Futurity.org

Art preserves Ganda, the pope’s regifted rhino The tale of one of the most infamous Christmas gifts of all time—Ganda the rhino, a gift to Pope Leo X that drowned in 1515—lives on in one of the most influential images in art history and is also the focus of a new book coming out this spring. “Ganda the rhino, was sent by Sultan Muzaffar Shah II of Cambay to King Manuel I of Portugal as a diplomatic gift,” says Giorgio Riello, the book’s autho
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prehistoric bling? Aesthetics crucial factor in development of earliest copper alloys Gold from the richest grave in the cemetery at the 5th millennium site of Varna, Bulgaria. This grave contains c.3kg of gold items decorating the body of the deceased. Varna is considered one of the key archaeological sites in world prehistory. Credit: E. Pernicka While studies of ancient gold metallurgy and the colour characteristics of gold alloys are well supported by modern research, the colo
1d
Futurity.org

Eggs may give baby brains a boost Feeding eggs to babies may give them key nutrients for brain development, a new study suggests. Researchers found that babies who first ate eggs beginning at 6 months showed significantly higher blood concentrations of choline, other biomarkers in choline pathways, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Choline (a nutrient that acts like vitamin B) and DHA (an omega-3 fatty acid that serves as a structu
1d
Popular Science

A casual's guide to console gaming The holidays are a great time for video games. Console makers drop the prices on their machines in hopes people will give them as gifts. Kids all the way up to college are on break, so online matches fire quickly. And all the great new games are out in the world. But navigating the landscape of console gaming can be tough, especially if the last time you bought a console was when the Nintendo 64
1d
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Bike Down a Deadly Road | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Fernando Jordan, a fearless mountain biker in La Paz, Bolivia. Known as "The Death Road", Fernando choses this road as his playground. Here he expertly guides thrill seekers who come from all around the world to drop into one of earth's deadliest paths. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content downlo
1d
Big Think

The Universe Shouldn’t Exist, CERN Scientists Announce Thank your lucky stars you’re alive. It’s truly a miracle of nature. This has nothing to do with spirituality or religion and everything to do with science. Life itself may not be the miracle. Although we haven’t found it elsewhere yet, our galaxy alone is so replete with Earth-like planets that, mathematically speaking, one of them must hold life, even if it’s just the microbial variety. Intelli
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wheat disease breakthrough to help feed the worldFamine may be largely a thing of the past but in recent years the re-emergence of a disease that can kill wheat -- which provides a fifth of humanity's food -- has threatened food security; now a wheat stem rust breakthrough is being announced.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motionFish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the human ear sense a range of sounds.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human impacts on forests and grasslands much larger and older than previously assumedHuman biomass utilization reduces global carbon stocks in vegetation by 50%, implying that massive emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere have occurred over the past centuries and millennia. The contribution of forest management and livestock grazing on natural grasslands to global carbon losses is of similar magnitude as that of deforestation. Currently, these effects are underappreciated in existing
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team maps magnetic fields of bacterial cells and nano-objects for the first time Left: Schematic of the off-axis electron holography using a fluid cell. Right: (A)Hologram of a magnetite nanocrystal chain released from a magnetotacticbacterium, and (B) corresponding magnetic induction map. Credit: US Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory A research team led by a scientist from the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that the magneti
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mathematical model reveals solution to sloshing coffee Credit: CC0 Public Domain Americans drink an average of 3.1 cups of coffee per day; for many people, the popular beverage is a morning necessity. When carrying a liquid, common sense says to walk slowly and refrain from overfilling the container. But when commuters rush out the door with coffee in hand, chances are their hastiness causes some of the hot liquid to slosh out of the cup. The resulti
1d
Big Think

How to Outsmart Your Brain's Inbuilt Xenophobia Oxytocin is sometimes marketed as a wonder hormone. This “trust molecule,” which acts a neurotransmitter in your brain, plays a role in mother-child bonding and is implicated in helping promote empathy and generosity. It is especially popular in modern lore for its role in sex: the “love hormone” is stimulated when hugging, kissing, and copulating. It is also delivered via breast milk, hushing
1d
Popular Science

Books to give kids who love science Sure, the kids in your life are going to get toys, but you'd like them to learn something over the holiday break, too. Here are some great books for kids of all ages to enjoy. Ever get asked a question that only an astronaut can answer? In Ask an Astronaut: My Guide to Life in Space British astronaut Tim Peake answers all your burning space questions, including the grossest thing about living in
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

West African dolphin now listed as one of Africa's rarest mammals A mother-and-calf pair of Atlantic humpback dolphins. A group of scientists now considers this little-known dolphin to be among the Africa's most endangered mammals. Credit: T. Collins/WCS A group of scientists now considers a little-known dolphin that only lives along the Atlantic coasts of Western Africa to be among the continent's most endangered mammals, a list that includes widely recognized
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Memristors power quick-learning neural network Reservoir computing system based on a memristor array. a Schematic of an RC system, showing the reservoir with internal dynamics and a readout function. Only the weight matrix Θ connecting the reservoir state x(t) and the output y(t) needs to be trained. b Response of a typical WO x memristor to a pulse stream with different time intervals between pulses. Inset: image of the memristor array wired
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feathering the plasma nest: Tiny structures help prevent short circuits in plasma devices Physicist Charles Swanson. Credit: Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications Physicists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found a way to prevent plasma—the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei—from causing short circuits in machines such as spacecraft thrusters, radar amplifiers, and particle accelerators. In findings published online in
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients have an important voice in shaping kidney disease research and treatment Washington, DC (December 21, 2017) -- In an effort to provide patients the opportunity to share practical health consumer perspectives, the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) is including Patient Voice editorials that will accompany certain journal articles. In the first editorial, Paul T. Conway, a past recipient of the ASN President's medal, highlights 2 CJASN articl
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Star in the constellation Pisces is 'eating' planetsAstronomers have discovered that a distant star called RZ Picseum in the constellation Pisces is crushing one or more planets into its orbit into a vast cloud of gas and dust.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An integrated assessment of vascular plants species of the AmericasBotanists have compiled a comprehensive, searchable checklist of 124,993 species, 6,227 genera and 355 families of vascular plants of the Americas. This represents one third of all known vascular plants worldwide.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hotter temperatures will accelerate migration of asylum-seekers to EuropeResearchers predict a rising number of asylum-seekers to the EU as global temperatures increase.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut reaction: Repeated mild food poisoning triggers chronic diseaseSmall bacterial infections that may go unnoticed and which the body easily clears without treatment, such as occurs during mild food poisoning, nevertheless can start a chain of events that leads to chronic inflammation and potentially life-threatening colitis.
1d
NYT > Science

Georgia, Facing ‘Difficult Dilemma,’ Keeps Nuclear Project Alive Unlike many states, Georgia still tightly regulates its electricity sector. The Georgia Public Service Commission approves plans for new power plants and then adjusts electricity rates to ensure utilities receive a “reasonable” return on their investment. In August, Georgia Power asked the commission to approve a revised timetable and bigger budget to finish the Vogtle reactors. The utility owns
1d
NYT > Science

The Cycle: When a Grieving Mother Talks, Listen We know we delivered, but then the timeline stops. We look frantically for the next page, but it will always be blank. My imagination does simultaneously beautiful and terrible things with these unwritten pages. Would his hair be curly or wavy? Would his eyes be dark brown or amber? Would he love dragons or “My Little Pony” or something entirely different that I cannot possibly imagine? Questions
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multifunctional protein contributes to blood cell development LA JOLLA--(December 21, 2017) Like an actor who excels at both comedy and drama, proteins also can play multiple roles. Uncovering these varied talents can teach researchers more about the inner workings of cells. It also can yield new discoveries about evolution and how proteins have been conserved across species over hundreds of millions of years. In a new finding, a team of investigators from
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

G-quadruplex regulates breast cancer-associated gene IMAGE: This is (left), Dr. Dr. Chonghui Cheng, and Dr. Jing Zhang. view more Credit: Baylor College of Medicine For breast cancer, carrying protein CD44s, instead of CD44v, has a survival advantage. Researchers have now discovered a mechanism by which cells can regulate switching between the two proteins, opening options for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cancer gr
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough pulls science ahead in race against devastating wheat disease MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (12/21/2017) -- For the first time ever, scientists are gaining ground in the race against wheat stem rust, a pathogen that threatens global food security because of its ability to kill wheat. A team of researchers from the University of Sydney, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Rothamsted Research, the University of Minnesota and USDA have
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UofL researcher proposes new term for the role of microbiota in neurodegeneration IMAGE: Amyloid produced by commensal bacteria may cause changes in protein folding and neuroinflammation in the central nervous system through the autonomic nervous system (particularly the vagus nerve), the trigeminal nerve... view more Credit: University of Louisville LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Research in the past two decades has revealed that microbial organisms in the gut influence health and dis
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mathematical model reveals solution to sloshing coffee Americans drink an average of 3.1 cups of coffee per day; for many people, the popular beverage is a morning necessity. When carrying a liquid, common sense says to walk slowly and refrain from overfilling the container. But when commuters rush out the door with coffee in hand, chances are their hastiness causes some of the hot liquid to slosh out of the cup. The resulting spills, messes, and mil
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ames Lab-led team maps magnetic fields of nano-objects in liquid IMAGE: Left: Schematic of the off-axis electron holography using a fluid cell. Right: (A) Hologram of a magnetite nanocrystal chain released from a magnetotactic bacterium, and (B) corresponding magnetic induction map.... view more Credit: US Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory A research team led by a scientist from the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the
1d
New Scientist - News

2017 review: The 12 best science and tech stories of the year Technology: The ultimate player AlphaGo has been going from strength to strength. In January, it emerged that DeepMind’s Go-playing AI had been lurking incognito in online Go tournaments and secretly beating some of the world’s top human players. And in May it beat Ke Jie, the world’s number one player, in Wuzhen, China. Finally, in October, DeepMind unveiled a new version that hones its cons
1d
New Scientist - News

Earth was smashed by a rock the size of Mars to make the moon The moon started with a bang NASA/JPL-Caltech By Shannon Hall A little rock can pack a mighty punch. The object that smashed into Earth 4.5 billion years ago to create the moon was relatively small – roughly one-tenth the mass of Earth, according to the latest modelling. Since the 1970s, astronomers have suspected that the moon was created when a giant protoplanet called Theia struck the newl
1d
New Scientist - News

Shocking drop in life expectancy shows US still in bad health The US is in poor health Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images By Laudan Aron Five years ago, a groundbreaking report showed people in the US in worse health and dying younger than those in other rich nations. Today, despite the alarm the report generated , we learned that life expectancy in the country declined for a second year in a row – astonishing by any standard. The origin
1d
New Scientist - News

2018 preview: Bioelectricity tweak can regenerate missing limbs By Jessica Hamzelou A bold plan to regenerate missing limbs by tweaking the body’s bioelectricity could be realised in the coming year. Michael Levin and his team at Tufts University, Massachusetts, have started experiments to get mice to regrow parts of their paws. Levin’s team has already found that patterns of electrical activity allow cells to communicate with each other, and control how
1d
The Atlantic

Death Comes for Cardinal Law VATICAN CITY—Cardinal Bernard Law was laid to rest on Thursday far from Boston, the city of his highest ascent and most devastating failure. The American priest resigned his leadership of the archdiocese in 2002 when The Boston Globe revealed that he had covered up rampant clergy sex abuse of children. Just two years later, he was whisked to Rome, where Pope John Paul II made him the ceremonial h
1d
Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: out-of-this-world drone with a Titanic task ahead A sample return spacecraft to a comet and a drone to fly across a moon of Saturn are the two robotic mission concepts chosen for further study by Nasa this week. Both proposals build upon previous missions performed by the European Space Agency . The Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (Caesar) mission would revisit comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This is the icy body that ESA explored
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Selective suppression of inflammation could deplete HIV and control HIV activation A class of anti-inflammatory drugs already FDA-approved for rheumatoid arthritis could "purge" the reservoir of infected immune cells in people infected by HIV, according to new research. When culturing cells from HIV-infected individuals, researchers found the medications tofacitinib and ruxolitinib block viral production from infected cells, prevent transmission to bystander cells, and decay
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting straight to the heart of the matter in stem cells LA JOLLA--(December 21, 2017) The process by which embryonic stem cells develop into heart cells is a complex process involving the precisely timed activation of several molecular pathways and at least 200 genes. Now, Salk Institute scientists have found a simpler way to go from stem cells to heart cells that involves turning off a single gene. The work, which appears in Genes & Dev
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memristors power quick-learning neural network ANN ARBOR--A new type of neural network made with memristors can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present. The research team that created the reservoir computing system, led by Wei Lu, professor
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

West African dolphin now listed as one of Africa's rarest mammals IMAGE: Entanglement in fishing gear is one of the many threats faced by the Atlantic humpback dolphin along its coastal range in Western Africa. view more Credit: T. Collins/WCS NEW YORK (December 21, 2017) -- A group of scientists now considers a little-known dolphin that only lives along the Atlantic coasts of Western Africa to be among the continent's most endangered mammals, a list th
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feathering the plasma nest: Tiny structures help prevent short circuits in plasma devices IMAGE: This is Physicist Charles Swanson. view more Credit: Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found a way to prevent plasma -- the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei -- from causing short circuits in machines such as spacecraft thrusters, radar a
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicaid expansion leads to increase in early-stage cancer diagnoses BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- The Affordable Care Act led to an increase in the number of cancer diagnoses -- particularly those at early stages -- in states where Medicaid was expanded, according to research from Indiana University. The research, published in the American Journal of Public Health , suggests that public health insurance may increase cancer detection, which can lead to fewer cancer deaths
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The origin of water's unusual properties foundUsing x-ray lasers, researchers have been able to map out how water fluctuates between two different states when it is cooled. At -44°C these fluctuations reach a maximum pointing to the fact that water can exist as two different distinct liquids.
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News

Boy robot passes agility tests In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
1d
Science : NPR

Rounding Up Reindeer: Zoo Prepares To Evacuate As Fire Burns Close Santa Barbara Zoo employees round up sheep in preparation for fire evacuation. Courtesy Santa Barbara Zoo hide caption toggle caption Courtesy Santa Barbara Zoo Santa Barbara Zoo employees round up sheep in preparation for fire evacuation. Courtesy Santa Barbara Zoo Chadwick the African Lion gets up slowly from a late morning nap in a spot of warm sunshine that's become somewhat of a rarity in th
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

The Machines of Walmart Have Had a Banner Year Computer Vision Algorithms Are Still Way Too Easy to Trick AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research shows, the systems can still be tripped up by examples that would never fool a person. Labsix, a group of MIT students who recently tricked an image classifier developed by Google… Read more AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research
1d
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

"Good" and "bad" are incomplete stories we tell ourselves | Heather LanierHeather Lanier's daughter Fiona has Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a genetic condition that results in developmental delays -- but that doesn't make her tragic, angelic or any of the other stereotypes about kids like her. In this talk about the beautiful, complicated, joyful and hard journey of raising a rare girl, Lanier questions our assumptions about what makes a life "good" or "bad," challenging us
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare white tiger diagnosed with cancer dies at zoo For more than half a century, studies on the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) have helped scientists better understand the biological underpinnings of life, from embryonic development and neurobiology to genetics and ...
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computational method improves the resolution of time-of-flight depth sensors 1,000-fold For the past 10 years, the Camera Culture group at MIT's Media Lab has been developing innovative imaging systems—from a camera that can see around corners to one that can read text in closed books—by using "time of flight," an approach that gauges distance by measuring the time it takes light projected into a scene to bounce back to a sensor. In a new paper appearing in IEEE Access , members of
1d
Science current issue

The secret life of Hedy Lamarr AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Taking the lead AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Podcast AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Managing quantities of antimicrobials AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Response AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Addendum to "Editorial Retraction of the Report 'Environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic particles influence larval fish ecology, by O. M. Lönnstedt and P. Eklöv" AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Continue U.S.-Cuban science diplomacy AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award winners named The Silver Award for online reporting went to Nick Neely for an article on a newly discovered species of crossbill that is threatened with extinction. PHOTO: NICK NEELY Stories on the social value of aging female killer whales, a frantic hunt for a meteorite in the Australian outback, and the unusual brain of the world's greatest solo climber are among the winners of the 2017 AAAS Kavli Science J
1d
Science current issue

Stemming the spread of rabies AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Warming stresses developing countries AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Timing a switch in tissue integrity AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Spatial information from NICHE-seq AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

The vascular plants of the Americas AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Chemical control of transcription AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Untangling service denial motivations AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Determining damping of our plates AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

GROWTH observations of GW170817 AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Photons from a gravitational wave event AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Minor infections cause big problems AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Pointing to a second critical point AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Fungal effectors of wheat stem rust AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

A treasure trove of early plant fossils AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Licensing microbes for symbiosis AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Understanding a metabolic weakness AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Choosing to amplify Tree crickets can create nearly perfect acoustic baffles to amplify their calls. PHOTO: NATASHA MHATRE Crickets are well known for the calls that the males make to attract females. Just listening to a cricket chorus, however, emphasizes the challenge that these little insects have to be heard above the din. Tree crickets ( Oecanthus henryi ) have evolved the ability to use leaves as a baffle to a
1d
Science current issue

Aiding and abetting Staphylococcus aureus Human skin hosts an ecosystem of microorganisms. Infections can therefore involve more than one organism, but antibiotic therapy options rarely consider the possibility of interference by a nontarget species. Staphylococcus aureus is a member of the normal skin microbiota that can show a spectrum of virulence and cause persistent and intractable infections. Radlinski et al. show that co-infection
1d
Science current issue

Cell mechanics indicate cell fate Gene expression changes are accompanied by biophysical phenotypes during differentiation or reprogramming, as has now been shown by measurements of cell stiffness or relative compliancy. Using real-time deformability cytometry (a microfluidic-based method that deforms cells by stress) and atomic force microscopy-enabled nanoindentation, Urbanska et al. characterized mouse fetal neural progenitor
1d
Science current issue

Optimizing optical antennae Nanophotonic technology relies on the ability to capture freely propagating light and convert it to a nanometer-scale plasmonic excitation on a chip. Optical antennae are devices that can be used in that capacity but so far are suboptimal for such applications. Feichtner et al. attribute their poor performance to the fact that present antenna designs are based on larger-scale radiowave rules, whi
1d
Science current issue

Melting around the margins A Landsat 8 satellite image of the Helheim-Sermilik glacier-fjord system in summer CREDIT: T. MOON ET AL., NAT. GEOSCI. 10.1038/S41561-017-0018-Z (2017) How and when is fresh water added to the margins of ice sheets? That question is central to understanding the effects of ice sheet melting on ocean water properties, circulation, and biological systems, on scales from local to basinwide. Moon et
1d
Science current issue

Reversing a regime shift (or not) Herbivores are needed to keep the macroalga Sargassum from replacing corals. CREDIT: WATERFRAME/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO Coral reefs worldwide face many challenges. One of these, brought on by declines in herbivore populations on reefs, is a tendency to shift from dominance by live corals to dominance by macroalgae. Loffler and Hoey, in a study of the leathery brown macroalga Sargassum on Australia's Gr
1d
Science current issue

Probing an excitonic insulator In semiconductors and semimetals, the negatively charged electrons and positively charged holes carry electrical current by moving in opposite directions. However, if electrons and holes were to form electrically neutral pairs, the material might stop conducting electricity and become an (excitonic) insulator. Du et al. explored this possibility in InAs/GaSb quantum wells, where electrons reside
1d
Science current issue

An illuminating cosmic collision Artist's conception of the neutron star merger ILLUSTRATION: DANA BERRY/HARVARD-SMITHSONIAN CFA The gravitational wave event GW170817—detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and named after the date that it occurred—was swiftly identified as the merger of two neutron stars. Unlike previously detected black hole mergers, theoretical models predicted that merging
1d
Science current issue

Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a), the optical counterpart to a gravitational wave source On 17 August 2017, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo interferometer detected gravitational waves (GWs) emanating from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817. Nearly simultaneously, the Fermi and INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) telescopes detected a gamma-ray transient, GRB 170817A. At 10.9 hours after the GW trigger, we discove
1d
Science current issue

Illuminating gravitational waves: A concordant picture of photons from a neutron star merger Merging neutron stars offer an excellent laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart (EM170817) with gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic data set, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought produ
1d
Science current issue

Swift and NuSTAR observations of GW170817: Detection of a blue kilonova With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and x-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger G
1d
Science current issue

Light curves of the neutron star merger GW170817/SSS17a: Implications for r-process nucleosynthesis On 17 August 2017, gravitational waves (GWs) were detected from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817, along with a coincident short gamma-ray burst, GRB 170817A. An optical transient source, Swope Supernova Survey 17a (SSS17a), was subsequently identified as the counterpart of this event. We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared light curves of SSS17a extending from 10.9 hours to 18 days p
1d
Science current issue

Early spectra of the gravitational wave source GW170817: Evolution of a neutron star merger On 17 August 2017, Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the optical counterpart of the binary neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817. We report time-series spectroscopy of SSS17a from 11.75 hours until 8.5 days after the merger. Over the first hour of observations, the ejecta rapidly expanded and cooled. Applying blackbody fits to the spectra, we measured the photospher
1d
Science current issue

A radio counterpart to a neutron star merger Gravitational waves have been detected from a binary neutron star merger event, GW170817. The detection of electromagnetic radiation from the same source has shown that the merger occurred in the outskirts of the galaxy NGC 4993, at a distance of 40 megaparsecs from Earth. We report the detection of a counterpart radio source that appears 16 days after the event, allowing us to diagnose the energ
1d
Science current issue

Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger Eleven hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. Although the gravitational wave data indicate that GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide indepen
1d
Science current issue

Maxima in the thermodynamic response and correlation functions of deeply supercooled water Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses were used to probe micrometer-sized water droplets that were cooled down to 227 kelvin in vacuum. Isothermal compressibility and correlation length were extracted from x-ray scattering at the low–momentum transfer region. The temperature dependence of these thermodynamic response and correlation functions shows maxima at 229 kelvin for water and 233 kelvin for heavy
1d
Science current issue

Determination of intrinsic attenuation in the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere system We recorded P and S waves traveling through the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere system (LAS) using broadband ocean-bottom seismometers in the northwest Pacific, and we quantitatively separated the intrinsic (anelastic) and extrinsic (scattering) attenuation effects on seismic wave propagation to directly infer the thermomechanical properties of the oceanic LAS. The strong intrinsic attenuation
1d
Science current issue

Arabidopsis pollen tube integrity and sperm release are regulated by RALF-mediated signaling In flowering plants, fertilization requires complex cell-to-cell communication events between the pollen tube and the female reproductive tissues, which are controlled by extracellular signaling molecules interacting with receptors at the pollen tube surface. We found that two such receptors in Arabidopsis , BUPS1 and BUPS2, and their peptide ligands, RALF4 and RALF19, are pollen tube–expressed a
1d
Science current issue

RALF4/19 peptides interact with LRX proteins to control pollen tube growth in Arabidopsis The communication of changes in the extracellular matrix to the interior of the cell is crucial for a cell’s function. The extracellular peptides of the RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR (RALF) family have been identified as ligands of receptor-like kinases of the Cr RLK1L subclass, but the exact mechanism of their perception is unclear. We found that Arabidopsis RALF4 and RALF19 redundantly regulate p
1d
Science current issue

Variation in the AvrSr35 gene determines Sr35 resistance against wheat stem rust race Ug99 Fungal effectors of wheat stem rust The fungal pathogen Ug99 (named for its identification in Uganda in 1999) threatens wheat crops worldwide. Ug99 can kill entire fields of wheat and is undeterred by many of the disease-resistance genes that otherwise protect wheat crops. Two papers describe two peptides secreted by the fungus as it attacks the wheat (see the Perspective by Moscou and van Esse).
1d
Science current issue

Loss of AvrSr50 by somatic exchange in stem rust leads to virulence for Sr50 resistance in wheat Race-specific resistance genes protect the global wheat crop from stem rust disease caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici ( Pgt ) but are often overcome owing to evolution of new virulent races of the pathogen. To understand virulence evolution in Pgt , we identified the protein ligand (AvrSr50) recognized by the Sr50 resistance protein. A spontaneous mutant of Pgt virulent to Sr50 contained
1d
Science current issue

Asylum applications respond to temperature fluctuations Warming stresses developing countries Weather-induced conflicts in developing countries spill over to developed countries through asylum applications. One approach to estimating the future impacts of climate change is to look at the effects of weather fluctuations. These transient shocks can be interpreted analytically as randomly distributed treatments applied to countries around the world. Miss
1d
Science current issue

An integrated assessment of the vascular plant species of the Americas The vascular plants of the Americas Botanical exploration in the Americas has a history that stretches back for half a millennium, with knowledge assembled in diverse regional floras and lists. Ulloa Ulloa et al. present a comprehensive and integrated compilation of all known native New World vascular plant species (see the Perspective by Givnish). This compilation, in a publicly available, searc
1d
Science current issue

Synthetic transcription elongation factors license transcription across repressive chromatin The release of paused RNA polymerase II into productive elongation is highly regulated, especially at genes that affect human development and disease. To exert control over this rate-limiting step, we designed sequence-specific synthetic transcription elongation factors (Syn-TEFs). These molecules are composed of programmable DNA-binding ligands flexibly tethered to a small molecule that engages
1d
Science current issue

Spatial reconstruction of immune niches by combining photoactivatable reporters and scRNA-seq Cellular functions are strongly dependent on surrounding cells and environmental factors. Current technologies are limited in their ability to characterize the spatial location and gene programs of cells in poorly structured and dynamic niches. We developed a method, NICHE-seq, that combines photoactivatable fluorescent reporters, two-photon microscopy, and single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq)
1d
Science current issue

New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
1d
Science current issue

My second-chance Ph.D I thought that attending a top-ranked university in the West, and especially the United States, would be a guaranteed ticket to success. I was also eager to help the world by studying the impact of pollution on the global environment. As a child growing up in a remote village in India, I had seen some of these effects myself, such as how indoor air pollution from cooking leads to health problems
1d
Science current issue

Recurrent infection progressively disables host protection against intestinal inflammation Intestinal inflammation is the central pathological feature of colitis and the inflammatory bowel diseases. These syndromes arise from unidentified environmental factors. We found that recurrent nonlethal gastric infections of Gram-negative Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (ST), a major source of human food poisoning, caused inflammation of murine intestinal tissue, predominantly the colon, which
1d
Science current issue

Comment on "Rapid cooling and cold storage in a silicic magma reservoir recorded in individual crystals" Rubin et al . (Reports, 16 June 2017, p. 1154) proposed that gradients in lithium abundance in zircons from a rhyolitic eruption in New Zealand reflected short-lived residence at magmatic temperatures interleaved with long-term "cold" (
1d
Science current issue

Response to Comment on "Rapid cooling and cold storage in a silicic magma reservoir recorded in individual crystals" In a recent paper, we used Li concentration profiles and U-Th ages to constrain the thermal conditions of magma storage. Wilson and co-authors argue that the data instead reflect control of Li behavior by charge balance during partitioning and not by experimentally determined diffusion rates. Their arguments are based on (i) a coupled diffusion mechanism for Li, which has been postulated but has
1d
Science current issue

Science, big and small Please log in to add an alert for this article.
1d
Science current issue

News at a glance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Saturn's rings are solar system newcomers AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Safety concerns derail dengue vaccination program AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Deep Pacific cooled by 'little ice age waters AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Deadly virus threatens European pigs and boar AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Were nomads the world's first traders? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Blockade harms Qatari science AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Cosmic convergence Summary On 17 August, scientists around the world witnessed something never seen before: One hundred and thirty million light-years away, two neutron stars spiraled into each other in a spectacular explosion that was studied by observatories ranging from gamma ray detectors to radio telescopes. The blast confirmed several key astrophysical models, revealed a birthplace of many heavy elements, and
1d
Science current issue

The runners up AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Breakdowns of the year AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

What can machine learning do? Workforce implications Summary Digital computers have transformed work in almost every sector of the economy over the past several decades ( 1 ). We are now at the beginning of an even larger and more rapid transformation due to recent advances in machine learning (ML), which is capable of accelerating the pace of automation itself. However, although it is clear that ML is a “general purpose technology,” like the steam
1d
Science current issue

A New World of plants AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

How seismic waves lose energy AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

How land plant life cycles first evolved AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

The rise of near-zero-index technologies AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

The quest for durable resistance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Supercooled water reveals its secrets AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
Science current issue

Complex regulation of plant sex by peptides AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New depth sensors could make self-driving cars practical For the past 10 years, the Camera Culture group at MIT's Media Lab has been developing innovative imaging systems -- from a camera that can see around corners to one that can read text in closed books -- by using "time of flight," an approach that gauges distance by measuring the time it takes light projected into a scene to bounce back to a sensor. In a new paper appearing in IEEE Access , membe
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a tumor grows can predict response to cancer therapy Individual tumors respond differently to cancer drugs, if at all. Until now, it remained a mystery why tumors have different reactions to the exact same therapy. But a new study at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering finds that tumor growth properties can influence response to cancer drugs. "Identifying a measurement or quantity that predicts how specific tumors will respond, called a predictiv
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mars' surface water: We finally know what happened--SFU study An international study co-led by SFU researcher Brendan Dyck has revealed that the sun may not have evaporated away all of Mars' surface water after all. Instead, the surface water on Mars was absorbed by its crust over time, leaving the planet essentially dry. "The public's infatuation with finding life on Mars stems from the many characteristics both Earth and Mars share," says Dyck. "Early on,
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discounting humanity: Bargain hunters see customer service workers as less humanEveryone loves a bargain, but new research suggests some employees may be getting short-changed when it comes to how consumers perceive them when they are price-conscious.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

FDA-approved high blood pressure drug extends life span in roundwormsAn FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study confirms beauty is in the eye of the beer holder Abbey Riemer, a psychology researcher at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, used eye-tracking technology to investigate how alcohol influences men's objectifying gazes toward women. Credit: Craig Chandler, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Popular songs and barstool philosophers have long observed how, after a few drinks, guys often change how they look at women around them. University of Nebraska-
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA spots a weaker, elongated Tropical Depression Kai-Tak Six hundred kilometers south of Lake Titicaca and more than 3700 m above sea level, the Intersalar region, between the two large salt lakes of Uyuni and Coipasa, is dotted with fields of quinoa and numerous communities. Today, ...
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds 'winking' star may be devouring wrecked planets An illustration of the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton X-ray observatory in orbit above Earth. Credit: ESA A team of U.S. astronomers studying the star RZ Piscium has found evidence suggesting its strange, unpredictable dimming episodes may be caused by vast orbiting clouds of gas and dust, the remains of one or more destroyed planets. "Our observations show there are massive blobs of du
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA spots Tropical Storm Tembin form On Dec. 20, 2017, at 9:05 p.m. EST (Dec. 21 at 0205 UTC) NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible light image of Tropical Storm Tembin approaching the southern Philippines. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found newly formed Tropical Storm Tembin in the Philippine Sea as it was nearing the southeastern Philipp
1d
The Atlantic

Pictures of Christmas Past With only a few days left until Christmas, I thought it might be fun to take a look at celebrations and preparations from years past. Gathered here is a collection of images of all things Christmas: decorated trees, shoppers, Santas, gifts, family gatherings, carolers, parades— even a bear and a flying saucer, from the early 1900s through the 1990s.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Now entering, lithium niobate valleyLithium niobate is already one of the most widely used optical materials, well-known for its electro-optic properties but it is notoriously difficult to fabricate high-quality devices on a small scale using lithium niobate, an obstacle that has so far ruled out practical integrated, on-chip applications. Now, researchers have developed a technique to fabricate high-performance optical microstructu
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Project helps assemble complex moleculesNucleosides are fundamental building blocks of genetic material which makes them attractive for a number of biologically relevant applications and as potential pharmaceuticals. Scientists are developing facile methods for modifying nucleoside structures to make chemical processes more efficient.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase childhood allergy riskTaking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in offspring affected by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), new research indicates.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inebriation at sporting events is a problemIn many western countries, public concern about violence and other problems at sporting events has increased. Alcohol is often involved. Research shows that approximately 40 percent of the spectators drink alcohol while attending U.S. baseball and football games, especially when alcohol is served within the arenas themselves. Alcohol-related problems can be compounded at large sport stadiums that
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights on grapheneGraphene floating on water does not repel water, as many researchers believe, but rather attracts it, explain researchers in a new report.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep brain stimulation linked to longer survival for Parkinson's patientsA treatment called deep brain stimulation could slightly extend the life of people with Parkinson's disease. Researchers found that patients who received stimulation via an implanted device had a modest survival advantage compared with those treated with medication only.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New class of anti-cancer drug effective against kidney cancerA study reports initial findings with a novel drug belonging to a new class of medicines called HIF-2a inhibitors that show promise in treating metastatic kidney cancer.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotic resistance: 'Sleeping' bacteria that can survive drug treatment identified'Sleeper cells,' which can survive doses of antibiotics and lie resting in a dormant state, may hold a key to understanding antibiotic resistance, research has found.
1d
Popular Science

Here are the cold and flu remedies that actually work Cold weather doesn’t literally make you sick , but the winter season does indeed make you more prone to catching a bad cold. Chilly conditions mean you spend more time indoors, where bacteria and viruses are more likely to linger in the air and on surfaces you touch, and the drop in temperature leaves your mucus membranes dry, irritated, and more vulnerable to infection . The holiday season can b
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spots a weaker, elongated Tropical Depression Kai-Tak IMAGE: The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of an elongated Kai-Tak on Dec. 21 at 1:41 a.m. EST (0641 UTC). Coldest cloud tops and strongest storms... view more Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Kai-Tak it measured cloud top temperatures and provided a look at the structure of the elongated storm. The Atmospheric Infrared
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IU astronomer helps discover that a star in the constellation Pisces is 'eating' planets Like the ancient Greek god Cronus who devoured his children, a star 550 light years from Earth has been discovered to be slowly consuming its "offspring" -- crushing one or more planets in its orbit into vast clouds of gas and dust . The discovery that RZ Piscium -- located in the constellation Pisces -- is an insatiable "eater of worlds" was reported today in The Astronomical Journal . Indiana U
1d
Big Think

Lifestyle Changes, Not a Magic Pill, Can Reverse Alzheimer’s Last summer, a research group from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) quietly published the results of a new approach in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. What they found was striking. Although the size of the study was small, every participant demonstrated such marked improvement that almost all were found to be in the normal range on testing for memory and cognition by the stu
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computational study of world music outliers reveals countries with distinct recordingsBotswana is the country with the most distinct musical recordings around the world while China has the most distinct recordings in relation to its neighbours, according to research.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seasonal images reveal the science behind stem cellsAt first glance, a new image seems to have a seasonal theme. But look more closely and you'll see that the component parts of the picture (or micrographs) of a Christmas tree are actually composed of stem cells created using innovative laser-based imaging techniques used in regenerative medicine research.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of a 4,000-year-old military network in northern SyriaThe discovery of more than a thousand sites in Syria has revised our understanding of the settlement of the steppes during all periods in the history of the Near East. Recently, analysis of aerial and satellite images has enabled the discovery of a vast structured surveillance and communication network dating from the Middle Bronze Age (2nd millennium BCE).
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increaseWith children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new research has revealed that as digital pasttimes have become intertwined with daily life, children have adapted their behaviors to include their devices. Much like adults, they are able to
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggestsThe natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking.
1d
NYT > Science

Shell, Seeking to Curb Its Carbon Footprint, Buys Electricity Provider First Utility, which is privately held, does not own wires or power plants, but obtains its electricity and natural gas through Shell. Mark Gainsborough, Shell’s executive vice president of new energies, said in an interview that First Utility fit the company’s strategy of growing in various parts of the electric power business, an energy sector that has seen great change in recent years. Britain
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrons track quantum entanglement in copper elpasolite mineral Georgia Tech’s Martin Mourigal (left) and Xiaojian Bai (right), along with Florida State University’s Lianyang Dong (center), explore low-temperature quantum states in the mineral Cu-Elpasolite at HFIR beam line HB-2A. Credit: ORNL/Genevieve Martin A research team including Georgia Institute of Technology professor Martin Mourigal used neutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snowy owl numbers far lower than once thought In this Dec. 14, 2017 photo a snowy owl stares prior being released along the shore of Duxbury Beach in Duxbury, Mass. The owl is one of 14 trapped so far this winter at Boston's Logan Airport and moved to the beach on Cape Cod Bay. The large white raptors from the Arctic have descended on the northern U.S. in huge numbers in recent weeks, giving researchers opportunities to study them. (AP Photo
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook signs deal with music label Universal MusicFacebook and record label Universal Music Group have signed a multiyear deal that will let Facebook users share videos that have the label's music in them.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spots Tropical Storm Tembin form NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found newly formed Tropical Storm Tembin in the Philippine Sea as it was nearing the southeastern Philippines. On Dec. 20 at 9:05 p.m. EST (Dec. 21 at 0205 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible light image of Tropical Storm Tembin approachin
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study confirms beauty is in the eye of the beer holder Popular songs and barstool philosophers have long observed how, after a few drinks, guys often change how they look at women around them. University of Nebraska-Lincoln psychology researchers used eye-tracking technology to investigate alcohol's influence on when college-age men drop their gaze from a woman's face to other parts of her anatomy. In a newly published study, they confirmed that into
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds 'winking' star may be devouring wrecked planets A team of U.S. astronomers studying the star RZ Piscium has found evidence suggesting its strange, unpredictable dimming episodes may be caused by vast orbiting clouds of gas and dust, the remains of one or more destroyed planets. "Our observations show there are massive blobs of dust and gas that occasionally block the star's light and are probably spiraling into it," said Kristina Punzi, a doct
1d
The Atlantic

High Temperatures Are Already Sending Refugees to Europe Can unexpected weather make a war or a failed state more likely? It’s a question that could define the 21st century. A new study , published Thursday in Science , finds a link between temperature variation and forced migration. When unusually hot or cold weather strikes the growing region of an agricultural country, more people living in that country seek asylum protection in the European Union.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lithuania bans Kaspersky software over security fears Lithuania will ban Moscow-based cyber security firm Kaspersky Lab's products from computers managing key energy, finance and transport systems due to security concerns, authorities said Thursday. The Russian firm's software was banned from US government networks earlier this year amid allegations that it helped Russian intelligence steal top secret information. "The government... recognised tha
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Got a toy that can spy? Here's how to know and what to do In this Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, file photo, shoppers browse at a Toys R Us store in Miami. The toys your kids unwrap this Christmas could invite hackers into your home. That Grinch-like warning comes from the FBI, which said this summer that toys connected to the internet could be a target for crooks who may listen in on conversations or use them to steal a child's personal information. (AP Photo/
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodiesResearchers have developed a sustainable alternative to the most widely used antibodies and their controversial production in animals.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FCC proposes $13.4M fine for TV-station owner Sinclair This Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, photo, shows the seal of the Federal Communications Commission before a meeting in Washington. On Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, the FCC proposed a $13.4 million fine on TV-station owner Sinclair for not identifying paid programming as advertising. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) The Federal Communications Commission has proposed a $13.4 million fine on TV-station owner Sincla
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the hu
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study details how fertilization triggers changes to thousands of proteins in frog eggs Surface contraction waves on a frog egg are triggered by fertilization and driven by protein activity. Credit: Tessa Montague For more than half a century, studies on the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) have helped scientists better understand the biological underpinnings of life, from embryonic development and neurobiology to genetics and disease. The frog's claims to fame include the Nobel
1d
Live Science

'Spermbot' May One Day Help Treat Cervical Cancer A biohybrid sperm microrobot might one day deliver anti-cancer drugs to tumors in the female reproductive tract, according to a new paper from Germany. The sci-fi-sounding microbot, which was described in a December article in the journal ACS Nano , consists of sperm from a bull combined with a plastic, 3D-printed microstructure covered with an iron-based coating. This coating allows th
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The origin of water's unusual properties found Using x-ray lasers, researchers at Stockholm University have been able to map out how water fluctuates between two different states when it is cooled. At -44°C these fluctuations reach a maximum pointing to the fact that water can exist as two different distinct liquids. The findings will be published in the journal Science . Water, both common and necessary for life on earth, behav
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning will change jobs PITTSBURGH--Machine learning computer systems, which get better with experience, are poised to transform the economy much as steam engines and electricity have in the past. They can outperform people in a number of tasks, though they are unlikely to replace people in all jobs. So say Carnegie Mellon University's Tom Mitchell and MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson in a Policy Forum commentary to be published
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hotter temperatures will accelerate migration of asylum-seekers to Europe, says study New research predicts that migrants applying for asylum in the European Union will nearly triple over the average of the last 15 years by 2100 if carbon emissions continue on their current path. The study suggests that cutting emissions could partially stem the tide, but even under an optimistic scenario, Europe could see asylum applications rise by at least a quarter. The study appears today
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rust stemmed for wheat Expertise in viruses and high security containment brought Rothamsted Research into a multinational team that has just won a major battle in the war against a genetically versatile fungal pathogen with a long record of devastation of wheat production globally. The team, from Australia, the US and the UK, identified a gene in the fungus that triggers resistance in the host plant and have begun to
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meet the tiny machines in cells that massacre viruses When viruses infect the body's cells, those cells face a difficult problem. How can they destroy viruses without harming themselves? Scientists at University of Utah Health have found an answer by visualizing a tiny cellular machine that chops the viruses' genetic material into bits. Their research shows how the machine detects the intruders and processes them for destruction to protect cells and
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut reaction: Repeated food poisoning triggers chronic disease La Jolla, Calif., December 21, 2017 - A startling discovery published today in the journal Science reveals how your past history of minor bacterial infections can add up with age to cause a severe inflammatory disease. Small bacterial infections that may go unnoticed and which the body easily clears without treatment, such as occurs during mild food poisoning, nevertheless can start a chain of ev
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Towards better fates for wheat crops: Gene-level insights into a deadly pathogen IMAGE: Stem rust infecting adult wheat stems in the field. The pathogen kills wheat plants by girdling stems, resulting in crops comprising a tangled mess. This material relates to a paper... view more Credit: Professor Robert F. Park, The University of Sydney Plant Breeding Institute After decades, researchers finally have some gene-level insights into an age-old evolutionary arms race bet
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The heat is on: Asylum-seeking into the EU will increase with climate change IMAGE: An infographic depicting results from Missirian et al. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the 22 December 2017, issue of Science , published by AAAS. The paper, by... view more Credit: Carla Schaffer / AAAS Weather shocks in countries around the world have increased applications by asylum seekers hoping to enter the European Union - a trend that could dramatically incr
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Science's 2017 Breakthrough of the Year: The observation of two neutron stars merging IMAGE: Artist's concept of the explosive collision of two neutron stars. This material relates to 2017's Breakthrough of the Year by Science News staff in Washington, DC. view more Credit: Illustration by Robin Dienel courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science Science has chosen as its 2017 Breakthrough of the Year the first observations of a neutron-star merger, a violent celestial eve
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A detailed map of North and South America's plant diversity IMAGE: Kunhardtia rhodantha is in the family Rapateaceae, which is a family almost endemic to the Americas. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the 22 Dec. 2017, issue... view more Credit: P. Berry A team of researchers has complied a comprehensive list of all known plants that take root throughout North and South America, shedding light on plant diversity and patterns across
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wheat disease breakthrough to help feed the world IMAGE: The pathogen kills wheat plants by girdling stems, resulting in crops comprising a tangled mess. view more Credit: Robert Park, University of Sydney Famine may be largely a thing of the past but in recent years the re-emergence of a disease that can kill wheat - which provides a fifth of humanity's food - has threatened food security; now a breakthrough is being announced j
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An integrated assessment of vascular plants species of the Americas Missouri Botanical Garden researcher Dr. Carmen Ulloa is the lead author of "An Integrated Assessment of Vascular Plant Species of the Americas," published today in Science . Ulloa along with 23 co-authors compiled a comprehensive, searchable checklist of 124,993 species, 6,227 genera and 355 families of vascular plants of the Americas. This represents one third of all known vascular plants world
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tumor growth parameters predict response to anti-angiogenic therapy in mice IMAGE: Properties related to how a tumor grows can be used to predict the response to anti-angiogenic treatment that targets VEGF. Gray lines, tumor growth with no treatment; Red line, treatment... view more Credit: Stacey D. Finley, Ph.D. Using a mathematical modeling approach, scientists have found that certain parameters of tumor growth in mice can predict the effectiveness of drugs that b
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-virus protein in humans may resist transmission of HIV-1 precursor from chimps IMAGE: This is a model of SIVcpz cross species transmission to human. view more Credit: Zhang Z, et al. (2017) In humans, an anti-virus protein known as APOBEC3H may defend against cross-species transmission from chimpanzees of the virus that gave rise to HIV-1. Zeli Zhang of Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany, and colleagues present this finding in a new PLOS Pathogens study. A
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vampire bat rabies kills hundreds of cattle a year in Peru IMAGE: This is Peruvian cow. view more Credit: Julio Benavides, 2017 The vampire bat is known to be the principle reservoir of rabies throughout Latin America, yet the burden of vampire bat-transmitted rabies on human lives and livestock has been largely anecdotal. Now, researchers have calculated that, in Peru, more than 500 cattle a year die of rabies. The new study, which also detailed ris
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Knock, knock! "Who's there?" Parasitic wasps, on aphid hunt, at Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, broadcast 26-28 December on BBC. Credit: Rothamsted Research Insect communication, silent and often deadly, features prominently among the remarkable experiments that are performed live during the three lectures that explore "The Language of Life" for this year's Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. The three hour-long lect
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Assembling complex molecules Nucleosides are fundamental building blocks of genetic material which makes them attractive for a number of biologically relevant applications and as potential pharmaceuticals. At The City College of New York, scientists are developing facile methods for modifying nucleoside structures to make chemical processes more efficient. Mahesh Lakshman, professor in City College's Department of Chemistry
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers demonstrate high-quality optical microstructures using lithium niobate SEAS researchers have designed a micro-ring and micro-racetrack resonators made from lithium niobate, a material previously thought unworkable for high-quality, small scale optical devices Credit: Loncar Lab/Harvard SEAS If the epicenter of the electronics revolution is named after the material that made it possible—silicon?— then the birthplace of the photonics revolution may well be named after
1d
Feed: All Latest

How the Magic Leap Lightwear Headset Might Actually Work Rony Abovitz has never been one for direct information. Over the past few years, the Magic Leap founder has confounded people with not-exactly-updates about his company’s not-exactly-vaporware mixed-reality system—especially on Twitter, where he’s been given to statements like “We are not chasing perfection - we are chasing 'feels good, feels right'. Tuning for everyday magic.” So last week, when
1d
Viden

Kan du dø af julen? Julen er hyggelig. Men pas på. For ud over velsignet bud bringer juledagene også store og små ulykker eller sygdomme, der giver trængsel på sygehusene. Der er de mindre ulykker som for eksempel folk, der skærer sig på gavebåndene. For jo, det kan man godt komme til. - Dem kan man faktisk skære sig ret meget på, siger Dorthe Kragelund, der er sygeplejerske på Aalborg Universitetshospital, og som h
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists have isolated the very first rust pathogen gene that wheat plants detect to 'switch on' resistance The stem rust pathogen infects all above-ground parts of the wheat plants, including the head. In this case, control with fungicides is usually not possible because of end-product contamination, or economic. Credit: Karanjeet Sandhu, University of Sydney. Famine may be largely a thing of the past but in recent years the re-emergence of a disease that can kill wheat - which provides a fifth of hum
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An integrated assessment of vascular plants species of the Americas Perezia pungens, which is found from Colombia to Southern Cone, is in the family Asteraceae, the second most diverse family in the Americas. Credit: C. Ulloa Missouri Botanical Garden researcher Dr. Carmen Ulloa is the lead author of "An Integrated Assessment of Vascular Plant Species of the Americas," published today in Science . Ulloa along with 23 co-authors compiled a comprehensive, searchabl
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meet the tiny machines in cells that massacre viruses When viruses infect the body's cells, those cells face a difficult problem. How can they destroy viruses without harming themselves? Scientists at University of Utah Health have found an answer by visualizing a tiny cellular machine that chops the viruses' genetic material into bits. Their research shows how the machine detects the intruders and processes them for destruction to protect cells and
1d
Ingeniøren

Årets videnskabelige højdepunkt: Sammenstød mellem to neutronstjerner Det er igen tid til at kåre årets videnskabelige højdepunkter. Lad os begynde med den måske mest prestigefyldte pris, Breakthrough of the Year, som uddeles af det amerikanske videnskabelige tidsskrift Science. I det nyeste nummer giver Science den til observationen af et sammenstød mellem to neutronstjerner. Lad mig tilføje, at det britiske tidsskrift Physics World, som udelukkende holder sig til
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using footprints to identify and monitor giant pandas in the wildFootprints left by giant pandas in the wild can be used to identify the individual panda that made them and determine its sex, scientists show. The new identification technique uses an interactive software tool called FIT.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resolving to have a happier, healthier 2018? Reshape your body attitudesA psychology professor describes research that offers an entirely different perspective on New Year's resolutions.
1d
The Scientist RSS

Study: Climate Change Could Threaten TardigradesResearchers find that a combination of high temperatures and UV radiation can have negative effects on these hardy creatures.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunting for immune cells' cancer targetsA new method sifts through hundreds of millions of potential targets to find a precise cancer beacon. The results may lead to better immunotherapies, which harness the immune system to attack tumors.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Short-term exercise equals big-time brain boostEven a short burst of exercise can temporarily boost our brain power, says a new study.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain waves may predict and potentially prevent epilepsyThe findings demonstrate how using EEGs to identify changes in brain wave patterns over time can predict which post-injury patients will develop epilepsy.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shutdown of coal-fired power plant results in significant fetal health improvement in downwind areasFirst study to show fetal health improvement as a result of a coal-fired power plant shutdown due to direct federal level regulation on single pollution source finds 15 percent reduction in likelihood of having a low birth weight baby and 28 percent reduction in likelihood of a preterm birth in areas downwind of the power plant.
1d
The Atlantic

The Opioid Crisis Comes to the Workplace Addiction to prescription pain medication has taken a staggering toll on America: According to one accounting , overdoses killed more people in one year than guns and car accidents combined. Tens of thousands of Americans are dying each year from overdoses. It’s a grim trend that has touched just about every aspect of life—even, as the latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate,
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Individuals in the US diagnosed with cancer are 2.7 times more likely to declare bankruptcy than individuals without cancer, study finds As advancements in cancer therapies have been making headlines in recent years, cancer drug prices have significantly increased. The remaining question is, what are the economic impacts of the differentiations in cost of FDA approved drugs and the purchasing power of individuals around the world? This study , published in Oncotarget , titled "A global comparison of the cost of patented cancer dru
1d
The Atlantic

Where Food Meets Art “The menu started with color and form,” says chef Jordan Kahn of Los Angeles restaurant Vespertine, described on its website as a “gastronomical experience seeking to disrupt the course of the modern restaurant.” In a new video from The Atlantic , Kahn details his culinary inspiration—which started with the building itself. “I stood in front of the [building] for a solid 25 minutes,” he says. “Th
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making waves IMAGE: Surface contraction waves on a frog egg are triggered by fertilization and driven by protein activity. view more Credit: Tessa Montague At a glance: New approach enables measurements of changes in thousands of proteins in the minutes after frog eggs are fertilized, revealing previously opaque molecular mechanisms. Researchers describe in detail how fertilization triggers destr
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Now entering, lithium niobate valley IMAGE: SEAS researchers have designed a micro-ring and micro-racetrack resonators made from lithium niobate, a material previously thought unworkable for high-quality, small scale optical devices view more Credit: Image courtesy of the Loncar Lab/Harvard SEAS If the epicenter of the electronics revolution is named after the material that made it possible -- silicon?-- then the birthplace of t
1d
The Scientist RSS

Hormonal Male Contraceptive to Enter Clinical TrialThe gel, which men rub on their upper bodies daily, delivers synthetic progestin to block the testes from producing normal levels of sperm.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Promoting self-esteem among African-American girls through racial, cultural connections For African-American students, data, alongside societal attitudes and stereotypes, often present a negative picture: a wide academic achievement gap separating them from their white peers. Higher rates of discipline and absenteeism. Discrimination by other students, teachers and the larger community. And just last summer, a study indicated that black girls, from an early age, are perceived as mor
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seasonal images reveal the science behind stem cells Micrograph of a Christmas tree comprised of stem cells. Credit: Catarina Moura, University of Southampton At first glance, a pair of award-winning images created by University of Southampton postgraduate researcher Catarina Moura seem to have a seasonal theme. But look more closely and you'll see that the component parts of the pictures (or micrographs) of a Christmas tree and seasonal wreath are
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computational study of world music outliers reveals countries with distinct recordings Credit: CC0 Public Domain Botswana is the country with the most distinct musical recordings around the world while China has the most distinct recordings in relation to its neighbours, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. The study, published in PLOS ONE , demonstrates the first time computational tools have been used to compare world music cultures at a large scale. In parti
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodies The alpacas held at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry roam freely over large meadows. Following very mild immunizations of two alpacas, the Göttingen researchers retrieved construction plans for the secondary nanobodies from a small blood sample. Using these plans, bacteria can be programmed to produce them in large-scale without further animal involvement. Credit: © MPI for Biop
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using footprints to identify and monitor giant pandas in the wild New software measures the unique footprints of giant pandas, enabling conservationists to identify and monitor pandas in the wild. Credit: Binbin Li, Duke Kunshan University Footprints left by giant pandas in the wild can be used to identify the individual panda that made them and determine its sex, a new Duke University-led study by an international team of conservation scientists shows. The new
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the hu
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Project at CCNY helps assemble complex molecules Nucleosides are fundamental building blocks of genetic material which makes them attractive for a number of biologically relevant applications and as potential pharmaceuticals. At The City College of New York, scientists are developing facile methods for modifying nucleoside structures to make chemical processes more efficient. Mahesh Lakshman, professor in City College's Department of Chemistry
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insect communication IMAGE: Parasitic wasps, on aphid hunt, at Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, broadcast 26-28 December on BBC. view more Credit: Rothamsted Research Insect communication, silent and often deadly, features prominently among the remarkable experiments that are performed live during the three lectures that explore "The Language of Life" for this year's Royal Institution Christmas Lectures.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shutdown of coal-fired power plant results in significant fetal health improvement in downwind areas As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves to dismantle the Clean Power Plan touting a return to "cooperative federalism," the results of a new study focused on the downwind impact on fetal health of emissions from a coal-fired power plant, which is located on the border between two states, highlight policy gaps engendered by state-level regulation of air pollution. The reason? Wind
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First complete look at protein behind sense of touchThe findings point the way to targeting diseases where this protein is mutated.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Killing it softly: How seemingly disparate disordered materials failMechanical engineers predict how seemingly disparate disordered materials fail, using 'softness' as a criterion.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seasonal images reveal the science behind stem cells IMAGE: Micrograph of a Christmas tree comprised of stem cells. view more Credit: Catarina Moura, University of Southampton At first glance, a pair of award-winning images created by University of Southampton postgraduate researcher Catarina Moura seem to have a seasonal theme. But look more closely and you'll see that the component parts of the pictures (or micrographs) of a Christmas tre
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers recommend specific diets for preventing colorectal cancer in high-risk groups Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent malignant tumour in Spain. It is known that factors such as diet and intestinal inflammation play an important role in its occurrence, but direct links between nutrients, inflammation and colorectal cancer are poorly described. Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that the amount of protein in our diet may be an
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leukaemia treatment can be made more effective by using a drug for iron overload IMAGE: Healthy bone marrow (yellow) invaded by leukaemia, with blood vessels in cyan (red). view more Credit: Delfim Duarte/Imperial College London Chemotherapy for one type of leukaemia could be improved by giving patients a drug currently used to treat an unrelated condition, new research shows. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer that stops healthy blood cell
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MGH team engineers anti-inflammatory antibodies that may treat autoimmune disease A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has found a way to engineer antibodies within an organism, converting autoantibodies that attack "self" tissues into anti-inflammatory antibodies in animal models of two autoimmune diseases. The researchers' report will be published in the January 25 issue of Cell and has been released online. "We were able to convert antibodies that ca
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting for immune cells' cancer targets IMAGE: Proteins on immune cells called T-cell receptors (red) detect specific protein snippets (yellow) on the surface of other cells, including tumor cells. A new technique lets researchers find snippets linked... view more Credit: Eric Smith and Christopher Garcia By screening millions of molecular targets, researchers have uncovered a tumor beacon detected by the immune cells of two patients w
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique could reveal immunotherapy targets, Stanford-led study finds Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their colleagues have developed a way to pinpoint potential targets for cancer therapies that rely on the body's immune system. Those targets are molecules called antigens, which appear on the surface of tumor cells and other malignant or damaged cells. Antigens are cumbersome to identify but critical to developing cancer immunotherapi
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A PSA from your gut microbes: Enjoy the holidays but don't forget your fiber IMAGE: A visualization of the changes to the colon and the gut bacteria after eating a low-fiber, Western-type diet and then subsequently eating a diet supplemented with fiber. view more Credit: Shroeder, et al. Anyone watching their waistline this holiday season may want to pay attention to what their gut bacteria are eating. It's not just calories that matter in a healthy diet--it's fiber t
1d
The Atlantic

Wonder Is a 'Feel-Good' Movie That Needed More Realism Since its premiere last month, Wonder has been touted as a “feel-good,” family-friendly movie for the holiday season. The film is based on the 2012 bestselling novel by R.J. Palacio and follows a boy who was born with a craniofacial condition known as Treacher Collins syndrome , which causes disfigurement. Ten-year-old Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay) has had to undergo nearly 30 surgeries, and hi
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cutting-edge statistics yield new insight into attributing, projecting climate change ALEXANDRIA, Va. (Dec. 21, 2017) - Projecting the future of extreme weather events and their impact on human life, the environment and vulnerable ecosystems locally and across the globe remains a complex task in climate research--and one in which statisticians are increasingly playing key roles, particularly through the development of new models. The December issue of CHANCE examines complexities
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking a solvation process step by stepChemists have tracked with unprecedented spatial resolution how individual water molecules attach to an organic molecule. They used low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to visualize the processes at a scale smaller than one nanometer. This allowed them to investigate the phenomena of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity at the molecular level, i.e. why certain parts of organic molecules attr
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protected tropical forests are threatened by the bounty of adjacent oil palm plantationsA new study has warned of the threat that oil palm production poses to tropical forests.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Valleytronics route towards reversible computerResearchers have discovered a new route towards novel reversible computer by fusing the concepts of valleytronics with digital information processing.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weekly fish consumption linked to better sleep, higher IQRegular fish consumption has been shown to improve cognition. It's also been known to help with sleep. A new study connects all three for the first time. The team found that children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have higher IQs by an average of 4 points.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers map molecular interaction that prevents aggressive breast cancerResearchers have discovered how specific versions of a protein called Numb protect the key tumor suppressor p53 from destruction. The study suggests that the loss of these particular Numb proteins makes breast cancers more aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy, but points the way toward new therapeutic approaches that could improve patient outcome by preserving p53 levels.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online interest in sex rises at Christmas, with more births nine months laterA global analysis of human birth-rate cycles reveals that online interest in sex rises at Christmas and certain other holidays, with more babies born nine months later.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LSUHealthNo contributes to 1st-of-its-kind study of upper aerodigestive cancers New Orleans, LA - Using data interpreted by LSU Health New Orleans' Louisiana Tumor Registry, a case-control study found for the first time that older people who have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are at higher risk for cancers of the upper respiratory and digestive tract. The study is published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery online December 21, 2017. The researchers, led by
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shutdown of coal-fired power plant results in significant fetal health improvement in downwind areasFirst study to show fetal health improvement as a result of a coal-fired power plant shutdown due to direct federal level regulation on single pollution source finds 15 percent reduction in likelihood of having a low birth weight baby and 28 percent reduction in likelihood of a preterm birth in areas downwind of the power plant.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Promoting self-esteem among African-American girls through racial, cultural connections For African-American students, data, alongside societal attitudes and stereotypes, often present a negative picture: a wide academic achievement gap separating them from their white peers. Higher rates of discipline and absenteeism. Discrimination by other students, teachers and the larger community. And just last summer, a study indicated that black girls, from an early age, are perceived as mor
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resolving to have a happier, healthier 2018? Reshape your body attitudes IMAGE: FSU psychology professor Pamela Keel's thoughts on the traditional New Year's resolutions: "I think a better resolution, instead of trying to change your body, is to change your attitudes about... view more Credit: FSU Photography Services Put together a list of New Year's resolutions yet? Every year, many of us pledge to work harder at being healthy, losing weight or eating more veg
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Short-term exercise equals big-time brain boost IMAGE: Even a short, one-time burst of exercise can boost parts of the brain responsible for executive function such as decision-making and focus, says a research paper from Western University, Canada.... view more Credit: Western University, London, Canada A 10-minute, one-time burst of exercise can measurably boost your brain power, at least temporarily, researchers at Western University in
1d
Science | The Guardian

Royal Statistical Society christmas quiz: have you got what it takes? The Royal Statistical Society has published a wickedly difficult Christmas quiz to entertain puzzle fans over the festive break for the past 24 years, and this year’s challenge, set by Dr Tim Paulden, may well be one of the toughest yet. Cracking the thirteen problems below will require a blend of general knowledge, logic, and lateral thinking skills, but as usual no specialist mathematical knowl
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Life Expectancy in the U.S. Is Falling--and Drug Overdose Deaths Are Soaring Life expectancy in the U.S. has fallen for the second year in a row, the first time it’s dropped for two consecutive years in more than half a century. People born in the U.S. in 2016 could expect to live 78.6 years on average, down from 78.7 the year before, according to a new report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The most common cause of death: heart di
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A particle like slow lightWeyl particles are not particles which can move on their own (like electrons or protons), they only exist as 'quasiparticles' within a solid material. Now, for the first time, such Weyl particles have been found in a special kind of material, which is particularly interesting for novel technological applications: scientists have measured Weyl fermions in a material with highly correlated electrons
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How singing your heart out could make you happierSinging in groups could make you happier, according to new research. Researchers examined the benefits of singing among people with mental health conditions including anxiety and depression. They found that people who took part in a community singing group maintained or improved their mental health. And that the combination of singing and socializing was an essential part of recovery because it pr
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists negate century-old assumption regarding neurons and brain activityNeurons are the basic computational building blocks that compose our brain. According to the neuronal computational scheme used for over a century, each neuron functions as a centralized excitable element. Using new types of experiments on neuronal cultures, scientists have demonstrated that this assumption regarding brain activity is mistaken. Their results call for a re-examination of neuronal f
1d
The Atlantic

A Shocking Decline in American Life Expectancy For the first time since the early 1960s, life expectancy in the United States has declined for the second year in a row, according to a CDC report released Thursday . American men can now expect to live 76.1 years, a decrease of two-tenths of a year from 2015. American women’s life expectancy remained at 81.1 years. The change was driven largely by a rising death rate among younger Americans. Th
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Airport Face Scanning Skates on Thin Legal Ice—and Doesn’t Work Too Well Computer Vision Algorithms Are Still Way Too Easy to Trick AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research shows, the systems can still be tripped up by examples that would never fool a person. Labsix, a group of MIT students who recently tricked an image classifier developed by Google… Read more AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using footprints to identify and monitor giant pandas in the wild IMAGE: New software measures the unique footprints of giant pandas, enabling conservationists to identify and monitor pandas in the wild. view more Credit: Binbin Li, Duke Kunshan University DURHAM, N.C. -- Footprints left by giant pandas in the wild can be used to identify the individual panda that made them and determine its sex, a new Duke University-led study by an international team of c
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep brain stimulation linked to longer survival for Parkinson's patients IMAGE: Richard Hutton, a patient at the Parkinson's Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center at the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, underwent deep brain stimulation back in... view more Credit: Tommy Leonardi A treatment called deep brain stimulation (DBS) could extend the life of people with Parkinson's disease. Researchers at the Edward Hines, Jr. VA
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain waves may predict and potentially prevent epilepsy -- Ben-Gurion U. researchers BEER-SHEVA, Israel...Dec. 21, 2017 - Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have discovered a promising biomarker for predicting and potentially preventing epileptic seizures in patients with brain injuries using EEG (electroencephalographic) recordings of theta brain waves. Their findings, published in The Journal of Neuroscience , demonstrate how using EEGs to identify changes i
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodies Antibodies are indispensable in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, their production is time-consuming, expensive, and requires the use of many animals. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany, have now developed so-called secondary nanobodies that can replace the most-used antibodies and may drastically reduce the number of ani
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computational study of world music outliers reveals countries with distinct recordings Botswana is the country with the most distinct musical recordings around the world while China has the most distinct recordings in relation to its neighbours, according to research by Queen Mary University of London. The study, published in PLOS ONE , demonstrates the first time computational tools have been used to compare world music cultures at a large scale. In particular, the researchers aim
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Another test to help clinicians diagnose asthma more accurately Rochester, MN, December 21, 2017 - Although about 24 million Americans are diagnosed with asthma every year, there is no single test that can diagnose the disease. Common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, wheezing, and cough, are relatively nonspecific, and physicians may use multiple tests and observations to reach an accurate diagnosis. In order to assess the accuracy and reliability of on
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why digital strategies matter in bond markets COLLEGE PARK, Md. - Information technology (IT) investments are often valued favorably by the stock market because of their strategic nature and important role in influencing revenue and profit growth of firms. New research by professors Sunil Mithas and Michael Kimbrough at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, with Keongtae Kim, a Smith School PhD graduate and now ass
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How did the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident impact thyroid cancer risk? IMAGE: Thyroid , the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, publishes original articles and timely reviews that reflect the rapidly advancing changes in our understanding of thyroid physiology and pathology, from... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, Dec. 21, 2017--New lessons are being learned about risk assessment and predicting the extent
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acid reflux associated with head and neck cancers in older adults Bottom Line: Acid reflux was associated with cancer of the respiratory and upper digestive tracts in older adults. Why The Research Is Interesting: Cancers of the respiratory and upper digestive tracts account for more than 360,000 deaths worldwide each year. These cancers are thought to be caused by various factors, including chronic inflammation. Studies examining a link between the inflammat
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular mapping made easy Every day, every inch of skin on your body comes into contact with thousands of molecules -- from food, cosmetics, sweat, the microbes that call your skin home. Now researchers can create interactive 3D maps that show where each molecule lingers on your body, thanks to a new method developed by University of California San Diego and European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) researchers. The te
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: How to spot fake metals with acids Proteins are fundamental macromolecules for life, with a diversity of functions, like acting as channels through cellular walls, catalysers, DNA benders, etc. When it comes to these functions, what matters is the layout of ...
1d
Ingeniøren

HSS-teknologi flytter 3D-printeren længere ind i produktionen Det vakte opsigt, da HP helt tilbage i 2014 præsenterede ideen til en ny type 3D-printer, der sidste år kom på markedet under navnet Jet Fusion. I mellemtiden har konkurrenterne ikke ligget på den lade side og lover nu tilsvarende hastighed og materialeholdbarhed. Princippet, som HP bruger, går også under navnet High Speed Sintering (HSS) og er udviklet på Loughborough University i Stor­britannie
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook changing how it identifies 'fake news' stories The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit ...
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular mapping made easy 3-D map of the molecules on an ATM machine. This map demonstrates how we transfer molecules from our skin to the objects we interact with, providing information that may have many forensic applications. Credit: UC San Diego and EMBL Every day, every inch of skin on your body comes into contact with thousands of molecules—from food, cosmetics, sweat, the microbes that call your skin home. Now rese
1d
Quanta Magazine

Mathematicians Find Wrinkle in Famed Fluid Equations The Navier-Stokes equations capture in a few succinct terms one of the most ubiquitous features of the physical world: the flow of fluids. The equations, which date to the 1820s, are today used to model everything from ocean currents to turbulence in the wake of an airplane to the flow of blood in the heart. While physicists consider the equations to be as reliable as a hammer, mathematicians eye
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Algae Growth Speeds Up Greenland's Melting Algae growth fuels Greenland ice sheet melt Algae growth as a result of climate change is making the Greenland ice sheet, a primary contributor to sea-level rise, melt faster, according to a new study. Algae grows naturally on the ice sheet, but it thrives under a warmer climate. It makes the Greenland ice sheet, which is the second-largest ice sheet on Earth, less reflective of the sun, which me
1d
The Atlantic

The New Casualties of Automation During the last big wave of automation in the 1980s and 1990s, technology produced new jobs and made others obsolete. The demand for rote-labor workers had diminished, while that for workers with computer-based skills had gone up. Laborers who didn’t have much experience beyond their rote jobs were, in turn, hit the hardest, and those laborers tended to be black: “Even before the economic restruc
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to spot fake metals with acids (video) WASHINGTON, Dec. 21, 2017 -- Acids are reactive, with even weak acids like vinegar interacting with other materials to wow students. But strong acids can really put on a show. For example, aqua regia, or royal water, is a mixture of two strong acids -- hydrochloric and nitric acids - that can dissolve gold, a noble metal. This reaction can be put to use. Watch as Reactions employs some acid know-
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of a 4,000-year-old military network in northern Syria The discovery of more than a thousand sites in Syria has revised our understanding of the settlement of the steppes during all periods in the history of the Near East. Recently, analysis of aerial and satellite images has enabled the discovery of a vast structured surveillance and communication network dating from the Middle Bronze Age (2nd millennium BCE). This research, led by researchers from
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook Lets Firms Exclude Older People from Job Ads Computer Vision Algorithms Are Still Way Too Easy to Trick AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research shows, the systems can still be tripped up by examples that would never fool a person. Labsix, a group of MIT students who recently tricked an image classifier developed by Google… Read more AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research
1d
Futurity.org

Chunky monkeys hint obesity risk starts before birth A new study with vervet monkeys suggests how genes, pedigree, and environment work together to influence adult obesity. In 2004, the monkeys of the Vervet Research Colony got an unpleasant surprise. Scientists noticed that the 350-or-so African green monkeys, also called vervets, were getting a little chunky, so they changed the animals’ diet from regular monkey chow to high-fiber, high-protein f
1d
Live Science

The Truth About Those 'Alien Alloys' in The NY Times UFO Story What to make of a Las Vegas building full of unidentified alloys? The New York Times published a stunning story Saturday (Dec. 16) revealing that the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) had, between 2007 and 2012, funded a $22 million program for investigating UFOs. The story included three revelations that were tailored to blow readers' minds: Many high-ranking people in the federal gov
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists learned to predict public corruption with neural networks Scientists from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) and University of Valladolid have developed a neural network prediction model of corruption based on economic and political factors. The results of the research were published in Social Indicators Research : https:/ / link. springer. com/ article/ 10. 1007/ s11205-017-1802-2 . Researchers contend that corruption must be detected as soon as po
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking a solvation process step by step Chemists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum tracked with unprecedented spatial resolution how individual water molecules attach to an organic molecule. They used low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to visualize the processes at a scale smaller than one nanometre. This allowed them to investigate the phenomena of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity at the molecular level, i.e. why certain parts of
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A particle like slow light IMAGE: This is Sami Dzsaber and Prof. Silke Bühler-Paschen. view more Credit: TU Wien There was great excitement back in 2015, when it was first possible to measure these 'Weyl fermions' - outlandish, massless particles that had been predicted almost 90 years earlier by German mathematician, physician and philosopher, Hermann Weyl. Now, once again, there has been a breakthrough in thi
1d
The Atlantic

A Woman Gave Birth From an Embryo Frozen for 24 Years Emma Wren Gibson, frozen as an embryo in 1992, was born a few days after Thanksgiving in 2017, more than 25 years later. It’s the longest an embryo is known to have been frozen before being born as baby. In fact, the embryo that became Emma is only a year younger than the woman who gave birth to her, Tina Gibson. “This embryo and I could have been best friends,” Gibson, now 26, told CNN . Tina an
1d
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The next generation of African architects and designers | Christian BenimanaChristian Benimana wants to build a network of architects who can help Africa's booming cities flourish in sustainable, equitable ways -- balancing growth with values that are uniquely African. From Nigeria to Burkina Faso and beyond, he shares examples of architecture bringing communities together. A pan-African movement of architects, designers and engineers on the continent and in diaspora are
1d
Futurity.org

Ex-smokers might want to eat more of these 2 foods Ex-smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruit, especially apples, experience a slower decline in lung function as they age, a study suggests. The findings raise the possibility that nutrients in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. Researchers found that adults who on average ate more than two tomatoes or three portions of fresh fruit a day had a slower decline in lun
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ural scientists synthesized a new phosphor IMAGE: This is a crystal structure of the compound. view more Credit: Source: Yana Baklanova (co-author of the research study) Chemists and physicists from Ural Federal University and Institute of Chemistry of Solids of the Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences synthesized a new compound and studied its properties. Derivative of compounds may be used to convert UV radiation into visible
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University research has revealed that as digital past-times have become intertwined with daily life, children have adapted their behaviours to include their devices. Much like adu
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In the mood for love Scientists at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal) and Indiana University (IU, USA) showed that there is a specific mood associated with religious celebrations, and that this "loving mood" can influence human reproductive behaviour. The research team led by Joana Goncalves-Sa and Luis Rocha used worldwide data from Twitter and Google Trends to find that culture, and not only biolog
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New lensless camera creates detailed 3-D images without scanning WASHINGTON -- Researchers have developed an easy-to-build camera that produces 3D images from a single 2D image without any lenses. In an initial application of the technology, the researchers plan to use the new camera, which they call DiffuserCam, to watch microscopic neuron activity in living mice without a microscope. Ultimately, it could prove useful for a wide range of applications involvin
1d
Popular Science

The easiest way to keep your home warm this winter Winter winds may be howling, but you can trust your walls and roof to keep them outside...right? Unfortunately, small leaks let icy drafts in and cozy heat out. To prevent this, you should thoroughly winterize your house . But that takes time and money. In a pinch, you can at least halt air from escaping through the cracks underneath windows and doors. And the easiest way to do that is with DIY d
1d
Futurity.org

Google searches reveal cause of post-holiday ‘baby boom’ Many studies cite seasonal changes to explain why birth rates peak in September—a “baby boom” nine months after the holidays. But new research finds that spikes in pregnancies are actually rooted in society, not biology. The evidence comes from the “collective unconscious” of web searches and Twitter posts that researchers now use to reveal our hidden desires and motivations. “The rise of the web
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers solve 'four-phonon' thermal-conductivity obstacle key to tech applications These diagrams describe the interactions of four phonons, quantum-mechanical phenomena related to the effects of heat conduction in solid materials. In such “four-phonon interactions,” one phonon splits into three; or two phonons join to form two new phonons; or three phonons combine into one. New research findings have implications for research and various commercial technologies. Credit: Purdue
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

We Have Souls, and So Do Crows Maybe because it’s Winter Solstice, the darkest and hence most spiritual time of year, I’ve been thinking about souls. By soul I mean essence, what makes you uniquely you and me uniquely me. From one point of view, souls cannot possibly exist. To be human is to shape-shift, shedding one identity after another. Think of all the transitions we go through on the way from infancy to adulthood. In
1d
Science : NPR

Mistrial Declared In Bundy Ranch Standoff Case The government's case against Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy accuses him of leading an armed standoff over control of U.S. public lands in 2014.
1d
Feed: All Latest

The 12 Most-read WIRED Magazine Stories of 2017 There’s a moment in James Vlahos’ piece— "A Son’s Race to Give His Dying Father Immortality" —that made me tear up the first time I read it. Vlahos has just finished a prototype of a chatbot that speaks much like his father, who’s dying of lung cancer. The system has been trained on hours and hours of recordings of the father’s life story. It actually works, and now, after demonstrating it to his
1d
Feed: All Latest

Build a Thermoelectric Generator, Like the Ones That Power Deep Space Missions The phrase "heat engine" might trigger some bad memories from your introductory thermodynamics course. But don't worry, I am going to show you the coolest heat engine you could possibly image—the thermoelectric generator (TEG) . The basic idea behind a heat engine is to draw some useful energy out of a temperature difference. This output energy could be mechanical or electrical—and other weird st
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New lensless camera creates detailed 3-D images without scanning The lensless DiffuserCam consists of a diffuser placed in front of a sensor (bumpson the diffuser are exaggerated for illustration). The system turns a 3-D scene into a 2-D image on the sensor. After a one-time calibration, an algorithm is used to reconstruct 3-D images computationally. The result is a 3-D image reconstructed from a single 2-D measurement. Credit: Laura Waller, University of Cali
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How singing your heart out could make you happier IMAGE: The Sing Your Heart Out project runs weekly singing workshops, aimed at people with mental health conditions as well as the general public. It originally began at Hellesdon psychiatric hospital... view more Credit: Sing Your Heart Out Singing in groups could make you happier - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Researchers examined the benefit
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Standardized breastfeeding monitoring for Germany? All participants agreed that breastfeeding has positive effects on the health and wellbeing of the child and the mother. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months provides sufficient nutrition for the majority of infants. Depending on the child's growth and development, complementary food should be given no later than at the beginning of the 7th month of life and no earlier than the begin
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SUTD researchers discover a Valleytronics route towards reversible computer IMAGE: (a) This is aSchematic drawing of the valleytronic logic gate (b) Operation of the valleytronic logic gate (c-e) Electrical characteristics of the valleytronic logic gate (f) Traditional reversible logical operation... view more Credit: Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) In many two-dimensional (2D) materials, electrons not only possess charge and spin, but furt
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shining molecules distinguish between proteins in the brain IMAGE: Brain tissue with Alzheimer's pathology, stained with one of the new tau-specific molecules (orange) and one of the molecules previously developed by the group at Linköping University (blue). The image... view more Credit: Peter R Nilsson Small shining molecules developed by scientists at Linköping University in Sweden can be designed to distinguish between plaque of different proteins
1d
Ingeniøren

»Det skete i de dage...« Men kan hunkøn egentlig jomfruføde hankøn? Ifølge Matthæus- og Lukasevangelierne var Maria jomfru, da hun fødte Jesus. Men kan hunkøn overhovedet jomfruføde hankøn - hvis ikke hos mennesker, så hos dyr? Ingen mennesker eller pattedyr, som videnskaben har kendskab til, har foretaget en jomfrufødsel. Men flere dyrearter er i stand til at få unger, selvom mødrene er jomfruer. Det betegnes partenogenese. Partenogenese er vidt udbredt blandt h
1d
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: What Does a Bee See?Scientists identify floral temperature patterns as a sensory cue that may help bees identify flower species.
1d
Popular Science

NASA’s next mission will either grab part of a comet, or bop around one of Saturn's moons Which new frontier will we head towards? On Wednesday, NASA narrowed that choice down to two with an announcement proclaiming that their next New Frontiers mission would either play tag with the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko or hopscotch around Saturn’s moon, Titan. New Frontiers missions are mid-range missions intended to explore our solar system. They each have a budget that is capped at roug
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protected tropical forests are threatened by the bounty of adjacent oil palm plantations A new study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has warned of the threat that oil palm production poses to tropical forests. Over two decades, the international team of scientists found that oil palm production in Malaysia has an impact beyond the direct loss of habitat. It also provides a rich source of food for nearby wildlife such as wild boars, which then multip
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding the impact of defects on the properties of moS2 IMAGE: The study on 2-D molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) defects employed low frequency noise measurements and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The enlarged image shows an AFM cantilever tip pointing to an... view more Credit: IBS, published on Nature Communications Researchers at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have shown tha
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robots and humans: How to improve physical interaction Popular entertainment often portrays robots as the perfect best friend, from Bender in the cartoon Futurama to the mighty Transformers. These close friendships don't exist off-screen yet, but humans and robots are getting to know each other better in real life. Dr. Ali Safavi and Prof. Mehrdad Zadeh at Kettering University have proposed a model to improve human-robot interactions using haptic gui
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't step on my heels: Scientists teach robots how to respect personal space Robots have a lot to learn about humans, including how to respect their personal space. Scientists at the Institute of Automatics of the National University of San Juan in Argentina are giving mobile robots a crash course in avoiding collisions with humans. The researchers published their methods in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Associat
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Motion in action: Scientists develop method to track human movements more accurately Scientists have developed a data-driven method to better detect and track human movements for use in technologies such as at-home personal training videos or monitoring at-risk elderly patients. The scientists published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinca (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Association of Automation. The collaborative research team includes scien
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mixing state of black carbon from biomass burning differs in different combustion phase IMAGE: Schematic diagram illustrating the mixing state of rBC during flaming combustion (left) and smoldering combustion (right). view more Credit: Xiaole PAN As a short-lived climate forcer, black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere play a vital role in climate change by absorbing solar radiation and altering the formation, lifespan and albedo of clouds. It also provides "seed" for haze format
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rosie's robustness: Bringing the Jetsons to reality Rosie, the housekeeper from The Jetsons, has been the archetypal representative of helper robots since she wheeled onto televisions screens in the early 1960s. While Rosie vacuumed and washed dishes without a hint of incoordination, it turns out her real-world counterpart is far more likely to tip over and become a hindrance instead of a helper. The contemporary version of the Rosie robot is actu
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Activists want to build bridge over freeway to provide safe crossing for wildlife As 101 Freeway traffic streaked past, a dozen conservationists and fundraisers gathered this week just west of Liberty Canyon Road in Agoura Hills, their eyes alternating between maps they carried and the contours of a canyon where mountain lions hunt and breed. But it wasn't the big cats they were looking for. Their target, instead, was a patch of land that could anchor a 200-foot-long, 165-foot
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Home Depot's online push continues with Company Store buy The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit ...
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research opening gates for better targeting drugs Through their research, Cuello, along with D. Marien Cortes, determined how to open gates for better targeting drugs. Credit: TTUHSC Researchers at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics and the Center for Membrane Protein. Research have determined the kinetic cycle of a potassium channel at atomic resolution. Potassium cha
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research opening gates for better targeting drugs IMAGE: Dr. Cuello determined the kinetic cycle of a potassium channel at atomic resolution. view more Credit: TTUHSC Researchers at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics and the Center for Membrane Protein. Research have determined the kinetic cycle of a potassium channel at atomic resolution. Potassium channel
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Assay to ID anticancer reagents targeting fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase IMAGE: ALDOA catalyzes the reversible aldol cleavage of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-BP) into D-Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). ALDOA activity is assayed by monitoring NADH levels via a coupled enzymatic reaction using... view more Credit: Eun Jeong Cho, Ph.D. An original research report by Eun Jeong Cho et al. (University of Texas at Austin) in the Jan
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Duke-led team develops more accurate tool to track new HIV infections DURHAM, N.C. - Researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute have led an effort to develop a more accurate way to gauge the incidence of HIV infections in large populations, which will improve research and prevention strategies worldwide. The new method more correctly identifies new vs. long-standing infections - an important distinction for determining where to target public health measures an
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanofractionation platform with parallel mass spec to ID cytochrome CYP1A2 inhibitors IMAGE: Generation of Phase I metabolic mixture of a drug is followed by chromatographic separation of the metabolites. A split directs eluent to MS for compound identification and to nanofractionation on... view more Credit: Jeroen Kool A new (and freely available) original research article by Barbara M. Zietek et al., now available ahead-of-print at SLAS Discovery Online, presents a fast, robust
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers map molecular interaction that prevents aggressive breast cancer IMAGE: An x-ray crystallographic structure of the Numb domain that binds to Mdm2, with the crucial stretch of 11 amino acids--only present in Numb isoforms 1 and 2--shown in red.... view more Credit: : Colaluca et al., 2018 Researchers in Italy have discovered how specific versions of a protein called Numb protect the key tumor suppressor p53 from destruction. The study, which will be publish
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein analysis allows for treatment of eye-disease symptoms with existing drugs Demonstrating the potential of precision health, a team led by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine has matched existing drugs to errant proteins expressed by patients with a rare eye disease. "Analyzing fluid samples from the eye can totally change how we treat patients," said Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD, associate professor of ophthalmology. The team employed proteomics, the la
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The muscle of machinery: How to better control robotic movements Researchers have improved the control of a key robotic component to better ensure the safety of humans. They published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Association of Automation . The team, based at Nankai University, China, focused on series elastic actuators. The actuator is the mover of a robotic limb--it's the piece tha
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emphasizing the auto in automobile: A unified approach for automated vehicles The idea of driverless cars continues to make headlines across the world, including the recent revelation that researchers don car seat costumes to observe how the public interacts with cars that appear driverless. Despite the apparent absurdity of such research techniques, driverless cars are approaching the on ramp to reality. A team of researchers have proposed an integrated framework to help
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Medications alone don't help smokers quit IMAGE: John P. Pierce, PhD, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center. view more Credit: UC San Diego Health Pharmaceutical interventions are routinely prescribed to help people quit smoking. However, a new study by University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers suggests that, despit
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New class of anti-cancer drug effective against kidney cancer DALLAS - Dec. 20, 2017 - Metastatic kidney cancer remains largely incurable. Despite a dozen treatments and several immunotherapies, survival rates beyond 5 years remain around 10 percent. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology reports initial findings with a novel drug belonging to a new class of medicines called HIF-2a inhibitors that show promise in treating metastatic kidney ca
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of a 4,000-year-old military network in northern Syria View of the thickness of the Qal'at al-Rahiyya northern wall. Credit: CNRS The discovery of more than a thousand sites in Syria has revised our understanding of the settlement of the steppes during all periods in the history of the Near East. Recently, analysis of aerial and satellite images has enabled the discovery of a vast structured surveillance and communication network dating from the Midd
1d
Dagens Medicin

Politikere vil have direkte dialog med klinikere om Sundhedsplatformen Nyt forum skal bane vejen for en direkte kontakt mellem Hovedstadens politikere og dem, der arbejder med Sundhedsplatformen.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic research breakthrough to boost barley production Grain growers are celebrating a recent breakthrough by Murdoch University researchers that will lead to a boost in future barley production. Professor Chengdao Li, Director of Murdoch's Western Barley Genetics Alliance, said the exciting development would see new lines of barley bred without blue aleurone – a blue tinge to the grain – which is not desired by the market. This is a significant is
1d
Ingeniøren

Alvorlig revne i japansk højhastighedstog - var få centimeter fra fatal ulykke For første gang i 53 år har den japanske havarikommission betegnet et problem med et af landets shinkansen-tog som 'alvorligt.' Det skriver flere japanske medier - heriblandt avisen Nikkei. Den 11. december opdagede personale fra operatøren JR West, at det lugtede usædvanligt i en af vognene i et togsæt, der var på vej fra Hakata mod Tokyo. Passagererne beskrev det, som om der var en tåge i vogne
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insights on graphene Credit: Leiden University Graphene floating on water does not repel water, as many researchers believe, but rather attracts it. This has been demonstrated by chemists Liubov Belyaeva and Pauline van Deursen and their supervisor Grégory F. Schneider. The study is published in Advanced Materials . Graphene is made up of the same material as graphite – found in pencils for example – which is why it
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research and tools help Internet of Things applications adapt better In a society built on communication and Internet of Things, computer systems that can adapt to changing circumstances instead of crashing become ever more important. Muhammad Usman Iftikhar's research sheds important light on how one can guarantee that a self-adaptive system is able to achieve its goals. What if a computer system that controls power distribution could see a problem coming up and
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanofractionation platform with parallel mass spec to ID cytochrome CYP1A2 inhibitors Generation of Phase I metabolic mixture of a drug is followed by chromatographic separation of the metabolites. A split directs eluent to MS for compound identification and to nanofractionation on a 384-well plate for bioassaying. Finally, a bioassay chromatogram is reconstructed and comparison with parallel obtained MS data is performed. Credit: Jeroen Kool A new (and freely available) original
1d
Feed: All Latest

The Best Movies You Missed in 2017, From 'The Big Sick' to 'The Florida Project' Every year more movies hit theaters than any sane person could ever hope to try to see. Yet we here at WIRED are crazy enough to try to see as many as we can. And in the process we often catch films that might fall under the radar (or just get overlooked in lieu of a second, or third, viewing of Thor: Ragnarok or Star Wars: The Last Jedi ). To ensure you don't go into 2018 without knowing what yo
1d
Feed: All Latest

Light-Triggered Genes Reveal the Hidden Workings of Memory Susumu Tonegawa ’s presence announces itself as soon as you walk through the door of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. A three-foot-high framed photograph of Tonegawa stands front and center in the high-ceilinged lobby, flanked by a screen playing a looping rainbow-hued clip of recent research highlights. Quanta Magazine About Original story re
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

A Semester-Long Program Aims to Help College Students with Mental Health Conditions BOSTON—Evan Jones was excited when he signed up for a contemporary art class at community college. Then the professor announced the course would focus heavily on class participation. “That was the first class that I dropped,” he said. Jones’s persistent, severe anxiety has shadowed him for years. He’s struggled to pipe up in class and to make friends. His anxiety was so acute, he left h
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA's next satellite propelled by butane ESA’s biggest small satellite yet: the GomX-4B 6-unit CubeSat will demonstrate miniaturised technologies, preparing the way for future operational nanosatellite constellations. Credit: GomSpace ESA's next miniature satellite will be its first able to change orbit. Thanks to a compact thruster resembling a butane cigarette lighter, the cereal box-sized satellite will fly around its near-twin to te
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking a solvation process step by step Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, Karsten Lucht and Karina Morgenstern can observe the behaviour of individual molecules in detail. Credit: RUB, Marquard Chemists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have tracked with unprecedented spatial resolution how individual water molecules attach to an organic molecule. They used low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to visualize the proc
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The chemical industry can achieve a 36% reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, study shows Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced with already existing technologies. Credit: Fotolia, Chad McDermott The chemical sector has a big role to play in tackling climate change and achieving EU energy targets. The wide scale use of existing and—in particular—emerging innovative energy technologies can bring big emissions savings to the sector. The Joint Research Centre (JRC), the European Commis
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shining molecules distinguish between proteins in the brain Brain tissue with Alzheimer’s pathology, stained with one of the new tau-specific molecules (orange) and one of the molecules previously developed by the group at LiU (blue). The image has been taken in a fluorescence microscope. Credit: Peter R Nilsson Small shining molecules developed by scientists at Linköping University in Sweden can be designed to distinguish between plaque of different prot
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants can choose between alternative responses to competition The plant Potentilla reptans growing under simulated dense vegetation. Credit: Udi Segev Biologists from the University of Tübingen have demonstrated that plants can choose between alternative competitive responses according to the stature and densities of their opponents. A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology reveals that plants can evaluate the competitive abili
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum coupling Hybrid quantum architecture—Superconductor chip with captured atoms. Credit: University of Tübingen Today's quantum technologies are set to revolutionize information processing, communications, and sensor technology in the coming decades. The basic building blocks of future quantum processors are, for example, atoms, superconducting quantum electronic circuits, spin crystals in diamonds, and phot
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop method to assess damage from natural disasters Credit: Texas Tech University Awesome. Amazing. Incredible. Unbelievable. Spectacular. These words aptly describe what is left following any natural disaster, whether it's an earthquake, tornado, hurricane or any other occurrence where homes, buildings or infrastructure are destroyed and lives are turned upside down. However, these words are not the words the people whose lives have been permanen
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How invasive weeds can make wildfires hotter and more frequent Mixed grill: Burning combinations of invasive and native plants helps us understand how invasive plants make fires hotter and more likely. Credit: Sarah Wyse, CC BY-ND Over the past year the global media has been full of reports of catastrophic fires in California , the Mediterranean, Chile and elsewhere. One suggested reason for increases in catastrophic wildfires has been human-induced climate
1d
The Scientist RSS

CRISPR Proves Promising for Treating ALS in MiceThe gene-editing tool was effective in disabling a defective gene responsible for some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
1d
Futurity.org

Why Christmas music is wrapped in nostalgia Love it or hate it, there’s no escaping it: From Thanksgiving to Christmas, the songs of the season are everywhere. Coffee shops, grocery stores, and entire radio stations dedicated to holiday songs make it seem like sleigh bells are endlessly ringing. Music has long been part of the cultural phenomenon of Christmas, says Matthew Mugmon, assistant professor of music at the University of Arizona’s
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor drainage in slums and refugee camps can be lethal—we must do better Credit: Margaret Mezue, Author provided If your main worry about puddles is that you might absent-mindedly wander into one and get your feet wet, consider yourself lucky. Standing water can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes and other insects which can carry diseases such as zika, dengue or chikungunya, and therefore puddles represent a serious threat to human health in much of the world. Alread
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Delving into the atomic realm “Atoms, molecules and the bonds that hold them together – I want to see these things as they actually appear in nature,” says Wilson Ho, UCI’s Donald Bren Professor of Physics & Astronomy and Chemistry, here seated beside the tanks of liquid helium that allow his scanning tunneling microscope to operate at a temperature of nearly absolute zero. Credit: Elena Zhukova / UCOP Models and schematic di
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food sharing as a means to reduce waste and boost urban sustainability Credit: Shutterstock From community gardens to restaurants and cafes using out-of-date food to create meals that are charged on a voluntary basis, food-sharing initiatives are gaining momentum. But little is known about the cumulative nature of these urban food initiatives at a city, nation or aggregate level as large, comparative analyses are rarely developed. This means that the full range and
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New photovoltaic production technique reduces cost while boosting stability Credit: Shutterstock Perovskite solar cells are cheap to produce and simple to manufacture. Improving their efficiency, as one EU-backed project has just done, makes them an ever-more compelling alternative source of energy. A perovskite solar cell includes a perovskite structured compound, most commonly a hybrid organic-inorganic lead or tin halide-based material, as the light-harvesting active
1d
Ingeniøren

Kæmpeprojekt rykker nærmere: Norsk gas skal til Polen via Danmark Mindst 550 kilometer gasrørledning i Nordsøen, på det danske fastland og i Østersøen er nu lidt tættere på at blive til virkelighed Danske Energinet og deres polske partner GAZ-SYSTEM står bag projektet. De ansøgte i starten af november om miljøvurdering. De næste fire uger kan borgere, virksomheder og interesseorganisationer komme med deres input til de mulige miljøkonsekvenser forbundet med gas
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study of beetle flagellum offers possible way to improve medical devices Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) image of the Cassida rubiginosa flagellum tip (25 μm). Credit: Matsumura, Kovalev, Gorb, Sci. Adv . 2017;3: eaao5469 A trio of researchers at Kiel University in Germany has discovered how the male thistle tortoise beetle manages to penetrate the coiled duct inside the female reproductive organ without buckling his flagellum. In their paper published on th
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The inflatable bridge The concrete dome, which is then cut on both ends, creating a bridge. Credit: Vienna University of Technology A wildlife crossing over the upcoming Koralm railway is being built using a new construction technique developed by TU Wien. Traditional support structures are replaced by an air cushion. The shell construction methods which are usually used to build bridges and domes generally rely on ex
1d
Popular Science

Fruits and vegetables could save your life—but not from any one disease. Eating plenty of fruits and veggies is probably the single most important piece of advice that most Americans ignore on a daily basis. As a country, we eat woefully little ruffage, and it is undoubtedly hurting our health. But any story that claims eating more [insert fruit or veggie here] will directly prevent you from getting [insert common and specific disease] is misleading you in a major way
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Braiding Science Together with Indigenous Knowledge “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.” —Albert Einstein As the negative consequences of human-induced environmental and social changes are becoming increasingly obvious, there is a growing recognition that “status quo” approaches to resource development and management, rooted in the dominant, largely linear, reduc
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows protected tropical forests are threatened by the bounty of adjacent oil palm plantations Oil palm harvest at Pasoh. Credit: Nanyang Technological University A new study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has warned of the threat that oil palm production poses to tropical forests. Over two decades, the international team of scientists found that oil palm production in Malaysia has an impact beyond the direct loss of habitat. It also provides a rich sour
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create single device capable of dual transistor operation Credit: Bhattacharjee et al. Transistors, the building blocks of modern devices, act like electronic switches controlling the flow of current across circuits. In the last few decades, they have shrunk more than 1000 times in size, making devices such as laptops and smartphones faster and more compact. As they grow smaller, however, they are also consuming and wasting more power. The most common t
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A century of galaxy discrimination revealed by giant European astronomy survey Credit: Cardiff University A huge European astronomy survey, whose results are released today (21 December 2017), has revealed that the view of the Universe provided by traditional optical telescopes is seriously biased. The Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) was a survey carried out by an international team led by researchers at Cardiff University with the European Herschel Space Observatory in the far-in
1d
New Scientist - News

Booby-trapped obstacle course trains older people not to fall Staying upright Neuroscience Research Australia By Alice Klein My foot slips on a loose tile and for a split-second I’m flailing in mid-air, but then I feel a comforting tug as my harness pulls me upright. I’m at the falls prevention lab in Sydney, where a first-of-its-kind obstacle course has been designed to make seniors fall over – and then instinctively learn how not to. One-third of peop
1d
New Scientist - News

NASA plans a launch to Titan or a return to comet 67P in 2025 Dragonfly could explore Titan, one of Saturn’s moons NASA By Leah Crane NASA has selected two finalists for its New Frontiers programme: a mission to bring back bits of a comet, and a spacecraft that will land on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan. Each of the teams will receive $4 million to continue developing its concept and working out any kinks. In July 2019, NASA will choose a single mi
1d
Feed: All Latest

Using Genetics to Make a More Perfect Christmas Tree This year, for the first time in my life, I’ll be hosting my family for the holidays. And to their deep disgruntlement, we’ll be celebrating it without a Christmas tree. No, this isn’t some principled stance against the yuletide-industrial complex or a personal front in the war on Christmas. I’m just much more interested in an indoor evergreen interloper when its needles fall in someone else’s ho
1d
Feed: All Latest

The Tech That's Going to Make Air Travel Less Awful You have to be a hardcore avgeek to enjoy flying these days. People shuffling from one line to the next, shoes off, laptops out, passports checked, power failures, where’s the bar? But airlines, airport operators, and security staff, are turning to tech to ease the pain. Here are some of the latest airport innovations to look out for. Just Checking You already know this, but: Check in before you
1d
Futurity.org

How CRISPR could fight genetic hearing loss Gene editing could one day help people at risk of losing their hearing due to genetic mutations, according to new research. Xue (Sherry) Gao, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Rice University, is co-lead author of a new paper in Nature that reports on the promise of gene editing to treat autosomal dominant hearing diseases. Gao performed the research while a postd
1d
Live Science

The 10 Biggest Archaeology Discoveries of 2017From mysterious stone structures in Saudi Arabia, to a previously undiscovered cave holding Dead Sea Scrolls, here are 10 of the coolest archaeological finds of 2017.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CMS releases more than one petabyte of open data A collision event recorded by CMS in 2012 showing a “Higgs candidate”, available on the CERN Open Data portal with the latest release of CMS Open Data. Credit: Tom McCauley/CMS/CERN The CMS Collaboration at CERN have just made public around half of the data collected in 2012 by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. This release includes sets used to discover the Higgs boson , and is bein
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Hot' electrons heat up solar energy research The figure in the foreground shows near-infrared and broadband light pulses (squiggly lines at top) striking a silver nanocube measuring 150 nanometers square. The near-infrared pulse excites electrons in the nanostructure, while the broadband pulse monitors their optical response. An aluminum oxide spacer separates the nanocube from a gold film with a thickness of 50 nanometers. The spacer measu
1d
Live Science

Byzantine Monastery with Colorful Mosaics Unearthed in Israel The ruins of a 1,500-year-old church were unearthed during salvage excavations in Israel. Credit: Israel Antiquities Authority The remains of a 1,500-year-old monastery and church, complete with a colorful mosaic floor, have been unearthed in Israel. The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced that the Byzantine monastery (the complex where the church was located) was uncovered during salvag
1d
Live Science

Photos: Remains of Ancient Monastery in Israel Ancient marble Credit: Israel Antiquities Authority Archaeologists and high-school students participating in the dig uncovered architectural elements at the site, including this marble pillar base decorated with crosses. Valuable decor Credit: Israel Antiquities Authority The elaborate mosaic floor and the marble imported from Turkey indicate that the Byzantine church was wealthy when it was in u
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunting of bighorn sheep ewes could produce more trophy rams UW Assistant Professor Kevin Monteith, right, and graduate student Tayler LaSharr release a bighorn sheep ram on Wyoming’s Wind River Indian Reservation last March. The two are among authors of a new paper that concludes that hunting of female bighorn sheep may well be one of the most effective ways to increase the number of trophy rams in North American bighorn sheep populations. Credit: Kevin M
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parents in STEM fields boost girls' participation in science degrees Even when girls perform just as well as boys on standardized math tests, they are half as likely to major in science at college. However, having one parent or guardian work in the STEM ( science , technology, engineering or math ) field makes it more likely for girls to perform better in math and to enroll in a "hard sciences" college degree in programs such as engineering, architecture, math and
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Piezoelectric lighter hovering above South Pole may help pinpoint mystery source of cosmic energy Launching the Hi-Cal experiment. Credit: University of Kansas Soaring some 23 miles over the South Pole, a University of Kansas experiment slung from a high-altitude weather balloon is calculating how the surface of Antarctica reflects radio signals caused by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The Hi-Cal (High-Altitude Calibration) experiment loops around the South Pole, trailing hundreds of miles be
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prototype space sensors take test ride on NASA ER-2 The view from NASA's ER-2 flying at approximately 65,000 feet (19,812 meters) near a controlled fire burning near Flagstaff, Arizona, during the Aerosol Characterization from Polarimeter and Lidar (ACEPOL) airborne campaign on Nov. 7, 2017. Credit: NASA/Stu Broce Scientists recently completed test flights with prototypes of potential satellite sensors—including two from NASA's Jet Propulsion Labo
1d
Live Science

Poor Pups: Chocolate Poisonings in Dogs Spike During Christmastime 'Tis the season … in which chocolate treats poison pet dogs, according to a new study from England. The research found that pups are four times more likely to go to the veterinarian for chocolate poisoning during Christmastime than any non-holiday time of the year. The findings may help raise awareness among pet owners that Christmastime, and to a lesser extent Easter, are periods when dogs
1d
Live Science

Winter Solstice: The Science of the Shortest Day of 2017 On the winter solstice, the sun is at its southernmost point in the sky in the Northern Hemisphere. Credit: Shutterstock The winter solstice is in full stride today (Dec. 21), which boasts the fewest hours of daylight for 2017 in the Northern Hemisphere. Although the solstice gets an entire day of recognition, it happens in an instant: at 11:28 a.m. EST (16:28 GMT), when the North Pole is a
1d
Science | The Guardian

Bryan Aves obituary My father, Bryan Aves, who has died aged 92, established a successful career as a radiographer and radiotherapist despite having left school at 14 without qualifications. At one point he worked as an assistant for the physicists Otto Frisch and Joseph Rotblat in the secret “tube alloys” experiments that led to the creation of the atom bomb, apparently without knowing what the project was about. B
1d
Science | The Guardian

Keith Briffa obituary My friend and colleague, Keith Briffa, who has died aged 64, was a climate scientist whose influential work helped drive the international acceptance of global warming as being due to human agency. His scientific investigations ranged widely but his most influential and sustained contributions lay in decoding the complex climatic signals encrypted by annual tree rings and thereby positioning the
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA bricks enable self-assembly of 3-D nanostructures from 10,000 unique components The top model and the bottom TEM image shows how the size of a 536 megadalton DNA brick cuboid (grey) compares to that of a much smaller 4.3 megadalton origami cuboid (light blue). Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University DNA, present in almost every cell, is increasingly being used as a building material to construct tiny, but sophisticated structures such as autonomous 'DNA walkers' that ca
1d
Feed: All Latest

The Tricky Ethics of Knightscope's Crime-Fighting Robots In November, the San Francisco SPCA deployed a 5-foot-tall, 400-pound robot to patrol its campus. Not for muscle, mind you, but for surveillance. The SPCA, a large complex nestled in the northeast corner of the city's Mission neighborhood, has long dealt with vandalism, break-ins, and discarded needles in its surrounding parking lots. Fearing for the safety of its staff, the SPCA figured the robo
1d
Feed: All Latest

As Artificial Intelligence Advances, Here Are Five Tough Projects for 2018 For all the hype about killer robots , 2017 saw some notable strides in artificial intelligence. A bot called Libratus out-bluffed poker kingpins , for example. Out in the real world, machine learning is being put to use improving farming and widening access to healthcare . But have you talked to Siri or Alexa recently? Then you’ll know that despite the hype, and worried billionaires , there are
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thousands of citizen-scientists help researchers map kelp forests Scientists believe that kelp forests like this one off of California’s coast are being threatened by climate change. Credit: University of California, Los Angeles Kelp forests grow along coastlines worldwide, largely hidden from view. Like rainforests, they're among the planet's most important ecosystems: beautiful but fragile habitats for a wide array of plant and animal species. But scientists
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New snake species hiding in plain sight Sara Ruane in the New Jersey Pine Barrens with the Pine Snake. Credit: Sara Ruane Samuel McDowell, the late herpetologist and professor at Rutgers-Newark, spent a good part of his life studying ground snakes in New Guinea. Forty years later, Sara Ruane – who joined the Department of Biological Sciences faculty last semester – was able to find evidence that the snakes McDowell studied were, in fac
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality in Aid of Conservation Augmented and mixed reality (AR/MR) has been getting a lot of press recently for its applications in gaming, marketing and productivity. At Internet of Elephants , along with our partners, we are constantly evaluating the question of how emerging technology can benefit wildlife conservation, and we’d like to share some of our discoveries about this one. Using tech, data and gaming, our missio
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unhackable computer under development with DARPA grant By turning computer circuits into unsolvable puzzles, a University of Michigan team aims to create an unhackable computer with a new $3.6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Todd Austin, U-M professor of computer science and engineering, leads the project, called MORPHEUS. Its cybersecurity approach is dramatically different from today's, which relies on software—spe
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung now mass-producing industry's first 2nd-generation, 10-nanometer class DRAM Credit: Samsung Samsung Electronics announced today that it has begun mass producing the industry's first 2nd-generation of 10-nanometer class (1y-nm), 8-gigabit (Gb) DDR4 DRAM. For use in a wide range of next-generation computing systems, the new 8Gb DDR4 features the highest performance and energy efficiency for an 8Gb DRAM chip, as well as the smallest dimensions. "By developing innovative tec
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK's favourite Christmas spirit revealed with online searches Flaming pudding. Credit: Ruth Hartnup Brandy is the UK's favourite Christmas spirit, according to research into our festive online searches from the University of Warwick. Nathan Cunningham from Warwick's Department of Statistics has discovered that during the week of Christmas, UK online searches for brandy have been far higher than for any other alcoholic drink during the last five years. Thi
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds new way to clean up radioactive sites, protect radiotherapy patients, astronauts A new discovery by scientists could aid efforts to clean up radioactive waste sites, and could also help protect military personnel, cancer patients, and astronauts. According to a collaborative study, led by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, published Dec. 20 in PLOS One , "Microbial cells can cooperate to resist high-level chronic ionizing radiation," the
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human impacts on forests and grasslands much larger and older than previously assumed Credit: Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt Human biomass utilization reduces global carbon stocks in vegetation by 50%, implying that massive emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere have occurred over the past centuries and millennia. The contribution of forest management and livestock grazing on natural grasslands to global carbon losses is of similar magnitude as that of deforestation. Currently, th
1d
Ingeniøren

Ørsted vil bygge USA's første kommercielle havmøllepark Ørsted og selskabets amerikanske samarbejdspartner, energiselskabet Eversource, har onsdag afgivet bud i delstatens Massachusetts' første udbud for havvind. Udbuddet er samtidig det første udbud af havvind i kommerciel skala i USA overhovedet. Delstaten Massachusetts har som mål at opstille 1,6 GW offshore vindkraft inden 2027 i et havområde syd for øen Martha's Vineyard. Og i dette første udbud
1d
Ingeniøren

Fire måder at imponere din chef under møder Møder er en del af de flestes hverdag på det moderne arbejdsmarked, uanset om du bryder dig om det eller ej. Derfor giver det mening at vide, hvordan men gebærder sig, hvis man vil udnytte potentialet i at være samlet med ledelse og kollegerne i samme rum. Du skal stråle og vise, hvorfor du er vigtig for virksomheden. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Jobfinder har flere
1d
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Ny partnerskabsaftale skal give erhvervslivet lettere adgang til KU's forskning 21. december 2017 Ny partnerskabsaftale skal give erhvervslivet lettere adgang til KU's forskning VIDEN i spil Danske virksomheder skal have bedre adgang til den specialiserede viden og teknologi, som huses på Københavns Universitet og på GTS-institutterne (Godkendt Teknologisk Service). Det er ambitionen bag en ny partnerskabsaftale, der blev underskrevet på Teknologisk Institut den 20. december
1d
Science : NPR

Why Some Cities Are Better Than Others At Avoiding Gridlock Just because a city is efficient at moving traffic around doesn't mean it's "traffic resilient." Scientists examined 40 cities and ranked them in terms of how they handle disruptions.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study's projections show climate change to increase commercial Indiana energy consumption, reduce residential use Roshanak Nateghi, an assistant professor of industrial engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University, leads research into the effects of climate change on future energy consumption. Credit: Purdue University image/ DeEtte Starr New projections show climate change could induce a 5 percent increase for the average commercial building's energy consumption in Indiana b
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paris Climate Agreement targets challenged New research into the targets set out in the Paris Climate Agreement challenges conventional wisdom on the way that global warming and climate change should be tackled in the long term. Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the 2015 'Paris Agreement' on climate change sets out temperature targets that signatories of the Agreement should strive to achieve, by cu
1d
Ingeniøren

Nordkorea afviser beskyldninger om cyberangreb Det har ikke været småt med cyberkriminalitet i 2017, og i flere tilfælde er Nordkorea blevet udpeget som bagmand bag angrebene - eksempelvis det verdensomspændende ransomware angreb WannaCry, der inficerede over 230.000 computere på verdensplan. Men nu har en talsmand for den nordkoreanske regering blankt afvist, at landet skulle have noget at gøre med de mange angreb. Det skriver Reuters . For
1d
Ingeniøren

Ny teori: Vandet på Mars blev opsuget af klipperne I september 2015 skabte Nasa store overskrifter med nyheden om, at der om sommeren er flydende saltvand på Mars på skråninger, der vender mod Solen. Satellitfotos viser nemlig, at der opstår mørke striber på overfladen, og senere forsvinder stregerne igen. Nu mener forskere fra University of Oxford , at der også er masser af vand ophobet i klipperne på Mars. Mineralogien kan forklare, hvordan van
1d
Feed: All Latest

The Best Games of 2017, From 'Nier: Automata' to 'Legend of Zelda' 2017 was an incredible year for videogames—a mixed bag of genre, style, and mood. The best titles ranged from sweeping adventures to tense shooters to meditations on the existential burden of life. Some of the games released this year will go on to be lauded as the most important, profound videogames of this generation. If you don't know how to dive into videogames in the coming days, here is whe
1d
NYT > Science

Q&A: Starry, Starry Dust Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. What is the cosmic dust that I keep hearing about? What is it made of? Where does it come from? A. One of the most important targets of NASA’s space research is the vast amount of cosmic dust in the universe. It is often referred to as stardust, but there are many kinds in many locations in the solar system, and between planets, stars and galaxies. According to NA
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smartphone app uses computer vision to identify lost animals SciPet, a company incubated at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, and formed in 2016, uses computer vision and artificial intelligence to identify animals. The smartphone app CrowdPet is the result of research carried out by the company. It combines two data sources: photographs of lost animals registered by their owners and photographs of animals sighted in th
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Healthier air due to the low emission zone The study by LfULG and TROPOS shows that the concentrations of the carcinogenic combustion particles of diesel vehicles have been reduced by more than half. In contrast, the pollution with nitrogen oxides has remained nearly constant despite the modern diesel vehicles. Credit: Leipzig Environmental Zone - final report, LfULG/TROPOS The low emission zone in Leipzig was established in March 2011, a
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Leaves contaminate soil with hydrocarbon In the autumn, leaves fall and contaminate soil, according to a study conducted by scientists at Ca' Foscari University of Venice and The Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes (CNR) in collaboration with the Società estense servizi ambientali, a specialized company based in Padua. It happens in woods where clearing the land is required by law for heavy hydrocarbon concentration gr
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Listening' drone helps find victims needing rescue in disasters Blue circles on the map (top right) indicate the detected sound source locations.https://youtu.be/xsD4saM6vFo Credit: Kumamoto Univiversity, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Waseda University "Robot audition" is a research area that was proposed by Adjunct Professor Kazuhiro Nakadai of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Professor Hiroshi G. Okuno of Waseda University in 2000. Until t
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzymes and bacteria move directionally, but bacteria towards food, enzymes away In the presence of food (blue), bacteria (white) swim straight, then change orientation (tumble), and follow this pattern over and over again. This study shows that enzymes (red) move in the same way, but after reacting with substrates (from green to yellow), they continue to run-and-tumble away from the higher concentration of substrates. Credit: IBS Although putting together the words "random"
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds reduced feeding activity of soil detritivores under warmer and drier conditions Woodlice (isopods) are important detrivores in the soil. Credit: Sarah Zieger When the soil warms up, it releases more carbon dioxide (CO2)—an effect that fuels climate change. Until now, it had been assumed that this was mainly due to the presence of small soil-dwelling animals and microorganisms that would eat and breathe more in warmer temperatures. However, a new study in Nature Climate Chang
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News

These 2017 discoveries could be big news, if they turn out to be true In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
1d
Ingeniøren

Fandt løsning ved en fejl: Kan have knækket en af de vigtigste batterikoder Sammen med Dynatec har det norske Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE) udviklet en ny måde at producere silicium til solceller på. Denne proces er nu praktisk talt færdigudviklet og kan bidrage til, at kvaliteten af silicium til solceller øges, mens prisen reduceres. »Under forsøgene i udviklingsfasen begik vi nogle fejl, som betød, at vi kom til at lave noget helt andet, end vi forsøgte at lave,« f
1d
Dagens Medicin

Regionerne styrker samarbejdet på kræftområdetNationale netværk af ledende overlæger skal sikre bedre koordinering af kapaciteten på kræftområdet i hele landet, når den behandlingsmæssige kapacitet er under særligt pres
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds online interest in sex rises at Christmas, with more births nine months later IMAGE: Researchers were able to predict a country's religious majority based upon the correlation in their peak birth periods and higher interest in sex based upon web searches and social media.... view more Credit: Image courtesy Ian Wood, Indiana University It's often wryly observed that birth rates peak in September, with many studies citing seasonal changes in human biology to e
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mental stress-induced constricted blood vessels more likely in women DALLAS, Dec. 21, 2017 - In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men's, potentially raising women's risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal. In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessel
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weekly fish consumption linked to better sleep, higher IQ, Penn study finds Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have IQ scores that are 4 points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all, according to new findings from the University of Pennsylvania published this week in Scientific Reports , a Nature journal. Previous studies showed a relationship between omega-3s, the fatty acids in many types of fish, and imp
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists negate century-old assumption regarding neurons and brain activity Neurons are the basic computational building blocks that compose our brain. Their number is approximately one Tera (trillion), similar to Tera-bits in midsize hard discs. According to the neuronal computational scheme, which has been used for over a century, each neuron functions as a centralized excitable element. The neuron accumulates its incoming electrical signals from connecting neurons thr
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds California's seaside cliffs crumbling without discernible pattern Thinking about building a new home on a bluff overlooking the sea? You may want to think again. A new report out of UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography finds that methods of tracking coastal cliff erosion using historical data to predict the impacts of sea-level rise may be unreliable. "Using those old rates could significantly under predict what's going to happen at a particular
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bioethicist discusses four keys to know about possibilities, pitfalls of gene editing Credit: CC0 Public Domain Gene editing has captivated scientists and medical providers with tantalizing visions of wiping out debilitating inherited diseases. Could conditions like Huntington's disease, for example, be cured by using a tool that acts as a "molecular scissors" to remove and replace disease-causing DNA? Or, would gene editing tempt some to engineer designer babies with genes encode
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds online interest in sex rises at Christmas, with more births nine months later The study found a close correlation between peaks in sexual search terms on Google (black line) and spikes in birth rates (shaded upper line in blue), shifted by nine months, in the Northern Hemisphere (upper chart) and Southern Hemisphere (lower chart). The red line marks Christmas week. Credit: Image courtesy Ian Wood, Indiana University It's often wryly observed that birth rates peak in Septem
1d
Dagens Medicin

Her de 10 mest læste artikler på Dagens Medicin i 2017Svendborg-sagen og Sundhedsplatformen har været de mest populære emner blandt Dagens Medicins læsere.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook ads targeting younger workers discriminate against older workers, lawsuit alleges Amazon, T-Mobile and hundreds of companies and employment agencies are being sued for age discrimination for placing recruiting ads on Facebook that target younger workers. The lawsuit filed Wednesday in San Francisco federal court by the Communications Workers of America labor union and its members is seeking class action status to represent Facebook users 40 or older who may have been denied th
1d
Ingeniøren

Kødforskere anbefaler: Steg julens flæskesteg i vandbad i timevis Står der flæskesteg på julemenuen, men man samtidig mangler plads i ovnen og oveni har lidt svært ved at tilberede kødet perfekt, så bør man skele til de mere professionelle køkkeners begejstring for metoden kaldet sous vide, som nu også vinder indpas i lidt mere avancerede private køkkener. Her tilbereder man maden i vakuumposer lagt i varmt vandbad i timevis. I flæskestegens tilfælde skal svære
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change: Soil animals cannot explain self-reinforcing effect Leipzig. When the soil warms up, it releases more carbon dioxide (CO2) - an effect that further fuels climate change. Until now, it had been assumed that the reason for this was mainly due to the presence of small soil animals and microorganisms that would eat and breathe more in warmer temperatures. However, a new study in Nature Climate Change has shown that this is not the case.
1d
Ingeniøren

Apple indrømmer at sænke hastigheden på iPhones med ældre batterierFor at undgå pludselige shutdowns, throttler Apple bevidst ældre iPhones. Det kan løses ved at udskifte batteriet.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery solved as Australian sub found after 103 years In this undated image provided by the Australian Department of Defense, survey data forms the image of the Australian submarine HMAS AE1 off the coast of the Papua New Guinea island of New Britain. One of Australia's oldest naval mysteries has been solved after the discovery of the wreck of the country's first submarine more than 103 years after its disappearance in World War I. (Australian Depar
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA reveals finalists for next New Frontiers robotic mission: Saturn's moon Titan or Rosetta spacecraft's comet This unprocessed image of Saturn's moon Titan was captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its final close flyby of the hazy, planet-sized moon on April 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute NASA on Wednesday announced two finalists for billion-dollar robotic missions—one to explore a comet and another Saturn's moon Titan—with a launch by the winner planned in the 2020s.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-speed internet to bring big change in remote Alaska In this Oct. 31, 2017 photo provided by Arctic Slope Telephone Association Cooperative, crews with the Arctic Slope Telephone Association Cooperative install fiber distribution cable n Utqiagvik, Alaska, for the new high-speed fiber-optic system launching in Alaska's northern region, where several of the telecom company's communities are located. The new link by Anchorage-based wholesaler Quintil
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discounting humanity: Bargain hunters see customer service workers as less human Credit: University of British Columbia Everyone loves a bargain, but new research suggests some employees may be getting short-changed when it comes to how consumers perceive them when they are price-conscious. The UBC Sauder School of Business study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology , found that bargain-hunters who adopt a "price-conscious mentality"— meaning their main goal is to
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. The researchers found that adults who on average ate more than two tomatoes or mor
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A 508-million-year-old sea predator with a 'jackknife' head Artistic reconstruction of Habelia optata . Habelia is thought to have been an active predator, eating small animals with hard carapaces -- such as trilobites. Credit: Joanna Liang. Copyright: Royal Ontario Museum Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto have entirely revisited a tiny yet exceptionally fierce ancient sea creature called H
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antibiotic resistance: 'Sleeping' bacteria that can survive drug treatment identified Credit: CC0 Public Domain 'Sleeper cells', which can survive doses of antibiotics and lie resting in a dormant state, may hold a key to understanding antibiotic resistance, research has found. Dr Stefano Pagliara, a biophysicist at the University of Exeter, has developed a novel way of identifying cells likely to survive antibiotics , even before the drug treatment. The research, published in the
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fluorescent nanomedicine can guide tumor removal, kill remaining cancer cells Electron microscopic image of a single human lymphocyte. Credit: Dr. Triche National Cancer Institute Oregon State University scientists have developed a nanomedicine platform for cancer that can help doctors know which tissue to cut out as well as kill any malignant cells that can't be surgically removed. The platform allows for greater precision and thoroughness in cancer treatment . Here's how
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers get first complete look at protein behind sense of touch Structure of Piezo1, showing two of the three blades that surround the central pore. Credit: Ward Lab Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of the structure of Piezo1, a member of a family of proteins that convert physical stimuli such as touch or blood flow into chemical signals. The findings, published today in the journal Nature , point the way to targetin
1d
Dagens Medicin

3.000 patienter skifter til Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen overtage både kliniske og forskningsmæssige funktioner fra Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.
1d
Science | The Guardian

We need to talk about Rudolph: sex, drugs and aerodynamic reindeer I t is coming up to Santa’s busy time. Last minute preparations are being made, lists are being checked and double checked, routes are being analysed and optimised. Elves will be working overtime to put the finishing touches to their orders. But please spare a thought for Rudolph and the team of reindeer called on to drag tons of presents over thousands of miles in the most appalling weather. It’
1d
Ingeniøren

Endelig godkendt: I dag åbner Danmarks første letbane Danmarks første letbane, en strækning på 12 kilometer fra banegården i centrum af Aarhus til det nye supersygehus i byens nordlige udkant, åbner i dag, torsdag, kl. 11. Det står klart, efter at Trafikstyrelsen onsdag aften endelig sendte den godkendelse af banen til drift med passagerer, som aarhusianerne har sukket sådan efter. De har kunnet se deres nye Stadler-tog tøffe rundt i byens gader ude
1d
Science | The Guardian

Country diary: venerable beech hosts a swarm of microscopic life T he beech that stands at the end of the stepping stones across Waskerley beck is an elephantine presence, dwarfing surrounding trees. The scarred grey bark of its bole has the colour and texture of pachyderm skin. Its moss-covered surface roots seem to be melting into the earth under the massive burden they support. Over decades they have grown and coalesced, creating hollows between them that r
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teens exposed to drug use, mental distress, violence at risk for HIV in adulthood ANN ARBOR--The psychological and social risks that adolescents experience can have a lasting impact on adulthood. When those risks include drug use, mental distress and exposure to violence, they may engage in unsafe sexual behavior that increases their chance of HIV infection, according to a new longitudinal study by the University of Michigan. "Our findings support the notion that the increasin
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Small Ontario municipalities least prepared to support aging adults Small municipalities in Ontario are less likely than larger centres to be able to accommodate the needs of their aging populations, according to a report from the University of Waterloo. The report, Prepared for the Silver Tsunami: An examination of municipal old-age dependency and age-friendly policy in Ontario, Canada, examined the current and projected demographic profiles of 159 Ontario munic
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New test shows when body is fighting a virus New Haven, Conn.-- A new test that measures RNA or protein molecules in human cells can accurately identify viral infection as a cause of respiratory symptoms, according to a Yale study. Performed with a simple nasal swab, the test could prove to be a quicker, cheaper way to diagnose respiratory viral illnesses than current methods, the researchers said. "It's a simpler test and more cost-effecti
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News

U.S. life expectancy drops for the second year in a row In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Robots Won’t Save the U.K. from a Brexit Labor Shortage When Britain leaves the European Union, many immigrants will be forced out of the country. But many of those people provide much-needed labor, and calls to automate the jobs they leave behind are impractical. Eighteen months after the U.K. voted to leave the EU, many details of the exit remain unnegotiated. But the process is broadly expected to have one big impact: a clampdown on immigration fro
1d
Live Science

UFO Sightings & News UFOs have fascinated and puzzled people for decades, yet hard evidence seems ever elusive. Many people are convinced that not only are extraterrestrials visiting Earth, but that governments have perpetuated a top-secret global conspiracy to cover it up. Here's a look at UFOs throughout history. Today, most people equate UFOs with extraterrestrial intelligence and advanced technologies, but
1d
Live Science

Vostok: Lake Under Antarctic Ice Deep, dark and mysterious, Lake Vostok is one of the largest subglacial lakes in the world. Once a large surface lake in East Antarctica, Lake Vostok is now buried under more than 2 miles (3.7 kilometers) of ice near Russia's Vostok research station. Covered with ice for millennia, cut off from light and contact with the atmosphere, Lake Vostok is one of the most extreme environments on Earth.
1d
Live Science

Neanderthals: Facts About Our Extinct Human Relatives Neanderthals (or Neandertals) are our closest extinct human relatives. There is some debate as to whether they were a distinct species of the Homo genus ( Homo neanderthalensis ) or a subspecies of Homo sapiens . Our well-known, but often misunderstood, fossil kin lived in Eurasia 200,000 to 30,000 years ago, in the Pleistocene Epoch. They started to evolve 300,000 and 100,000 years ago, accord
1d
Live Science

Am I Having a Boy or Girl? — Ultrasound & Sex Prediction Ultrasounds have a variety of purposes during pregnancy, but the use that often receives the most attention is its ability to reveal the sex of the baby. Some parents-to-be can't wait to find out whether they're having a boy or a girl, while others choose to put off knowing the sex until birth. Either way, a sonogram — the grainy, black-and-white image that results from an ultrasound scan —
1d
Ingeniøren

Stor udfordring at få koblet gamle it-systemer op på Sundhedsplatformen I disse uger er Sundhedsplatformen ved at blive kørt ind i Region Sjælland efter en turbulent opstart i Region Hovedstaden. Forløbet i hovedstadsregionen har dog hjulpet Region Sjælland, så en række udfordringer er blevet håndteret allerede inden, de er opstået, fortæller it-direktør Per Buchwaldt i Region Sjælland. Alligevel har idriftsættelsen i Region Sjælland været teknisk omfattende, idet ma
1d
Big Think

4 Ways to Fight Off Winter’s Darkness It’s such a common cause of depression in the U.S. that it has a name: seasonal affective disorder , abbreviated, appropriately enough, as SAD. While it can sometimes occur in the summer, it most typically appears as a response to these dark days of winter. The lack of Vitamin D is one thing, but it’s mostly the feeling of being in the dark all the time, leaving us de-energized and even moody. We
1d
Ingeniøren

Disse virksomheder har flest ledige job lige nu Der kæmpes altid om pladserne på Jobfinders liste over de femten firmaer, som tørster mest efter friske talenter og erfarne folk. Flere virksomheder holder sig i toppen af listen. Blandt andet Netcompany, som endnu en gang indtager førstepladsen med et solidt forspring til nummer to, der i denne måned er 3Shape, som må overgive førerpositionen til en af landets største it-virksomheder. Biotekfirm
1d
Ingeniøren

Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 21. december Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: Danmarks første store by-batteri er rykket ind i det københavnske kvarter Nordhavn. Batteriet skal bruges til at teste fremtidens forbrugsmønstre og sikre forsyningsikkerhed med vedvarende energikilder. Hvor stor er batteriets ener
1d
Ingeniøren

GPS under huden er til næsehorn - ikke til mennesker Sundheds- og omsorgsudvalget i Esbjerg kommune sendte i sidste uge et brev til to ministre, hvor de anmodede om lov til at operere GPS-chips ind under huden på ældre borgere, der lider af demens. Det har affødt en diskussion den sidste uges tid, hvor personer i medierne skiftevis er blevet skræmte eller fascinerede af teknologiens muligheder. Men er det overhovedet muligt at operere GPS-implantat
1d
Big Think

The NIH Restarts Funding for Work With Deadly Pathogens "I believe nature is the ultimate bioterrorist,” says chair of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, Samuel Stanley, “and we need to do all we can to stay one step ahead." Certainly deadly pathogens on the loose have been the stuff of horrible narratives, including books like The Hot Zone and movies such as Contagion and Outbreak . And then there’s biological warfare , the delibera
1d
Feed: All Latest

The Kindle Changed the Book Business. Can It Change Books? In 2007, a small team of Amazon employees had been working for a few years on a new ebook reader project they'd eventually call the Kindle . Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos was eager to finish and sell the thing; he was certain Apple or Google was working on something similar, and didn't want them to beat Amazon to market. The team, sequestered away in an old law office in Seattle, working among racks of t
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Fungal disease poses global threat to snakes Image copyright USGS National Wildlife Health Center/D.E. Green Image caption A northern water snake suffering from a fungal skin infection A potentially deadly fungal disease poses a significant threat to snakes all over the world, new research suggests. The pathogen, has been found in 23 species of wild snake in the US and three in Europe. The fungus causes lesions on the snake's body, leading
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Chocolate poisoning risk to dogs at Christmas Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Dogs have been known to snaffle chocolate decorations, gifts and advent calendars Chocolate poisoning is a risk to the family dog at Christmas, say vets. They warn that dogs are four times more likely to fall ill from eating it at this time of year. A study found hundreds of cases of dogs needing veterinary treatment after stealing chocolate Santas, sele
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forget calorie counting: Diet low in specific amino acids may be the key to weight loss A worldwide epidemic of diabetes and obesity has led many individuals to try to lose weight by dieting - but reduced-calorie diets are notoriously difficult to maintain. New research published in the Journal of Physiology indicates that lowering consumption of specific building blocks of proteins (amino acids) may combat the metabolic problems that occur in diabetes and obesity. In a mouse study,
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A 508-million-year-old sea predator with a 'jackknife' head IMAGE: Artistic reconstruction of Habelia optata . Habelia is thought to have been an active predator, eating small animals with hard carapaces -- such as trilobites. view more Credit: Courtesy of Joanna Liang. Copyright: Royal Ontario Museum TORONTO, ON (Canada) - Paleontologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto have entirely revisit
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

This Fish Emits Damaging Decibels They're among the most amazing events of the wild world: Africa's thundering herds of wildebeest . BBC : "...and nothing will stop them now.">> The incredible migrating monarch butterflies . National Geographic : "One of the great spectacles of nature.">> The captivating chorus "It's a true wildlife spectacle. A fish this loud, this many fish calling." Brad Erisman is a fisheries
1d
Feed: All Latest

It's Time to Take Magic Leap Seriously The last time I visited Magic Leap founder Rony Abovitz at the company’s secretive Florida offices, he told me about the time he met Beaker, the meeping beeping scientist on the Muppet Show. Not the character Beaker, but the real Beaker. The guy was a film director at creator Jim Henson’s studio, Abovitz explained enthusiastically. “He’s tall, he looks just like Beaker and he acts like Beaker! Yo
1d
Futurity.org

The winter solstice was also a big deal for the ancient Maya This year’s winter solstice will take place Thursday December 21, in the Northern Hemisphere, while the Southern Hemisphere experiences its summer solstice. Because the Earth’s axis is tilted farthest from the sun, winter solstice is the darkest, shortest day of the year. “Similar to our fascination with nature and science, for them the solstice and tracking the sun was about creating an understa
1d
Science | The Guardian

Leicester car park where Richard III was buried given protected status The scruffy council car park in Leicester that was revealed in 2012 to an astonished world as the site where Richard III was buried in 1485 is being given scheduled monument status by the government. The listing is to protect “one of the most important sites in our national history”, the remains of the medieval friary where the battered, naked body of the last Plantagenet king was buried after he
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotic resistance: 'Sleeping' bacteria that can survive drug treatment identified 'Sleeper cells', which can survive doses of antibiotics and lie resting in a dormant state, may hold a key to understanding antibiotic resistance, research has found. Dr Stefano Pagliara, a biophysicist at the University of Exeter, has developed a novel way of identifying cells likely to survive antibiotics, even before the drug treatment. The research, published in the journal BMC Biology , lays
1d
Futurity.org

To reduce gender inequality at work, focus on ‘small wins’ A new method, dubbed the “small wins model,” is showing promise in reducing the kind of bias that leads to gender inequality within a company’s workforce. “Step by step, I believe that these small wins are the path to achieving our larger goal…” The method focuses on educating managers and workers about bias; diagnosing where gender bias could enter their company’s hiring, promotion, or other eva
2d
Futurity.org

Reindeer’s blood donation saves his brother’s life Two reindeer brothers can enjoy the holiday season in peace after a health scare almost cost one his life—until a brotherly blood transfusion saved the day. In Shortsville, New York, about 30 miles east of Rochester, Moose and Little Buddy call a little farm home. Their owner, Mike Schaertl, was looking forward to Little Buddy’s first holiday season, but last month the five-month-old reindeer got
2d
Big Think

Stanford Scientists Classify 5 Subtypes of Anxiety and Depression One of the more informative revelations in our quest to understand autism is the wide ranges that exist in behavior and effect. Journalist Steve Silberman opens his tour de force, Neurotribes , by detailing just how varied what is now known as “the spectrum” can be. One hundred people could feasibly have one hundred different genetic causes, resulting in a popular sentiment in the autism commun
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Tis the season to be vigilant: Risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs peaks at Christmas University of Liverpool researchers are warning of a "significant peak" in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats. Most people know that chocolate can be poisonous to dogs but may not know why. The toxic ingredient is a caffeine-like stimulant called theobromine that can lead to an upset stomach, a racing heartbeat, dehydration
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts advise using benchmarking to identify farms with high antibiotic use A number of British dairy farms are using extremely high levels of antibiotics in their cattle, finds a study published by Vet Record today. The findings from a large sample of farms across the UK, indicate that while most dairy farms exhibit lower antibiotic use than the UK livestock average, there are several outlying farms with high levels of use. The researchers say that identifying these hig
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most dog treats exceed recommended daily energy allowance Most commercially available dog treats contain a range of undefined ingredients, including sugars, and often exceed the recommended daily energy allowance for treats ('complementary feed'), warn researchers in the Vet Record today. They say treat labels should be more explicit and provide more detailed information on ingredients and energy content to prevent dogs becoming overweight or obese and
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs peaks at Christmas, warn experts Experts are warning of a "significant peak" in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats. In the Vet Record today, researchers at the University of Liverpool say dog owners need to be aware of the heightened risk, particularly in the run up to Christmas - and to a lesser extent Easter - as chocolate becomes more accessible within th
2d
Futurity.org

More sick days for overweight kids with asthma Young children with untreated asthma who are also overweight may face more days of symptoms each year than their healthy weight peers, a new study suggests. In the study, researchers found that preschoolers with a body mass index (BMI) beyond the 84th percentile who weren’t using an inhaler had 70 percent more days with asthma symptoms per year than untreated healthy weight children. These childr
2d
Science | The Guardian

Resist the puppy eyes – chocolate Christmas treats can be deadly for dogs Dog owners need to be vigilant in keeping chocolate away from hopeful muzzles over Christmas, vets have warned, with research suggesting that the risk of canine poisoning from the confectionery peaks during the festive period. Chocolate can be toxic to dogs since canines break down a substance known as theobromine more slowly than humans, meaning that even seemingly modest quantities can result i
2d

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.