4 T cells, expressing high CD26, resist death and are robustly effective at killing multipl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Halogens can increase solar cell performance by 25 per centNew research shows that using halogens -- a class of elements that include fluoride, bromine, chlorine and iodine -- in a dye-sensitized solar cell can increase conversion efficiency by 25 per cent. The discovery could set the stage for improved solar cell designs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conflict between farmers and livestock predatorsA new study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aggression in childhood: Rooted in genetics, influenced by the environmentAccording to a new psychosocial study, reactive and proactive types of aggressive behavior in 6-year-old children share most of the same genetic factors. However, their evolution over time seems to be influenced by various environmental factors, suggesting the need to develop different intervention methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How plants form their seedsVegetable, fruit, or grain -- the majority of our food results from plant reproduction. Researchers have now discovered the key to how plants regulate pollen growth and seed formation. In addition to seed formation, knowledge about these signaling pathways can be used to influence plant growth or their defense against pests.
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Live Science

Cellphone Guidelines Won't Harm, But They Probably Won't Help Either There's no harm in following California's new cellphone guidelines detailing how to reduce exposure to a phone's radio-frequency (RF) energy, but know this: There's no science showing that following these guidelines will make you safer, experts said. That's because large, high-quality studies have failed to find any big, adverse health effects linked to cellphone use, said John Moulder, a p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

FDA-approved high blood pressure drug extends life span in roundworms DALLAS - Dec. 20, 2017 - UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers find that an FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. The drug, hydralazine, extended life span about 25 percent in two strains of C. elegans (roundworms), one a wild type and the other bred to generate high levels of a neuro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers get first complete look at protein behind sense of touch IMAGE: Structure of Piezo1, showing two of the three blades that surround the central pore. view more Credit: Ward Lab LA JOLLA, CA - Dec. 20, 2017 - Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of the structure of Piezo1, a member of a family of proteins that convert physical stimuli such as touch or blood flow into chemical signals. The findings, published tod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fluorescent nanomedicine can guide tumor removal, kill remaining cancer cells PORTLAND, Ore. - Oregon State University scientists have developed a nanomedicine platform for cancer that can help doctors know which tissue to cut out as well as kill any malignant cells that can't be surgically removed. The platform allows for greater precision and thoroughness in cancer treatment. Here's how it works: Nanoparticles tightly loaded with a dye compound are administered systemica
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Scientific American Content: Global

Where Will NASA Go Next? Saturn's Moon Titan, or Maybe a Comet A team proposing the use of a flying rover to explore Saturn’s moon Titan, and another that wants to send a sample-collecting mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, are the finalists in NASA’s search for its next interplanetary destination, officials announced Wednesday. The competition began in earnest in late April, when 12 teams submitted proposals to fly spacecraft to a wide variety of t
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Inside Science

From the Toilet to the Frog: How Nutrients in Human Waste Feed Pond Ecosystems From the Toilet to the Frog: How Nutrients in Human Waste Feed Pond Ecosystems Nitrogen isotopes show how nutrients leach out of septic tanks and into pond ecosystems. Neighborhood-Pond.jpg Image credits: Max Lambert Rights information: This image may be used by news outlets to accompany this Inside Science story. Earth Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 16:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Scienc
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Latest Headlines | Science News

NASA’s next stop will be Titan or a comet In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Live Science

Skip the Snake Pills: Rattlesnake Medicine Linked to Salmonella Rattlesnake pills sold as a folk remedy may carry Salmonella bacteria, which are commonly found in reptiles. Credit: Shutterstock Rattlesnake pills — capsules containing dried and powdered rattlesnake flesh — have been linked to a recent Salmonella infection, according to a new report. The pills, which are widely marketed in Mexico as a remedy for a range of ailments, including HIV and canc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurosexuality needs to be better addressed in patients with neurodisabilities Amsterdam, NL, December 20, 2017 - For people with brain disorders, whether from injury or disease, rehabilitation is a complex process. Neurosexuality is an emerging area of study and practice that focuses on the relationships between brain and sexual function in individuals with and without neurological disorders. Experts on the subject, reporting in NeuroRehabilitation , discuss how sexuality
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find key to making transplant rejection a thing of the past HOUSTON-(Dec. 20, 2017) - Houston Methodist researchers have cracked a code in T-cells that could make autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection a thing of the past. Wenhao Chen, Ph.D., a scientist in the Immunobiology and Transplant Science Center at the Houston Methodist Research Institute, and his colleagues have identified a critical switch that controls T-cell function and dys
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discounting humanity: Bargain hunters see customer service workers as less human Everyone loves a bargain, but new research suggests some employees may be getting short-changed when it comes to how consumers perceive them when they are price-conscious. The UBC Sauder School of Business study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology , found that bargain-hunters who adopt a "price-conscious mentality"-- meaning their main goal is to save money and get the cheapest deal-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are phages our best bet against antibiotic-resistant bacteria? Bacteriophages, or simply phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria, and they hold considerable potential for combatting antibiotic-resistance and other threats to human health. Timed with the hundredth anniversary of their discovery, a new review published in the British Journal of Pharmacology examines the challenges and opportunities of developing phages as health-promoting
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cell research: (Re)-acquiring the potential to become everythingA new study in 'Nature Genetics' identifies a specific population of pluripotent embryonic stem cells that can reprogram to totipotent-like cells in culture. Moreover, the scientists have identified bottlenecks and drivers of this reprogramming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Micro-spectrometer opens door to a wealth of new smartphone functionsUse your smartphone to check how clean the air is, whether food is fresh or a lump is malignant. This has all come a step closer thanks to a new spectrometer that is so small it can be incorporated easily and cheaply in a mobile phone. The little sensor is just as precise as the normal tabletop models used in scientific labs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

North Atlantic Oscillation synchronizes tree reproduction across EuropeResearch has found a strong correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation and synchronized tree reproduction across Europe, supporting the idea that this phenomenon plays a greater role in large scale masting, the process whereby forest trees produce large numbers of seeds in the same year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early disease diagnosis could be dramatically improved with new detection systemBy attaching specialized molecules to the backbone of DNA, researchers have made it easier to detect rare molecules associated with early disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unifying the theories of neural information encodingOur eyes are flooded with visual information, but the neurons in our eyes have certain constraints. Thus, how do neurons select what to extract and send on to the brain? Until now neuroscientists have used several different theories to predict what neurons will do. Now, scientists have developed a framework that unites the previous theories as special cases, and enables them to make predictions ab
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using MRI to understand why some women go into early laborScientists are using the latest imaging techniques usually used to map the brain to try and understand why some pregnant women miscarry or go into early labor.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A deadly fungus is infecting snake species seemingly at random It doesn’t matter if it’s a burly rattler or a tiny garter snake. A deadly fungal disease that’s infecting snakes in the eastern and midwestern United States doesn’t appear to discriminate by species, size or habitat , researchers report online December 20 in Science Advances. The infection, caused by the fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola , can cover snakes’ bodies with lesions that make
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Putting a fork in cognitive decline While cognitive abilities naturally decline with age, eating one serving of leafy green vegetables a day may aid in preserving memory and thinking skills as a person grows older, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The study results were published in the December 20, issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "Addin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High out-of-pocket costs may place oral cancer medications out of reach PHILADELPHIA - Sticker shock may be leading many insured Americans with cancer to forego treatment with a wide range of oral cancer drugs, suggests a study published online this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology . Led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the findings point to high out-of-pocket costs as a barrier to potentially life-saving or
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular super enhancers: A new key for targeted therapy of brain cancer in childrenEpendymoma refers to a heterogeneous group of cancers that can occur at any age and is one of the most common types of brain cancer in children. The genetic causes for its development are largely unknown and there are no targeted treatments to date. Scientists have now developed a molecular approach that opens new treatment prospects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whitesPeople who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging in resistance exercise differ dramatically in how their muscles build protein, a process called protein synthesis, during the post-workout period, researchers report in a new study. Specifically, the post-workout muscle-building response in those eating whole eggs is 40 percent greater than in those consuming
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Powerful new tool for looking for life beyond EarthNASA has developed an innovative new spectroscopy instrument to aid the search for extraterrestrial life. The new instrument is designed to detect compounds and minerals associated with biological activity more quickly and with greater sensitivity than previous instruments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stress reprograms cellsResearchers have recently shown how cells adapt to stressors -- like water loss -- by reprogramming their internal signaling networks. The studies describe previously unknown mechanisms that cells use to send signals between cellular machinery and avoid cell death. According to the authors, drugs that enhance the adaptation mechanisms could help cells stave off multiple diseases, including type 2
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plant defense following the iron-maiden principleCalcium phosphate is a typical component of animal teeth. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mineral in their 'teeth.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Commonalities in late stages of inherited blinding diseases suggest targets for therapyIn studying the late stages of disease in two different canine models of retinitis pigmentosa, a group of progressive and inherited blinding diseases, researchers found commonalities, specifically involving the innate immune system. The findings point to potential new treatment options for the conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

California cliffs at risk of collapse identifiedA new study provides the largest analysis of cliff erosion throughout the state of California and provides a new hazard index for determining which areas are at most risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algae growth reduces reflectivity, enhances Greenland ice sheet meltingNew research shows algae growing on the Greenland ice sheet, the Earth's second-largest ice sheet, significantly reduce the surface reflectivity of the ice sheet's bare ice area and contribute more to its melting than dust or black carbon. The new findings could influence scientists' understanding of ice sheet melting and projections of future sea level rise, according to the study's authors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using the dark side of excitons for quantum computingA dark exciton can store information in its spin state, analogous to how a regular, classical bit stores information in its off or on state, but dark excitons do not emit light, making it hard to determine their spins and use them for quantum information processing. In new experiments, however, researchers can read the spin states of dark excitons, and do it more efficiently than before.
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The Atlantic

Myths from American History Class In the U.S., kids spend a lot of time in history class learning about the American Revolution and the founding fathers. But history books tend to simplify the complex reality of the war and the country’s founding. This episode of School Myths by The Atlantic investigates the overblown, rose-colored glasses that are often donned to teach American students about their country’s history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study findsBig data study of global biodiversity shows ineffective national governance is a better indicator of species decline than any other measure of 'anthropogenic impact.' Even protected conservation areas make little difference in countries that struggle with socio-political stability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific NorthwestEcologists compared maps produced before World War I to recent surveys of kelp forest in the Pacific Northwest, and found they have been relatively stable over the past century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cellsA new method could greatly speed up the development of novel new materials for future photovoltaic cells.
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Popular Science

Greek yogurt creates a ton of wheyst—but wheyt! There may be a whey forward for all that whey. In the past decade, Greek yogurt has morphed into one of America’s most popular breakfast and snack items. In fact, from 2007 to 2012, the production of Greek yogurt in New York state nearly tripled, going from 106,000 to 315,000 tons a year. And for good reason: it’s absolutely delicious, full of gut-friendly microbes , and jam-packed with nearly twice the protein found in many other yogurt type
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmic filament probes our galaxy's giant black hole A radio image from the NSF’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array showing the center of our galaxy. The mysterious radio filament is the curved line located near the center of the image, & the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), is shown by the bright source near the bottom of the image. Credit: NSF/VLA/UCLA/M. Morris et al. The center of our Galaxy has been intensely studied for many yea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers shed light on formation of black holes and galaxies Image of the quasar host galaxy from the UC San Diego research team’s data. The distance to this quasar galaxy is ~9.3 billion light years. The four-color image shows findings from use of the Keck Observatory and ALMA. As seen from Keck Observatory, the green colors highlight the energetic gas across the galaxy that is being illuminated by the quasar. The blue color represents powerful winds blow
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New on MIT Technology Review

CRISPR: The Next Hearing-Loss Treatment? A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Defending against environmental stressors may shorten lifespan IMAGE: The binding of GBP to Mthl10 promotes inflammation, which decreases the lifespan of a fruit fly. In contrast, the removal of GBP's binding partner Mthl10, produces less inflammation and increases... view more Credit: NIEHS A shorter life may be the price an organism pays for coping with the natural assaults of daily living, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTA researchers focus on pain management in older adults IMAGE: Robert Gatchel, UTA Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Nancy P. and John G. Penson Endowed Professor of Clinical Health Psychology and director of UTA's Center of Excellence in Health & Chronic... view more Credit: UTA Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are focusing their attention on pain management in older adults, a segment of the population which presents a spe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When one reference genome is not enough A single reference genome is not enough to harness the full genetic variation of a species so pan-genomes of crops would be extremely useful. The phenotypic diversity of Brachypodium plants is demonstrated in this image, which is associated with a news release for a Nature Communications paper in which an international team led by DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers gauged the size of a plant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's look at the difference of a few days in the Thomas Fire Terra image of the Thomas Fire on Dec. 16, 2017. Credit: NASA Worldview application What a difference a few days can make in the life cycle of a fire. In this particular case, the Thomas Fire that is ongoing in the Ventura County around (and surrounding) in Southern California. The following images were taken by the Terra and Aqua satellites on Dec. 16, 17, and 19, 2017, and during those times fi
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Scientific American Content: Global

Massive Fish Orgy Produces One of the Loudest Noises under the Sea When Gulf corvina mate, they are not shy about making noise. Each year the species’ entire population gathers off the coast of Mexico to spawn. Like so many crickets, cicadas and frogs, male corvina produce a thumping love song that likely acts as an audible come-hither signal for females. The resulting din turns out to be the loudest fish noise ever recorded, and—rivaling some whales—one of the
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Scientific American Content: Global

Gene Editing Shows Promise for Alleviating Hearing Loss When David Liu first heard about a strain of mouse from his colleague Zheng-Yi Chen, he got excited. The mice carry a gene, TMC1 , with a mutation that leads to deafness over time, giving them the name Beethoven mice. Their mutation matches one in humans that produces the same effect. The mutation is dominant; if it is present, hearing loss is certain. Liu, a chemical biologist at the Broad I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After net neutrality: Brace for internet 'fast lanes' This June 19, 2015, file photo, shows the entrance to the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington. Now that federal telecom regulators have repealed net neutrality, it may be time to brace for the arrival of internet "fast lanes" and "slow lanes." The Associated Press queried seven major internet providers about their post-net-neutrality plans, and all of them equivocated when as
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New on MIT Technology Review

Automation Is Creeping into Journalism, but We Don’t Have Much to Fear (Yet) A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees a re-strengthened Tropical Storm Kai-TakNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and infrared imagery showed that Kai-Tak re-strengthened into a tropical storm. Infrared data from Aqua's AIRS instrument revealed very cold cloud top temperatures in powerful thunderstorms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

WSU researchers see gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people Washington State University researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep deprived. Their research shows that individuals with a particular variation of the DRD2 gene are resilient to the effects of sleep deprivation when completing tasks that require cognitive flexibility, the ability to make appropriate decisions b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are phages our best bet against antibiotic-resistant bacteria? Bacteriophages, or simply phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria, and they hold considerable potential for combatting antibiotic-resistance and other threats to human health. Timed with the hundredth anniversary of their discovery, a new review published in the British Journal of Pharmacology examines the challenges and opportunities of developing phages as health-promoting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's look at the difference of a few days in the Thomas Fire What a difference a few days can make in the life cycle of a fire. In this particular case, the Thomas Fire that is ongoing in the Ventura County around (and surrounding) in Southern California. The following images were taken by the Terra and Aqua satellites on Dec. 16, 17, and 19, 2017, and during those times fire conditions improved visibly. A difference in winds, in humidity, in the ability o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When one reference genome is not enough Much of the research in the field of plant functional genomics to date has relied on approaches based on single reference genomes. But by itself, a single reference genome does not capture the full genetic variability of a species. A pan-genome, the non-redundant union of all the sets of genes found in individuals of a species, is a valuable resource for unlocking natural diversity. However, the
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Big Think

Cars Parts Show Us How Some Genetic Stats Mislead 1. We can “read” genes with ease now, but still can’t say what most of them “mean.” Mastering precisely how they “cause” higher-level traits will require clearer “causology” and fitter metaphors. 2. Genes (more precisely, gene products) contribute to fiendishly complex processes that confound the standard stats grinder. To illustrate, imagine scrutinizing cars and their parts like we do bodie
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Science : NPR

WATCH: What Happens When 2 Neutron Stars Collide VIDEO Caption: A hydrodynamical simulation shows a cocoon breaking out of the neutron star merger. This model explains the gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, infrared, and radio data gathered by the GROWTH team from 18 telescopes around the world. Ehud Nakar (Tel Aviv), Ore Gottlieb (Tel Aviv), Leo Singer (NASA), Mansi Kasliwal (Caltech), and the GROWTH collaboration YouTube An international
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Live Science

We May Not Be Alone, Former Pentagon UFO Investigator Says Luis Elizondo, the former head of a Pentagon program to investigate U.F.O. sightings by the U.S. military, says we may not be alone. Credit: Shutterstock The former head of a secret government program to investigate UFO sightings told several media outlets that extraterrestrial life may exist. Simultaneously, the public benefit corporation he is affiliated with has raised more than $2.2 million t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees a re-strengthened Tropical Storm Kai-Tak NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and infrared imagery showed that Kai-Tak re-strengthened into a tropical storm. Infrared data from Aqua's AIRS instrument revealed very cold cloud top temperatures in powerful thunderstorms. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the newly strengthened Tropical Storm Kai-Tak on Dec. 20 at 12
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study connects stocks, democracy, and the Arab Spring Day after day in early 2011, massive crowds gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square, calling for the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Away from the square, the protests had another effect, as a study co-authored by an MIT professor shows. The demonstrations lowered the stock market valuations of politically connected firms -- and showed how much people thought a full democratic revolution wa
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Net Neutrality Bill Has Glaring Loopholes Hopes that Congress would take up the net neutrality cause took a hit Tuesday, when Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced a bill that promises consumers some internet access protections. But the bill also includes several loopholes favoring internet service providers (ISPs). Blackburn’s Open Internet Preservation Act would prohibit ISPs from blocking or slowing internet traffic—an apparent atte
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NYT > Science

Researchers Warn of a Spreading Fungus Deadly to Snakes Sometimes the snakes recover quickly, but sometimes the fungus is fatal. “I’ve seen it go really, really rapidly,” said Frank Burbrink, a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and an author of a new report on the disease published Wednesday in Science Advances . “If it were a human, it would be one day Grandpa had a sore on his face and the next day it’s like ‘Night of the
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The Atlantic

Ushuaia: Photos From the End of the World On the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, at the southern tip of South America, sits the Argentinian city of Ushuaia, known as the southernmost city in the world, or sometimes, “the end of the world.” A couple of months ago, Getty Images photographer Mario Tama spent a short time in Ushuaia, capturing images of the harbor, the city, the people, the mountains, and nearby glaciers. He found that residen
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Scientific American Content: Global

Plastic Found in Mussels from the Arctic to China Plastic found in mussels from Arctic to China - enters human food OSLO (Reuters) - Tiny bits of plastic are contaminating mussels from the European Arctic to China in a sign of the global spread of ocean pollution that can end up on people’s dinner plates. Mussels in apparently pristine Arctic waters had most plastic of any tested along the Norwegian coast, according to a study this month
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Killing it softly (Santa Barbara, Calif.) -- So you drop your smartphone flat on its back. What's the worst that could happen? These days, maybe a dent. A smartphone's metal body is made of a crystalline material with a highly ordered arrangement of atoms. Such materials have a clear order to disrupt -- with potential weak points defined by "defects" in that order -- making it relatively easy to predict which atom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After the diagnosis: How cancer affects sexual functioning IMAGE: Lead study author and assistant professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. view more Credit: University of Houston A cancer diagnosis disrupts a person's life in many ways, including sexually. A study led by the University of Houston found that more than half of young cancer patients reported problems with sexual function, with the probability of reporting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modeling the effects of wastewater injection IMAGE: Wastewater injected in an underground reservoir layer crossed by a fault triggers an earthquake. The earthquake rupture grows larger than the zone pressurized by water injection. view more Credit: Galis et al., and Thomas Willard/Caltech Graphic Resources In work that offers insight into the magnitude of the hazards posed by earthquake faults in general, seismologists have developed a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proof-of-concept study reveals feasibility of eliminating rabies in Africa IMAGE: 'We have shown that African teams in one of the poorest countries can eliminate human rabies through mass vaccination of dogs. What is needed next is additional funding and a... view more Credit: Copyright Swiss TPH, photograph by Christian Heuss Rabies is a viral disease that kills tens of thousands of people every year, predominantly in Africa and Asia. The disease is transmitted thr
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First step toward CRISPR cure of Lou Gehrig's disease IMAGE: The UC Berkeley team used an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to ferry genes for CRISPR-Cas9 into motor neurons to delay onset of symptoms of ALS in mice. view more Credit: David Schaffer graphic University of California, Berkeley scientists have for the first time used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to disable a defective gene that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease,
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Attitudes of American public on service denial to same-sex and interracial couples IMAGE: The first national survey of public attitudes on allowing businesses to deny service to same-sex couples reveals that Americans who support service refusal do so regardless of whether the denial... view more Credit: Carla Schaffer/ AAAS The first national survey of public attitudes on allowing businesses to deny service to same-sex couples reveals that Americans who support service ref
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Unexpected agricultural production allowed pre-Hispanic society to flourish in arid Andes Six hundred kilometers south of Lake Titicaca and more than 3700 m above sea level, the Intersalar region, between the two large salt lakes of Uyuni and Coipasa, is dotted with fields of quinoa and numerous communities. Today, this region is the main producer of this pseudo cereal that is exported throughout the world. Close to these villages, numerous archaeological settlement sites bear witness
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The importance of the robot iCub as a standard robotic research platform for embodied AI IMAGE: iCub is a robot child whose project is coordinated by IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia. It is a standardized common open-source platform for research on embodied artificial intelligence (AI). iCub is... view more Credit: IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia Robotic research benefited in the last ten years of a standardized common open-source platform for research on embodied
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Support for right to deny service to same-sex couples is fueled not only by religion BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Americans are evenly divided on whether a business should be able to deny service to same-sex couples, according to a study by Indiana University Bloomington sociologists. It is the first national survey to use an experimental approach to examine views on refusing service to sexual minorities. But people who support denying service don't necessarily see it as a matter of reli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A mass dog vaccination campaign stops rabies transmission in its tracks Mass dog vaccination campaigns in an African city successfully interrupted rabies transmission for nine months during 2014, researchers report. They say their results show that currently available vaccines can halt the spread of rabies, provided that local communities are informed and engaged. Even though vaccines for dogs work well, more than 59,000 individuals die every year after contracting r
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How a virus becomes chronic IMAGE: Schematic Illustration of an LCMV-Infection and the interactions of the LCMV polymerase (in violett) with cellular proteins view more Credit: CeMM/Bojan Vilagos (Vienna, Dec, 20, 2017) Chronic viral infections like HIV or hepatitis are among the biggest threads to human health worldwide. While an acute viral infection usually results in a full recovery and effective immune memo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sardines take us to the sources of biodiversity in the Amazon River IMAGE: The Amazonian sardine. view more Credit: Queiroz et al. (2013). Peixes do Rio Madeira. Dialeto. The Amazon River harbors the largest biodiversity of freshwater fish in the world. What is the origin of this abundance of species? Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have integrated a range of potential factors into a single statistical model to study the genesis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat IMAGE: This is a northern water snake ( Nerodia sipedon ) with crusty and thickened scales overlaying raised blisters as a result of a fungal skin infection. view more Credit: © USGS National Wildlife Health Center/D.E. Green New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The stu
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A repurposed drug could open door to more stem cell transplants IMAGE: This is Peter Zandstra, director of UBC's School of Biomedical Engineering and Michael Smith Laboratories, and chief scientific officer of the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine. view more Credit: UBC/Paul Joseph A medication used to treat joint and skin conditions might also help people whose only hope of surviving cancer is receiving stem cells from a donor, accord
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New ancient dolphin species Urkudelphis chawpipacha discovered in Ecuador A new dolphin species likely from the Oligocene was discovered and described in Ecuador, according to a study published December 20, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Yoshihiro Tanaka from the Osaka Museum of Natural History, Japan, and colleagues. Many marine fossils described in previous research have been from long-recognized temperate regions such as South Carolina, off the co
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Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Change Has Doubled Snowfall in Alaska Global warming doubled snowfall in Alaska — study Snowfall in south-central Alaska has dramatically increased over the last 150 years because of climate change, scientists said in a report released yesterday. According to the study published in the journal Scientific Reports, summer snowfall has risen by about 49 percent since the mid-19th century, and winter snowfall has increased by a w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radio observations point to likely explanation for neutron-star merger phenomenaData from the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes have allowed astronomers to identify the most likely scenario for the aftermath of the merger of two neutron stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The coldest chip in the worldPhysicists have succeeded in cooling a nanoelectronic chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. The scientists used magnetic cooling to cool the electrical connections as well as the chip itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holderMen under the influence of alcohol are more likely to see women as sexual objects. This is according to a study which moves beyond the mere anecdotal to investigate some of the circumstances and factors that influence why men objectify women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antidepressant may help combat the course of multiple sclerosisThe antidepressant clomipramine may also alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis, specifically in its progressive form, i.e. when it occurs without relapses or remissions. As yet, drugs for this type of MS have been virtually non-existent. Researchers screened 1,040 generic therapeutics and, based on preclinical studies, identified one that is suitable for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
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Don't Gift an Internet-Connected Toy This Holiday For last-minute shoppers, tech toys hold a special appeal. They’re crowdpleasers, and generally available with two-day shipping—or faster—from any number of online retailers. Stapling on internet connectivity also might make these flashy kids gadgets sound all the more appealing; it’s not just a teddy bear, it’s a machine learning teddy bear. On the other hand: don't. This is not a screed against
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A Freaky Humanoid Robot That Sweats as It Does Push-Ups Continuing their quest to make me feel even worse about being a lazy human, robots can now do sit-ups and push-ups and something called a back extension, which I had to look up because that’s how lazy I am. Today in Science Robotics , researchers from the University of Tokyo show off a humanoid that is strikingly lifelike not just in how it looks, but how it moves. The machine is a radical depart
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Science : NPR

Beetle Penises May Hold Clues For Better Medical Devices The tip of a penis from a thistle tortoise beetle. Matsumura, Kovalev, Gorb, Sci. Adv. 2017;3: eaao5469 hide caption toggle caption Matsumura, Kovalev, Gorb, Sci. Adv. 2017;3: eaao5469 The tip of a penis from a thistle tortoise beetle. Matsumura, Kovalev, Gorb, Sci. Adv. 2017;3: eaao5469 A new study describes, in detail, the stiffness of beetle penises, which might serve as inspiration for people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The importance of iCub as a standard robotic research platform for embodied AI iCub is a robot child whose project is coordinated by IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia. It is a standardized common open-source platform for research on embodied artificial intelligence (AI). iCub is able to crawl on all fours, sit-up, balance walk, interact physically with the environment and recognize objects. It is one of the few robots in the world with a sensitive full-body electronic ski
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modeling the effects of wastewater injection Wastewater injected in an underground reservoir layer crossed by a fault triggers an earthquake. The earthquake rupture grows larger than the zone pressurized by water injection. Credit: Galis et al., and Thomas Willard/Caltech Graphic Resources In work that offers insight into the magnitude of the hazards posed by earthquake faults in general, seismologists have developed a model to determine th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ancient dolphin species Urkudelphis chawpipacha discovered in Ecuador Skull, Urkudelphis chawpipacha MO-1 (holotype) in right lateral view. Credit: Tanaka et al (2017) A new dolphin species likely from the Oligocene was discovered and described in Ecuador, according to a study published December 20, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Yoshihiro Tanaka from the Osaka Museum of Natural History, Japan, and colleagues. Many marine fossils described in previous
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sardines take us to the sources of biodiversity in the Amazon River The Amazonian sardine. Credit: Queiroz et al. (2013). Peixes do Rio Madeira. Dialeto. The Amazon River harbors the largest biodiversity of freshwater fish in the world. What is the origin of this abundance of species? Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have integrated a range of potential factors into a single statistical model to study the genesis of genetic diversity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unexpected agricultural production allowed pre-Hispanic society to flourish in arid Andes Aerial view of the archaeological site of Murmuntani. Credit: B Roux, L'Avion Jaune Six hundred kilometers south of Lake Titicaca and more than 3700 m above sea level, the Intersalar region, between the two large salt lakes of Uyuni and Coipasa, is dotted with fields of quinoa and numerous communities. Today, this region is the main producer of quinoa exported throughout the world. Close to these
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat Milk snake ( Lampropeltis triangulum ) showing signs of fungal and bacterial infections. Credit: © USGS National Wildlife Health Center/D.E. Green New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The study, published today in the journal Science Advances , shows that the snake fungal disease cau
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineralThe first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium have now been captured by researchers. The findings could accelerate the development of drugs to correct abnormalities in calcium uptake, which have been linked to cancers of the breast, endometrium, prostate, and colon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mars: Not as dry as it seemsTwo new articles have shed light on why there is, presumably, no life on Mars. Although today's Martian surface is barren, frozen and inhabitable, a trail of evidence points to a once warmer, wetter planet, where water flowed freely -- and life may have thrived. The conundrum of what happened to this water is long standing and unsolved. However, new research suggests that this water is now locked
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inflammation drives progression of Alzheimer'sInflammatory mechanisms caused by the brain's immune system drive the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research. These findings, which rely on a series of laboratory experiments, provide new insights into pathogenetic mechanisms that are believed to hold potential for tackling Alzheimer's before symptoms manifest. The researchers envision that one day this may lead to new ways
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Origins of photosynthesis in plants dated to 1.25 billion years agoThe world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists. Based on this finding, the researchers also estimate that the basis for photosynthesis in today's plants was set in place 1.25 billion years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Easter Island had a cooperative community, analysis of giant hats revealsAnalysis of giant stone hats found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely held belief that the ancient civilization had a warrior culture. According to a new study these stone hats suggest that the people of Rapa Nui were part of a supportive and inclusive community.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metal printing offers low-cost way to make flexible, stretchable electronicsResearchers have developed a new technique for directly printing metal circuits, creating flexible, stretchable electronics. The technique can use multiple metals and substrates and is compatible with existing manufacturing systems that employ direct printing technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Struggling to get your kids to eat healthy? 'Don't give up!' researchers sayVaried diets and persistence in exposing infants and children to healthy foods, even when they don't like them at first, are key to promoting healthy eating behaviors, a new review paper has concluded.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treating refugees from Western perspective leaves providers, patients lost in translationSomali Bantu women are open to family planning when methods help to space births of future children, rather than preventing new additions to their families, outlines a new report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to protect your internet-of-things devices Credit: CC0 Public Domain Internet-connected devices are nearly ubiquitous, with computer circuitry now found in a variety of common appliances. They can include security cameras, DVRs, printers, cars, baby monitors, and refrigerators—even "smart" lightbulbs and clothing. Collectively those devices are called the internet of things. The internet of things is a big, juicy target for criminals. Up
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant bubbles on red giant star's surfaceAstronomershave for the first time directly observed granulation patterns on the surface of a star outside the Solar System -- the ageing red giant ?1 Gruis. This remarkable new image reveals the convective cells that make up the surface of this huge star, which has 350 times the diameter of the Sun. Each cell covers more than a quarter of the star's diameter and measures about 120 million kilomet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR treatment prevents hearing loss in miceA single treatment of a genome editing agent partially preserved hearing in mice with genetic deafness. The work could one day help scientists treat certain forms of genetic hearing loss in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Life on the ice: For the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snowFor the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snow -- an environment once considered sterile. The new evidence has the potential to alter perceptions about which planets in the universe could sustain life and may mean that humans are having an even greater impact on levels of CO2 in Earth's atmosphere than accepted evidence from climate history studies of ic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Healthier air due to the low emission zoneEven though the total mass of particulate matter was only slightly reduced by the modernization of the vehicles, the scientists were able to prove that the Low Emission Zone Leipzig significantly contributes to the health protection of the population.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approaches in medical genomics: A step forward in Parkinson's diseaseIt is widely known that genomics has already begun to influence medicine and that bioinformatics holds the key for developing new medical approaches, but how does medical genomics really work? Researchers now bring to light a clear example of how genomics is changing the way we currently know medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nearly zero-energy buildings: A difficult challenge for Southern EuropeMost of the countries in Southern Europe are ill-prepared when it comes to implementing nearly zero-energy buildings, and in particular, when addressing the challenge to modernize existing buildings, say researchers who have proposed improvements for the development of future buildings.
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The Atlantic

Stronger's Masterful Sense of Healing After Trauma Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. Next up is David Gordon Green’s Stronger . (Read our previous entries here .) By 10 minutes into Stronger , Jeff Bauman’s (Jake Gyllenhaal) legs are gone. They’ve been amputated above the knee, his p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN rights expert 'very concerned' about US rollback of 'net neutrality' The UN's top expert on freedom of expression voiced alarm Wednesday at the decision by US regulators to roll back "net neutrality" rules, which require internet providers to treat all traffic equally. "Net neutrality is a really, really important principle from the perspective of ensuring broad access to information by all individuals," David Kaye told reporters in Geneva. While access to infor
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Specks in the brain attract Alzheimer’s plaque-forming protein Globs of an inflammation protein beckon an Alzheimer’s protein and cause it to accumulate in the brain, a study in mice finds. The results, described in the Dec. 21/28 Nature , add new details to the relationship between brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease . Researchers suspect that this inflammatory cycle is an early step in the disease, which raises the prospect of being able to prevent
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New on MIT Technology Review

Computer Vision Algorithms Are Still Way Too Easy to Trick A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells This experimental setup was used by the team to measure the electrical output of a sample of solar cell material, under controlled conditions of varying temperature and illumination. The data from those tests was then used as the basis for computer modeling using statistical methods to predict the overall performance of the material in real-world operating conditions. Credit: Riley Brand The worl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

School ditches online learning program after parents revolt This Dec. 13, 2017 photo, shows the exterior of the board of education headquarters in Cheshire, Conn. Schools in the town have suspended use of the Summit Learning program, a go-at-your-own-pace personalized online learning platform built by a California charter school network with help from Facebook engineers. Parents who organized against it said there was no need to change what's worked in a
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The Atlantic

The Most Expensive Weather Year Ever There were the hurricanes that rained down biblical floods on Texas and Florida and devastated Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. There were the fires that smoked wine country and coated Montana and Oregon in ash , and the fires that are burning down houses in Santa Barbara. Then, there were the king tides that flooded Miami, the heat waves that seared the southwest, the tornadoes that scarred t
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New Scientist - News

Mars rocks may have drunk up all the water and doomed life there By Leah Crane Most of the water on Mars is gone, and it may be the fault of the rocks. Billions of years ago, the Red Planet probably had just as much water as Earth, but now it’s all gone. Tiny variations in the chemistry of the two planets may have allowed Mars’s rocks to suck up the water before they sank deep under the surface. It has been suggested that Mars lost its water when it lost t
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New Scientist - News

One-off CRISPR treatment slows genetic hearing loss in mice CRISPR can slow hearing loss in mice Ivaylo Sarayski / Alamy Stock Photo By Michael Le Page Hearing loss in mice with a form of progressive deafness has been slowed by a one-off treatment using the CRISPR genome editing method. The approach might lead to a treatment that helps stave off hearing loss in people with certain forms of inherited deafness. We have two copies of almost every gene in
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New Scientist - News

Why complex life could prove remarkably common in the universe There could be a whole zoo up there Abdul Azis/Getty Do we live on a rare earth , so exceptional that it is pretty much alone in hosting a rich diversity of life, with almost all other planets being home to simple microbes at best? Or are we in a universe teeming with living things as complex as those here, meaning that we exist as part of a vast, cosmic zoo? Debate on this rages on, but we s
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New Scientist - News

3D-printed implant mends broken legs by turning into real bone Soon to be replaced? Edwardolive/Getty By Alice Klein No metal plates or screws needed: a new 3D-printed ceramic implant mends broken legs by holding the fractured parts together, then turning into natural bone. The implant has the same strength as real bone, and is made by Hala Zreiqat at the University of Sydney in Australia and her colleagues. In previous studies, they showed the material coul
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New Scientist - News

Hardy Antarctic tardigrades may be threatened by climate change Lorena Rebecchi and Roberto Guidetti, University of Modena and Regio Emilia By Sam Wong They can survive freezing temperatures, total desiccation, and even being sent into space. But the world’s hardiest animal, the tardigrade, could have a hard time surviving climate change. Tardigrades , also known as water bears, live in many environments. They are one of the few organisms that are abundan
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New Scientist - News

Fooling AI can now be done a thousand times faster To human eyes, this is obviously a dog in the snow Meike Engels/Alamy By Abigail Beall Tricking artificial intelligence has never been easier. One way is to fool an AI into misclassifying an image by misinforming it about what that file shows. Such “adversarial examples” can now be generated a thousand times faster than before. Anish Athalye at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and hi
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The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Helps Mice HearResearchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot drummer posts pictures of jamming sessions on Facebook Mortimer. Credit: QMUL The study, by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, looks at how humans interact with robots over time and in particular how social media can enhance that relationship. Relationships between humans and robots require both long term engagement and a feeling of believability, or social presence, towards the robot. The researchers contend that music can provide this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- The worldwide quest by researchers to find better, more efficient materials for tomorrow's solar panels is usually slow and painstaking. Researchers typically must produce lab samples -- which are often composed of multiple layers of different materials bonded together -- for extensive testing. Now, a team at MIT and other institutions has come up with a way to bypass such exp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hearing is believing in gene therapy's promise IMAGE: This is Xue (Sherry) Gao. view more Credit: Tommy LaVergne/Rice University HOUSTON - (Dec. 20, 2017) - Gene editing could someday help people at risk of hearing loss from genetic mutations, according to research by a new Rice University faculty member. Xue (Sherry) Gao, who joined Rice in the fall as the Ted N. Law Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammation drives progression of Alzheimer's According to a study by scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn now published in the journal " Nature ", inflammatory mechanisms caused by the brain's immune system drive the progression of Alzheimer's disease. These findings, which rely on a series of laboratory experiments, provide new insights into pathogenetic mechanisms that are believ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mars: Not as dry as it seems IMAGE: This is image shows modern Mars (left) dry and barren, compared with the same scene over 3.5 billion years ago covered in water (right). The rocks of the surface... view more Credit: Jon Wade When searching for life, scientists first look for an element key to sustaining it: fresh water. Although today's Martian surface is barren, frozen and inhabitable, a trail of evidence points
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR treatment prevents hearing loss in miceA single treatment of a genome editing agent partially preserved hearing in mice with genetic deafness. The work could one day help scientists treat certain forms of genetic hearing loss in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neutron-star merger creates new mysteries The neutron-star merger announced in October has solved one mystery - where gold comes from - but has also raised other questions, an international team reports today in the journal Nature . The merger, dubbed GW170817, took place 130 million light-years away and was detected in August by the gravitational waves it created. Astronomers then followed it up with conventional telesco
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CRISPR therapy preserves hearing in progressive deafness model IMAGE: Confocal microscopy images of mouse cochlea; hair cells in green. (Left) An untreated cochlea from a mouse with the Tmc1 mutation, displaying hair cell loss. (Right) The opposite, treated, cochlea... view more Credit: Gao et al./Nature 2017 WHAT THEY FOUND A CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing complex can be delivered directly into hair cells, the sound-sensing cells of the inner ear,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant bubbles on red giant star's surface IMAGE: Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have directly observed granulation patterns on the surface of a star outside the Solar System -- the ageing red giant π1 Gruis. This remarkable... view more Credit: ESO Located 530 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Grus (The Crane), π1 Gruis is a cool red giant. It has about the same mass as our Sun, but is 700 times larger an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radio observations point to likely explanation for neutron-star merger phenomena Three months of observations with the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have allowed astronomers to zero in on the most likely explanation for what happened in the aftermath of the violent collision of a pair of neutron stars in a galaxy 130 million light-years from Earth. What they learned means that astronomers will be able to see and study many more such colli
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Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds IMAGE: This is a black-tailed godwit ( Limosa limosa ). Habitats range from the Russian far-east to Europe, Africa, and Australasia. view more Credit: Szabolcs Nagy, Wetlands International. A vast new study of changes in global wildlife over almost three decades has found that low levels of effective national governance are the strongest predictor of declining species numbers - more so
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Molecular super enhancers: A new key for targeted therapy of brain cancer in children Ependymoma refers to a heterogeneous group of cancers that can occur at any age and is one of the most common types of brain cancer in children. The genetic causes for its development are largely unknown and there are no targeted treatments to date. Scientists from the "Hopp Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg" (KiTZ), in collaboration with colleagues from the U.S.A. and Canada, have n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral IMAGE: TRPV6 channel in closed and open states. view more Credit: Credit: Sobolevsky lab/CUMC New York, NY (Dec. 20, 2017) -- Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could accelerate the development of drugs to correct abnormalities in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No rest for weary canola plantsPlants don't sleep like humans do -- but just like some people don't rest well in the heat, some plants don't either. The canola plant isn't as productive if the temperature is high at nighttime, and scientists are trying to find out why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smoking cessation drug may increase risk of adverse cardiovascular eventVarenicline, one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for helping people quit smoking, may put them at higher risk for a cardiovascular event, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lower class wiser about interpersonal conflict than middle classLower class populations are wiser than their middle-class counterparts in their ability to reason about interpersonal matters, new research indicates.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Smothered jet may explain weird light from neutron star crash View the video The neutron star collision heard and seen around the world has failed to fade. That lingering glow could mean that a jet of bright matter created in the crash has diffused into a glowing, billowy cocoon that surrounds the merged star , researchers report online December 20 in Nature . Gravitational waves from the collision between two ultradense stellar corpses was picked up in Aug
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Popular Science

Pinecones could help make buildings more energy efficient Scientists who invent things often look to nature for inspiration. Their goal is to mimic biological systems in order to create new consumer products, or improve existing ones. The 1941 introduction of Velcro , for example, grew out of a Swiss engineer’s curiosity about why Burdock seeds clung to his coat — and that of his dog — when they were walking through the woods. Today, responding to the g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algae growth reduces reflectivity, enhances Greenland ice sheet melting An aerial view of the study area on the Greenland ice sheet. Credit: Jason Box/Jonathan Ryan New research shows algae growing on the Greenland ice sheet, the Earth's second-largest ice sheet, significantly reduce the surface reflectivity of the ice sheet's bare ice area and contribute more to its melting than dust or black carbon. The new findings could influence scientists' understanding of ice
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Sea turtle found tangled in floating cocaine balesThe US Coast Guard tries to save the animal tangled in line connecting bales of cocaine in the Pacific.
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Live Science

Why Most of Us Lean to the Right When We Kiss Are you a right- or left-leaner? Credit: Shutterstock This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Your brain is an organ of two halves – the left side and the right side. And there are many brain functions, such as language skills or which hand you write with, which are organised mostly
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reversibility of genetic nervous system disease revealed by scientistsAfter developing a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia that shows symptoms similar to patients, researchers have found that many early symptoms of the disease are completely reversible when the genetic defect linked to the ataxia is reversed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern enginesAs cars become more fuel-efficient, less heat is wasted in the exhaust, which makes it harder to clean up the pollutants being emitted. Researchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blueberry vinegar improves memory in mice with amnesiaDementia affects millions of people worldwide, robbing them of their ability to think, remember and live as they once did. In the search for new ways to fight cognitive decline, scientists report that blueberry vinegar might offer some help. They found that the fermented product could restore cognitive function in mice.
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Science | The Guardian

Breakthrough for genetic hearing loss as gene editing prevents deafness in mice Deafness has been prevented in mice using gene editing for the first time, in an advance that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss. The study found that a single injection of a gene editing cocktail prevented progressive deafness in baby animals that were destined to lose their hearing. “We hope that the work will one day inform the development of a cure for certain forms of g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds Black-tailed godwit ( Limosa limosa ). Habitats range from the Russian far-east to Europe, Africa, and Australasia. Credit: Szabolcs Nagy, Wetlands International. A vast new study of changes in global wildlife over almost three decades has found that low levels of effective national governance are the strongest predictor of declining species numbers - more so than economic growth, climate change
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral TRPV6 channel in closed and open states. Credit: Sobolevsky lab/CUMC Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could accelerate the development of drugs to correct abnormalities in calcium uptake, which have been linked to cancers of the breast,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant bubbles on red giant star's surface Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have directly observed granulation patterns on the surface of a star outside the Solar System -- the ageing red giant π1 Gruis. This remarkable new image from the PIONIER instrument reveals the convective cells that make up the surface of this huge star. Each cell covers more than a quarter of the star's diameter and measures about 120 million kilometr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water on Mars absorbed like a sponge, new research suggests Image shows modern Mars (left) dry and barren, compared with the same scene over 3.5 billion years ago covered in water (right). The rocks of the surface were slowly reacting with the water, sequestering it into the Martian mantle leading to the dry, inhospitable scene shown on the left. Credit: Jon Wade When searching for life, scientists first look for an element key to sustaining it: fresh wat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radio observations point to likely explanation for neutron-star merger phenomena A hidden or 'choked' jet (white) powering a radio-emitting 'cocoon' (pink) is the best explanation for the radio waves, gamma rays and X-rays the astronomers observed. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF: D. Berr Three months of observations with the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have allowed astronomers to zero in on the most likely explanation for what happened in the aft
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic modification and genome editing rely on active roles for researchers and industry How society regards the use of genetic modification and genome editing can have a significant influence on how these technologies are regulated by authorities and on the pace of technological advancement. In a review published in the Journal of Dairy Science authors from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences discuss potential applications of genetic modification and genome editing of ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific Northwest Credit: University of Chicago Medical Center In the early 1900s, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recognized a problem. The United States relied heavily on fertilizer to grow crops and support its burgeoning economy, yet a crucial ingredient for fertilizer—potash, a mixture of potassium and salts—was mined almost exclusively in Germany. German mines supplied nearly the entire world's supply of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sprint targets unnamed employees in alleged Uzbekistan-based cellphone scheme Sprint has taken its battle against cellphone trafficking in house, suing 20 unnamed employees along with an Uzbekistan resident in U.S. federal court. And the company ran a sting operation to investigate the scheme. The 14-page lawsuit described a conspiracy in which to promote his scheme Adik Kummetov of Tashkent, Uzbekistan, allegedly recruited Sprint employees, or possibly employees of compan
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Live Science

UFO Mysteries: These Sightings Have Never Been Solved "What people sometimes don't get about science is that we often have phenomena that remain unexplained," said an astrophysicist at MIT https://t.co/Z8UdjWmVCg — The New York Times (@nytimes) December 18, 2017 Crashes in Roswell, New Mexico, and flashing lights over New Jersey — for decades, people around the world have looked up at the skies and reported mysterious unidentified objects
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover key link between mitochondria and cocaine addiction For years, scientists have known that mitochondria in brain cells play a role in brain disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and stress responses. But recently, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them. Mitochondria serve as the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific Northwest In the early 1900s, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recognized a problem. The United States relied heavily on fertilizer to grow crops and support its burgeoning economy, yet a crucial ingredient for fertilizer -- potash, a mixture of potassium and salts -- was mined almost exclusively in Germany. German mines supplied nearly the entire world's supply of potash, and at the time the U.S. used a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fake social media accounts can be hazardous to your health Fake social media accounts already have a reputation of swaying political discourse, but a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher says these automated accounts are even more dangerous -- they can be bad for your health. Social bots are automated accounts that use artificial intelligence to influence discussions and promote specific ideas or products. USC researchers focused on how these bots p
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The Atlantic

How Drug-Free School Zones Backfired In 1970 a new trend in narcotics law began to spread: Legislators began creating Drug Free School Zones, imposing harsh penalties on drug crimes committed within them. The theory behind these zones was straightforward: kids are the last people we want drug dealers to target; schoolyards are the last place we want them plying their violent trade; so why not create an incentive to keep drugs elsewh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powerful new tool for looking for life beyond Earth Thanks to a carefully designed optical setup, the new standoff ultra-compact micro Raman (SUCR) instrument can perform microscopic Raman analysis of samples 10 centimeters away from the instrument with 17.3-micron resolution. Credit: M. Nurul Abedin, NASA Langley Research Center NASA has developed an innovative new spectroscopy instrument to aid the search for extraterrestrial life. The new instr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Origins of photosynthesis in plants dated to 1.25 billion years ago The Angmaat Formation above Tremblay Sound on the Baffin Island coast. Bangiomorpha pubescens fossils occur in this roughly 500-meter thick rock formation. Credit: Timothy Gibson The world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists at McGill University. Based on this finding, the researchers also estimate that the basis for photosynthesis in to
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New on MIT Technology Review

Can You Be Addicted to Video Games? The WHO Certainly Thinks So A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Struggling to get your kids to eat healthy? 'Don't give up!' UB researchers say IMAGE: Anzman-Frasca is lead author on a review paper that found that variety and persistence are key to developing healthy eating habits in young children. view more Credit: Douglas Levere, University at Buffalo BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Varied diets and persistence in exposing infants and children to healthy foods, even when they don't like them at first, are key to promoting healthy eating behavior
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metal printing offers low-cost way to make flexible, stretchable electronics IMAGE: This prototype demonstrates the potential of a new technique for printing flexible, stretchable circuits. view more Credit: Jingyan Dong, North Carolina State University Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique for directly printing metal circuits, creating flexible, stretchable electronics. The technique can use multiple metals and substrates and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

East meets West: The Science Bridge Current plans, which focus on collaborations between Western and Middle Eastern countries, are outlined in the current edition of the journal Neuron *. During their medieval 'Golden Age', the Arab and Persian cultures were a vibrant hub of fruitful intellectual exchange. A brief overview of this history is discussed as part of a recent article which represents a collaborative effort involving a t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating refugees from Western perspective leaves providers, patients lost in translation IMAGE: This is afuli Agbemenu, PhD, assistant professor in the UB School of Nursing. view more Credit: University at Buffalo BUFFALO, N.Y. - For years, research has shown that female Somali Bantu refugees may be hesitant to use hormonal birth control and other methods of family planning. However, a new University at Buffalo study revealed that the women are open to family planning when me
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidelines aim to prevent medics from failing to diagnose patients with liver disease IMAGE: New guidelines aim to prevent medics from failing to diagnose patients with liver disease. view more Credit: University of Birmingham New recommendations, led by experts at the University of Birmingham, have been published to improve the use of liver blood tests. The recommendations, published in Gut , are aimed at helping healthcare workers diagnose patients with liver disease as w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Origins of photosynthesis in plants dated to 1.25 billion years ago IMAGE: The Angmaat Formation above Tremblay Sound on the Baffin Island coast. Bangiomorpha pubescens fossils occur in this roughly 500-meter thick rock formation. view more Credit: Timothy Gibson The world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists at McGill University. Based on this finding, the researchers also estimate that the basis for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robot drummer posts pictures of jamming sessions on Facebook IMAGE: This is Mortimer and Louis McCallum. view more Credit: QMUL The study, by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, looks at how humans interact with robots over time and in particular how social media can enhance that relationship. Relationships between humans and robots require both long term engagement and a feeling of believability, or social presence, towards the rob
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Powerful new tool for looking for life beyond Earth IMAGE: Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and the University of Hawaii developed a new micro Raman spectroscopy instrument to search for life on the surface of other planets. Looking for... view more Credit: M. Nurul Abedin, NASA Langley Research Center WASHINGTON -- NASA has developed an innovative new spectroscopy instrument to aid the search for extraterrestrial life. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Easter Island had a cooperative community, analysis of giant hats reveals Pukao are large, cylindrical stones made from a volcanic rock known as 'red scoria.' Weighing multiple tons, they were placed on the heads of the moai during prehistoric times, consistent with the Polynesian traditions of honoring their ancestors. Credit: Carl LIpo Analysis of giant stone hats found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely held belief that the a
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New on MIT Technology Review

Can You Be Addicted to Video Games? The WHO Says Yes A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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Feed: All Latest

Researchers Made Google's Image Recognition AI Mistake a Rifle For a Helicopter Tech giants love to tout how good their computers are at identifying what’s depicted in a photograph. In 2015, deep learning algorithms designed by Google, Microsoft , and China’s Baidu superseded humans at the task, at least initially . This week, Facebook announced that its facial-recognition technology is now smart enough to identify a photo of you, even if you’re not tagged in it. But algorit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Life in marine driftwood: The case of driftwood specialist talitrids Photograph of a driftwood depository at Hartley Cove, Bay of Fundy, Canada, in May 2016. Credit: David Wildish Driftwood in the sea - either floating or stranded on beaches - is a common feature particularly in temperate regions. Large quantities of driftwood, termed driftwood depositories, may collect at the mouth of small streams associated with marshes and have been present for some 120 millen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study identifies California cliffs at risk of collapse Cliff retreat hot spots and high cliff top hazard locations identified by the study. Credit: Adam Young, 2017 The yellow warning signs that pepper coastal cliffs from northern California to the US-Mexico border may seem overly dramatic to the casual observer. But actively eroding cliffs make up the majority of the California coastline, and sudden landslides and collapses have caused injuries and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harnessing sperm to treat gynecological diseases IMAGE: The swimming power of sperm could deliver cancer drugs directly to cervical tumors. view more Credit: American Chemical Society Delivering drugs specifically to cancer cells is one approach researchers are taking to minimize treatment side effects. Stem cells, bacteria and other carriers have been tested as tiny delivery vehicles. Now a new potential drug carrier to treat gynecologic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better treatment, not more spending, saves heart attack patients, study finds A new long-term look at heart attack care and spending in America since the turn of the century shows more survival, more spending, and more variation between hospitals on both scores. And while some of that spending - on rapid angioplasty to open clogged heart arteries - appears to be paying off, a lot of the dollars spent in the six months after a heart attack don't seem to be making much of a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algae growth reduces reflectivity, enhances Greenland ice sheet melting IMAGE: Study co-author Nathan Chrismas collecting surface ice for analysis. view more Credit: Karen Cameron/Sara Penrhyn Jones WASHINGTON D.C. -- New research shows algae growing on the Greenland ice sheet, the Earth's second-largest ice sheet, significantly reduce the surface reflectivity of the ice sheet's bare ice area and contribute more to its melting than dust or black carbon. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic modification and genome editing rely on active roles for researchers and industry Philadelphia, Dec. 20, 2017 - How society regards the use of genetic modification and genome editing can have a significant influence on how these technologies are regulated by authorities and on the pace of technological advancement. In a review published in the Journal of Dairy Science ® authors from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences discuss potential applications of genetic modif
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Big Think

Moose May Be the Real Canaries in the Coal Mine Isle Royale is an 893 square mile island in the northwest corner of Lake Superior, about a four-hour boat ride from Houghton, Michigan on the Keweenaw Peninsula. It’s a pretty rustic place with little development, and as such makes a fascinating isolated ecosystem for the study of the few species that live there, most significantly 1,600 moose and one or two wolves, interrupted only sometimes by
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Quanta Magazine

A Mathematician Who Decodes the Patterns Stamped Out by Life When Corina Tarnita was a budding mathematician, she found her interest in mathematics flickering, about to burn out. As a girl she had stormed through Romania’s National Mathematical Olympiad — where she won a three-peat from 1999 to 2001 — then on to Harvard University as an undergraduate and straight into its graduate school to study questions in pure mathematics. Then suddenly, around a decad
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Give Thanks for the Winter Solstice. You Might Not Be Here Without It. Had we evolved on Venus, it’s likely that we would not have noticed solstices or seasons at all, said David Grinspoon, an astrobiologist at the Planetary Science Institute. The same can’t be said for imaginary aliens living within Uranus’s chilly blue clouds. “Uranus is wild,” Dr. Grinspoon said. An axial tilt of 98 degrees causes the ice giant to spin on its side. So, whereas one of Earth’s pole
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant defense following the iron-maiden principle The large stinging hairs (long stings) are way too long to do any damage to the small insects. However, the sharp mineralized trichomes represent a deadly forest of needles that the animal has to walk over. Credit: Adeel Mustafa/Uni Bonn Calcium phosphate is a typical component of teeth and bones. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mineral in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two studies find stress reprograms cells Credit: CC0 Public Domain In a pair of publications, researchers have shown how cells adapt to stressors—like water loss—by reprogramming their internal signaling networks. The studies describe previously unknown mechanisms that cells use to send signals between cellular machinery and avoid cell death. According to the authors, drugs that enhance the adaptation mechanisms could help cells stave o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Panning for silver in laundry wastewaterSilver nanoparticles are being used in clothing for their anti-odor abilities but some of this silver comes off when the clothes are laundered. The wastewater from this process could end up in the environment, possibly harming aquatic life, so researchers have attempted to recover the silver. Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that detergent chemistry plays a signifi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies California cliffs at risk of collapse Danger - Unstable Cliffs - Stay Back: The yellow warning signs that pepper coastal cliffs from northern California to the US-Mexico border may seem overly dramatic to the casual observer. But actively eroding cliffs make up the majority of the California coastline, and sudden landslides and collapses have caused injuries and several fatalities in recent years. In addition, eroding cliffs currentl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whites, researchers find IMAGE: From left, nutritional sciences graduate student Joseph Beals, kinesiology and community health professor Nicholas Burd, kinesiology graduate student Sarah Skinner and their colleagues found that eating whole eggs after resistance... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- People who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Commonalities in late stages of inherited blinding diseases suggest targets for therapy IMAGE: A heat map showing patterns of gene expression reveals similarities between two different forms of retinitis pigmentosa, a blinding disease. The commonalities involve innate immune pathways, and point to new... view more Credit: University of Pennsylvania Gene therapy holds promise for treating a variety of diseases, including some inherited blinding conditions. But for a gene therapy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many brain tumor patients do not receive adequate end-of-life care While more than 60 percent of patients with the brain tumors called malignant gliomas enroll in hospice services, almost a quarter of them do so within a week of death, probably too late for patients and family members to benefit from hospice care. A study by research team from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center also finds that certain groups are more likely than others to rec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Easter Island had a cooperative community, analysis of giant hats reveals IMAGE: Pukao are large, cylindrical stones made from a volcanic rock known as 'red scoria.' Weighing multiple tons, they were placed on the heads of the moai during prehistoric times, consistent... view more Credit: Carl LIpo BINGHAMTON, NY- Analysis of giant stone hats found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely held belief that the ancient civiliz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plant defense following the iron-maiden principle IMAGE: The large stinging hairs (long stings) are way too long to do any damage to the small insects. However, the sharp mineralized trichomes represent a deadly forest of needles that... view more Credit: © Adeel Mustafa/Uni Bonn Calcium phosphate is a typical component of teeth and bones. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two studies find stress reprograms cells In a pair of publications, researchers have shown how cells adapt to stressors--like water loss--by reprogramming their internal signaling networks. The studies describe previously unknown mechanisms that cells use to send signals between cellular machinery and avoid cell death. According to the authors, drugs that enhance the adaptation mechanisms could help cells stave off multiple diseases, in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone app monitors cancer patients recovery PITTSBURGH, Dec. 20, 2017 - Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy can be remotely monitored using their smartphone sensors and an algorithm that detects worsening symptoms based on objective changes in patient behavior, according to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC Hillman Cancer Center. The findings, published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research , indicate that wor
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan lakridsbolsjer holde mig vågen? Vores læser Rasmus Pedersen spørger: I min tid som studerende gik jeg ofte til forelæsning i en knap så udsovet tilstand, og da jeg ikke drikker kaffe, kunne det være en kamp at holde sig vågen. Jeg opdagede imidlertid, at stærke lakridsbolsjer som Tyrkisk Peber kunne kvikke op i nogle få minutter, så dem endte jeg med at spise frygtelig mange af. Men jeg fandt aldrig ud af hvorfor. Kan det være
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-dose X-ray exposure does not harm human stem cells IMAGE: Mesenchymal stem cell nucleus on a microphotograph. Cell nucleus highlighted by a fluorescent stain called DAPI (blue); γH2AX foci, that is, the accumulations of the protein marking DNA damage (red... view more Credit: MIPT Press Office Biophysicists have shown that following low-dose exposure to X-rays (at 80 milligrays), stem cells remain healthy, proliferate, and do not
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Live Science

Dog-Mauling Death: Why Dogs Turn on Their Owners After a woman in Virginia was reportedly mauled to death by her own dogs, some of her friends had trouble believing the story, because the woman had a strong bond with her dogs. But what could cause a dog to turn on its owner? The 22-year-old woman, Bethany Lynn Stephens, was found dead in the woods last week, with her two dogs apparently "guarding" her body, according to the Washin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Panning for silver in laundry wastewater Silver nanoparticles are being used in clothing for their anti-odor abilities but some of this silver comes off when the clothes are laundered. The wastewater from this process could end up in the environment, possibly harming aquatic life, so researchers have attempted to recover the silver. Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that detergent chemistry plays a signif
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Life in marine driftwood: The case of driftwood specialist talitrids IMAGE: Photograph of a driftwood depository at Hartley Cove, Bay of Fundy, Canada, in May 2016. view more Credit: David Wildish Driftwood in the sea - either floating or stranded on beaches - is a common feature particularly in temperate regions. Large quantities of driftwood, termed driftwood depositories, may collect at the mouth of small streams associated with marshes and have been pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder Men under the influence of alcohol are more likely to see women as sexual objects. This is according to a study which moves beyond the mere anecdotal to investigate some of the circumstances and factors that influence why men objectify women. The research is published in Springer's journal Sex Roles and is led by Abigail Riemer of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the US. The study involved 4
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using the dark side of excitons for quantum computing IMAGE: The schematic illustrates the microlens device to measure dark excitons in a quantum dot. The left diagram depicts the spin-blockaded biexciton state that relaxes into a dark exciton and produces... view more Credit: Tobias Heindel WASHINGTON, D.C., December 20, 2017 -- To build tomorrow's quantum computers, some researchers are turning to dark excitons, which are bound pairs of an ele
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Entitled people don't follow instructions because they see them as 'unfair' Washington, DC - From job applications to being in line at the DMV, instructions, and the expectations that we follow them, are everywhere. Recent research found people with a greater sense of entitlement are less likely to follow instructions than less entitled people are, because they view the instructions as an unfair imposition on them. The results appear in the journal Social Psychological a
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A mother and son united by love and art | Deborah Willis and Hank Willis ThomasAn art school professor once told Deborah Willis that she, as a woman, was taking a place from a good man -- but the storied photographer says she instead made a space for a good man, her son Hank Willis Thomas. In this moving talk, the mother and son artists describe how they draw from one another in their work, how their art challenges mainstream narratives about black life and black joy, and ho
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New on MIT Technology Review

Perceptive Algorithms Are Battling to Spot More of the Web’s Toxic Content A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Is Magic Leap’s AR Headset, Coming 2018 Magic Leap , an augmented-reality startup that has raised close to $2 billion without even publicly demonstrating a product, is pulling back the curtains a bit—on its website, at least. The company now says it will release a headset next year for developers, though it still won’t divulge how much it will cost or when, exactly, it will ship. On a new version of its website unveiled Wednesday, Magi
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New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon Is Hurting Retail—But It’s Women Losing the Jobs A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs A Newly Approved Gene Therapy Is So Expensive, the Company Behind It Can’t Even Say What It Costs When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though. The gene-therapy pioneer, based in Philadelphia, won approval on Tuesday for a gene replacement… Read more When the government says a new drug i
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New Scientist - News

Parallel universes could solve a big problem with black holes Paradox fixed? Science Photo Library/Alamy Stock Photo By Anil Ananthaswamy When it comes to black holes, we are caught between a rock and a hard place. A black hole, it seems, either destroys information in violation of quantum mechanics or it is enveloped by a blazing firewall, defying Einstein’s general relativity. But a new analysis using the “many worlds” interpretation, which says that
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New Scientist - News

After crows fight they touch and preen each other to make up Francois Gohier/ardea.com Crows may sound unpleasant and represent a living symbol of death, but it seems a murder of crows has a soft side – even when it is made up of relative strangers. Crows belong to a group of birds called corvids , known for their intelligence. They are loyal birds, forming long-lasting social relationships with specific individuals. To find out how they form new relat
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New Scientist - News

Video gaming disorder to be officially recognised for first time When does it become a problem? Erik Tham/Alamy Stock Photo By Timothy Revell Can playing too many video games be a mental health condition ? In some circumstances, the World Health Organization thinks that it can be, New Scientist has learned. The WHO is to include gaming disorder in its International Classification of Diseases for the first time. This widely used diagnostic manual was last u
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The Atlantic

What Writers Can Take Away From the Bible By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean For Min Jin Lee, the author of Pachinko, writing a novel is a nearly god-like act of creation, a way to preside over a small universe that authors fashion in the image of their beliefs. In a con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early disease diagnosis could be dramatically improved with new detection system IMAGE: This is an illustration of the system in action. view more Credit: Joshua Edel/Imperial College London The presence of, or changes in the concentration of, certain proteins in biological fluids can be indicators of disease. However, in the early stages of disease these 'biomarkers' can be difficult to detect, as they are relatively rare. Detecting important biomarkers in lower conc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shining a light on bacterial cell divisionResearchers have revealed new insights into the process of E. coli cell division, aiding the search for new ways to target bacteria with antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can't switch your focus? You brain might not be wired for itA new study suggests that the extent to which brain signals 'stick' to white matter networks is associated with cognitive flexibility, or our ability to switch our focus from one concept to another.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Two Neurologists Walk into a Christmas Concert BRIEF: Two Neurologists Walk into a Christmas Concert Many of the boys in the choir had tics, leading the scientists to speculate that the repetitive movements may be related to motor learning. xmas-carol.jpg Image credits: Public domain Human Wednesday, December 20, 2017 - 10:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Even the transcendental harmonies of Bach's Christmas Oratorio were not eno
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Ingeniøren

BAGGRUND: Sådan finder computere planeter Nasas Kepler satellit har allerede opdaget langt over 2.000 planeter i fremmede stjernesystemer - de såkaldte exoplaneter. Lige så mange observationer er foreløbig registreret som potentielle kandidater og afventer kun en videre vurdering. Det kan derfor synes som en næsten triviel nyhed, da det i sidste uge blev meddelt, at man nu havde fundet to nye exoplaneter, hvoraf den ene var i et stjernes
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Viden

Stressreaktion fra hård træning kan bekæmpe kræft Når vi taler om sygdom, er det ofte med vendinger om, at vi skal holde os i ro. Vi ”bliver i sengen”, ”kryber ned under dynen”, ”tager en slapper” eller ”snupper en dag på langs”. Men hvis vi er rigtigt syge, skal vi i stedet gøre det stik modsatte og se at komme op i omdrejninger. Når man sætter patienter op på en kondicykel, får man også mobiliseret deres immunceller. Humanbiolog Pernille Højma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snow The research team positioned themselves away from polar wildlife to limit contamination, but one persistently curious character meant a testing site had to be abandoned Credit: James Chong For the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snow - an environment once considered sterile. The new evidence has the potential to alter perceptions about which planets i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cargill, Ecolab look to jump-start food innovation In an effort to jump-start innovation in the agriculture industry, Cargill Inc. and Ecolab said Monday they will launch a program to fund entrepreneurs and startup companies in early 2018. The companies are working with Techstars on an initiative called the Farm to Fork Accelerator. The focus will include business ideas with potential to impact all areas of the food system, including food securit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Halloween asteroid prepares to return in 2018There is one year to go until asteroid 2015 TB-145 approaches Earth once again, just as it did in 2015 around the night of Halloween, an occasion which astronomers did not pass up to study its characteristics. This dark object measures between 625 and 700 meters, its rotation period is around three hours and, in certain lighting conditions, it resembles a human skull.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cellular division strategy shared across all domains of lifeThe three domains of life — archaea, bacteria, and eukarya — may have more in common than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists simulate the climate of Game of ThronesWinter is coming ... as anyone who watches the hit TV series, Game of Thrones, knows. Some even have their own theories for what causes the strange extended seasons in that world of dragons, kings, queens, and magic. But scientists have gone one stage further, by using a Climate Model to simulate and explore the climate of the world of Game of Thrones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthier air due to the low emission zone IMAGE: The researchers of LfULG and TROPOS showed a positive trendfor air quaility in Leipzig when presenting its final report on the impact of the environmental zone on air quality. view more Credit: Photo: Tilo Arnhold/TROPOS Leipzig (Germany) - The Low Emission Zone in Leipzig was established in March 2011, allowing only access of Diesel vehicles of Euro4 and higher with few except
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New AI method keeps data private IMAGE: New machine learning method developed by researchers at the University of Helsinki, Aalto University and Waseda University of Tokyo can use for example data on cell phones while guaranteeing data... view more Credit: Eliel Kilkki Modern AI is based on machine learning which creates models by learning from data. Data used in many applications such as health and human behaviour is priv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Life on the ice IMAGE: The research team positioned themselves away from polar wildlife to limit contamination, but one persistently curious character meant a testing site had to be abandoned view more Credit: James Chong For the first time scientists have directly observed living bacteria in polar ice and snow - an environment once considered sterile. The new evidence has the potential to alter perceptions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polluted woods: Leaves contaminate soil with hydrocarbon In the Autumn leaves fall and apparently contaminate soil. It happens in the Italian woods where clearing the land is required by law for heavy hydrocarbon concentration greater than 50 milligrams per kilo. It was revealed by a study conducted by scientists at Ca' Foscari University of Venice and The Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes (CNR) in collaboration with the Società e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The coldest chip in the world IMAGE: A chip with a Coulomb blockade thermometer on it is prepared for experiments at extremely low temperatures. view more Credit: University of Basel, Department of Physics Physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in cooling a nanoelectronic chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. The scientists from the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute set this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research finds North Atlantic Oscillation synchronizes tree reproduction across Europe IMAGE: Tree reproduction across Europe is synchronized by North Atlantic Oscillation. view more Credit: University of Liverpool Research by the University of Liverpool has found a strong correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation and synchronised tree reproduction across Europe, supporting the idea that this phenomenon plays a greater role in large scale masting, the process whereby
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Florida tries to stem the tide in iguana invasion Growing up on Key Biscayne in the 1970s, Paul Zuccarini had no idea the commonplace green iguanas he loved to chase were as exotic as the tourists that descended every winter. They were like "prehistoric beasts," said Zuccarini, who would release his prize captives back into the wild. "If we caught a 3- to 5-foot iguana, it was like catching a dinosaur." Except these dinosaurs have gone the opp
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Popular Science

Amazon tracks everything you buy. Here's how to make that work for you. Given all of the time we spend shopping on Amazon , the retailer picks up some major hints about our lives: Our hobbies, the phones and gaming consoles we own, our taste in books, the toys our kids play with, our garden equipment, and even our affection for DIY . Amazon relies on this information to target us with better recommendations for new products and more relevant advertising. Even with al
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pandora, playing catch-up to Spotify, offers free music with ads Pick a song. Any song. It's almost Christmas, so, how about a song of the season like "Fairytale of New York" by the Pogues? Now, if you were using Pandora to listen to music, and you didn't want to wait through a playlist of who knows what in the hopes of hearing Shane McGowan and Kirsty McColl's greatest-ever musical performance, you had to pay $9.99 month for the company's on-demand option, Pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New company's technology lets quadriplegics use the phone without physical assistance A day after Oded Ben Dov appeared on Israeli television to promote his video game technology, which allowed players to control their games by moving their heads, a viewer called him with another suggestion for the software. "I can't move my arms or legs," the viewer told him. "Can you make a smartphone that I can use?" That conversation more than four years ago led to the creation of Open Sesam
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Futurity.org

Electric device slows deadly brain tumor growth A device attached to a patient’s scalp that delivers a continuous dose of low-intensity electric fields can improve survival and slow the growth of a deadly brain tumor, a new clinical trial suggests. “This trial establishes a new treatment paradigm that substantially improves the outcome in patients with glioblastoma…” The new treatment for glioblastoma uses alternating electric currents called
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using MRI to understand why some women go into early labor IMAGE: This image shows a view horizontally across the cervical canal. At this point, the cervix has to provide support to the womb and the developing fetus -- and the image... view more Credit: University of Leeds Scientists are using the latest imaging techniques usually used to map the brain to try and understand why some pregnant women miscarry or go into early labour. They have devel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mobile genetic elements that alter the function of nearby genes are detected Transposons are DNA fragments capable of "jumping" from one chromosomal region to another and bringing about permanent changes in the genome. In his study, the researcher has shown that besides causing mutations and reordering in the genome, some transposons can switch off the functioning of the genes in their vicinity, thus silencing the expression of the gene in question and preventing the prot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Micro-spectrometer opens door to a wealth of new smartphone functions IMAGE: The blue perforated slab is the upper membrane, with the photonic crystal cavity in the middle. This captures the light of a specific near infrarad frequency and generates a current... view more Credit: Eindhoven University of Technology. Use your smartphone to check how clean the air is, whether food is fresh or a lump is malignant. This has all come a step closer thanks to a ne
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antidepressant may help combat the course of multiple sclerosis The antidepressant clomipramine may also alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), specifically in its progressive form, i.e. when it occurs without relapses or remissions. As yet, drugs for this type of MS have been virtually non-existent. Researchers collaborating with Prof V. Wee Yong, PhD, from the University of Calgary and Dr Simon Faissner from Ruhr-Universität Bochum screened 1,040 ge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unifying the theories of neural information encoding IMAGE: Neurons in the retina encode the information they receive for transmission to the brain. view more Credit: IST Austria/Birgit Rieger Digital video cameras have the capability to record in incredible detail, but saving all that data would take up a huge amount of space: how can we compress a video--that is, remove information--in such a way that we can't see the difference when it is pl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cell research: (Re)-acquiring the potential to become everything IMAGE: This is a fluorescence image of mouse embryonic stem cells (nuclei in blue) including 2 cell-like cells (green) and the novel population of transitioning cells (red). view more Credit: Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München/IES A new study in Nature Genetics identifies a specific population of pluripotent embryonic stem cells that can reprogram to totipotent-like cells in culture. Moreove
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secrets of ancient Egypt may spark better fuel cells for tomorrow's carsTo make modern-day fuel cells less expensive and more powerful, a team of chemical engineers has drawn inspiration from the ancient Egyptian tradition of gilding.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AIM, aka AOL Instant Messenger, dead at 20 AOL's Instant Messenger service was finally erased from the internet Friday after the company made the announcement in October that Dec. 15 would be the chat platform's last day on Earth. Long gone are the days where parents would mandate time limits on teens' internet usage as you messaged away emojis and emo song lyrics in a chat room with friends. AIM first emerged in 1997 and paved the way
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UGR studies effects of tramadol on cognitive and sports performance Tramadol is an opioid pain medication mainly used to treat moderate to severe pain, such as backache or postoperative pain. Although it has not yet been included in the list of banned substances by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), the drug has recently generated significant media interest. Increasing numbers of professional cyclists and team members are coming forward about the frequent use o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzymes and bacteria move directionally, but bacteria towards food, enzymes away IMAGE: In the presence of food (blue), bacteria (white) swim straight, then change orientation (tumble), and follow this pattern over and over again. This study shows that enzymes (red) move in... view more Credit: IBS Although putting together the words "random" and "biased" can seem like a clash, these are the attributes that describe how bacteria navigate and fetch their food. They fol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines As cars become more fuel-efficient, less heat is wasted in the exhaust, which makes it harder to clean up the pollutants being emitted. Researchers at The University of New Mexico (UNM) and Washington State University have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines. Their work, published this week in the journal Science , presents a ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Pokemon Go' unleashes its critters in Apple's AR playground In this Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, photo, Pokemon Go is played at a park in San Francisco. Pokemon Go is unleashing its digital critters in Apple's playground for augmented reality, turning iPhones made during the past two years into the best place to play the mobile game, according to the CEO of the company that makes Pokemon Go. (AP Photo/Michael Liedtke) "Pokemon Go" is moving into a different dim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Am I allergic to this? Label Insight, with fresh $21M, helps stores tell you Label Insight, the Chicago-based company that helps stores tell customers what's in food and other goods, has raised $21 million in new funding, the company announced this week. The company started by using its technology to scan food packaging . It collects facts like nutritional information and marketing claims, providing the data to retailers or consumer packaged-goods manufacturers. The end
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Futurity.org

Watch a spider use its tiny brain to build a web New research aims to unlock how spiders, whose brains are no bigger than a fly’s, builds their intricate, elegant, geometric webs—in the dark. The spiders in Andrew Gordus’ laboratory spin their webs under close surveillance. Every movement of every one of their eight legs, every step through the two hours or so that it takes to create a web, gets recorded under infrared light. “How does a brain
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Dagens Medicin

EUs bivirkningskomité: Intet belæg for skadelig langtidseffekt ved clarithromycinMens FDA har iværksat en handlingsplan, der skal advare patienter med hjertekarsygdomme om at en clarithromycin-kur øger risikoen for at dø flere år efter afsluttet kur, vælger EU ikke at gøre noget. Langtidseffekten er ikke dokumenteret, lyder det.
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Dagens Medicin

FDA advarer mod overdødelighed flere år efter antibiotika-kurPå baggrund af bl.a. danske studier vælger den amerikanske sundhedsmyndighed FDA nu at advare om, at patienter har en øget risiko for at dø flere år efter at de har taget en kur med antibiotikaet clarithromycin. Den danske lægemiddelstyrelse tror ikke på studiernes fund.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research finds North Atlantic Oscillation synchronises tree reproduction across Europe Credit: University of Liverpool Research by the University of Liverpool has found a strong correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation and synchronised tree reproduction across Europe, supporting the idea that this phenomenon plays a greater role in large scale masting, the process whereby forest trees produce large numbers of seeds in the same year. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light-erasable memory promising for system-on-panel displays AFM image of the light-erasable memory device. Credit: He et al. ©2017 American Institute of Physics Researchers have designed a memory device based on atomically thin semiconductors and demonstrated that, in addition to exhibiting a good performance in general, the memory can also be fully erased with light, without any electrical assistance. The new memory has potential applications for system-
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Ingeniøren

Forsinket sikkerhedssystem kunne have forhindret mandagens togulykke Rettet kl. 09:57 Togulykken nær Seattle i mandags, som kostede tre personer livet og kvæstede adskillige, kunne have været forhindret, hvis strækningen havde haft det sikkerhedssystem, som de amerikanske jernbaneselskaber i snart ti år har været pålagt af Kongressen. Det slår amerikansk lektor i transport ved DTU Steven Harrod fast. »PTC (Positive Train Control, red. ) ville have givet togføreren
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How exercise is key to successfully quitting smokingExercise can help smokers finally kick the habit, suggests new research. The study reveals that even moderate intensity exercise markedly reduces the severity of nicotine withdrawal symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing of regulatory stick and supportive carrot may keep businesses focusedCoordinating the stick of regulation with the carrot of technical assistance may help small companies perform better environmentally and economically, according to a team of researchers.
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Futurity.org

Could aiming for ‘MiNT’ in mitochondria fight disease? A two-faced protein in a chain that regulates iron and other elements in cells could provide a new target to treat cancer, diabetes, and other diseases, say researchers. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences details the structure of a protein called mitochondrial inner NEET (MiNT), part of a pathway that stabilizes mitochondria, the organelles that produce energy for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shining a light on bacterial cell division IMAGE: These are nanoscopic images showing the spatial organization of two cell division proteins in E. coli cells. FtsZ (green) and FtsN (red) are organized into patchy rings at the division... view more Credit: OIST Imagine trying to defeat an army of invaders that can double its population size every twenty minutes. This is what the human body is facing when it becomes infected with a ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How plants form their seedsVegetable, fruit, or grain -- the majority of our food results from plant reproduction. Researchers at UZH have now discovered the key to how plants regulate pollen growth and seed formation. In addition to seed formation, knowledge about these signaling pathways can be used to influence plant growth or their defense against pests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals reversibility of genetic nervous system disease In children and adults with Friedreich's ataxia, an inherited disease that causes damage to the nervous system, a loss of coordination typically progresses to muscle weakness and can involve vision, diabetes, and other problems over the course of several years. Until now, mimicking those symptoms and progression in mice for research studies has been difficult. UCLA researchers, after developing a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can't switch your focus? Your brain might not be wired for it IMAGE: Study participants were asked to respond to the larger (or global) shape if the image was green and to the smaller (or local) shape if it was white, while researchers... view more Credit: Drexel University Take a look at the images above. A healthy brain can quickly switch its focus from the large shapes to the individual parts that make up the bigger pictures. But imagine taking a t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overlooked immune cells hold breakthrough for treating aggressive cancers IMAGE: Chrystal Paulos, Ph.D., associate professor of Microbiology and Immunology and the Cecilia and Vincent Peng Endowed Chair in Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology and graduate student Stefanie Bailey in the laboratory... view more Credit: Medical University of South Carolina The latest generation of cancer treatments spring from the discovery that the human immune system is able to beat the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Halogens can increase solar cell performance by 25 per cent IMAGE: This is UBC professor Curtis Berlinguette. view more Credit: University of British Columbia New research from the University of British Columbia and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that using halogens--a class of elements that include fluoride, bromine, chlorine and iodine--in a dye-sensitized solar cell can increase conversion efficiency by 25 per cent. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Micro-spectrometer opens door to a wealth of new smartphone functions An electron microscope image of the perforated membrane with the crystal cavity in the middle. Detail: the crystal cavity which captures light. Credit: Eindhoven University of Technology Use your smartphone to check how clean the air is, whether food is fresh or a lump is malignant. This has all come a step closer thanks to a new spectrometer that is so small it can be incorporated easily and che
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What Neolithic rock art can tell us about the way our ancestors lived 6,000 years ago Rock art in central Northumberland, with a view over the Cheviot Hills. Author provided The British and Irish countryside is often celebrated for its wealth of unique places of heritage, significance and interest. But not many people know that this heritage includes thousands of ancient panels of neolithic art , which are usually found out in the open for anyone to see. Known also as "cup and rin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using the dark side of excitons for quantum computing The schematic illustrates the microlens device to measure dark excitons in a quantum dot. The left diagram depicts the spin-blockaded biexciton state that relaxes into a dark exciton and produces a photon; solid circles are electrons while empty ones are holes. The dark exciton then undergoes precession. To read the dark exciton, an extra charge carrier is introduced -- in this case, a spin-down
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The coldest chip in the world A chip with a Coulomb blockade thermometer on it is prepared for experiments at extremely low temperatures. Credit: University of Basel, Department of Physics Physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in cooling a nanoelectronic chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. The scientists from the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute set this record in collaborat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New AI method keeps data privateModern AI is based on machine learning which creates models by learning from data. Data used in many applications such as health and human behaviour is private and needs protection. New privacy-aware machine learning methods have been developed recently based on the concept of differential privacy. They guarantee that the published model or result can reveal only limited information on each data s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More businesses are trying mobile apps to lure and keep consumers Using a store’s mobile app can affect in-store purchases. Credit: Javier Arres/Shutterstock.com Intense retail competition has led old standbys, such as Sears , to close dozens of stores . Walmart is venturing online more . And Amazon is expanding offline, opening stores and buying Whole Foods . The fight for retail dollars is fierce, and the battleground will soon migrate into the palms of custo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mobile genetic elements that alter the function of nearby genes Credit: CC0 Public Domain Raúl Castanera-Andrés, an engineer in the Agri-Food Engineering and Rural Environment Department of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has worked on detecting mobile genetic elements (transposons) in basidiomycete fungi, a type of well-known fungi because they produce edible mushrooms and are active degraders of lignocellulosic waste. Transposons are DNA fragment
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Cosmic lantern' could help us further understand the fate of the universe Nearby emission line galaxies NCG 4038 – 4039. The pink parts in this image are showing the light from the gas heated by newly formed stars. Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage (STScl/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration. New research has provided a deeper insight into emission line galaxies, used in several ongoing and upcoming surveys, to help us further understand the composition and fate of t
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The Scientist RSS

Federal Ban Lifted on Studying Most Dangerous PathogensOnly a few labs will earn funding for such 'gain-of-function' research on SARS, MERS, and other deadly diseases.
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The Scientist RSS

Sound of the Day: Big Mouth Gulf CorvinaResearchers document the loudest sound ever recorded in fish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Americans will never agree on oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is home to a great diversity of wildlife – one reason environmentalists oppose oil and gas drilling. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, CC BY-SA After decades of bitter struggle, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge seems on the verge of being opened to the oil industry. The consensus tax bill Republicans are trying to pass retains this measure , which was added to
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Dagens Medicin

Nykøbing får ny professor i epidemiologi Nykøbing F. Sygehus styrker sin forskning i epidemiologi med Elsebeth Lynge som klinisk professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Untrustworthy memories make it hard to shop ethically Imagine a shopper, Sarah, who is concerned about child labor and knows about groups like the Fair Wear Foundation that certify which brands sell ethically produced clothing. Hours after learning that fashion giant H&M reportedly sells clothing made by children in risky workplaces in Burma, she goes shopping. Completely forgetting about what she just heard, she buys an H&M dress. What happened? Sa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It will take more than good intentions to clear Nairobi's garbage mountains Nairobi's new governor, Mike Sonko, has promised to rid Nairobi of its mountains of trash . The city, which is home to an estimated 3.9 million people, generates between 3,000 and 3,200 tons of solid waste daily. But only half is collected. And only about 25% of waste generated reaches the main dumpsite at Dandora east of the Kenyan capital where the evidence points to severe effects on the healt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New software can model natural light from the occupants' perspective Marilyne Andersen, EPFL professor and Siobhan Rockcastle, who just achieved a postdoc at Laboratory of lntegrated Performance in Design, are the developers of OCUVIS. Credit: Alain Herzog OCUVIS, a visualization software developed by a soon-to-be-launched EPFL spin-off, lets architects simulate 3-D building models to assess the performance of natural light indoors. After specifying the ambient co
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Dagens Medicin

Vejle opretter palliativt center til tarmkræftpatienter Vejle Sygehus har som det første hospital i landet etableret et Center for Palliativ Kirurgi. Palliative operationer højner patienters livskvalitet og kan spare mange indlæggelser, forklarer overlæge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

(Re)-acquiring the potential to become everything Fluorescence image of mouse embryonic stem cells (nuclei in blue) including 2 cell-like cells (green) and the novel population of transitioning cells (red). Credit: Helmholtz Zentrum München/IES A new study in Nature Genetics identifies a specific population of pluripotent embryonic stem cells that can reprogram to totipotent-like cells in culture. Moreover, the scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum Mü
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover a 'hot Jupiter' orbiting a rapidly rotating star All follow-up transits of KELT-21b combined into one light curve (grey) and a 5 minute binned light curve (black). The red line is the combined and binned models for each transit. Credit: Johnson et al., 2017. An international team of astronomers has found a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet circling a rapidly rotating, metal-poor star. The newly discovered alien world, designated KELT-21b, is larger than
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Dagens Medicin

Svensk råd anbefaler Spinraza til visse patienterLandsting i Sverige har forhandlet sig frem til en rabataftale på dyrt lægemiddel mod spinal muskelatrofi.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Alaska's Northernmost Town Warms So Fast, It Fools NOAA Computers When federal climate scientists set about making their usual monthly tally of data from weather stations around the country in December, one station was glaringly missing: Utqiavik (formerly Barrow), Alaska, the northernmost community in the U.S. After some digging the scientists found that month upon month of exceptionally warm temperatures had caused their automated quality-control checks t
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Scientific American Content: Global

Healthy Choices? Storefront Placement Plays a Role Visit the grocery store on an empty stomach, and you will probably come home with a few things you had not planned to buy. But hunger pangs are not the only culprit behind impulse purchases. The location of store displays also influences our shopping choices—and may make or break some healthy eating habits. The checkout area is a particular hotspot for junk food. Studies have found that the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon drops sale of circumcision kit in UK after complaint In West African cities, male circumcision rates in 1950 were negatively correlated with HIV-2 prevalence from 1985, according to a study published December 7, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by João Sousa from the ...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pesticides, poor nutrition damage animal healthThe combined effects of pesticides and a lack of nutrition form a deadly one-two punch for animals, new research shows for the first time. Researchers studied how honey bees fared with exposure to commonly used pesticides and limited nutrient sources, scenarios found in agricultural areas. They were surprised to find that bee deaths increased by up to 50 percent more than they expected compared wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In delaying aging, caloric restriction becomes powerful research tool in human studiesNew research has been published on a proven method for increasing longevity in many organisms -- including the results of the first-ever clinical trial of caloric restriction (CR) in humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How blockchain technology could transform the food industry Blockchain technology could solve food safety and fraud by enabling immediate traceability to the point of origin. Credit: Shutterstock There has been a lot of noise on cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin of late. While some suggest cryptocurrencies are a fraud , others believe them to be the next biggest economic revolution the world has seen since the internet. Bitcoin has brought to light blockchain
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How fungus manipulate fruit flies into hosting spores and releasing them Wild drosophilids killed by Entomophthora muscae Berkeley. A) Cadavers found among sampled flies 65 minutes (above) and 40 minutes (below) after sunset. E. muscae Berkeley has not grown through the host cuticle. B) Cadavers found among sampled flies 120 minutes (above) and 160 minutes (below) after sunset. E. muscae Berkeley has grown through the host cuticle and will soon start to eject conidia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests dangerous crop fungus produces toxic chemical to repel insects A conidiophore of A. flavus. Credit: Medmyco/Wikipedia A team of researchers from Cornell and North Carolina State University has conducted a study examining a possible connection between a toxin produced by a crop-damaging fungus and insects that may attempt to feed on it. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , the group describes their study and what they found. Asperg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thick smog keeps schools closed for fourth day in Iran Schools were closed for a fourth straight day in Tehran on Wednesday as dangerous air pollution covered the Iranian capital and traffic restrictions failed to clear the thick smog. Average airborne concentration of the finest and most hazardous particles (PM2.5) was "unhealthy" at 160 microgrammes per cubic metre, slightly worse than Tuesday, authorities said. That is more than six times higher
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shining a light on bacterial cell division Nanoscopic images showing the spatial organization of two cell division proteins in E. coli cells. FtsZ (green) and FtsN (red) are organized into patchy rings at the division site. Credit: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Imagine trying to defeat an army of invaders that can double its population size every twenty minutes. This is what the human body is facing when it becomes infected
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Using science to wrap oddly-shaped giftsDr Adam Rutherford and Dr Hannah Fry offer a scientist's guide
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How plants form their seeds Pollen tubes with internalized, fluorescence-labelled signal substances (RALF peptides). Credit: UZH Vegetable, fruit, or grain – the majority of our food results from plant reproduction. Researchers at UZH have now discovered the key to how plants regulate pollen growth and seed formation. In addition to seed formation, knowledge about these signaling pathways can be used to influence plant grow
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Action needed now to save forest area the size of India Credit: Institute of Physics An area of forest the size of India will be lost by 2050 unless carbon pricing and anti-deforestation policies are put in place. That is the primary finding of a new study carried out by researchers from the Center for Global Development, Washington, DC, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, published today in Environmental Research Letters . They analysed detail
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin's energy use is out of control—but maybe that's the point? Arina P Habich / shutterstock The soaring value of bitcoin is encouraging more and more companies and individuals to engage in "mining". Mining is actually a process which secures the distributed bitcoin network, and processes all of its transactions. Historically anyone could do this using a standard PC, but these days hardware that is purpose-built for more energy-efficient mining is a necessit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How mobile working ruins work-life balance – unless you've got a good manager Burning the candle at both ends. Credit: shutterstock.com An increasing number of office workers can now work from any location for at least part of their working week. According to the Work Foundation , 30% of office workers could work from any location for at least part of their working week in 2016. This figure is expected to rise to 70% in the next few years. These are mobile workers. They fu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fracking and earthquakes—weighing up the dangers in South Africa There are concerns about the negative environmental and social impact of fracking in the Karoo. Credit: Martin Heigan/Flickr The South African government is looking into fracking to reduce the country's huge reliance on coal for energy. Fracking involves pumping high pressured fluids into rock formations to release reserves of oil and gas. Estimates for gas deposits in the main Karoo region of So
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drivers avoid tough penalties by staying under threshold Credit: University of Portsmouth When faced with a 'stepped' penalty system for speeding, drivers who go over the limit tend to stay just below the threshold at which the penalty rises, according to new research. The study of over 150,000 speeding tickets in Germany reveal that drivers' reaction to a notched penalty system – one that has stepped increases to the penalties the greater the misdemea
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Popular Science

People with egg allergies don't actually need a special flu shot Egg allergies used to be one of the only legitimate reasons not to get your annual flu shot. But since 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that everyone, egg-allergic or not, get the vaccine. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) joined a year later. And yet somehow, a recent update to the ACAAI’s recommendation is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New occupancy detection device designed to save home energy usePhotoelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are the current choice for occupancy presence detection in buildings. The sensors are used for smart thermostats to control heating and cooling based on occupancy. A major problem is that these PIR sensors only detect individuals who are moving. A Stony Brook University research team is developing a new type of PIR sensor that is equipped with an electronic shu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The universal truth about sticky surfaces A better understanding of purification setups will help material scientists to develop better filtering systems. Credit: Panther Media GmbH / Alamy Trapping molecules on custom-designed porous surfaces becomes easier with a new model that unifies previous theories of adsorption. Many purification tools, from simple charcoal filters to complex desalination plants, rely on solids with millions of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decriminalizing prostitution could reduce sexual violence and STD transmission A new study published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that Rhode Island's 6-year prostitution decriminalization policy increased the size of the sex market, but it also appears that during this period both rape offenses and female gonorrhea incidence declined dramatically. Prostitution prohibition is mostly due to moral concerns, though disease transmission and victimization risks associa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blueberry vinegar improves memory in mice with amnesia Dementia affects millions of people worldwide, robbing them of their ability to think, remember and live as they once did. In the search for new ways to fight cognitive decline, scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that blueberry vinegar might offer some help. They found that the fermented product could restore cognitive function in mice. Recent studies have shown
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Hunter PlateletsResearchers explore how blood platelets sweep bacteria into aggregate bundles at sites of infection to help phagocytic cells dispose of them.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Moth ResurrectionEntomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sea DinosaurPalaeontologists have discovered the oldest fossil evidence to date for small, stiff-necked, sea-dwelling reptiles.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Plant BulbsScientists infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.
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Ingeniøren

Rapport: Nasa ved slet ikke nok om, hvordan rumfart skader mennesketUSA skal både til Månen og Mars, men mangler en strategi for, hvordan man bruger rumstationen som springbræt til viden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Membranes for the industrial-scale separation of chemical mixtures A superior membrane, with a higher pore density, is produced through synthesizing this polyacrylonitrile nanofiltration membrane using an ionic liquid solvent. Credit: © 2017 Susana Nunes Tailor-made membranes offer a cleaner method for the industrial-scale separation of chemical mixtures, says Suzana Nunes. But first we need to make their manufacture greener. Porous polymeric membranes could rea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish's rapid response to climate change When a chemical alarm cue is released into one of two flumes, the normal response for a fish is to swim down the flume without the chemical. But when the water is more acidic, some fish do not behave normally: instead they swim down the flume that contains the chemical alarm and so toward "danger." Fish born to parents tolerant to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) could have a better chance
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Dagens Medicin

Tre almen medicinere: Derfor har vi valgt almen praksis fra Hver sjette speciallæge i almen medicin arbejder ikke i almen praksis. For lidt tid til for mange opgaver er blandt forklaringerne, som tre almen medicinere på sygehusene nævner overfor Dagens Medicin.
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Sorry, Congress: Your Tax Bill Won't Create the Jobs of the Future Republicans argue that the lower taxes for corporations and wealthy individuals promised in the tax bill currently before Congress will result in new investment in businesses and more jobs. But in the age of artificial intelligence and automation, trickle-down economics won't create employment. What corporations and the US economy at large need most in this emerging era is not more free cash, but
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Ingeniøren

Advarsel: Seneste Ubuntu smadrer BIOS på Lenovo-maskiner Det direkte download-link til den seneste udgave af Ubuntu til desktop er blevet deaktiveret efter forlydender om, at den seneste udgave af styresystemet har smadret BIOS på en stribe Lenovo-computere. På den officielle download-side for Ubuntu, som Canonical står bag, er der nu en tekst i stedet for download-knappen for version 17.10 af Ubuntu: »Download af Ubuntu 17.10 frarådes i øjeblikket på
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New on MIT Technology Review

Europe Unveils Its Vision for a Quantum Future The race to conquer the quantum world is among the most fiercely competitive in technology. China and the U.S. have both invested billions in developing new ways to exploit the strange laws of physics that quantum effects give access to. The promise is a new era of computing and communication and, of course, undreamed-of riches. In all the excitement, one part of the world is being left behind. E
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research reveals England's only resident bottlenose dolphins Credit: University of Plymouth The south-west of England is known as a hotspot for cetaceans but until recently little was known about the bottlenose dolphins glimpsed off the coast. Now new research reveals that the region is home to a resident population of bottlenose dolphins , the first and only such community to be identified in English waters. The study has been conducted by Rebecca Dudley,
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Dolphin pod living year-round off coast of England Image copyright Daniel Murphy Image caption Experts analysed thousands of photographs and sightings of bottlenose dolphins The first resident pod of bottlenose dolphins has been discovered off the south-west coast of England. Experts used thousands of sightings and photos to identify a group of 28 individuals living year-round off the coasts of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. They were identified usi
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Futurity.org

More social anxiety after young teens rejected by dad Teens who face rejection by their fathers tend to experience more social anxiety—and more loneliness—later on, research shows. “We might be overlooking the family as an important piece of cultivating these healthy peer relationships…” The study—conducted by Hio Wa “Grace” Mak, doctoral student of human development and family studies at Penn State—examines how parental rejection, as well as the ov
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Viden

Første førerløse taxa-passagerer er forsikret Et af de helt fundamentale spørgsmål i forbindelse med førerløse biler er forsikring. Hvem har ansvaret, hvis en robotbil forårsager skade på et andet menneske? Og hvad hvis en passager kommer til skade, mens personen befinder sig i en førerløs bil? Det sidste spørgsmål har Googles bildivison, Waymo, fundet en løsning på. Læs også: Bilgigant: Vi har flåde af robot-taxaer klar i 2019 De har indgåe
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Scientific American Content: Global

What Was the Christmas Star? What Was the Christmas Star? Was it a comet? A supernova? A planet? Or some otherwordly phenomenon? Everyday Einstein examines the possibilities. Credit: Christian Cruzado Flickr ( CC BY 2.0 ) Advertisement According to Biblical accounts, 2,000 years ago something appeared in the sky which led a group of wise men to Jerusalem to see the birth of the new king of the Jews. But what was this b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inventing the 'Google' for predictive analytics An illustration of real-world behavioral commonalities in raw data of transactions. Credit: Endor Companies often employ number-crunching data scientists to gather insights such as which customers want certain services or where to open new stores and stock products. Analyzing the data to answer one or two of those queries, however, can take weeks or even months. Now MIT spinout Endor has develope
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study teases out preference for positive news Credit: iStock "If it bleeds, it leads" has been a newsroom dictum for generations. Cable TV's "Crossfire" ushered in the left-right political shouting match in 1982. But new research authored by Ashley Muddiman, University of Kansas assistant professor of communication studies, suggests that consumers may be tiring of the fray and inclined to favor news content that shows politicians reaching ac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: The evolutionary history of men and women should not prevent us from seeking gender equality Studies of twins let us see the contributions that genes, upbringing and culture make to behaviour. Credit: www.shutterstock.com Compared to women, men are more aggressive and enjoy being promiscuous. These are just two examples of the sorts of statements that are linked to research findings from evolutionary psychologists. If such conclusions are accurate, it raises concerns that our biology m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The bluest of iceAcquired on November 29 by Operation IceBridge during a flight to Victoria Land, this image shows an iceberg floating in Antarctica's McMurdo Sound. The part of the iceberg below water appears bluest primarily due to blue light from the water in the Sound.
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Live Science

The Weird Quantum Property of 'Spin' Paul Sutter is an astrophysicist at The Ohio State University and the chief scientist at COSI science center . Sutter is also host of Ask a Spaceman and Space Radio , and leads AstroTours around the world. Sutter contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . You would think that electrons would be easy enough to describe. Mass. Charge. Good to go. Those two littl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nature demonstrates how bacteria degrade lignin and provides better understanding to make biofuels Gene expression of cells grown in lignin and glucose were compared to cells grown in glucose alone at the same time point. Credit: Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory The production of biofuels from plant biomass is a highly promising source of energy, but researchers are trying to find microbes that readily degrade recalcitrant lignin found in plant biomass. Recent comprehensive genomic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gilding technique inspired by ancient Egyptians may spark better fuel cells for tomorrow's electric cars Chao Wang (right) inspects a glass vial containing cobalt cores, each coated with a thin layer of platinum. At left is postdoctoral fellow Lei Wang. Credit: Will Kirk / Homewood Photography To make modern-day fuel cells less expensive and more powerful, a team led by Johns Hopkins chemical engineers has drawn inspiration from the ancient Egyptian tradition of gilding. Egyptian artists at the time
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robotic assistants on the International Space Station NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough is seen executing the SPHERES-RINGS experiment aboard the International Space Station. The investigation uses two small, self-contained satellites (SPHERES) fitted with donut-like rings (RINGS) to test wireless power transfer and formation flight using electromagnetic fields. Credit: NASA Astronaut crew time on the International Space Station is a precious commodity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach to reducing gender inequality at work At a time when many companies are feeling pressured to report on and improve gender inequality within the workforce, a Stanford sociologist is finding success with a new method for reducing the kind of bias that leads to these inequalities. In a recently published paper in Gender & Society , Shelley Correll, director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, explains the method, which she and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early disease diagnosis could be dramatically improved with new detection system Credit: Imperial College London By attaching specialised molecules to the backbone of DNA, researchers have made it easier to detect rare molecules associated with early disease. The presence of, or changes in the concentration of, certain proteins in biological fluids can be indicators of disease . However, in the early stages of disease these 'biomarkers' can be difficult to detect, as they are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell? A normal shaped red blood cell (left) versus a sickle-shaped one. Credit: Imperial College London Scientists have identified the genetic mutations that cause sickle cells in deer, according to new research in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution . The scientists from Imperial College London say although their research is in its early stages, it shows promise that certain species of deer might p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Untouched forests fight climate change, but face threats Dr Qie in the forest. Credit: Imperial College London The world's rainforests take up extra carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but their ability to do so is threatened by drought and fragmentation. Human activities pump extra carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, but only around half of it stays there. The oceans and forests of the world are known to be carbon 'sinks', absorbing much of the excess a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-tech camera helps protect sows and piglets A thermal image of a pig’s surface temperature. ARS scientists used surface temperatures to determine the ideal environmental temperatures for growing pigs. Credit: Tami Brown-Brandl Each animal's growth, development, reproduction, and well-being is critically important for a profitable enterprise. Precision farming allows producers to monitor individual animal feed consumption, movement, tempera
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Vandals damage ancient dinosaur footprint in Australia Image copyright PARKS VICTORIA Image caption The damaged footprint with missing toe sections Vandals have partially destroyed a 115 million year old dinosaur footprint in a national park in Australia. Palaeontologists first discovered the imprint of the theropod dinosaur in a tidal rock platform in Flat Rocks, Victoria in 2006. The area is a well-known dinosaur fossil area and one of the few Ice
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Bees lead the way to farming's futureIf our farms are going to feed a growing planet without hastening climate change, farmers needs to transition to diversified agriculture, argues Claire Kremen, a professor of environmental science, policy and management.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows how seriously investors took the possibility of a democratic revolution during Egypt's Arab Spring A study co-authored by MIT professor Daron Acemoglu shows that demonstrations in Cairo’s Tahrir Square lowered the stock market valuations of politically connected firms — indicating how much people thought a full democratic revolution was possible. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Day after day in early 2011, massive crowds gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square, calling for the ouster o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Plastic fir-tree forestThis image shows how a metal alloy could look like as it solidifies – using a transparent organic mixture as a stand-in for metals. Likened to a 'star rain', the fir tree-like crystallisations that form during the casting of metal alloys are called dendrites. Dendrites can be crucial to the mix – the atomic structures can form a strong and flexible metal or cause a brittle and weak one.
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The Atlantic

America Experiences More Pain Than Other Countries When T.R. Reid, an American reporter, went to his American doctor for an old shoulder injury, he got a very American recommendation. The doctor suggested a total shoulder arthroplasty, a Cadillac of a procedure that would saw off his shoulder joint, replace it with silicon and titanium, and cement it into place. Reid declined, then set off to get the same shoulder treated in five other countries,
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The Atlantic

Where Were Netflix and Google in the Net-Neutrality Fight? The most recent chapter in the debate over net neutrality has been, like previous chapters, cacophonous. One notable difference this time around, though, was the relative quiet of many large tech companies. In previous years, these firms had been outspoken about the issue. What changed? Netflix’s net-neutrality journey is an illuminating example. In 2014, Reed Hastings, the company’s CEO, issued
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The Atlantic

33 Great Songs of 2017 Here’s a wildly incomplete and personal list of pop, rock, hip-hop, and electronic songs I became fascinated by this year, ordered only alphabetically. A Spotify playlist of the songs is here , and my best albums of 2017 are here . “8 Ball,” Waxahatchee Close in the ear, strumming with unnerving precision, Katie Crutchfield plots her escape from some suffocating relationship: “I’ll breathe / I do
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large-scale simulations of quarks promise precise view of reactions of astrophysical importance Two protons (green), after “tunneling’’ through their repulsive electrostatic barrier and undergoing weak and strong interactions, fuse together to produce a deuteron (the lightest nucleus) (yellow), a positron, and a neutrino. Credit: William Detmold The fusion of two protons initiates the primary nuclear cycle that powers the Sun. The rate of this low-energy, weak-interaction fusion is too smal
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World War II's Best Codebreaker Was a Woman One married couple was responsible for the foundations of modern code breaking , and the principles that gave the NSA a head start in cryptanalysis. Though the husband, William Friedman, is usually apportioned the lion’s share of the credit, his wife Elizebeth Friedman was in every way his equal. During World War II, both worked under total secrecy, and only now are we learning about Elizebeth’s
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Chatty Technology Has a Problem One day in 2015, Dan Hon put his toddler, Calvin, on the scale. He was two and a half years old, and he clocked in at 29.2 pounds—up 1.9 pounds from the week before, and smack in the middle of the normal range for his age. Hon didn’t think twice about it. But his scale did. Later that week, Hon received Calvin’s “Weekly Report” from Withings, the company that makes his “smart scale” and accompany
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The Golden State Warriors Owe a Lot to Data “Well, you’re going to have to look down if you want to see the camera.” Travis Schlenk didn’t give off the impression of someone you’d care to defy. Beefy and bald, with a penchant for wearing cowboy boots instead of designer shoes, Schlenk was wrapping up his seventh season with the Warriors when we met on April 13, 2011. It was his second year as the team’s director of player personnel. Two mo
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Why Tech Giants and Telecoms Should Join to Build an Internet for All Last week’s repeal of net neutrality regulations by the Federal Communications Commission generated considerable controversy. Many characterized the decision as a win for telecom and cable companies at the expense of both consumers and content companies. The history of the past decade, however, is that all those companies have been winners, with a massive consolidation of control and profit in th
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Driving Volkswagen's New Buzz Electric Microbus Volkswagen harbors electric aspirations, and it wants the world to know. Furthermore, it would prefer if the world forgot all about Dieselgate—you know, when the company sold 11 million cars all over the world designed to cheat emissions tests and pollute far beyond legal limits. Now, however, it's moving away from dirty diesel, and getting into batteries, with plans to introduce 30 new electric
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Can Science Keep Deep Sea Miners From Ruining the Seafloor? Ocean explorers and entrepreneurs have been thinking about how to scoop up mineral-laden deposits on the seafloor since the HMS Challenger dragged a few up in a bucket during its globe-trotting scientific voyage in the 1870s. A century later, the CIA used deep sea mining as a cover story for a secretive plan to recover a sunken Russian nuclear sub. Now, it’s a serious engineering proposition. Com
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Twitter Has Officially Replaced the Town Square In 2011, a few days after yet another major protest in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Sana (not her real name) and I sat in a coffee shop close to the square where so much had happened in a few months. In the immediate aftermath of Hosni Mubarak’s resignation, the protesters’ spirit and optimism seemed to shine on everything. Even corporate advertisers were using the theme of revolution to sell sof
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

LLNL-developed Petawatt Laser Installed at ELI Beamlines The L3-HAPLS laser system, installed at the ELI Beamlines Research Center in Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The L3-HAPLS advanced petawatt laser system was installed last week at the ELI Beamlines Research Center in Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic. L3-HAPLS – the world's most advanced and highest average power, diode-pumped petawatt laser system—was de
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BBC News - Science & Environment

What's hiding in my dust?Scientists have found thousands of new species living in household dust.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The scientist who paints lost worldsDr Julian Hume draws extinct animals with scientific accuracy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in debate on recent increase in atmospheric methane The amount of the greenhouse gas methane in the atmosphere is once again increasing rapidly after a period of stagnation through 2007. The cause of this recent increase is the subject of heated scientific debate. Scenarios in which the increase was due to either fossil energy mining or agriculture seemed to exclude one another as the likely cause. A new study by Dutch and American climate scienti
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Live Science

Underground Castles? How Desert Spiders Craft Vertical Tunnels A Cebrennus rechenbergi emerges from its burrow. It carries a load of dry sand (left) and disperses the sand load close to the burrow entrance (right), where the seemingly compact ball of sand disintegrates into single grains. Credit: Courtesy of Rainer Foelix Beachgoing sandcastle builders know the exquisite frustration of tunneling into sand that's too dry. The tunnel simply won't hold its sh
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Scientific American Content: Global

Fighting Depression with Magnets Depression and antidepressant use are at all-time highs in the year 2017, but for about a third of those affected, depression still doesn’t get better with medication—and for these patients, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which uses powerful magnets to stimulate brain cells noninvasively, can be a viable option. To be clear, TMS isn’t new; it was first approved by the FDA in 2008. W
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Habitable planets around pulsars theoretically possible Credit: Astronomie.nl It is theoretically possible that habitable planets exist around pulsars. Such planets must have an enormous atmosphere that convert the deadly X-rays and high energy particles of the pulsar into heat. This is the conclusion of a paper by astronomers Alessandro Patruno and Mihkel Kama, working in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The paper appears today in the journal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Halloween asteroid prepares to return in 2018 Artist´s impression of the Halloween asteroid 2015 TB145, which resembles a human skull in certain light conditions. Credit: J. A. Peñas/SINC There is one year to go until asteroid 2015 TB145 approaches Earth once again, just as it did in 2015 around the night of Halloween, during which astronomers studied its characteristics. This dark object measures between 625 and 700 metres; its rotation per
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Meet the Unlikely Hero Who Predicted Hurricane Harvey's Floods On August 24 at 8:20 pm, a 44-year-old moonlighting meteorologist named Eric Berger was nearly finished writing a post for his Houston-centric blog, Space City Weather , titled “ Harvey Late Night: Some Final Thursday Thoughts .” He was in his home office. He had just poured himself a glass of cabernet. He had been looking at the online forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and agreed with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More complex biological systems evolve more freely First author Mato Lagator is analyzing the phenotype of a sample of E.Coli mutants. Credit: IST Austria Our genes (aka. the genotype) determine our characteristics (aka. the phenotype). Evolution acts on changes in the phenotype, which occur when mutations change the underlying genotype. But what changes to the phenotype can be produced by mutations is not without bounds—ants cannot suddenly grow
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nearly zero-energy buildings remain a difficult challenge for Southern Europe Thermal image of a Basque Country building in the 70s, where heat loss is evidenced due to lack of insulation. Credit: (Juan María Hidalgo / UPV/EHU) In coming years, there is a legal commitment for all the countries of Europe to improve the energy efficiency of buildings, which boils down to constructing nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEBs), buildings that consume the minimum energy. The EU Dire
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of ruins of ancient Turkic monument surrounded by 14 pillars with inscriptions Drone aerial shot of the ancient Turkish ruins on Dongoin shiree. (North at the top.) Segments of the inscriptions and sarcophagus excavated from the hole at the center of the ruins can be seen. (September 2016) Credit: Osaka University and Institute of History and Archaeology, Mongolian Academy of Science A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electromagnetic emissions from smartphones analyzed for security vulnerability This study of the UC3M and the CSIC analyzes the vulnerabilities of smartphones. Credit: UC3M A platform to improve smartphone security and that of other electronic devices was recently presented in Canada in an international conference on security and privacy, the Workshop on Security and Privacy on Internet of Things. The research focuses on "lateral movement attacks," which happen when "someon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese scientists reveal a novel signaling pathway for cold tolerance in rice OsMAPK3-OsbHLH002-OsTPP1 pathway mediates the chilling tolerance in rice. Credit: XU Yunyuan The ability of plants to tolerate cold stress is fundamental in determining the growing season and geographical distribution of plants. Local temperature anomalies caused by global climate change directly threaten crop production. Improvement of cold tolerance in rice varieties requires clarifying the reg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biofilms as construction workers Biofilms are generally seen as a problem to be eradicated due to the hazards they pose for humans and materials. However, these communities of algae, fungi or bacteria possess interesting properties both from a scientific and a technical standpoint. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes processes from the field of biology that utilize biofilms to create structural templat
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Science | The Guardian

Loud orgies of Mexican fish could deafen dolphins, say scientists A species of Mexican fish amasses in reproductive orgies so loud they can deafen other sea animals, awed scientists have said, calling for preservation of the “spectacle” threatened by overfishing. An individual spawning Gulf corvina, say the researchers, utters a mating call resembling “a really loud machine gun” with multiple rapid sound pulses. Overfishing and climate change push seabirds to e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study resolves controversy about electron structure of defects in graphene Credit: AlexanderAlUS/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 A study conducted at the University of São Paulo's Physics Institute (IF-USP), Brazil, has resolved a longstanding controversy regarding defects in graphene. The controversy is related to the calculation of the overall electronic structure of defects. This configuration, which comprises many variables, was described in different ways depending on the r
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NYT > Science

Beavers Emerge as Agents of Arctic Destruction Photo A North American beaver in Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Credit Morgan Trimble, via Getty Images Want the latest climate news in your inbox? You can sign up here to receive Climate Fwd: , our new email newsletter. Even as climate change shrinks some populations of arctic animals like polar bears and caribou, beavers may be taking advantage of warming temperatures to expand th
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Science | The Guardian

DIY Crispr: biohacking your own genome – Science Weekly podcast With do-it-yourself Crispr kits now available online, Hannah Devlin asks if it’s really possible to edit your own DNA, is it safe and how should it be regulated? Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In October, biohacker Josiah Zayner gave a lecture in San Francisco in which he claimed to be the first person kno
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Ingeniøren

Fejl i vandanalyser fra søer og vandløb er fortsat ikke fundet Det er uvist, om analyserne af kvælstof og total fosfor i vandprøver fra søer, vandløb og danske farvande gennem de seneste år har været fejlagtige, fordi laboratorierne har anvendt forkerte analysemetoder. Lige nu er DCE - Nationalt Center for Miljø og Energi ved Aarhus Universitet på vegne af Miljøstyrelsen i gang med at gennemgå de analysemetoder, som de eksterne laboratorier har anvendt i per
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

DIY Crispr: biohacking your own genome – Science Weekly podcastWith do-it-yourself Crispr kits now available online, Hannah Devlin asks if it’s really possible to edit your own DNA, is it safe and how should it be regulated?
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Ingeniøren

GRAFIK: Verdens stejleste kabelbane har vandrette gulve I et perfekt eksempel på schweizisk ingeniørkunst er en af verdens stejleste kabelbaner åbnet i den schweiziske by Schwyz-Stoos. Kabelbanen når en maksimal stigning på 47,7 º (110%), men på trods af den stejle stigning, vil passagererne hverken sidde ned eller være fastspændt. For vognene vil altid være vandrette. Og netop her kommer den bemærkelsesværdige ingeniørbedrift ind i billedet. For kupe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study suggests health benefits of swapping animal proteins for plant proteins IMAGE: Substituting one to two servings of animal proteins with plant proteins every day could lead to a small reduction in the three main cholesterol markers for cardiovascular disease prevention, according... view more Credit: Courtesy of St. Michael's Hospital TORONTO, Dec. 20, 2017--Substituting one to two servings of animal proteins with plant proteins every day could lead to a small r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unmarried heart patients face higher risk of deathCompared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying. This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population.
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Science : NPR

How Racism May Cause Black Mothers To Suffer The Death Of Their Infants Samantha Pierce of Cleveland has a 7-year-old daughter, Camryn. In 2009, Pierce gave premature birth to twins. The babies did not survive. Scientists say black women lead more stressful lives, which makes them more likely to give birth prematurely and puts their babies at risk of dying. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption toggle caption Dustin Franz for NPR Samantha Pierce of Cleveland has a 7-year
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Science : NPR

For Alaskan Coastal Village, Erosion Hits Home During a storm, the Alaskan village of Newtok can lose 10 to 20 feet of tundra. Erosion is getting worse because of warming temperatures and record low sea ice. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption toggle caption Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk During a storm, the Alaskan village of Newtok can lose 10 to 20 feet of tundra. Erosion is getting worse because of warming temperatures
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Ingeniøren

Bitcoins anonyme bagmand blandt verdens 50 rigeste i mindre end et døgn Da bitcoin i søndags var på sit endnu højeste, 19,771 dollars, var personen eller personerne bag, kort blandt verdens 50 rigeste. Det skriver Quartz . Satoshi Nakamoto, som er det pseudonym, som bitcoins skaber(re) gemmer sig bag, ejer i omegnen af 980.000 bitcoins , hvilket med søndagens værdi gav bagmændene en værdi på svimlende 19.4 milliarder dollars. Det gav Nakamoto en plads som verdens 44.
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Ingeniøren

Facebook: I bytte for dit ansigt bliver du advaret, når folk uploader et billede af dig I de enorme softwarevirksomheders jagt på forbrugernes ansigter til det endnu større og næsten guldbelagte databaser, har Facebook nu fremlagt et nyt tilbud for at få brugerne til at tilføje sig selv. For i bytte for dit ansigt til Facebooks database vil det sociale medie advare dig, når noget uploader et billede, hvori du indgår. Det skriver Reuters . Selskabet udtalte selv, at tilbuddet vil vær
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Science | The Guardian

Top 10 books about the unconscious T o what extent are our conscious intentions and strategies in control of our choices and decisions, our feelings and actions? The 20th century provided three different answers to this basic existential question: Freud’s psychodynamic theory placed a hidden and self-destructive unconscious mind in charge; Skinner and the behaviourists put control instead with the outside stimulus environment. Fin
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Ingeniøren

Teslas australske megabatteri har allerede vist sit værd Australske elforbrugere kan være godt tilfredse i denne tid. Ikke fordi det er jul, men fordi julens stegning og andet elforbrug ikke bliver forstyrret af irriterende strømafbrydelse i nær samme grad som tidligere. Det kan de takke det nye megabatteri fra Tesla for. Det blev installeret og sat officielt i drift 1. december i år. Batteriet er på 100 MW og 129 MWh og kan, fordi det består af litium
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish sex so loud it could deafen dolphins Credit: Brad Erisman A species of Mexican fish amasses in reproductive orgies so loud they can deafen other sea animals, awed scientists said Wednesday, calling for preservation of the "spectacle" threatened by overfishing. An individual spawning Gulf corvina, said the research team, utters a mating call resembling "a really loud machine gun", with multiple, rapid sound pulses. And when hundreds
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scuba-diving Santa Claus delights children in San Francisco Coral reefs provide protection for islands, billions of dollars in economic value, and a dazzling array of biodiversity. Keeping reefs healthy is an important job, and one particular group of herbivorous fish and invertebrates ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservation group says Japan aiding in illegal ivory tradeA conservation group says Japan's lax controls over its domestic stock of ivory are encouraging illegal exports to other countries and undermining efforts to end trafficking in elephant tusks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High nighttime temperatures negatively impact canola plant production Canola flowers opening under control and high nighttime temperature are marked. This allows the researchers to understand the different impacts of stress on yield. Credit: Meghnath Pokharel. Plants don't sleep like humans do—but just like some people don't rest well in the heat, some plants don't either. The canola plant isn't as productive if the temperature is high at nighttime, and scientists
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lower class wiser about interpersonal conflict than middle class: study Credit: CC0 Public Domain New research from the University of Waterloo finds that lower class populations are wiser than their middle-class counterparts in their ability to reason about interpersonal matters. The study measures wisdom as the ability to be open-minded, intellectually humble and integrate different perspectives on the issue people reflect on. In comparing social classes and their a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists simulate the climate of Game of Thrones The world of Game of Thrones, showing the positions of the continents over the globe. Light blue represents the ocean, and the colour scale over the continents shows the height of the mountains and hills. This information is needed by the climate model because the surface characteristics such as height and reflectivity have a strong influence on atmospheric winds and temperature. Credit: Dan Lunt
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Science | The Guardian

‘Drugs are too expensive for the NHS – and people are paying with their lives’ | Robert Hart A rms aloft, activist and breast cancer patient Emma Robertson emerged from the UK headquarters of pharmaceutical giant Pfizer last month wearing a bright blue T-shirt. Emblazoned on the back in bold yellow letters were the words: “No drug should ever cost a life”. Cancer drug companies cut prices to win NHS approval Thirty minutes earlier she had snatched a pen from my hands. “I can’t believe I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change may favor large plant eaters over small competitors A new study shows that climate change that significantly decreases plant quality grants a competitive advantage to larger invertebrate herbivores, such as grasshoppers, who can convert the foliage to energy more efficiently than smaller herbivores. Credit: Andrew v. F. Block In the drive to survive changing climates, larger herbivores may fare slightly better than their smaller competitors, accor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Device may save seabirds from the dangers of fishing gearA new Animal Conservation article summarizing 4 years of study found that a device called the Hookpod can help prevent birds from being inadvertently caught by fishermen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Timing of regulatory stick and supportive carrot may keep businesses focused The researchers found in a study that when punitive measures from regulatory agencies were followed by help from business support organizations, companies were more likely to stick to voluntary improvement projects than when these projects were followed by punitive regulatory action Credit: Penn State Coordinating the stick of regulation with the carrot of technical assistance may help small comp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predatorsA new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

XSEDE supercomputer allocations on Stampede1 and Comet help sample protein folding in bone regeneration study XSEDE supercomputers Stampede at TACC and Comet at SDSC helped study authors simulate the head piece domain of the cell membrane protein receptor integrin in solution, based on molecular dynamics modeling. Credit: Davoud Ebrahimi Some secrets to repair our skeletons might be found in the silky webs of spiders, according to recent experiments guided by supercomputers. Scientists involved say their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Acoustic device makes piezoelectrics sing to a different tune In today's "internet of things," devices connect primarily over short ranges at high speeds, an environment in which surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have shown promise for years, resulting in the shrinking size of your smartphone. To obtain ever faster speeds, however, SAW devices need to operate at higher frequencies, which limits output power and can deteriorate overall performance. A new S
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Science | The Guardian

Make way for megamarsupials: the migration of Australia's extinct megafauna Perhaps nowhere is the debate regarding the causes of megafaunal extinction more prominent than in Australia. During the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs, a magnificent suite of giant marsupials (mammals who carry their young in a pouch), reptiles and birds roamed Australia, only to meet their demise at the end of the Pleistocene. Why these behemoths disappeared has been, and continues to be, the
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Ingeniøren

Spiludvikling i Danmark er i vækst - men salget af spil er sløjt 2017 var et godt år for spil og spiludvikling i Danmark. Det danske mobilspil Subway Surfers blev downloadet til milliarder af telefoner, 12.000 mennesker var til Counter-Strike turnering i København, og der bliver udgivet flere danske spil end nogensinde før. »Spilbranchen er modnet markant de seneste par år, og på grund af en øget produktivitet ser den mere professionel ud,« siger Sofie Filt Læ
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Ingeniøren

Sikkerhedsekspert: Smid din gamle Android-mobil ud Teleselskabet 3 er ifølge dem selv første danske mobiloperatør i Danmark, som flytter kunderne over på internetprotokollen IPv6. IPv6 er efterfølgeren til den nuværende standard IPv4, som er den protokol, der har ansvaret for at bære internet-pakker rundt på netværket. IPv6 løser en række problemer ved IPv4, som for eksempel antallet af mulige IP-adresser, der mangedobles i den nye version. Overf
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Ingeniøren

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 20. december Er du klar til dagens spørgsmål? Blandt alle, der svarer rigtigt, trækker vi lod om et gavekort på 500 kr. For hvert rigtigt svar optjenes der samtidig lodder til den store trækning d. 24. december, hvor hovedpræmien er et gavekort på 10.000 kr. Dagens spørgsmål: I foråret besluttede regeringen og DUC, at flere af platformene i Tyrafeltet skal renoveres. Blandt andet skal flere af platformene hæv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aggression in childhood: Rooted in genetics, influenced by the environment MONTREAL, December 20, 2017 - Over the past few months, many local cases of assault and harassment have come to light and been widely discussed in the news, both here and in the U.S. and Europe. Why do people have these types of aggressive impulses? To look for an answer, Stéphane Paquin, a PhD candidate in sociology at Université de Montréal working under the supervision of Éric Lacourse and Mar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lower class wiser about interpersonal conflict than middle class New research from the University of Waterloo finds that lower class populations are wiser than their middle-class counterparts in their ability to reason about interpersonal matters. The study measures wisdom as the ability to be open-minded, intellectually humble and integrate different perspectives on the issue people reflect on. In comparing social classes and their associated wisdom, the stud
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UofL, Harvard, USF provide model for medical schools to teach signs of human trafficking As many as 88 percent of human trafficking victims in the United States interact with a health care professional while they are being exploited. These professionals' ability to recognize the signs of human trafficking and intervene appropriately, however, is lacking due to an absence of training. A new medical school curriculum to fill this training gap has been proposed and tested by researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No rest for weary canola plants Plants don't sleep like humans do--but just like some people don't rest well in the heat, some plants don't either. The canola plant isn't as productive if the temperature is high at nighttime, and scientists are trying to find out why. You might know canola from the canola oil on grocery store shelves. The plant grows to be between 3-5 feet tall with small yellow flowers. The resulting seeds are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoking cessation drug may increase risk of adverse cardiovascular event IMAGE: Common drug in smoking cessation treatment may increase stroke risk. view more Credit: ATS Varenicline, one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for helping people quit smoking, may put them at higher risk for a cardiovascular event, according to new research published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine . In " Cardiovascular and Neuropsychiatric E
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. Jackals are opportunistic predators, eating whatever prey is available, including rodents and insect
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Device may save seabirds from the dangers of fishing gear IMAGE: This is the Brazil hand cast Gianuca Projeto Albatroz. view more Credit: Brazil hand cast Gianuca Projeto Albatroz A new Animal Conservation article summarizing 4 years of study found that a device called the Hookpod can help prevent birds from being inadvertently caught by fishermen. Investigators note that 15 of 22 albatross species are threatened with extinction, and a major threa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Community factors and social connection may determine whether sexual minority parents view their community as tolerant versus supportive A new Family Relations study has found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) parents feel more positive about where they live when that place is more legally, politically, and religiously supportive of LGB people; when there are more LGB-friendly employers; and when there are other LBG-headed households. Community characteristics alone, however, did not determine perceived climate, as LGB parents
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Running away from addiction: How exercise aids smoking cessation New research in mice sheds light on the mechanism underlining exercise's protective effect against nicotine dependence and withdrawal. The British Journal of Pharmacology study reveals that exercise during nicotine exposure markedly reduces the severity of nicotine withdrawal symptoms, an effect that is accompanied by increased activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (which are targe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers examine social functioning in middle-aged adults with autism spectrum disorders A new Autism Research report describes the social functioning of 169 adults with autism spectrum disorders in mid-life who were first identified with autism in childhood in the 1980s. Participants spanned all levels of cognitive and functional ability, with more than 75% functioning in the cognitively impaired range. The report provides detailed information regarding employment outcomes, social r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies provide new insights on mosquito-borne chikungunya virus infection The frequency of chronic joint pain after infection with chikungunya in a large Latin American cohort was 25% at a median of 20-months post-infection. In the Arthritis & Rheumatology study, significant predictors of persistent joint pain included being a college graduate, headache, knee pain, missed work, normal activities effected, four or more days of initial symptoms, and four or more weeks of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review sheds light on prostate orgasms A new Clinical Anatomy review notes that stimulating the prostate via the rectal wall can create ecstatic feelings in men that are exceptionally pleasurable, often surpassing those obtained by stimulation of the penis. The review also describes what we know about the anatomy and physiology of the prostate and its involvement in reproduction. "The scientific study of orgasm has always been challen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes, but not diabetes drug, linked to poor pregnancy outcomes New research indicates that pregnant women with pre-gestational diabetes who take metformin are at a higher risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes--such as major birth defects and pregnancy loss--than the general population, but their increased risk is not due to metformin but diabetes. The findings come from a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study including 471 women in the metformin group
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor oral health may put older individuals at increased risk of frailty The presence of oral health problems was linked with greater risks of being frail and developing frailty in older age in a recent Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study. In the study that included 1622 older men, complete tooth loss, dry mouth, and cumulative oral health problems were associated with incidence of frailty independent of socioeconomic factors and comorbidities. The findin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tics are common in famous boys choir 'Tis the season for choirs to raise their voices in holiday song. A new Annals of Neurology study shows that there is a high frequency of tics in an extremely highly achieving group of pre-pubertal singers. 35% of 40 young singers in the Boys Choir exhibited tics during a public concert of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. The findings illustrate that there may be a relation between ticcing and profes
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cognitive science

Direct electrical stimulation of the amygdala enhances declarative memory in humans A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Contraceptive Gel for Men Is About to Go on Trial After more than a decade of work, government researchers in the U.S. are ready to test an unusual birth control method for men—a topical gel that could prevent the production of sperm. And no, gentlemen, you don’t rub it on your genitals. The clinical trial, which begins in April and will run for about four years, will be the largest effort in the U.S. to test a hormonal form of birth control for
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Science | The Guardian

Tiny marsupial believed extinct in NSW rediscovered by scientists A tiny carnivorous marsupial that was presumed extinct in New South Wales has been discovered just inside the border, two years before scientists planned to reintroduce it. The juvenile female crest-tailed mulgara, Dasycercus cristicauda , was caught in a trap in November by University of New South Wales researchers working on the Wild Deserts project, which aims to reintroduce long-absent marsup
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Live Science

Mount Vesuvius & Pompeii: Facts & History Mount Vesuvius, on the west coast of Italy, is the only active volcano on mainland Europe. It is best known because of the eruption in A.D. 79 that destroyed the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, but Vesuvius has erupted more than 50 times . Mount Vesuvius facts Vesuvius in 2013 was 4,203 feet (1,281 meters) tall. After each eruption, the size of the cone changes, according to Encyclop
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Ingeniøren

Nyt firma vil udfordre konsulenthuse og give ingeniører frihedEn dansk virksomheder vil at være matchmaker mellem arbejdsgivere og tekniske konsulenter. Firmaet automatiserer rekrutteringsprocessen og håber at lokke tusinde af jobsøgere ind i folden i 2018.
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Ingeniøren

Snart er det slut med fysiske sim-kort til telefonen Inden længe er det slut med at lirke sim-kort lavet af plastik og chips på plads i mobiltelefonen. Det såkaldte ‘subscriber identity module’, der identificerer forbindelsen over for det trådløse telefonnetværk, vil i fremtiden være en lille chip inden i udstyret. Den nye teknologi kommer ikke kun telefoner og deres ejere til gavn. Den vil i høj grad også være rettet mod IoT-udstyr, hvor manuel ko
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mechanism behind metabolic vulnerability of some breast cancersMany cancer cells are relatively sensitive to the deprivation of an essential amino acid known as methionine. Now, a new study has elucidated one mechanism behind that dependency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Silky secrets to make bonesA study activated genes in human stem cells that initiate biomineralization, a key step in bone formation, according to a science team. Scientists engineered spider web silk combined with silica to activate cell membrane protein receptor integrin. The research will help scientists model intracellular pathways that govern bone formation and efforts to cure diseases such as osteoporosis and calcific
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robotic device improves balance and gait in Parkinson's disease patientsMedical researchers have found that a single session of perturbation-based training, using their Tethered Pelvic Assist Device, increased stability of patients during walking while exposed to unexpected perturbations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Underactive thyroid within normal range may affect woman's ability to conceiveNew research suggests that a slightly underactive thyroid may affect a women's ability to become pregnant -- even when the gland is functioning at the low end of the normal range.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny red animals dart in the dark under the ice of a frozen Quebec lakeIn a frozen lake in Quebec, tiny red creatures zip about under the ice. Biologists report the discovery of active, unusually red, life in a winter lake. Bright pigment may preserve zooplankton's fatty acids from oxidative damage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Songbirds may hold the secret to how babies learn to speakA new study of songbirds may reveal how people learn complex behaviors, including speech, suggests a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dysfunctional gene may be culprit in some Crohn's disease casesScientists hope that understanding how immune cells adapt as they enter different tissues will spur the design of better, more specific, medicines for Crohn's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some newborns with chronic illness show signs of serious sleep problems at birthNew parents often hear about how important sleep is for their babies' development -- but some newborns may have more serious sleep challenges than others. A new study finds that babies with spina bifida have early symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing that could contribute to lifelong issues with neurodevelopment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How can we best help vulnerable young people?The recipe for success in helping young vulnerable people relies on three ingredients being permanently in place, research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cigarette smoking is increasing among Americans with drug problemsWhile cigarette smoking has declined in the US for the past several decades, since 2002 the prevalence of smoking has increased significantly among people with an illicit substance use disorder, according to a new study. Researchers found more than half of individuals with a substance use disorder (56 percent) reported cigarette use in the past month, compared with 18 percent of those without a su
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NYT > Science

Finalists in NASA’s Spacecraft Sweepstakes: A Drone on Titan, and a Comet-Chaser Proposal for the moon Photo The blue region is the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Earth’s moon, the scar of a cataclysmic impact more than 4 billion years ago. Credit NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center The South Pole-Aitken Basin on the moon has long been on the wish list of destinations for planetary scientists. The basin, 1,600 miles wide and eight miles deep, is the scar of a cataclysmic impact
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Popular Science

Planetariums seem old-school, but they have a surprisingly lively future It felt like being on a third grade field trip again—in a good way. I was dwarfed by the perforated aluminum dome of the new Jennifer Chalsty Planetarium at the Liberty Science Center, just across the river from Manhattan. Reaching 60 feet from the floor to the top of the dome, and with a diameter of 89 feet, the recently opened planetarium is the largest in the Western Hemisphere, beaten only by
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Futurity.org

To fight the opioid epidemic, take drug makers to court? Litigation against drug manufacturers that produce and distribute opioids could be a promising option in the fight against the opioid addiction crisis, according to a new article. In the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine , Rebecca Haffajee of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, along with Michelle Mello of Stanford University, analyze the history of litigation e
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Futurity.org

How card-playing A.I. beat top poker pros An artificial intelligence called Libratus beat four top professional poker players in No-Limit Texas Hold’em by breaking the game into smaller, more manageable parts and adjusting its strategy as play progressed during the competition, researchers report. In a new paper in Science , Tuomas Sandholm, professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, and Noam Brown, a PhD student in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists simulate the climate of Game of Thrones IMAGE: The world of Game of Thrones, showing the positions of the continents over the globe. Light blue represents the ocean, and the colour scale over the continents shows the... view more Credit: Dan Lunt, University of Bristol Winter is coming.....as anyone who watches the hit TV series, Game of Thrones, knows. Some even have their own theories for what causes the strange extende
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pesticides and poor nutrition damage animal health The combined effects of pesticides and a lack of nutrition form a deadly one-two punch, new research from biologists at the University of California San Diego has shown for the first time. In a study published Dec. 20 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Simone Tosi, James Nieh and their colleagues used honey bees due to their important role as agricultural pollinators and "bioindicators" of en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pesticides and poor nutrition damage animal health A bee eats dandelion nectar. Credit: Simone Tosi, UC San Diego The combined effects of pesticides and a lack of nutrition form a deadly one-two punch, new research from biologists at the University of California San Diego has shown for the first time. In a study published Dec. 20 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , Simone Tosi, James Nieh and their colleagues used honey bees due to their impo
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Futurity.org

Layer of precious metal could make fuel cells cheaper Applying a tiny coating of costly platinum just 1 nanometer thick—about 1/100,000th the width of a human hair—to a core of much cheaper cobalt could bring down the cost of fuel cells. “The idea is to put a little bit of the precious treasure on top of the cheap stuff.” This microscopic marriage could become a crucial catalyst in new fuel cells that use generate electricity from hydrogen fuel to p
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Futurity.org

Do nuclear weapons make us more or less safe? Do nuclear weapons keep us safe? “Today there are tensions between the United States and Russia; there are tensions between the United States and China. And these are being exacerbated, not reduced, by nuclear weapons,” says Waheguru Pal Sidhu, clinical associate professor at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs, who tackles the question in this video. “Perhaps the most underrated chal
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Viden

Skildpadde er blandt 100 nye arter i Mekong-regionen (Foto: Kort: Google Grafik: Morten Fogde Christensen © DR Nyheder) En vietnamesisk "krokodilleøgle" og en thailandsk skildpadde er blandt de mere end 100 nye arter, som er blevet opdaget i den biologisk mangfoldige, men truede region omkring floden Mekong. Floden snor sig fra Tibets højland til Det Sydkinesiske Hav og løber gennem Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodja, Laos og Vietnam. Men der er frygt for
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Futurity.org

About 1 in 6 U.K. parents let their young teens drink In the United Kingdom, 17 percent of parents allow their 13- to 14-year-old children to drink alcohol, according to a new study. The finding comes from an analysis of data from the University College of London Institute of Education’s ongoing Millennium Cohort Study, which has followed more than 10,000 UK children and their parents since infancy. “We need to see better guidance offered to parents
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Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

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