Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists provide theoretical interpretation to understand chemical reactions Credit: University of New Mexico In a lot of ways, understanding quantum mechanical equations in an effort to predict what will happen between reactants such as atoms and molecules resulting in complex phenomena in chemistry can be exhausting, and mind boggling to many. Yet, without the theoretical insights, experimental chemists would largely be unable to understand what they are observing. Rese
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Viden
Efter Apple-undskyldning: Nyt iPhone-batteri bliver billigere I Danmark sænker Apple prisen for udskiftning af batterier fra 629 kroner til 229 kroner. Det oplyser virksomheden fredag. Det sker, efter at virksomheden er blevet sagsøgt under beskyldninger om bevidst at gøre ældre modeller af iPhones langsommere for at øge salget på nye telefoner. Fem kunder har ifølge nyhedsbureauet AP sagsøgt Apple ved en føderal domstol i Chicago i kølvandet på indrømmelse
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Ingeniøren
Fysikere kaster med 25.000 terninger for at blive klogere på materialers tæthed Forestil dig, at du har 25.000 spilleterninger, som du hælder ned i en stor cylinder. For at få dem til at ordne sig pænt mellem hinanden, må du kun benytte dig af at bevæge cylinderen. Hvordan får man hurtigst terningerne til at opnå den største tæthed? Den opgave har forskere fra det spanske universitet i Navarra sat sig for at løse, for at blive klogere på, hvordan granulære materialer opfører
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Popular Science
WATCH: Bill Nye on science media, politics, and the feature film he wants to make Is Bill Nye ever stressed out that he's known as "The Science Guy?" How was being the subject of a documentary different than other productions with which he's been involved? What project does he want to work on next? We asked Bill all these questions and more in this exclusive conversation. Watch the video (and while you're at it, subscribe to Popular Science on YouTube ) above and/or read Bill'
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Live Science
6 Strange Sites Spotted on Google Earth in 2017Google Earth is an amazing trove of visuals from all over the planet, and new strange things turn up in it all the time. Here are the best from 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whole Foods' wine business replaces Amazon's; WineWoot founder sees an openingAmazon.com's purchase of Whole Foods Market is showing up in the wine category. Amazon has shut down Wine.Woot and its own wine marketplace in favor of Whole Foods expansive wine operation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California company gets FCC approval for at-a-distance device charging Credit: Energous Energous, a San Jose, Calif., company, is the first firm to receive federal approval for a wireless charging system purported to power devices from up to 3 feet away, the company said. The Federal Communications Commission certified the company's "WattUp Mid Field transmitter," which uses radio frequency energy to deliver power from the transmitter to a multitude of device types,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How good is your New Year's bubbly? Listen closely The importance of fizz, more technically known as effervescence, in sparkling wines and champagnes is not to be underestimated—it contributes to the complete sensory experience of a glass, or flute, of fine bubbly. A scientist ...
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The Atlantic
Baker Mayfield Will Not Go Down Quietly Baker Mayfield, the senior quarterback and driving force of the No. 2–ranked Oklahoma Sooners, is both the best and most captivating player in college football. A representative—but by no means singular—display of his flair came back in the second game of the season, when the Sooners traveled east to face an Ohio State Buckeyes team that had beaten them the year before. With his team trailing by
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Senses at the American Museum of Natural History The Senses at the American Museum of Natural History The exhibit at the AMNH is a new and totally fresh look at our sensory systems, with demonstrations that you won’t see elsewhere Visuo-Vestibular Integration Can Be Tricky! In one gallery, visitors discover what happens when our senses disagree: though their feet will feel a flat floor beneath them, their eyes will see walls and a floor that ap
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Science : NPR
No 'Easy Answer' To Growing Number Of Stray Dogs In The U.S., Advocate Says Dogs rescued from floodwater wait to be transferred to a shelter after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas following Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey on Sept. 3, 2017 in Orange, Texas. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images Dogs rescued from floodwater wait to be transferred to a shelter after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas following Hurric
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Inside Science
Why does music make us emotional? Why does music make us emotional? A neuroscientist explains how music is the language of emotion. Why does music make us emotional? Video of Why does music make us emotional? Human Friday, December 29, 2017 - 14:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) -- From a simple, lonely melody to an intricate sonata, sometimes it feels like music can speak directly to your heart, in a language th
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Chilly Days, a Bearskin Parade, Preparations for 2018 People stranded at Disneyland; a spectacular rocket launch in California; polar bears dance for the Pope; violent attacks in Afghanistan and Mexico; a ridiculous amount of snow buries Erie, Pennsylvania; Christmas on an Australian beach; and much more.
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Big Think
How Do You Feel About Being Automatically Tagged in Posted Pix? You have to wonder if this wasn’t a solution in search of a problem. Facebook has just announced that, unless you opt out, they’ll be automatically tagging you any time you appear in someone’s photo so that no one can use your face as their profile picture. (An issue probably only really attractive people have.) “Now, if you’re in a photo and are part of the audience for that post, we’ll notify y
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes in Space-3 successfully identifies unknown microbes in spaceBeing able to identify microbes in real time aboard the International Space Station, without having to send them back to Earth for identification first, would be revolutionary for the world of microbiology and space exploration. The Genes in Space-3 team turned that possibility into a reality this year, when it completed the first-ever sample-to-sequence process entirely aboard the space station.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Streams can be sensorsScientists have shown that streams can be key health indicators of a region's landscape, but the way they're being monitored can be improved.
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Futurity.org
Some of our top stories of 2017 are pretty unsettling On the cusp of the new year, we’re revisiting the five stories from 2017 that most sparked our readers’ curiosity—as well as a few that resurfaced from deep in the archives. Enjoy these hits and have a wonderful 2018! 1. Something big is warping the outer solar system (Credit: Heather Roper/LPL) “According to our calculations, something as massive as Mars would be needed to cause the warp that we
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A phospholipid pathway from plants to parasitesRecent findings may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria, and may help plant scientists one day produce hardier crops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit?Pilot study finds smokers who are willing to use e-cigarettes tend to smoke less and have increased quit attempts, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Berry gives boost to cervical cancer therapyAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 12,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. One of the most common treatments for cervical cancer is radiation. While radiation therapy destroys cancer cells, it also destroys nearby healthy cells. Researchers studied in vitro human cancer cells to show that combining blueberry extract wi
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NYT > Science
Ben Barres, Neuroscientist and Equal-Opportunity Advocate, Dies at 63 “By far,” he wrote, “the main difference that I have noticed is that people who don’t know I am transgendered treat me with much more respect: I can even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.” Dr. Barres (pronounced BARE-ess) was born on Sept. 13, 1954, in West Orange, N.J., with the given name Barbara. “I knew from a very young age — 5 or 6 — that I wanted to be a scienti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Streams can be sensors Scientists at Michigan State University have shown that streams can be key health indicators of a region's landscape, but the way they're being monitored can be improved. Credit: Ben Abbott Scientists at Michigan State University have shown that streams can be key health indicators of a region's landscape, but the way they're being monitored can be improved. New research featured in Ecology Lette
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A phospholipid pathway from plants to parasites 3-D structures of Arabidopsis phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase (PMT) and phosphatidylcholine, with evolutionary relationships of PMT sequences from different organisms. Credit: Soon Goo Lee and Joseph Jez Recent findings by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria, and may help plant scientists
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Chronification of Pain Earlier this year, I wrote about my patient , Andrew, an engineer who developed a heroin habit. An unfortunate series of joint replacements had left Andrew with terrible pain and, when his medication ran out, he turned to heroin. Months after his surgeries—after his tissue and scars had healed—Andrew remained disabled by a deep, biting pain. I recall puzzling over his pain, how it had spread
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Science | The Guardian
Letter: Heinz Wolff’s support for young scientists In 1973 Heinz Wolff was the specialist judge for my school’s team in the first heat of the BBC Young Scientists of the Year competition. Two years previously a consultant at Guy’s hospital in London had asked our school if we could assist children with cerebral palsy; they wore out their shoes very quickly due to the manner in which they walked. We researched materials and eventually produced an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Berry gives boost to cervical cancer therapy IMAGE: This is Yujiang Fang, M.D., Ph.D., a visiting professor at the MU School of Medicine. view more Credit: University of Missouri School of Medicine According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 12,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. One of the most common treatments for cervical cancer is radiation. While radiation t
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Popular Science
Five rad and random food gifts I found this week My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are useful or fun or ridiculously cheap. Often times, these choices coalesce into a guide of like items—for example, Apple Watch accessories that are worth your time , items to elevate your binge watching , or kits and gadgets that encourage your kids to be more creative . But I often stumble across s
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The Atlantic
Innovations in Conservation, From the East Coast to the West and in Between This continues our weeklong series on steps that individuals—both the hugely wealthy and those of ordinary means—and communities of any size in every part of the world, can take to protect the environment, at a time when national policy in the United States is headed the other way. The series began with news of a $165 million gift for preservation of coastal land in California, and followed with
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The Atlantic
9 Charts That Show What Education in America Is Like in 2017 As trends in education ebb and flow, it gets hard to keep track of the current state of things. Visuals can clarify what’s changed over the past year and what has stayed the same. As 2017 comes to a close, we’ve compiled some graphs and charts that help contextualize the year in education issues. * * * College Access Courtesy of Raj Chetty and the Equality Opportunity Project (from Mobility Repor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit? IMAGE: Matthew Carpenter is the co-director of the Tobacco Research Program at the Hollings Cancer Center. view more Credit: Sarah Pack/Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC As e-cigarettes become more popular, fewer people are taking up smoking traditional cigarettes. But can e-cigarettes, an electronic nicotine delivery system, help people quit smoking altogether? That was the focus of a recent st
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New Scientist - News
2018 preview: Last chance for new physics at the LHC for years Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images By Leah Crane Stay on the edge of your seat. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will keep smashing particles until the end of 2018, although this will be our last chance for a while to see a new particle emerge from the cloud of collisions. A year from now, the atom smasher will shut down for two years of upgrades. With the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, the
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Live Science
'Vast Majority' of Online Anti-Vaxxers Are Women The "vast majority" of people commenting, sharing and liking anti-vaccination information on Facebook are women, a new study finds. Researchers dug into the world of anti-vaccination people — better known as anti-vaxxers — by looking at data from six of the largest, public anti-vaxxer pages on Facebook. By analyzing two years' worth of data from these pages, the researchers determined that
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New on MIT Technology Review
Data Mining Reveals Historical Events in Government Archive Records The study of political history is undergoing a revolution. The driving force behind this change is the availability of electronic records of government activity and the ability to number-crunch this data in ways that have never before been possible. Historians have immediate access to contemporary news reports of important world events. But these reports need to be calibrated by comparing them to
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Blog » Languages » English
Summer vs. Winter: Winter Wins! It was a well fought battle but in the end there could only be one winner. Winter prevailed this time around. Enjoy your snowball fights and hot cocoa! Leaderboard:
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Science : NPR
Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption David Silverman/Getty Images Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images You might not suspect that the success of the emerging field of precision medicine
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Scientific American Content: Global
Do Women Want to Be Oppressed? In principle, evolutionary psychology, which seeks to understand our behavior in light of the fact that we are products of natural selection, can give us deep insights into ourselves. In practice, the field often reinforces insidious prejudices. That was the theme of my recent column “ Darwin Was Sexist, and So Are Many Modern Scientists .” The column provoked such intense pushback that I dec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A phospholipid pathway from plants to parasites IMAGE: These are 3-D structures of Arabidopsis phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase (PMT) and phosphatidylcholine, with evolutionary relationships of PMT sequences from different organisms. view more Credit: Soon Goo Lee and Joseph Jez Recent findings by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria,
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The Atlantic
Black Mirror: 'Arkangel' Mines the Horror of Helicopter Parenting Sophie Gilbert and David Sims will be discussing the new season of Netflix’s Black Mirror , considering alternate episodes. The reviews contain spoilers; don’t read further than you’ve watched. See all of their coverage here . David, I loved “USS Callister”—it’s my favorite of all the new episodes. You’re smart to observe how it starts with this mopey cliché of a lonely coder, encouraging you to
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Scientific American Content: Global
Rebuilding Science Education in Puerto Rico This past September, back-to-back hurricanes devastated Puerto Rico. The archipelago had already been struggling with a decade-long economic recession, fragile infrastructure and floundering institutions. Irma and Maria plunged Puerto Rico into an even deeper crisis. But could these natural disasters create once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for change? Many with whom I work and collaborate bel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Streams can be sensors EAST LANSING, Mich. - Scientists at Michigan State University have shown that streams can be key health indicators of a region's landscape, but the way they're being monitored can be improved. New research featured in Ecology Letters showcases how streams can be used as sensors to diagnose a watershed's sensitivity or resiliency to changes in land use practices, including the long-term use
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Selenium protects a specific type of interneurons in the brainExactly 200 years after the discovery of the trace element selenium, researchers have shown for the first time why this chemical element is indispensable for mammalian life. As integral part of the enzyme GPX4, selenium protects a subset of neurons from cell death during postnatal development.
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Futurity.org
People with sense of purpose tend to do healthy stuff People who have a sense of purpose in their life tend to make healthier lifestyle choices and report feeling better about their own health status, according to a new study. “Our analysis found that participants’ sense of purpose was positively associated with their reports of both vigorous and moderate activity, vegetable intake, flossing, and sleep quality,” says the study’s lead author Patrick
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NYT > Science
Out There: U.F.O.s: Is This All There Is? For a minimum of $200, you can join and help finance their research into how U.F.O.s do whatever it is they do, as well as telepathy and “a point-to-point transportation craft that will erase the current travel limits of distance and time” by using a drive that “alters the space-time metric” — that is, a warp drive going faster than the speed of light, Einstein’s old cosmic speed limit. “We belie
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Ingeniøren
Afrikanske bønder drømmer om et bioolieeventyr Overalt i Kenya vokser der crotontræer, og antallet af dem øges måske markant i de kommende år med mange små lunde eller små skove. Træernes nødder kan nemlig være med til at skaffe mad på bordet hos bønderne i det østafrikanske land, for nødderne indeholder meget olie, der kan anvendes til biobrændstof. Så hvis man kan skaffe penge til en egentlig trædyrkning og produktionsanlæg, kan det komme t
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Live Science
Full Wolf Moon: New Year's Supermoon Is the Biggest of the Year New Year's Day is a time for resolutions and hangovers, but this year, it also provides a chance to see the moon in all its glory. The first day of 2018 brings a "Full Wolf Moon" — the biggest of two supermoons that will rise in January. Skywatchers, take note! On Jan. 1, 2018, Earth will be closest to the moon at 4:54 p.m. EST (2154 GMT), according to EarthSky.org . The moon will be fu
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Futurity.org
Electrical stimulation to amygdala can boost memory New findings are the first example of electrical brain stimulation in humans giving a time-specific boost to memory lasting more than a few minutes, the scientists say. Direct electrical stimulation of the human amygdala, a region of the brain known to regulate memory and emotional behaviors, can enhance next-day recognition of images when applied immediately after viewing the images, report the
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Live Science
Does Pure Water Exist? It seems like so-called pure water is very important to people. Bottled-spring-water brands put the word "pure" before "fresh" and "clean" in their advertisements. Water-purifier companies make billions of dollars all over the world promising to cut anything but H2O out of tap water. There's even a whole branch of alternative medicine built on imagined, seemingly magical properties of superpure w
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The Atlantic
Black Mirror's 'USS Callister' Is Much More Than a Star Trek Parody Sophie Gilbert and David Sims will be discussing the new season of Netflix’s Black Mirror , considering alternate episodes. The reviews contain spoilers; don’t read further than you’ve watched. See all of their coverage here . When Black Mirror ’s third season premiered in late 2016, it began with “ Nosedive ,” a wrenchingly comical episode about the horrors of a connected world, where every inte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ebola virus inhibitedThe incurable Ebola virus has long been feared due to its high mortality rate and danger of infection. Now researchers have succeeded in inhibiting the virus in cell cultures. The researchers hope to be able to continue doing animal testing and developing an actual drug.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unlocking the mystery of pollen tube guidancePollen tube guidance towards the ovule is an important step for fertilization in flowering plants. In order for this to happen, a pollen tube attractant peptide LURE guides the pollen tube precisely to the ovule. Plant biologists have succeeded in analyzing for the first time, the crystal structure of LURE bound to its receptor protein PRK6.
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Futurity.org
Smartphones let docs remotely monitor chemo patients Doctors can monitor the status cancer patients receiving chemotherapy using the sensors in smartphones and an algorithm that detects worsening symptoms based on objective changes in patient behavior, according to a new study. The findings indicate that worsening symptoms during cancer treatments can be detected using smartphones that patients likely already own and use. Real-time estimation of sy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Selenium protects a specific type of interneurons in the brain IMAGE: Selenium protects a specific type of interneurons in the brain. view more Credit: Source: Ingold et al., Cell , 2017 Exactly 200 years ago, the Swedish scientist Jöns Jacob Berzelius discovered the trace element selenium, which he named after the goddess of the moon, Selene. Besides its industrial applications (chemical industry, production of semiconductors and toners), selenium is an
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The Most-read WIRED Security Stories of 2017 Back in July, WIRED security writer Lily Hay Newman assessed the year in hacks and breaches and found, "the first six months of 2017 have seen an inordinate number of cybersecurity meltdowns. And they weren't just your standard corporate breaches. It's only July, and already there's been viral, state-sponsored ransomware, leaks of spy tools from US intelligence agencies, and full-on campaign hack
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Living on Ice | Antarctica 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR See Every Discovery TRVLR Episode: https://goo.gl/GNWKNE Hike with Sam Beaugey, a polar explorer and world-renowned mountaineer from the French Alps, as he returns for his 8th year to Antarctica. Sam recounts his death defying experiences including summiting some of the most dangerous icy climbs in white out conditions. Watch as he navigates the harsh terrain of this legendary continent in search
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The Atlantic
The Places That May Never Recover From the Recession HEMET, California—Many cities across America are doing better today than they were before the recession. This is not one of them. A decade after the start of the Great Recession, it struggles with pervasive crime and poverty. “We’re still recovering—we were really hit hard on all levels,” Linda Krupa, the mayor of Hemet, told me. A fifth of the population lives below the poverty line, up from 13
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Live Science
10 Ways to Cheat a HangoverFrom drinking clear drinks to taking ancient herbal remedies, there are several ways to avoid a hangover after New Year's revelry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel MOF shell-derived surface modification of Li-rich layered oxide cathode IMAGE: This is a schematic illustration of LLO@C&NiCo; Cycling performance and the corresponding Coulombic efficiencies tested at current densities of 0.4 C; SAED patterns of LLO and LLO@C&NiCo after 50 cycles... view more Credit: ©Science China Press Rapid development of portable electronics and electric vehicles requires lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) to have high energy/power density, low co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales IMAGE: This is a SPECIAL TOPIC: Past human-environmental interaction. view more Credit: ©Science China Press Many famous ancient civilizations such as ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Maya, Angkor, Han and Tang Dynasties in ancient China, had emerged and flourished in different parts of the world, while these highly developed civilizations in prehistoric and historical periods eventually declined,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unlocking the mystery of pollen tube guidance IMAGE: The LURE peptide, which is secreted by the synergid cells within the ovule acts as a key to bind to the lock, which is the PRK6 receptor found on the... view more Credit: ITbM, Nagoya University Pollen tube guidance towards the ovule is an important step for fertilization in flowering plants. In order for this to happen, a pollen tube attractant peptide LURE guides the poll
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers inhibit ebola virus A single enzyme. That is all the researchers behind a new study need to manipulate to prevent the feared Ebola virus from spreading. Because with the enzyme they also take away the virus' ability to copy itself and thus produce more virus particles and more infection. The study has been published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell and was conducted by researchers from the University of Co
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Ingeniøren
Nu kan astronauter selv analysere ukendte mikroorganismer i rummet Når mennesket i fremtiden rejser længere ud i rummet, handler det især om at finde tegn på DNA-baseret liv. Selv om man i teorien kunne forestille sig synligt liv, så vil det formentlig være mikrobiologisk liv, man skal lede efter. Og der er astronauterne på stedet nødt til at kunne analysere prøver i stedet for at vente flere år på, at mikroorganismer fysisk bliver sendt hjem til Jorden og under
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The Atlantic
The Best Books We Missed in 2017 Editor’s Note: Find all of The Atlantic ’s “Best of 2017” coverage here . “So many worthy books, so little space.” I type those words all too often, and my colleagues on The Atlantic ’s digital side, Jane Yong Kim and Sophie Gilbert, and I have now made a tradition of lamenting that predicament every year as the list-making season arrives. Working both online and in print, as we do, we really sho
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New Scientist - News
Your body fat may be protecting you against infections Fat may be an immune organ iStock/Getty Images Plus Did you pile on the pounds this Christmas? At least you can take some comfort in the fact that not all fat is bad. Evidence in mice and monkeys suggests it is important for storing important immune cells and may even make them more effective at fighting infection. Yasmine Belkaid at the US National Institutes of Health and her team have foun
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2017's Best Moments in Music, From Cardi B to Lady Gaga If Baby Driver taught folks anything this year, it's that finding just the right song at just the right moment is like kismet. You can't predict it, but when it happens you have to let it wash over you. Typically these jolts of joy occur to individuals listening alone, but every so often they happen to the public at large. Maybe it's a music cue in a movie, maybe it's Lady Gaga premiering a new t
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Physics Found Gravitational Waves. Now Come the Existential Questions On September 14, 2015, at 3:50 AM Central time, a tiny vibration shuddered down the 2.5-mile-long arms of a massive machine in Livingston, Louisiana. A fraction of a second later, a similar vibration shook the arms of an identical machine in Hanford, Washington. Eventually, physicists from those facilities confirmed the nature of those twinned tremors : After a century of work, they’d finally see
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5 Tips and Tricks For Your Xbox One Microsoft's Xbox One isn't the most popular gaming console, but it's still as relevant as ever. If you're new to the Xbox, there are plenty of awesome features you might not know exist. That's why we've put together this list of tips to help you get the most from your gaming system. Plug It In Since the Xbox is, underneath it all, a Microsoft-made computer, it has some features similar to a norma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts try to keep Georgia O'Keeffe paintings from fading In this Feb. 3, 2015 photo provided by the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Dale Kronkright, head of conservation at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, reviews imaging data of an oil painting in Santa Fe, N.M. Chemical changes are gradually darkening many of Georgia O'Keeffe's famously vibrant paintings. Art conservation experts in Santa Fe and Chicago plan to use advanced imaging technology to detect the buil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Methane still leaking from the ground at site of gas explosion decades ago Ball and stick model of methane. Credit: Ben Mills/Public Domain A team with members from several institutions in the Netherlands has found that the area around a site where a gas explosion occurred in 1965 is still emitting methane gas from the ground into the air. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the group describes their study of the area and the de
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Top 7 Climate Findings of 2017 As the potential effects of climate change are seen around the world - from starving polar bears to record-breaking storms - interest in climate science is soaring. Scientists are digging into the "how," "why" and "what's next" of global temperatures, melting ice, emission sources and sinks, changing weather patterns, and rising seas. The last year has seen major breakthroughs and advancement
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dinosaurs of a Feather The social lives of prehistoric dinosaurs are almost entirely unknown to us. It’s not for lack of trying. It’s just that bones can only take us so far. Take ornaments, for example. A crest, spike, plate, or horn could be a signal of, well, something, but precisely what generates more debate than consensus. Is that particular arrangement of horns supposed to attract mates, intimidate rivals, s
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Futurity.org
Poor health more likely for babies born near fracking Babies born to mothers living up to about 2 miles from a hydraulic fracturing site suffer from poorer health, new research indicates. The largest impacts were to babies born within about a half mile of a site, with those babies being 25 percent more likely to be born at a low birth weight—leaving them with a greater risk of infant mortality, ADHD, asthma, lower test scores, lower schooling attain
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: 11 Best Science PodcastsLong road trip over the holidays? Endless pipetting at the bench? Here's how to keep your brain occupied.
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Big Think
Why Life Seems to Speed Up over Time, and How to Slow It Down Again When you are young, time often passes quite slowly. Each birthday is a monumental occasion. Long lazy summers seem to never end. We remember trying to make the clock hands move faster with our minds as we sat bored in class. But as we grow older, life seems to speed up. Birthdays aren’t as big a deal. You’d almost rather not even notice them as you feel like you're barreling towards old age. Why
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Live Science
An Anthropologist Explains Why We Love Holiday Rituals and Traditions This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. The mere thought of holiday traditions brings smiles to most people's faces and elicits feelings of sweet anticipation and nostalgia. We can almost smell those candles, taste those special meals, hear those familiar songs in our minds. Rit
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Futurity.org
Quasar at edge of cosmic dawn is most distant yet Astronomers have discovered the most distant quasar ever known. Supermassive black holes lurk at the centers of many galaxies. While some—like the black hole at the center of our own Milky Way—live quiet lives, occasionally snacking on a star or two, others feed voraciously, consuming gas and stars and growing rapidly in mass. To understand when supermassive black holes first appeared, astronomer
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Science-Based Medicine
Snake-Based Medicine?: Another Salmonella Infection Linked to Rattlesnake Pills This website has been around for about a decade now, and we have covered a wide variety of pseudoscience and quackery. So I was surprised, and just a bit delighted, to actually come across something that had never been discussed before on SBM: rattlesnake pills. Well, technically Mark Crislip mentioned it very briefly back in April. Just let me have this one, okay? Rattlesnake pills? The ingestio
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Viden
Sådan kom børnegadget fyldt med sikkerhedshuller på hylderne i Danmark En ny type simple, men smarte ure til børn er kommet på markedet i løbet af 2017. Urene skal gøre det mere trygt og sikkert at være forælder i fremtiden. Urene har en GPS-funktion og en indbygget telefon, som kan parres med forældrenes smartphone. På den måde kan man altid kan se, hvor ens barn befinder sig befinder sig, ligesom man kan sende beskeder og ringe til uret. Men løftet om tryghed kom
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How Snapchat's Dancing Hot Dog Taught the Internet to Love AR The first sighting of the dancing hot dog in the wild happened in June. By the Fourth of July, it had made its way around the world, breakdancing at bars and barbecues, at weddings and bar mitzvahs. It turned otherwise banal videos of the grocery store into cinematic masterpieces starring the hot dog, surmounting the refrigerated Oscar Mayers like a pile of carnage. Over all, the dancing hot dog—
8h
Live Science
The 8 Biggest Happiness Findings of 2017 For young children, sharing can bring happiness, but only if they do it voluntarily, a study from China suggests. The study looked at groups of 3- and 5-year-olds who were either pressured to share objects — in this case, stickers — or were given the opportunity to share voluntarily. The researchers found, judging by facial expressions, that the kids were happier when they shared voluntarily
9h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan konstruerer man isolatorer på højspændingsmaster? Vores læser Jens Aage Bjørkøe spørger: Hvordan er isolatorerne på højspændingsmaster konstrueret? De skal jo både være enormt stærke for at bære ledningerne og have stor isolationsevne. Hvordan forenes det i konstruktionen? Figur 1 - tværsnit af cap and pin-isolator. Foto: Energinet.dk Pressechef Jesper Nørskov Rasmussen og hans stærkstrømskolleger i afdelingen for Ledningsanlæg i Energinet.dk, s
9h
Ingeniøren
Første stof sendt på markedet, der erstatter defekte gener Den amerikanske læge- og levnedsmiddelstyrelse FDA har for første gang godkendt brugen af et stof, der korrigerer en arvelig øjensygdom. Stoffet hedder Luxturna (voretigene neparvovec-rzyl) og har vist sig af afhjælpe de typer af medfødt nethindesvind, Lebers kongenitte amaurose, og retinitis pigmentosa, som er forårsaget af en mutation i begge kopier af RPE65-genet . Mutationen viser sig ofte ve
9h
Science | The Guardian
The evidence keeps piling up: e-cigarettes are definitely safer than smoking Search for the term ‘vaping’ online and you’d be forgiven for thinking that it is an activity fraught with risks. The top stories relate to health problems, explosions and that vaping leads to smoking in teenagers. For the average smoker seeking information on vaping, a quick internet search offers little reassurance. Might as well continue smoking, the headlines imply, if these products are so d
9h
Science | The Guardian
The experts’ guide to making – and keeping – your New Year resolutions Making a New Year resolution … • Don’t think of it as a New Year resolution, says Charles Duhigg, the author of The Power of Habit – think of it as a new year plan. “Much more important than setting a far off goal, like running a marathon, is to set an immediate plan that you can start right away.” Start with baby steps – running half a mile every Monday morning, for example – and you can work up
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Watch our most-viewed videos of 2017 In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Cryptojacking Has Gotten Out of Control Cryptojacking, which exploded in popularity this fall , has an ostensibly worthy goal: Use an untapped resource to create an alternative revenue stream for games or media sites, and reduce reliance on ads. It works by embedding a JavaScript component in a website that can leverage a visiting device's processing power to mine a cryptocurrency (usually Monero ). Each visitor might only do a tiny bi
9h
The Atlantic
The Futility of College Interviews The prospective student on the other end of the phone was frantic and desperate. She had already called my alma mater’s admissions office at least twice and seemed to know what I was going to say before I started my sentence. The student was ineligible for the optional alumni interviews offered to most applicants, and she was ostensibly aware that this last-ditch effort was unlikely to change the
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Airplane Design Could Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Airplane emissions are a big problem for the climate—and steadily rising. If the aviation sector were a country, it would rank seventh worldwide in carbon pollution. Experts predict that aircraft emissions, on their current trajectory, will triple by 2050 as demand for flights increases. To prevent this dire scenario, a team of scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, along with g
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient jumping genes may give corals a new lease on life Symbiodinium microadraticum is a unicellular alga that provides its coral host with photosynthetic products in return for nutrients and shelter. Credit: Jit Ern Chen A particular gene is shown by KAUST researchers to help the heat tolerance of an alga that lives symbiotically with coral, which could potentially help Red Sea corals adapt to some warming. Symbiodinium is a unicellular alga that pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI is learning from our encounters with nature – and that's a concern In the Global Biodiversity Information Facility there are 682,447 records of human encounters with dandelions. Credit: www.shutterstock.com The idea seems wonderful—a phone app that allows you to take a photo of a plant or animal and receive immediate species identification and other information about it. A " Shazam for nature" so to speak. We are building huge repositories of data related to our
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The day zero was banned from British roulette – how times have changed Feeling lucky? Credit: Stuart-Buchanan, CC BY-SA On December 30, 1967, senior detectives from Scotland Yard sent owners of gambling clubs into a proverbial spin. Anyone operating a roulette wheel that contained the number zero would be prosecuted, they warned. From now on the whirl of numbers would all be reds and blacks – starting with the number one. This warning 50 years ago followed a judgmen
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The diet that helps fight climate change For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains may be linked to having less disability and fewer symptoms than people whose diet is less healthy, according to a study ...
11h
Ingeniøren
Algevækst accelerer afsmeltningen i Grønland Alger er en større trussel for Grønlandsisen end støv og sod, viser et nyt studie, publiceret i Geophysical Research Letters . Albedoen, som er måleenheden for refleksion af lys, har vist sig at falde betragteligt, hvor der ligger alger, fordi disse mørke pletter absorberer mere af Solens energi - og det altså i langt højere grad, end vi kan give støv og sod skyld for, lyder konklusionen. Faktisk
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BBC News - Science & Environment
World first for dog's broken legA new treatment that has saved a dog's broken leg is to be tried on humans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Droughts and ecosystems are determined by the interaction of two climate phenomena Pine forest. Credit: Asier Herrero / UPV/EHU What is causing the droughts that the Iberian Peninsula regularly endures? Why are the winters sometimes mild and rainy and other times cold and dry or cold and damp? Is climate change of anthropogenic origin exerting an influence on these processes? How are these cycles affecting the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems? And finally, can these cycle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The wave power farm off Mutriku could improve its efficiency Gabriel Ibarra in his office at the university. On the computer a picture of Mutriku. Credit: Mitxi / UPV/EHU The study by the UPV/EHU's EOLO (Meteorology, Climate and Environment) research group reveals that the technology used at the farm off Mutriku—a global pioneer in generating wave power—needs to improve its output to be on a par with the values of other renewable energy sources, and to fac
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carving out circuits that click into place A strategy for assembly of electronic systems-especially the flexible structures needed for high-performance devices of the future-uses integrated circuits as Lego-like building blocks. "This plug-and-play approach is absolutely disruptive," says Ph.D. candidate Sohail Shaikh from KAUST: this unique method of assembly creates completely new options for manufacturing processes of these systems. Ex
11h
Ingeniøren
Styrelse: Masse-nulstilling af passwords i statslige systemer var planlagt Moderniseringsstyrelsen valgte onsdag at nulstille samtlige passwords til brugere og systembrugere til en række statslige it-systemer. Indtil videre har styrelsen udelukkende forklaret, at manøvren skete af sikkerhedshensyn. Nu fortæller styrelsens vicedirektør Maria Damborg Hald til Version2, at øvelsen var planlagt. Version2 har bedt om et interview med Moderniseringsstyrelsen. Den forespørgsel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple apologizes for slowing iPhones, offers discounted batteries Credit: CC0 Public Domain Apple on Thursday apologized to its customers for slowing down performance of older iPhone models and said it would discount replacement batteries for some of its handsets. The move by Apple responded to an uproar from iPhone users—and a series of lawsuits—after news of the battery problems stoked concerns the company was unfairly nudging consumers to upgrade. "We know
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia restores contact with Angolan satelliteRussian specialists on Friday said they have restored communication with Angosat-1, the first national satellite it launched for Angola, days after they lost contact with it.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will we get a sad poop emoji? Well, there's a process In this Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, photo, author Jennifer 8. Lee holds an image of a dumpling emoji while posing for photos before eating lunch at Dumpling Time restaurant in San Francisco. Thanks largely to Lee's efforts, the dumpling emoji was added to the Unicode Standard this year after almost two years of research, meetings, and a written, illustrated proposal that reads a bit like an academi
12h
Ingeniøren
Friske, gratis sattelitfotos åbner et væld af nye muligheder Det er ikke en svær opgave for DMI’s eksperter at skelne hav fra is på et satellitfoto. Det er heller ikke raket­videnskab at tælle biler og beregne belægningsprocenten på en parkeringsplads. Men at gøre begge dele dagligt kan hurtigt blive en omfattende opgave. Derfor bliver den slags analyser i disse år langsomt, men sikkert flyttet fra menneskehænder til vores hurtigere og mere tålmodige hjælp
13h
Ingeniøren
NASA: Vi gør klar til første besøg på exoplaneter I 2069, når Apollo 11-missionen fylder 100 år, vil NASA sende en sonde mod en exoplanet for at lede efter liv på nærmeste hold. Det skriver New Scientist , som har været til American Geophysical Unions konference i USA, hvor ideerne fra NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) blev præsenteret. Optimistisk har en lille JPL-gruppe sat sig til skrivebordet for at regne ud, hvordan de kan sende en sonde
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Gardens under threat from 'game changing' plant disease Image copyright EPPO Image caption The pest has infected thousands of hectares of olive plantations in Italy A pest that can infect plants from lavender to cherry trees is of real and growing concern in the UK, say experts. Outbreaks of Xylella fastidiosa have caused widespread problems in Europe, wiping out entire olive groves. The Royal Horticultural Society says the disease could arrive in the
13h
Science | The Guardian
Hard-hitting new advert urges smokers to quit Smokers are being urged to quit in the new year by a government advertising campaign highlighting how toxic chemicals from cigarettes spread rapidly through the body. The 20 second advert features a lone man lighting up outside a building, with the blood vessels in his arms, face and hands quickly turning black as chemicals from the cigarette tar enter his body. “Every cigarette you smoke causes
14h
Viden
Sådan overlever du årets første tømmermænd Kroppen er slatten, kvalmen presser på, og hovedet er ved at eksplodere. Nytårsaften er for mange en god undskyldning for at drikke sig fuld og få en ordentlig brandert på. Og det kan ende med bankende tømmermænd dagen derpå. Hvorfor får du ondt i hovedet? Selve hjernen er faktisk ikke smertefølsom. Men det er hinderne, der omgiver hjernen, til gengæld. Inde i kraniet bader hjernen i hjernevæske.
15h
Science | The Guardian
How to stop catastrophising – an expert’s guide L et us start by considering why some people catastrophise – that is, on hearing uncertain news, they imagine the worst possible outcome. After all, it is not uncommon and those who catastrophise seem to do it a lot. Catastrophisers tend to be fairly anxious people. Whether this characteristic is principally genetic or more the result of learning is unknown. High levels of anxiety are extremely u
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
2017: The Year AI Floated into the Cloud Cloud computing is already a huge business, and competition is stiff. But this year, tech firms opened a new front in the battle to win users over in the cloud: the large-scale introduction of cloud-based AI. For small and medium-size companies, building AI-capable systems at scale can be prohibitively expensive, largely because training algorithms takes a lot of computing power. Enter the likes
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Best Online Classes for Job Skills In 2017, people flocked to online classes about artificial intelligence, cryptocurrency, and data analytics. In 2018, expect more of the same, say leading online-education providers Codecademy , Coursera , edX , and Udacity . In response to a request from MIT Technology Review , they calculated their most popular courses of the past year and revealed which topics they think will lure the most stu
17h
Ingeniøren
Fleksible elpriser åbner muligheder for mini-kraftvarmeværker De fleste betragter nok fleks-afregning af strøm som noget, man lige skal vænne sig til, men ikke virksomheden EC Power fra Hinnerup ved Aarhus. Her er man helt klar på, at fleksible tariffer og elpriser – samt måske med tiden også fleksible elafgifter – kan åbne for nye forretningsmodeller for virksomheden i Danmark. EC Power fabrikerer naturgasfyrede mini-kraftvarmeværker med en el-effekt melle
17h
Ingeniøren
Sådan scorer du job på LinkedIn Over halvdelen af medlemmerne i IDA får job gennem deres netværk eller LinkedIn. Jobsøgere skal derfor lære at bruge de digitale værktøjer til at øge deres muligheder for at finde arbejde. Særligt LinkedIn har givet et bredt udvalg af nye tilgange til jobsøgningen, men hvordan bruger man egentligt netværkssiden til at få et job? Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Jobfinde
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Baby Bats Can Learn Different Dialects Bats are sophisticated communicators. And not just when they’re in vampire form. New research finds that Egyptian fruit bats actually have regional dialects, depending on the bat chatter that surrounds them as they grow up. The study is in the journal PLOS Biology . [Yosef Prat et al, Crowd vocal learning induces vocal dialects in bats: Playback of conspecifics shapes fundamental frequency usage
18h
Big Think
What’s Behind California’s Apocalyptic, Brutal Wildfires? These things tend to result from an unpredictable stew of underlying conditions, natural and man-made factors, weather, and just plain bad luck. Even just the weather part of it is complicated — with moving air, temperature, and moisture coming together just so to create a beautiful sunny day, or as in California in December 2017, to set the stage for wildfires from Hell. To look for a single cau
20h
Big Think
The Biggest Health Queries of 2017, Revealed by Google Search Data While 2017 will go down as a seemingly anti-science year in American politics, scientists and researchers are telling a different story. While legislators were banning words from agency reports and politicians continue to deny the validity of climate change, real progress was being done in labs and in the field. The boomerang from the cult of science denial has been more, more, and more science
20h
NeuWrite San Diego
Machines Comparing Circuitry (or, Understanding Our Uniquely Human Brain) Machines Comparing Circuitry (or, Understanding Our Uniquely Human Brain) Posted by megkirch on December 28, 2017 in Evolution , genetics , Neuroscience , Uncategorized | Leave a comment I became fascinated by the brain because I was – and continue to be – fascinated by humans. Why are we so obsessed with other people’s lives, including (sometimes especially) those whom we’ve never met? How are w
21h
Futurity.org
Higher uterine fibroid risk for black women with this hair loss African-American women with a common form of hair loss have a significantly increased chance of developing uterine fibroids, a study finds. The researchers say doctors should tell women with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia they may be at increased risk for fibroids and should undergo screening, particularly if they have symptoms such as heavy bleeding and pain. The study, published in JA
21h
Futurity.org
Book: Americans are no more polarized than pre-Reagan Despite widespread perceptions of rising political polarization in the United States, the American public is no more polarized than it was before the Reagan era, says political scientist Morris Fiorina. Fiorina, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution who studies elections and public opinion is the author of a new book, Unstable Majorities: Polarization, Party Sorting and Political Stalemate (H
22h
Futurity.org
Sleepless nights let Alzheimer’s protein build up in brain Sleep deprivation can lead the brain to produce more of the Alzheimer’s-linked protein amyloid beta than the its waste-disposal system can handle, according to a small study. “Understanding how lack of sleep relates to the concentrations of amyloid beta in the brain will help direct future research into therapeutics…” Levels of the protein rise, potentially setting off a sequence of changes to th
22h
Big Think
How We Learn to Read Another’s Mind by Looking into Their Eyes Eyes play a prominent role in our daily social encounters and are sometimes metaphorically referred to as windows to our souls. There now is compelling evidence to support the notion that much information about another person’s mind can be gleaned from his or her eyes. In one proof of concept, the Reading the Mind in the Eye Test (RMET), developed by Simon Baron-Cohen and his group at Cambridge U
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Scott Bakula Leaps Into The Cash Cab Cash Cab | Sundays 10p Cash Cab surprises an unsuspecting couple with celebrity guest Scott Bakula. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/cash-cab/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudesA survey of residents near two major national parks in Panama indicates that jaguars deserve increased protection. But because most residents still support road-building in the parks, the survey team recommends further education to emphasize the connection between healthy ecosystems and jaguar survival.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest firesCharcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Defect in zinc supply mechanism affects pathology of intractable pulmonary diseasesResearchers revealed that abnormal delivery of zinc to lung cells contributes to obstructive pulmonary diseases. They further showed that mRNA splicing abnormalities are involved in the detailed mechanism. So far, the importance of zinc in the lung has only been understood from a nutritional aspect. This discovery is thought to be the first to clarify zinc's effects on the regulation of mRNA ligat
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New patch aims to turn energy-storing fats into energy-burning fatsA new approach to reducing bulging tummy fats has shown promise in laboratory trials. It combines a new way to deliver drugs, via a micro-needle patch, with drugs that are known to turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Double strike against tuberculosisIn search of new strategies against life-threatening tuberculosis infections, scientists have found a new ally. They discovered a substance that interferes with the mycomembrane formation of the bacterium. It is effective even in low concentrations and when combined with known antibiotics their effectiveness is improved by up to 100-fold.
23h
Popular Science
How to stop hackers from rickrolling your smart speaker The future is now: Prank-happy hackers can apparently crack into smart speakers to cue up songs and spooky sounds . The vulnerability, identified by security firm Trend Micro in a new case study , exposes user data like device names and email addresses associated with streaming-music services—just enough info to allow for targeted earworm attacks. Disturbingly, the researchers needed only basic I
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want to beat antibiotic-resistant superbugs? Rethink that strep throat remedy Got a sore throat? The doctor may write a quick prescription for penicillin or amoxicillin, and with the stroke of a pen, help diminish public health and your own future health by helping bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics. It's time to develop alternatives to antibiotics for small infections, according to a new paper by scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and to do so quick
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statistical test relates pathogen mutation to infectious disease progressionNucleic acid sequencing methods, which determine the order of nucleotides in DNA, are rapidly progressing. These processes yield large quantities of sequence data that helps researchers understand organism function. Sequencing also benefits epidemiological studies, such as the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic and/or contagious diseases. Researchers have now developed an inductiv
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study: High-stakes tests a likely factor in STEM performance gapMale students tend to do better on high-stakes tests in biology courses, but it's not because they are better students. Gaps in performance change based on the stakes of the test. A new study confirms this, finding that performance gaps between male and female students increased or decreased based on whether instructors emphasized or de-emphasized the value of exams.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Caribbean is stressed outForty percent of the world's 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team of marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ophthalmologists increasingly dissatisfied with electronic health recordsOphthalmologists' use of electronic health records (EHR) systems for storing and accessing patients' medical histories more than doubled between 2006 and 2016, while their perceptions of financial and clinical productivity following EHR implementation declined, a study shows.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ophthalmologists increasingly dissatisfied with electronic health records Ophthalmologists' use of electronic health records (EHR) systems for storing and accessing patients' medical histories more than doubled between 2006 and 2016, while their perceptions of financial and clinical productivity following EHR implementation declined, a study published today in JAMA Ophthalmology shows. "Our findings highlight the fact that companies that design EHR systems should furth
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two Romanians charged with hacking US capital police camerasTwo Romanian nationals have been arrested and charged with hacking into computer systems which controlled surveillance cameras for the Metropolitan Police Department in the US capital earlier this year, officials said Thursday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Caribbean is stressed out One of the standardized measurements taken at all CARICOMP Caribbean monitoring sites is water turbidity, an indicator of water quality. Decreases in visibility were most likely where human populations increased the most. Credit: Karen Koltes Forty percent of the world's 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of d
23h
Science | The Guardian
World weatherwatch: Record snowfall hits city of Erie, Pennsylvania on Christmas Day T he magic of a picture-perfect white Christmas is something many long for year after year. Erie, Pennsylvania was the place to be this year, where a whopping 86cm of snow fell on Christmas day. This 24-hour snowfall shattered the previous Christmas record (20cm) and even broke the all-time snowiest day in the city’s history (51cm) on 22 November 1956. Officials declared a state of emergency and
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Live Science
Your Body's Internal Scale May Sense (and Fight) Weight Gain The body may have an internal scale that senses how much a person weighs, so the body can regulate fat mass in response, a new study in rodents suggests. If the findings hold up in humans, the research could pave the way to novel treatments for obesity, researchers said in the new study. The results may also provide an explanation for why sitting leads to weight gain, the researchers said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Caribbean is stressed out IMAGE: By measuring ocean health in the same way at sites across the Caribbean, it's possible to understand where coastal environments are the most stressed out. "If people get their act... view more Credit: Karen Koltes Forty percent of the world's 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-stakes tests a likely factor in STEM performance gap: study Credit: University of Minnesota Male students tend to do better on high-stakes tests in biology courses, but it's not because they are better students. Gaps in performance change based on the stakes of the test. A new study published in PLOS ONE confirms this, finding that performance gaps between male and female students increased or decreased based on whether instructors emphasized or de-emphas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudes A jaguar named Aquiles caught in a camera trap image taken in Cana, Panama. The number one cause of jaguar deaths in Panama is retaliation for livestock predation. Enclosing livestock in corrals during the night can significantly reduce encounters with predators. Credit: Ricardo Moreno According to a new survey of residents living near two major national parks in Panama, jaguars deserve increased
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Statistical test relates pathogen mutation to infectious disease progression Ryosuke Omori and Jianhong Wu develop an inductive algorithm to study site-specific nucleotide frequencies using a multi-strain susceptible-infective-removed (SIR) model to better understand infectious disease epistemology, pathogen evolution, and population dynamics. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Nucleic acid sequencing methods, which determine the order of nucleotides in DNA fragments, are rapidly
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Popular Science
How will Formula One reckon with electric cars? D rivers take turn 11 at Circuit of the Americas pretty slowly. It’s tight, and they’ll only hit about 60 miles per hour, depending on the car. Then they’ll charge down the main straight, a three-quarters-of-a-mile descent that lets the right machine clear 200. As I stand in the grandstands before turn 12, a black-and-gold racecar quickly fills my field of view. It’s Texas-hot in Austin today, cl
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Live Science
Sea Stars Make a Comeback After Mysterious 'Goo' Disease Killed Millions For the past four years, a mysterious syndrome has been killing millions of sea stars along the West Coast, turning the five-armed critters into piles of goo. But now, the sea stars appear to be making a comeback, according to news reports. In Southern California and elsewhere, the palm-size sea stars are showing up in record numbers, compared with the past few years, The Orange County Regi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new regulator of vesicle trafficking in plantsA protein that transports the simple chemical choline plays a major role in vesicle trafficking, ion homeostasis, and growth and development in plants, according to two new studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cholera hotspots found at Uganda's borders and lakesUganda is among the countries is sub-Saharan Africa where cholera remains a recurring problem, despite advances in science and technology for prevention, detection and treatment of the infectious disease. Now, researchers have identified cholera hotspots around Uganda to help target interventions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel complementary effects of estrogen treatment in multiple sclerosisA study reveals the cellular basis for how the hormone protects against damage to the central nervous system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carfilzomib can lead to cardiovascular toxicity in multiple myeloma patientsThe proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib has taken on an increasing role in the treatment of multiple myeloma, but new research shows the therapy comes with the risk of cardiovascular problems in a higher than expected percentage of patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Important tricyclic chemical compounds with efficient chirality controlResearchers have developed a highly efficient way to produce chiral multi-centered fused tricyclic compounds of which core structure is often found in bioactive compounds including medicines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New understanding of why cancer cells moveResearchers have identified how some cancer cells are made to move during metastasis. The research provides a better understanding of how cancer spreads and may create new opportunities for cancer drug development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: High-stakes tests a likely factor in STEM performance gap Male students tend to do better on high-stakes tests in biology courses, but it's not because they are better students. Gaps in performance change based on the stakes of the test. A new study published in PLOS ONE confirms this, finding that performance gaps between male and female students increased or decreased based on whether instructors emphasized or de-emphasized the value of exams. Sehoya
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudes IMAGE: A jaguar named Aquiles caught in a camera trap image taken in Cana, Panama. The number one cause of jaguar deaths in Panama is retaliation for livestock predation. Enclosing livestock... view more Credit: Ricardo Moreno According to a new survey of residents living near two major national parks in Panama, jaguars deserve increased protection. Nature and wildlife are considered national tre
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Big Think
Western Society Will Give Up Alcohol In a Generation, Says Leading Scientist Within a generation, drinking alcohol will become a thing of the past. This is what David Nutt, a British scientist and a former drugs advisor to the U.K. government, believes. In this brave new world, innovative synthetic beverages will be able to deliver all the desirable and none of the negative effects of booze. Nutt, who is also a professor at Imperial College London, has dedicated his resea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy using CAR T-cells could provide long-term protection against HIVThrough gene therapy, researchers engineered blood-forming stem cells (hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, or HSPCs) to carry chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) genes to make cells that can detect and destroy HIV-infected cells. These engineered cells persisted for more than two years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Try exercise to improve memory and thinking, new guideline urgesFor patients with mild cognitive impairment, don't be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication. A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting the right treatment: Predicting treatment response in depressionNew evidence from mice suggests why an antidepressant treatment can alleviate depression in one person but not another.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alternative therapies for mild infections could help combat antibiotic resistanceResistance to antibiotics poses a serious and sometimes deadly challenge to the treatment of severe bacterial infections. Researchers propose that development of alternative therapies for mild infections could help slow the development and spread of antibiotic resistance.
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Viden
NASA har udvalgt årets bedste billeder af jorden fra rummet Lysende blå søer midt i ørkenen, kilometervis af lys og store, hvide orkaner der ødelægger alt på deres vej. Alt sammen set fra rummet. Hvert år tager astro-og kosmonauter på den Internationale Rumstation (ISS) tusindvis af billeder af jorden. Og hvert år udvælger et observationshold fra NASA's Johnson Rumcenter i Houston, Texas i USA de bedste billeder fra året, der gik. Her er dem, de har udval
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statistical test relates pathogen mutation to infectious disease progression Nucleic acid sequencing methods, which determine the order of nucleotides in DNA fragments, are rapidly progressing. These processes yield large quantities of sequence data--some of which is dynamic--that helps researchers understand how and why organisms function like they do. Sequencing also benefits epidemiological studies, such as the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic and/or
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The Atlantic
More Than a Thousand Days of War in Yemen For more than 1,000 days now, Yemen has been torn by a ferocious war pitting rebels, known as Houthis (supported by Iran), and forces fighting for former President Ali Abdullah Saleh (who was killed in December) against fighters loyal to exiled President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi (supported by Saudi Arabia). Multiple Yemeni tribal militias have aligned with the Hadi government, or the Houthis, or h
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Popular Science
Five questions about NASA's plans to visit an alien world in 2069 Earlier this month, New Scientist reported that NASA has plans in the works to visit Alpha Centauri . While the plan is reportedly “nebulous,” the space agency hopes to launch something by 2069. Here’s what we know: First things first: Why 2069? The proposed launch date may seem an odd (if rather giggle-worthy) choice. But NASA didn’t just pull this one out of their butts: While setting the agenc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to keep your smartened-up home safe from hackers This July 25, 2017, file frame grab from video shows the Nest Cam IQ camera. As people get voice-activated speakers and online security cameras for convenience and peace of mind, are they also giving hackers a key to their homes? Many devices from reputable manufacturers have safeguards built in, but safeguards aren't the same as guarantees. (AP Photo/Ryan Nakashima, File) More people are getting
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy using CAR T-cells could provide long-term protection against HIV IMAGE: This is Scott Kitchen, the study's senior author view more Credit: UCLA Health FINDINGS Through gene therapy, researchers engineered blood-forming stem cells (hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, or HSPCs) to carry chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) genes to make cells that can detect and destroy HIV-infected cells. These engineered cells not only destroyed the infected cells, they pers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cholera hotspots found at Uganda's borders and lakes IMAGE: These are high risk districts (hotspots) for cholera in Uganda, 2011-2016. view more Credit: Mohammad Ali, 18 Nov 2017 Uganda is among the countries is sub-Saharan Africa where cholera remains a recurring problem, despite advances in science and technology for prevention, detection and treatment of the infectious disease. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new regulator of vesicle trafficking in plants IMAGE: This is the expression pattern of CTL1 gene reporters in Arabidopsis seedling. view more Credit: Sheng Luan A protein that transports the simple chemical choline plays a major role in vesicle trafficking, ion homeostasis, and growth and development in plants, according to two new studies publishing 28 December in the open-access journal PLOS Biology , by Dai-Yin Chao of the Shanghai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alternative therapies for mild infections could help combat antibiotic resistance IMAGE: Alternative therapies for mild infections could slow the development of antibiotic resistance. view more Credit: oliver.dodd, Flickr Resistance to antibiotics poses a serious and sometimes deadly challenge to the treatment of severe bacterial infections. In a new Essay publishing 28 December in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Kristofer Wollein Waldetoft and Sam P. Brown of Georgi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting the right treatment: Predicting treatment response in depression IMAGE: Antidepressants are not a one-size-fits-all pill. view more Credit: Tumisu, Pixabay New evidence from mice suggests why an antidepressant treatment can alleviate depression in one person but not another. The study, publishing December 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology , was led by Marianne Müller and an international team at the University Medical Center Mainz and the Max Planck
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NYT > Science
Do Australians Need a Sugar Intervention?Since 1990, the number of obese adults in Australia has tripled. Can a region built on the sugar industry turn down the sweets?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A cluster of mutations in neurofibromatosis is an important risk factor for severe symptomsResearch shows that missense mutations in a cluster of just five codons in the NF1 gene are an important risk factor for severe symptoms of the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1. Such information is vital to help guide clinical management and genetic counseling in this complex disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Topiramate in early pregnancy increases risk of oral cleftsA new study suggests that using topiramate in early pregnancy, particularly at the high doses used for epilepsy, increases the risk of oral clefts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New structure of key protein holds clues for better drug designScientists have peered deep into the heart of a key protein used in drug design and discovered dynamic structural features that may lead to new ways to target diseases. The protein, called the A2A adenosine receptor (A2aAR), is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, which are the targets of roughly 40 percent of all approved pharmaceuticals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new regulator of vesicle trafficking in plants The expression pattern of CTL1 gene reporters in Arabidopsis seedling. Credit: Sheng Luan A protein that transports the simple chemical choline plays a major role in vesicle trafficking, ion homeostasis, and growth and development in plants, according to two new studies publishing 28 December in the open-access journal PLOS Biology , by Dai-Yin Chao of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Scien
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers hack cell biology to create 3-D shapes from living tissueMany of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be explained with very simple instructions, bioengineers report. By patterning mechanically active mouse or human cells to thin layers of extracellular fibers, the researchers could create bowls, coils, and ripples out of living tissue. The cells collaborated mechanically through a web of these fibers to fold themselves up in predic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
With wrist-worn gadget, researchers capture real-life sleep for the first timeTo measure a person's sleep, researchers have relied on costly and time-consuming approaches that could only be used in a sleep lab. But now researchers have found a way to capture detailed information on human sleep cycles over long periods of time while individuals slumber at home. According to the researchers, it will now be possible to objectively capture the real-life sleep habits and sleep q
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer overrides the circadian clock to surviveTumor cells use the unfolded protein response to alter circadian rhythm, which contributes to more tumor growth, researchers find. A key part of the the circadian clock opposes this process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wrens' calls reveal subtle differences between subspeciesBirds' songs and the ways they vary between places have been well studied -- but what can the simpler vocalizations known as calls tell us about bird biology? A new study provides the first detailed description of how Marsh Wren calls vary across eastern North America and hints at the evolutionary processes playing out between wren subspecies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New structure of key protein holds clues for better drug design Probes (shown glowing here) revealed the inner architecture of the protein A2aAR in the new study. Credit: Kurt Wuthrich and Matthew Eddy, The Scripps Research Institute Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have peered deep into the heart of a key protein used in drug design and discovered dynamic structural features that may lead to new ways to target diseases. The protein, called
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds heavy rain in new Tropical Cyclone Hilda A GPM rainfall analysis of Hilda on Dec. 26 showed a few extremely powerful convective storms northwest of the Dampier Land coast were dropping precipitation at a rate of greater than 130 mm (5.1 inches) per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce As Tropical Cyclone Hilda was coming together in the Southern Indian Ocean the GPM satellite analyzed its rainfall from space. On December 26, 2017 at 3:06
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds heavy rain in new Tropical Cyclone Hilda IMAGE: A GPM rainfall analysis of Hilda on Dec. 26 showed a few extremely powerful convective storms northwest of the Dampier Land coast were dropping precipitation at a rate of greater... view more Credit: Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce As Tropical Cyclone Hilda was coming together in the Southern Indian Ocean the GPM satellite analyzed its rainfall from space. On December 26, 2017 a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New structure of key protein holds clues for better drug design IMAGE: Probes (shown glowing here) revealed the inner architecture of the protein A2aAR in the new study. view more Credit: Kurt Wuthrich and Matthew Eddy, The Scripps Research Institute LA JOLLA, CA - Dec. 28, 2017 - Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have peered deep into the heart of a key protein used in drug design and discovered dynamic structural features that may
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Viden
Kroppens indbyggede badevægt kan have betydning for fedme Det er forskere fra det sundhedsvidenskabelige Sahlgrenska Akademi ved Göteborgs Universitetet, som har fremlagt teorierne i en artikel i tidsskriftet Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Deres resultater skal tages med det forbehold, at de er baseret på forsøg med overvægtige gnavere. Men erfaringerne med tykke rotter og mus har fået de svenske forskere til at spekulere i, at
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Viden
Entusiaster vækker 30 år gamle computere til live Året er 1982, og hjemmecomputeren Commodore 64 kommer på markedet. Den er en del af den første bølge af computere, der kommer ind i folks hjem, hvor de bruges til regnskab, tekstbehandling og ikke mindst spil . Meget lig i dag, men uendeligt meget langsommere. Men selv om udviklingen har efterladt dem i støvet rent teknisk, er computerne og programmerne stadig relevante som en del af vores teknol
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