[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
'Startling' dinosaur protein discovery
Ancient proteins dating back 195 million years have been found inside a dinosaur bone.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
'Tuberculosis-resistant' cattle developed in China
Scientists in China say they have produced cloned cattle with increased resistance to bovine tuberculosis.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
New 'super yield' GM wheat trial gets go-ahead
A new experimental crop of genetically modified (GM) wheat will be planted this spring after the UK government gave the final go-ahead.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Australian scientists use soybean oil to create graphene
Australian researchers say their discovery could significantly lower the material's cost to produce.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Forskere: Vores ældste forfader var én stor mund
Det mikroskopiske væsen levede for 540 millioner år siden og havde angiveligt ikke noget anus.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Brain circuits may flag suicide risk in bipolar teens
A new study of adolescents and young adults at high risk of taking their own lives—those suffering from bipolar disorder—points to specific differences in the brains of those who attempt suicide and those who don’t. “Suicide is a leading cause of death of adolescents and young adults, and we can’t move on this issue fast enough,” says Hilary Blumberg, professor of psychiatric neuroscience, and pr

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Chimp expert shocked by reaction to dead outcast
Seeing a group of chimps kill a member of their own community—something extremely rare—was shocking, says Jill Pruetz. And the abuse that followed was completely unexpected, too, she says. “It was very difficult and quite gruesome to watch,” says Pruetz, a professor of anthropology at Iowa State University. “I couldn’t initially make sense of what was happening, and I didn’t expect them to be so

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
New drug makes HIV medicines last and last
A new drug extends the effectiveness of multiple HIV therapies by unleashing a cell’s own protective machinery on the virus. The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation , are an important step toward the creation of long-acting HIV drugs that could be administered once or twice per year, unlike current HIV treatments that need to be taken every day. The drug, called URMC-099,

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
‘Mini-guts’ show how nasty virus invades
New research offers the first details of how enteroviruses—which cause millions of infections worldwide each year—enter the body through the intestine. Enterovirus infections are associated with diseases that can range from mild flu-like symptoms to much more severe outcomes such as inflammation in the brain or heart, acute paralysis, and even death. Enterovirus infections acquired within neonata

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Device corrals nanoparticles with nothing but sound
Mechanical engineers have demonstrated a tiny whirlpool that can concentrate nanoparticles using nothing but sound. The innovation could gather proteins and other biological structures from blood, urine, or saliva samples for future diagnostic devices. Early diagnosis is key to successfully treating many diseases, but spotting early indicators of a problem is often challenging. To pick out the fi

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
New tool gives tweets a credibility score
A new system can judge how reliable a tweet is based on word types. Scientists developed it after scanning 66 million tweets linked to nearly 1,400 real events. “There have been many studies about social media credibility in recent years, but very little is known about what types of words or phrases create credibility perceptions during rapidly unfolding events,” says Tanushree Mitra, a PhD candi

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Egg-Hibernating Technique Could Keep Women's Eggs Fresh
A hormone produced in the cells surrounding a woman's eggs could be used to hit the pause button on the aging of her reproductive system, new research suggests.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Maps Show Where Melting Glaciers Will Reveal Cold-War-Era Nuclear Waste
Ice loss on the Greenland Ice Sheet could reveal buried hazardous waste from a Cold War-era military base.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Computer Diagnoses Cataracts As Well As Eye Doctors Can
A new artificial-intelligence system designed to imitate the way the brain handles vision can diagnose a rare eye condition just as well as eye doctors can, a new study shows.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
4 People with Locked-In Syndrome 'Talk' Using Their Minds
A groundbreaking study using brain-computer interfaces overturns two misconceptions about people with completely locked-in syndrome.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
To Catch Prey, Frogs Turn to Sticky Spit
Frogs are unmatched in their speed and ability to catch prey. It's all about their super-soft tongue and specialized saliva, say researchers, who got saliva to test by scraping frogs' tongues.
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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Nye teknologier udvisker fakta i din nyhedsstrøm
I dag bliver falske nyheder skabt med tekst. I morgen består de af lydbidder og video, hvor det er noget nær umuligt at vurdere, om der er tale om en animeret figur eller computerstemme.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
How a bacterial protein's structure aids biomedical studies
A light-sensing protein from a salt-loving, sulfur-forming microbe has proved key to developing methods essential to advanced drug discovery, understanding human vision and other biomedical applications. In a review published this week in Structural Dynamics, physicist Marius Schmidt of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee presents a history of decades of research of this microbe and the many new

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Brain-computer interface could improve hearing aids
(Phys.org)—Researchers are working on the early stages of a brain-computer interface (BCI) that can tell who you're listening to in a room full of noise and other people talking. In the future, the technology could be incorporated into hearing aids as tiny beam-formers that point in the direction of interest so that they tune in to certain conversations, sounds, or voices that an individual is pay

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Dino rib yields evidence of oldest soft tissue remains
The rib of a long-necked, plant-eating dinosaur that lived 195 million years ago has yielded what may be the oldest remains of soft tissue ever recovered, scientists said Tuesday.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Dutch experiment with 'Tinder for orangutans'
An animal reserve in the Netherlands is having apes respond to images of their fellow creatures on a tablet, a programme dubbed "Tinder for orangutans" by the Dutch press.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
New explanation links competing theories of the origin of Antarctic glaciation, highlights complexity of climate change
One of the big mysteries in the scientific world is how the ice sheets of Antarctica formed so rapidly about 34 million years ago, at the boundary between the Eocene and Oligocene epochs.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Exploring the brain/fat connection to identify key differences amongst humans and monkeys
Among the greatest unanswered questions in all of evolutionary biology is what were the molecular forces that gave rise to the unique cognitive abilities of the human brain? Which, among the constellation of neurons, expanded amongst the myriad folds of gray and white matter in the cerebral cortex to vault humans over monkeys after the last common ancestor split some 6-8 million years ago?

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Material scientist invents breath monitor to detect flu
Perena Gouma, a professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, has published an article in the journal Sensors that describes her invention of a hand-held breath monitor that can potentially detect the flu virus.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Mechanism for photosynthesis already existed in primeval microbe
A Japanese research group has discovered an evolutionary model for the biological function that creates CO2 from glucose

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Researchers discover new molecular details about protein sorting in the cell
The targeted incorporation of proteins into the membrane is a vital process for cell maintenance; these membrane proteins ensure the proper functioning of the cell's metabolism, communication with its environment, and energy supply. Protein-sorting mechanisms ensure that membrane proteins are specifically recognized among thousands of different proteins – and are sent to the membrane, where they'r

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Scat sniffer dogs tell York U researchers a lot about endangered lizards
Dogs can be trained to find almost anything (people, drugs, weapons, poached ivory) but one York University researcher had them detect something a little unusual - the scat of endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizards. The scat detection dogs helped biology PhD student Alex Filazzola discover not only scat, but the importance of shrubs in preserving lizard populations in the face of climate change.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Tuberculosis-resistant cows developed for the first time using CRISPR technology
CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology has been used for the first time to successfully produce live cows with increased resistance to bovine tuberculosis, reports new research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Researchers from the UGR develop a new software which adapts medical technology to see the interior of a sculpture
A student at the University of Granada (UGR) has designed software that adapts current medical technology to analyze the interior of sculptures. It's a tool to see the interior without damaging wood carvings, and it has been designed for the restoration and conservation of the sculptural heritage.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Urgent need to check how males and females respond differently to ocean acidification
Climate change can have a different impact on male and female fish, shellfish and other marine animals, with widespread implications for the future of marine life and the production of seafood.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Beleaguered bees hit by 'deformed wing virus'
A wing-deforming virus shortens the lifespan of wild honeybees already contending with a startlingly long list of existential threats, researchers said Wednesday.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Scientists take the first step toward creating efficient electrolyte-free batteries
Scientists of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), in collaboration with French, Swiss and Polish researchers, have found unique atomic-scale processes in a crystal lattice of antiferroelectric lead zirconate during a synchrotron X-ray scattering experiment. The discovery is the first step toward creating efficient, electrolyte-free accumulators of electric energy. The

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Transparent hydrogel-based robots can catch and release live fish
Engineers at MIT have fabricated transparent, gel-based robots that move when water is pumped in and out of them. The bots can perform a number of fast, forceful tasks, including kicking a ball underwater, and grabbing and releasing a live fish.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
How Life Turns Asymmetric
In 2009, after she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer, Ann Ramsdell began to search the scientific literature to see if someone with her diagnosis could make a full recovery. Ramsdell, a developmental biologist at the University of South Carolina, soon found something strange: The odds of recovery differed for women who had cancer in the left breast versus the right. Even more surprisingly,

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Brain potassium channels may unlock future precision medicine approaches for alcoholism
Researchers have identified novel potassium (K+) channel genes within addiction brain circuitry that are altered by alcohol dependence and correlate with drinking levels in a mouse model of alcohol drinking.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Clue to how cancer cells spread
In a second human case, a research team has found that a melanoma cell and a white blood cell can fuse to form a hybrid with the ability to metastasize. The finding provides further insight into how melanoma and other cancers spread from solid tumors with implications for future treatment.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Smoking gobbles up almost 6 percent of global health spend and nearly 2 percent of world's GDP
Smoking consumes almost 6 percent of the world's total spend on healthcare and nearly 2 percent of global GDP, reveals the first study of its kind.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Viral protein transforms as it measures out DNA
Researchers have pieced together the three-dimensional atomic structure of a doughnut-shaped protein that acts like a door or 'portal' for the DNA to get in and out of the capsid, and have now discovered that this protein begins to transform its structure when it comes into contact with DNA.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
A better way to farm algae for biofuels, chemicals
Researchers have developed a method that improves the growth of microalgae, which could have big implications for production of biofuels and other valuable chemicals.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
The world's first heat-driven transistor
Scientists have created a thermoelectric organic transistor. A temperature rise of a single degree is sufficient to cause a detectable current modulation in the transistor.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Scientists step closer to developing new drug in fight against antimicrobial resistance
Scientists have for the first time determined the molecular structure of a new antibiotic which could hold the key to tackling drug resistant bacteria.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Autism may begin early in brain development
An overload of neural connections typically observed in autistic brains begins early in mammalian development, when key neurons in the brain region known as the cerebral cortex begin to form their first circuits, new research shows. By pinpointing where and when autism-related neural defects first emerge in mice, the study results could lead to a stronger understanding of autism in humans -- inclu

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Scientists design electricity generator that mimics trees
A prototype biomimetic tree has been built that generates electricity when wind blows through its artificial leaves. The researchers think such technology may help people charge household appliances without the need for large wind turbines.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Researchers explore essential cell behavior with crystal sensor
A team of scientists has developed a new tool to monitor under a microscope how cells attach to an adjacent substrate. Studying adhesion events can help researchers understand how tissues grow, how diseases spread, and how stem cells differentiate into more specific cell types.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Substance in crude oil harms fish hearts, could affect humans as well
Exposure to oil can cause severe cardiovascular effects in fish. Experiments provide direct evidence of how phenanthrene, an oil pollutant found in water, air and soil, causes irregular heartbeat and weaker contractions of heart cells.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
For bonding and breastfeeding, newborns benefit from a cheek full of dextrose
Researchers are proving that a dose of dextrose gel administered into a baby's cheek along with regular feedings can raise hypoglycemic babies' blood sugar, allowing them to stay with their mothers, which promotes breastfeeding.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
A Biohacker’s Plan to Upgrade Dalmatians Ends Up in the Doghouse
The FDA wants to regulate animals altered using the gene-editing technique CRISPR.

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[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]
Robotic Grocers Have Learned How to Handle Your Vegetables
The ability to gently grasp soft and unpredictable items will help pave the way toward fully automated grocery stores.

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Structural Connectome Validation Using Pairwise Classification
In this work, we study the extent to which structural connectomes and topological derivative measures are unique to individual changes within human brains. To do so, we classify structural connectome pairs from two large longitudinal datasets as either belonging to the same individual or not. Our data is comprised of 227 individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and 2

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Researchers Find a “Vaccine” for Climate Change Skeptics
The spreading of misinformation and doubt has undermined support for climate change. Despite broad consensus from climate scientists that humans are largely responsible for climate change, only 27% of Americans think there is agreement. New research points to a possible way to "vaccinate" against this misinformation.

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Knowingly Taking a Placebo Still Reduces Pain, Studies Find
This technique could have applications in pain management and addiction treatment.

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The Gross Failures of Gross Domestic Product.
The world economy is often measured in terms of money, but is this the best method?

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Dig Sector 5 is complete!
For science! Sector 5 of The Dig is complete as of 1/31/2017! In this sector we uncovered 177 cells. Check out all the cells we found in our “ Dig Sector 5 ” Facebook album. To celebrate we’re hosting an extra 177 minute Happy Hour today, 2/1 , starting at 1:00 PM EST . Regular HH bonuses apply. This will be almost three hours, wow! Now onward around the rim we go, barreling through Sector 6!

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Plastlakeringer på tænder kan erstatte smertefulde boringer
Mindst 50.000 af de huller i tænderne, der hvert år bliver lavet med fyldninger på...

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Rare 'lava firehose' from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano
Dramatic footage shows the unusual phenomenon as lava flows through a crack in a sea cliff.

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Australia sharks: Campaigners call for end to nets
Conservationists say the nets are killing too many dolphins and turtles.

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Meet the ex-policeman who saves seahorses
Paul Ferber, an ex-British policeman who lives on Koh Seh in the Gulf of Thailand, tells World Service how he catches illegal fishermen plundering Cambodia's ecosystem.

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Dakota pipeline: US Army to allow work on final section
Native Americans vow legal action as the go-ahead is given to complete the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

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Fem hold kæmper om at nå Månen og vinde Googles millioner
Dansk professor tror dog ikke, at de private firmaer har store chancer for at nå Månen i år.

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Kina spiller med Måne-musklerne - er på vej til 'den mørke side'
Kineserne udforsker rummet .Til november henter Kina et par kilo måne-materiale.

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Would perks for people improve nature reserves?
A group of scientists recommends rethinking the world’s nature reserves to defend not just plants and animals, but also people. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , they argue that the world’s protected areas such as nature reserves, traditionally havens for endangered animals and plants, can be made better if they ratchet up benefits that directly benefit people. The world’s

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This ‘needle’ beam could mean super-sharp ultrasound
Scientists have come up with an “analytically beautiful mathematical solution” to create a new type of beam pattern. It could apply to light, ultrasound, radar, and sonar and could yield unprecedented sharpness. The pattern causes a light or sound wave to collapse inward, forming—during a mere nanosecond or less—an incredibly thin, intense beam before the wave expands outward again. This animatio

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To make a skill stick, practice it a bit too much
To learn something fast and make the skill stick, train for 20 minutes past the point of mastery. A new study in Nature Neuroscience , in which people learned visual perception tasks, shows that “overlearning” can lock in performance gains. Prior studies and also the new one show that when people learn a new task and then learn a similar one soon afterward, the second instance of learning often i

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Cambrian Creatures Gallery: Photos of Primitive Sea Life
The Cambrian explosion, when simple life forms rapidly evolved to more complex creatures, produced some beautiful, bizarre, and mysterious animals

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'Naked' Thumb-Size Worm Grabbed Prey with Spiny Arms | Video
Unlike its relatives, a 500-million-year-old worm-like creature had neither armor nor spikes, meaning it was "naked" during its lifetime.

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Chuckwalla Photos: Meet this Large, Desert-Dwelling Lizard
The cracks and crevasses found throughout Baja and northern Mexico create a special environment for one of the region's most unique animals — the chuckwalla.

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Deep Ocean 'Mud Monsters' Captured By ROV | Video
On or near the muddy ocean floor of the Mariana Trench, NOAA’s remote operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer (D2) captured footage of swimming sea cucumbers, carnivorous sponges, acorn worms, several long-legged isopods, and more.

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'Gateway to Hell': Volcano Caught Spewing Lava in Satellite Image
Ethiopia’s most active volcano has seen a surge of recent activity.

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Cheerleaders of the Deep: How Pom-Pom Crabs Got Their Name
The elusive pom pom crab, so named because of its tendency to clutch two anemones in its hands, gets its poufy accessories by stealing them from other crabs and then cloning them.

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Coffee Drinkers, Beware: Milk, Sugar & Other Add-ins Add Up
Coffee and tea drinkers who regularly sweeten and flavor their drinks of choice with add-ins such as sugar and milk may be stirring in up to about 70 extra calories, a new study finds.

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Why Kids Should Pay Attention to Their Mistakes
Kids who think they can get smarter if they work hard are more likely to bounce back from their mistakes than those who think their level of intelligence is set in stone.

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Massive Stream of Lava Plunges into Sea in Stunning New Video
A huge, hot firehose of lava streamed from a sea cliff on the Big Island of Hawaii, and was recently captured in breathtaking video.

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'Mud Monsters' Galore! Mariana Trench Dive Yields Bizarre Deep-Sea Life
A recent underwater expedition to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known ocean location in the world, filmed many forms of bizarre marine life close to the seafloor.

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Huge Stream of Lava Plunges into Sea | Video
In this stunning video from the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, a scalding stream of bright-red lava plunges from a sea cliff into the cold seawater below, resulting in steamy explosions.

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Chimps Caught Killing One of Their Own | Video
Chimpanzees are known to attack chimps in rival groups, but it’s rare for them to kill a member of their own group. However, researchers in Senegal witnessed just that: When a exiled alpha male chimp attempted to rejoin his group, the group killed hi

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Slimy Defense: Hagfish-Inspired Slime Could Protect Navy Warships
The U.S. Navy is taking inspiration from the natural world to develop a new defense tool.

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Cosmic Neutrino Detector Reveals Clues About 'Ghost' Particles
The IceCube experiment, buried under the Antarctic ice, was designed primarily to capture particles called neutrinos that are produced by powerful cosmic events, but it's revealing new clues on the nature of the ghostly particles.

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3-Billion-Year-Old 'Lost Continent' Lurking Under African Island
The remnants of a 3-billion-year-old continent are lurking under the African island of Mauritius, new research confirms.

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Deadly Fruit: Cause of Mysterious Brain Illness in India is Found
The mystery of why hundreds of children in an Indian city become sick every summer with a deadly brain illness has been solved, researchers say.

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Facts About Porpoises
Porpoises have sleek bodies and large flippers, like their cousins the dolphins. But they are smaller and have different types of fins (or none at all).

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Gene drives thwarted by emergence of resistant organisms
Until this obstacle is overcome, the technology is unlikely to succeed in the wild.
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Gene Drives Thwarted by Emergence of Resistant Organisms
Until this obstacle is overcome, the technology is unlikely to succeed in the wild
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Astronomers explore uses for AI-generated images
Neural networks produce pictures to train image-recognition programs and scientific software.
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Race to provide commercial weather data heats up
A movement to privatize Earth-observing satellites is gaining ground.
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Space Archaeologist Wants Citizen Scientists To Identify Archaeological Looting
Sarah Parcak used $1 million in TED Prize money to launch a program called GlobalXplorer that allows anyone online to analyze satellite images of archaeological sites for evidence.

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What to Make of Those Animal-Welfare Labels on Meat and Eggs
They are meant to assure shoppers that animals have been treated humanely, but they can confuse or even mislead.

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Dangerous Fruit: Mystery of Deadly Outbreaks in India Is Solved
Researchers had suspected that heat stroke, infections or pesticides were behind a disease that killed about 40 percent of children affected, but it seems lychees were to blame.

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Frogs use elastic tongues and reversible spit to catch prey
Science Check out these spitting images New research reveals a frog's meal is dependent on the softness of its tongue and the versatility of its saliva.

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I tested 'gluten-free' food with the new gluten sensor—here's what I found
Health I've been waiting for this gadget for three years. I tested "gluten-free" fast food with The Nima. Read on for the results.

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Device reads brain activity to help locked-in people communicate
Health It can tell whether a completely paralyzed person is thinking “yes” or “no” A brain-computer interface can read the answers to yes-or-no questions from the thoughts of people who are completely paralyzed.

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How to activate your brain's ability to learn
Science A new study looks at the power of practicing well beyond mastery. Overlearning, or continuing to train a skill after you've already mastered it, may make it less likely to forget that skill when you acquire new ones.

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Why we're so bad at statistics | Alan Smith
Think you're good at guessing stats? Guess again. Whether we consider ourselves math people or not, our ability to understand and work with numbers is terribly limited, says data visualization expert Alan Smith. In this delightful talk, Smith explores the mismatch between what we know and what we think we know.

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Edgar Allan Poe--Cosmologist?
The treatise Eureka, which he published the year before his death in 1849, anticipates a surprising amount of modern science.
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Is Trump Driving Recruits to ISIS?
Research in social psychology suggests that the answer is probably yes
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From the Archives: DARPA and Neuroethics
In an essay for Cerebrum in 2004, neuroethicist Jonathan Moreno described how the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) was supporting projects aimed at using neuroscience to improve US military prospects. This month, Moreno, a professor at University of Pennsylvania and a member of the former US bioethics commission , wrote for The Neuroethics Blog on “neurosecurity”—its history a

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Travel ban throws research, academic exchange into turmoil
Universities across the nation say President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from seven Muslim countries is disrupting vital research projects and academic exchanges in such fields as medicine, public health and engineering, with untold numbers of scholars blocked from entering the U.S.

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Acid trip makes clumsy cone snails miss their prey
Deadly cone snails are too clumsy to catch their prey when exposed to the levels of ocean acidification expected under predicted climate change, according to new research published in Biology Letters.

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African lake provides new clues about ancient marine life
New research shows there may have been more nitrogen in the ocean between one and two billion years ago than previously thought, allowing marine organisms to proliferate at a time when multi-cellularity and eukaryotic life first emerged.

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New Cheyenne supercomputer triples scientific capability with greater efficiency
The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world's most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences.

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Chimps' behavior following death disturbing to ISU anthropologist
Shocking is one word Jill Pruetz uses to describe the behavior she witnessed after a chimp was killed at her research site in Fongoli, Senegal. The fact that chimps would kill a member of their own community is extremely rare - most aggression is between communities - but the abuse that followed was completely unexpected.

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Climate change drove population decline in New World before Europeans arrived
What caused the rapid disappearance of a vibrant Native American agrarian culture that lived in urban settlements from the Ohio River Valley to the Mississippi River Valley in the two centuries preceding the European settlement of North America? In a new study, researchers from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis reconstructed and analyzed 2,100 years of temperature and precipitation

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When crackpot conspiracy theories are touted as news, we all lose
Humans are fascinated by potential disasters, legends or prophecies that promise the end of the world. There is even a word for the study of such things: eschatology, from the Greek eschatos for "last" and -ology "to speak" or "to study".

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Making crowd estimates is a mix of science, statistics, computer analysis and guesswork
It's what everyone wants to know - but is literally impossible to answer: How many people took to the streets Saturday in the women's marches across the United States?

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Daimler to supply self-driving cars for Uber
German auto giant Daimler on Tuesday said it had struck a partnership with Uber to supply self-driving cars for the US ride-hailing company.

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Deutsche Bank to stop financing coal projects
German banking giant Deutsche Bank on Tuesday announced it would stop financing coal projects as part of its commitments under the Paris Agreement to tackle global warming.

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How the drone went from the latest must-have tech toy to a billion-dollar cultural phenomenon
Of the many technologies to have captured our imaginations over the last five years, there have been few with such lofty aspirations as drones. These high-tech flying machines have opened up new cultural pastimes which bring together hobbyist enthusiasm and a simple human curiosity to take to the skies.

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Find elusive particles from your phone with Oxford's new neutrino viewer app
Not so long ago, observing fundamental particles was reserved for scientists with complex equipment. Now technological progress means that anyone can explore the world of particles from their phone. VENu is a new smartphone app, designed by Oxford University scientists, to support would-be physicists to see neutrino activity and to even try and catch them themselves.

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US travel 'extreme vetting' to include social media, phone contacts
Travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries singled out for "extreme vetting" will face scrutiny of their social media footprint and phone records, the new Homeland Security secretary said Tuesday.

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Increasing factory and auto emissions disrupt natural cycle in East China Sea
China's rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Cali

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'Ghost particles' could improve understanding the universe
Trillions of neutrinos, or ghost particles, are passing through us every second. While scientists know this fact, they don't know what role neutrinos play in the universe because they are devilishly hard to measure.

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Habitat features and social behavior impact how baboons move as a group
When deciding what path to take during collective movement, individual baboons will likely follow the road most travelled by their group mates, according to new findings published in eLife.

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Health is the new religion
Can you describe health and fitness as a religion? The answer is Yes! Britta Pelters at Halmstad University, along with her research colleague Barbro Wijma from Linköping University, concludes that today's health community meets all the criteria for being a religion. Something, which means greater risks for those who do not fit in to the healthy template.

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High levels of black carbon found at remote site in Siberia
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Sweden, the U.S., Russia, Norway and Austria has found higher than expected levels of black carbon at a remote test site in Siberia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes the amount of black carbon they found and its sources.

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Infrared links could simplify data center communications
Data centers are the central point of many, if not most, information systems today, but the masses of wires interconnecting the servers and piled high on racks begins to resemble last year's tangled Christmas-tree lights disaster. Now a team of engineers is proposing to eliminate most of the wires and substitute infrared free-space optics for communications.

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Large marine protected areas effectively protect reef shark populations
Researchers at Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station investigated the role of expanded marine protected areas (MPAs) on grey reef sharks and found that the aquatic no-fishing zones were an effective tool for protecting this near-threatened species.

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Lobstermen question need for restrictions to help species
Some lobster fishermen expressed skepticism Tuesday about a plan to try to revive the dwindling southern New England lobster stock through new fishing restrictions.

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Researchers confirm the existence of a 'lost continent' under Mauritius
Scientists have confirmed the existence of a "lost continent" under the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius that was left-over by the break-up of the supercontinent, Gondwana, which started about 200 million years ago.The piece of crust, which was subsequently covered by young lava during volcanic eruptions on the island, seems to be a tiny piece of ancient continent, which broke off from the island

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Mathematical model reveals parental involvement can 'immunize' students from dropping out
Newsflash for American high school students—choose friends wisely, or they may end up costing you your education.

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New method for activating Earth-abundant metal catalysts
(Phys.org)—Many industrially relevant reactions require either a precious metal catalyst or an Earth-abundant metal catalyst in a low oxidation state. A catalyst with a Fe(0) complex, for example, is a good catalyst for hydroboration and hydrosilylation, but the methods required to reduce iron are prohibitive for practical use. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh in the UK have demonstrat

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What are the minds of non-human creatures really like?
It is often talked about as the ultimate prize of artificial intelligence: a machine that can think like a human. But human minds are only one example of the kinds of minds on earth. So what are those other minds like? How do they work and how can we understand them? Suppose we do create human level cognition in artificial intelligence (AI), does that widen the 'space of possible minds' to include

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New study connects running motion to ground force, provides patterns for any runner
Researchers at Southern Methodist University in Dallas have developed a concise new explanation for the basic mechanics involved in human running.

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NASA's new shape-shifting radiator inspired by origami
Japan's ancient art of paper folding has inspired the design of a potentially trailblazing "smart" radiator that a NASA technologist is now developing to remove or retain heat on small satellites.

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Non-reporting 'Did You Feel It?' areas can be used to improve earthquake intensity maps
The remarkable reach of the U.S. Geological Survey's "Did You Feel It?" website can be used to improve maps of earthquake intensity—if non-reporting areas are including in the mapping analysis, according to a new study published online February 1 in the journal Seismological Research Letters.

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One-year mission investigators debut preliminary results at NASA workshop
Preliminary research results for the NASA One-Year Mission debuted last week at an annual NASA conference. Last March, two men landed back on Earth after having spent nearly one year in space. NASA and Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, teamed up for an unprecedented One-Year Mission. One crewmember from each agency lived on the International Space Station for almost one year.

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Paper spotlights key flaw in widely used radioisotope dating technique
An oversight in a radioisotope dating technique used to date everything from meteorites to geologic samples means that scientists have likely overestimated the age of many samples, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

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PBS' 'Nova' seeking periodic-table fans to fund TV special
Geeks of America, PBS' "Nova" wants you to open up your minds and wallets for a sequel to its sleeper 2012 hit film on the periodic table.

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Making the switch to polarization diversity
Vast amounts of data transmit across the Internet and telecommunications networks delivering, for example, real-time video calls from one cell phone to another - across the world. As people send and receive increasing amounts of data like ultra-high definition (4K, 8K) images over these largely optical fiber-based networks, and the demand for such increases, so too does the need for new technologi

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Rarely-seen event of ant brood parasitism by scuttle flies video-documented
While many species of scuttle flies are associated with ants, their specific interactions with their hosts are largely unknown. Brood parasitism (attacking the immature stages, rather than the adult ants), for example, is an extremely rarely observed and little-studied phenomenon. However, a research team from the USA and Brazil, led by Dr. Brian Brown, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

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Study to examine the relationship between grasslands and soil biodiversity
A new study by researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture will evaluate pastures to document how management of native grasslands may enhance soil biodiversity and contribute to producer profitability.

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Reversible saliva allows frogs to hang on to next meal
A frog uses its whip-like tongue to snag its prey faster than a human can blink, hitting it with a force five times greater than gravity. How does it hang onto its meal as the food rockets back into its mouth?

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Slack's messaging service sets sights on big businesses
Slack Technologies, a fast-growing startup trying to wean businesses off email by hooking employees on its more informal messaging service, is now hoping to snare the world's biggest companies as customers.

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Why is some social media content interpreted as bragging?
People who post personal content on social networking sites such as Facebook and try to present themselves in a positive light may be perceived as bragging, and therefore be less attractive to others, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

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SpaceX shuffles Falcon 9 launch schedule
SpaceX announced Sunday (Jan. 29) a significant shuffle to the Falcon 9 launch schedule, saying that a key NASA mission to resupply the space station is moving to the head of the line and will now be their first mission to launch from historic pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center – formerly used to launch space shuttles.

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3 arrests over breach claimed by 'Phineas Fisher' hacker
Spanish police have arrested three people over a data breach linked to a series of dramatic intrusions at European spy software companies—feeding speculation that the net has closed on an online Robin Hood figure known as Phineas Fisher.

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Spectacles might get the buzz, but for investors Snapchat is all about the advertising
The company behind Snapchat has two offerings - that beloved, 5-year-old app for messaging and video streaming, and Spectacles, a months-old, $130 pair of sunglasses that double as a camcorder.

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Spider silk demonstrates Spider Man-like abilities
Our muscles are amazing structures. With the trigger of a thought, muscle filaments slide past each other and bundles of contracting fibers pull on the bones moving our bodies. The triggered stretching behavior of muscle is inherently based in geometry, characterized by a decrease in length and increase in volume (or vice versa) in response to a change in the local environment, such as humidity or

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Startup offers car washes on demand that save water, too
Imagine telling your JPMorgan bosses you're leaving a high-finance career to start a car-wash company. "They thought I was crazy," Nathan Bekerman said. "But my years at JPMorgan taught me how to execute and run a business."

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How stressful will a trip to Mars be on the human body?
Preliminary research results for the NASA Twins Study debuted at NASA's Human Research Program's annual Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, Texas the week of January 23. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned home last March after nearly one year in space living on the International Space Station. His identical twin brother, Mark, remained on Earth.

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Substance in crude oil harms fish hearts, could affect humans as well
Research from Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station has identified a substance in oil that's to blame for the cardiotoxicity seen in fish exposed to crude oil spills. More than a hazard for marine life exposed to oil, the contaminant this team identified is abundant in air pollution and could pose a global threat to human health.

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Explainer: Tech companies worry about cherished tech visas
Next on the immigration chopping block? U.S. tech companies fear the Trump administration will target a visa program they cherish for bringing in programmers and other specialized workers from other countries.

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Tech firms unite to challenge Trump on immigration
A broad coalition of US technology firms has begun planning a joint legal strategy challenging President Donald Trump's executive order barring refugees and many Muslims from American soil, sources say.

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Texas mulls changing science standards questioning evolution
The Texas Board of Education will decide whether to scrap a requirement that public schools teach high school students to scrutinize "all sides" of scientific theory after hearing Tuesday from academics who say that was meant to water down lessons on evolution and leave students wondering whether God created the universe.

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New tool designed to help food industry set climate change targets
A new tool has been launched today (January 31 )which enables agriculture and food companies and others to identify reasonable greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for the sector.

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Trump pledges beefed up cybersecurity but doesn't sign order
President Donald Trump pledged Tuesday to strengthen the government's ability to protect its computer networks, but then canceled plans to sign an executive order on cybersecurity without explanation.

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Video: What your mucus says about your health
It's peak cold and flu season, and mucus is making many of our lives miserable. But despite being a little icky, phlegm gets a bad rap. This germ-fighting goo contains cells and chemical compounds that help us power through a cold.

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Review: Wi-Fi systems for the home just keep getting better
It's interesting to watch when enterprise technology makes its way down to the consumer level.

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How X-rays in matter create genetoxic low-energy electrons
Researchers led by Kiyoshi Ueda of Tohoku University have investigated what x-rays in matter really do and identified a new mechanism of producing low-energy free electrons. Since the low-energy electrons cause damage to the matter, the identified process might be important in understanding and designing radiation treatment of illnesses.

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New analysis supports mangrove forests, tidal marshes and seagrass meadows as effective climate buffers
In the global effort to mitigate carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, all options are on the table—including help from nature. Recent research suggests that healthy, intact coastal wetland ecosystems such as mangrove forests, tidal marshes and seagrass meadows are particularly good at drawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it for hundreds to thousands of years.

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Celestial cat meets cosmic lobster
Astronomers have for a long time studied the glowing, cosmic clouds of gas and dust catalogued as NGC 6334 and NGC 6357, this gigantic new image from ESO's Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope being only the most recent one. With around two billion pixels this is one of the largest images ever released by ESO. The evocative shapes of the clouds have led to their memorable names: the Cat's Paw Neb

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Gull decline on Scottish island linked to decline in fishing discards
The research, published in the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) journal Bird Study, looked at the breeding populations of three species of large gull; Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull and Lesser Black-backed Gull on the Hebridean island of Canna, and the relationship between these gull populations and the fall in the quantity of fish landed in the nearby harbour of Mallaig.

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Harvard scholars: Travel ban deprives US of best, brightest
Harvard Medical School professor Thomas Michel was so excited about recruiting Iranian researcher Soheil Saravi, he put Saravi's name on the door of his Boston lab when his new hire got his visa.

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High-resolution imaging reveals new understanding of battery cathode particles
Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been able to observe what exactly happens inside a cathode particle as lithium-ion batteries are charged and discharged.

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One income for all: far-fetched, or future fact?
It is a utopian idea, literally, but is enjoying a renaissance as politicians and policy wonks grapple with technology-driven changes that could redefine our very understanding of work.

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Plant keeps moths captive inside its fruits for almost a year
Some moths use fruit of trees they pollinate as food for their larvae, but one East Asian moth matures within the fruit right until adulthood

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Trump’s travel ban is already stopping scientific collaboration
Scientists inside and outside the US have had their plans disrupted by Donald Trump’s travel restrictions, and some fear it could lead to a brain drain

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Call off the breakfast wars and pass another slice of toast
Despite a large serving of negative dietary advice, the first meal of the day is not a danger to one and all, say chef Anthony Warner and nutritionist Laura Thomas

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Ants with fussy personalities help colonies find better homes
Forget ants all being mindless clones. Fussy individuals that learn from past experience are crucial for helping a colony choose the right place to live

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Long-lost continent found submerged deep under Indian Ocean
The continent of "Mauritia" sunk as it was stretched out like plasticine by the plate tectonics that drew India and Madagascar apart some 85 million years ago

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Completely paralysed people use thoughts to say they are happy
Many assume that people “locked-in” by ALS have a low quality of life, but a non-invasive device that can read “yes” and “no” thoughts has found the opposite

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A paper in JPSP suggests that broad travel experience may increase a belief in moral relativism that can lead to more immoral actions.
submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]

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Low back pain in school-aged children a common occurrence
Low back pain in school-aged children is a common occurrence, and the prevalence of low back pain increases once children reach school age according to a recent review.

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Recent upsurge of A(H7N9) flu cases in China
At present, the most immediate threat to EU citizens is to those living or visiting influenza A(H7N9)-affected areas in China concludes the updated rapid risk assessment. Caution should be taken by people traveling to China to avoid direct exposure to poultry, live poultry markets or backyard farms.

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A new model of deformation and breakup of droplets could improve nanoscale printing and spraying
As interest and demand for nanotechnology continues to rise, so will the need for nanoscale printing and spraying, which relies on depositing tiny drops of liquid onto a surface. Now researchers have developed a new theory that describes how such a nanosized droplet deforms and breaks up when it strikes a surface.

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Misdiagnosed foot, ankle injuries may result in arthritis, chronic pain and disability
Front-line physicians are advised to err on the side of caution and opt for additional imaging and second opinions when diagnosing six common foot and ankle injuries. A new study by orthopedic surgeons finds misdiagnosis often results in poor long-term patient outcomes, including arthritis and disability.

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Move over Bear Grylls! Academics build ultimate solar-powered water purifier
You've seen Bear Grylls turn foul water into drinking water with little more than sunlight and plastic. Academics added a third element -- carbon-dipped paper -- to create a highly efficient and inexpensive way to turn saltwater and contaminated water into potable water for personal use. The system could help address global drinking water shortages, especially in developing areas and regions affec

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People infected with HIV may be more susceptible to diabetes
People infected with HIV may be more susceptible to developing diabetes, suggests new research.

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Origami of the cell
A cell biologist shows that blocking a critical enzyme helps to mitigate diseases associated with protein folding and lipid stress.

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New ocean observations improve understanding of motion
Oceanographers commonly calculate large scale surface ocean circulation from satellite sea level information using a concept called 'geostrophy', which describes the relationship between oceanic surface flows and sea level gradient. Conversely, researchers rely on data from in-water current meters to measure smaller scale motion. New research has determined from observational data the length scale

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Using fruit flies to study cancer: Scientists investigate childhood tumors
A new report describes how a complex protein called Snr1, the homologue of human SMARCB1/hSNF5/INI1, acts as a tumor suppressor in an unconventional manner in fruit flies.

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NASA's Fermi sees gamma rays from 'hidden' solar flares
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy light from solar eruptions located on the far side of the sun -- light it shouldn't be able to see.

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NASA's Fermi discovers the most extreme blazars yet
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has identified the farthest gamma-ray blazars, a type of galaxy whose intense emissions are powered by supersized black holes. Light from the most distant object began its journey to us when the universe was 1.4 billion years old, or nearly 10 percent of its present age.

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Hitting the right notes
A biology graduate student played a harmonious duet of singing wrens from a recording she captured out in the field during a recent trip to Costa Rica, to learn about how they learn a new tune with a new mate.

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Boxer crabs acquire anemones by stealing from each other, and splitting them into clones
Researchers have described a little known yet fascinating aspect of the behavior of Lybia crabs, a species which holds sea anemones in each of its claws (behavior which has earnt it the nickname 'boxer' or 'pom-pom' crab). In a series of experiments, they showed that when these crabs need an anemone, they will fight to steal one from another crab and then both crabs will split their anemone into t

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Physically active children are less depressed
Being active, getting sweaty and roughhousing offer more than just physical health benefits for young children. A new study shows this kind of physical activity also protects against depression.

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Scientists Uncover Possible Therapeutic Targets for Rare Autism Spectrum Disorder
Researchers have uncovered 30 genes that could, one day, serve as therapeutic targets to reverse Rett syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that affects only girls and is a severe form of an autism spectrum disorder.

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Engineered intrinsically disordered proteins provide biomedical insights
Biomedical researchers have engineered the first examples of biomimetic structures composed from a mysterious class of proteins that lack any sort of internal structure. Researchers reveal the ability to control the self-assembly and disassembly of these structures in an organized manner.

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How stressful will a trip to Mars be on the human body?
Preliminary research results for the NASA Twins Study debuted at NASA's Human Research Program's annual Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, Texas the week of Jan. 23. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned home last March after nearly one year in space living on the International Space Station. His identical twin brother, Mark, remained on Earth.

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Engineers develop low-cost, flexible terahertz radiation source for fast, non-invasive screening
Scientists have successfully developed flexible, high performance and low-power driven terahertz (THz) emitters that could be mass-produced at low cost. This novel invention is a major technological breakthrough and addresses a critical challenge for industrial application of THz technology.

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Habitat features and social behavior impact how baboons move as a group
When deciding what path to take during collective movement, individual baboons will likely follow the road most traveled by their group mates, according to new findings.

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Scat sniffer dogs tell researchers a lot about endangered lizards
Dogs can be trained to find almost anything, but one researcher had them detect something a little unusual -- the scat of endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizards. The dogs helped find out how important shrubs are in preserving lizard populations in the face of climate change.

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Updated cystic fibrosis diagnosis guidelines can help in diagnosis, personalized treatment
An international research group of 32 experts from nine countries has updated the guidelines for diagnosing the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The researchers expect that these guidelines will provide better direction for clinicians looking at patients with symptoms of the disease to make a correct diagnosis and recommend personalized treatment.

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Yeast mutants unlock the secrets of aging
Researchers take a closer look into what delaying and accelerating yeast genes might mean for humans.

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New study connects running motion to ground force, provides patterns for any runner
Researchers have developed a concise approach to understanding the mechanics of human running. The research has immediate application for running performance, injury prevention, rehab and the individualized design of running shoes, orthotics and prostheses. The work integrates classic physics and human anatomy to link the motion of individual runners to their patterns of force application on the g

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Climate change drove population decline in New World before Europeans arrived
Scientists report on dramatic environmental changes that occurred as Native Americans flourished and then vanished from the Midwestern United States before Europeans arrived. The researchers theorize that catastrophic climate change they observed, which doomed food production, was a primary cause of the disappearance.

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Drug candidate stabilizes essential transport mechanism in nerve cells
New research has discovered how a drug candidate works to possibly alleviate Alzheimer's disease and autism spectrum disorders.

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Females no longer neglected in obesity research
Scientists revise the typical use of male rats and point to sex-differences that can drastically change how we approach obesity and the related health problems in females.

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Spider silk demonstrates Spider man-like abilities
Spider silk offers new inspiration for developments in artificial muscle technology. The silk of the Ornithoctonus Huwena spider demonstrates impressive weight-lifting abilities with efficient, water-driven actuation.

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Reversing the HIV epidemic: Europe needs to scale-up prevention, testing and treatment
Experts from across the European Union discuss how to reverse the HIV epidemic and how to prepare Europe to achieve the set target of ending AIDS by 2030.

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Paper spotlights key flaw in widely used radioisotope dating technique
An oversight in a radioisotope dating technique used to date everything from meteorites to geologic samples means scientists have likely overestimated the age of many samples.

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Paracetamol study could open door for way to treat liver damage
Scientists have shed light on how paracetamol can damage the liver, by harming vital structural connections between adjacent cells in the organ.

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Scientists show how cells communicate
Primary cilia are antenna-like structures that are present on the surface of most cells in the human body. The cilia are essential mediators of communication between the different cells in the body. If the cilia are defective, this communication is disrupted, and the cells are unable to appropriately regulate several important cellular processes, which ultimately can lead to severe diseases that m

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Cell biology: New molecular details about protein sorting in the cell
The targeted incorporation of proteins into the membrane is a vital process for cell maintenance; these membrane proteins ensure the proper functioning of the cell's metabolism, communication with its environment, and energy supply. Protein-sorting mechanisms ensure that membrane proteins are specifically recognized among thousands of different proteins -- and are sent to the membrane, where they'

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Ultrahigh sensitivity graphene infrared detectors for imaging and spectroscopy
Researcher have developed a novel graphene-based infrared (IR) detector demonstrating record high sensitivity for thermal detection. Graphene's unique attributes pave the way for high-performance IR imaging and spectroscopy.

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How a bacterial protein's structure aids biomedical studies
A light-sensing protein from a salt-loving, sulfur-forming microbe has proved key to developing methods essential to advanced drug discovery, understanding human vision and other biomedical applications. In a new review, researchers present a history of decades of research of this microbe and the many new technologies that have enabled these applications.

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Mechanism for photosynthesis already existed in primeval microbe
A Japanese research team has discovered an evolutionary model for the biological function that creates carbon dioxide from glucose in photosynthesis. They found the mechanism in a primitive, non-photosynthesizing microbe.

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Research journey to the center of the Earth
Researchers may be one step closer to solving the mystery at the core of the Earth. It has long been established that approximately 85 percent of the Earth's core is made of iron, while nickel makes up an additional 10 percent. Details of the final 5 percent - believed to be some amount of light elements - has, until now, eluded scientists.

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Air pollution may lead to dementia in older women
Tiny air pollution particles -- the type that mainly comes from power plants and automobiles -- may greatly increase the chance of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Scientists and engineers found that older women who live in places with fine particulate matter exceeding the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard are 81 percent more at risk for global cognitive decline and 92 percent

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Children exposed to complications at birth at risk of autism, study finds
Children who were exposed to complications shortly before or during birth, including birth asphyxia and preeclampsia, were more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder, according to a study.

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Link between sleep, cognitive impairment in the elderly
Daytime sleepiness is very common in the elderly with prevalence rates of up to 50 percent. Caused by sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), a disruption of normal breathing during sleep, these cause recurrent awakenings and subsequent excessive daytime sleepiness. Now a researcher stresses that it is time for physicians to consider the association between these sleep conditions and cognitive impairmen

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Optimized compiler yields more-efficient parallel programs
By modifying the 'middle end' of the popular open-source compiler LLVM, MIT computer scientists have created a C compiler that optimizes parallel code better than any other.

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African lake provides new clues about ancient marine life
New research shows there may have been more nitrogen in the ocean between one and two billion years ago than previously thought, allowing marine organisms to proliferate at a time when multi-cellularity and eukaryotic life first emerged.

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Why only some people develop life-threatening dengue infections
After contracting dengue fever once, certain people who encounter the virus again develop much more severe infections. New research identifies an immunological signature that could help identify and better treat these patients.

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Tracing the cosmic web with star-forming galaxies in the distant universe
A research group has revealed a picture of the increasing fraction of massive star-forming galaxies in the distant universe. Massive star-forming galaxies in the distant universe, about 5 billion years ago, trace large-scale structure in the universe. In the nearby universe, about 3 billion years ago, massive star-forming galaxies are not apparent. This change is consistent with the picture of gal

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Intimate partner violence among youth linked to suicide, weapons and drug use
Adolescents who are violent toward their romantic partners are also more likely to think about or attempt suicide, carry a weapon, threaten others with a weapon and use drugs or alcohol than peers in non-violent relationships, according to new research.

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Existing reprocessing techniques prove insufficient for flexible endoscopes
Current techniques used to clean endoscopes for reuse are not consistently effective, according to a new study. The findings of this study support the need for careful visual inspection and cleaning verification tests to ensure that all endoscopes are free of damage and debris before they are high-level disinfected or sterilized and used on another patient.

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Astronauts' brains change shape during spaceflight
MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a new study.

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E-tool provides wake-up call for parents of children with excess weight
An innovative e-tool is helping lift the blinders for parents of children with excess weight by offering much-needed and welcomed support.

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Mathematical model reveals parental involvement can 'immunize' students from dropping out
Newsflash for American high school students -- choose friends wisely, or they may end up costing you your education.

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'Ghost particles' could improve understanding the universe
New measurements of neutrino oscillations, observed at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, have shed light on outstanding questions regarding fundamental properties of neutrinos. The findings could help fill key gaps in the Standard Model, the theory that describes the behavior of fundamental particles at every energy scale scientists have been able to measure.

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The making of Antarctica
A group of researchers suggest that the best way to understand the creation of the glaciers in Antarctica is by linking two competing theories about their origins. They argue that the deepening of the Drake Passage changed patterns of ocean circulation which in turn resulted in a drop in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to a threshold that allowed glaciation to take place.

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Experts urge use of evidence-based medicine to avoid overtreatment of type 2 diabetes
Research supports an evidence-based medicine (EBM) approach that embraces individualized care to prevent overtreatment, specifically for patients with type 2 diabetes.

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Large marine protected areas effectively protect reef shark populations
Expanded marine protected areas are successful in limiting fishing and increasing reef shark populations, report scientists.

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Brain-computer interface allows completely locked-in people to communicate
A computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a new article. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy," despite their extreme condition.

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Increasing factory and auto emissions disrupt natural cycle in East China Sea
China's rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to a new study.

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Flu fighter: Breath monitor to detect flu
A new hand-held breath monitor can potentially detect the flu virus.

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Infrared links could simplify data center communications
Data centers are the central point of many, if not most, information systems today, but the masses of wires interconnecting the servers and piled high on racks begins to resemble last year's tangled Christmas-tree lights disaster. Now a team of engineers is proposing to eliminate most of the wires and substitute infrared free-space optics for communications.

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Re-assessing 'at risk' cutoffs for birth weight
A recent research article contributes to the evidence base regarding the use of population charts for detection of fetal growth disorders and how best to determine risk of complications.

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How Heat from the Sun Can Keep Us All Cool
As demand for air conditioning climbs, some see a solution in the very thing that makes us sweat: the Sun
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“Planned Retreat” Enters the Climate Dialogue
The strategy is emerging from the shadows as scientists and governments try to figure out how to move people out of the way of coastal flooding and other hazards
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NASA's Fermi Telescope Spots Record-Breaking Blazars
Powered by supermassive black holes, the intense light from these extreme galaxies began its journey to us when the universe was but a tenth of its present age
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Widening Suez Canal Ushers In Underwater Invaders
Nomadic jellyfish and poisonous pufferfish are the poster children of an invasion of non-native species into the Mediterranean, with environmental and economic costs. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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Soft, Sticky Frog Tongues Slurp Supper
Scientists discovered a frog’s ability to nab an insect in a fraction of a second depends on the fluid mechanics of its spit.
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What’s at Stake as Trump Takes Aim at Clean Energy Research
Defunding programs like ARPA-E and the Office of Energy Efficiency would stall clean energy advances and cost jobs.

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Reached Via a Mind-Reading Device, Deeply Paralyzed Patients Say They Want to Live
A brain-computer interface records “yes” and “no” answers in patients who lack any voluntary muscle movement.

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The Download, Jan 31, 2017: The Download: Customer Service AI, Quantum Security, and Grocery Robots
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

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The Trillion Internet Observations Showing How Global Sleep Patterns Are Changing
The way we use the Internet is beginning to reveal human behavior patterns on a previously unimaginable scale.

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An AI Poker Bot Has Whipped the Pros
It’s another seminal moment for machine learning, and a painful schooling for humans.

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Alternativet: USA er blevet en digital kolonimagt
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/alternativet-usa-blevet-digital-kolonimagt-1072875 Alternativet kræver pseudonyme og formålsbestemte identiteter, som understøtter lokal datadeling.

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Den danske Wikipedia fylder 15 år med tæt på en kvart million artikler
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danske-wikipedia-fylder-15-aar-taet-paa-kvart-million-artikler-1072862 Det er 15 år siden, projektet med at skrive danske artikler til det åbne onlineleksikon Wikipedia blev påbegyndt. Hver måned kommer 1.000 nye artikler til.

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Nyt 5K-tv skal holdes væk fra wifi-routere
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/lgs-5k-skaerm-skal-holdes-mindst-2-meter-vaek-wifi-routere-1072877 LG's topmodel, som blandt andet forhandles af Apple, har problemer med afskærmningen mod elektromagnetisk støj.

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Gymnasium lækker 240 elevers cpr-numre på Google for Education
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/aarhus-gymnasium-laekker-240-elevers-cpr-numre-paa-google-education-1072876 Skolen beklager fejlen, som den kalder "menneskelig".

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Doctors and Patients Reel After Trump’s Immigration Ban
The healthcare industry reels from the effects of President Trump's executive order on immigration.
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Follow All of These Earth Scientists on Twitter Right Now
If you care about earth science, you should follow these people and organizations on Twitter to get all the best science information and news.
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Spoofed Grindr Accounts Turned One Man’s Life Into a ‘Living Hell’
When someone started making fake Grindr profiles for Matthew Herrick, more than 700 men came to his home and work.
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The Robots Are Coming for Your Heart
Medical advances are forcing humanity to reconsider what a robot even is in the first place—because more and more, the robots will become a part of us.

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