Science : NPR

Race To Eradicate Guinea Worm And Polio Experienced Roadblocks In 2017 This year, the world came tantalizingly close to wiping out two human diseases: Guinea worm and polio. But right at the finish line, both eradication projects have run into surprising roadblocks.
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Popular Science

Three portable power packs to resurrect your smartphone Picture this: A YouTube tutorial on changing a flat tire suddenly goes black just before you get to the part about how to put on the spare. “No! No! No!” you silently shout to yourself, while cursing your utter lack of life skills. Your phone is dead; its 3,000 mAh battery—average for a smartphone—lasts only 12 hours of heavy use per charge on its own, but you can carry 100, 300, or 900 percent m
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Big Think

The Divine Fire of Philip K Dick’s Religious Visions Although the earliest psychoanalysts saw religion as neurotic, the modern mental health field has stopped pathologising religious beliefs. Contemporary systems of psychiatric diagnosis have no problem with a belief in God, Zoroaster, Demeter, or the Moon Goddess. At least in theory, we are free to hold whatever religious beliefs we wish without fear of being labelled mentally ill. However, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cleaner air, longer lives The air we breathe contains particulate matter from a range of natural and human-related sources. Particulate matter is responsible for thousands of premature deaths in the United States each year, but legislation from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is credited with significantly decreasing this number, as well as the amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere. However, the EP
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New hope for stopping an understudied heart disease in its tracks MADISON -- The diminutive size of our aortic valve -- just shy of a quarter -- belies its essential role in pushing oxygen-rich blood from the heart into the aorta, our body's largest vessel, and from there to all other organs. Yet for decades, researchers have focused less on damaged valves than on atherosclerosis, the gradual hardening of the blood vessels themselves. Thanks, in part, to pigs a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A classic Darwinian ecological hypothesis holds up -- with a twist New University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that a long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism. The prediction, first iterated by Charles Darwin in 1859, holds that climate factors will limit species expansion in more stressful environments (such as cold or dry regions),
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A classic Darwinian ecological hypothesis holds up—with a twist Credit: CC0 Public Domain New University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that a long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism. The prediction, first iterated by Charles Darwin in 1859, holds that climate factors will limit species expansion in more stressful environments (suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows Clean Air Act is likely responsible for dramatic decline in atmospheric organic aerosol Credit: CC0 Public Domain The air we breathe contains particulate matter from a range of natural and human-related sources. Particulate matter is responsible for thousands of premature deaths in the United States each year, but legislation from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is credited with significantly decreasing this number, as well as the amount of particulate matter in the a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers describe first-ever hybrid bird species from the Amazon The male golden-crowned manakin has evolved yellow feathers, likely as a way to attract potential female mates. Credit: University of Toronto Scarborough A team of U of T Scarborough researchers have described the first known hybrid bird species to be found in the Amazon rainforest. Through a series of genetic and other tests the team have revealed that the golden-crowned manakin - first discover
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Science | The Guardian

Lord Quirk obituary In 1959 Randolph Quirk, who has died aged 97, embarked on a long-term project to produce a comprehensive analysis of British English as it is actually used in the present day, rather than as reflected in the distorting mirrors of ivory-tower linguists and armchair pedants. In doing so he came to have an enormous influence on the development of English language studies worldwide, particularly thro
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Popular Science

How the world’s fastest workstation PC compares to other machines The HP Z8 G4 is about the size of a carry-on bag, but five years ago, a computer of its oomph would have been as large as a steamer trunk. Size isn’t a big deal to Pixar animators , Formula One engineers, and others who use this kind of machine professionally, but it does make the desktop more reasonable for aspiring visual artists and die-hard PC gamers . The spec sheet alone can’t quite convey
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Science | The Guardian

Zbigniew Kotowicz obituary My friend Zbigniew Kotowicz, who has died of cancer aged 67, was a rare, proud, sometimes solitary man with a gift for friendship. He wrote four acclaimed books: on the Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa, on the neurologist Egas Moniz (originator of psycho-surgery), on the psychiatrist RD Laing and on the philosopher Gaston Bachelard. The books themselves are impressive, but their range more strik
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Science | The Guardian

Online test aims to predict best antidepressants for individual patients Researchers are developing an internet-based tool they hope will predict the effectiveness of antidepressants for individual patients, ending the current prescription lottery. Patients with depression often try many different drugs before settling on one that works, but a study aims to help clinicians make an informed choice as to which is likely to work best for a particular person. Dr Claire Gi
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Live Science

Jade Eggs and Gay Lions: The Biggest Myths Debunked in 2017It's not uncommon for people to make faulty claims or misinterpret events when science is concerned.
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Scientific American Content: Global

H.G. Wells vs. George Orwell: Their Debate Whether Science Is Humanity's Best Hope Continues Today In the midst of contemporary science's stunning discoveries and innovations – for example, 2017 alone brought the editing of a human embryo's genes, the location of an eighth continent under the ocean and the ability to reuse a spacecraft's rocket boosters – it's easy to forget that there's an ongoing debate over science's capacity to save humankind. Seventy-five years ago, two of the best-known
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Big Think

In Norway, Bad Things Happen to You If You Don't Get Clothes for Christmas All your Christmas presents have been opened, and you haven't even gotten that perennial staple of seasonal gifts, new socks – let alone any other new clothes. That may be just as you like it. Perhaps you've made it abundantly clear to your nearest and dearest that gift certificates are the best way to avoid disappointment. But according to Norwegian folklore, a lack of sartorial renovation a
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Popular Science

The most uplifting science stories of 2017 As you reflect on the transition from one year to the next, consider some of the science and tech stories that have made 2017 a great year. Here are the ones that made us smile: Gravitational waves got even cooler Yes, using gravitational waves—tiny ripples in the fabric of spacetime—to detect black hole collisions was cool. But in 2017, the hunt for gravitational waves leveled up in a major way.
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Futurity.org

Oldest algae fossils suggest when photosynthesis began New research dates the world’s oldest algae fossils to over a billion years ago. And, based on that finding, estimates that the origins of photosynthesis used by today’s plants dates back 1.25 billion years. The study could resolve a long-standing mystery over the age of the fossilized algae, Bangiomorpha pubescens , which were first discovered in rocks in Arctic Canada in 1990. The microscopic o
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Futurity.org

What could net neutrality’s end mean for you? business Stanford University What could net neutrality’s end mean for you? Posted by Stanford December 25th, 2017 On December 14, 2017, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to repeal its net neutrality rules, which critics say could make the internet more expensive and less accessible for Americans. Here, net neutrality experts Ryan Singel from the Stanford University Law School and
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Big Think

The Mystery of Jesus’s Brother Gets Even Weirder Whether Jesus had any siblings is an old debate within Christianity. A number of passages within the New Testament have been stoking this speculation for almost two thousand years. The Gospel of Mark mentions Jesus having brothers and sisters, while the Gospel of Matthew talks about his “brothers” James, Joseph, Simon and Judas. Are these references more figurative than literal, meaning these a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Looking Back at the Year in Science Looking Back at the Year in Science Our editors recap some of the most notable science stories of 2017. Check out https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-top-10-science-stories-of-2017/ Tags: Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now! Looking Back at the Year in Science Our editors reca
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Scientific American Content: Global

Good Friends Might Be Your Best Brain Booster as You Age Ask Edith Smith, a proud 103-year-old, about her friends, and she’ll give you an earful. There’s Johnetta, 101, whom she’s known for 70 years and who has Alzheimer’s disease. “I call her every day and just say ‘Hi, how are you doing?’ She never knows, but she says hi back, and I tease her,” Smith said. There’s Katie, 93, whom Smith met during a long teaching career with the Chicago Public
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Science Says Fitness Trackers Don't Work. Wear One Anyway Personal technology is getting a bad rap these days. It keeps getting more addictive: Notifications keep us glued to our phones . Autoplaying episodes lure us into Netflix binges. Social awareness cues—like the "seen-by" list on Instagram Stories—enslave us to obsessive, ouroboric usage patterns. (Blink twice if you've ever closed Instagram, only to re-open it reflexively.) Our devices, apps, and
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The Atlantic

Black Mirror's Universe Coalesces The biggest accomplishment of the fourth season of Black Mirror, set to be released Friday on Netflix, is that for the first time the dystopian speculative anthology series takes its manifold anxieties about humanity’s future and smooshes them together into a single thematic tube. Past episodes have tackled vigilante justice and reality television, social-media shaming and pickup artistry, intern
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The Atlantic

Employers Are Looking for Job Candidates in the Wrong Places The employers who can’t seem to fill the United States’s roughly 6 million vacant jobs are at a loss for what to do. Qualified candidates are seemingly nowhere to be found. In Washington, D.C., for example, there aren’t enough workers who have the healthcare-management or sales skills to meet the demands of the hospitals and retail stores and banks desperate to hire, according to a report by Link
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Scientific American Content: Global

Weird World: Evaporating Exoplanet's Orbit Is Askew GJ 436b keeps getting weirder. Astronomers already knew that the Neptune-mass exoplanet is evaporating ; a few years back, a research team spotted the huge, comet-like tail of gas that streams behind GJ 436b as it orbits its small, dim host star. Now, a new study reveals there's something very off about that orbit: It's highly elliptical and takes the alien world over the star's poles. (T
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Scientific American Content: Global

Watching How Rare, Meteoric Diamonds Form When a meteorite containing graphite slams into the earth, the collision’s heat and pressure can transform this form of carbon into a rare and extremely hard type of diamond. Scientists have long debated exactly how this happens at the atomic level. Now researchers can answer some questions after simulating the precise moment of impact and watch­ing this transformation take place in real time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter + Citizen Science + AI = improved flood data collection Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers from the University of Dundee are combining Twitter, citizen science and cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to develop an early-warning system for flood-prone communities. Dr. Roger Wang and his colleagues from the University's School of Science and Engineering have shown how AI can be used to extract data from Twitter and crowdsourced infor
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia 32: Hvad putter finske biohackere i kaffen? Foto: MI Grafik Abonnér på Techtopia Klik her for at abonnere på podcasten. Du kan også søge på ‘Techtopia’ i din foretrukne podcast-app. Der er flere apps at vælge imellem. Et eksempel er Podcast Republic , der er et gratis program, som kan downloades via Google Play. Podcasten er lavet i samarbejde mellem IDA og Ingeniøren. Den er sponsoreret af en række partnere: IBM, KMD, DI Digital, MCH Mess
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Viden

4 typer: Sådan reagerer du på klimaforandringerne kl. 11.30 Temperaturen stiger, det samme gør havene. Orkanerne bliver kraftigere. Tørke mere udbredt. Og hvis CO2-forsuringen af havene fortsætter, sættes hele økosystemet under pres. Der er med andre ord nok at være bekymret over med hensyn til de klimaforandringer, der er i gang. Men der er stor forskel på, hvordan vi rent faktisk håndterer den bekymring. Med hjælp fra den amerikanske miljøpsyk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's new 'driverless' metro train keeps driver for nowIndia's capital launched a metro train with driverless technology Monday, though officials said it would operate with a driver for at least a year or two.
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Ingeniøren

I dag er det videnskabens dag "Jens Ramskov har siden 2004 udpeget de bedste forskningsresultater inden for naturvidenskab og teknisk videnskab udført af forskere i Danmark, eller hvor forskere fra Danmark har ydet et væsentligt bidrag som del af et internationalt forskningssamarbejde. Derudover er den eneste betingelse, at forskningsresultaterne er publiceret før 15. november i et anerkendt videnskabeligt tidsskrift. Vi følg
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Ingeniøren

Fysikkens love testes med antibrint VIDENSKABENS TOP-5 – NOMINERET Den eneste forskel mellem antistof og almindeligt stof er den elektriske ladning. Antiprotonen er helt identisk med protonen, bortset fra,at dens ladning er negativ, og antielektronen – også kaldet en positron – er helt identisk med elektronen bortset fra dens ladning, som er positiv. Derfor siger fysikkens love, at energiniveauerne for antibrint (antiproton plus po
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Ingeniøren

DTU-forskere viser vejen til bedre og lettere flyvinger VIDENSKABENS TOP-5 – NOMINERET Hvordan kan en konstruktion udføres med mindst muligt materialeforbrug, når det er givet, at den skal overholde en række mekaniske parametre som for eksempel styrke og fleksibilitet? Det er et klassisk ingeniørproblem inden for feltet topologioptimering, som forskere på DTU ledet af professor Ole Sigmund har arbejdet med gennem mange år. Metoden fører til hullede og
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Ingeniøren

Danske æbler har fået et nyt stamtræ VIDENSKABENS TOP-5 – NOMINERET Der findes omkring 300 navngivne danske æblesorter i den samling, som Institut for Plante- og Miljøvidenskab ved Københavns Universitet har i Taastrup vest for København. Æbletræerne er en del af Pometet (pomum er det latinske ord for frugt på træer), der har sit udspring i en samling af frugtsorter, som blev påbegyndt i 1863. Langt hovedparten af de mange æble­sort
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Ingeniøren

Nye stensikre beviser på Jordens ældste liv VIDENSKABENS TOP-5 – NOMINERET I 1999 chokerede Minik Rosing fra Statens Naturhistoriske Museum ved Københavns Universitet sine forskerkolleger verden over med en artikel i Science. Her beskrev han, at forholdet mellem kulstof-12 og kulstof-13 i nogle af verdens ældste klipper, Isua-formationen i Grønland, tydede på eksistensen af biologisk liv på Jorden for 3,7 milliarder år siden. Det var 200 m
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Viden

Juleknas: Nu skal du spise risengrød med larver Pebernødder med græshopper? Det er en del af fremtidens julemenu. Det samme er løgtærte med ristede melorme. Og risengrød med finhakkede voksmøllarver. I hvert fald hvis du spørger de danske virksomheder ENORM, Syngja og Dare to Eat. De eksperimenter lige nu med forskellige juleretter, der er fyldt med nærende insekter. Det siger de til DR Viden. Læs også: Hvad skulle det være? Et insektbrød, tak
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The Scientist RSS

Photos of the YearFrom a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist's favorite images from 2017.
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The Scientist RSS

Top Technical Advances in 2017The year's most impressive achievements include new methods to extend CRISPR editing, patch-clamp neurons hands-free, and analyze the contents of live cells.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Job done' Image copyright BLOODHOUND SSC Image caption Big for a drag racer A British team is developing a car that will be capable of reaching 1,000mph (1,610km/h). Powered by a rocket bolted to a Eurofighter-Typhoon jet engine, the vehicle aims to show its potential by going progressively faster, year after year. In 2018, Bloodhound wants to run above 500mph. In 2019, the goal is to raise the existing wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insider Q&A: Aptiv spins off to speed automated driving This photo provided by Aptiv shows Glen De Vos, chief technology officer at Aptiv. Aptiv spun off from Delphi Automotive to speed development of automated driving. De Vos says Aptiv split so it can be more nimble and pursue relationships that are different than the traditional one between auto suppliers and the automakers they sell parts to. Aptiv wants to supply automated driving systems to auto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maine robotics company competing for major Army contract The discovery of a new species of hard coral, found on Lord Howe Island, suggests that the fauna of this isolated location in the Tasman Sea off south eastern Australia is even more distinct than previously recognised.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mongoose Societies are Skeptical of Strangers Small, tasty mammals like dwarf mongooses have one main goal: do not get eaten. So the animal—a type of weasel—has a surveillance system. While most of the group focuses on finding food, a handful of others watch for predators . They take turns so that the burden is distributed equally. But in other ways, there’s a definite class distinction. "You have a typical cooperative breeding society,
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Todd Hoffman Shuts Down. He's Waiting for A Miracle. | Gold Rush #GoldRush | Friday 9p Two months in to what Todd Hoffman hoped would be a 5,000-ounce season, the Hoffman crew has barely made 643 ounces. A long way from $2 million, can they keep going without some sort of miracle? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dis
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Big Think

Want to Make New Friends? Here Are the Best Strategies, According to Psychology When we’re young, it’s easier to make friends. You’re usually in school or college, taking part in extracurricular activities or sports, and those around you are of the same age and have similar interests and experiences . After college we mature and in a lot of ways, improve . We settle into our identity and grow more comfortable in our own skin. We also tend to focus on what matters to us. Yo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Re-assessing Alaska's energy frontierThe new USGS assessment estimates 8.7 billion barrels of oil and 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas resources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum noise reduction method for enhanced precision in atomic clocksFinding ways to reduce quantum noise can enhance the precision of measurement in atomic fountain clocks or in methods used for quantum information processing. Physicists are now investigating ways of improving the analysis of quantum noise measurement in the case of spectroscopic investigations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preterm infants have narrowed upper airways, which may explain higher obstructive sleep apnea riskA multidisciplinary team used MRI to determine that the risk factors that lead to obstructive sleep apena are confined to the uppermost airway and do not appear to be explained by enlarged adenoids and tonsils.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep brain stimulation: Improving outcomes in the treatment of movement disordersFor the first time, researchers have shown that, in patients with a type of movement disorder known as dystonia, a particular pattern of brain activity is linked to both the severity of symptoms and the clinical outcomes achieved through deep brain stimulation. Results from this study may help to improve the way in which treatment is adapted to an individual patients needs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists identify hidden genetic variation that helps drive evolutionIdentifying complex mutations in the structure of an organism's genome has been difficult. But ecologists and evolutionary biologists have applied new methods of genome analysis to identify these complex mutations with unprecedented resolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists describe how solar system could have formed in bubble around giant starScientists have laid out a comprehensive theory for how our solar system could have formed in the wind-blown bubbles around a giant, long-dead star. The study addresses a nagging cosmic mystery about the abundance of two elements in our solar system compared to the rest of the galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study visualizes motion of water molecules, promises new wave of electronic devicesA novel approach to studying the viscosity of water has revealed new insights about the behavior of water molecules and may open pathways for liquid-based electronics. Researchers have used a high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering technique to measure the strong bond involving a hydrogen atom sandwiched between two oxygen atoms. This hydrogen bond is a quantum-mechanical phenomenon responsible
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Big Think

Why Bullies Have More Sex Bullies are the bane of many a high schooler, and they also apparently have more sex that their less aggressive and manipulative counterparts. That’s according to a new study published in the journal Evolutionary Psychological Science . Researchers, led by Daniel Provenzano from the University of Windsor in Canada, found that bullying might have evolved as a behavior for men to assert dominan
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New Scientist - News

2018 preview: Thousands of mystery lifeforms to be revealed Colin Monteath/Hedgehog House/Minden Pictures By Alice Klein Get ready for an explosion of life. Next year, thousands of previously unknown microbes will be revealed. Bacteria and other microbes are all around us, but we know only about 1 per cent of them. The rest are “microbial dark matter”. It is hard to study these mystery microbes because most can’t be grown in labs. They need the condit
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Calculating the Power Usage of LED vs. Incandescent Christmas Lights I remember the Christmas tree when I was younger. It had these large colored bulbs—they were pretty, but you couldn't touch them. Yes, these were the old style incandescent lights, and they could get wicked hot. They were essentially smaller versions for the bulbs you would put in your lamp. Today, many people still use a type of incandescent Christmas light. They are much smaller, but also way m
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Scientific American Content: Global

Amphibian and Reptile Biology and Conservation, the 2017 Joint Scientific Meeting I really like academic herpetology meetings, and I (mostly) really like herpetologists, so it was with a skip in my step and a smile on my face that I made my way to Bournemouth, Dorset (UK) for the 2017 Amphibian and Reptile Biology and Conservation meeting. Because the meeting jointly involves two bodies – Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (ARC) and the British Herpetological Society (BHS) – i
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Popular Science

The procrastinator's guide to buying a decent gift at the very last minute DIY Last-minute digital presents you can send on Christmas Eve. Even if you've left your shopping until the very last minute, you can still send loved ones a gift that will arrive instantly. Here are some ideas.
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WIRED's 16 Favorite Longform Stories of 2017 This year WIRED ramped up its longstanding commitment to publishing deeply reported narratives and investigations, both online and in print. In the process we covered everything from a strange pink pigment to a casino hacking caper to an obsessed robot-making scientist. Our writers spanned the globe, alighting in Japan, France, Silicon Valley, and Kansas. As 2017 comes to a close, here's one feat
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'Extremity' and 5 More of the Best Comics of 2017 This last year has been a particularly strong one for comics—so much so, in fact, that this year’s Top 5 is actually a Top 6, and even that is only because we made the decision not to include titles that continued to be great after their inclusion in last year’s list . ( The Flintstones , Giant Days , and The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl , we still love you, honest.) Even without those favorites, the
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NYT > Science

How Do You Keep an Elephant Warm? Knit a Giant Blanket How Do You Keep an Elephant Warm? Knit a Giant Blanket Baby elephants in Myanmar wearing blankets during a cold spell. Credit Save Elephant Foundation When an unexpectedly cold front from China descended on parts of Southeast Asia this past week, people in Thailand, Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia bundled up in coats and put on hats and mittens to stave off the unusual weather for the region. But what
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Live Science

10 Times Earth Revealed Its Weirdness in 2017 You can't hear it, but Earth “ hums ." It produces a perpetual, low-frequency drone, caused by the vibrations of ongoing, subtle microseismic movements that are not earthquakes and are too small to be detected without special equipment. While scientists already knew about this persistent hum, they recently measured it from the ocean floor for the first time. Researchers traveled to the Indian O
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Live Science

10 Times Science Proved the World Is Amazing in 2017 An exciting discovery near Australia’s Jervis Bay has all the makings of perfect reality TV: 10 strangers, each one solitary and standoffish, thrust into close quarters to collaborate, quarrel, and (eventually) copulate. Also, in this case, they are all octopuses. Researchers call it "Octlantis": a thriving cephalopod community where, over the course of 8 days, a group of 10 to 15 octopuses wer
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Scientific American Content: Global

Tips from Negotiation Experts for Truly Happy Holidays The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. I had the most awesome Thanksgiving this year. My husband took our two boys, ages 8 and 10, to his family’s celebration, and I had five days of uninterrupted sleep, fun with friends and grownup time. Don’t get me wrong; I love my husband’s family and I believe that
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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.