[om opdagelsen af et magnetfelt omkring en mærkelig neutronstjerne i et dobbeltstjerne-system som forhindrer stjernen i at modtage stof fra dens ledsagestjerne]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Mind the gap—Rapid Burster behaviour explained
Scientists observing a curious neutron star in a binary system known as the 'Rapid Burster' may have solved a forty-year-old mystery surrounding its puzzling X-ray bursts. They discovered that its magnetic field creates a gap around the star, largely preventing it from feeding on matter from its stellar companion. Gas builds up until, under certain conditions, it hits the neutron star all at once,

[om opdagelse af et vigtigt molekyle som regulerer vores åndedræt - måske af betydning for behandling af respiratoriske lidelser]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Newly discovered breathing molecule vital to treating respiratory conditions
Respiratory conditions could be better targeted and treated, thanks to the discovery of the vital molecule which regulates breathing – according to research by the University of Warwick.

[om virkningernes af Donald Trumps politik: En mexikansk mur vil accelerere tilbagegangen for kristendom i USA]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Mexico border wall likely to accelerate the decline of American Christianity
In 2015, the Pew Research Center released the largest study of American religious identity ever done in the United States of America, called "America's Changing Religious Landscape." The big discovery was that the number of American Christians had declined by 7.8 percent since the previous survey in 2007, while the number of Americans religiously unaffiliated had increased by 6.7 percent to 22.8 p

[om svampe og hvilken rolle de spiller i naturen, i videnskab og for os]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
The good, the bad and the ugly—the many roles of mushrooms
A new review that investigates the true magic of mushrooms and the many roles they play in our lives, in science and in nature has been published by scientists from the University of Bristol.

[om amatørornithologers hjælp til studiet af fuglenæbbets evolution]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Bird lovers help scientists discover secrets of beak evolution
Citizen scientists and bird lovers across the world have helped researchers at the University of Sheffield and the University of South Florida uncover new secrets about the evolution of bird's beaks over time in a ground-breaking study published today in the journal Nature.

[om den første eksperimentelle observation af en såkaldt førsteordens faseovergang i et kvantesystem]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Quantum phase transition observed for the first time
A group of scientists led by Johannes Fink from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) reported the first experimental observation of a first-order phase transition in a dissipative quantum system. Phase transitions include such phenomena as the freezing of water at the critical temperature of 0 degrees Celsius. However, phase transitions also occur at the quantum mechanical

[om kritik af et studie, der hævder at have opnået metallisk hydrogen]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Metallisk hydrogen sætter forskerverdenen i kog
Påstand om fremstilling af metallisk hydrogen mødes med meget hård kritik fra forskere. Lige til skraldepanden, lyder det. Andre bakker dog de kritiserede forskere op.

[om at virksomheder er mere udsat for hackerangreb fordi de ansatte bruger mobiltelefoner]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Virksomheder bliver sårbare over for hacking på grund af ansattes mobil-spil
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/virksomheders-saarbarhed-hacking-eskalerer-paa-grund-ansattes-mobil-apps-1072911 Et spil på mobiltelefonen kan give hackere adgang til fortrolige dokumenter i en virksomhed, advarer ny sikkerhedsrapport. Version2

[om at der var lavt niveau af oxygen i Jordens middelalder og at dette hæmmede evolutionen i 2 milliarder år]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Low level of oxygen in Earth's middle ages delayed evolution for two billion years
A low level of atmospheric oxygen in Earth's middle ages held back evolution for 2 billion years, raising fresh questions about the origins of life on this planet.

[om at skældyr bliver dræbt for at blive brugt som pangolin-scales på det asiatiske marked]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Thai cops seize record three tonnes of pangolin scales
Thai customs police on Thursday unveiled a massive three-tonne cache of seized pangolin scales intended for Asia's lucrative wildlife markets, where feverish demand for the 'scaly anteater' has turned it into the most trafficked mammal on earth.

[om gigtmedicin eventuelt ikke bør tages hele livet]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Forskere sår tvivl om livsvarig brug af gigtmedicin
Nyt projekt skal afklare, om gigtpatienter kan nøjes med at få biologisk medicin i en afgrænset periode, eller om behandlingen er livslang.

[om at fiskere kan bruge mobiltelefonen til at fiske mere og samtidig hjælpe med miljøovervågningen og bevare fiskebestandene]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Clickbait
The mobile phone apps that are enabling fishermen to increase their catches at the same time as helping environmentalists monitor and preserve stocks.

[om at vitamin-C måske nedsætter risikoen for hjerteflimmer (atrial fibrillation) efter hjerteoperation]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Vitamin C may decrease risk of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery
Vitamin C decreased the incidence of post-operative atrial fibrillation (AF) by 44% in cardiac surgery patients in nine randomized trials that were conducted outside of the USA according to a meta-analysis.

[om at en test med spejl-spil kan gøre det muligt at opdage schizofreni tidligt]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
'Mirror game' test could secure early detection of schizophrenia, study shows
A pioneering new study has developed a new, 'mirror game' test using computer avatars to accurately detect specific variations in how patients move and interact socially -- well-documented characteristics of the mental disorder.

[om hurtigere test for prostatakræft med radiotracer]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
New radiotracer could make diagnosing prostate cancer faster and easier
A new radiotracer has been developed to diagnose prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and is especially difficult to diagnose. While prostate cancer is relatively easy to treat in its early stages, it is prone to metastasis and can quickly become deadly. In order to plan how aggressively they should treat the cancer, it is important for doctors to know how

[om at hjernen udfylder manglende informationer med fyld-informationer i hullerne og at det sker i hippocampus]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Your Brain’s Favorite Trick is Filling in the ______
A study reveals the surprising pattern of pattern-completing connections in the hippocampus.

[om at neutronanalyse har påvist detaljer i bakterieenzym som er involveret i mavekræft]

[UDVALGT SOM MULIG INTERESSANT ARTIKEL]:
Neutrons identify critical details in bacterial enzyme implicated in gastric cancer
Neutron analysis is helping researchers better understand a key enzyme found in a bacterium known to cause stomach cancer. Understanding the details of this enzyme, and thus the Helicobacter pylori bacteria's metabolism and biological pathways, could be central to developing drugs that act against H. pylori, but that do not attack the stomach's useful bacteria.

Image: Solar array drive mechanism on microvibration unit
The smooth running of the mechanism that will align the solar wings powering Europe's latest weather satellite has been demonstrated using ESA's new microvibration unit.

Space travel visionaries solve the problem of interstellar slowdown at Alpha Centauri
In April last year, billionaire Yuri Milner announced the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative. He plans to invest 100 million US dollars in the development of an ultra-light light sail that can be accelerated to 20 percent of the speed of light to reach the Alpha Centauri star system within 20 years. The problem of how to slow down this projectile once it reaches its target remains a challenge. René

6 Cosmic Catastrophes That Could Wipe Out Life on Earth
If you ask yourself what the biggest threat to human existence is you'd probably think of nuclear war, global warming or a large-scale pandemic disease. But assuming we can overcome such challenges, are we really safe?

Researchers complete first stage of experiment to study giant air showers
The first stage of a study on giant air showers has been completed at NEVOD-SHAL, a new facility created at the territory of the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) as a part of a Russian-Italian collaboration.

Ultrahigh sensitivity graphene infrared detectors for imaging and spectroscopy
Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have developed a novel graphene-based infrared (IR) detector demonstrating record high sensitivity for thermal detection. Graphene's unique attributes pave the way for high-performance IR imaging and spectroscopy.

Astronauts' brains change shape during spaceflight
MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a University of Michigan study.

How to improve data management in the supercomputers of the future
Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are establishing new foundations for data management in the supercomputing systems of the future. In recent decades, many scientific discoveries have depended on the analysis of an enormous volume of data, which is done essentially through computational simulations performed on a large scale in supercomputers. This type of machine is used to s

Research journey to the center of the Earth
Researchers in Japan say they may be one step closer to solving a mystery at the core of the Earth. It has long been established that approximately 85 percent of the Earth's core is made of iron, while nickel makes up an additional 10 percent. Details of the final 5 percent—believed to be some amount of light elements—has, until now, eluded scientists.

Scientists show how cells communicate
Primary cilia are antenna-like structures present on the surface of most cells in the human body. The cilia are essential mediators of communication between cell types in the body. If the cilia are defective, this communication is disrupted, and the cells are unable to appropriately regulate important cellular processes, which ultimately can lead to severe diseases that may affect nearly every org

Punxsutawney Phil Spies His Shadow, Signaling 6 More Weeks of Winter
The famous weather prognosticator, a pudgy groundhog, has crawled out of its burrow on Gobbler's Knob to reveal whether an early spring is on its way.

Invasive wild pigs leave a growing swath of destruction across U.S.
They go by many names: wild boar, wild hog, razorback, Eurasian boar, feral swine. But whatever you call them, invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) are wreaking environmental havoc and spreading rapidly.

VIDEO: Tag med på en flyvetur henover Iter-byggeriet
Fusionsanlægget begynder at tage form, men der udestår mange års byggeri endnu.

After oil and gas, Denmark's Dong ditches coal
Danish green energy giant Dong said Thursday it was pulling out of coal use, burning another bridge to its fossil fuel past after ditching oil and gas.

Danmarksrekord: Flok på over 1.000 krondyr spottet
Landets hidtil største flok krondyr optalt på hede i Vestjylland.

Physicists realize exotic quantum system robust to mixing by periodic forces
A team of researchers led by LMU physics professor Immanuel Bloch has experimentally realized an exotic quantum system which is robust to mixing by periodic forces.

Paper: Mexico's natural gas and electricity industries still far from a competitive marketplace
The recent reform in Mexico's natural gas and electricity industries is hampered from ushering in a competitive marketplace because of the country's economic regulation and regulatory design, according to a new paper from the Mexico Center at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

"Escape Room" Game Challenges Physics-Phobes to Face Their Fear
A quantum leap in problem-solving is the only way out of a university’s new LabEscape scenario game --

Comcast Looks All Set to Keep Controlling Your Cable Box. Yay
The FCC was going to open up the cable box to promote competition. But that's all changed under Trump.

WIRED Book Club: Loved Arrival? Check Out Ted Chiang’s ‘Story of Your Life’
Now that Ted Chiang is super hot, let's read some of his short fiction for the month of February.

Physicists, Lasers, and an Airplane: Taking Aim at Quantum Cryptography
Experts claim that quantum cryptography will be more secure than any encryption technique we use today.

Police Could Get Your Location Data Without a Warrant. That Has to End
Opinion: Lawmakers should craft privacy regulations to ensure protection of citizens' amendment rights.

The Warbot Builders of the Middle East Spill Their Secrets
The tech behind new remote-operated 'bots is homebrewed, inelegant---and deadly.

Habitat destruction, pollution and climate change are driving global declines in marine biodiversity
Intensifying pressures from fisheries, habitat destruction, pollution and climate change are driving global declines in marine biodiversity.

New analysis suggests ways for landowners to limit fracking and mineral extraction without regulations
Private landowners concerned about the risks of fracking may be able to prevent mining for oil and natural gas on their land – in perpetuity – without government regulation, according to a new analysis by Rob Jackson, professor of Earth system science at Stanford University, and his colleagues.

NASA's Juno spacecraft to make its fourth flyby over Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft will make its fourth flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:57 a.m. PST (7:57 a.m. EST, 12:57 UTC).

Groundhog Day is Hogwash
Sure, Punxsutawney Phil is fun to watch, but his annual predictions about spring are no better than chance --

Indonesian farmers brush up on efficient vegetable production practices combined with modern varieties
In addition to rice or coffee, many Indonesian farmers grow vegetables such as hot peppers, tomato, cucumber or cabbage. Unfortunately, the quality and yield of these vegetables is often too low. This is why Wageningen University & Research plant scientists started a programme called VegImpact in which they have trained over 10,000 Indonesian farmers in efficient vegetable farming. The farmers wer

Catalyst mediates energy-efficient proton transport for reversibility
When it comes to solar power, storing electricity as fuel would let that energy work on dark or stormy days. The challenge is creating a catalyst that can push the reactions to produce a fuel, such as hydrogen, and later break the fuel to release the energy. Mother Nature does this every day in tiny microorganisms, such as those that make up pond scum. These enzymes work in both directions, revers

Researchers investigate mechanics of lithium sulfides, which show promise as solid electrolytes
Most batteries are composed of two solid, electrochemically active layers called electrodes, separated by a polymer membrane infused with a liquid or gel electrolyte. But recent research has explored the possibility of all-solid-state batteries, in which the liquid (and potentially flammable) electrolyte would be replaced by a solid electrolyte, which could enhance the batteries' energy density an

Air purification via plants and trees
In addition to improving the ambiance in buildings, plants also purify the air. But how does this work, and which conditions are best for this filtering? Three scientists from Wageningen University & Research discuss the potential of plants as air purifiers.

Could Wormholes Really Work? Probably Not
Could we actually warp and bend space-time to make a convenient tunnel, making all our galactic dreams come true? Short answer: not likely.

No Hands! Gadget Taps Brain Waves for Netflix Picks
For when the remote truly is too far away.

Why has the El Nino-Southern Oscillation been more difficult to predict since 2000?
El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a striking interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, has been extensively studied for several decades. Understanding the changes in its characteristics is still an important issue for worldwide environmental and socioeconomic interests. Clear decadal variations exist in the ENSO's predictability, with the most recent decade having the lowest ENSO predict

Artificially introduced atomic-level sensors enable measurements of anelectric field within working semiconductor device
Semiconductors are at the heart of most electronic devices that govern our daily lives. The proper functioning of semiconductor devices relies on their internally generated electric fields. Measuring these fields on the nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation electronics, but current techniques are restricted to measurements of the electric field at a semiconductor's surface. T

How Dragonfish Open Their Fearsome Mouths So Wide
A new study has discovered one of the secrets to deep-sea predatory dragonfishes' wide-gaping jaws.

Pursuits: In Hawaii, a Swimmer’s Communion With the Wild Ocean
“We swam in that heaving body of aquamarine, and what I remember most is the profound feeling that the ocean water had weight.”

Dong Energy dropper kul i kraftværkerne fra 2023
Fra 2023 lover Dong Energy at stoppe med kul på sine kraftværker. De fleste er dog allerede ombygget til at kunne køre 100 pct. på biomasse. CO2-udledningen reduceres hermed til 0,5 mio. ton.

Why Eating The Same Food Increases People's Trust And Cooperation
All over the world, people say they make friends by "breaking bread together." Social science research explores why sitting down to eat together makes people feel closer.

Predator threat boosts friendships among guppies
Danger from predators causes animals to form stronger friendships, according to new research.

Image: Solar array drive mechanism on microvibration unit
The smooth running of the mechanism that will align the solar wings powering Europe's latest weather satellite has been demonstrated using ESA's new microvibration unit.

Space travel visionaries solve the problem of interstellar slowdown at Alpha Centauri
In April last year, billionaire Yuri Milner announced the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative. He plans to invest 100 million US dollars in the development of an ultra-light light sail that can be accelerated to 20 percent of the speed of light to reach the Alpha Centauri star system within 20 years. The problem of how to slow down this projectile once it reaches its target remains a challenge. René

6 Cosmic Catastrophes That Could Wipe Out Life on Earth
If you ask yourself what the biggest threat to human existence is you'd probably think of nuclear war, global warming or a large-scale pandemic disease. But assuming we can overcome such challenges, are we really safe?

Researchers complete first stage of experiment to study giant air showers
The first stage of a study on giant air showers has been completed at NEVOD-SHAL, a new facility created at the territory of the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) as a part of a Russian-Italian collaboration.

Ultrahigh sensitivity graphene infrared detectors for imaging and spectroscopy
Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have developed a novel graphene-based infrared (IR) detector demonstrating record high sensitivity for thermal detection. Graphene's unique attributes pave the way for high-performance IR imaging and spectroscopy.

Astronauts' brains change shape during spaceflight
MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a University of Michigan study.

How to improve data management in the supercomputers of the future
Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are establishing new foundations for data management in the supercomputing systems of the future. In recent decades, many scientific discoveries have depended on the analysis of an enormous volume of data, which is done essentially through computational simulations performed on a large scale in supercomputers. This type of machine is used to s

Research journey to the center of the Earth
Researchers in Japan say they may be one step closer to solving a mystery at the core of the Earth. It has long been established that approximately 85 percent of the Earth's core is made of iron, while nickel makes up an additional 10 percent. Details of the final 5 percent—believed to be some amount of light elements—has, until now, eluded scientists.

Scientists show how cells communicate
Primary cilia are antenna-like structures present on the surface of most cells in the human body. The cilia are essential mediators of communication between cell types in the body. If the cilia are defective, this communication is disrupted, and the cells are unable to appropriately regulate important cellular processes, which ultimately can lead to severe diseases that may affect nearly every org

Punxsutawney Phil Spies His Shadow, Signaling 6 More Weeks of Winter
The famous weather prognosticator, a pudgy groundhog, has crawled out of its burrow on Gobbler's Knob to reveal whether an early spring is on its way.

Invasive wild pigs leave a growing swath of destruction across U.S.
They go by many names: wild boar, wild hog, razorback, Eurasian boar, feral swine. But whatever you call them, invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) are wreaking environmental havoc and spreading rapidly.

VIDEO: Tag med på en flyvetur henover Iter-byggeriet
Fusionsanlægget begynder at tage form, men der udestår mange års byggeri endnu.

After oil and gas, Denmark's Dong ditches coal
Danish green energy giant Dong said Thursday it was pulling out of coal use, burning another bridge to its fossil fuel past after ditching oil and gas.

Danmarksrekord: Flok på over 1.000 krondyr spottet
Landets hidtil største flok krondyr optalt på hede i Vestjylland.

Physicists realize exotic quantum system robust to mixing by periodic forces
A team of researchers led by LMU physics professor Immanuel Bloch has experimentally realized an exotic quantum system which is robust to mixing by periodic forces.

Paper: Mexico's natural gas and electricity industries still far from a competitive marketplace
The recent reform in Mexico's natural gas and electricity industries is hampered from ushering in a competitive marketplace because of the country's economic regulation and regulatory design, according to a new paper from the Mexico Center at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

"Escape Room" Game Challenges Physics-Phobes to Face Their Fear
A quantum leap in problem-solving is the only way out of a university’s new LabEscape scenario game --

Comcast Looks All Set to Keep Controlling Your Cable Box. Yay
The FCC was going to open up the cable box to promote competition. But that's all changed under Trump.

WIRED Book Club: Loved Arrival? Check Out Ted Chiang’s ‘Story of Your Life’
Now that Ted Chiang is super hot, let's read some of his short fiction for the month of February.

Physicists, Lasers, and an Airplane: Taking Aim at Quantum Cryptography
Experts claim that quantum cryptography will be more secure than any encryption technique we use today.

Police Could Get Your Location Data Without a Warrant. That Has to End
Opinion: Lawmakers should craft privacy regulations to ensure protection of citizens' amendment rights.

The Warbot Builders of the Middle East Spill Their Secrets
The tech behind new remote-operated 'bots is homebrewed, inelegant---and deadly.

Habitat destruction, pollution and climate change are driving global declines in marine biodiversity
Intensifying pressures from fisheries, habitat destruction, pollution and climate change are driving global declines in marine biodiversity.

New analysis suggests ways for landowners to limit fracking and mineral extraction without regulations
Private landowners concerned about the risks of fracking may be able to prevent mining for oil and natural gas on their land – in perpetuity – without government regulation, according to a new analysis by Rob Jackson, professor of Earth system science at Stanford University, and his colleagues.

NASA's Juno spacecraft to make its fourth flyby over Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft will make its fourth flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:57 a.m. PST (7:57 a.m. EST, 12:57 UTC).

Groundhog Day is Hogwash
Sure, Punxsutawney Phil is fun to watch, but his annual predictions about spring are no better than chance --

Indonesian farmers brush up on efficient vegetable production practices combined with modern varieties
In addition to rice or coffee, many Indonesian farmers grow vegetables such as hot peppers, tomato, cucumber or cabbage. Unfortunately, the quality and yield of these vegetables is often too low. This is why Wageningen University & Research plant scientists started a programme called VegImpact in which they have trained over 10,000 Indonesian farmers in efficient vegetable farming. The farmers wer

Catalyst mediates energy-efficient proton transport for reversibility
When it comes to solar power, storing electricity as fuel would let that energy work on dark or stormy days. The challenge is creating a catalyst that can push the reactions to produce a fuel, such as hydrogen, and later break the fuel to release the energy. Mother Nature does this every day in tiny microorganisms, such as those that make up pond scum. These enzymes work in both directions, revers

Researchers investigate mechanics of lithium sulfides, which show promise as solid electrolytes
Most batteries are composed of two solid, electrochemically active layers called electrodes, separated by a polymer membrane infused with a liquid or gel electrolyte. But recent research has explored the possibility of all-solid-state batteries, in which the liquid (and potentially flammable) electrolyte would be replaced by a solid electrolyte, which could enhance the batteries' energy density an

Air purification via plants and trees
In addition to improving the ambiance in buildings, plants also purify the air. But how does this work, and which conditions are best for this filtering? Three scientists from Wageningen University & Research discuss the potential of plants as air purifiers.

Could Wormholes Really Work? Probably Not
Could we actually warp and bend space-time to make a convenient tunnel, making all our galactic dreams come true? Short answer: not likely.

No Hands! Gadget Taps Brain Waves for Netflix Picks
For when the remote truly is too far away.

Why has the El Nino-Southern Oscillation been more difficult to predict since 2000?
El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a striking interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, has been extensively studied for several decades. Understanding the changes in its characteristics is still an important issue for worldwide environmental and socioeconomic interests. Clear decadal variations exist in the ENSO's predictability, with the most recent decade having the lowest ENSO predict

Artificially introduced atomic-level sensors enable measurements of anelectric field within working semiconductor device
Semiconductors are at the heart of most electronic devices that govern our daily lives. The proper functioning of semiconductor devices relies on their internally generated electric fields. Measuring these fields on the nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation electronics, but current techniques are restricted to measurements of the electric field at a semiconductor's surface. T

How Dragonfish Open Their Fearsome Mouths So Wide
A new study has discovered one of the secrets to deep-sea predatory dragonfishes' wide-gaping jaws.

Pursuits: In Hawaii, a Swimmer’s Communion With the Wild Ocean
“We swam in that heaving body of aquamarine, and what I remember most is the profound feeling that the ocean water had weight.”

Dong Energy dropper kul i kraftværkerne fra 2023
Fra 2023 lover Dong Energy at stoppe med kul på sine kraftværker. De fleste er dog allerede ombygget til at kunne køre 100 pct. på biomasse. CO2-udledningen reduceres hermed til 0,5 mio. ton.

Why Eating The Same Food Increases People's Trust And Cooperation
All over the world, people say they make friends by "breaking bread together." Social science research explores why sitting down to eat together makes people feel closer.

Predator threat boosts friendships among guppies
Danger from predators causes animals to form stronger friendships, according to new research.

DI Energi: Dongs stop for kul kan påvirke næste energiforlig
DI Energi kalder det et stærkt signal, at energiselskabet Dong fra 2023 kun vil fyre med biomasse på kraftværkerne.

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants more flexibility in deciding whom to quarantine and why. But critics say the changes the agency has proposed raise civil liberties questions.

VIDEO Enorme mængder lava fosser ud af hawaiiansk ”brandslange”
Lavastrømmen fra Kilauea-vulkanen på Hawaii tager til i intensitet.

Brændselsstave fundet under nedsmeltet reaktor i Fukushima
Seks år efter nedsmeltningen på atomkraftværket Fukushima Daiichi mener operatøren nu endelig at have lokaliseret nogle forsvundne brændselsstave.

Texas votes to change science lessons challenging evolution
The Texas Board of Education has preliminarily voted to ease—but not completely eliminate—state high school science curriculum requirements that experts argued cast doubt on the theory of evolution.

H&R Block adds IBM's Watson to its tax team
H&R Block Inc. is working IBM's Watson supercomputer this tax season.

Arkansas bill aimed at forcing Amazon to collect sales taxes
Forcing Amazon and other e-commerce companies to collect Arkansas sales taxes could generate up to $100 million annually in extra revenue, a senator said Wednesday, arguing his plan would put the state in a better position to enact deeper tax cuts in two years.

Nokia reports 766 million euro loss in 2016
Telecoms giant Nokia on Thursday said that falling network sales and costs stemming from acquisitions and its integration of Alcatel-Lucent had resulted in a "disappointing" loss in 2016.

Research shows importance of remote cameras as biodiversity tools
University of Montana doctoral candidate Robin Steenweg shows how remote cameras can transform monitoring wildlife and habitat biodiversity worldwide in a paper published Feb. 1 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Thin, flexible, light-absorbent material for energy and stealth applications
Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection. These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego.

Four Bengal tigers born in El Salvador animal park
Four Bengal tigers have been born in an El Salvador animal park that runs an endangered-species reproduction program, the facility announced Wednesday.

King of the zoo: liger cub Tsar is Russian hit
His name is fit for a king, and he's being treated like one: Tsar the liger cub, born from an extremely rare lion-tiger romance, is proving a hit for a travelling Russian zoo.

Mexico's vaquita porpoise close to extinction, 30 left
Mexico's vaquita marina is edging closer to extinction as scientists warned Wednesday that only 30 were left despite navy efforts to intercept illegal fishing nets killing the world's smallest porpoise.

Japan court rejects 'right to be forgotten' on Google
Japan's Supreme Court has rejected a man's demand that news search results of his arrest on sex charges be deleted from Google, ruling that to do so would violate freedom of expression.

As California drought eases thanks to storms
Roaring storms that brought California almost a year's worth of snow and rain in a single month should make state water managers' Sierra snowpack survey Thursday a celebration, marking this winter's dramatic retreat of the state's more than 5-year-drought, water experts say.

Facebook's Oculus facing $500 million bill in copyright case
Facebook's virtual-reality subsidiary and two of its founders are facing a sobering reality after a jury hit them with a $500 million bill for violating the intellectual property rights of video-game maker ZeniMax Media.

Verdenskendt klimaekspert bliver ny professor
Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen tiltræder som ny professor på Niels Bohr Institutet, NBI, på...

I 2023 er det slut med kul hos Dong
Kul skiftes ud med biomasse på de sidste af Dongs værker, så det er helt slut med kul fra 2023.

VIDEO: When Humans Got Cozy, Germs Got Deadly
Our first germs didn't do much damage, until we gave up our hunter-gatherer ways and started farming. Episode 1 of a three-part animated miniseries on the battle between humans and germs.

Inside the Far-out Glass Lab
A key ingredient in flexible and lightweight devices of the future is taking shape at Corning’s research center in rural New York.

OVERBLIK: Her skaber Trump-kaos utryghed og vrede blandt forskere
En bomberegn af uklare tiltag fra Trump-regeringen får forskere på barrikaderne, og komplicerer samarbejde med internationale eksperter.

Reversible saliva allows frogs to hang on to next meal
A frog tongue's stickiness is caused by a reversible saliva in combination with a super soft tongue, new research shows. A frog's saliva is thick and sticky during prey capture, then turns thin and watery as prey is removed inside the mouth.

Topological Principles of Control in Dynamical Network Systems
Networked systems display complex patterns of interactions between a large number of components. In physical networks, these interactions often occur along structural connections that link components in a hard-wired connection topology, supporting a variety of system-wide dynamical behaviors such as synchronization. While descriptions of these behaviors are important, they are only a first step to

Process reveals structure: How a network is traversed mediates expectations about its architecture
Network science has emerged as a powerful tool through which we can study the higher-order architectural properties of the world around us. How human learners exploit this information remains an essential question. Here, we focus on the temporal constraints that govern such a process. Participants viewed a continuous sequence of images generated by three distinct walks on a modular network. Walks

Battles over non-medical exemptions to vaccination festering in state legislatures
Bills to eliminate non-medical exemptions to school vaccination requirements are pending in state legislatures. Bills to add non-medical exemptions are pending as well. Some bills make harder to claim an exemption. Others discourage vaccination by requiring “misinformed consent.” Still others try to weaken the authority of public health officials to combat vaccine-preventable diseases. Today, we

How Intelligent Are Psychopaths? Study Examines the "Hannibal Lecter Myth"
A new study makes a surprising finding on the intelligence of psychopaths, often portrayed as evil geniuses in popular culture.

Voters Are Pestering Reps With a Newfangled Alternative: Fax
At the #PaulRyanFaxParty, the politics are 2017 but the tech is very 1987.
DI Energi: Dongs stop for kul kan påvirke næste energiforlig
DI Energi kalder det et stærkt signal, at energiselskabet Dong fra 2023 kun vil fyre med biomasse på kraftværkerne.

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants more flexibility in deciding whom to quarantine and why. But critics say the changes the agency has proposed raise civil liberties questions.

VIDEO Enorme mængder lava fosser ud af hawaiiansk ”brandslange”
Lavastrømmen fra Kilauea-vulkanen på Hawaii tager til i intensitet.

Brændselsstave fundet under nedsmeltet reaktor i Fukushima
Seks år efter nedsmeltningen på atomkraftværket Fukushima Daiichi mener operatøren nu endelig at have lokaliseret nogle forsvundne brændselsstave.

Texas votes to change science lessons challenging evolution
The Texas Board of Education has preliminarily voted to ease—but not completely eliminate—state high school science curriculum requirements that experts argued cast doubt on the theory of evolution.

H&R Block adds IBM's Watson to its tax team
H&R Block Inc. is working IBM's Watson supercomputer this tax season.

Arkansas bill aimed at forcing Amazon to collect sales taxes
Forcing Amazon and other e-commerce companies to collect Arkansas sales taxes could generate up to $100 million annually in extra revenue, a senator said Wednesday, arguing his plan would put the state in a better position to enact deeper tax cuts in two years.

Nokia reports 766 million euro loss in 2016
Telecoms giant Nokia on Thursday said that falling network sales and costs stemming from acquisitions and its integration of Alcatel-Lucent had resulted in a "disappointing" loss in 2016.

Research shows importance of remote cameras as biodiversity tools
University of Montana doctoral candidate Robin Steenweg shows how remote cameras can transform monitoring wildlife and habitat biodiversity worldwide in a paper published Feb. 1 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Thin, flexible, light-absorbent material for energy and stealth applications
Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection. These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego.

Four Bengal tigers born in El Salvador animal park
Four Bengal tigers have been born in an El Salvador animal park that runs an endangered-species reproduction program, the facility announced Wednesday.

King of the zoo: liger cub Tsar is Russian hit
His name is fit for a king, and he's being treated like one: Tsar the liger cub, born from an extremely rare lion-tiger romance, is proving a hit for a travelling Russian zoo.

Mexico's vaquita porpoise close to extinction, 30 left
Mexico's vaquita marina is edging closer to extinction as scientists warned Wednesday that only 30 were left despite navy efforts to intercept illegal fishing nets killing the world's smallest porpoise.

Japan court rejects 'right to be forgotten' on Google
Japan's Supreme Court has rejected a man's demand that news search results of his arrest on sex charges be deleted from Google, ruling that to do so would violate freedom of expression.

As California drought eases thanks to storms
Roaring storms that brought California almost a year's worth of snow and rain in a single month should make state water managers' Sierra snowpack survey Thursday a celebration, marking this winter's dramatic retreat of the state's more than 5-year-drought, water experts say.

Facebook's Oculus facing $500 million bill in copyright case
Facebook's virtual-reality subsidiary and two of its founders are facing a sobering reality after a jury hit them with a $500 million bill for violating the intellectual property rights of video-game maker ZeniMax Media.

Verdenskendt klimaekspert bliver ny professor
Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen tiltræder som ny professor på Niels Bohr Institutet, NBI, på...

I 2023 er det slut med kul hos Dong
Kul skiftes ud med biomasse på de sidste af Dongs værker, så det er helt slut med kul fra 2023.

VIDEO: When Humans Got Cozy, Germs Got Deadly
Our first germs didn't do much damage, until we gave up our hunter-gatherer ways and started farming. Episode 1 of a three-part animated miniseries on the battle between humans and germs.

Inside the Far-out Glass Lab
A key ingredient in flexible and lightweight devices of the future is taking shape at Corning’s research center in rural New York.

OVERBLIK: Her skaber Trump-kaos utryghed og vrede blandt forskere
En bomberegn af uklare tiltag fra Trump-regeringen får forskere på barrikaderne, og komplicerer samarbejde med internationale eksperter.

Reversible saliva allows frogs to hang on to next meal
A frog tongue's stickiness is caused by a reversible saliva in combination with a super soft tongue, new research shows. A frog's saliva is thick and sticky during prey capture, then turns thin and watery as prey is removed inside the mouth.

Topological Principles of Control in Dynamical Network Systems
Networked systems display complex patterns of interactions between a large number of components. In physical networks, these interactions often occur along structural connections that link components in a hard-wired connection topology, supporting a variety of system-wide dynamical behaviors such as synchronization. While descriptions of these behaviors are important, they are only a first step to

Process reveals structure: How a network is traversed mediates expectations about its architecture
Network science has emerged as a powerful tool through which we can study the higher-order architectural properties of the world around us. How human learners exploit this information remains an essential question. Here, we focus on the temporal constraints that govern such a process. Participants viewed a continuous sequence of images generated by three distinct walks on a modular network. Walks

Battles over non-medical exemptions to vaccination festering in state legislatures
Bills to eliminate non-medical exemptions to school vaccination requirements are pending in state legislatures. Bills to add non-medical exemptions are pending as well. Some bills make harder to claim an exemption. Others discourage vaccination by requiring “misinformed consent.” Still others try to weaken the authority of public health officials to combat vaccine-preventable diseases. Today, we

How Intelligent Are Psychopaths? Study Examines the "Hannibal Lecter Myth"
A new study makes a surprising finding on the intelligence of psychopaths, often portrayed as evil geniuses in popular culture.

Voters Are Pestering Reps With a Newfangled Alternative: Fax
At the #PaulRyanFaxParty, the politics are 2017 but the tech is very 1987.

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