Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genes in Space-3 successfully identifies unknown microbes in space Sarah Wallace (L), NASA microbiologist and Genes in Space-3 principal investigator, and Sarah Stahl (R), microbiologist, are seen in their Johnson Space Center lab with the in-flight sample from the Genes in Space-3 investigation. Credit: Rachel Barry Being able to identify microbes in real time aboard the International Space Station, without having to send them back to Earth for identification f
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Ingeniøren
Dansk virksomhed kåret til Europas sjoveste arbejdsplads To dage hvert år får ansatte i Pentia fri. Baggrunden er simpel: Medarbejdere i en it-virksomhed bør få chancen for at spille computer mod og med hinanden. Årlige arrangementer som gamer-dage og halve fredage dedikeret til videndeling og fri leg er et par af de initiativer, der har scoret Pentia titlen som den sjoveste virksomhed i Europa. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinde
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Viden
Computer kan forudsige om du havner akut på sygehuset Forskere og IT-folk bag et forskningsprojekt i Horsens har så lovende resultater med at bruge kunstig intelligens til at forudsige akutte indlæggelser, at de håber at kunne afprøve teknologien over for patienter. Projektet, Tværspor, går ud på at få en computer til at finde mønstre i store mængder af data og derigennem forudsige sygdom. En række indledende forsøg har vist, at computeren faktisk e
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Science : NPR
How Pirates Of The Caribbean Hijacked America's Metric System In 1793, French scientist Joseph Dombey boarded a ship bound for the United States carrying with him a standard kilogram weight. Thanks to pirates, he and the weight never arrived. (Image credit: NIST Museum)
9min
New Scientist - News
2018 preview: Gene therapy treats disease while in the womb Dr G. Moscoso/Science Photo Library By Andy Coghlan “You can see during pregnancy that they already have bone fractures in the womb,” says Cecilia Götherström of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. She is head of what will be the world’s first ever trial of giving fetuses stem cell therapy in the womb. The aim is to relieve symptoms of, or even cure, osteogenesis imperfecta, known
9min
The Atlantic
How the Animal Kingdom Sleeps Sleep is universal in the animal kingdom, but each species slumbers in a different — and often mysterious — way. Some animals snooze with half their brain, while others sleep for just two hours a day (without suffering sleep deprivation). In this episode of Animalism , Ed Yong guides us through the latest research on how creatures catch their z’s.
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Science : NPR
How Pirates Of The Caribbean Hijacked America's Metric System The grave of 1793, an early version of the kilogram. It is possible this object, now owned by the NIST museum, was once pirate treasure. NIST Museum hide caption toggle caption NIST Museum The grave of 1793, an early version of the kilogram. It is possible this object, now owned by the NIST museum, was once pirate treasure. NIST Museum If the United States was more like the rest of the world, a M
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New on MIT Technology Review
While U.S. Workers Fear Automation, Swedish Employees Welcome It CRISPR: The Next Hearing-Loss Treatment? Scientists have used the gene-editing tool to restore hearing in animals with a genetic form of deafness. The work, which is detailed Wednesday in the journal Nature , was done in mice, but a similar technique could eventually be used in humans. In mice,… Read more Scientists have used the gene-editing tool to restore hearing in animals with a genetic fo
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Science | The Guardian
After 40 years of studying the strong nuclear force, a revelation In the mid 1970s, four Soviet physicists, Batlisky, Fadin, Kuraev and Lipatov, made some predictions involving the strong nuclear force which would lead to their initials entering the lore. “BFKL” became a shorthand for a difficult-to-understand but important physical effect which could have big implications for high energy physics. The strongest of the known fundamental forces of nature is somet
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carfilzomib can lead to cardiovascular toxicity in multiple myeloma patientsThe proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib has taken on an increasing role in the treatment of multiple myeloma, but new research from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania shows the therapy comes with the risk of cardiovascular problems in a higher than expected percentage of patients.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A cluster of mutations in neurofibromatosis is important risk factor for severe symptoms BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Research led by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., professor of genetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, shows that missense mutations in a cluster of just five codons in the NF1 gene are an important risk factor for severe symptoms of the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1. Such information is vital to help guide clinical management and genetic counseling in this
40min
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Engineers hack cell biology to create 3-D shapes from living tissue IMAGE: This image shows the shapes made of living tissue made by the researchers. By patterning mechanically active mouse or human cells to thin layers of extracellular fibers, the researchers could... view more Credit: Alex Hughes Many of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be recreated with very simple instructions, UC San Francisco bioengineers report December 28 in t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With wrist-worn gadget, researchers capture real-life sleep for the first time To measure a person's sleep, researchers have always relied on costly and time-consuming approaches that could only be used in a sleep lab. But now researchers reporting in Current Biology on December 28 have found a way to capture detailed information on human sleep cycles over long periods of time while individuals slumber at home in their usual way. According to the researchers, the findings r
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Futurity.org
CRISPR knocks out ALS gene mutation in mice For the first time, scientists have used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to disable a defective gene that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, in mice. The therapy delayed the onset of the muscle wasting that characterizes the disease, which results in progressive weakness and eventually proves fatal when the muscles that control breathing fail, and extended the lifespan of the
49min
The Scientist RSS
2017 in QuotesGender discrimination, Brexit, and climate change are among the issues that have received considerable attention from the scientific community this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers hack cell biology to create 3-D shapes from living tissue The shapes made of living tissue made by the researchers. By patterning mechanically active mouse or human cells to thin layers of extracellular fibers, the researchers could create bowls, coils, and ripple shapes. Credit: Alex Hughes Many of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be recreated with very simple instructions, UC San Francisco bioengineers report December 28 in th
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Scientific American Content: Global
DARPA Contest Aims to Take People Underground From the seas to mountain peaks, humans have colonized almost every inch of Earth's surface. Now, humans may soon be able to routinely venture below the planet's surface, at least if the military has any say in the matter. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has announced its latest challenge, called the Subterranean or "SubT" Challenge. The global competition asks entra
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Popular Science
A week of holiday junk food could derail your gut microbiome—but there's hope We’re right between Christmas and New Years—that time of the year when we often allow ourselves to indulge in deliciously sweet and savory treats. For one week out of the whole year, that’s absolutely fine. Moderation is key to maintaining a healthy diet all year round . But it’s important not to completely neglect your fruits and vegetables, and not just for the vitamins and other nutrients they
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The Atlantic
Conservation in Nebraska: 'Our Hope Is For People to Think of This as Not Just Flyover Country' In announcing a $165 million gift for preservation of coastal land in California, the tech-industry Dangermond family said that they were trying to set an example for other rich people like themselves. But they also suggested that non-billionaires, through much smaller scale community and neighborhood efforts could cumulatively make a large environmental and livability difference. The previous tw
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Live Science
Nuclear Sphere: Weird Globe Could Revolutionize Fusion Energy A team of researchers has a plan to achieve nuclear fusion that actually produces energy, and their proposal looks very different from the fusion projects the world has already seen. If the team is right, its strange, spherical hydrogen-boron reactor could be built in useful form before any ongoing conventional fusion projects reach completion. The secret behind the new reactor design? It relies
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Science : NPR
Size (And Sound) Matters When It Comes To Bubbles In Your Sparkling Wine The smaller the bubble in that glass of champagne, the higher the pitch — and the price. Viktoria Rodriguez/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption toggle caption Viktoria Rodriguez/Getty Images/EyeEm The smaller the bubble in that glass of champagne, the higher the pitch — and the price. Viktoria Rodriguez/Getty Images/EyeEm Oenophiles have debated the most desirable characteristics of bubbles in champa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA researchers report novel complementary effects of estrogen treatment in MS FINDINGS A study by UCLA researchers reveals the cellular basis for how the hormone estrogen protects against damage to the central nervous system in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The researchers found that estrogen treatment exerts positive effects on two types of cells during disease --immune cells in the brain and also cells called oligodendrocytes. Complementary actions on these two ty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ophthalmologists report increased use of electronic health records but decreased productivity as a result Bottom Line: Most ophthalmologists in a survey reported using electronic health records (EHRs) but thought that EHR use decreased their productivity. Why The Research Is Interesting: A previous survey study reported a rapid increase in the proportion of ophthalmologists using EHRs. Understanding EHR use by ophthalmologists and their impact on productivity can guide the design of future EHRs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viewing atomic structures of dopant atoms in 3-D relating to electrical activity in a semiconductorScientists have just developed a novel approach to determine and visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of individual dopant atoms using SPring-8.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Introducing Internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughsProviding Internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Project will provide reaction kinetics data for synthesis of metallic nanocrystalsResearchers have published the first part of what they expect to be a database showing the kinetics involved in producing colloidal metal nanocrystals -- which are suitable for catalytic, biomedical, photonic and electronic applications -- through an autocatalytic mechanism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From C-H to C-C at room temperatureBy oxidizing the iridium center of the reaction intermediate, scientists achieve arylation of C-H bonds at mild conditions.
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Meal Kits Have a Packaging Problem Recently, someone asked me if I thought people were cooking at home less frequently than they used to. I bristled at the query, probably because I was worried that it might be true. Wasn’t everyone out there watching cooking shows then turning off the TV, getting out their mason jars, and whipping up Alton Brown’s watermelon rind pickles ? Anyone fretting over America’s culinary decline can attem
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Topiramate in early pregnancy increases risk of oral cleftsA new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that using topiramate in early pregnancy, particularly at the high doses used for epilepsy, increases the risk of oral clefts. Their results are published in Neurology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur sealA neurosurgical team has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Conn.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Epson, Apple face French legal pressure over planned obsolescence French prosecutors have launched a probe into Japanese printer maker Epson for alleged planned obsolescence in its products, using landmark consumer legislation that campaigners hope to turn against Apple as well. The investigation, confirmed to AFP by a legal source on Thursday, was opened in November and is being led by anti-trust and consumer protection specialists in the French economy minist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple CEO must fly private for 'security, efficiency'Apple's board has instructed chief executive Tim Cook to use only private aircraft "in the interests of security and efficiency" at the world's most valuable company, regulatory documents show.
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Science-Based Medicine
Top ten signs your detox may be a scam As we prepare to welcome 2018, it’s time to start thinking about your New Year’s resolutions. And what better way to start fresh in 2018 than by literally purging yourself of 2017, inside and out? You may already been seeing advertisements for all forms of detox products and services: Your local pharmacy likely has a shelf of supplements and kits that promise a svelte, glowing you within a few da
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Ingeniøren
Japanerne ryster i bukserne: Tepco vil genstarte verdens største atomkraftværk 90.000 indbyggere i byen Kashiwazaki på den japanske vestkyst er urolige - i hvert fald en stor del af dem. Energivirksomheden Tepco (Tokyo Electric Power Company) har nemlig formelt fået godkendt en genstart af to reaktorer på verdens største atomkraftværk, efter at det har været lukket ned siden nedsmeltningskatastrofen i Fukushima i marts 2011. Indbyggerne frygter nu, at miseren vil gentage si
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer overrides the circadian clock to survive IMAGE: Hollings Cancer Center researchers Dr. Yiwen Bu and Dr. J. Alan Diehl explore how cancer overrides the circadian clock to survive. view more Credit: Hollings Cancer Center Tumor cells use the unfolded protein response to alter circadian rhythm, which contributes to more tumor growth, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) find. A key par
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Droughts and ecosystems are determined by the interaction of two climate phenomena IMAGE: This is a pine forest. view more Credit: Asier Herrero / UPV/EHU What is causing the droughts that the Iberian Peninsula regularly endures? Why are the winters sometimes mild and rainy and other times cold and dry or cold and damp? Is climate change of anthropogenic origin exerting an influence on these processes? How are these cycles affecting the productivity of terrestrial ecosyst
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Futurity.org
Teen girls feel ‘bombarded’ by requests for nude photos Adolescent women feel intense pressure to send sexual images to men, but they lack the tools to cope with their concerns and the potential consequences, according to new research. Sexting, or sending nude or semi-nude sexually suggestive images or messages to others, is a reality for an estimated 15 to 25 percent of teens growing up today. Though some research points to sexting as a potentially l
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The Scientist RSS
Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research DiesBen Barres of Stanford University described glia's roles in ensuring neurons' proper synapse formation and in responding to brain injury.
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The Scientist RSS
The Industry of Bodies Donated for Science Lacks Oversight: InvestigationsReuters sheds light on the largely unregulated trade of human body parts taken from human cadavers donated for science.
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Live Science
Newly Unveiled 16th-Century Map Shows a World Filled with Centaurs and Unicorns A 16th-century map made by cartographer Urbano Monte is going on display at the David Rumsey Map Collection at Stanford University. The map includes fantastical creatures, like sea monsters, griffins and mermaids. Credit: Courtesy of David Rumsey Map Collection/DavidRumsey.com A rare, 60-page map of the world illustrated during the Renaissance era is finally on display as its creator intended:
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Live Science
Photos: Renaissance World Map Sports Magical CreaturesIn 1587, Italian cartographer Urbano Monte completed a world map with a unique perspective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows increased risk of uterine fibroids in African-American women with a common form of hair In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids. In a report on the research, published in the December 27 issue of JAMA Dermatology , the researchers call on physicians who treat women with ce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The wave power farm off Mutriku could improve its efficiency IMAGE: Gabriel Ibarra in his office at the university. On the computer a picture of Mutriku. view more Credit: Mitxi / UPV/EHU The offshore power plant or wave farm at Mutriku is the only commercial facility (it is not a prototype) in the world that operates by regularly feeding the grid with electrical power produced by waves. It has been operating since 2011 and the study by the UPV/EHU's
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Scientific American Content: Global
Vultures, Hippos and Anthrax Want to clear a room quickly? Just casually mention you’ve recently encountered anthrax. Turns out the mere whisper of the word, to most Americans, conjures up a mental image of white powder falling like snow from an envelope sent by terrorists, followed by a gruesome and highly exaggerated death scene. Indeed anthrax in high doses can be extremely lethal and many a government has even considered
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Fly an Airplane on Skis | Antarctica 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR See Every Discovery TRVLR Episode: https://goo.gl/GNWKNE Ride with Brian Burchartz as he pilots a DC-3 outfitted with its own skis in order to land on the dangerous icy terrain of Wolf Fang Runway in Antarctica. For 10 years, Brian has flown tourists across the continent from the home of the Emperor Penguins at Atka Bay, to the South Pole, a long two-day trip with multiple fueling stops along the
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Popular Science
You should develop your own black-and-white film. Here’s how. Got a yen for film? Good luck getting those pictures developed. Even as analog photography experiences a serious renaissance period, few locations remain to turn that exposed film into pictures. The good news, however, is that developing film at home is pretty easy and extremely fun. It mixes chemistry, art—and probably ruining at least one of your T-shirts. Buying the film For this DIY process,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How neurotechnologies impact risk appetite Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have shown that by stimulating the frontal cortex, a person's financial risk appetite can be increased temporarily. Their article on the cognitive mechanisms of risky decision-making was published in eNeuro , an international peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Society for Neuroscience. Neuroeconomics focuses on the neurobiological fou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Double strike against tuberculosis In search of new strategies against life-threatening tuberculosis infections, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), as well as Harvard University and Texas A&M University in the USA have found a new ally. They discovered a substance that interferes with the mycomembrane formation of the bacterium. It is effective even in low concentrations and when combined with known antibiotics
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New patch aims to turn energy-storing fats into energy-burning fatsA new approach to reducing bulging tummy fats has shown promise in laboratory trials. It combines a new way to deliver drugs, via a micro-needle patch, with drugs that are known to turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering molecular targets for childhood cancer therapeutics IMAGE: A, The samples with mutations in DNA damage response-associated genes, including ATM, were mutually exclusive with 1 lq deletion. B, Immunoblot analysis of neuroblastoma derived cell line. C, Olaparib suppresses... view more Credit: Department of Pediatrics, Perinatal and Maternal Medicine (Ibaraki),TMDU Study led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) elucidates genomic
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Futurity.org
Hurricanes ‘sandblasted’ these Caribbean coral reefs Coral reefs off St. John, part of the US Virgin Islands, suffered severe injury during hurricanes Maria and Irma, say scientists who traveled there in late November to assess the damage—the first step in understanding the reefs’ recovery. Some coral colonies lost branches. Harmful algal growth cloaked others. Many—weakened by the hurricanes—were left with ghostly, feather-like strands of bacteria
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Defect in zinc supply mechanism affects pathology of intractable pulmonary diseases IMAGE: In normal lungs, the transporter ZIP2 (WT-ZIP2: the bullet train, or "Shinkansen ", on the left side of the figure) controls zinc transport and delivers zinc to lung epithelial cells. For... view more Credit: Associate Professor Tsuyoshi Syuto Obstructive pulmonary disease is a collective term for refractory respiratory diseases with chronic airway inflammation and excessive mucu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO 2 emissions in boreal forests. Boreal forests are a huge carbon sink. The fine roots, not only the leaves, stems and branches of trees, largely contribute to carbon accumulation. The Russian Far East has had an increasing number of forest fires, many of which are believed to be caused by global
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modeling helped to improve the configuration of an autonomous heat supply unitIn their article the authors of the study presented a mathematical model describing the work of an electrical technological unit for autonomous heat supply (EKAT). The dimensions of the unit range from 0.8×1×1 m to 1.5×2×2.5 m. It can be used in standalone heating, water supply, and air conditioning systems. The unit is green and easy to operate and allows a user to set a preferred working regime.
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Futurity.org
Phone, ruler, and footprints identify pandas on the move Using a new interactive software tool, researchers can identify an individual panda and its sex by examining footprints it left behind. The “Footprint Identification Technique” (FIT) reads and analyzes digital images of footprints, which are submitted electronically to a global database for matching. In field tests, the technique accurately identified individual animals and their sex more than 90
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Ingeniøren
Opdateringsfejl i KMD-system annullerede sygefravær for tusindvis af borgere KMD-systemet Workbase har ved en fejl annulleret registreringer om sygefravær fra Det Fælles Datagrundlag (DFDG), som blandt andet bruges af a-kasser til at afgøre, hvem der skal have udbetalt sygedagpenge. Fejlen har mellem 11. december og 18. december betydet af tusindvis af borgere har fået annulleret enten aktive eller historiske sygemeldinger, fremgår det af et brev, som Styrelsen for Arbejd
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5 Tips and Tricks For Using Your Amazon Kids Tablet Handing your child a teddy bear with an embedded camera is a bad idea . But a kid-friendly tablet, with carefully curated content under direct parental supervision, is another thing altogether. Our recommended tablet for kids is the Amazon Fire HD 8 for Kids , which we reviewed earlier this year. Its parental controls and rugged design make it ideal for your tot, but there are five things you sho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a chemically primitive dwarf star in the galactic halo OSIRIS medium-resolution spectrum of J0815+4729 (black line) and the best fit obtained with FERRE (red line). Credit: Aguado et al., 2017. Spanish astronomers have identified a new carbon-rich ultra metal-poor unevolved star in the halo of the Milky Way galaxy. The newly found star, designated J0815+4729, could be the most iron-poor unevolved star known to date. The finding was detailed in a pape
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New on MIT Technology Review
23andMe Launches Giant Weight-Loss Study Right now, a lot of Americans are getting their skis out of the attic and trying to fit into last year’s snow pants. More than a few will regret drinking that extra cup of eggnog. To mark the season, consumer DNA testing company 23andMe is kicking off what it terms a “massive study” into the genetic basis of weight loss that it says will ultimately involve 100,000 people. The company, based in Mo
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Failed satellite programmed with 'wrong co-ordinates' Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The rocket carrying the satellite and other equipment launched from Vostochny cosmodrome The loss of a multi-million pound weather mapping satellite was due to programming errors, the Russian deputy prime minister has said. Dmitry Rogozin said Meteor-M had been programmed for take-off from a different space station. Speaking to Russian state TV, he blame
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The Atlantic
The Dark Horse in the Search for Dark Matter Two years ago, China launched a space probe into orbit around Earth. Scientists nicknamed it Wukong, or Monkey King, after the hero of a 16th-century novel about a Buddhist monk’s long journey to India to secure religious texts. The probe’s job was to track and record cosmic rays, the streams of high-energy particles that constantly bombard Earth’s atmosphere from all corners of the universe. In
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New Scientist - News
Plants use sand armour to break teeth of attacking caterpillars SOME plants have an odd defensive tactic against insects. It seems they use sand grains as abrasive armour that damages the insects’ teeth. These “psammophorous” plants have sticky surfaces to which sand adheres. This sand was suspected to be involved in protecting against herbivorous insects, but this was only tested in 2016. Eric LoPresti of the University of California, Davis, showed that
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In 2018, TV Needs to Take a Cue From 'SMILF' and Embrace Smallness In the final moments of SMILF ’s debut episode, its strapped-for-cash, do-anything heroine Bridgette auditions for a small role in a PSA about post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans. Curious as to how she staged such a tear-inducing performance, she casually tells the director, “I was sexually abused by my dad, which also causes PTSD. So I guess I kinda have been to war.” But the scene doe
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Ingeniøren
Her er årets læserhits på ing.dk ... Det er forkert at bruge ordet "favorit" om artiklerne om Peter Madsen. At mange mennesker læser en artikel, gør det ikke til en favorit. De fleste ville nok helst have undgået at en sådan artikel nogensinde skulle blive aktuel. En favorit er noget man godt kan lide, og klik og læsninger er altså ikke nødvendigvis udtryk for at man kan lide det man læser.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How NASA's Search for ET Relies on Advanced AI The biggest knock against sending robots to explore the solar system for signs of life has always been their inability to make intuitive, even creative decisions as effectively as humans can. Recent advances in artificial intelligence (AI) promise to narrow that gap soon—which is a good thing, because there are no immediate plans to send people to explore Mars’s subterranean caves or search for h
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Ingeniøren
Mere end halvdelen af vores husholdningsaffald skal genanvendes i 2035 I 2035 skal EU-landene genanvende mindst 65 pct. af det husholdningsaffald, som landet producerer. Samtidig skal landenes deponering reduceres til 10 pct. frem mod 2035. Det er hovedlinjerne i en ny aftale, som er indgået mellem EU-landene. Og sætter man målene op mod de mål, som vi internt har fastlagt i Danmark, så er vi i princippet ret godt med. »Vi skal nok komme i mål. Nu har vi lavet fire
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian experts looking into nation's recent space failures Most galaxies lie in clusters containing from a few to thousands of objects. Our Milky Way, for example, belongs to a cluster of about fifty galaxies called the Local Group whose other large member is the Andromeda galaxy ...
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is Your Computer Secretly Mining Bitcoin Alternatives? A Guide to "Cryptojacking" The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Nothing comes for free, especially online. Websites and apps that don’t charge you for their services are often collecting your data or bombarding you with advertising. Now some sites have found a new way to make money from you: using your computer to generate virtual c
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The Atlantic
The Intrusion of White Families Into Bilingual Schools Stephanie Lugardo’s second-grade classroom at Academia Antonia Alonso in Wilmington, Delaware, is bubbling. Students chatter with one another as they work, smiling and joking and wiggling in and out of their chairs. Sure—it’s an elementary-school classroom. It’s expected to exude the earnest joy of children growing into themselves. But this one is different. Smiles break out on an array of faces,
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The Atlantic
Food Swamps Are the New Food Deserts The term “food desert” conjures the image of a forlorn citizen, wandering through a barren landscape for miles and miles (or, by definition, for more than a mile ) to reach the nearest fresh-food market. Populating food deserts with grocery stores is a favored cause among nutrition advocates, but the concept became controversial after some recent studies found the distance to the nearest grocery
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Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, synthetic DNA made its debut In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Fighting Climate Change, and Building a World to Withstand It This past year, 2017, was the worst fire season in American history. Over 9.5 million acres burned across North America. Firefighting efforts cost $2 billion . This past year, 2017, was the seventh-worst Atlantic hurricane season on record and the worst since 2005. There were six major storms . Early estimates put the costs at more than $180 billion. As the preventable disease hepatitis A spread
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Scientific American Content: Global
Beyond Pluto, New Horizons' Next Target May Have a Moon NEW ORLEANS—When NASA's New Horizons spacecraft arrives at its next destination in 2019 , it may find more primordial objects than NASA had anticipated: Researchers have announced that the probe's next target, an icy object known as 2014 MU69, may have at least one moon and could even host a swarm of natural satellites. "It is very exciting," New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern, of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New app developed to locate people in areas without a phone signal José Ángel Berná with the new application. Credit: Asociación RUVID Researchers of the Universidad de Alicante (UA) have developed new technology that makes it possible to locate people who have suffered an accident in remote locations without a phone signal and where a speedy rescue is essential to save lives. The system can also be used in emergency situations that arise as a result of earthqua
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires A field in the Russian Far East after a forest fire. Due to the location of the trees, the concentration of charcoal differs from place to place. Credit: Bryanin S.V. Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. Boreal forests are a huge carbon sink. The fine roots, not only the leaves, stems and branches of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Important tricyclic chemical compounds with efficient chirality control Figure 1. Representative examples of bioactive molecules having hydronaphthofurans scaffolds. Credit: Osaka University Osaka University researchers developed a highly efficient way to produce chiral multi-centered fused tricyclic compounds of which core structure is often found in bioactive compounds including medicines. Chemists have devoted tremendous efforts to develop a way to build molecules
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Ingeniøren
2017 bliver Storbritanniens 'grønneste el-år' Storbritannien vil inden 2025 have udfaset alle kulkraftværker for at reducere udledningen af drivhusgasser, og der bliver investeret meget i grøn teknologi, især vindmøller. Nye tal for 2017 viser, at Det Forenede Kongerige er godt på vej, for ifølge BBC har briterne oplevet det ’grønneste el-år’ nogensinde. Takket være vindmølleparker har Storbritannien haft sin første ’kulfrie dag’, for vinden
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Scientific American Content: Global
Secret to Porpoise Sonar Revealed Secret to Porpoise Sonar Revealed The animals can adjust structures in their foreheads to change the echolocation signals they emit Yangtze finless porpoise. Credit: China Photos Getty Images Advertisement The best military sonar technology pales in comparison with the echolocation porpoises use to track prey, predators and obstacles. The marine mammals can find objects a few centimeters wide fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Information extraction and visualization from Twitter considering spatial structure From where (orange) about what place (blue) people in Tokyo post. Credit: University of Electro Communications Social media is expected to be a good source of data for analyzing human behavior and statuses of locations. It is possible to provide location-based information simply by geospatially filtering archived data. However, this naive approach causes problems for practical applications. For e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explain how the process of erosion forms unusual shapes and structures Credit: Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology Scientists at Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology have determined through mathematical modeling that the process of erosion optimizes the shapes of disintegrating materials. Natural wind and water erosion often creates spectacular landforms such as natural arches and bridges, balanced pillars and domes. The national parks of Utah in th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronic nose developed to sniff out colon diseases A team of researchers from the Gandia campus of Valencia's Polytechnic University and the La Fe Health Investigation Institute have developed a prototype of an electronic nose that can distinguish between patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The device, called Moosy 32 eNose, can also tell whether the disease is active, with close to 90 percent accuracy. According to the research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly efficient, high-power short-pulse lasers based on Tm3+ doped materials Fig.1. Output powers of Tm doped short pulse laser as a function of pulse duration. Credit: University of Electro-Communications Highly efficient high power short pulse lasers at the wavelength range of 2 µm based on Tm3+ doped materials have a variety of applications such as material processing, LiDAR, mid-infrared OPOs for wavelengths up to 12 μm, or mid-infrared supercontinuum generation. They
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hierarchical opportunistic routing with moderate clustering for ad hoc networks Forwarding procedure of the proposed method (CHOR). Credit: University of Electro Communications The self-organizing nature of ad hoc networks generally has an advantage that the networks are free from fixed infrastructures such as APs (Access points). However, this also has a disadvantage that the networks are unstable and unreliable compared with wired and fixed communication. Although there ar
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Live Science
From American Cockroaches to Zebras, New Book Answers 'Does It Fart?' Dani Rabaiotti didn't expect to become something of an expert on animal farts. It all started on a family vacation when the zoologist's brother asked her if snakes farted. She realized she had no idea. But through a close community of animal researchers on Twitter, she knew someone who did. When she asked David Steen, a wildlife ecologist and snake expert at Auburn University in Alabama, hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Efficiently reading piano musical scores by analyzing geometrical information in musical notes Figure 1: Example of the hypotheses. Credit: University of Electro Communications Musical scores for piano usually have a large number of notes and instructions, such as marks indicating expression, articulation, and accidentals. When pianists sight-read sheet music, they must decode such information instantly and transform it into finger actions and movement. However, it is still not clear how p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gallium nitride processor—next-generation technology for space exploration Credit: ASU A material known as gallium nitride (GaN), poised to become the next semiconductor for power electronics, could be also essential for various space applications. Yuji Zhao, an expert in electrical and computer engineering at Arizona State University (ASU), plans to develop the first-ever processor from gallium nitride, which could revolutionize future space exploration missions. Galli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viewing atomic structures of dopant atoms in 3-D relating to electrical activity in a semiconductor Soft X-rays excite the core level electrons, leading to the emission of photoelectrons from various atoms, whose waves are then scattered by the surrounding atoms. The interference pattern between the scattered and direct photoelectron waves creates the photoelectron hologram, which may then be captured with an electron analyzer. Credit: Nano Letters Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Kwanzaa tholus on CeresWhat is a tholus? A tholus is a type of small mountain. These images show such a feature on dwarf planet Ceres called Kwanzaa Tholus. Kwanzaa, meaning "first fruits" in Swahili, is an African-American festival based on ancient African harvest celebrations, and takes place each year from December 26 to January 1.
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Live Science
Does It Fart? 10 Fascinating Facts About Animal Toots Cows do it. Koalas do it. But birds don’t. Fart, that is. In a new book aptly titled "Does It Fart?", zoologist Dani Rabaiotti and ecologist Nick Caruso catalogue the farting habits of animals across the web of life, with plenty of facts that elicit laughs and gagging. Here are a few of Live Science’s favorite farting facts from the book (to be released in the U.S. on April 3, 2018).
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New Scientist - News
Human or robot? Google’s speech generator makes it hard to tell Another job for machines? Kristina Kohanova/EyeEm/Getty By Nicole Kobie When machines speak, they sound stilted, robotic and mechanical – but they’re getting better. Google’s latest text-to-speech system, called Tacotron 2, generates sounds entirely from scratch , and the search giant claims the results are as good as those built using professional voice artists. Previous systems normally pro
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Science | The Guardian
'You can work your arse off and still not be able to pay bills': your best comments today Discussion today has focused on the continuing stagnation of wages , the story about a Russian satellite that went missing , and the sci-fi, fanstasy and horror films to look forward to in 2018 . To join in you can click on the links in the comments below to expand and add your thoughts. We’ll continue to highlight more comments worth reading as the day goes on. There are many comments under Ben
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Ingeniøren
Hackere kan bruge din telefons egen sensordata til at lure din PIN-kode Forskere har undersøgt, hvordan sensordata fra en smartphone kan bruges til at aflure PIN-koden på din telefon. Gennem seks forskellige sensorer har forskerne kunnet regne PIN-koder ud for Android-telefoner med 99,5 pct. nøjagtighed indenfor tre gæt, skriver Nanyang Technology University i en pressemeddelelse på EurekAlert . Hvilke sensorer er brugt til at finde din PIN-kode : Accelerometer Gyros
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State Medicaid expansions led to more prenatal care for low-income mothers IMAGE: Laura Wherry. view more Credit: UCLA Health FINDINGS The Medicaid expansions for low-income parents that took place in 34 states between 1996 and 2011 led to a 2.3 percent decrease in the uninsured rate among women who already had a child and became pregnant again, and a 7.9 percent decrease in the number of mothers who didn't have insurance while they were pregnant. The expansions a
7h
Ingeniøren
Verdens største containerskib skal sejle på gas Inden 2020 vil verdens største containerskib med plads til 22.000 TEU-containere sejle med gas som brændstof. Da er der gået 20 år siden, at den norske færge Glutra var den første i verden med LNG-motorer. Med 22.000 containere om bord og gasmotorer under dæk, skal et af verdens største rederier vise, at skibe kan krydse alle verdenshave med nedkølet, flydende gas (LNG) som brændstof. Skibet skal
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Ingeniøren
I fremtiden styres fabrikken af dine hjernebølger Verdens første fabrik styret alene ved arbejdernes tankekraft blev indviet i oktober i år. Fabrikken ligger i Schweiz, nærmere bestemt på École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), og har hidtil udelukkende produceret bunkevis af data med hjernebølgeaktivitet. Fabrikken er nemlig et led i et videnskabeligt kunstprojekt, Mental Work, hvor de besøgende sætter maskinerne i gang ved at tænke på
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bundle up: Bitter cold weather takes hold of northern US Rochelle Carlotti, 28, shovels steps near her home after a record snowfall on Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017, in Erie, Pa. The National Weather Service office in Cleveland says Monday's storm brought 34 inches of snow, an all-time daily snowfall record for Erie. (Greg Wohlford/Erie Times-News via AP) Bitter cold weather has taken hold of much of the northern United States and is expected to stay put for
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Science | The Guardian
Top Fossil Discoveries of 2017 | Lost Worlds Revisited The Lost Worlds Revisited team has been reflecting on a bumper twelve months of palaeontological discoveries. Overwhelmed with choice, we also asked on Twitter for other people’s favourite fossil finds of 2017. So here is a combination of those fossiliferous suggestions, alongside some of our personal favourites. Enjoy! First life on earth - Susannah Lydon Some of the smallest fossil finds of 201
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New Scientist - News
Plants use sand armour to break teeth of attacking caterpillars A white-lined sphinx caterpillar ( Hyles lineata ) devours a sand verbena Eric LoPresti By Jake Buehler Some plants may use an odd, yet simple defensive tactic against insect herbivores: sand. New research suggests that some plants use sand grains as an unappetizing and abrasive armour. Psammophorous (“sand-carrying”) plants have sticky surfaces to which sand adheres. The coating was thought
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Viden
Er du med? 5 digitale diller fra 2017 kl. 10.00 Selvom de store teknologifirmaer ynder at bruge ordet revolutionary hver eneste gang, de præsenterer et nyt produkt, så vil 2017 næppe blive husket for at være et teknologi-år med store revolutioner på den forbrugerorienterede gadget-front. Kigger man tilbage, har der dog været nogle tendenser, som indrammer året og den tid, vi går i møde. Vi har udpeget fem af dem. 1. Rammeløse telefon
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Ingeniøren
Podcast-special: Nettet er en kampplads for cyberkrigere Transformator Ingeniørens fredagspodcast sætter strøm til ugens største nyheder inden for teknologi, forskning og naturvidenskab og analyserer de svingninger, der på godt og ondt transformerer verden og vores samfund. Anders Høeg Nissen er vært på Transformator Foto: PodLAB Abonnér på Transformator: Følg i iTunes På mobilen: Søg på Ingeniøren i din podcast-app. På iPhone er podcast-appen indbygge
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Science | The Guardian
I used to think people made rational decisions. But now I know I was wrong | Deborah Orr I t’s been coming on for a while, so I can’t claim any eureka moment. But something did crystallise this year. What I changed my mind about was people. More specifically, I realised that people cannot be relied upon to make rational choices. We would have fixed global warming by now if we were rational. Instead, there’s a stubborn refusal to let go of the idea that environmental degradation is a
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Ingeniøren
Bombardement med store datamængder kan finde sårbarheder i kode Denne artikkel er skrevet til et særtema om softwareudvikling i avisen Ingeniøren. Der er mange måder at teste software på. En automatiseret metode, som blandt andet er populær blandt folk, der søger efter it-sikkerhedshuller i software, kaldes fuzzing. Teknikken går ud på at teste et hav af input-parametre på et stykke software. Input er i denne sammenhæng et vidt begreb. Det kan være alt fra en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Postcard from Pyongyang: The airport now has Wi-Fi, sort of This Dec. 23, 2017, photo shows the Internet corner in the departures lobby of Pyongyang's international airport. Despite being one of the least Internet-friendly countries in the world, North Korea's main Internet provider recently set up an airport WiFi network available to travelers who have cleared customs. Access to WiFi and the Internet in general remains beyond the reach of most North Kore
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Five Most Amazing Things That Were 3-D-Printed This Year Additive manufacturing has been hyped for years . But in 2017 much of its promise materialized: 3-D printing took a series of big steps out of the realm of niche prototyping and into the world of mass manufacturing. Here’s a look at some of the most impressive things 3-D printers made this year, as well as what their creations portend for the future. Running shoes Adidas Through a partnership wit
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New on MIT Technology Review
2017 Was the Year of the ICO—Now What? As 2017 comes to an end, Floyd “Money” Mayweather’s affinity for initial coin offerings is back in the news. Perhaps the world’s most famous boxer, Mayweather promoted no fewer than three ICOs this year , one of which, organized by a company called Centra Tech, is at the center of a new class action lawsuit that claims the offering violated U.S. securities laws. It’s emblematic of how the year tr
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Big Think
Why You Can Miss Things Happening Right in Front of You We may think we’re pretty observant, but most of us suffer from what’s, in effect, a blind spot. It’s not an area of vision we can’t see — it’s just that we tend to miss changes in what we’re looking at and paying attention to. It’s called “change blindness,” and it’s just the way our minds work. The New York Times defined it as “the frequent inability of our visual system to detect alterations t
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Ingeniøren
Næste etape af Letbanen er udsat på ubestemt tid Mens Letbanen endelig er begyndt at fragte passagerer mellem Hovedbanegården og Aarhus Universitetshospital, så er næste strækning, der går mellem Aarhus og Odder, forsinket på ubestemt tid. Aarhus Letbane havde nemlig ikke regnet med at skulle teste strækningen under Trafikstyrelsens regler. De vilkår har de nu accepteret, og kun ‘enkelte’ såkaldte funktionstest mangler. Dem vil Aarhus Letbane d
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK enjoyed 'greenest year for electricity ever' in 2017 Image copyright PA Image caption Wind farms helped the UK experience its first coal-free day since the Industrial Revolution The UK has achieved its greenest year ever in terms of how the nation's electricity is generated, National Grid figures reveal. The rise of renewable energy helped break 13 clean energy records in 2017. In June, for the first time, wind, nuclear and solar power generated mo
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Futurity.org
Laser sensor sniffs out ‘fingerprint’ traces of chemicals A new chemical sensor prototype will be able to detect “single-fingerprint quantities” of chemicals and other substances at a distance of more than 100 feet—and its creators are working to make it the size of a shoebox. “We’ve shown we can make a $10,000 laser that can do everything a $60,000 laser can do.” The device could potentially identify traces of drugs and explosives, as well as speed up
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Futurity.org
How ‘enzyme cascades’ break down sugar in your cells New research describes how enzymes come together to metabolize sugar at the cellular level. For sugars to metabolize and provide energy to the cells, a series of enzymes—biological catalysts—must each, in turn, break down a reactant. In this case, the researchers used glucose, the sugar found in corn syrup and one of the two sugars that result when table sugar—sucrose—breaks down in the body. In
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: In Winter, You Might Wish You Had This Rodent Superpower The new research brings scientists closer to understanding enigmas of hibernation and solving a mystery of how this molecular sensor works. The work also may lead to therapies for allodynia, a nerve condition that causes some people to misperceive something normally not-so-cold as painful. Photo The Syrian hamster, too, can adjust its body temperature to withstand prolonged cold. Credit Arterra/U
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Big Think
‘Let the Soul Dangle’: How Mind-Wandering Spurs Creativity The Renaissance painter Albrecht Dürer was regarded by his friends as a master in the art of mind-wandering. He could become ‘enwrapped’ in his own pleasant reflections, wrote the German humanist Willibald Pirckheimer, at which times Dürer ‘would seem the happiest person on Earth’. Many of us are familiar with mind-wandering in a number of guises: procrastination, reflection, meditation, self-fla
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Futurity.org
Blame this gene mutation for chronic bad breath Researchers have identified a genetic cause for chronic bad breath, also called halitosis. While most cases of bad breath are linked to bacteria growing in the mouth, up to 3 percent of the population have chronic halitosis of no obvious cause. “While we didn’t put our noses up to the mice’s mouths, we did measure high amounts of some of these odor-forming chemicals in their blood… “It’s importan
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NYT > Science
F.D.A. Leaves Tainted Foods on Shelves Too Long, Report Finds About 48 million Americans get sick from food-borne diseases each year, according to the agency. Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die. Food recalls are announced frequently, but the vast majority are voluntary. Sometimes a company comes forward to report contamination, adulteration or mislabeling to the F.D.A. Sometimes the agency approaches a manufacturer after learning of a hazard f
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Popular Science
Puerto Rico’s Arecibo Observatory is up and running, and it just spotted a nearby asteroid It was bigger than anyone thought. When astronomers captured high-resolution images of the near-Earth asteroid 3200 Phaethon earlier this month, one of the first things they noticed was that it outstripped previous estimates for the rocky object’s size, expanding its girth from 3 miles to 3.6 miles. The images were captured using a powerful planetary radar system at the Arecibo Observatory in Pue
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Futurity.org
This planet-eating star consumes its ‘offspring’ A star 550 light years from Earth is slowly consuming its “offspring”—crushing one or more planets in its orbit into vast clouds of gas and dust—according to a new study. The discovery that RZ Piscium—located in the constellation Pisces—is an insatiable “eater of worlds” may shed light on a brief but volatile period in the history of many solar systems, including our own. “We know it’s not uncomm
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Big Think
Human CRISPR Trials Will Happen in 2018. They'll Look Like This. “Every new and hot biomedical technology usually undergoes an inflated expectations phase,” Alexey Bersenev, director of the Advanced Cell Therapy Lab at Yale-New Haven Hospital tells MIT Technology Review . When CRISPR-Cas9 was first introduced in 2014, the sky seemed to be the limit when it came to all the genetic issues it could conceivably repair. As with any potentially life-saving medical b
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Popular Science
Last year in tech: 2017 edition Year-end wrap-ups are the best. We get to sit here in our new holiday pajamas and dish out harsh judgments on everything that happened during the past spin ‘round the sun. Interestingly, though, the end of 2017 doesn’t look all that different from the beginning. Smart home stuff is still popular, social media emotions still fluctuate wildly between “ooh, fun!” and “ooh, scary!” and nobody cares a
19h

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