Ingeniøren
Kæmpe sikkerhedshændelse i staten: Passwords nulstillet på 10 systemer En række store statslige systemer er ramt af så stor en sikkerhedshændelse, at samtlige passwords til brugere og systembrugere til systemerne er nulstillet. Det oplyser Moderniseringsstyrelsen på en side for driftsstatus . »Alle passwords er blevet nulstillet for installationer hostet hos KMD eller SIT (Statens IT, red.). Dette gælder for både almindelige brugere og systembrugere,« oplyser Modern
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Viden
Arkæologer kan have fundet to urokser i gammel dansk sø Det hører til de absolutte sjældenheder, at urokser bliver fundet, når jorden bliver endevendt. Ikke desto mindre er det netop urokser, som arkæologer på Nordsjællands Museum mener at have fundet i den tørlagte Søborg Sø nær Gilleleje. Det skriver Frederiksborg Amts Avis. Ifølge Esben Aarsleff, der er arkæolog og afdelingschef på Museum Nordsjælland, er der tale om to unge urokser, som er mellem
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conserving coral communities Cambridge, MA (December 27, 2017) -- Spending hours a day diving in and around the coral reefs off St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands sounds like the stuff of a dream vacation, but for Annie Opel it was serious business. As part of her undergraduate thesis, Opel spent much of her time in the water working on a study showing efforts to restore coral reefs have a positive impact on local fish pop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur seal Veterinarians from Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University and Mystic Aquarium prepare Ziggy Star, an adult Northern fur seal, for brain surgery. Credit: Mystic Aquarium. A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur seal GRAFTON, Mass. (December 27, 2017)-- A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic,
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New understanding of why cancer cells move IMAGE: Joe W. Ramos, deputy director of the UH Cancer Center. view more Credit: University of Hawaii Cancer Center A University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researcher has identified how some cancer cells are made to move during metastasis. The research provides a better understanding of how cancer spreads and may create new opportunities for cancer drug development. Metastasis causes the deaths of
31min
Big Think
Life Should Be Widespread Throughout the Universe, Study Finds If the sheer number of Earth-like planets wasn’t enough to convince you there’s life elsewhere in the universe , this might. Scientists studying the oldest ever discovered fossils, found that microbes actually lived very early on in our planet’s history , when it wasn’t what we traditionally consider hospitable to life. The results of this study were published in the Proceedings of the National A
48min
Live Science
China’s First Emperor Ordered Official Search for Immortality Elixir About 8,000 Terracotta Warriors were buried in three pits less than a mile to the northeast of the mausoleum of the First Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huangdi. They include infantryman, archers, cavalry, charioteers and generals. Now new research, including newly translated ancient records, indicates that the construction of these warriors was inspired by Greek art. Credit: Lukas Hlavac | Shuttersto
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guideline: Try exercise to improve memory, thinking ROCHESTER, Minn. -- For patients with mild cognitive impairment, don't be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication. A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking. MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video and audio are available for download on the Mayo Clini
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guideline: Exercise may improve thinking ability and memoryExercising twice a week may improve thinking ability and memory in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a guideline released by the American Academy of Neurology. The recommendation is an update to the AAN's previous guideline on mild cognitive impairment and is published in the Dec. 27, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does dosing of drug for mom make a difference for baby's risk of cleft lip, palate? MINNEAPOLIS - Taking a higher dose of topiramate during the first three months of pregnancy may increase a baby's risk of cleft lip or cleft palate more than when taking a lower dose, according to a study published in the December 27, 2017, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Topiramate is prescribed to prevent seizures in people with epileps
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The body's own bathroom scales: New understanding of obesityResearchers have found evidence for the existence of an internal body weight sensing system. This system operates like bathroom scales, registering body weight and thereby fat mass. More knowledge about the sensing mechanism could lead to a better understanding of the causes of obesity as well as new anti-obesity drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-altitude skiing can slow down ageing - relativisticallyA doctor could tell you that skiing and running will most likely slow down aging. But how come mathematicians and physicists give their scientific support to this point of view?
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurons’ sugar coating is essential for long-term memoriesHow the brain is able to store memories over long periods of time has been a persistent mystery to neuroscientists. In a new study, researchers show that long-lived extracellular matrix molecules called perineuronal nets are essential for distant memories.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electronic nose developed to sniff out colon diseasesIn much the same way as dogs can be trained to detect some diseases through their keen sense of smell, technology can help create electronic devices capable of performing this same task. This is precisely what a team of researchers have achieved, developing a prototype of an electronic nose that can distinguish between patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fissionResearchers have proposed an improved model for predicting the generation of thermal energy from nuclear fission processes, by focusing on Uranium-236. This model can help improve efficiency in nuclear power generation.
54min
Live Science
Ancient Axes, Spear Points May Reveal When Early Humans Left Africa This handaxe weighs almost 8 pounds and is unusually heavy. It and many of the other stone artifacts at Wadi Dabsa date to some point between 1.76 million years ago and 100,000 years ago. Researchers are trying to determine a more precise date. Credit: Andrew Shuttleworth and Frederick Foulds More than 1,000 stone artifacts, some of which may be up to 1.76 million years old, have been discovere
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impact of obesity on bone marrow cellsNew research explores the pernicious effect of obesity on the long-term health of blood-making stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells). Conducted largely in genetic models of obese mice, the study shows obesity causes durable and harmful changes to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment - the blood-making factory in our bodies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Iberian brown bears do not descend from those fled from the north during the Ice AgeAccording to the glacier refuges theory, after the last glaciations the bears of northern Europe sought shelter in the South. Researchers now reject this idea: they have reconstructed the colonization of brown bears in the Iberian Peninsula and have shown that the lineage of the Pleistocene bears was lost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noninvasive brainwave technology improved post-traumatic stress symptoms in militaryA noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress in military personnel in a pilot study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists get early look at hurricane damage to Caribbean coral reefsCoral reefs off St. John, part of the US Virgin Islands, suffered severe injury during the storms, say the scientists who traveled there in late November to assess the damage -- the first step in understanding the reefs' recovery.
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Popular Science
What is a horsepower? In 1781, the story goes, James Watt needed to convince skeptics to ditch their draft horses and buy his new steam engine. To prove his machine’s superiority, he measured a horse walking in ­circles to turn a grindstone in a mill. He multiplied the distance it walked by its ­roughly 180 pounds of pulling force and came up with a new measure: ­horsepower. (His new engine did the work of 35 nags, ab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Local economic factors affect opioid prescribing to disabled Medicare beneficiaries December 27, 2017 - For non-elderly Americans on disability, local prescribing of opioid pain medications is significantly related to county-level economic factors like unemployment and income level, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care , published by Wolters Kluwer . About half of Medicare beneficiaries under age 65 received an opioid prescription in 2014, according to the new
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The Atlantic
Private-Public Partnership for Conservation: Examples From Oregon, Hawaii, and Maine Yesterday I mentioned a land-conservation scheme in Europe that a Swiss farmer was helping publicize. This followed news of a major donation of coastal land in California to The Nature Conservancy, for permanent preservation. Jack Dangermond, who with his wife, Laura, has donated $165 million to make the California purchase possible, said that he wanted to set an example of increased public-priva
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Science | The Guardian
A fear of dogs dominated my childhood and hasn't left me – until recently | Anna Sublet Fears are not rational. But growing up, in my mind, it made perfect sense that a dog could bite me, and moreover, most likely would if given the chance. My fear was born of repeated backyard encounters with a mauling, snarling dog. We shared the yard with tenants who lived in the other part of our grandfather’s house. This meant our sandpit was contested territory, my dolls were easy targets, and
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Popular Science
The weirdest, funniest, whackiest PopSci stories of 2017 It’s the most magical time of the year: that week between Christmas and New Years. The roads are empty, the fridge is full of leftovers, and oh my god there are only three of us in this office . While academics (deservedly!) check out for the holiday season and leave the science news cycle about as lively as a funeral parlor, we know your thirst for intriguing stories is never-ceasing. So from th
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NYT > Science
Jerold F. Lucey, Innovator in Premature Births, Dies at 91 Dr. Lucey was also influential in the introduction of other important neonatal therapies, including using surfactant, which coats the air sacs, to help the struggling lungs of premature babies; cooling the brains of babies to prevent damage from asphyxiation; and monitoring babies’ oxygen levels through the skin, rather than through blood drawn repeatedly from arteries. Dr. Lucey was also editor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new stellar X-ray 'reality' show debuts Screen shot of the VR model in production. Credit: Chandra X-ray Center A new project using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes allows people to navigate through real data of the remains of an exploded star for the first time. This three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) project with augmented reality (AR) allows users to explore inside the debris from actual observatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs The randomised controlled trial of more than 2,000 people in Lambeth and Southwark was led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and King's College London¹, in partnership with SH:24, a digital sexual health service. The study found testing uptake was nearly doubled in a group that was invited to use internet-accessed STI testing (e-STI testing) compared to a group which was invit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of STIs: A PLOS medicine collection This week PLOS Medicine launches the research content in our Collection on Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), advised by Guest Editors Nicola Low of the University of Bern, Switzerland and Nathalie Broutet of the World Health Organization (WHO). More than 1 million people acquire an STI each day. These infections, when not treated, take their toll in g
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Live Science
Physicists are Building the World's Most Perfect Snowflake Nothing in nature is perfect — but frosty, shimmery snowflakes come pretty close. Now one man is trying to push the limits of those shimmery, symmetrical ice crystals, to make the largest, most perfectly symmetrical snowflake ever, according to the San Jose Mercury News . Libbrecht said he was inspired by snowflakes he encountered in his hometown of Fargo, North Dakota. Kenneth Libbrech
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Science | The Guardian
Online STI kits double testing uptake in young people, study suggests Offering young people testing kits for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) over the internet almost doubles testing uptake compared with inviting them to a clinic, research suggests. In 2016 alone there were more than 417,000 diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections in England, including gonorrhoea and chlamydia, with rates of STI diagnoses generally higher among young people. While the us
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Viden
Sådan finder Google hemmelige navne Hvor Google i gamle dage helt enkelt ledte efter det, du skrev i søgningen, så kigger Google på mange andre faktorer end søgeteksten i dag. Med deres såkaldte "Rankbrain-algoritme" introducerer Google maskinlæring og kunstig intelligens i sin søgefunktion . Rankbrain arbejder med forskellige inputs fra brugerne. Når du laver en søgning, så kigger Rankbrain på, hvad andre med lignende søgninger ha
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Viden
Google afslører pædofilimistænkt trods navneforbud kl. 20.02 Med to ord kan brugere af den populære søgemaskine Google søge sig frem til den tiltaltes navn i en pædofilisag fra Aarhus Vest, hvor en 4-årig i juni blev bortført fra sin børnehave. Det burde ikke være muligt, da der er nedlagt navneforbud i sagen, hvilket skal sikre, at den tiltalte ikke kan identificeres. Læs også: Computer kan forudsige om du havner akut på sygehuset Ifølge Henrik
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Live Science
Bud in the Oven? Marijuana Use Rises in Pregnant Women Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in pregnant woman, and now its use is increasing, a new study finds. According to urine samples from about 300,000 women in California, more than 7 percent of them had marijuana in their systems while pregnant, the researchers found. This is likely bad news for fetuses, as "initial evidence suggests that prenatal marijuana may impair fetal growth a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multimodal intervention can reduce PIVC insertion in the emergency department IMAGE: Before and after study: 10 week multimodal intervention. view more Credit: Kirsty Challen, BSc, MBChB, MRes, PhD, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, United Kingdom. DES PLAINES, IL--Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion in the emergency department can be reduced using a multimodal approach designed to support critical thinking and promote clinically appropriate peripheral intravenous
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multidisciplinary approach to identifying and caring for ischemic stroke in young women IMAGE: Epidemiology, risks, differentials, and management. view more Credit: Kirsty Challen, BSc, MBChB, MRes, PhD, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, United Kingdom. DES PLAINES, IL-- A multidisciplinary approach aimed at providing emergency physicians with a foundation of knowledge regarding ischemic stroke in young women and addressing the unique challenges in the evaluation and diagnosis of ische
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Referrals by private ERs are prevalent in communities with a public hospital IMAGE: 143 patients attending public ED with the same chief complaint as previous attendance at another ED; 74 presented in study hours. view more Credit: Kirsty Challen, BSc, MBChB, MRes, PhD, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, United Kingdom. DES PLAINES, IL--The practice of indirect referrals by nonpublic emergency departments and their affiliated physicians are prevalent in communities with a pub
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Big Think
Energy Drinks and Junk Food Are Destroying Teenage Brain Development Life depends upon such a precarious balancing of forces that comprehending the totality of influences can be exhausting, yet getting lost in the minutia is equally crippling. The last few decades have produced an unforgivable amount of energy devoted to optimizing cognitive and physical performance through micronutrients and compounds deserving far less attention. how-do-we-eat-better-2 The
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Popular Science
Save a snowflake for decades Ever wanted to catch a snowflake and keep it forever? You can. The image above is a photograph of a snowflake that fell in January 1979, but it isn't an old photo. It is a recent shot of a snowflake that's been sitting in chemist Tryggvi Emilsson's desk for decades, locked in a drop of that miracle of modern chemistry we call superglue. The "super" in the thin, runny adhesive, which was invented
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The Atlantic
The Disaster Artist's Tribute to the Joys of Moviemaking Over the next month, The Atlantic ’s “And, Scene” series will delve into some of the most interesting films of the year by examining a single, noteworthy moment and unpacking what it says about 2017. Next up is James Franco’s The Disaster Artist . (Read our previous entries here .) There’s nothing Hollywood loves more than a tale of suffering in the name of creation. Making great art can be a mag
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New Scientist - News
2018 preview: Bitcoin and ICO bubbles are set to burst John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images By Timothy Revell Sick of hearing about bitcoin ? Well it’s unlikely to be any different next year, and ICOs, the latest cryptocurrency fad, will be impossible to escape too. This year, Jamie Foxx, Paris Hilton and Floyd Mayweather all promoted “initial coin offerings”. Named to mimic initial public offerings, where firms raise money in exchange for shares, IC
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests coral restoration projects can help restore fish communities Staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis). Credit: Wikipedia Spending hours a day diving in and around the coral reefs off St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands sounds like the stuff of a dream vacation, but for Annie Opel it was serious business. As part of her undergraduate thesis, Opel spent much of her time in the water working on a study showing efforts to restore coral reefs have a positive impa
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The Atlantic
Why The Last Jedi Is More 'Spiritual' Than 'Religious' This story contains spoilers for T he Last Jedi. For at least two generations, the Star Wars saga has served as a kind of secularized American religion. Throughout the series, the Force is a stand-in for a divine power that draws on a number of mystical traditions, representing the balance of good and evil, the promise of an ultimate unity, and the notion that those learned in its ways can tap in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-driving vehicle proving ground tests cars before they hit open road The launch of self-driving vehicle testing at the American Center for Mobility west of Detroit came with something that frequently confounds human drivers in Michigan—snow. But it's an element that actually boosts the value of the site, which was once the home of the famed Willow Run World War II bomber plant. The proving ground north of I-94 in Ypsilanti Township has been under construction for
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Live Science
When the World Turned Green: Age of Plant Photosynthesis Revealed By dating the ancient algae Bangiomorpha pubescens , found on the coast of Baffin Island, in Canada, researchers have determined that photosynthesis began in plants about 1.25 billion years ago. Credit: Timothy Gibson Ancient rocks from a remote Canada island contain the oldest algae ever discovered. The samples, found on Canada's Baffin Island, also reveal roughly when plants had the compo
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Revisiting the science stories that made us cry, think and say ‘OMG’ in 2017 Watch the SN staff sum up 2017 Our Top 10 stories of 2017 cover the science that was earthshaking, field-advancing or otherwise important. But choosing our favorite stories requires some different metrics. Here are some of our staff’s favorites from 2017, selected for their intrigue, their power, their element of surprise — or because they were just really, really fun. Stories that moved us “The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viewing atomic structures of dopant atoms in 3-D relating to electrical activity in a semiconductor IMAGE: Soft X-rays excite the core level electrons, leading to the emission of photoelectrons from various atoms, whose waves are then scattered by the surrounding atoms. The interference pattern between the... view more Credit: Nano Letters Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and their research team involving researchers of JASRI, Osaka University, Nagoya Institute of Te
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Scientific American Content: Global
Blink and It's Over: Short-Duration, High-Impact Experiences of 2017 The top of the sky darkened to a deep purple-blue, leaving a glow of pink on the horizon and an odd feeling of stillness as dozens of spectators cheered. A seemingly alien object—a pitch-black circle surrounded by shimmering tendrils—replaced the sun. This was it: totality of the eclipse. It was nature’s gift to those who put in the effort to experience two-minutes-and-change of ecstasy.
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Popular Science
Check out the most astounding neuroscience images of the year T o understand how the healthy brain works and what occurs in brain disease, neuroscientists use many microscopy techniques, ranging from whole-brain human MRIs to imaging within a single neuron (brain cell), creating stunning images in the process. Here are a selection of the best and brightest produced by scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland in 2017. This
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fission IMAGE: This color map represents the potential energy surface for U-236. The color changes as the excitation energy increases. Researchers used this net of energy relationships to account for the stochastic nature of... view more Credit: Chikako Ishizuka, Tokyo Institute of Technology For all of us working with electricity, radioactive waste containment, or hospitals, controlling radioa
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The Atlantic
Prison Food Is Making U.S. Inmates Disproportionately Sick This won’t surprise anyone: The food served in correctional institutions is generally not very good. Even though most Americans have never tasted a meal dished up in a correctional kitchen, occasional secondhand glimpses tend to reinforce a common belief that “prison food” is scant, joyless, and unsavory—if not even worse. In August, the Detroit Free Press reported that a prison kitchen worker wa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Factor in safety before choosing a new dresser or TV This Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo shows televisions on display at a Best Buy in Cary, N.C. If you are shopping for a new flat-screen TV or dresser for the baby's room this holiday season, factoring in safety concerns can save you some trouble. Federal safety regulators recommend anchoring TVs and dressers to the wall to prevent them from tipping over, especially with small children around. Planni
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A classic Darwinian ecological hypothesis holds up -- with a twistNew research shows that a long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's diseaseWhile vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Surface Book 2—New Windows computer has an edgy look I'm a sucker for sexy hardware. I think that's why I'm drawn to Apple products. Say what you will about the Apple ecosystem being too expensive—it's darn sexy. I've been in the IT game long enough to realize that a computer is just a tool to run software. For more than 30 years, my computers of choice have all been Apple Macintosh. But lately, Microsoft has been introducing some pretty darn sex
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The Atlantic
T.C. Boyle’s Fictions of Catastrophe “All he could think about was bailing, one bucket after the other, as if the house he’d lived in all his life was a boat out on the open sea.” This is the opening line of “Surtsey,” a new short story by T.C. Boyle that takes place at the end of the world—more specifically, on a remote island off the coast of Alaska, one of those places where the concrete effects of rising sea levels and melting i
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Futurity.org
Discovery could take guesswork out of making quantum dots In a new paper, researchers describe the underlying mechanisms involved in creating a widely used class of quantum dots that use cadmium and selenium compounds as their molecular precursors. For more than 30 years, researchers have been creating quantum dots—tiny, crystalline, nanoscale semiconductors with remarkable optical and electronic properties. They’ve applied them to improve television se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Central Florida endangered sparrow 'unlikely' to survive in the wild A Central Florida bird has begun to plunge so swiftly toward extinction in the wild that biologists are considering the risky option of capturing the last of the species, including fewer than two dozen females. If that happens, those Florida grasshopper sparrows would be added to a pair of small, captive populations. But there are rising fears the captive birds are being threatened by lethal dise
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is punishment as effective as we think?Punishment might not be an effective means to get members of society to cooperate for the common good, according to a social dilemma experiment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria acquire resistance from competitorsBacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, they also can pick it up from their rivals. Researchers have demonstrated that some bacteria inject a toxic cocktail into their competitors causing cell lysis and death. Then, by integrating the released genetic material, which may also carry drug resistance genes, the predator cell can acquire antibiotic resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Growing organs a few ink drops at a timeResearchers develop a finely tuned enzyme-driven crosslinking method to glue together biological ink droplets and extend the range of cell types that can be handled by inkjet bioprinting. Such printing holds strong promise for regenerative medicine, such as in use of iPS cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Callous and unemotional traits show in brain structure of boys onlyCallous-unemotional traits are linked to differences in brain structure in boys, but not girls. This report is based on a study on brain development in 189 adolescents.
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Futurity.org
Could croton nuts from Kenya help scale up biofuel? Small-holder farmers in Kenya have the capacity and desire to play a major role in the scale-up of biofuel production from agroforestry, according to new research. Croton trees—which seem to grow everywhere in Kenya—and the oilseeds they produce have the potential to improve rural livelihoods, says forest economist Michael Jacobson, professor of forest resources in the Penn State College of Agric
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video game developers encounter funding woes Hezekiah Olopade has just received a lesson in building video games. Now that his virtual reality-based escape room has been built, however, the 26-year-old University of Central Florida student must find a way to pay for its development if he wants to push forward with his team of five. That means trying to get investors to play the game. "It's a different world when you're in there," said Olo
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The Scientist RSS
The Best Multimedia of 2017Editors' picks of the year's best in The Scientist infographics.
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The Scientist RSS
Those We Lost in 2017The scientific community bid farewell to a number of luminaries this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fireball lights up social media, evening sky in New England Most galaxies lie in clusters containing from a few to thousands of objects. Our Milky Way, for example, belongs to a cluster of about fifty galaxies called the Local Group whose other large member is the Andromeda galaxy ...
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Popular Science
Food science tricks to make the perfect popcorn Popcorn is by far my favorite snack food. It’s easy to make, you can dress it up any way you want, and it’s chock full of gut-friendly fiber . But there are still some pitfalls lurking in the popping process: Stray too far from the rule book, and you might end up with burned corn or a sad cluster of unpopped kernels. Neither scenario is ideal, so we'll help you avoid them. The mechanism behind po
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Scientific American Content: Global
If Dogs Can Smell Cancer, Why Don't They Screen People? Dogs can be trained to be cancer-sniffing wizards, using their sensitive noses to detect cancerous fumes wafting from diseased cells. This sniffing is noninvasive and could help diagnose countless people, which begs the question: If these pups are so olfactorily astute, why aren't they screening people for cancer right now? Here's the short answer: Dogs do well in engaging situations, such as
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarkers in breast cancer: IQWiG criticizes conclusion on MINDACT data in US guideline The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recently updated its guideline on biomarkers with regard to the MammaPrint test and published this update in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO). On the basis of data from the MINDACT study, they concluded that in certain patient groups, MammaPrint can better identify those patients who do not require chemotherapy and that therefore this test co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive brainwave technology improved post-traumatic stress symptoms in military WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Dec. 22, 2017 - A noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress in military personnel in a pilot study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the Dec. 22 online edition of the journal Military Medical Research . "Ongoing symptoms of post-traumatic stress, whether clinically diagnosed or
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Ingeniøren
Døde norske laks kan være guld værd som biogas Hvert år dør mellem 30 og 50 millioner laks i de norske fiskeopdrætsanlæg på grund af parasitter og lakselus. Men der er en kæmpe gevinst at hente for Norge, hvis man tænker laksen ind i biogasproduktionen med husdyrgødning. Udbyttet af metangas stiger med 100 procent, når mængden af fiskeaffald (fiskeensilage) udgør 15 procent af den mængde husdyrgødning, der behandles i biogasanlægget, skriver
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Iberian brown bears do not descend from those fled from the north during the Ice Age According to the glacier refuges theory, after the last glaciations the bears of northern Europe sought shelter in the South. Researchers from A Coruña University reject this idea: they have reconstructed the colonization of brown bears in the Iberian Peninsula and have shown that the lineage of the Pleistocene bears was lost. After the last glaciations in Western Europe, southern Europe could
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Callous and unemotional traits show in brain structure of boys only Callous-unemotional traits have been linked to deficits in development of the conscience and of empathy. Children and adolescents react less to negative stimuli; they often prefer risky activities and show less caution or fear. In recent years, researchers and doctors have given these personality traits increased attention, since they have been associated with the development of more serious and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Project will provide reaction kinetics data for synthesis of metallic nanocrystals IMAGE: Researchers led by Younan Xia, professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, have studied the kinetics of autocatalytic reactions used to... view more Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech Researchers have published the first part of what they expect to be a database showing the kinetics involved in producing colloidal metal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From C-H to C-C at room temperature IMAGE: Oxidation of the metal (M, iridium, blue pathway) leads to a 19 kcal/mol decrease in reaction's energy barrier, and allows the arylation to occur at room temperature. view more Credit: IBS, published in Nature Chemistry Carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds make up the skeleton of all organic molecules. However, creating such ubiquitous C-C bonds artificially is still a complicated task. I
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is punishment as effective as we think? IMAGE: In the first group (Well-mixed) where the opponents were reshuffled each round, defectors prevailed over the course of 50 rounds. In the second group (Network reciprocity) where the opponents remained... view more Credit: Xuelong Li, et al., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , December 19, 2017. Punishment might not be an effective means to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria acquire resistance from competitors IMAGE: The T6SS (green, magenta) mediated killing and lysis of competing bacteria can lead to DNA release (cyan) and subsequent gene transfer. view more Credit: University of Basel, Biozentrum Bacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, they also can pick it up from their rivals. In a recent publication in Cell Reports , Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Growing organs a few ink drops at a time IMAGE: This is a photograph of a 3-D hydrogel construct obtained through drop-on-drop multi-material bioprintinig. view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka - Printed replacement human body parts might seem like science fiction, but this technology is rapidly becoming a reality with the potential to greatly contribute to regenerative medicine. Before any real applications, "bioprinting" still
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Science | The Guardian
Westminster Abbey's attics yield a treasure trove of stained glass When the archaeologist Warwick Rodwell scooped up a handful of dust from the attics of Westminster Abbey and saw dozens of tiny fragments of glass glittering in the grime, he realised they were dealing with excavation, not house clearance. The salvaged glass – some dating back to the 13th century, including stars, flowers and sun rays, fierce little mythical animals and beautiful medieval faces –
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gentrification triggers 16 percent drop in city crime in Cambridge, Massachusetts The end of rent control and the addition of new developments caused gentrification to increase in neighborhoods like Cambridge's Area Four in the 1990s. Credit: Mimi Phan Gentrification reduces crime rates and increases public safety in city neighborhoods, according to a new study by MIT researchers. The paper, authored by MIT Sloan assistant professor Christopher Palmer, along with MIT professor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Promising new wildfire behavior model may aid fire managers in near real-time Firefighter works fire line at the Happy Camp Complex Fire in the Klamath National Forest in California, which began on Sep. 17, 2014 from lightening and has consumed 125, 788 acres to date and is 68% contained. Credit: U.S. Forest Service photo by Kari Greer Wildfires continue to scar California beyond the normal fire season in what's been a particularly catastrophic year for natural disasters a
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Futurity.org
Negative portrayals of shooting victims can trigger blame Negative portrayal of a shooting victim can lead people to blame the victim for his own death and to sympathize with the shooter, a new study suggests. After reading a negative biographical sketch about the victim of a fatal shooting, study participants favored lighter sentences for the shooter, says coauthor Sarah Gaither, an assistant professor of psychology at Duke University. Researchers gave
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explores impact of obesity on bone marrow cellsNew research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine highlights the pernicious effect of obesity on the long-term health of blood-making stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells). Published Dec. 27 and conducted largely in genetic models of obese mice, the study shows obesity causes durable and harmful changes to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment - the blood-making factory in our bodie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't let your pet accidentally get drunk this silly season (sorry Tiddles) 1947 - A patron of “Sammy’s Bowery Follies,” a downtown bar, sleeping at his table while the resident cat laps at his beer. Credit: Wikimedia Commons Most responsible pet owners know that animals and booze don't mix, but with the Christmas season upon us, many Australians will be drinking a little more than usual. While most pets aren't generally interested in alcohol itself, rich treats like cre
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'Nier: Automata': The Wrenching RPG is 2017's Game of the Year—Here's Why Late in Nier: Automata 's runtime, the game takes an unexpected break from sci-fi action to share the backstory of two minor characters. It does so by turning itself briefly into a text adventure, the sort of thing you'd find in Twine, that tells you how these two came to be where they are. The pain and persecution they've been through; how they held onto each other through it. And then, at the e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HATSouth discovers four 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets Phase-folded unbinned HATSouth light curves for HATS-50 (upper left), HATS-51 (upper right), HATS-52 (lower left) and HATS-53 (lower right). In each case we show two panels. The top panel shows the full light curve, while the bottom panel shows the light curve zoomed-in on the transit. The solid lines show the model fits to the light curves. The dark filled circles in the bottom panels show the l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists achieve arylation of C-H bonds in mild conditions Oxidation of the metal (M, iridium, blue pathway) leads to a 19 kcal/mol decrease in reaction’s energy barrier, and allows the arylation to occur at room temperature. Credit: Institute for Basic Science Carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds make up the skeleton of all organic molecules. However, creating such ubiquitous C-C bonds artificially is still a complicated task. In particular, since several molecule
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria acquire resistance from competitors Bacterial competition at the microscale: The T6SS (green, magenta) mediated killing and lysis of competing bacteria can lead to DNA release (cyan) and subsequent gene transfer. Credit: Universität Basel Bacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, they also can pick it up from their rivals. In a recent publication in Cell Reports , researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Base
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Scientific American Content: Global
Science and Morality I am a faithful book buyer and an omnivorous reader, but one with a precocious streak—I like to look up authors and email them with questions about their books. Since penning a book about the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-modification system, readers are now writing to me with all sorts of middle-of-the-night thoughts. Many people think of science as a good thing—STEM has cachet, synonymous with our goodness—
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists engineer microbes to form 'memories' of their environment Inserting chemically sensitive genes into the DNA of bacteria can produce lasting “memories” of their environment and show scientists how they communicate. Credit: Pixabay Microbes like bacteria aren't conscious enough to form memories, but a group of scientists in Texas developed a new way for them to do so at the genetic level. Researchers report they've successfully engineered microbes to repo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeological dig provides clues to how feasting became an important ritual Hilazon Tachtit cave. Credit: Naftali Hilger, CC BY-NC-ND This holiday season millions of families will come together to celebrate their respective festivals and engage in myriad rituals. These may include exchanging gifts, singing songs, giving thanks, and most importantly, preparing and consuming the holiday feast. Archaeological evidence shows that such communally shared meals have long been v
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This ambulance cart could transform health care access in Tanzania An illustration of the Okoa Project's ambulance, which attaches to motorcycles in hard-to-reach rural areas. Credit: MIT Sloan School of Management In Tanzania, rural villages are often hours from medical facilities. Mortality among pregnant women is a grave problem: Lack of health care access results in complications and even death for either mother or baby. As many as 400 women die for every 10
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Men more likely to try to dodge paying tax Men are significantly more likely than women to try to evade paying tax, researchers have found. A new study shows men under-report their income, while women are more honest. Men are more willing to contribute their full share of tax when they are given more information about what their money pays for. Governments around the world are working to collect more tax revenue from citizens. Their focus
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The Atlantic
Is a 'Cure' for Blindness Worth $1 Million? Among blind people, says Kim Charlson, asking if you’d prefer to see always starts a lively debate: “Every opinion is going to be different.” Charlson, who lost her sight at age 11 and now is president of the American Council of the Blind , says she would hold out for full color vision. Others might settle for seeing in blurry black and white. And yet other blind people might have no desire to se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are so many of our pets overweight? Pet obesity often says more about an owner’s relationship with their pet than the animal itself. Credit: Susan Schmitz/shutterstock.com When I looked at my appointment book for the day, I thought something must be wrong. Someone who worked in the fitness industry was bringing his cat in to the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals. Did he confuse us for a different kind of weight management clinic? Is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Project will provide reaction kinetics data for deterministic synthesis of metallic nanocrystals Comparison of the activation energies involved in the autocatalytic surface reduction for the growth of palladium nanocrystals. Credit: Xia laboratory, Georgia Tech Researchers have published the first part of what they expect to be a database showing the kinetics involved in producing colloidal metal nanocrystals – which are suitable for catalytic, biomedical, photonic and electronic application
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble captures planetary nebula NGC 6326The Hubble Space Telescope captured what looks like a colorful holiday ornament in space. It's actually an image of NGC 6326, a planetary nebula with glowing wisps of outpouring gas that are lit up by a central star nearing the end of its life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing organs a few ink drops at a time Photograph of a 3D hydrogel construct obtained through drop-on-drop multi-material bioprinting. Credit: Osaka University Printed replacement human body parts might seem like science fiction, but this technology is rapidly becoming a reality with the potential to greatly contribute to regenerative medicine. Before any real applications, "bioprinting" still faces many technical challenges. Processi
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The Scientist RSS
The New Species of 2017A sampling of some of the fascinating critters identified by scientists this year
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Ingeniøren
USA’s sundhedsmyndigheder advarer: Zika-pandemien florerer stadig I februar 2016 slog FN’s verdenssundhedsorganisation WHO zika-alarm, efter at hundredvis af babyer i Sydamerika var født med hjerneskader. Man konkluderede, at deres underudviklede kranier (microcephali) skyldtes, at deres mødre under graviditeten var blevet stykket af en myg, der havde overført zika-virussen. De følgende mange måneder var der stor interesse for virussen, der har spredt sig til o
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cracking the Brain's Enigma Code Brain-controlled prosthetic devices have the potential to dramatically improve the lives of people with limited mobility resulting from injury or disease. To drive such brain-computer interfaces, neuroscientists have developed a variety of algorithms to decode movement-related thoughts with increasing accuracy and precision. Now researchers are expanding their tool chest by borrowing from the wor
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Scientific American Content: Global
When to Worry About Eye Twitching When to Worry About Eye Twitching Eye twitching is common. How do you know when it's benign and when it's a sign of something more serious? Credit: Juliet White Getty Images Advertisement I recently saw Eileen, a 45-year-old female accountant, in my office who reported an aggravating “eye twitching.” Now this is a common, yet potentially annoying, medical problem. It may not be debilitating, bu
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Scientific American Content: Global
King Tut's Dagger Is Out of This World Daggers, axes and jewelry made from rare iron during the Bronze Age are literally out of this world, according to new research finding that ancient artisans crafted these metal artifacts with iron from outer space carried to Earth by meteorites. The finding upends the idea that a few artisans during the Bronze Age in the ancient Near East knew how to make iron by smelting it from Earth's crus
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Scientific American Content: Global
Market Bubbles and Sonic Attacks: Mass Hysterias Will Never Go Away The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Ancient and quaint seem the days of witch crazes, demon scares and tulip manias . Instances of mass hysteria may strike you as rare events in modern advanced societies. But such outbreaks are products of their times. They’re still around today, just in different guises.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Rapper's Lyrics about Climate Change Are Smart Want to hear the most cogent scientific, social and political arguments about climate change? Check out Baba Brinkman’s song “Make It Hot.” Brinkman is a Canadian rapper who has garnered fame for his various collections of work, such as The Rap Guide to Religion . He’s become a bit of a phenomenon in the science and policy community, first with The Rap Guide to Evolution and his more recent colle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study illuminates botanical bias Barnabas Daru is lead author of a study that uncovered sampling biases in several herbarium collections around the world, casting doubt on their usefulness in evaluating climate change. Credit: Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer When botanists began collecting plant samples for herbaria more than a century ago, their goal was to catalog and understand the diversity of the natural world
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning real estate data into decision-making tools David Geltner (left), a professor of real estate finance, and postdoc Alexander van de Minne are helping translate masses of data into predictive tools for investors. Credit: Tom Gearty The unprecedented amount of commercial real estate information being generated today presents new opportunities for analysts to develop models that translate masses of data into predictive tools for investors. Rec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multiwavelength image of the 'Toothbrush' galaxy cluster A multiwavelength false-color image of the "Toothbrush" cluster of galaxies, 1RXS J0603.3+4214. The intensity in red shows the radio emission, blue is X -ray, and the background color composite is optical emission. Astronomers studying the cluster with new radio observations combined with other wavelengths have been able to confirm the galaxy merger scenario and estimate the magnetic field streng
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iberian brown bears do not descend from those fled from the north during the Ice Age According to the glacier refuges theory, after the last glaciations, the bears of northern Europe sought shelter in the South. Researchers from A Coruña University reject this idea. They have reconstructed the colonization of brown bears in the Iberian Peninsula and shown that the lineage of the Pleistocene bears was lost. After the last glaciations in Western Europe, southern Europe could have b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Driving soft molecular vehicles on a metallic surface Schematic diagram showing the interaction of tunneling current with molecules. Credit: National Institute for Materials Science Soft molecules deposited on metallic surfaces were driven using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) without mechanically pulling or pushing them, but by inducing inelastic excitations with the tunneling current. In nanoscience, compared to rigid molecules , it is chall
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomically thin perovskites boost for future electronics Credit: National Institute for Materials Science WPI-MANA has developed the world's highest performance dielectric nanofilms using atomically thin perovskites. This technology may revolutionize the next-generation of electronics. This research was conducted by a WPI-MANA research group led by Principal Investigator Minoru Osada and Director Takayoshi Sasaki of WPI-MANA at NIMS. Electronic devices
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The Texas Turnaround: A Mysteriously Feel-Good Bit of Infrastructure The car radio is playing something loud and twangy. It’s late summer, so bugs are peppering your windshield like dollops of rain as you speed comfortably in the wide, smooth lanes. And then you realize you just missed your dang exit. Relax, partner—you’re in Texas. Just take the next one, and stay to the left as the off ramp descends towards the intersection. Follow the signage that leads you int
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Dive into the Mind-Boggling Math of Tessellating Pentagons Children’s blocks lie scattered on the floor. You start playing with them—squares, rectangles, triangles and hexagons—moving them around, flipping them over, seeing how they fit together. You feel a primal satisfaction from arranging these shapes into a perfect pattern, an experience you’ve probably enjoyed many times. But of all the blocks designed to lie flat on a table or floor, have you ever
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Hackers Can Rickroll Thousands of Sonos and Bose Speakers Over the Internet Perhaps you've been hearing strange sounds in your home—ghostly creaks and moans, random Rick Astley tunes, Alexa commands issued in someone else's voice. If so, you haven't necessarily lost your mind. Instead, if you own one of a few models of internet-connected speaker and you've been careless with your network settings, you might be one of thousands of people whose Sonos or Bose devices have b
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Ingeniøren
Kunstig intelligens kan snyde sig gennem samtaler Det bliver generelt meget ensformigt at tale med en kunstig intelligens, da den spørger ind til hver eneste ting, den ikke forstår - hvilket mennesker sjældent gør. Illustration af, hvordan AI tænker og efterfølgende bekræfter, at dens gæt var korrekt. Foto: Osaka University Derfor har forskere fra Osaka University nu undersøgt, om en AI kan snyde sig gennem samtaler, hvor den ikke er sikker på,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative transistors based on magnetically induced movement of ions Credit: National Institute for Materials Science Just as magnets attract iron particles in sandpits, permanent magnetics only attract one type of ion in an electrochemical solution, constituting the basis of magnetically controlled electrochemical transistors. Electrochemical devices find application in many technologies, including batteries, capacitors, sensors, and transistors . For such electr
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Live Science
Mongolian 'Game of Thrones' Revealed in Ancient Engravings Drone footage show 14 mysterious stone pillars unearthed in the Mongolian steppe that provide clues to ancient power struggles. Segments of the inscriptions and sarcophagus excavated from the hole at the center of the ruins can be seen. Credit: Osaka University and Institute of History and Archaeology, Mongolian Academy of Science A 1,300-year-old structure containing 14 engraved stone pillars
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The Atlantic
The Second Life of Mongolian Fossils In downtown Ulaanbaatar, on a pedestal in the Central Museum of Mongolian Dinosaurs, stands a 70-million-year-old Tarbosaurus bataar dinosaur from the southern Gobi Desert. In 2012, the Tarbosaurus was very nearly sold at auction in New York, despite such a sale violating Mongolian law as well as a temporary restraining order by a U.S. federal judge in Dallas. Five years and 6,000 miles later, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All-nanotube stretchable supercapacitor with low equivalent series resistance Scanning electron image of BNNT separator on top of the SWCNT film electrode, (B) EIS spectra of the as-fabricated supercapacitor (blue) after 1000 stretching cycles under 25% (black) strain, 50% (red) elongation; (C) cyclic voltammetry spectra of as-fabricated SSC device (blue), 25% (black) and 50% (red) strain after 1000 stretching cycles. Credit: Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology Cu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematicians obtain new fundamental results in functional inequalities Credit: RUDN University Invited professor of RUDN University Durvudkhan Suragan and a team of colleagues have obtained and established new types of functional inequalities. Hardy's inequalities are an important type of problem solving in mathematical physics. The results of the study were published in Advances in Mathematics . The properties of the so-called Hardy's inequalities have been studied
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop highly sensitive gas sensors Principle of the operation of the sensor based on porous silicon nanowire arrays. Credit: Liubov Osminkina A team from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University has suggested using porous silicon nanowire arrays in highly sensitive gas sensors. These devices will be able to detect the presence of toxic and non-toxic gas molecules in the air at room temperature. The results of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explore quantum properties in the two-dimensional limit Credit: TU Delft/Dirk Groenendijk As electronic components become smaller, understanding how materials behave at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation electronics. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to predict what happens when materials are only a few atomic layers thick. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the T
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermoelectric power generation at room temperature: Coming soon? (a) Three-dimensional crystal structure of YbSi2, (b) view along the a-axis, and (c) along the c-axis. Credit: 2017 Kurosaki et al. Phys. Status Solidi RRL 2017, 1700372. doi: 10.1002/pssr.201700372 Thermoelectric (TE) materials could play a key role in future technologies. Although the applications of these remarkable compounds have long been explored, they are mostly limited to high-temperature
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward designing/controlling flexibility of MOFs Flexible metal-organic frameworks: from controlling the structures to controlling the flexibility. Credit: Science China Press Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been extensively studied for their diversified and designable/tailorable framework and pore structures. Compared with conventional porous materials, MOFs have much larger framework flexibility, wh
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Prince Charles: 'Technology won't solve climate change'The Prince of Wales says we need to deal with the symptoms of climate change.
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Teens Aren’t Partying Anymore. They're on Social Media. Kevin and I sit down at two desks just outside his third period class at a high school in northern San Diego. He is 17 years old and Asian American, with spiky black hair, fashionable glasses, and a wan smile. He is the oldest of three children, with his parents expecting another child in a few months. Until recently, the family lived in an apartment, where the noise from his younger siblings was
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When Star Trek’s Spock Met PLATO The first thing they noticed was the ears. They were just plain wrong . They seemed tiny—really, really tiny—when they were supposed to be big and pointy. That would be strike one against him: the absence of that universal trademark, his Vulcan ears. And he wasn’t wearing his regulation blue shirt, black pants, and black boots. No Federation logo in sight. No communicator, phaser, or tricorder ei
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What Happens Now? Studies of Sexual Harassment Can Show the Way Academics have been cast in a slow-motion horror movie for the past couple of years, as superstar scientist after superstar scientist has been pushed from his pedestal for allegations of sexual harassment. Societies and universities have tried to determine what to do—academe-style fixes like panels, workshops, and policies. None of that ivory-tower work cued the public crescendo that this year’s
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The Best Tech Books of 2017: Part II Last week, we brought you six of the best tech books of 2017 , which you promptly purchased in bulk as last-minute holiday gifts for your loved ones. No? Well, here’s another chance. We’re back this week with five more recommendations to close out the year. This week’s books take a turn for the historical: Leslie Berlin and Noam Cohen offer complementary histories of Silicon Valley and the key pe
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The 1970s Xerox Conference That Predicted the Future of Work In November 1977, some 300 executives and their wives flew in from all over the world on first-class tickets to spend four days in the sun at the Xerox World Conference. Between meetings for the men and fashion shows for the wives, the visitors slept in luxury rooms at the Boca Raton Hotel and Club and attended cocktail parties and a keynote by Henry Kissinger. Now, on the last morning of the las
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2017 Is the Year the Home Button Died. Soon, You Won’t Miss It The most convincing lie Steve Jobs ever told was "you already know how to use it." For years, Apple crowed about its ability to build gadgets that were so simple and obvious, they were practically ingrained—as if you could emerge from decades of cryogenic freeze and instinctively understand how to 3D-Touch the camera app icon and snap a selfie. Need proof? Just look at this adorable video of a tw
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How Blockchain Technology is Redefining Trust Around the time when bitcoin and blockchains were starting to catch the attention of the mainstream investment world, a New York-based start​up called Digital Asset Holdings (DAH) was launched. Blythe Masters was at its helm. The Wall Street veteran is knowledgeable about a common problem many banks face: Getting incompatible financial databases to talk to each other. It’s costly, complex, and ta
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Latest Headlines | Science News
2017 delivered amazing biology finds from organisms large and small In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Live Science
Lies, Mistakes & More: These Scientific Papers Got Nixed in 2017 Lies, exaggerations, criminal acts, unbridled irony, alternative facts, fake news … No, we're not talking about 2017 politics. This is the 2017 world of science. This past year, hundreds of scientific papers were retracted from professional journals. In the majority of cases involving these retractions, the reason was an innocent, yet sloppy, error in the methodology of the experiment that
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Viden
Forsker der manipulerer naturen: Vi skal lytte til folks bekymringer Udvikling af bedre medicin og mere effektiv produktion af bæredygtige landbrugsafgrøder. Det er eksempler, hvor forskere bruger såkaldt syntesebiologi til at manipulere naturen. Men hidsige debatter om genmodificerede GMO-afgrøder og sensationshistorier om at teknologien også kan bruges til at skabe kunstigt liv har tidligere spændt ben for forskerne. Det er vigtigt, at vi lytter med respekt og a
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Live Science
Dig Deep: DARPA Contest Aims to Take People Underground A new DARPA challenge aims to help people navigate in the subterranean world of human-made tunnels, natural caves and subway tunnels. Credit: DARPA From the seas to mountain peaks, humans have colonized almost every inch of Earth's surface. Now, humans may soon be able to routinely venture below the planet's surface, at least if the military has any say in the matter. The Defense Advanc
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Ingeniøren
Google stemmerobot er nu helt menneskeagtig Et videnskabelig artikel , som Google har offentliggjort, beskriver et nyt tekst-til-tale-system kaldet Tacotron 2, der hævder at kunne efterligne en person, der taler ud fra en tekst, med meget stor detaljerigdom og nøjagtighed. Det skriver qz. Systemet er Googles anden officielle generation af teknologien, som består af to neurale netværk. Det første netværk oversætter teksten til et spektrogra
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rekordmange ledige stillinger for ingeniører BIM Ansvarlig WSP Danmark A/S El Ingeniør WSP Danmark A/S Konstruktionsingeniør WSP Danmark A/S HVAC Ingeniør WSP Danmark A/S Proposal Engineer, Construction & Planning BWSC Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor A/S Electrical WTG engineer Ørsted Supervisor til Technical Assistance team MAN Diesel & Turbo Test System Engineer in Devices & Supply Chain Management Novo Nordisk A/S Researcher or
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A powerful guiding principle for topological quantum synthesis The collaborative team of Prof. Huijun Liu at Wuhan University, Prof. Xingqiu Chen at the Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Zhenyu Zhang at the University of Science and Technology of China proposes an efficient criterion that allows ready screening of potential topological insulators, a powerful guiding principle in synthesizing topological quantum materials. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds that hackers could guess your phone PIN using its sensor data NTU scientist Dr Shivam Bhasin holding a laptop with the deep learning software and a mobile phone with their custom app. Credit: NTU Singapore Instruments in smart phones such as the accelerometer, gyroscope and proximity sensors represent a potential security vulnerability, according to researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), whose research was published in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass spectrometric imaging technique makes diagnosis easier and smarter High resolution atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry imaging system. Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team at DGIST has recently developed a technology to acquire high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging in micrometer sized, live biological samples without chemical pretreatment in the general atmospheric pressure environment. This achievement has b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traditional secrets to keeping cool—investigating Okinawan textiles Magnified images of vascular bundles after traditional degumming in 'Naha-u', the outer part of the banana plant leaf sheath that is used to make Basho-fu. Credit: Journal of Fiber Science and Technology, The Society of Fiber Science and Technology, Japan When Yoko Nomura moved from warm, dry California to the subtropical island of Okinawa, she was struck by the stifling heat and humidity. Search
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Development of a nanowire device to detect cancer with a urine test Nanowire extraction allowed many microRNAs to be compared at once using urine samples collected from patients. Expression of each microRNA is shown as low/downregulated (blue), intermediate (black), or high/upregulated (yellow). The analysis reveals unique patterns of expression for groups of microRNAs when comparing healthy donors (?) with cancer patients (+). Credit: Takao Yasui Cells communica
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New strategy for isotope separation with flexible porous material Breathing of MIL-53(Al), a flexible metal-organic framework (MOF). Credit: UNIST A new study by an international team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has succeeded in developing a novel deuterium separation method using a special class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) whose pore dimensions change upon gas adsorption. This new strategy allows deuterium to diffuse more quickly through the ex
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NYT > Science
The New Health Care: What We Mean When We Say Evidence-Based Medicine What We Mean When We Say Evidence-Based Medicine People understand different things by this term, and the arguments don’t divide along predictable partisan lines, either. In medicine, the term “evidence-based” causes more arguments than you might expect. And that’s quite apart from the recent political controversy over why certain words were avoided in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention b
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NYT > Science
‘Nobody Thought It Would Come to This’: Drug Maker Teva Faces a Crisis Mr. Schultz, in a statement of his own, sounded like a man ready to carry out the unhappy task he had been hired to perform. “Unfortunately, Teva is unable to consent to the request of the prime minister and ministers and avoid the closure of the plant in Jerusalem,” he said in the statement. He described this and other measures as “painful but absolutely vital,” and he added that it was “designe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique allows AI to learn words in the flow of dialogue Example of implicit confirmation: 1. Predict category of unknown word.2. Generate implicit confirmation request with category c.3. Determine if the category c is correct from user response. Credit: Osaka University A group of researchers at Osaka University has developed a new method for dialogue systems. Lexical acquisition through implicit confirmation is a method for a computer to acquire the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Local electrical responses in leaves make photosynthesis heat-tolerant Plants exist in variable and often unfavorable environmental conditions, which requires the functioning of a variety of adaptive mechanisms for their survival under the action of stressors. The study of such adaptive mechanisms and identifying ways to control them opens up broad prospects for saving agricultural crops under drought and high temperatures, disease development, pests and other facto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the topology of a porous material influences the phase separation of binary mixtures Two demixed phases [the green and blue phases] are shown together with the porous structure surface (black). Credit: Hajime Tanaka and Ryotaro Shimizu, Tanaka Laboratory, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo Researchers at University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) report a new physical model that shows how the topology of a porous material influences the phase
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia loses contact with Angolan satellite: space industry sourceRussia has lost contact with Angosat-1, the first national telecoms satellite for Angola launched from its Baikonur space pad, a source in the space industry told AFP on Wednesday.
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New Scientist - News
Our lust for tastier chocolate has transformed the cocoa tree We’ve changed cocoa Ingo Arndt / NaturePL By Chris Baraniuk The world loves chocolate, but thousands of years of selective breeding have drastically changed the genome of the trees from which chocolate is made. The plants now produce tastier chocolate, but they also make less due to harmful mutations. The key ingredient in chocolate is cocoa powder. This is made from the seeds of the cocoa tr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A visual database of human plasma compounds The database is able to map the correlation of the different metabolites, offering visitors further research opportunities. Credit: Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization Researchers in Japan have created a database of metabolites from blood samples collected from over 5,000 Japanese volunteers, making it freely available online as a valuable resource for researchers around the world. Metabolites a
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Science : NPR
Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch! Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption toggle caption Lily Padula for NPR Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical rec
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Science : NPR
The Haunting Effects Of Going Days Without Sleep Decades ago, Randy Gardner stayed awake for 11 days. He broke a record in the process, but the teenage stunt has come back to haunt him. At 71, he offers wisdom about staying up past your bedtime.
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Science : NPR
After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption toggle caption Ricardo Arduengo for NPR Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly rec
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Ingeniøren
Kunstig intelligens kan forudsige akutte indlæggelser Et forskningsprojekt i Horsens har vist, at en computer er god til at finde mønstre i store mængder sundhedsdata fra hver enkelt patient og derigennem forudsige, hvilke patienter der har risiko for akutte indlæggelser. F.eks. kan computeren med 90 procents nøjagtighed regne ud, hvem der vil blive indlagt med en blodprop inden for de næste 100 dage, fortæller computerfirmaet Enversion til DR Nyhed
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Big Think
A Bitcoin Millionaire Has Unexpectedly Started Funding Dozens of Charities On December 13, an anonymous user called "Pine" posted the following message on reddit: Hello! I remember starting at bitcoin a few years ago. When bitcoin broke single digits for the first time, I thought that was a triumphant moment for bitcoin. I watched and admired the price jump to $15.. $20.. $30.. wow! Today, I see $17,539 per BTC. I still don't believe reality sometimes. Bitcoin
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Viden
Anklaget for CPR-tyveri: Jeg ville gøre det igen - Jeg ville gøre det igen. Så klart er budskabet fra Esben Warming seks måneder og en masse frustrationer efter, han blev politianmeldt for hacking i en af årets mest spektakulære danske it-sager. Tilbage i maj opdagede Esben Warming ved et tilfælde et sikkerhedshul i et kommunalt it-system og ville vise fejlen til Frederiksberg Kommune, hvor han bor. Men i stedet for et takkekort og en buket blo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Starfish making comeback after syndrome killed millions This July 31, 2010 file photo, shows a starfish clings to a rock near Haystack Rock during low tide in Cannon Beach, Ore. Starfish are making a comeback on the West Coast, four years after a mysterious syndrome killed millions of them. From 2013 to 2014, Sea Star Wasting Syndrome hit sea stars from British Columbia to Mexico. Now the species is rebounding with sea stars being spotted in Southern
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Does this croc found in Australian suburb belong to you?Australian police found a crocodile strolling the streets of a Melbourne suburb on Christmas Day.
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New Scientist - News
Love at first sight is really just lust or even false memory Physical attraction can distort perceptions Annie Otzen/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou Your eyes met across a crowded room – but was it really love at first sight? One in three people say they have experienced the phenomenon, however a study suggests it probably doesn’t exist. “People think of love at first sight as a lightning strike as soon as they see a person,” says Florian Zsok at the Univers
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Science | The Guardian
Frankenpod 200: celebrating Mary Shelley’s masterpiece - Science Weekly podcast Two hundred years after the publication of Frankenstein, how relevant are the themes and concerns of Shelley’s gothic tale to today’s readers? Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter On 1 January 1818, a small publishing house in London produced 500 copies of a novel that would go on to define a genre and r
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Frankenpod 200: celebrating Mary Shelley’s masterpiece - Science Weekly podcastTwo hundred years after the publication of Frankenstein, how relevant are the themes and concerns of Shelley’s gothic tale to today’s readers?
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Science | The Guardian
Back to front: why switching queues will get you nowhere faster No-one relishes the moment. You are stuck at the back of a queue and as those in other lines sail past and get served, the time to decide arrives. Do you hold your nerve and stay put, switch to another line in the hope it moves faster, or give up altogether? The pressing question has now been tackled by research at Harvard Business School. It found that when a person finds themselves at the end o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wrens' calls reveal subtle differences between subspecies IMAGE: Biologist Sarah Luttrell captures a recording of a Marsh Wren's calls. view more Credit: S. Luttrell Birds' songs and the ways they vary between places have been well studied--but what can the simpler vocalizations known as calls tell us about bird biology? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances provides the first detailed description of how Marsh Wren calls vary across east
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New on MIT Technology Review
Four Amazing Things Gene Editing Did in 2017 Gene editing hasn’t cured disease in a human being yet—but it is getting closer. With the debut of CRISPR a few years ago, advances in the technology have been happening at a breakneck pace. Here are a few of the remarkable things that gene editing did in 2017. 1. The first human embryos in the U.S. are modified with CRISPR. In August, researchers at Oregon Health and Science University, led by S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wrens' calls reveal subtle differences between subspecies Biologist Sarah Luttrell captures a recording of a Marsh Wren's calls. Credit: S. Luttrell Birds' songs and the ways they vary between places have been well studied—but what can the simpler vocalizations known as calls tell us about bird biology? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances provides the first detailed description of how Marsh Wren calls vary across eastern North America and
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Big Think
Scientists Discovered What Causes Dementia Scientists discovered a major cause of dementia which can help in the diagnosis and treatment of the illness. The researchers point to toxic levels of urea in the brain as being responsible for the brain damage that leads to dementia , an incurable neurodegenerative disease that causes an impairment of memory and thinking abilities. Urea is a byproduct of protein metabolism, produced by the liver
17h
Ingeniøren
Tre trends for jobsøgere i 2018 Den teknologiske udvikling ændrer arbejdsmarkedet, skaber nye jobs og hiver andre op med roden. Men før de store forandringer indtræffer, vil der være mindre ændringer, som får knap så voldsomme konsekvenser – selvom det kan betyde meget for den enkelte. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Jobfinder gennemgår nogle af de nye tendenser, som jobsøgere kan få glæde af i 2018.
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Ingeniøren
Bevilling på 80 mio. kr. til DTU vækker undren – Christiansborg har kontaktet statsrevisorerne Folketingets Finansudvalg har bedt statsrevisorerne overveje en undersøgelse af, hvordan DTU har håndteret en bevilling på 80,3 millioner kroner, som var øremærket nye laboratoriefaciliteter til det veterinære beredskab. DTU fik pengene bevilget gennem to aktstykker tilbage i folketingsåret 2012-2013. Men i maj droppede DTU bygningen, der skulle have navnet 205b, og så springer bevillingen pludse
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Big Think
Scientists Accidentally Invent Glass You Can Fix in a Literal Pinch Imagine dropping a new glass-front or -back phone you just spent precious money on, and watching helplessly as it shatters. Welcome to your brand-new, high-priced phone with a smashed screen for the rest of its life. Sigh. A University of Tokyo research team has just announced chancing upon a rigid, glass-like polymer that you can “heal” just by pressing together its broken pieces. For phones and
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Popular Science
Why did last week's SpaceX launch look so strange? The glowing ball of light that hovered briefly over over Los Angeles last week was not aliens . And it definitely wasn’t a Nuclear alien UFO from North Korea. ... whatever that means. But it did look really odd. It was a pearly teardrop glowing against the darkening sky, lovely and otherworldly. It was also just a cloud of frozen crystals of water and exhaust marking the path of a SpaceX rocket.
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Futurity.org
Repeat food poisoning may lead to chronic intestine trouble Repeated bacterial infections can add up over time, eventually leading to severe inflammatory disease, a new study suggests. Small bacterial infections, which may go unnoticed and which clear the body without treatment—such as occurs in mild food poisoning—can start a chain of events that leads to chronic inflammation and life-threatening colitis. The new findings also may identify the long-myste
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overcoming difficulties developing an HIV vaccineThe development of an HIV vaccine has proven extraordinarily difficult. One of the reasons is that naïve precursor B cells that can give rise to mature B cells producing broadly neutralizing antibodies are exceedingly rare within the average human. Yet, despite their low frequency these B cell precursors can outcompete their B cell competitors under the right conditions.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Befriending oneself has benefits, but backup plan recommendedA self-replicating fish replicates only its own DNA, but researchers have found the mangrove killifish has a remarkable amount of genetic diversity across its species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob MarleyIt was 02:00h on 11 January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's 'Sunshine State' of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. The observant researchers, who would later describe this population as a species new to science, were quick to associate their emergence with Bob Marley's song 'High Tide or Low Tide'.
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Big Think
How to Fight Work Bullshit (And Keep Your Job and Your Dignity) After getting lost in the conference hotel, I finally located the ‘creativity workshop’. Joining the others, I sat cross-legged on the floor. Soon, an ageing hippie was on his feet. ‘Just walk around the room and introduce yourself,’ he said. ‘But don’t use words.’ After a few minutes of people acting like demented mimes, the hippie stopped us. ‘Now grab a mandala,’ he said, pointing to a pile of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How T-cells navigate the rough-and-tumble environment of the bloodstreamHelper T cells move toward inflamed tissue using membrane protrusions that stabilize them and provide traction on the vasculature. Using high-resolution microscopy and global molecular analysis, scientists show that immature T cells lack these protrusions but that maturing T-cells switch on a gene expression program to create material to construct them.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New strategy for isotope separation with flexible porous materialResearchers have succeeded in developing a novel deuterium separation method, using a special class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) whose pore dimensions change upon gas adsorption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new strategy for efficient hydrogen productionScientists have introduced the Hybrid-SOEC system with highest reported electrochemical performance in hydrogen production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thermoelectric power generation at room temperature: Coming soon?A research team has created a thermoelectric material with promising performance at room temperature. Ytterbium silicide is a good electrical conductor. It also has a high Seebeck coefficient thanks to Kondo resonance (fluctuation of f-electrons), which increases its power factor. Its layered structure further promotes the thermoelectric effect by blocking heat conduction. This non-toxic, room-tem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists should be super modelersScholars and conservationists want to aim for the right future to preserve biodiversity and plan sustainable environments. One of those scholars is calling for due diligence to make sure the right data, not conventional wisdom, shapes that target.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuroscientists shed light on causes of postpartum depression using new research modelPostpartum depression strikes nearly one in five new mothers. Stress is a significant risk factor for this complex condition. Neuroscientists have generated a novel preclinical model of postpartum depression and demonstrated involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (the neuroendocrine system that mediates physiological response to stress and is normally suppressed during and after pr
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Futurity.org
This test can tell whether a virus is making you sick A new test can identify whether viral infections are causing a patient’s respiratory illness by measuring RNA or protein molecules in their cells, according to a new study. Performed with a simple nasal swab, the test could prove to be a quicker, cheaper way to diagnose respiratory viral illnesses than current methods, researchers say. “It’s a simpler test and more cost-effective for looking at v
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Futurity.org
Our solar system may have formed in a star-making ‘bubble’ Scientists have proposed a new, comprehensive theory for how our solar system could have formed in the wind-blown bubbles around a giant, long-dead star. The study addresses a nagging cosmic mystery about the abundance of two elements in our solar system compared to the rest of the galaxy. The general prevailing theory is that our solar system formed billions of years ago near a supernova. But th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pain-free skin patch responds to sugar levels for management of type 2 diabetesResearchers have devised a biochemically formulated patch of dissolvable microneedles for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The biochemical formula of mineralized compounds in the patch responds to blood chemistry to manage glucose automatically. In a proof-of-concept study performed with mice, the researchers showed that the chemicals interact in the bloodstream to regulate blood sugar for days a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanowire device to detect cancer with a urine testResearchers have developed a nanowire device able to detect microscopic levels of urinary markers potentially implicated in cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Technique to allow AI to learn words in the flow of dialogue developedA group of researchers has developed a new method for dialogue systems. This new method, lexical acquisition through implicit confirmation, is a method for a computer to acquire the category of an unknown word over multiple dialogues by confirming whether or not its predictions are correct in the flow of conversation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trees' spring awakening is becoming less and less sensitive to altitude differencesIn the Swiss Alps, the time lag between leafing of trees at high and low altitudes has shortened dramatically since the 1960s due to climate warming.
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Futurity.org
Watch: Hagfishes use skin and slime to survive attack Hagfishes, an ancient group of eel-like animals found on the bottom of the ocean, have skin that is both unattached and flaccid to protect them from any internal damage that might be caused by a predator’s penetrating teeth, according to a new study. When predators bite hagfishes, they release a nasty slime that sends the predator into a fit as it “coughs” up the substance, trying to prevent suff
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Live Science
Moon's Supersonic Shadow Created Waves During the Solar Eclipse This composite image shows the progression of a total solar eclipse over Madras, Oregon, on Aug. 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani When the moon's shadow zipped across the United States during the Great American Solar Eclipse this past August, the shadow traveled so fast it created waves in Earth's upper atmosphere, a new study finds. During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between th
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