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Ingeniøren
Førerløse S-tog: Dansk togtrafik bliver igen prøvekanin »Det er ikke sandt, at vi er first movers på førerløse tog. Alle, der har taget metroen, ved, at det har vi gjort i årevis, selv i lille Danmark.« Sådan lød svaret fra transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA), da han ved sidste uges pressemøde om den nye politiske aftale om førerløse S-tog blev spurgt, om Danmark ligesom med problemprojekterne IC4 og signalprogrammet igen er ved at blive kastet ud
14h
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Did You Like or Follow Facebook Pages from a Russian Troll Farm? Facebook Friday made available a tool to allow users to see whether they had liked or followed a page linked to Russia’s attempt to influence the 2016 US election. Facebook had promised to make such a tool available in November, after the company revealed in a congressional hearing that more than 140 million people may have been exposed to Russia-linked propaganda during the 2016 election cycle.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of new studies including 250,000 people confirms sugar-sweetened drinks are linked to overweight and obesity in children and adults A new review of the latest evidence on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)- which includes 30 new studies published between 2013 and 2015 (and none of them industry sponsored) - concludes that SSB consumption is associated with overweight and obesity, and that countries that have not already done so should take action to reduce the consumption of the so-called 'empty calories' that these drinks cont
46min

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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Moonshiners Are Camouflaging Their Still Site #Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Chico and Sandra must camouflage their site in Kentucky. They use whatever they can to hide the platform including branches, netting, and a Christmas tree… Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/Moon
1h
Inside Science
The Science of Christmas The Science of Christmas Three holiday facts from the Inside Science archive (infographic). xmasinfograph_2017_topnteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Culture Friday, December 22, 2017 - 16:30 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) -- We'd like to wish Happy Holidays to all o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA astronaut, first to fly untethered in space, dies at 80 This Feb. 7, 1984 photo made available by NASA shows astronaut Bruce McCandless II, participating in a spacewalk a few meters away from the cabin of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger, using a nitrogen-propelled Manned Maneuvering Unit. The Johnson Space Center says McCandless died Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017 in California. (NASA via AP) NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless, the first person to f
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tribe will move from shrinking island to farm in Louisiana Louisiana officials have chosen a sugar cane farm as the next home for residents of a tiny, shrinking island—a move funded with a 2016 federal grant awarded to help relocate communities fleeing the effects of climate change. Dozens of Isle de Jean Charles residents are to be relocated about 40 miles (64 kilometers) to the northwest, in Terrebonne Parish, Nola.com|The Times-Picayune and The New Or
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suit: iPhones Apple slowed forced owners to buy new phonesApple iPhone owners from several states are suing the tech giant for not disclosing sooner that it had issued software updates deliberately slowing older-model phones so aging batteries lasted longer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify hidden genetic variation that helps drive evolution First author Mahul Chakraborty looks through several specimens of fruit flies to identify new phenotypes. Credit: UCI Identifying complex mutations in the structure of an organism's genome has been difficult. But in a new study published online in Nature Genetics , a research team led by J.J. Emerson, assistant professor of ecology & evolutionary biology at the Ayala School of Biological Sciences
1h
The Atlantic
Can Europe Enforce Its Founding Ideals? PARIS—When history books are written on Europe in the early 21st century, this week may stand out. Pro-independence parties gained a majority in Catalonia’s regional elections, exacerbating a constitutional crisis in Spain. This occurred just days after Poland’s defiant right-wing government pushed back against the unprecedented threat of European Union sanctions by moving ahead with changes to t
2h
Big Think
These A.I. Tools Could Lead to the Next Generation of Fake News We have the phrase “Seeing is believing.” It makes sense. The rash of “fake news” that infested the 2016 presidential election, surrounded mostly false articles. Fabricated news stories have existed since the birth of the printing press. But what if, with the help of A.I., spin doctors and hackers could make fictitious videos in a way that’s so visceral and realistic that skepticism is much harde
2h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: The Best of Our ‘Best of 2017’ Lists For our final email of 2017, we’ve turned to The Atlantic ’s writers and editors for their recommendations of the year’s best cultural creations to keep you entertained, informed, and inspired while the newsletter is on hiatus. We’ll be back as usual on Tuesday, January 2. Until then, check out the full collection of culture highlights here, and go here for The Atlantic ’s latest coverage. — Rosa
3h
Popular Science
What to do if your dog eats your Christmas chocolates Every dog owner knows that you should never feed your dog chocolate. Most of us keep the stuff far away from the reach of our four-footed friends. And then Christmas happens. Kids are drinking hot cocoa, gifted chocolate bars are strewn throughout the kitchen, and your high alert for chocolatey things is probably on holiday, too. In a study out this week in the British Medical Journal , researche
3h
Popular Science
Gifts that will make you the favorite friend If you want to bring real cheer and reduce waste this holiday season, give presents your loved ones will actually use and cherish. Grant them permission to be a real hedonist. Below, gifts that'll encourage your friends to engage in a little self care. For the binge-watcher: cozy clothing and accessories that will keep your friends company during their next Friends " comfort binge ." Arrested Dev
4h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: A Train Wreck, a Tax Bill, Christmas Preparations Preparations for Christmas around the world, big surf in Portugal, taming the Thomas Fire in California, an Amtrak crash in Washington state, celebrating Hanukkah in Jerusalem, the passage of a major U.S. tax bill in Washington, D.C., and much more.
4h
The Atlantic
How ISIS Changed the Yezidi Religion BEHZANE, IRAQ—On a recent Friday afternoon, Yezidi musicians led a procession of worshipers toward a newly rebuilt temple on a hillside in northern Iraq. Women burned incense and the congregation threw handfuls of sweets at the flute and drum players. Hundreds of local Yezidis from the town of Behzane, near Mosul, had gathered to reopen one of the temples blown up by ISIS. “We are so excited to b
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies new loci associated with asthma enriched in epigenetic marks An international study led by scientists from Inserm and Paris Diderot University (France), the University of Chicago (USA), the National Heart and Lung Institute (UK) and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (USA) together with researchers of the Trans-National Asthma Genetics Consortium (TAGC) has discovered five new regions of the genome that increase the risk of asthma. This stu
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Re-assessing Alaska's energy frontier IMAGE: Fish Creek wanders through the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, a 22.8 million acre region managed by the Bureau of Land Management on Alaska's North Slope. USGS has periodically assessed oil and... view more Credit: David Houseknecht, USGS Less than 80 miles from Prudhoe Bay, home to the giant oil fields that feed the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, lies the site of USGS' latest oi
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study visualizes motion of water molecules, promises new wave of electronic devices IMAGE: An Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led research team used a sophisticated X-ray scattering technique to visualize and quantify the movement of water molecules in space and time, which provides new insights... view more Credit: Jason Richards/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 22, 2017 - A novel approach to studying the viscosity of water has reveal
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease AURORA, Colo. (Dec. 22, 2017) - While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. But now scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus may have an answer. For the first time in a progressive, age-related mouse model of Parkinson's, researchers have shown tha
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shape separates substance IMAGE: Two demixed phases [the green and blue phases] are shown together with the porous structure surface (black). view more Credit: Hajime Tanaka and Ryotaro Shimizu, Tanaka Laboratory, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo (Tokyo, Japan) Researchers at University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) report a new physical model that shows how the topology of
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electronically-smooth '3-D graphene': A bright future for trisodium bismuthide Researchers have found that the topological material trisodium bismuthide (Na 3 Bi) can be manufactured to be as 'electronically smooth' as the highest-quality graphene-based alternative, while maintaining graphene's high electron mobility. Na 3 Bi is a Topological Dirac Semimetal (TDS), considered a 3D equivalent of graphene in that it shows the same extraordinarily high electron mobility. In gr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Re-assessing Alaska's energy frontier Permafrost forms a grid-like pattern in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, a 22.8 million acre region managed by the Bureau of Land Management on Alaska's North Slope. USGS has periodically assessed oil and gas resource potential there. Credit: David Houseknecht, USGS. Public domain Less than 80 miles from Prudhoe Bay, home to the giant oil fields that feed the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, lies the
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study visualizes motion of water molecules, promises new wave of electronic devices An Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led research team used a sophisticated X-ray scattering technique to visualize and quantify the movement of water molecules in space and time, which provides new insights that may open pathways for liquid-based electronics. Credit: Jason Richards/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy A novel approach to studying the viscosity of water has revealed new
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronically-smooth '3-D graphene': A bright future for trisodium bismuthide Researchers have found that the topological material trisodium bismuthide (Na 3 Bi) can be manufactured to be as 'electronically smooth' as the highest-quality graphene-based alternative, while maintaining graphene's high electron mobility. Na 3 Bi is a Topological Dirac Semimetal (TDS), considered a 3D equivalent of graphene in that it shows the same extraordinarily high electron mobility. In gr
5h
Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: All the Tech That Died We welcome special guest Jordan McMahon onto the show to count down his list of all the technology that died in 2017. Send the hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Jordan McMahon is @typingpixels , David Pierce is @pierce , Brendan Nystedt is @bnystedt , and Michael Calore is @snackfight . Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab . Our theme song is by Solar Keys . How to Listen You can al
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Stay Healthy While Traveling Over the Holidays Admit it. There are few things worse than being sick over the holidays. So we have some advice. Well, Dr. Gary Brunette has some advice. Brunette heads the travelers’ health branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He gave STAT some recommendations to maximize your chances of healthy holidays, especially if you’re traveling. (Confession: We should have done this sooner. B
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New depth sensors could make self-driving cars practicalScientists present a new approach to time-of-flight imaging that increases its depth resolution 1,000-fold. That's the type of resolution that could make self-driving cars practical.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Machine learning will change jobsMachine learning computer systems, which get better with experience, are poised to transform the economy much as steam engines and electricity have in the past. They can outperform people in a number of tasks, though they are unlikely to replace people in all jobs, suggest researchers.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Allergens need collaborators to cause allergyDirect evidence has been found that the ligands, compounds carried by allergens, are actively involved in the allergic sensitization phase.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adolescent brain makes learning easierThe brains of adolescents react more responsively to receiving rewards. This can lead to risky behavior, but, according to new research, it also has a positive function: it makes learning easier.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Laser shoes prevent 'freezing' in Parkinson patientsFreezing of gait, an absence of forward progression of the feet despite the intention to walk, is a debilitating symptom of Parkinson's disease. Laser shoes that project a line on the floor to the rhythm of the footsteps help trigger the person to walk. The shoes benefit the wearer significantly, according to research.
5h
Viden
Nye beviser: Vandet på Mars blev opsuget af klipper For milliarder af år siden flød det med vand på overfladen af Mars. Men på et tidspunkt forsvandt vandet og efterlod den røde planet helt tør. Den gængse forklaring har altid været, at planetens manglende magnetfelt betød, at solvinden fjernede Mars' atmosfære. Og med den også meget af vandet. Den forklaring holder stadig - men kun for en del af vandet. Et hold forskere ved Oxford University i En
5h
Popular Science
Yes, UFOs exist. But they're probably not what you think. On a dark and otherwise serene night back in the 1960s, my grandpa, a doctor and recreational pilot, was ferrying two lawyers to a deposition. As they bisected the state of Washington, the airborne group encountered something surreal: An aircraft unlike anything they had ever seen before was flying straight toward them. My grandpa recalled an oblong flying machine, with blinking lights and an eer
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique could reveal immunotherapy targets, study findsA new way to pinpoint potential targets for cancer therapies that rely on the body's immune system have now been developed by researchers.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PSA from your gut microbes: Enjoy the holidays, but don't forget your fiberAnyone watching their waistline this holiday season may want to pay attention to what their gut bacteria are eating. It's not just calories that matter in a healthy diet -- it's fiber, which can influence weight gain, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity, and colon health. Research with mice help shed light on how and why fiber has such a powerful effect on the entire body.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why digital strategies matter in bond marketsInformation technology investments are often valued favorably by the stock market because of their strategic nature and important role in influencing revenue and profit growth of firms. New research shows that IT investments also matter to bond markets. However, bond markets value IT investments differently than stock markets according to the strategic roles of IT in industries and the types of ri
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists describe how solar system could have formed in bubble around giant star Despite the many impressive discoveries humans have made about the universe, scientists are still unsure about the birth story of our solar system. Scientists with the University of Chicago have laid out a comprehensive theory for how our solar system could have formed in the wind-blown bubbles around a giant, long-dead star. Published Dec. 22 in the Astrophysical Journal , the study addresses a
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Truth About Those 'Alien Alloys' in The New York Times' UFO Story What to make of a Las Vegas building full of unidentified alloys? The New York Times published a stunning story Saturday (Dec. 16) revealing that the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) had, between 2007 and 2012, funded a $22 million program for investigating UFOs. The story included three revelations that were tailored to blow readers' minds: 1. Many high-ranking people in the federal gove
5h
Science : NPR
All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye A magnetic resonance imaging of the whale eye. Courtesy of Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison A magnetic resonance imaging of the whale eye. Courtesy of Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison The end of the year is a tim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny Australian rainbow peacock spiders may inspire new optical technologiesEven if you are arachnophobic, you probably have seen pictures or videos of Australian peacock spiders (Maratus spp.). These tiny spiders are only 1-5 mm long but are famous for their flamboyant courtship displays featuring diverse and intricate body colorations, patterns, and movements.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI scientists identify hidden genetic variation that helps drive evolution IMAGE: First author Mahul Chakraborty looks through several specimens of fruit flies to identify new phenotypes. view more Credit: UCI Identifying complex mutations in the structure of an organism's genome has been difficult. But in a new study published online in Nature Genetics , a research team led by J.J. Emerson, assistant professor of ecology & evolutionary biology at the Ayala School o
6h
Futurity.org
Scrooge’s time-travel poses some trouble with physics In A Christmas Carol , the Christmas ghosts teach Scrooge a life lesson by bringing him back to his past, and giving him a glimpse of his future. “From a physics point of view, he is moving back and forth in time and you should wonder, ‘How’d that happen?'” says Ibrahima “Ibou” Bah, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. “If you’re able to create such a rip i
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists describe how solar system could have formed in bubble around giant star This simulation shows how bubbles form over the course of 4.7 million years from the intense stellar winds off a massive star. UChicago scientists postulated how our own solar system could have formed in the dense shell of such a bubble. Credit: V. Dwarkadas/D. Rosenberg Despite the many impressive discoveries humans have made about the universe, scientists are still unsure about the birth story
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arecibo radar returns with asteroid phaethon images These radar images of near-Earth asteroid 3200 Phaethon were generated by astronomers at the National Science Foundation's Arecibo Observatory on Dec. 17, 2017. Observations of Phaethon were conducted at Arecibo from Dec.15 through 19, 2017. At time of closest approach on Dec. 16 at 3 p.m. PST (3 p.m. EST, 11 p.m. UTC) the asteroid was about 1.1 million miles (1.8 million kilometers) away, or abo
6h
Big Think
A Haiku for Every Element in the Periodic Table Sometimes, when science and art get together, the results can be just plain-old delightful. Here’s one such case: Elemental Haiku . ( SCIENCE ) The folks at Science have invited people to tweet a haiku for each element in the periodic table. If you’d like to submit one, use the hashtag #ChemHaiku . Or feel free to hover over (desktop) or tap (mobile device) an element to see its current hai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin goes on wild ride and it may only get crazier (Update) In this April 7, 2014, file photo, Bitcoin logos are displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. A bitcoin sell-off that began at the beginning of the week is gaining momentum, with a quarter of its value evaporating in the past 24 hours. Just hours before U.S. markets opened Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, bitcoin was trading at $13,659.85, according to the tracking site CoinD
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Belarus aspires to become leader in digital currenciesThe president of Belarus has offered generous tax benefits and other incentives to information technology firms to help turn the ex-Soviet nation into a leader in digital currencies.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees second Tropical soaking in Southern Philippines NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Tembin on Dec. 21 at 12:17 p.m. (17:17 UTC) as it blanketed the southern region of Mindanao. Purple indicates coldest cloud tops and strongest storms. Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Philippines and infrared imagery showed that Tropical Storm Tembin contained strong thunderstorms with heavy rainmaki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob Marley Life image of a female individual of the new species Desis bobmarleyi . Credit: R. Raven It was 2am on the 11th of January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's "Sunshine State" of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. The observant researchers who would later describe these spiders as a species new to science, were quick to ass
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA captures Tropical Depression Kai-Tak's final bowNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Malay Peninsula and infrared imagery showed Tropical Depression Kai-Tak dissipating in the Gulf of Thailand under strong vertical wind shear.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The science behind kids’ belief in Santa Over the past week, my little girls have seen Santa in real life at least three times (though only one encounter was close enough to whisper “yo-yo” in his ear). You’d think that this Santa saturation might make them doubt that each one was the real deal. For one thing, they looked quite different. Brewery Santa’s beard was a joke, while Christmas-tree-lighting Santa’s beard was legit. Add to tha
6h
Science : NPR
Nearly Dying In Childbirth: Why Preventable Complications Are Growing In U.S. Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman hide caption toggle caption Ilana Panich-Linsman Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman Leah Bahrencu's kidneys and li
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep brain stimulation: Improving outcomes in the treatment of movement disorders Dystonia affects more than 500,000 people across Europe. Globally, it is the third most common movement disorder after Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. In patients with dystonia, the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neural connections, which is normally responsible for 'normal' movement processes, is disrupted. This results in patients experiencing involuntary movements, muscle
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA captures Tropical Depression Kai-Tak's final bow IMAGE: NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression Kai-Tak dissipating on Dec. 21 at 1:59 p.m. (18:59 UTC). view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Malay Peninsula and infrared imagery showed Tropical Depression Kai-Tak dissipating in the Gulf of Thailand under strong vertical wind shear. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees second Tropical soaking in Southern Philippines IMAGE: NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Tembin on Dec. 21 at 12:17 p.m. (17:17 UTC) as it blanketed the southern region of Mindanao. Purple indicates coldest... view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Philippines and infrared imagery showed that Tropical Storm Tembin contained strong thunderstorms with heavy rainma
6h
Feed: All Latest
Artificial Intelligence Is Fueling Smarter Prosthetics Than Ever Before The distance between prosthetic and real is shrinking. Thanks to advances in batteries, brain-controlled robotics, and AI, today’s mechanical limbs can do everything from twist and point to grab and lift. And this isn’t just good news for amputees. “For something like bomb disposal, why not use a robotic arm?” says Justin Sanchez, manager of Darpa’s Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. Well, that
6h
New Scientist - News
2018 preview: Get ready to meet your newest long-lost ancestor Uriel Sinai/The New York Times)/Redux/Eyevine By Colin Barras The 21st century has so far been a golden age of hominin discovery. New species like the 7-million-year-old Sahelanthropus tchadensis and the 300,000-year-old Homo naledi have added to our understanding of humanity’s past. And the finds will keep coming. “It doesn’t look like [we’re] sampling something that is running out,” says Jo
6h
Big Think
The Theory of Evolution: Another Reason to Be an Existentialist? In his 1945 public lecture ' Existentialism is a Humanism ' Jean-Paul Sartre made a bold claim: for human beings, existence precedes essence . We exist, then we choose how to be. This is as opposed to a chair, for example, which is designed to fit a particular purpose and then brought into existence to fulfill that purpose. The chair has an essence that precedes it; it has a "chair nature" that i
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News
The man flu struggle might be real, says one researcher Cold weather often brings with it hot takes on so-called man flu. That’s the phenomenon in which the flu hits men harder than women — or, depending on who you ask, when men exaggerate regular cold symptoms into flu symptoms. In time for the 2017–2018 flu season, one researcher has examined the scientific evidence for and against man flu. “The concept of man flu, as commonly defined, is potentiall
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preterm infants have narrowed upper airways, which may explain higher obstructive sleep apnea risk IMAGE: The airway structures of interest to the Children's National research team included the nasopharynx (labeled red), oropharynx (labeled purple), hypopharynx (labeled green), adenoids (labeled yellow) and tonsils (labeled blue). The... view more Credit: Credit: A. Smitthimedhin, et al, Clinical Imaging . Infants born preterm have significantly lower nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal volum
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Stay Healthy While Traveling Over the Holidays Admit it. There are few things worse than being sick over the holidays. So we have some advice. Well, Dr. Gary Brunette has some advice. Brunette heads the travelers’ health branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He gave STAT some recommendations to maximize your chances of healthy holidays, especially if you’re traveling. (Confession: We should have done this sooner. B
7h
Popular Science
11 gifts for 7 types of science enthusiast If you're visiting this website, you probably like science, or at least have friends that do. And within the category of general fans, you'll always find specialists: those who love learning about, or actually work in, a field like physics or paleontology. So when you start shopping for science gifts, get specific. We've collected the best picks for everyone from mathematicians to medical doctors
7h
Inside Science
The Forgotten Physics Experiment The Forgotten Physics Experiment Vital work by scientists leads to one of the most important physics experiments in history. The Forgotten Physics Experiment Video of The Forgotten Physics Experiment Physics Friday, December 22, 2017 - 11:30 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- “I've been doing history and philosophy of physics for some 40 years now and that's what I continue to
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone therapy combination may benefit health without increasing cancer risk IMAGE: A team led by University of Illinois food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan found that treating ovariectomized mice with a combination of conjugated estrogens and the drug bazedoxifene... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Treating ovariectomized mice with a combination of conjugated estrogens and the drug bazedoxifene triggers the
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New on MIT Technology Review
Quantum Computers Barely Exist—Here’s Why We’re Writing Languages for Them Anyway Quantum computers are still extremely rudimentary, and largely remain intriguing playthings in a few advanced research labs. That hasn’t deterred people from developing new programming languages for them. The most recent one comes from Microsoft, which has unveiled Q# (pronounced Q sharp) and some associated tools to help developers use it to create software. It joins a growing list of other high
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Futurity.org
A cardiologist diagnoses the Grinch’s growing heart Cardiologist David Kass has a possible medical explanation for the Grinch’s heart growing three sizes after the beloved but curmudgeonly holiday character realizes what Christmas means to Whoville. Despite never having diagnosed a storybook character, and his inability to interview the patient or get any sort of a medical history, with such an extremely mis-sized organ that got suddenly large, Ka
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New on MIT Technology Review
Quantum Computers Barely Exist—Here’s Why We’re Writing Languages for Them Anyway Quantum computers are still extremely rudimentary, and largely remain intriguing playthings in a few advanced research labs. That hasn’t deterred people from developing new programming languages for them. The most recent one comes from Microsoft, which has unveiled Q# (pronounced Q sharp) and some associated tools to help developers use it to create software. It joins a growing list of other high
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How odors are turned into long-term memoriesNeuroscientists have investigated which brain area is responsible for storing odors as long-term memories. Some odors can trigger memories of experiences from years back. A new study shows that the piriform cortex, a part of the olfactory brain, is involved in the process of saving those memories; the mechanism, however, only works in interaction with other brain areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Accelerated analysis of the stability of complex alloysMaterial scientists are able to determine if a new material remains stable under temperature load within the space of a few days. They have developed a novel process for analyzing, for example, the temperature and oxidation resistance of complex alloys that are made up of a number of different elements. Previously, such analyses used to take months.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A novel way to synthesize antioxidant substancesScientists have proposed a novel way to address the most important and fundamental challenge of organic chemistry, such as breaking a bond between carbon and hydrogen atoms to form new organic substances. They were the first to carry out “breaking” in water thanks to especially synthesized substances called arylbenziodoxaboroles. As a result, the scientists synthesized a number of novel phenolic s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking stock of a thorny issueA new book exploring the best scientific research on preventing coral-eating Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (COTS) outbreaks, is expected to become a critical resource for informing management of these outbreaks across the Indo-Pacific.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meet the tiny machines in cells that massacre virusesWhen viruses infect the body's cells, those cells face a difficult problem. How can they destroy viruses without harming themselves? Scientists have found an answer by visualizing a tiny cellular machine that chops the viruses' genetic material into bits. Their research shows how the machine detects the intruders and processes them for destruction to protect cells and prevent the spread of infecti
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cognitive science
How Machine Learning May Change Jobs A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob Marley IMAGE: Life image of a male individual of the new species Desis bobmarleyi . view more Credit: R. Raven It was 02:00h on 11 January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's "Sunshine State" of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. The observant researchers who would later describe these spiders as a species new to scien
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multifunctional protein contributes to blood cell developmentResearchers have uncovered a mechanism for how blood cells mature and specialize -- and why errors can sometimes lead to leukemia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tumor growth parameters predict response to anti-angiogenic therapy in miceUsing a mathematical modeling approach, scientists have found that certain parameters of tumor growth in mice can predict the effectiveness of drugs that block formation of tumor-nourishing blood vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Another test to help clinicians diagnose asthma more accuratelyA meta-analysis shows that fractional exhaled nitrous oxide (FeNO) is a good evidence-based adjunct test for asthma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum couplingPhysicists have linked atoms and superconductors in a key step towards new hardware for quantum computers and networks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cutting-edge statistics yield new insight into attributing, projecting climate changeProjecting the future of extreme weather events across the globe remains a complex task in climate research -- and one in which statisticians are increasingly playing key roles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plants reveal decision-making abilities under competitionPlants can choose between alternative competitive responses according to the stature and densities of their opponents, biologists have discovered. A new study reveals that plants can evaluate the competitive ability of their neighbors and optimally match their responses to them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein analysis allows for treatment of eye-disease symptoms with existing drugsDemonstrating the potential of precision health, a team of researchers has matched existing drugs to errant proteins expressed by patients with a rare eye disease.
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Quanta Magazine
Quanta’s Science and Math Crossword Puzzle There is no new Insights puzzle this month, but I come bearing a holiday gift — a special crossword puzzle for all readers of Quanta Magazine . This crossword is my homage to the wonderful writers and editors who have made Quanta the excellent scientific newsmagazine that it is. It is an honor and privilege to be associated with a publication that combines in-depth erudition with the ability to c
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NYT > Science
Should You Shower in the Morning, or at Night? Yes. “Everybody in my house showered in the morning,” said Nate Martins, a writer from San Francisco. After the water heated up, “we’d all stack up like dominoes,” he said. “Washing the sleep off, that’s something that I still do,” he said — much to the chagrin of his wife, Natalie, who’s a steadfast night showerer. “There have been times where she’s asked me to shower before bed, especially when I’ve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Team maps magnetic fields of bacterial cells, nano-objects for the first timeFor the first time, researchers have noted that the magnetic fields of bacterial cells and magnetic nano-objects in liquid can be studied at high resolution using electron microscopy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting straight to the heart of the matter in stem cellsScientists have discovered how to generate functioning cardiac cells from stem cells in single step.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rate and risk of head injury in mixed martial arts remain unknownThe rate and potential risk of traumatic brain injury in mixed martial arts remain unknown due to lack of regulation and protocols surrounding these injuries, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humidity may prove breaking point for some areas as temperatures rise, says studyClimate scientists say that killer heat waves will become increasingly prevalent in many regions as climate warms. However, most projections leave out a major factor that could worsen things: humidity, which can greatly magnify the effects of heat alone. Now, a new global study projects that in coming decades the effects of high humidity in many areas will dramatically increase.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vampire bat rabies kills hundreds of cattle a year in PeruThe vampire bat is known to be the principle reservoir of rabies throughout Latin America, yet the burden of vampire bat-transmitted rabies on human lives and livestock has been largely anecdotal. Now, researchers have calculated that, in Peru, more than 500 cattle a year die of rabies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making wavesNew approach enables measurements of changes in thousands of proteins in the minutes after frog eggs are fertilized, revealing previously opaque mechanisms such as how the destruction of a small number of proteins releases the 'brakes' on an egg's cell cycle. Method has applications in a wide range of biological systems.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Men with Autism May Misread Social Cues in Body Odor Men with autism respond differently to human odors — and the social signals that they contain — than do their neurotypical peers, according to a new study. The results suggest that men with autism misread social signals present in human odors — causing them to misinterpret others’ emotions. Human sweat contains chemicals believed to convey social and emotional information. For instance, w
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Futurity.org
Westminster Abbey windows shatter glass myth The stained-glass windows of London’s Westminster Abbey have helped researchers dispel a myth that cathedral glass is thicker at the bottom because of the material’s transition from solid to liquid. While that has been established before, John Mauro, along with three other researchers, determined that the science was off by 16 orders of magnitude. What does that mean? It means those windows are t
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Futurity.org
5 things to know next time your kid coughs It’s familiar to any parent: First comes the sniffles, then the congestion—and finally, a persistent, hacking cough that can drag on for weeks, long after the other upper-respiratory symptoms clear up. Why is that? And more importantly, what’s a parent to do? Here, pediatricians from Yale University Medicine—including specialists in emergency medicine, allergies, and immunology—talk about colds,
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Futurity.org
DNA strand ‘cages’ leave imprint on polymer particles Scientists have chemically imprinted polymer particles with DNA strands—a technique that could lead to new materials for applications like biomedicine and “soft robotics.” In Nature Chemistry , the researchers describe a method to create asymmetrical polymer particles that bind together in a spatially defined manner, the way that atoms come together to make molecules. Although polymers are used i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny polyps save corals from predators and diseaseCorals may have unexpected allies in improving their health and resilience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Memristors power quick-learning neural networkA new type of neural network made with memristors can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Get a little closer: Moth females use scent proximity to attract matesFemale moths with an ineffective pheromone blend can use proximity to better-smelling females to attract mates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular mapping made easyEvery day, every inch of skin on your body comes into contact with thousands of molecules -- from food, cosmetics, sweat, the microbes that call your skin home. Now researchers can create interactive 3-D maps that show where each molecule lingers on your body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anti-virus protein in humans may resist transmission of HIV-1 precursor from chimpsIn humans, an anti-virus protein known as APOBEC3H may defend against cross-species transmission from chimpanzees of the virus that gave rise to HIV-1, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika remains a research and public health challenge, say NIAID scientists WHAT: /p> Since 2016, when Zika was declared by the World Health Organization as a public health emergency of international concern, the virus has become established in more than 80 countries, infected millions of people, and left many babies with birth defects (collectively called congenital Zika syndrome). Although scientists have made progress in their understanding of the virus and its mosqu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revised 'mcdonald criteria' expected to speed the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis New York, Dec. 21, 2017 -- The McDonald Criteria for the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis have just been revised by a 30-member international panel of MS experts co-chaired by Jeffrey Cohen, MD (Cleveland Clinic) and Alan Thompson, MD (University College London). Recommended revisions are expected to speed the diagnostic process and reduce the chance of misdiagnosis. The panel was convened under t
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Futurity.org
How Rudolph’s nose really could glow ‘like a light bulb’ Rudolph’s glowing red nose may not be entirely the stuff of kids’ Christmas stories after all. Although reindeer noses aren’t typically red, or infused with enough light to guide a sleigh, Steve Farber, a professor of biology at Johns Hopkins University and principal investigator at the Carnegie Institution for Science, says other earthly creatures are that color and glow through bioluminescence
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Legal pot in California brings host of environmental rules In this undated photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, are fallen trees amidst a marijuana farm in the Klamath River watershed, just outside the Yurok Reservation near Klamath, Calif. California pot growers choosing to go legal in the New Year will face a host of new environmental rules and regulators. A study published earlier this year found that plot for plot, mariju
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qualcomm rejects Broadcom's nominees to boardQualcomm says it won't back any of the candidates that Broadcom and Silver Lake Partners are proposing for its board of directors, saying they are conflicted and have no incremental skills or expertise to offer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's next major telescope to see the big picture of the universe NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, illustrated here, will fly in the mid-2020s and provide astronomers with the most complete view of the cosmos to date. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab NASA is beginning to design its next big astrophysics mission, a space telescope that will provide the largest picture of the universe ever seen with the same depth and clarity as the H
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New on MIT Technology Review
I Wouldn’t Dance to This Dumb DJ Robot Computer Vision Algorithms Are Still Way Too Easy to Trick AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research shows, the systems can still be tripped up by examples that would never fool a person. Labsix, a group of MIT students who recently tricked an image classifier developed by Google… Read more AI image recognition has made some stunning advances, but as new research
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Ingeniøren
EU-aftale vil tvinge Danmark til at sætte fut i energiforbedringer Hvis folk i isoleringsbranchen køber lidt større julegaver og sender venlige tanker mod Bruxelles og Allesø ved Odense, så er det med god grund. Kort før jul blev EU's formandskab, der for tiden klares af Estland, nemlig enige med Europa-Kommissionen og Europa-Parlamentet om en lang række nye krav til bygninger. Krav der vil betyde, at der skal gang i meget mere energirenovering. »Det centrale i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To mow or not to mow: Tackling nuisance growth of water plants at the root That question can be answered for water plants with nuisance growth, thanks to the research of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology. Credit: Michiel Verhofstad/NIOO-KNAW Massive growth of submerged aquatic plants can be a nuisance, especially in summer. It's up to water managers to limit the inconvenience for swimmers, boats and fishermen in a way that is both responsible and cost-effective. NIOO
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A kiss of death for prostate cancerResearchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A visual database of human plasma compoundsResearchers have created a database of metabolites from blood samples collected from over 5,000 Japanese volunteers, making it freely available online as a valuable resource for researchers around the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exploring the phenomenon of superconductivityUsing ultracold atoms, researchers have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. The findings from the field of quantum physics may hold important clues to intriguing phenomena of superconductivity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A catalytic balancing actScientists have recently used a new and counterintuitive approach to create a better catalyst that supports one of the reactions involved in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. By first creating an alloy of two of the densest naturally occurring elements and then removing one, the scientists reshaped the remaining material's structure so that it better balanced three important factors: activ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How small does your rice pudding need to get when stirring jam into it? Have you ever tried turning the spoon back after stirring jam into a rice pudding? It never brings the jam back into the spoon. This ever-increasing disorder is linked to a notion called entropy. Entropy is of interest to physicists studying the evolution of systems made up of multiple identical elements, like gas. Yet, how the states in such systems should be counted is a bone of contention. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Salamander genome gives clues about unique regenerative ability Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have managed to sequence the giant genome of a salamander, the Iberian ribbed newt, which is a full six times greater than the human genome. Amongst the early findings is a family of genes that can provide clues to the unique ability of salamanders to rebuild complex tissue, even body parts. The study is published in Nature
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphins Unsustainable tourism practices threaten dolphin populations in Panama's Bocas del Toro Province. Credit: Sean Mattson, STRI Bottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. Biologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute discovered that the roughly 80 dolphins in the archipelago do not interbreed with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum noise reduction method for enhanced precision in atomic clocksNoise: it affects us all by distracting us. Noise also occurs at the quantum scale and can e.g. interfere with the measurements of atomic fountain clocks or with quantum information processing. This is because at that scale, there are effects that don't exist at larger scales. As such, finding ways to reduce quantum noise can enhance the precision of measurement in the examples given above. Now a
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Feed: All Latest
2017 Tech in Memoriam: Pour One Out for AIM, Vine, GChat, and the Rest All good things come to an end. This year, we watched as some of our favorite gadgets found a new home in a casket filled with the technology of yesteryear. Fill up a glass and get ready to pour one out for the tech casualties of 2017. AIM On December 15, AOL Instant Messenger posted its final away message. Its days of being the hip way to stay in touch with all your school friends are long gone,
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Feed: All Latest
How Honda Builds the Business Jet of the Future From the outside, HondaJet reveals two few key innovations. Its engines sit on pylons above the wings, rather than being attached to the fuselage. This cuts drag and frees up space in the cabin—since the engine mounts don’t intrude. It also reduces noise and vibration, which dissipate through the wings rather than heading for the passenger compartment. And to maximize laminar airflow, in which th
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Viden
Folkelig teknologi-modstand skal undersøges af filosoffer Et nyt forskningsprojekt ved Københavns Universitet skal forklare den modstand i befolkningen, som lovende nye gen-teknologier ofte bliver mødt med, når de bliver præsenteret for offentligheden. Læs også: Fra hjertesygdom til kræft: Personlig medicin revolutionerer Afsættet for projektet er forskernes undren over, at debat om etiske problemer har det med at overskygge de mulige gevinster for samf
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: we give you the Christmas gift of science – happy holidays all! This week’s biggest stories It’s a significant step: gene editing has been used to prevent a form of genetic hearing loss in mice , raising the prospect of a new class of therapies that could transform future treatment. That’s small comfort for dolphins though, as apparently there’s a species of Mexican fish that has orgies so loud they can deafen other sea animals . Inconsiderate, no? Luckily th
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Inside Science
A Supercomputer That Makes Recipes for Ice Cubes A Supercomputer That Makes Recipes for Ice Cubes Researchers use computer simulations to learn how water forms different kinds of ice. Snowflakes_in_a_window_-_panoramio.jpg Ice crystals forming on a window. Image credits: jansku136 via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY 3.0 Physics Friday, December 22, 2017 - 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Researchers have created a co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How odors are turned into long-term memories The neuroscientists Dr Christina Strauch and Prof Dr Denise Manahan-Vaughan from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have investigated which brain area is responsible for storing odours as long-term memories. Some odours can trigger memories of experiences from years back. The current study shows that the piriform cortex, a part of the olfactory brain, is involved in the process of saving those memories;
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny polyps save corals from predators and disease In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society , the scientists show how tiny hydrozoans, polyps smaller than one millimeter and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals, may play a role in keeping corals safe and healthy. Tibor Navracsics, Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sports, responsible for the Joint Research Centre said: "EU scientist
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alexa and Siri in our head: Where voice recognition occurs in the brain IMAGE: Especially persons with lesions in certain areas of the right posterior temporal lobe experienced difficulties recognizing voices. The MPI scientists assume that the posterior superior temporal gyrus, the STG, is... view more Credit: MPI CBS We regularly find ourselves in situations in which we talk to others. We talk to friends in a different way than we do to strangers. One important
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University scientists study the problem of electrical response of plants as a mechanism Plants exist in variable and often unfavorable environmental conditions, which requires the functioning of a variety of adaptive mechanisms for their survival under the action of stressors. The study of such adaptation mechanisms and identifying the ways to control them opens up broad prospects for saving agricultural crops under drought and high temperatures, disease development, pest attacks an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salamander genome gives clues about unique regenerative ability Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have managed to sequence the giant genome of a salamander, the Iberian ribbed newt, which is a full six times greater than the human genome. Amongst the early findings is a family of genes that can provide clues to the unique ability of salamanders to rebuild complex tissue, even body parts. The study is published in Nature Communications . This is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helpful intestinal bacteria counteracts tendency to depression New research suggests that the micro-organisms known as probiotics, which are normally providing health benefits in the intestines, also have an affect on the brain, or as an actual study at Aarhus University has shown; protect against depression. In the animal study at the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University, rats were fed with an extra fatty and fiberless compound feed. Some of
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Live Science
8 Human-Animal Encounters That Went Horribly Wrong in 2017 8 Human-Animal Encounters That Went Horribly Wrong in 2017 By Mindy Weisberger, Senior Writer | December 22, 2017 09:47am ET
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Futurity.org
Parents in STEM careers guide girls to ‘hard science’ Having a parent or guardian who works in a STEM field makes it more likely for girls to perform better in math and enroll in a “hard sciences” college degree in programs like engineering, architecture, math and computer science, a new study suggests. The effect is larger for girls than for boys, the researchers found. Currently, even when girls perform just as well as boys on standardized math te
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Live Science
World's Smallest Christmas Card Offers Season's Tiniest Greetings This is the world’s smallest Christmas card, created from platinum-coated silicon nitride by the National Physical Library in the U.K. Credit: NPL In a very, very, very small gesture of holiday goodwill, the U.K.'s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has crafted the smallest Christmas card in the world, which is so tiny that it must be measured in microns — millionths of a meter. The card is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
T cell-inducing dengue vaccines may better protect children of vaccinated mothers For a long time, a dengue vaccine was the holy grail in dengue research. Now that a dengue vaccine is finally on the market (Sanofi's Dengvaxia®), other issues have arisen, such as what happens in the babies of vaccinated mothers. A vaccinated mother passes anti-dengue antibodies to her child during gestation and breastfeeding. These antibodies from the mother should protect the child against i
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How small does your rice pudding need to get when stirring jam into it? Have you ever tried turning the spoon back after stirring jam into a rice pudding? It never brings the jam back into the spoon. This ever-increasing disorder is linked to a notion called entropy. Entropy is of interest to physicists studying the evolution of systems made up of multiple identical elements, like gas. Yet, how the states in such systems should be counted is a bone of contention. The
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accelerated analysis of the stability of complex alloys Material scientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum are able to determine if a new material remains stable under temperature load within the space of a few days. They have developed a novel process for analysing, for example, the temperature and oxidation resistance of complex alloys that are made up of a number of different elements. Previously, such analyses used to take months. The team headed by P
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum noise reduction method for enhanced precision in atomic clocks Noise: it affects us all by distracting us. Noise also occurs at the quantum scale and can e.g. interfere with the measurements of atomic fountain clocks or with quantum information processing. This is because at that scale, there are effects that don't exist at larger scales. As such, finding ways to reduce quantum noise can enhance the precision of measurement in the examples given above. Now a
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A visual database of human plasma compounds IMAGE: The database is able to map the correlation of the different metabolites, offering visitors further research opportunities. view more Credit: Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization Researchers in Japan have created a database of metabolites from blood samples collected from over 5,000 Japanese volunteers, making it freely available online as a valuable resource for researchers around the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient dolphin species Urkudelphis chawpipacha discovered in EcuadorAn extinct dolphin species likely from the Oligocene has been discovered. The fossil is one of the few fossil dolphins from the equator, and is a reminder that Oligocene cetaceans may have ranged widely in tropical waters.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feathering the plasma nest: Tiny structures help prevent short circuits in plasma devicesPhysicists have found a way to prevent plasma -- the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei -- from causing short circuits in machines such as spacecraft thrusters, radar amplifiers, and particle accelerators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New term for role of microbiota in neurodegeneration proposedRecent studies have shown that gut microbes may cause or worsen Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. Neurologists have proposed a new term to describe an interaction between gut microbiota and the brain: mapranosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphinsBottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. Biologists have discovered that the roughly 80 dolphins in the archipelago do not interbreed with other Caribbean bottlenose dolphins. Their low numbers jeopardize their long-term survival, which is threatened by increasing local boat traffic that killed at least seven dolp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mathematical model reveals solution to sloshing coffeeWhen commuters rush out the door with coffee in hand, chances are their hastiness causes some of the hot liquid to slosh out of the cup. In a new paper, authors use surprisingly simple mathematics to develop a model for such sloshing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A 508-million-year-old sea predator with a 'jackknife' headPaleontologists have revisited a tiny yet fierce ancient sea creature called Habelia optata that has confounded scientists since it was discovered more than a century ago. Analysis of new fossil specimens suggest it was a close relative of the ancestor of all chelicerates, a sub-group of arthropods living today named for appendages called chelicerae in front of the mouth used to cut food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
West African dolphin now listed as one of Africa's rarest mammalsA group of scientists now considers a little-known dolphin that only lives along the Atlantic coasts of Western Africa to be among the continent's most endangered mammals, a list that includes widely recognized species such as gorillas, African wild dogs, and black rhinos.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Folic acid late in pregnancy may increase childhood allergy risk Research from the University of Adelaide suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in children affected by growth restriction during pregnancy. Folic acid, a type of B vitamin, is widely used to prevent neural tube defects in the fetus, and to aid in the development of the central nervous system. The neural tube develops in the first month of pregnancy,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A kiss of death for prostate cancer Hokkaido University researchers have uncovered a cellular protein that stabilizes a tumor promoting signaling pathway, suggesting a new target to treat prostate cancer. The drug Gefitinib is used to treat breast, lung, and other cancers by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, but it has only a limited effect on prostate cancer. EGFR, present on the cell membrane, is invol
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Futurity.org
How the venomous lionfish invaded the Atlantic Ocean While researchers initially estimated 9 or 10 lionfish began the species invasion of the Atlantic Ocean, a new study suggests that number was closer to 180. For more than a decade, lionfish have created a global problem by invading the United States Atlantic coastal waters, the Gulf Coast, and the Caribbean Sea. In addition to destroying native fish and plants, lionfish are capable of harming the
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Ingeniøren
Biogas forgylder otte fynske kommuner: Nyt, grønt industrieventyr på vej Et nyt, dansk eventyr inden for grøn energi kan være på vej med udgangspunkt i, hvad der tidligere lignede et støvet gasselskab ejet af otte fynske kommuner. Selskabet Nature Energy – som tidligere hed Naturgas Fyn – satser på grøn gas og er nu solgt i to bidder i en handel, der skæpper godt i kommunekasserne i de otte kommuner, som kan beholde 80 procent af salgsprisen for sig selv, da kun de 20
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Beetle PenisScientists look to a leaf beetle's genitals for lessons on improving catheter strength.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Tiny trackers reveal the secret lives of young sea turtles View the video Not so long ago, the lives of sea turtles were largely a mystery. From the time that hatchlings left the beaches where they were born to waddle into the ocean until females returned to lay their eggs, no one really knew where the turtles went or what they did. Then researchers started attaching satellite trackers to young turtles. And that’s when scientists discovered that the turt
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Scientific American Content: Global
A New Way to "See" Cancer It’s difficult to detect what we cannot see. This universally understood notion remains one of the biggest challenges in cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment today. Many forms of cancer go undetected until a later stage, making them hard to treat and putting patients at greater risk of death. On the flip side, many existing tests provide too many false positives that lead to risky surgeries
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Winking' star 550 light-years away may be devouring wrecked planets IMAGE: The star RZ Piscium, surrounded by huge clouds of dust and gas view more Credit: NASA video A team of U.S. astronomers including UCLA's Benjamin Zuckerman has found evidence suggesting that the strange, unpredictable dimming of a star 550 light-years away may be caused by vast orbiting clouds of gas and dust. The star, RZ Piscium, is in the constellation Pisces, and the huge dust clo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A catalytic balancing actScientists have recently used a new and counterintuitive approach to create a better catalyst that supports one of the reactions involved in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. By first creating an alloy of two of the densest naturally occurring elements and then removing one, the scientists reshaped the remaining material's structure so that it better balanced three important factors: activ
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphins IMAGE: Unsustainable tourism practices threaten dolphin populations in Panama's Bocas del Toro Province. view more Credit: Sean Mattson, STRI Bottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. Biologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute discovered that the roughly 80 dolphins in the archipel
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Reindeer hunted by wolverines get safety app Image copyright Actility Image caption Reindeer herding is big business in Lapland Reindeer, who fall prey to wolverines, wolves and lynx, are being fitted with sensors to protect them. It makes it easier for herders to track the animals across the remote Lapland forests where they roam. Sensors around the necks of the female reindeer are linked to the herders' smartphones, allowing them to rescu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
End of a Google era: Alphabet executive chairman Eric Schmidt steps down Bringing to a close the stewardship of one of the world's most successful companies, Eric Schmidt is stepping aside as the executive chairman of Google-parent Alphabet's board of directors. Schmidt, 62, will remain on the board and will become a technical advisor, the Internet giant said late Thursday. No reason was given for Schmidt's decision to step aside or for the timing. According to a fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detroit's Amazon bid pitches big tax breaks, cheap labor costs, possible ferry to Windsor State, local and Canadian officials have offered Amazon a giant package of tax breaks and development incentives that would extend over decades if the e-commerce giant were to pick the Detroit and Windsor region for its second headquarters. Confidential details of the tax breaks, as well as Detroit's official 242-page bid book, were obtained Wednesday by the Free Press. The documents describe how
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Science | The Guardian
Why we keep scanning the skies for signs of alien intelligence I n less than an hour, the decision was made. It was 2 December and Avi Loeb, an astronomy professor at Harvard, was with Yuri Milner, the Russian billionaire and founder of Breakthrough Listen, a $100m alien-hunting venture . Milner had invited Loeb, an adviser on the project, to his Palo Alto home to discuss the bizarre features of the interstellar object, ‘Oumuamua . The first known visitor fr
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Ingeniøren
It-koks giver kunder tidlig julegave: Alle varer hos H&M kostede 40 kroner Tidligt i morges var der en fejl på H&Ms hjemmeside, så alle varer kostede 39,99 kroner - uanset førpris. »De forkerte priser på vores hjemmeside i morges skyldtes en teknisk fejl, som hurtigt blev rettet,« skriver Stine Lerche Øilo fra HM i en mail til Version2. Det gjaldt også produkter, der før stod til tusindvis af kroner, og det har fik en H&M-kunde til at købe ekstra julegaver til sig selv,
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Futurity.org
Positive racial identity boosts black girls’ curiosity in class African-American girls with strong sense of racial identity are more likely to be curious and persistent in school, according to a new study. The findings could have implications for the physical and emotional health of children reaching into adulthood, according to Sheretta Butler-Barnes, assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and lead author of the study i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
T-Mobile to buy Austrian cable operator for $2.3 billionDeutsche Telekom's T-Mobile Austria unit has announced plans to buy cable operator UPC Austria in a deal that values the company at 1.9 billion euros ($2.3 billion.)
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Ingeniøren
Professor: DSB er ikke det logiske valg til at styre førerløse S-tog Når det første førerløse S-tog om otte år triller ud på Ringbanen mellem Ny Ellebjerg og Hellerup, bliver det stadig med DSB som ansvarlig for, at passagerne kommer sikkert og rettidigt frem. En del af den aftale om de førerløse S-tog, som regeringen indgik med Dansk Folkeparti og de radikale i sidste uge, er nemlig, at der skal opbygges en helt ny organisation for S-togene. Ligesom med hovedstad
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The Atlantic
HQ Trivia Is a Harbinger of Dystopia Twice a day, HQ Trivia players tune in to a smartphone game-show app, where an emcee poses 12 wholesome questions, each with three possible answers. Players who answer all of them correctly split a cash prize. The winnings started at a few hundred bucks when the app launched in the summer, and now average around $1,500. But they go up to $10,000 or more. The app, created by two former founders of
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Popular Science
Everything you know about toxic shock syndrome is probably wrong For a while there in the ‘90s it felt like every teen-girl magazine was required to publish at least one (terrifying) it-happened-to-me toxic shock syndrome story per year. “I left a tampon in for eight hours and almost died.” “My friend looked at a tampon once and died from TSS.” Maybe these tales were leftovers from the TSS epidemic in the late 1970s, or maybe editors tracked down new cases fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin sell-off picks up steam For the past 10 years, the Camera Culture group at MIT's Media Lab has been developing innovative imaging systems—from a camera that can see around corners to one that can read text in closed books—by using "time of flight," ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists call for action to tackle the threat of invasive tree species to a global biodiversity hotspot Pittosporum undulatum or mock orange are the dark green trees seen on the left in thei forest canopy in Jamaica. Credit: John Healey An invasive Australian tree is now posing a serious threat to a global diversity 'hotspot' according to new collaborative research between Landcare Research in New Zealand, the Universities of Cambridge (UK) Denver (US) and Bangor University (UK). This species, Pitt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Reindeer Island Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over part of Lake Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba, with Reindeer Island visible in the lower-right part of the image. While our friends on the other side of the pond might be able to tell us why this place is called 'Reindeer Island', we believe th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerated analysis of the stability of complex alloys Prof Dr Alfred Ludwig, Dr Yujiao Li, Alan Savan and Dr Aleksander Kostka (from front to back). Credit: RUB, Marquard Material scientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum are able to determine if a new material remains stable under temperature load within the space of a few days. They have developed a novel process for analysing, for example, the temperature and oxidation resistance of complex alloys th
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New Scientist - News
China tackles climate change with world’s largest carbon market Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty By Timothy Revell China has upped the ante in its efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions and slow the progress of climate change. The Chinese government is launching a nationwide carbon market that should encourage power companies to cut their emissions. China is the world’s largest polluter, responsible for more than a quarter of annual greenhouse gas emiss
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers chart the 'secret' movement of quantum particles Credit: Robert Couse-Baker Researchers from the University of Cambridge have taken a peek into the secretive domain of quantum mechanics. In a theoretical paper published in the journal Physical Review A , they have shown that the way that particles interact with their environment can be used to track quantum particles when they're not being observed, which had been thought to be impossible. One
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are you a 'cyberloafer?' Why internet procrastination is making life easier for hackers Credit: Shutterstock The biggest threat to an organisation's cyber-security comes from within, according to a growing body of evidence . Employees are frequently putting their companies at risk of hacking by sharing their passwords, using public WiFi networks to send sensitive information, or not protecting the privacy of social media accounts. But there's another threat that at first seems innoc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny polyps save corals from predators and disease Hydrozoan polyps living on coral surface. Credit: S. Montano, Milan-Bicocca University In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society , scientists show how tiny hydrozoans, polyps smaller than one millimeter and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals, may play a role in keeping corals safe and healthy. Tibor Navracsics, Commissioner for Education, Cultu
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Feed: All Latest
Why Workplace Instant Messaging Is Hot Again Chat is almost as old as the internet itself. But this year, investors and big tech companies alike treated workplace messaging as the next big thing. Slack announced a $250 million investment in September from Japanese tech company SoftBank, bringing its total funding to $790 million and boosting its valuation from $3.8 billion to $5.1. In June, rumors surfaced that Amazon wanted to buy the comp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rainbow peacock spiders may inspire new optical technologies A miniature peacock spider with rainbow-iridescence. a An adult male Maratus robinsoni. b A M. robinsoni resting on a human fingernail: the spider is only ~ 2.5 mm in size. The iridescent abdomen of the spider is indicated by the black arrow. c A zoom-in view (scale bar: 200 μm) of the same spider abdomen as shown in the dashed square of a, but with different viewing angle. Note the colours of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prehistoric women's skeletons show impact of rigorous manual labour Credit: Shutterstock Women living around 7 000 years ago did a lot of heavy lifting in their early agrarian societies. Now skeletal analysis reveals they were even stronger than the top female athletes of today. A woman's work, they say, is never done and judging by data collected from the analysis of skeletons belonging to mid-Holocene Central European female agriculturalists, that certainly was
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wet winters may not dampen small wildfires A wet winter allows grasses to grow profusely, but during the next fire season, the abundant dried grass fuels more small wildfires. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Carol Rasmussen NASA scientists conducting research on the connection between fuel moisture and fires have uncovered a paradox: a wet winter corresponds to more small wildfires in the following fire season, not fewer, as is commonly assumed.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Physicists Demonstrate How to Reverse of the Arrow of Time One of the more curious challenges in physics is to understand the nature of time. At the microscopic level, the laws of physics are symmetric with respect to time—they work just as well whether time runs forwards or backwards. But at the macroscopic level, processes all have a preferred direction. The great physicist Arthur Eddington called this the “arrow of time.” Just why this arrow points in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baidu accuses former exec of stealing self-driving car technology China's largest search engine Baidu is suing a former executive, accusing him of stealing self-driving car technology, reports said Friday, as competition in the sector heats up. In court filings , Baidu demanded US-based Jingchi Inc., a start-up founded by the former manager of its autonomous driving unit, stop using its technology to develop autonomous cars , according to zhichanli.cn, a websit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From U.S. South to China, heat stress could exceed human endurance A new study projects that drastic combinations of heat and humidity may hit large areas of the world later this century. Credit: Ethan Coffel Climate scientists say that killer heat waves will become increasingly prevalent in many regions as climate warms. However, most projections leave out a major factor that could worsen things: humidity, which can greatly magnify the effects of heat alone. No
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weyl particles detected in strongly correlated electron systems Sami Dzsaber and Prof. Silke Bühler-Paschen. Credit: Rice University At TU Wien recently, particles known as 'Weyl fermions' were discovered in materials with strong interaction between electrons. Just like light particles, they have no mass but nonetheless they move extremely slowly. There was great excitement back in 2015, when it was first possible to measure these 'Weyl fermions' – outlandish
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Science | The Guardian
Gifts are a traditional part of Christmas – but why do we give presents at all? Exchanging stuff – as gifts or economic transactions – and reciprocating those exchanges in a socially acceptable way - is a practice found in all human cultures. The rules and scope of the exchanges may be very different, but the fact of them is universal. French anthropologist Marcel Mauss doesn’t attempt to explain the politics and practice of the office Secret Santa (alas) – instead, he descr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Organic aerosols in remote areas have shorter lives than scientists assumed A view of the troposphere from an airplane. Credit: Nick Juhasz Ambient aerosols – those tiny mixtures of liquids and solids suspended in air – play important roles in Earth's climate, so much so that scientists are heading to remote locations to better understand them. Earth's atmosphere is a complicated system. It's impossible to measure every aspect of it everywhere all the time. Models can de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making container technology work for persistent microservices The Ubiquity architecture. Credit: IBM In the technology realm, containers are an approach to running a compute environment, a bit like virtual machines (VM). Users typically prefer containers because they use resources more efficiently, start and stop much faster, and are less expensive to maintain. IBM Research co-developed Ubiquity with the IBM Cloud Storage Solutions team with the objective o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why we shouldn't be so quick to demonise bats Bats are remarkable native creatures of key ecological and economic importance. We urgently need more matter-of-fact style reporting around the risks of bat-borne diseases to avoid vilification and persecution of these unappreciated mammals. Australia's weird and wonderful bats Australia has 81 bat species , from nine families. They comprise the second-largest group of mammals after marsupial
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Higher temperatures linked to EU asylum figures Image copyright Getty Images Image caption High temperatures that have impacted maize production have been linked to increases in numbers of EU asylum seekers Sharp increases in the numbers of those seeking asylum in the European Union have been linked to higher temperatures in agricultural regions of the world. Researchers found that when temperatures deviated from 20C in food growing areas of 1
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here's what bike-sharing programs need to succeed After nearly a decade of operation, Brisbane’s CityCycle scheme still needs to be. Credit: subsidised. Ash Kyd/flickr, CC BY Bike sharing has become a buzzword in cities from Cape Town to Shanghai to Melbourne. Planners, politicians and media pundits keep touting their benefits : reducing pollution, congestion, travel costs and oil dependence, while improving public health. Bike sharing also help
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theory Credit: Michigan State University A group of Michigan State University (MSU) researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation that holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules. By understanding the details of this motion, one can determine the amount of energ
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Null Results Produce Important Science It often feels like we planet hunters earn our chops by how many planets we successfully discover. Why, then, did I spend the last year working with observations that we already knew hadn’t detect any planets? Such “null results” may be harder for a parent to brag about, but it can often be just as valuable to question what isn’t observed as what is . Don’t get me wrong: getting successful observ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost technique for etching nanoholes in silicon could underpin new filtration and nanophotonic devices An example of directional etching for nanohole arrays of less than 500nm in diameter. Credit: © 2017 A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering Metal-assisted chemical etching, or 'MacEtch', is used to fabricate a range of nanostructures, but damaging movements of the catalyst during vertical etching processes hamper its wider use. Now, a team led by A*STAR have developed a technique
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine learning may boost protein production for better pharmaceuticals A machine learning program developed by an international team of researchers may help pharmaceutical companies produce higher quantities of cutting-edge drugs needed for medical treatments. In a study, the team developed a computer algorithm using gene expression data of Chinese hamster ovary cells—a cell line often used by biopharmaceutical researchers for medical research—to optimize the produc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cities: How smart strategies can turn into effective action plans Credit: Edouard Ki Smart innovations are years in the making and require long-term vision. Changes in government and citizens' sensibilities can halt or alter strategies. So how can they survive to create lasting change? When Justin Bieber made his way to Stockholm in September 2016, city officials hardly expected the tween heartthrob to pave the way for sustainable urban policy. But when thousan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A novel way to synthesize antioxidant substances Credit: Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University together with their colleagues from USA and Japan have proposed a novel way to address the most important and fundamental challenge of organic chemistry, i.e. breaking a bond between carbon and hydrogen atoms to form new organic substances. They were the first to carry out "breaking" in water thanks to especia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists find evidence of an exotic state of matter In a known and well-understood scenario, pairing is caused solely by the attraction between two fermions (green lines). However, Heidelberg scientists found that with strong interactions between the fermions, a different type of pairing takes place, which strongly depends on the density of the surrounding medium (gray shaded regions). This suggests that in this state, each particle is not only pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alternative fabrication scheme for microscale semiconductor lasers An etched facet semiconductor laser with an air gap reflector. Credit: Optical Society of America A systematic study of a simple and general structure for on-chip semiconductor lasers by A*STAR researchers sets the scene for much broader application of integrated semiconductor lasers beyond conventional silicon-based systems. The ability to use, manipulate and sense light is applicable to many te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two proteins maintain embryonic stem cell pluripotency through different means Two 'finger-like' proteins employ different mechanisms to help safeguard the ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell types, according to an A*STAR-led study. This finding could help researchers develop new ways to regenerate lost or damaged tissue. PRDMs are a family of 17 proteins with finger-like structures that contain zinc, which are involved in regulating gene
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals how climate change may affect Hawaiian fishpond aquaculture Moi (fish) from Heeia Fishpond. Credit: Paepae o Heeia For centuries, indigenous peoples of the Hawaiian Islands practiced sustainable aquaculture by building walled fishponds in coastal estuaries. Historical records estimate that in the early 1900s an extensive network of over 450 fishponds across the Hawaiian Islands produced upwards of 2 million pounds of fish annually and supported large thri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A catalytic balancing act for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen Argonne scientists and their collaborators have used a new and counterintuitive approach to balance three important factors — activity, stability and conductivity — in a new catalyst designed for splitting water. Credit: Argonne National Laboratory Balance forms the foundation for a happy life or a healthy diet. For scientists working to design new catalysts to create renewable energy, balancing
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Ingeniøren
Ny teknologi lyn-evaluerer kræftbehandling En revolutionerende teknologi ved MR-scanning kan gøre op med den frustrerende ventetid på kræft­behandling: Ved at ændre magnetismen i et sukkerstof, der bruges som kontraststof, kan man allerede samme dag, som kræftbehandlingen sættes i gang, se, om den påvirker cancercellerne. Det er en voldsom forbedring i forhold til dagens fremgangsmåde: Her kommer en kvinde, der har fået konstateret brystk
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Humidity may prove breaking point for some areas as temperatures rise, says study Climate scientists say that killer heat waves will become increasingly prevalent in many regions as climate warms. However, most projections leave out a major factor that could worsen things: humidity, which can greatly magnify the effects of heat alone. Now, a new global study projects that in coming decades the effects of high humidity in many areas will dramatically increase. At times, they ma
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Science | The Guardian
Rushing students through university and fixating on science is not the way forward | David Cannadine T he refrain of the past few years has surely been that we live in uncertain times. And hackneyed as that mantra might now be, the evidence is all around us – institutions are distrusted and derided, expertise is mocked and scorned, xenophobia and populism are on the march. When human affairs seem more than usually baffling and bewildering, it is tempting to suppose that there may be simple solut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healthy racial identity important for adolescent African-American girls The education impact can be traced to adolescence: African-American girls with strong racial identity are more likely to be academically curious and persistent in school, according to a recent study from Washington University in St. Louis. The findings could have implications for the physical and emotional health of children reaching into adulthood, according to Sheretta Butler-Barnes, assistant
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The Atlantic
The Irony of Specialized High Schools For all four years of high school I spent half of every day dancing. And not just casual, because-I-felt-like-it dancing (although that did happen every now and then), but full-out, pre-professional ballet and modern dancing. Pink or black tights, leotards, and ballet buns were a requirement, not a suggestion. So, it would make sense to assume that I’m writing this as a dancer. But alas, a dancer
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The Atlantic
The Asteroid Mission That Never Leaves Earth For most people, the thought of spending every waking hour with strangers in a metal capsule roughly the size of a studio apartment for weeks sounds like the stuff of nightmares. For others, it’s a dream. About 400 people applied this year to live, work, and sleep in NASA ’s Human Exploration Research Analog, a three-story habitat built to mimic the confinement of space missions and study human b
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The Atlantic
A 15-Year-Old Work of Gender Essentialism in the Age of #MeToo One of the open secrets that has been stripped of its secrecy in America’s current moment of #MeToo reckoning has been the nature of the secrets themselves. The spaces they have occupied. The structures that have allowed them to flourish out in the open for so long. The fact that women have been living in a world that has been built, in general, by and for men . Hollywood, pop culture, mass cultu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bedbug tips for holiday travelers Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service urban entomologist Dr. Mike Merchant shows a vial of adult bed bugs. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife Illustration by Gabe Saldana Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologists say a few simple practices can help holiday travelers deal with bedbug infestations and avoid spreading the pest. "All it takes is one traveler with bedbugs in their luggage to stay at a
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Behind the Fall and Rise of China's Xiaomi A year ago, Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi (sha-oh-me) had fallen from the world’s most valuable unicorn to a “unicorpse.” Sales plunged in 2016, pushing the company from first to fifth place among China’s smartphone makers. No firm had ever come back from a wound that severe in the trench warfare of the global smartphone business. Today, Xiaomi is being called a “Chinese phoenix.” The company h
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Feed: All Latest
Snowden-Backed App 'Haven' Turns Your Phone Into a Home Security System Your digital security, any sufficiently paranoid person will remind you, is only as good as your physical security . The world's most sensitive users of technology, like dissidents, activists, or journalists in repressive regimes, have to fear not just hacking and online surveillance, but the reality that police, intelligence agents, or other intruders can simply break into your home, office, or
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Science : NPR
Siddhartha Mukherjee: Can We Reimagine Our Approach To Treating Disease? Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Rethinking Medicine . About Siddhartha Mukherjee's TED Talk When it comes to medicine, one rule of thinking has generally prevailed: Have disease, take pill, kill something. But physician Siddhartha Mukherjee says treatment should take a broader approach. About Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician and researcher, and an Assistant Pro
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Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om førerløse s-tog, ny kræftundersøgelse og lyttestationer i Malmø I denne uges udgave af Transformator sætter vi fokus på de udfordringer, der skal styr på inden de førerløse s-tog kan trille ud på skinnerne. derudover skal vi se nærmere på en ny teknologi, der lover meget bedre og hurtigere vurderinger af, om en kræftbehandling er effektiv. Transformator Ingeniørens fredagspodcast sætter strøm til ugens største nyheder inden for teknologi, forskning og naturvi
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Live Science
Haunted Again: Skull-Faced 'Halloween Asteroid' Returns in 2018 An artist's illustration of the "Halloween Asteroid" 2015 TB145, which looks much like a skull from certain angles. The asteroid flew harmlessly by Earth on Oct. 31, 2015 and will return in November 2018. Credit: J. A. Peñas/SINC Astronomers will soon get another look at the big, ghoulishly weird space rock that buzzed Earth on Halloween three years ago. The roughly 2,100-foot-wide (640 met
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Live Science
The Strangest Science Findings of 2017 The year 2017 was brimming with strange science news. We're talking about worms sprouting two heads after visiting outer space, subatomic particles that were almost kept secret and mystery blobs floating in the ocean off the coast of Norway. Here are the top 10 strangest science stories that we covered here at Live Science in 2017. Two-headed flatworm An amputated flatworm fragment sent to space
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Live Science
If Dogs Can Smell Cancer, Why Don't They Screen People? Dogs can be trained to be cancer-sniffing wizards, using their sensitive noses to detect cancerous fumes wafting from diseased cells. This sniffing is noninvasive and could help diagnose countless people, which begs the question: If these pups are so olfactorily astute, why aren't they screening people for cancer right now? Here's the short answer: Dogs do well in engaging situations, such
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Webb Telescope's 'silver and gold decorations' This image mashup highlights two achievements NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope had in 2017. In October, Webb’s sunshield was tensioned for the first time at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California. In November, Webb’s combined optics and science instruments completed cryogenic testing inside Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn Webb
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists synthesize a new phosphor Crystal structure of the compound. Credit: Yana Baklanova (co-author of the research study) Chemists and physicists from Ural Federal University and Institute of Chemistry of Solids of the Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences have synthesized a new compound that may be used to convert UV radiation into visible light and change laser radiation range. The work was published in the Journal of
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Scientific American Content: Global
How DNA Could Unlock the Mysteries of Melting Glaciers and Ice Sheets The world’s glaciers and Greenland’s ice sheet are melting, and fast. The situation in Antarctica is less clear, but scientists generally agree that the continent is losing ice. And as the planet continues to warm, these vast and long-frozen regions will continue to thaw and spill water into our rising seas. Researchers are rushing to answer crucial questions, such as figuring out the dynamics in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a valleytronics route towards reversible computer (a) This is aSchematic drawing of the valleytronic logic gate (b) Operation of the valleytronic logic gate (c-e) Electrical characteristics of the valleytronic logic gate (f) Traditional reversible logical operation (g) Valleytronic-based reversible logical operation Credit: Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) In many two-dimensional (2-D) materials, electrons not only possess ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proof of randomness builds future of digital security Credit: CC0 Public Domain In an effort to block emerging threats to online security, researchers at Princeton University have developed a method to verify the strength of random number generators that form the basis of most encryption systems. Nearly all secure online traffic—from shopping to banking to communications—relies on a technique of randomly generating a number that serves as a key to u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Degrading coral reefs bad news for commercial fishing Credit: University of Queensland The degradation of coral reefs might have short-term benefits for some fish groups, but would be bad for fisheries long-term, according to a University of Queensland-led study. The research, which focused on fisheries' productivity under progressive coral reef degradation , also found that the industry may be fairly robust up until the early reef degradation stage
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emission characteristics of refractory black carbon aerosols from fresh biomass burningAs a short-lived climate forcer, black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere play a vital role in climate change by absorbing solar radiation and altering the formation, lifespan and albedo of clouds. It also provides "seed" for haze formation in urban/regional scale. In northern China, open biomass burning (OBB), such as straw burning after harvesting, is one of important sources of refractory black
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NYT > Science
Ties: Sundays at the Altar of Science Eventually I became a physician and a scientist. As I passed through medical school and residency, my religious belief faded until it was gone. I’ve encountered wonders in the hospital and laboratory. A child paralyzed by botulism who sat up the morning after receiving an antibody. Complete genomes arrayed on my computer screen like books on a shelf. These achievements were the product of centuri
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NYT > Science
The New Old Age: A Better Kind of Nursing Home At conventional nursing homes, aides have to hustle residents out of bed, help them dress, escort them to the dining room by whatever time breakfast is served, and then perhaps whisk them off for physical therapy. These facilities struggle to provide even a smidgen of personal autonomy. Here, physical therapists come to the Green House Homes. If they find a resident still asleep, they come back l
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NYT > Science
Greater Access to Donated Livers Promised to Transplant Patients Under the new procedures, the sickest patients are still prioritized for receipt of livers donated in their local area and region, but they will also gain access to donated livers across the regional border, within a range of 170 miles. Any modification to the system has life or death implications. Because the number of people in the United States who need livers vastly outnumbers the availabilit
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Science : NPR
Climate Change Likely To Increase Volcanic Eruptions, Scientists Say An Indonesian farmer passes a field as Mount Sinabung volcano spews thick smoke into the air in Karo, North Sumatra earlier this month. The volcano roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years, after another period of inactivity it erupted once more in 2013, and has remained highly active since. Ivan Damanik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Ivan Damanik/AFP/Getty Images
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Ingeniøren
Ny EU-aftale: Alle større bygninger skal have ladestandere Fremover skal bygninger ikke bare designes til at kunne rumme mennesker, men også deres elbiler. Det er Europaparlamentet, Kommissionen og det estiske formandskab, der for tiden styrer EU, blevet enige om. Det fremgår af en pressemeddelelse fra ministerrådet: Aftalen handler om en revision af EUs Bygningsdirektiv. Revisionen er en del af kommissionens såkaldte Vinterpakke, der skal fremme energie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the sun's influence on the remote planet Uranus changes its brightness in the sky Credit: Shutterstock Changes in solar activity influence the colour and formation of clouds around the planet, researchers at Oxford and Reading universities found. The icy planet is second furthest from the sun in the solar system and takes 84 Earth years to complete a full orbit – one Uranian year. The researchers found that, once the planet's long and strange seasons are taken into account,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: 2017 in space The world's first-ever detection of two faraway neutron stars colliding, causing a massive blast that rippled through the fabric of space and time, was judged the scientific breakthrough of 2017, the journal Science said ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stabilization of a wheeled inverted pendulum assistant robot Rosie, the housekeeper from The Jetsons , has been the archetypal representative of helper robots since she wheeled onto televisions screens in the early 1960s. While Rosie vacuumed and washed dishes without a hint of incoordination, it turns out that a real-world counterpart would be far more likely to tip over. Researchers from King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals in Saudi Arabia have n
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The Atlantic
Downsizing Has Big Ambitions but Little Payoff In Alexander Payne’s Downsizing , there’s a solution for everything. Can’t keep up with your bills? Worried about your carbon footprint? Seeking a way to shake up the mindless reverie of your job, your marriage, or your day-to-day routine? There’s a (literally) one-size-fits-all answer. At the beginning of the film, a kindly Norwegian scientist named Dr. Asbjørnsen (Rolf Lassgård) invents a way t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists teach robots how to respect humans' personal space Robots have a lot to learn about humans, including how to respect their personal space. Scientists at the Institute of Automatics of the National University of San Juan in Argentina are giving mobile robots a crash course in avoiding collisions with humans. The researchers published their methods in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Associat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's in a name? If it's close to 'bitcoin' it's gold In this Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, file photo, a man uses a Bitcoin ATM in Hong Kong. Bitcoin is the world's most popular virtual currency. The latest example of a company trying to tie its fortunes to the cryptocurrency craze came Thursday, Dec. 21, in form of an iced tea maker. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File) What's in a name? These days, if it's anything close to "bitcoin," it's Wall Street gold. The l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toshiba unveils device for Fukushima nuclear reactor probe Toshiba Corp. unveiled a pan-tilt camera which it jointly developed with the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning (IRND), to inspect the interior of the damaged primary containment vessel of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 in Yokohama, Friday, Dec. 22, 2017. The device shown to media Friday is 13 meters (43 feet) long and designed to give officials a deeper
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking up (protein complexes) is hard to do, but new study shows how A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers identified the structural basis for how tightly bound protein complexes are broken apart to become inactivated. The structure explains why the complexes are less active in some cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, and offers a starting point to identify drug targets to reactivate it. As we grow, our cells respond to tightly regulated c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding the impact of defects on the properties of MoS2 The study on 2-D molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) defects employed low frequency noise measurements and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The enlarged image shows an AFM cantilever tip pointing to an area with one sulfur monovacancy (area shaded red). As current flows through the AFM tip and the sample, switching events between different ionization states (neutral and charged -1) are measu
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop method to track human movements more accurately Scientists have developed a data-driven method to better detect and track human movements for use in technologies such as at-home personal training videos or monitoring at-risk elderly patients. The scientists published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinca (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Association of Automation. The collaborative research team includes scien
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better control of robotic movements for human safety Researchers have improved the control of a key robotic component to better ensure the safety of humans. They have published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica (JAS) , a joint publication of the IEEE and Chinese Association of Automation . The team, based at Nankai University, China, focused on a series elastic actuators. The actuator is the "muscle" of robotic machinery. Just
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to improve physical interactions between robots and humans Popular entertainment often portrays robots as the perfect best friend, from Bender in the cartoon Futurama to the mighty Transformers. These close friendships don't exist off-screen yet, but humans and robots are getting to know each other better in real life. Dr. Ali Safavi and Prof. Mehrdad Zadeh at Kettering University have proposed a model to improve human- robot interactions using haptic gu
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emphasizing the auto in automobile—a unified approach for automated vehicles The idea of driverless cars continues to make headlines across the world, including the recent revelation that researchers drive around wearing car seat costumes to observe how the public interacts with cars that appear driverless. Despite the apparent absurdity of such research techniques, driverless cars are approaching the on-ramp to reality. A team of researchers have proposed an integrated f
13h
Ingeniøren
Lande vil fortsætte masseovervågning – stik mod EU-domstolens intention Selvom to EU-domme har afgjort, at logningsreglerne for tele- og internetudbyderne bryder borgernes grundlæggende rettigheder, så forsøger landende at ændre reglerne så lidt som muligt. Det er lækkede papirer fra EU , der viser, at landene har en lang række betænkninger, inden de er klar til at begrænse overvågningen. Her er kommentarer til EU-domme om logning: : Belgien: »Although data processed
13h
Ingeniøren
Ny rekord: Forskere nedkøler nanochip til under 3 millikelvin Fysikere ved universitetet i Basel i har i samarbejde med tyske og finske forskere formået at afkøle en nanochip til kun tre millikelvin – tre tusindedele over det absolutte nulpunkt på -273,15 grader celcius. Forskerne brugte magnetisk køling til formålet, både hvad angår de elektriske forbindelser samt selve chippen. Resultaterne er offentliggjort i en artikel i tidsskriftet Applied Physics Let
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breaking up (protein complexes) is hard to do, but new UW study shows how MADISON, Wisconsin -- A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers identified the structural basis for how tightly bound protein complexes are broken apart to become inactivated. The structure explains why the complexes are less active in some cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, and offers a starting point to identify drug targets to reactivate it. As we grow, our cells respon
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moth females use scent proximity to attract mates IMAGE: Female moths can use satellite strategies to attract mates. view more Credit: Photo courtesy of Jan van Arkel. Female moths deemed unworthy or unattractive to male moths can increase their odds of attracting a mate by emitting their sex pheromones - their "come-hither" scents - in close proximity to attractive females, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Milestone' reached in fighting deadly wheat disease Image copyright Robert Park Image caption Stem rust infecting wheat in a field Scientists say they have made a step forward in the fight against a wheat disease that threatens food security. Wheat is a staple food crop, making up a fifth of the calories on our plates. But in many parts of the world, the crop is being attacked by stem rust (black rust), a fungus that can ravage a farmer's fields.
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Science : NPR
How Humans Use 'Strategic Ignorance' When Facts Get In The Way Social science research explores how our minds push away information that gets in the way of our feelings and desires.
14h
Ingeniøren
Komet 67P spøger: Skal Nasa tilbage? Der opstod global rumfartsjubel, da det i november 2014 lykkedes for den europæiskledede Rosetta-mission at lande fartøjet Philae på kometen Churyumov-Gerasimenko – også kendt som komet 67P. Missionen havde været 10 år undervejs. Desværre landede Philae i halvskygge, så solpanelerne ikke blev opladet, og Philae faldt i søvn et par dage senere. Heldigvis havde man nået at modtage 80 procent af de
14h
New Scientist - News
Odd fossils hint first complex life hung on long after its time S. Conway Morris and D. Grazhdankin By Colin Barras A strange 380-million-year-old fossil that was initially identified as a worm might actually be the last known survivor of an early form of life that no one fully understands . So claims one palaeontologist – but others are sceptical. The Ediacarans , also known as “vendobionts”, are some of the earliest multicellular organisms known. They w
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant marine reptile lived in Antarctic 150 million years ago Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists in Argentina have found the remains of a giant carnivorous marine reptile, or plesiosaur, that lived 150 million years ago in Antarctica. The four-finned reptile, which measured up to 12 meters (13 yards) long, dates from the late Jurassic period and is the most ancient creature ever discovered on the continent. Soledad Cavalli, a paleontologist at Argentina
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China jails seller of VPN services In this Aug. 19, 2013, file photo, computer users sit near a monitor display with a message from the Chinese police on the proper use of the Internet at an Internet cafe in Beijing. A Chinese official newspaper says an entrepreneur has been sentenced to 5 ½ years in prison in December 2017 for selling virtual private network service amid a campaign by Beijing to stamp out technology that evades i
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Vi hører, hvad vi vil høre om ny teknologi 22. december 2017 Filosoffer skal undersøge uvilje mod nye genteknologier genteknologi Når en ny genteknologi bliver præsenteret for offentligheden, reagerer mange med skepsis – selv når forskerne er enige om, at teknologien er ufarlig og har stort potentiale. Hvad skyldes den skepsis? Hvorfor bliver debatten om nye teknologier så polariseret? Og kan et demokratisk samfund forsvare at bruge en te
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Rate and risk of head injury in mixed martial arts remain unknown TORONTO, Dec, 22, 2017 -- The rate and potential risk of traumatic brain injury in mixed martial arts remain unknown due to lack of regulation and protocols surrounding these injuries, according to a new study. Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital reviewed 18 studies involving 7,587 patients, examining head injuries in MMA fighting published between 1990 and 2016. Of the studies included in the
15h
Ingeniøren
Kan du tippe 13 rigtige om 2018?Vind tre flasker god rødvin i Ingeniørens julequiz: Kan du regne ud, hvad der kommer til at ske i det kommende år?
16h
Viden
Slapt underliv: Eksperter dumper kendt knibeøvelse Ups, var det et lille strint i trussen? Efter en fødsel kan det være svært at holde på vandet. Knibeøvelser er derfor vigtige for at styrke bækkenbunden. Men mange kvinder laver knibeøvelserne helt forkert. - Ofte er det baller og mave, de træner, da bækkenbunden kan være svær at aktivere for mange, forklarer urogynækologisk fysioterapeut, Jannie Dobel fra Kontinensforeningen. Hun bliver bakket o
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Why this pig could make you go veganThis Christmas, Hope the pig will be the star of the first vegan advert to be screened across UK cinemas.
16h
Science | The Guardian
Transplant patient's Christmas plea: talk to your family about organ donation Families are being urged to talk about becoming an organ donor in the hope that more people on the waiting list for a heart transplant will be given the chance of life. Since last Christmas Day, 31 people have died on the heart transplant waiting list, according to NHS Blood and Transplant. To try to tackle the shortage of organs, the government has recently announced a consultation into an “opt-
16h
Ingeniøren
Politiet opruster kraftigt på IT: »Vi ser ind i et moderne data- og analysedrevet politi« Det danske politi står foran implementeringen af et af de mest avancerede it-systemer til hjælp til politiet i forbindelse med opklaring af alvorlige forbrydelser. Det nye system hedder POL-Intel og leveres af det Silicon Valley-baserede selskab Palantir. Direktør i Koncern IT, Rigspolitiet Lars Ole Dybdal. Foto: Privatfoto/Google+ Som navnet antyder er systemet i stand til at opsamle information
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Australian WW1-era submarine found after 13th search missionThe discovery of the first Allied submarine lost in World War One solves Australia's oldest naval mystery.
17h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Førerløse S-tog – kun med indbygget nødbremse, tak Intet ligger os mere fjernt end at være maskinstormere, sådan som transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) beskyldte Ingeniøren for i den forgangne uge. Tværtimod er det en del af vores dna at fremhæve teknologi, som giver os bedre sundhed, vilkår, miljø og i det hele taget skubber på mod en bedre verden. Derfor kan vi også kun bifalde, at et politisk flertal vil undersøge, om Københavns S-tog kan
18h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Ideas of the Year, 2017 Edition Every year is impossible to synthesize. Yet 2017 was not just another year. To help us wrangle the chaotic, extraordinary events of the last 12 months into some sort of shape, we posed a question to journalists from across The Atlantic 's staff, and to our listeners: What were the ideas of 2017? In this episode, Jeff and Matt discuss the many different responses to that question we collected, and
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
New Genome Scores Predict Breast Cancer Odds for Any Woman The actress Angelina Jolie prompted droves of women to seek genetic testing after she revealed, in 2013, that a “faulty gene” called BRCA1 had given her an 87 percent chance of developing breast cancer. In the face of those odds, Jolie had decided to have her breasts removed. “I chose not to keep my story private because there are many women who do not know they that they might be living under th
19h
Ingeniøren
Kronisk forsinkede kolleger kan være positivtOfte bliver medarbejdere, som er sent på den, dømt hårdt, men faktisk kan der være fordele i en forsinket medansat.
19h
Live Science
What is Kwanzaa? The seven candles — three red, three green and one black — represent the Seven Principles of Kwanzaa. Credit: MIND AND I/Shutterstock Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday that celebrates African heritage and identity. The name comes from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza," which translates to "first fruits," and the holiday is based on traditional African harvest festivals. Kwanzaa is a relatively
19h
Ingeniøren
Fire it-giganter tager monopol på verdens data Fire selskaber sidder tungt på at behandle hovedparten af de data, som er grundlaget for den digitale økonomi. Amazon, Google, Facebook og Microsoft har gennem en målrettet og aggressiv strategi formået at opbygge imperier til skade for både konkurrence og offentlig kontrol. Kun Apple kan udfordre med data om brugerne af selskabets hardware. Sammen med Apple opsamler de fire selskaber ikke blot h
19h
Ingeniøren
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 22. december Hver dag frem til juleaften får du et nyt spændende spørgsmål fra os, som tager udgangspunkt i en artikel vi har bragt i løbet af året her på ing.dk. Dagens spørgsmål: Det samlede træpille-forbrug steg med 22 pct. i 2016 set i forhold til 2014. Pillefyr hos private og en kold vinter er en del af forklaringen, men hvor mange ton træpiller havnede i danske kraftvarmeværker, fjernvarmeværker, træpil
19h
Big Think
It’s the Most Dangerous — Er, Wonderful — Time of the Year The holiday season is a magical time for family and friend get-togethers, great food, giving and receiving, and making memories. Also, it seems, trips to the emergency room. InsuranceQuotes.com recently crunched the numbers collected by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NAIS) cataloging holiday ER visits. Then they made some festive infographics . Er, ho, ho, ho? These are the
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking stock of a thorny issue IMAGE: Crown-of-thorns starfish ( Acanthaster cf. solaris ) munching its way through the Acroporatable corals on Rib Reef, as Dr Vanessa Messmer, of Coral CoE,conducts research on nearby coral. Rib Reef, Orpheus Island.... view more Credit: ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies/ Cassandra Thompson A new book exploring the best scientific research on preventing coral-eating Crown-Of-Thorns
21h
NeuWrite San Diego
Can a corpse have an orgasm? Can a corpse have an orgasm? Posted by Catie Profaci on December 21, 2017 in Uncategorized | Leave a comment Can a corpse have an orgasm? It’s not entirely unlikely [1]. The clue comes from patients with spinal cord injuries. Let’s start with t he spinal cord, and we’ll come back to dead bodies in a bit. Traffic Jam The sp inal cord–a long thin bundle of nervous tissue running from the base of th
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking stock of a thorny issue—30 years of crown-of-thorns starfish research on the Great Barrier Reef Crown-of-thorns starfish ( Acanthaster cf. solaris ) munching its way through the Acroporatable corals on Rib Reef, as Dr Vanessa Messmer, of Coral CoE,conducts research on nearby coral. Rib Reef, Orpheus Island. Credit: ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies/ Cassandra Thompson A new book exploring the best scientific research on preventing coral-eating Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (COTS) outbreaks, is expe
22h
Live Science
Mood Swings & Mommy Brain: The Emotional Challenges of Pregnancy The physical changes in a woman's body during pregnancy receive plenty of attention, but less consideration is given to the emotional changes she could be experiencing. In addition to her physical health, a woman's emotional well being and her mental outlook can also play important roles in pregnancy. During the nine months, a woman's moods and emotions can range from the highs of feeli
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New marker could detect fatal breast cancer up to one year earlier than current methods A new marker that could be used to diagnose fatal breast cancer up to one year ahead of current methods has been described in a study published in the open access journal Genome Medicine this week. A team of researchers led by University College London, UK found that a region of DNA called EFC#93 showed abnormal patterns of DNA methylation in breast cancer samples. Importantly, these patterns are
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Curbs on plastic bottle and packaging waste sought by MPs Image copyright Getty Images People should pay a deposit for using plastic bottles in an attempt to protect the seas from plastic pollution, MPs say. The government's Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) also wants free public drinking water fountains. And it says firms using plastic packaging should pay more for the waste they create. It is now consulting with industry on a deposit scheme for bot
23h
Popular Science
Mind your pickaxe: What to do when you encounter fossils and artifacts in the wild Hello, my dears. ‘Tis the season for making merry, which means you’re probably wondering: if I happen to visit some particularly ancient artifacts or fossils whilst on holiday, whatever is the proper protocol for interacting with them? These may just seem like a bunch of old rocks, but such objects present a tricky—and surprisingly delicate—social situation. Still, never fear. We’ve developed a h
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehistoric bling? Aesthetics crucial factor in development of earliest copper alloys IMAGE: Gold from the richest grave in the cemetery at the 5th millennium site of Varna, Bulgaria. This grave contains c.3kg of gold items decorating the body of the deceased. Varna... view more Credit: E. Pernicka While studies of ancient gold metallurgy and the colour characteristics of gold alloys are well supported by modern research, the colour properties of prehistoric copper alloys,
23h

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