VIDEO: Ny bro over Roskilde Fjord starter 60 meter under jordenFjordforbindelsen Frederikssund er startet på de geotekniske undersøgelser. Følg det store projekt, der starter med en kørevej af træflis og jernplader.ææææææ
Broken pebbles offer clues to Paleolithic funeral ritualsHumans may have ritualistically "killed" objects to remove their symbolic power, some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new international study of marine pebble tools from an Upper Paleolithic burial site in Italy suggests.ææææææ
Researchers optimize the assembly of micro-/meso-/macroporous carbon for Li-S batteriesLi-S batteries are considered as promising alternatives for Li-ion batteries in the new generation of energy storages, due to high specific capacity (1675 mAh/g) and energy density (2600 mWh/g) of sulfur. But the poor conductivity of sulfur and severe shuttle effect of reaction intermediates destory the stability of this system. A variety of porous carbon materials have been applied as sulfur hostææææææ
Wave of the future: Terahertz chips a new way of seeing through matterElectromagnetic pulses lasting one millionth of a millionth of a second may hold the key to advances in medical imaging, communications and drug development. But the pulses, called terahertz waves, have long required elaborate and expensive equipment to use.ææææææ
Chinese police probe endangered pangolin banquetChinese authorities are investigating whether government officials may have feasted on endangered pangolins, considered the most trafficked mammal on earth, at a banquet after posts about the meal drew outrage on social media.ææææææ
In-cell molecular sieve from protein crystalScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, RIKEN, and Kyoto Institute of Technology have applied rational crystal design to create protein crystals with extended porous network to accumulate exogenous molecules inside living cells. This work lays a foundation for engineering of stable self-assembling crystalline porous materials which can concentrate and preserve bioactive substances in variousææææææ
Art Rosenfeld, 'godfather' of energy efficiency, dies at 90Physicist Arthur Rosenfeld, who spearheaded breakthroughs in energy efficiency for lighting, refrigerators, televisions and other electronics while working at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has died. He was 90.ææææææ
Once-reviled scavenger bird now the pride of its Indian homeThe greater adjutant stork used to be an object of revulsion in northeast India. It's not a pretty bird, with its large, dull-orange bill and gray, black and white plumage. A carnivore and scavenger, it left bits of dead animals in its nests. People thought it brought bad luck, so they destroyed nests and sometimes poisoned the birds.ææææææ
Banedanmark-system i knæ: Højtalersystemer, rejseplan og skærme ude af driftEn endnu ukendt fejl har lagt hele Banedanmarks kommunikationssystem ned.æææ
Datatilsynet til forskere: I passer for dårligt på følsomme persondata https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kritik-hagler-ned-forskere-datatilsynet-de-forsynder-sig-mod-persondatalovgivningen-1073299 Forskere overholder for ofte ikke juridiske og tekniske krav, der skal beskytte bl.a. følsomme sundhedsdata, viser en 'razzia' fra Datatilsynet. I ét tilfælde er overtrædelserne så grelle, at en straffesag kan komme på tale. Version2ææææææ

Falske direktørmails i kraftig stigning: Danske virksomheder malkes for millioner https://www.version2.dk/artikel/goddag-jeg-din-chef-danske-virksomheder-bliver-malket-millioner-via-svindelmails-1073298 Danske virksomheder har i anden halvdel af 2016 mistet mere end 180 millioner kroner til svindlere, fremgår det af trusselsvurdering fra Center for Cybersikkerhed. Version2ææææææ
Zinkbombe hober sig op: Hvornår får jorden nok af tungmetal fra danske svin?Danmark har gang i en tvivlsom udvikling, hvor jorden med gylle fra svin bliver tilført mere zink, end planterne optager. Det kan miljøet ikke leve med i længden.ææææææ
Dakota Access Pipeline: ETP firm to resume work immediatelyThe decision comes after Donald Trump formally backed the pipeline in an early act as president.ææææææ
Nævn afviser atter ansøgning om tilskud til hjertemiddelMedicintilskudsnævnet afviser atter ansøgning fra Novartis om klausuleret tilskud til hjertemidlet Entresto. Klausulen er for kompliceret, og der er risiko for, at Entresto vil blive anvendt til patienter uden for klausulen, lyder begrundelsen.ææææææ
Facts About CicadasCicadas are winged insects that are mostly known for their cyclical lifespans. They emerge all at once every 13 or 17 years.ææææææ
Video: From Measles To Syphilis, How We Created The Golden Age Of Germs Ten thousand years ago, many of our deadly human diseases didn't exist. What happened?ææææææ
Facts About KiwisThe kiwi is a small, flightless bird native to New Zealand.ææææææ
This Technology Could Finally Make Brain Implants PracticalHarvard Medical School is testing a new design of a brain implant meant to restore vision to the blind.ææææææ
Weak Reporting System Let Risky Surgical Device Stay in UseDoctors and hospitals failed to tell the Food and Drug Administration about women whose cancer was spread by a surgical tool, a new report finds.ææææææ
Anti-cell death agent a potential treatment for vision loss associated with MSA new therapeutic agent tested in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS) produced anti-inflammatory activity and prevented loss of cells in the optic nerve, according to a new study.ææææææ
Poor and less educated suffer the most from chronic painPoorer and less-educated older Americans are more like to suffer from chronic pain than those with greater wealth and more education, but the disparity between the two groups is much greater than previously thought, according to new research.ææææææ
Real-time feedback helps save energy and waterThose who take long showers use a great deal of water and energy. Yet people who enjoy taking long showers do not usually realize to what extent they are damaging the environment. However, if a clever measuring system shows current consumption, this immediately leads to increased efficiency. The consumption information available on the display is incentive enough to reduce water and energy consumpææææææ
Lava Fire Hose in Hawaii Returns for an EncoreA remarkable stream of lava off the coast of Hawaii has become visible again, days after a cliff collapse blocked the view.ææææææ
'Corrective glass' for mass spectrometry imagingResearchers have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-built to accommodate the topography of non-flat samples. The new tool can be used for answering ecological questions from a new perspective.ææææææ
2,000 Years Ago, 2 Men Figured Out Nothing Is Solid The idea that reality is comprised of atoms and space goes way, way back. Read Moreææææææ
To do things with words (only): An introduction to the role of noise in coordination dynamics without equationsUncertainty, spatial or temporal errors, variability, are classic themes in the study of human and animal behaviors. Several theoretical approaches1 and concepts have been adopted to tackle those issues, often considering the CNS as an observer, using Shannon information and entropy, signal to noise ratio, and recently a Bayesian approach, and free energy minimization. In the coordination dynamicsææææææ
Biologically-inspired characterization of sparseness in natural imagesNatural images follow statistics inherited by the structure of our physical (visual) environment. In particular, a prominent facet of this structure is that images can be described by a relatively sparse number of features. We designed a sparse coding algorithm biologically-inspired by the architecture of the primary visual cortex. We show here that coefficients of this representation exhibit a heææææææ
Integrated Information as a Metric for Group Interaction: Analyzing Human and Computer Groups Using a Technique Developed to Measure ConsciousnessResearchers in many disciplines have previously used a variety of mathematical techniques for analyzing group interactions. Here we use a new metric for this purpose, called 'integrated information' or 'phi.' Phi was originally developed by neuroscientists as a measure of consciousness in brains, but it captures, in a single mathematical quantity, two properties that are important in many other kiææææææ
Naps may help preschoolers learn, study findsResearchers studied verb learning in 3-year-olds, finding that those who napped after learning new verbs had a better understanding of the words when tested 24 hours later.ææææææ
Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of daysA desktop diagnosis tool has been developed that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning.ææææææ
Intel’s ‘New’ Factory Isn’t About Trump—It’s About Fixing Intel The seemingly resurrected plant isn't about making America great again. It's about making chips for a post-PC world.
Versatile 2-dimensional material grown in labResearchers report that they are the first to grow a 2-D material with the ability to have many different properties.ææææææ
Believe in the American dream? You're less likely to impulse buy, study findsWhen materialistic consumers believe in the American dream -- that it's possible to improve their economic status through hard work -- they are less likely to spend impulsively, according to new research.ææææææ
Why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decadeWith the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide over the past decade, less of the greenhouse gas is reaching the Earth's atmosphere. That's decidedly good news, but it comes with a catch: Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean promote acidification, which breaks down the calcium carbonate shells of some marine organisms.ææææææ
First nuclear explosion helps test theory of moon's formationRadioactive glass found blanketing the ground after the first nuclear test bomb explosion is being used by scientists to test theories about the Moon’s formation some 4.5 billion years ago.ææææææ
Oculus Closes Many In-Store Demo Stations as VR Headsets Prove a Hard SellFacebook says it will continue to invest in virtual reality technology despite evidence it’s not catching on with many consumers.ææææææ
Orangutan squeaks reveal language evolution, says studyThe way orangutans communicate could shed light on humans' first words.ææææææ
Better scaffolds help scientists study cancerThree-dimensional printed scaffolds with varying pore sizes help scientists see how bone cancer tumors are prone to spread in a realistic environment.ææææææ
Bolivia declares emergency over locust plagueFumigation must start immediately to avoid further destruction in the main agricultural area.ææææææ
Older adults who exercise regularly may lower chances for severe mobility problemsA team of researchers theorized that exercise might also help adults prevent or delay disabilities that interfere with independent living.ææææææ
How Do You Save Snow Leopards? First, Gather Their DroppingsTo reduce conflict with herders in the Himalayas, biologists gathered a fecal data set to decode the diets of the endangered cats.ææææææ
A wireless charging port for 74 percent off? I'd buy it Gadgets Run like the wind! Be one with the deal! A wireless charger port for 74 percent off? I'd buy it. Run like the wind! Be one with the deal!ææææææ
Nuclear Fire-Formed Glass Used To Test Moon Formation Theory | VideoA green-colored glass, called trinitite, was found 30 feet (10m) to 80 feet (250 m) away from ground zero after the first plutonium bomb test in 1945. They were lacking volatile elements similarly to that of lunar rocks.ææææææ
How Big Can Stars Get? Awesome Visualization Shows ScaleSome stars can be the size of a planet, others can be more than 1400 times bigger than the Sun. Different types of stars are shown to scale in this European Southern Observatory visualization.ææææææ
Andean Bears Are Right at Home in Machu Picchu | VideoTourists to the world-famous Incan ruins at Machu Piccu in Peru have company — Andean bears, which researchers found to be widespread in the protected area.ææææææ
Crab Teases Anemone, Anemone Splits In Two, Crab And Anemone Live On Researchers have found the first known case of one animal, a boxer crab, stimulating another animal, a sea anemone, to reproduce asexually.
Breathing new life into 'Great Oxidation Event'Scientists are providing fresh insights into the 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE), in which oxygen first appeared in the Earth's atmosphere more than 2.3 billion years ago.ææææææ
Trump is 2nd president to tout unfinished Intel factoryPresident Donald Trump on Wednesday held up Intel's plan to invest more than $7 billion in an Arizona factory as a win for his economic agenda, but it's also a reminder that not all corporate commitments come to fruition.æææææææææ
Fecal Transplant Therapy Improves Autism Symptoms, Study Finds Evidence suggests that gains in symptom reduction are permanent. Read Moreæææ
Technology problem causes flight delays at United AirlinesUnited Airlines says it has fixed a technology problem that delayed hundreds of flight around the country.ææææææ
Newly Discovered Gecko's Giant Breakaway Scales Help It Flee Predators This species is a master escape artist. It's extremely fast. It can lose its tail and grow a new one. And most unusually, it can shed its huge scales to get out of sticky situations.
The hunt for rogue planets just got tougher New analyses cut down the estimated number of planets unattached to a star by half.
Can the HPV Vaccine Protect Against Skin Cancer?The HPV vaccine, which protects against several strains of the human papillomavirus, shows potential for preventing new spots of skin cancer from popping up in people who have had skin cancer in the past, a report of two patients’ cases suggests.ææææææ
Data on blue whales off California helps protect their distant relativesA research team has found a way to translate their knowledge of blue whales off California and in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean to the other side of the world, revealing those areas of the Northern Indian Ocean where whales are likely to be encountered.ææææææ
Refined method offers new piece in the cancer puzzleA special spectrometry method that is normally used in analyses of computer chips, lacquers and metals has been further developed so that it can help researchers better detect harmful cells in the body.ææææææ
Current climate change models understate the problem, scientists argueA new study on the relationship between people and the planet shows that climate change is only one of many inter-related threats to the Earth's capacity to support human life.ææææææ
Large groups of photons on demand: An equivalent of photonic 'integrated circuit'Holographic atomic memory is the first device able to generate single photons on demand in groups of several dozen or more. The device, successfully demonstrated in practice, overcomes one of the fundamental obstacles towards the construction of some type of quantum computer.ææææææ
Skeletons of London's past exposed in rail line digArtefacts revealing 8,000 years of human history in London are going on show on Friday after being unearthed during the city's giant underground railway project.ææææææ
America's youngest children most likely to live in poor economic conditionsOut of all age groups, children are still most likely to live in poverty, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Using the latest available data from the American Community Survey, NCCP researchers found that in 2015, while 30 percent of adults have low incomes, more than 40 percent of all childrenææææææ
Eww! Live Cockroach Pulled from Woman's Nose in Rare CaseAn odd "crawling sensation" that a women felt in her head turned out to be a real, live cockroach.ææææææ
An All-You-Can-Eat Buffet: Bald Eagles Prey On Farmer's Chickens Picture an organic farm, with thousands of free-range chickens roaming wide-open land. Now picture it from above, from the vantage of a soaring bald eagle. It's an all-you-can-eat buffet.ææææææ
Snow leopard and Himalayan wolf diets are about one-quarter livestockAround a quarter of Himalayan snow leopard and wolf diets are livestock, the rest being wild prey, according to a new study.ææææææ
Splitfin flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to illuminate planktonThe flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to detect and feed on its planktonic prey, according to a new study.ææææææ
Scientists create organs-on-chips for large-scale drug screeningModeling human organs on a small scale has been a major goal of researchers focused on improving the discovery of drug compounds that can target specific tissue cells, such as cancerous tumors. Now scientists have discovered an effective way to recreate the complex three-dimensional structure of tissues in a format that can be used in drug compound screening for potential new treatments.ææææææ
Grow, mow, mulch: Finding lawn's valueCan grassy lawns affect carbon and nitrogen in the soil? Researchers found grass species and mowing habits can make a difference.ææææææ
Study finds new bacterial strain can contaminate shellfishResearchers have found a new strain of bacteria thriving along the Atlantic Coast that can contaminate shellfish and sicken seafood lovers.ææææææ
Pinterest lets phones spy eye-catching itemsPinterest on Wednesday infused more machine smarts into its online bulletin boards, pushing harder into e-commerce by enabling people to use smartphones to identify products they might wish to pursue.æææ
Just 6 rad kites for celebrating National Kite Flying Day Gadgets Let out some slack and take flight. If you have a chance to go outside, make sure to fly a kite for us. We wish we could join you.æææ
In a Rare Zoo Escape, Sunny the Red Panda Is Still at LargeAbout a half-dozen animals a year escape from major zoos in the United States, but they are usually found quickly.æææ
Researchers determine why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decadeWith the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past decade, less of the greenhouse gas is reaching the Earth's atmosphere. That's decidedly good news, but it comes with a catch: Rising levels of CO2 in the ocean promote acidification, which breaks down the calcium carbonate shells of some marine organisms.æææ
Better scaffolds help scientists study cancerTesting treatments for bone cancer tumors may get easier with new enhancements to sophisticated support structures that mimic their biological environment, according to Rice University scientists.æææ
A trust gap may hinder academic success for minoritiesMiddle school students of color who lose trust in their teachers due to perceptions of mistreatment from school authorities are less likely to attend college even if they generally had good grades, according to psychology research at The University of Texas at Austin published in the journal Child Development.æææ
Grow, mow, mulch: Finding lawn's valueCranking up the lawn mower on a Saturday afternoon may be a child's most dreaded chore. But little does he or she know that it also affects how much carbon and nitrogen are present in the soil below the grass.æææ
For better skin grafts, take just one layer Research shows that a skin-graft harvesting system aids chronic wound recovery and reduces care costs by accelerating the healing process. More than six million cases of chronic wounds cost $20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores, surgical site wounds, and traumatic injuries to high-risk patients account for most wounds that won’t heal. “Chronic wounds occur whæææ
Republicans Offer to Tax Carbon EmissionsBut would a price of $40 per ton hold back climate change as much as Obama policies would have? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Why plant tissues have a sense of directionScientists have published new evidence that plant tissues can have a preferred direction of growth and that this characteristic is essential for producing complex plant shapes.æææ
Scientists create organs-on-chips for large-scale drug screeningLed by UCI professor of molecular biology & biochemistry Christopher C.W. Hughes, the research team successfully established multiple vascularized micro-organs on an industry-standard 96-well plate. Hughes and the study's first author, Duc T. T. Phan, showed that these miniature tissues are much better at reproducing human drug responses than previous model systems. Hughes and his group have shownæææ
Penn researchers among first to grow versatile 2-D material tungsten ditellurideUniversity of Pennsylvania researchers are now among the first to produce a single, three-atom-thick layer of a unique two-dimensional material called tungsten ditelluride. Their findings have been published in 2-D Materials.æææ
Mysterious geoglyphs can teach us about the Amazon's past—and its worrisome future Environment Enormous shapes etched onto the Earth Large geometric shapes found in the Amazon rainforest suggest that humans have been altering forests there for thousands of years…æææ
US national anthem mentions slaves: Racist? People have questioned why the national anthem of the United States mentions slavery. Is the song racist, patriotic, or both? In this 90-second video, Nicole Eustace, professor of history at New York University, puts the song and its lyrics in context. The national anthem lyrics in question are: “No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave: Andæææ
Poopy Situation Down Under: Why 36 Australian Beaches Were ClosedMelbourne's beaches are in an icky situation at the moment.æææ
World's First Atomic Blast Tests Theories of Moon's FormationRadioactive glass from the Trinity nuclear test site resembles ancient moon rocks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Alternative theory on how aspirin may thwart cancerMany studies have pointed to a role for aspirin in cancer prevention. Scientists have been unsure how the drug works in this regard, although they usually cite aspirin's anti-inflammatory effect. Now, lab studies point to a different mechanism. It involves aspirin's action against platelets, the blood cells that play a role in forming clots -- and new blood vessels, which can aid tumor growth.æææ
This Bra Offers Emergency SupportIg Nobel Prize creator Marc Abrahams shows off this unusual disaster-preparedness device before a night discussing humor and science at the 92nd Street Y. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Chimpanzee feet allow scientists a new grasp on human foot evolutionAn investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper.æææ
Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variabilityChanges in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to hydrologists. The researchers found that responses to climate variations can be detected in deep groundwater aquifers faster than expected -- in many cases within a year.æææ
Youth soccer coaches can prevent injuries with just 90-minutes of trainingProfessional preventive training programs can be expensive and difficult to implement. A new study shows that when coaches receive even a small amount of education about preventive training, they can be as effective as professional athletic trainers at mitigating poor movement behavior and preventing injury in young soccer athletes.æææ
Three new uranium minerals from UtahThree new minerals recently found are secondary crusts found in old uranium mines in southern Utah. They're bright, yellow and hard to find. Meet leesite, leószilárdite and redcanyonite.æææ
This male birth control worked for over a year (in monkeys) Health It gives ‘are you gellin’?’ a whole new meaning Nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended. We can do better.æææ
Teens tend to explore in a more ‘random’ way The strategies people use for exploration change during the transition from teen to young adult, research suggests. Young adults are more likely to engage in “directed exploration,” or exploration driven by information-seeking, than teenagers are. At the same time, teens seem to be more comfortable with uncertainty overall. The study differentiates between two distinct types of exploration: direcæææ
Wolfing it down: Brown bears reduce wolf kill rates says usu ecologistThe influence of predation on an ecosystem may depend on the composition of the predator community, researchers report.æææ
Researchers quantify immune cells associated with future breast cancer riskResearchers have quantified the numbers of various types of immune cells associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, outlines a new report.æææ
Flat lens opens a broad world of colorThe first flat lens that works within a continual bandwidth of colors, from blue to green, has now been developed by researchers. This bandwidth, close to that of an LED, paves the way for new applications in imaging, spectroscopy and sensing.æææ
Study reveals how melanoma spreadsNewly identified genes and genetic pathways in primary melanoma -- a type of skin cancer -- could give researchers new targets for developing new personalized treatments for melanoma, and potentially other cancers. Learning how the genes are expressed (turned on or off) could be used in the future to predict how and when the cancer cells will spread to other parts of the body and how fast they wilæææ
Researchers discover reason for permanent vision loss after head injuryResearch has shed new light on what causes the permanent vision loss sometimes seen in the wake of a head injury, report investigators.æææ
Satellite Sees Louisiana Tornado Storm System from SpaceSevere thunderstorms and several tornadoes struck the state of Louisiana on Tuesday (Feb. 7). A weather satellite operated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) captured an overhead view of the weather system responsible.æææ
Device Turns Air Pollution Into Printing InkThe Kaalink device can capture up to 93 percent of the emitted pollution from standard internal combustion engines.æææ
Rethink’s Sawyer Robot Just Got a Whole Lot SmarterThe company that makes robots meant to collaborate with people has just added a slew of features in a big software upgrade.æææ
Underwater Volcanic Eruption Could Create Temporary Island (Photo)An undersea volcanic eruption caused a bright turquoise spot in the ocean.æææ
12th Dead Sea Scrolls Cave Found in IsraelA cave that held Dead Sea Scrolls before they were stolen in the mid-20th century has been discovered in Qumran, Israel.æææ
House Science Committee May Soon Try to Weaken the EPAPanel will likely push reforms that many fear will meddle with the scientific process -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Research will shift how cancer diversity and resistance are understood, studiedCircular DNA, once thought to be rare in tumor cells, is actually very common and seems to play a fundamental role in tumor evolution, say researchers.æææ
A middleweight black hole is hiding at the center of a giant star clusterAll known black holes fall into two categories: small, stellar-mass black holes weighing a few suns, and supermassive black holes weighing millions or billions of suns. Astronomers expect that intermediate-mass black holes weighing 100 -- 10,000 suns also exist, but so far no conclusive proof of such middleweights has been found. Today, astronomers are announcing new evidence that an intermediate-æææ
Planets of red dwarf stars may face oxygen loss in habitable zonesScientists are expanding the definition of habitable zones (the area around a star where a life-sustaining planet might lurk), taking into account the effect of stellar activity that can threaten exoplanets' atmospheres with oxygen loss.æææ
Calcified plaque raises heart disease risk for younger adultsThe mere presence of even a small amount of calcified coronary plaque, more commonly referred to as coronary artery calcium (CAC), in people under age 50 — even small amounts — was strongly associated with increased risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease over the ensuing decade, report researchers.æææ
The only ice volcano on Ceres might vanish Scientists are puzzled by the solitary existence of an ice volcano on the dwarf planet Ceres. “Imagine if there was just one volcano on all of Earth,” says Michael Sori of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona. “That would be puzzling.” NASA’s Dawn spacecraft discovered the 4-kilometer-tall (2.5-mile) Ahuna Mons cryovolcano in 2015. Other icy worlds in our solar system,æææ
Analyzing gut microbes and their byproducts essential to understanding human healthTo best understand the potential of microbes in the gut to affect human health, clinicians need to look not just at the bacteria present in fecal samples but also at metabolites like amino acids that those bacteria produce, according to a new study.æææ
A bridge of stars connects two dwarf galaxiesThe Magellanic Clouds, the two largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, appear to be connected by a bridge stretching across 43,000 light years, according to astronomers. The discovery is based on the galactic stellar census being conducted by the European Space Observatory, Gaia.æææ
WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Fargo Need a dark comedy with a little bit of horror, drama, and sci-fi thrown in? Look no further.
Glass from nuclear test site shows the moon was born dryExamining residue from the first detonation of a nuclear weapon has helped explain why the moon seems to have so few volatile elements like water and methaneæææ
Antibiotics might kill gut bacteria that protect newborn lungsA study in mice has found that gut bacteria send signals that protect young lungs from pneumonia, prompting concern over antibiotic use in Caesarean sectionsæææ
2017 NYC Regional Brain Bee Champions For the first-place winner of this year’s Regional Brain Bee, biology was always the high school senior’s favorite subject in school. But it wasn’t until she was 14 years old that Winsome Ching narrowed her focus to neuroscience. After visiting a museum celebrating Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud in Vienna, Ching was “hooked” by his theories on the brain, she says. Since then, she has transitiæææ
Splitfin flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to illuminate planktonThe flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to detect and feed on its planktonic prey, according to a study published February 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jens Hellinger from Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany, and colleagues.æææ
First nuclear explosion helps test theory of moon's formationDecades-old radioactive glass found blanketing the ground after the first nuclear test bomb explosion is being used by scientists to examine theories about the Moon's formation some 4.5 billion years ago.æææ
Innovative procedure to measure cell energy production developedCollaborative work between researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in development of a new software tool that enhances measurement and analysis of energy production generated by human immune cells.æææ
Snow leopard and Himalayan wolf diets are about one-quarter livestockAround a quarter of Himalayan snow leopard and wolf diets are livestock, the rest being wild prey, according to a study published February 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madhu Chetri from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway, and colleagues.æææ
Rethink needed to save critically endangered black rhinocerosA new strategy of conservation must be adopted if the black rhinoceros is to be saved from extinction, concludes a new study.æææ
Measuring time without a clockScientists have been able to measure the ultrashort time delay in electron photoemission without using a clock. The discovery has important implications for fundamental research and cutting-edge technology.æææ
New evidence in favor of dark matter: The bars in galaxies are spinning more slowly than we thoughtA new article show that bars in galaxies are rotating much more slowly than had been inferred by previous works.æææ
Beliefs about better treatment for HIV leads gay men to engage in riskier sexA survey in the US notes a consistent increase in the occurrence of condomless anal sex among men, as well as a rise in how many sex partners they have. Although antiretroviral therapies (ART) have revolutionized the treatment and prevention of HIV infections, knowing that they have ART as a back-up makes people complacent. This can lead to increased risks.æææ
Is it too late for me to get a flu shot? Health Don’t throw away your shot It’s somehow already February, people in your office are succumbing to the flu one by one, and you’re wondering: is it too late for me to get my flu shot?æææ
How to survive the 'Little House' books DIY The Ingalls family almost died. A lot. We chose one near-death experience from each Little House book and compared the family’s survival technique to today’s best practices.æææ
French auditors criticize €5-billion science super-campus near Paris Would-be rival to MIT lacks strategy and governance, report says.
The Fate of Environmental Law in a Trump-Era Supreme CourtGiven what we know now, those laws will almost inevitably be weakened in ways that are hard to predict -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
How hydras know where to regrow lost body partsFew animals can match the humble hydra's resilience. The small, tentacled freshwater animals can be literally shredded into pieces and regrow into healthy animals. A new study suggests that pieces of hydras have structural memory that helps them shape their new body plan according to the pattern inherited by the animal's 'skeleton.' Previously, scientists thought that only chemical signals told aæææ
PTSD symptoms may be prevented with ketamineResearchers have evidence that giving a small dose of ketamine one week before a psychologically traumatic event may help prevent PTSD. The study, in mice, may have implications for soldiers who are at risk for trauma and PTSD.æææ
Diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaustA new study finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive -- these commuters breathe exhaust levels nine-times higher than on a busy city street.æææ
The origin of stem cellsThe protein WOX2 is responsible for enabling plants to develop organs throughout their lives.æææ
Designer compound may untangle damage leading to some dementiasScientists may be able to prevent and reverse some of the brain injury caused by the toxic form of a protein called tau.æææ
A Tasty Program at the Rubin The lady has an extraordinary palate, a palate of incredible finesse. She picks up hot ingredients, touches them, and she thinks about this image on the plate. She has the most disciplined execution on a plate that we’ve ever seen. But the palate is where it’s just extraordinary. And honestly, I know chefs with Michelin stars that don’t have palates like hers. –Chef Gordon Ramsay, MasterChef judgæææ
Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites GlacierDrainage of four interconnected lakes below Thwaites Glacier in late 2013 caused only a 10 percent increase in the glacier's speed. The glacier's recent speedup is therefore not due to changes in meltwater flow along its underside.æææ
How neuroscience insights could help architects judge designs and spaces, and fashion new ones submitted by /u/erusso16 [link] [comments]æææ
Quinoa genome could see 'super-food' prices tumbleScientists say that decoding the quinoa genome could cut the cost of this nutritious but underutilised crop.æææ
Exercise, sleep are key to keeping employees from bringing home work frustrations, study showsA brisk walk or a long swim may be the key to preventing a bad day at the office from spilling over into the home. A study tracked participants' sleep patterns and daytime physical movements found employees who recorded more than 10,900 steps each day were less likely to perpetuate abuse at home.æææ
Physically demanding jobs and shiftwork linked to lowered fertility in womenA physically demanding job or work schedules outside normal office hours may lower a woman's ability to conceive, suggests research.æææ
Researchers identify protein essential for healthy gut cell developmentScientists have uncovered key processes in the healthy development of cells which line the human gut, furthering their understanding about the development of cancer. A new study shows that a protein called ninein is essential for normal tissue development in the gut.æææ
Tech Still Doesn’t Get Diversity. Here’s How to Fix It Opinion: By failing to hire more women and people of color, tech companies do themselves---and their shareholders---a disservice.
The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Coding What if we regarded code not as a high-stakes, sexy affair, but the equivalent of skilled work at a Chrysler plant?
"Død" stjerne styrer nabostjernen i mystisk solsystemForskere har fundet en slags dynamo i et sært solsystem 380 lysår fra Jorden.æææ
Age verification for online porn will be a security disasterThe UK’s Digital Economy bill will force users to prove their age before they access porn. This is not only hard to do, it’s also a goldmine for blackmailers and hackersæææ
Why some people with HIV can now ditch condomsIf you take your meds regularly, and you are monogamous, two new studies show a negligible chance of passing on HIV. How will this change lives?æææ
More than 100 tech firms sign letter opposing Trump travel banApple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft claim the president’s ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries inflicts "substantial harm on US companies”æææ
Rare mid-weight black hole found at heart of bright star clusterIntermediate-mass black holes – weighing a few hundred to a few thousand solar masses – are the Bigfoot of astronomy, but now we may have seen one in our galaxyæææ
Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue more likely to develop contralateral diseaseBreast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research.æææ
Bacterium lassoes its way from the mouth to the heart to cause diseaseThe human mouth can harbor more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist with us as part of our resident oral microbiota. But when bacteria spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic.æææ
Researchers find brief, intense stair climbing is a practical way to boost fitnessThere are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health. The findings negate the two most common excuses of couch potatoes: no time and no access to the gym.æææ
The quinoa genome could help scientists get it out of the health food aisle Science It's the first step to bringing the super grain to the masses The genome of quinoa has been sequenced. Nutritious and grown in harsh environments, quinoa deserves more efforts to become a true commodity crop, researchers say.æææ
Quinoa genome accelerates solutions for food securityQuinoa could hold the key to feeding the world's growing population because it can thrive in harsh environments and grows well on poor quality, marginal lands. KAUST researchers have now completed the first high-quality sequence of the Chenopodium quinoa genome, and they have begun pinpointing genes that could be manipulated to change the way the plant matures and produces food. This project brougæææ
A middleweight black hole is hiding at the center of a giant star clusterAll known black holes fall into two categories: small, stellar-mass black holes weighing a few Suns, and supermassive black holes weighing millions or billions of Suns. Astronomers expect that intermediate-mass black holes weighing 100 - 10,000 Suns also exist, but so far no conclusive proof of such middleweights has been found. Today, astronomers are announcing new evidence that an intermediate-mæææ
Saiga Antelopes Are Struck Again by a Plague in Central AsiaAn ancient species that once roamed grasslands with woolly mammoths is dying in great numbers in Mongolia, with harmful factors piling up.æææ
Full moon, comet starring in night sky show this weekendA full moon and comet share double billing in a special night sky show this weekend.æææ
Data on blue whales off California helps protect their distant relativesScientists know a great deal about blue whales off California, where the endangered species has been studied for decades.æææ
Germanium tin laser could increase processing speed of computer chipsAn “optically pumped” laser made of the alloy germanium tin grown on silicon substrates has now been fabricated by a team of researchers. The augmented material could lead to the development of fully integrated silicon photonics, including both circuits and lasers, and thus faster micro-processing speed at much lower cost.æææ
New class of drugs to combat aging diseases discoveredNew details of the aging process have been uncovered by a research team. They discovered an altered balance between certain signaling molecules in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels and the heart. The team also discovered a new class of drugs that combats an important part of the aging process.æææ
Ultrasmall atom motions recorded with ultrashort x-ray pulsesPeriodic motions of atoms over a length of a billionth of a millionth of a meter are mapped by ultrashort x-ray pulses. In a novel type of experiment, regularly arranged atoms in a crystal are set into vibration by a laser pulse and a sequence of snapshots is generated via changes of x-ray absorption.æææ
How to recycle lithium batteriesResearch describes a new way to extract the lithium and the cobalt that make up the bulk of the metal components of rechargeable lithium ion batteries.æææ
European space agency to help NASA take humans beyond moonThe European Space Agency says it will contribute key components for a future NASA mission to take humans around the moon within the next few years.æææ
Germany, France plan cross-border self-driving test zoneEuropean neighbours Germany and France plan to test self-driving vehicles on a stretch of road linking the two countries, the transport ministry in Berlin said Wednesday.æææ
NY Times teams with Spotify for music-news offeringThe New York Times said Wednesday it had teamed up with the online service Spotify in bid to lure subscribers with a "news and music experience."æææ
Some animals are more equal than others—new study shows some animal welfare issues get more media than othersAnimal welfare issues receive varying levels of UK media attention, with some species being more widely reported than others, a new University of Oxford study has found.æææ
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Carlos moving past La Reunion IslandNASA found heavy rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Carlos as it continued to move between Madagascar and La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Terra satellite imagery revealed a concentrated storm, while the GPM core satellite measured rainfall rates within the storm.æææ
Chimpanzee feet allow scientists a new grasp on human foot evolutionAn investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper published in the March 2017 issue of Journal of Human Evolution.æææ
Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variabilityChanges in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to Penn State and Columbia University hydrologists.æææ
A 'bridge of stars' connects two of our closest galaxies Space Sadly it's not walkable Europe's Gaia spacecraft has spotted a 'bridge of stars' between two dwarf galaxies. The halo is 43,000 light-years long.æææ
Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites GlacierThwaites Glacier on the edge of West Antarctica is one of the planet's fastest-moving glaciers. Research shows that it is sliding unstoppably into the ocean, mainly due to warmer seawater lapping at its underside.æææ
Massive lake drained for hydropower leaves dry bed and no fishA large artificial lake in Bosnia’s Neretva valley has been emptied by an energy firm, leaving locals crying foul over damage to wildlifeæææ
Lattice of nanotraps and line narrowing in Raman gasDecreasing the emission linewidth from a molecule is one of the key aims in precision spectroscopy. One approach is based on cooling molecules to near absolute zero. An alternative way is to localize the molecules on subwavelength scale. A novel approach in this direction uses a standing wave in a gas-filled hollow fiber. It creates an array of deep, nanometer-scale traps for Raman-active moleculeæææ
Pioneering chip extends sensors' battery lifeA low-cost chip that enables batteries in sensors to last longer, in some cases by over ten times, has been developed by engineers.æææ
Android Wear 2.0 Has Landed—Here Are All the New Features With Wear 2.0, Google is sharpening its vision for wrist-worn wearables.
Review: LG Watch Style and Sport To coincide with the new software launch, Google worked with LG to make two new smartwatches, the Watch Sport and Watch Style.
More Money, More Problems for the Commercial Space Launch Biz SpaceX's mishaps and ULA's layoffs signal that the commercial launch market is getting way more competitive.
Math learned best when children moveChildren improve at math when instruction engages their own bodies, concludes a new study. The results also document that children require individualized learning strategies.æææ
Key friendships vital for effective human social networksClose friendships facilitate the exchange of information and culture, making social networks more effective for cultural transmission, according to new research that used wireless tracking technology to map social interactions in remote hunter-gatherer populations.æææ
Fish uses sneaking behavior as stealth mating strategyA researcher found and recorded the Cuatro Ciénegas cichlid, a rare fish by the scientific name of Herichthys minckleyi, using a stealth mating strategy called sneaking to slip his DNA into the next generation.æææ
Energy Costs at Record LowsThe findings counter claims by some, including in the Trump administration, that the adoption of wind, solar and other forms of renewable energy are driving up U.S. energy costs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Higher water table is good for radishes and CO2 emissions Increasing the water table by just 20 centimeters in radish fields not only reduced soil CO 2 emissions, but also improved crop growth. Another perk: it slowed the rate of loss of valuable peat soils converted into agricultural fields. “We are losing our peat soils in the UK at a fast rate, and we need to find solutions to decrease this loss if we want to preserve our food security.” A significanæææ
'It's Just A Mess.' New Orleans Residents Clean Up After Tornadoes Tornadoes injured dozens of people as they moved through southeastern Louisiana on Tuesday. In New Orleans East, the National Guard was helping clear streets of debris and downed electrical wires.
'Edutainer' Hans Rosling, Who Taught Us About The World, Has Died With facts, toys and good humor, the Swedish doctor and statistician helped people understand what numbers tell us about the world.
Cheaper battery for solar made with pee ingredient A battery made with urea, commonly found in fertilizers and mammal urine, could provide a low-cost way of storing energy produced through solar power or other forms of renewable energy for consumption during off hours. The battery is nonflammable and contains electrodes made from abundant aluminum and graphite. Its electrolyte’s main ingredient, urea, is already industrially produced by the ton fæææ
The Download, Feb 8, 2017: Tesla’s Big Battery Spend, Feature Phones Are Back, and Pruitt’s EPAThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.æææ
Mars’s frozen pole, Sweden’s climate plan and a stem-cell trial in Japan The week in science: 3–9 February 2017. Nature 542 142 doi: 10.1038/542142aæææ
Svalbard's electric power could come from hydrogenThe energy supply to Longyearbyen, midway between continental Norway and the North Pole, is a hot topic in the climate debate. Longyearbyen is the largest settlement and the administrative centre of Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. Today, Longyearbyen obtains its electric power and district heating from its coal power plant, the only one in Norway.æææ
Gulf Dead Zone Makes for Shrimpier ShrimpThe low-oxygen waters of the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico result in smaller shrimp, and a spike in large shrimp prices. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Huge Undersea Landslide Slammed Great Barrier Reef 300,000 Years AgoMore than 300,000 years ago, a behemoth undersea landslide sent huge amounts of debris sliding down the Great Barrier Reef, generating a 90-foot-high (27 meters) tsunami.æææ
Silicon Valley Finally Gets Real About Troll Control Another week, another plan by Twitter to combat abuse. But this time feels a little different.
The Internet Won’t Let the Senate Censor Elizabeth Warren Senator Mitch McConnell, we present to you the Streisand effect.
Mixing opioids and alcohol may increase likelihood of dangerous respiratory complicationTaking one oxycodone tablet together with even a modest amount of alcohol increases the risk of a potentially life-threatening side effect known as respiratory depression, which causes breathing to become extremely shallow or stop altogether, reports a study. Elderly people were especially likely to experience this complication, the study found.æææ
New nanotech to detect cancer early | Joshua SmithWhat if every home had an early-warning cancer detection system? Researcher Joshua Smith is developing a nanobiotechnology "cancer alarm" that scans for traces of disease in the form of special biomarkers called exosomes. In this forward-thinking talk, he shares his dream for how we might revolutionize cancer detection and, ultimately, save lives.æææ
Women with a thicker brain cortex are more likely to have autismThe outer layer of the brain is usually thicker in men than in women. Brain scans have found that having a thicker cortex is linked to autism spectrum disorderæææ
Physics explains why rock musicians prefer valve ampsFor many guitarists, the rich, warm sound of an overdriven valve amp – think AC/DC's crunchy Marshall rhythm tones or Carols Santana's singing Mesa Boogie-fuelled leads – can't be beaten.æææ
One year of high-quality early education improves outcomes for low-income infants, toddlersInfants and toddlers from low-income families who attended a high-quality center-based early education program did better in language and social skills after only one year than children who do not attend the program, research shows. The program, included specific components that may contribute to the positive development of children from low-income families.æææ
For youth of color, losing trust in teachers may mean losing the chance to make it to collegeIn a new set of longitudinal studies, minority youth perceived and experienced more biased treatment and lost more trust over the middle school years than their white peers. Minority students' growing lack of trust in turn predicted whether they acted out in school and even whether they made it to college years later.æææ
Host birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often the blue-green eggsHost birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often the blue-green eggs, a new study has concluded.æææ
Record-breaking material contracts when heatedResearchers have discovered a negative thermal expansion material that shrinks by a record-breaking amount when heated, and which could help control materials' thermal expansion. The volume of the reduced ruthenate material shrank by 6.7 percent, more than double that seen for the current record-holder, but this could not be explained by atomic changes. Microstructural effects resulting from highlæææ
Preemies in neonatal intensive care units exposed to loud noisesPreemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics, suggests new research. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development.æææ
To declaw cats or not? New Jersey could be first with banNew Jersey could become the first state to prohibit veterinarians from declawing cats.æææ
Diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaustA new study from U of T Engineering finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive.æææ
Key friendships vital for effective human social networksClose friendships facilitate the exchange of information and culture, making social networks more effective for cultural transmission, according to new UCL research that used wireless tracking technology to map social interactions in remote hunter-gatherer populations.æææ
Army Corps Approves Controversial Dakota PipelineThe decision could enable the $3.8 billion pipeline to begin operation as soon as June -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Teen vaping 'one way bridge' to future smoking among non-smokers, say researchersTeen vaping acts as a 'one way bridge' to future smoking among those who have never smoked before, and may not stop those who have smoked before from returning to it, concludes a small US study.æææ
The role of animal companions in the lives of homeless peoplePublished as 'Caring at the Borders of the Human: Companion animals and the homeless' in the book ReValuing Care: Cycles and Connections (Routledge), Professor Carr's research also reveals that homeless people often show a collective responsibility for the pets and, because of the close relationship between the pet and the homeless person, a collective responsibility for homelessness itself.æææ
New study explores disparities between researchers who publish in high-and low-impact journalsA new study surveying authors from a range of countries investigates the crucial differences between authors who publish in high- and low-impact factor medical journals. This original research shows that the growth of open access hasn't significantly changed the publishing landscape as regards impact factor.æææ
Researcher finds fish uses sneaking behavior as stealth mating strategyWhile a dominant male fish from northern Mexico mates with a female, a small fella bides his time in the offing. Suddenly, the little guy darts in ahead of Mr. Big and plants his seeds on freshly laid eggs.æææ
Scientists argue current climate change models understate the problemA new study on the relationship between people and the planet shows that climate change is only one of many inter-related threats to the Earth's capacity to support human life.æææ
Recycling yogurt waste to produce electricity, nutrients and more dairy foodsAmerica's appetite for Greek yogurt has skyrocketed over the past decade. But for every container of Greek yogurt consumed, you could fill two or three more with the acid whey it produces. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the interesting ways scientists are making use of the byproduct.æææ
The origin of stem cellsFreiburg plant biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux and his research group have published an article in the journal Developmental Cell presenting initial findings on how shoot stem cells in plants form during embryogenesis, the process of embryonic development. Pluripotent stem cells can develop into any type of cell in an organism. In contrast to animals, plants can form completely new organs from theæææ
Waivers help parents of kids with autism keep working Medicaid waivers that improve access to home and community-based services for children with autism also help their parents keep their jobs, research shows. It’s more challenging for families of children with autism spectrum disorder to find childcare and other services compared to families of children with other special needs, and waivers can help pay for expensive services that might have otherwæææ
Beware: Most Mobile VPNs Aren’t as Safe as They Seem Recent research suggests that many VPNs for Android have privacy and security flaws, and the problem of choosing a reliable VPN goes even further.
The Oddly Fascinating, Fantastical History of Eyeglasses Overview , an exhibit currently up at the Design Museum Holon in Israel, charts eyewear's evolution.
Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSAA compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the 'super bug.' Researchers have named the antibiotic compound 'dragmacidin G' and have shown that it has a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of MRSA as wæææ
Researchers study patients' genetic and susceptibility risk factors for lymphedemaGenetic variations may be one of the important factors that influence breast cancer survivors' responses to the inflammatory processes and vulnerability to lymphedema.æææ
Engineers develop powerful millimeter-wave signal generatorYour doctor waves a hand-held scanner over your body and gets detailed, high-resolution images of your internal organs and tissues. Using the same device, the physician then sends gigabytes of data instantly to a remote server and just as rapidly receives information to make a diagnosis. Integrated circuit researchers have created a silicon microchip-based component that could make these and manyæææ
LIGO's Underdog Cousin Ready to Enhance Gravitational-Wave HuntIt missed the historic discovery, but the Virgo lab in Italy is now primed to extend LIGO’s reach and precision -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
'Corrective glass' for mass spectrometry imagingThe chemical analysis of biological tissues with three-dimensional shapes has been a major problem so far. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-buæææ
Insights on optimal treatment of Paget's disease of boneIn a study of patients with Paget's disease of bone -- a common skeletal disorder that can lead to bone deformity, fractures, osteoarthritis, and bone pain -- long-term intensive bisphosphonate therapy conferred no clinical benefit over giving bisphosphonates only when patients felt bone pain.æææ
'Goldilocks' genes that tell the tale of human evolution hold clues to variety of diseasesA relatively short list of genes are candidates for a suite of diseases including autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and epilepsy.æææ
Weight loss often follows divorce for older women There have been lots of studies on marriage that focus on younger women, so researchers wanted to take a closer look at the health effects of marriage and divorce on older women. “The interesting thing we found in our study is that with divorce in postmenopausal women, it’s not all negative, at least not in the short term,” says Randa Kutob, an associate professor of family and community medicineæææ
Spørg Scientariet: Hvad sker der, hvis man spiser for lidt fedt?En læser har noteret sig, at vi bør indtage 30 procent fedt i vores kost. Men hvorfor det? Hvad sker der, hvis vi spiser mindre? Det svarer lektor på Institut for Idræt og Ernæring på.æææ
How Thailand eliminated mother-to-child HIV transmissionThailand has become the first Asian country to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, thanks to a pragmatic multi-sector response backed by strong political commitment and heavy government investment, a new study reports.æææ
Bill Nye's new Netflix show finally has an airdate Entertainment Coming to a screen near you on April 21 "Bill Nye Saves the World" will air on TKTK. And it can't come soon enough.æææ
Students who enjoy or take pride in math have better long-term math achievementA study of 3,425 German students from grades 5 through 9 has found that students who enjoyed and took pride in math had even better achievement than students with higher intelligence.æææ
How air on the rise creates giant hail Strong updrafts—currents of rising air—in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to meteorologists. “Hail can have significant socioeconomic effects on communities,” says Matt Kumjian, assistant professor of meteorology and atmospheric science in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences atæææ
Styrelse: Danmark i førerfeltet i kampen om EMA Regeringen har indledt kampen om at få EMA til Danmark, og ifølge Lægemiddelstyrelsen er det realistisk, at agenturet havner på danske hænder. Det betyder, at styrelsen får travlt med at gå i dialog og bygge relationer med europæiske kollegeræææ
Why Does the Melting of Arctic Sea Ice Matter?Due to the clear link to their diminishing habitat, polar bears have become
Function of olfactory receptor in the human heart identifiedResearchers have identified the function of olfactory receptors in the human heart muscle, such as are also present in the nose. One of the receptors reacts to fatty acids that occur in the blood, in patients with diabetes significantly above the normal range. If a fatty acid activates the receptor, it triggers a negative effect: the heart rate and the force of muscular contraction are reduced.æææ
Depressed patients with earlier and more severe symptoms have high genetic risk for major psychiatric disordersClinical features of major depressive disorder (MDD) may help identify specific subgroups of depressed patients based on associations with genetic risk for major psychiatric disorders, reports a study. The study found that patients with an early age at onset and higher symptom severity have an increased genetic risk for MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.æææ
It's hard to affect policymakers with climate science informationExposure to climate models’ predictions affects policymakers and climate negotiators less than the informed general public, a paper assesses. But the right presentation format can improve forecasts’ effectivenessæææ
People with asthma are missing airway ‘muscle relaxer’ A protein that appears to play a vital role in airway function is virtually missing in people who have asthma. The discovery points to a potential new treatment. When the protein, called SPLUNC1, is low or missing, people experience airway constriction, mucus production, chest tightness, and breathing problems. “This protein could be a potentially new target to go after, and it could really benefæææ
EU vil ikke begrænse CO2-udledning fra interkontinental luftfartEU-Kommissionen vil permanent fritage flyselskaber for CO2-kvoter på interkontinentale ruter. International luftfart skal i stedet reguleres af en FN-aftale. Problematisk, at EU ikke vil blande sig, siger forsker.æææ
Oxygen content increased when Earth was covered in iceIn the beginning, planet Earth was a very inhospitable place with no oxygen and only single-celled bacteria as inhabitants. According to a new study, the oxygen content in the air began to increase about 2.4 billion years ago, at the same time as the global glaciation and when all continents were gathered in a single huge landmass, or supercontinent. How to explain the exact connection between theæææ
Novel LED street lights reduce costsResearchers have developed a novel type of LED street light of increased efficiency. Compared to conventional LEDs, power consumption may be reduced by up to 20%. This will also decrease costs and carbon dioxide emission. Conventional high-power diodes are replaced by a special array of LEDs. This enhances efficiency, increases service life and safety, and produces a better light.æææ
Dinosaurs: Juvenile, adult or senior?How old were the oldest dinosaurs? This question remains largely unanswered. The natural life span of these long-extinct giants is of interest to scientists, in combination with questions regarding how fast they could grow and how they could obtain sufficient nutrients from their habitat. Palaeontologists estimate by means of bone structures whether a particular dinosaur fossil is a young, adult oæææ
How Much Damage Could Scott Pruitt Really Do at EPA?Donald Trump’s choice for EPA director would put at risk the nation’s ability to meet its Paris climate commitments.æææ
Bill Nye Saves the World, the Anti-Anti-Science Show, Hits Netflix in April Watch the first trailer here.
Your Guide to the Long, Strange Comic-Book Backstory of FX’s Legion It took nearly three decades for the world to finally be ready for the most powerful—and most interesting—member of the extended X-Men family.
Flipboard’s New App Learns What You Like, Then Crafts You a Zine Today, Flipboard is rolling out a brand-new version of its platform that introduces what it calls "Smart Magazines."
White dwarf pulsar unlike anything ever seen Scientists have identified an exotic binary star system 380 light-years away as a white dwarf pulsar—the first of its kind to be discovered in the universe. The new system, AR Scorpii (AR Sco), contains a rapidly spinning, burnt-out stellar remnant called a white dwarf, which lashes its neighbor—a red dwarf—with powerful beams of electrical particles and radiation, causing the entire system to bræææ
Carnivorous plants aren’t as cool as you think Science But their evolutionary history is Carnivorous plants aren't all that cool—they're just desperate.æææ
Her er metallet, der leder elektricitet, men ikke varmeVanadiumdioxid har den usædvanlige egenskab, at varmeledning forårsaget af en elektrisk strøm er ca. 10 gange mindre end forventet. Det åbner for interessante anvendelser til kontrolleret bortledning af varme fra motorer eller vinduer.æææ
Lock-out on the building siteEthambutol has long been part of the standard therapy for tuberculosis. Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers now describe how the antibiotic acts on the bacterium that causes the disease: It specifically inhibits growth of the cell wall from the cell poles.æææ
Team engineers oxide semiconductor just single atom thickA new study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel method for fabrication of world's thinnest oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick. This may open up new possibilities for thin, transparent, and flexible electronic devices, such as ultra-small sensors.æææ
Carnivores more seriously threatened by roads than previously acknowledgedLeipzig/Halle (Saale)/Porto. The effects of roads on carnivores have obviously been underestimated in worldwide species conservation. This is the conclusion of the first comprehensive global study on this topic, which has been published in the scientific journal Global Ecology and Biogeography by an international research team from Germany and Portugal. The protection status of several species thaæææ
Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSAA compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Also called the "super bug," MRSA bacteria are resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin, oxacillin and amoxicillin and can be fatal. According to the Centers fæææ
New evidence in favor of dark matter: The bars in galaxies are spinning more slowly than we thoughtAn article recently published in the Astrophysical Journal by a team of IAC researchers show that bars in galaxies are rotating much more slowly than had been inferred by previous works.æææ
Engineering dream diodes with a graphene interlayerA team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has created a new technique that greatly enhances the performance of Schottky Diodes (metal-semiconductor junction) used in electronic devices. Their research findings have attracted considerable attention within the scientific community by solving the contact resistance problem of metal-semiconductor, which had remained unsolved for almost 50 years.æææ
Real-time feedback helps save energy and waterThose who take long showers use a great deal of water and energy. Yet people who enjoy taking long showers do not usually realize to what extent they are damaging the environment. However, if a clever measuring system shows current consumption, this immediately leads to increased efficiency. The consumption information available on the display is incentive enough to reduce water and energy consumpæææ
Collapsed chloroplasts are targeted in self-eating processResearchers at Tohoku University have identified a previously uncharacterized type of autophagy, during which an autophagic process termed chlorophagy removes collapsed chloroplasts in plant leaves. The findings could lead to new methods for controlling the aging of plants.æææ
Surprising spin behavior at room temperatureThe field of spintronics focuses on spin transport behavior in magnetic metals, and the major findings in this area have important implications for the field of electronics. This is because conventional electronics primarily considers the electron charge, whereas spintronics allows the electron spin to be exploited. One of the most significant advancements in spintronics has been the introductionæææ
EU to phase out China solar panel dutiesThe EU said Wednesday it aimed to phase out anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar panel imports after 18 months, ending a bitter dispute with one of its largest trading partners.æææ
Facebook adds tool for helping in times of crisisFacebook on Wednesday updated its Safety Check feature with a way for people to lend, or get, helping hands after disasters.æææ
New study on how shellfish create their shellsA new study describing how shellfish create their shells in response to their environment is published today (Wednesday 8 February) in the journal Royal Society Open Science.æææ
NASA finds planets of red dwarf stars may face oxygen loss in habitable zonesThe search for life beyond Earth starts in habitable zones, the regions around stars where conditions could potentially allow liquid water – which is essential for life as we know it – to pool on a planet's surface. New NASA research suggests some of these zones might not actually be able to support life due to frequent stellar eruptions – which spew huge amounts of stellar material and radiationæææ
Towards equal access to digital coinsScientists at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) of the University of Luxembourg have developed an important mathematical algorithm called "Equihash." Equihash is a core component for the new cryptocurrency Zcash, which offers more privacy and equality than the famous Bitcoin. Zcash came into operation as an experimental technology for a community-driven digitalæææ
Digital relay baton enables remote crowd cheering of athletesThe loneliness of the long distance runner could soon be a thing of the past as new technology allows crowds to cheer on athletes from anywhere in the world.æææ
Flat lens to work across a continuous bandwidth allows new control of lightLast summer, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) announced a new, flat lens that could focus light with high efficiency within the visible spectrum. The lens used an ultrathin array of nanopillars to bend and focus light as it passed.æææ
New research finds timing is the key to success for science startupsTiming is essential when it comes to achieving commercial success for science-based companies according to a new research paper by faculty at SFU's Beedie School of Business. The study, published in leading journal
70 Years After Dead Sea Scrolls Were Found, New Discoveries AwaitIn 1947, or late 1946, the first batch of Dead Sea Scrolls was found in a cave located near the site of Qumran in what is now the West Bank. These bits of biblical history continue to perplex archaeologists to this day.æææ
Who Invented the Refrigerator?Methods for preserving food by cooling have been around for thousands of years, but the modern refrigerator is a recent invention.æææ
Inside the Pristine Factory Where Bugatti Crafts the $2.6M Chiron They spend days just polishing the damn thing.
Droughts actually make West Nile virus worse Animals An itch we can’t scratch Droughts bring a whole host of problems to humanity; limited water supplies, more wildfires, and also the perfect conditions for a West Nile virus epidemic.æææ
Farvel til en elsket statistiker: Her er hans bedste videoerMed banebrydende grafer og kreative metoder inden for visualisering forvandlede svenske Hans Rosling tørre tal om alt fra elektricitet til befolkningsvækst og miljø til nogle af internettets mest populære videoer.æææ
Do absent users blindside architects?A visionary edifice, a revolutionary feat of engineering, a blot on the landscape, a brutalist carbuncle. Rarely does architecture lead to subtle superlatives. But, sometimes architects design with only a vague notion of the users of their constructions. In the absence of personal profiles of the people that will swing through those grand front doors and ride the escalator to the giddy heights ofæææ
New species discovered in AntarcticaA team of Japanese scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan's Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments.æææ
Historical copper trapped in iceSouth America's mining industry supplies half the world with copper. The world's largest mines are located in the Andes. Yet just when copper production began there has remained unclear, until now. Very few artefacts from the early high cultures in Peru, Chile, and Bolivia have been preserved. Now, however, researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, are on the trail oæææ
Archaeologists find 12th Dead Sea Scrolls cavexcavations in a cave on the cliffs west of Qumran, near the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, prove that Dead Sea scrolls from the Second Temple period were hidden in the cave, and were looted by Bedouins in the middle of the last century. With the discovery of this cave, scholars now suggest that it should be numbered as Cave 12.æææ
Sandia researchers offer explanation for hissing and popping noises heard from meteors(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico has found an explanation for the variety of sounds people hear when witnessing a falling meteor—sounds that should not be heard until minutes later due to the long distances involved. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the team describes experiments they conducted with transducer materials and whatæææ
Ultrasmall atom motions recorded with ultrashort x-ray pulsesPeriodic motions of atoms over a length of a billionth of a millionth of a meter (10-15 m) are mapped by ultrashort x-ray pulses. In a novel type of experiment, regularly arranged atoms in a crystal are set into vibration by a laser pulse and a sequence of snapshots is generated via changes of x-ray absorption.æææ
Astronomers discover a very hot Jupiter exoplanet orbiting a bright, hot star(Phys.org)—Using the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) astronomers have detected a new gas giant alien world. The newly discovered exoplanet, designated KELT-18b, turns out to be a highly inflated "hot Jupiter" orbiting a bright, hot star. The findings were presented in a paper published Feb. 6 on the arXiv pre-print server.æææ
Men are from Clash of Clans, women are from Candy CrushIf anyone knows whether "there's an app for that," it's older men who happen to live in eastern Europe or North Dakota.æææ
Deciphering social justice language in modern musicPhrases and colloquialisms rarely heard in casual conversation are the bedrock of new linguistic research at The University of New Mexico.æææ
Record-breaking material that contracts when heatedResearchers based at Nagoya University discover ceramic material that contracts on heating by more than twice the previous record-holding material.æææ
NASA sent a twin to space to study nature versus nurture – and we're starting to get resultsNASA astronaut Scott Kelly recently spent one year in space, while his identical twin brother Mark (a former NASA astronaut himself) stayed on Earth. The mission was part of an important health experiment, looking at how being in space affects our bodies. While the data are still being studied carefully, NASA recently released some intriguing preliminary findings.æææ
Fear of sea turtle extinction due to female bias in warm water unwarranted study suggests(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with members from Australia, Greece and the U.K. has found evidence that suggests the unlikelihood of quick extinction of sea turtles due to warming waters due to overlooked factors. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team explains their findings and why they believe sea turtles will survive current ocean temperatuæææ
Humans are driving a new burst of evolution including possibly our ownThe unprecedented impact that humans are having on the planet is well known to us all. Scarcely a day passes by without a media report or two on the effects of human economic activity on the world's climate or some charismatic species under threat because of illegal wildlife trade or logging.æææ
Random radiation clouds found in atmosphere at flight altitudes(Phys.org)—A large team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S., Korea, and the U.K. has found evidence of random radiation clouds in the Earth's atmosphere at elevations used by aircraft. In their paper published in the journal Space Weather, the team describes how they discovered the clouds and offers a theory for their existence.æææ
3-D television is dead... so what next?Back in 2010 Sony Australia's Paul Colley forecasted that a large percentage of Australian viewers would have 3-D televisions by 2014.æææ
Russian police arrest 9 hacking suspectsRussia's interior ministry says it has arrested nine members of a major hacking group suspected of stealing millions of dollars from Russian bank accounts.æææ
New system makes it harder to track Bitcoin transactionsResearchers from North Carolina State University, Boston University and George Mason University have developed a Bitcoin-compatible system that could make it significantly more difficult for observers to identify or track the parties involved in any given Bitcoin transaction.æææ
Exposure to a newer flame retardant has been on the riseOut of concern that flame retardants - polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) - cause health problems, the U.S. government worked with manufacturers to start phasing them out in 2004. But evidence has been building that PBDE replacements, including organophosphate flame retardants, are in the environment and in our bodies. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Læææ
Pure iron grains are rare in the universePure iron grains in interstellar space are far rarer than previously thought, shedding new light on the evolution history of matters in the universe.æææ
New kit helps researchers make sense of mass cytometry datasets to uncover cell subsetsA new software package offers easier analysis and interpretation of experiments that use mass cytometry, a sophisticated method for determining the properties of cells. The tool—called cytofkit—enables scientists to identify different subpopulations of cells within a sample of immune cells, cancer cells or other tissue types.æææ
Controlling the way cracks form and spread to make a coating for electrochromic materialsCracks in a material typically compromise its strength and integrity, so research focus has traditionally been on preventing their occurrence and spread. An A*STAR team has now taken a different approach, prompting and directing the propagation of cracks on thin films to make highly-ordered patterned coatings for electrochromic materials.æææ
Stjernebro forbinder Mælkevejens nabo-galakser“Broen” strækker sig over 43.000 lysår.æææ
Facts About BromineProperties, sources and uses of the element bromine.æææ
Dirty Doctors Finished What an Assassin's Bullet StartedDisregarding new scientific information can be deadly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Let’s Use Physics to Model the Gaps in Saturn’s Rings When a planet has a ring system, you will often see gaps in the rings. Can these ring gaps be modeled numerically?
Ings læsere: Snyd med NOx-filtrering i lastbiler skal løses elektroniskTak til de læsere, der bidrog med løsninger til at opdage snyd med NOx-filtrerende teknologi i lastbiler. Ingeniøren har fået en ekspertvurdering af de forskellige kommentarer.æææ
Teaching plants to be better spendersEnergy is an all-important currency for plants, and scientists from The University of Western Australia have now calculated the cost of one of their biggest expenses. The knowledge could be a key to creating more energy efficient crops.æææ
Russian Academy of Sciences Calls Homeopathy PseudoscienceThat homeopathy is pure pseudoscience is not news. Its basic principles are essentially magic, and the preparation of homeopathic products is indistinguishable from brewing a magic potion. Its two core principles, as the commission states, are a priori dogma - that like cures like, and that diluting substances out of existence leaves behind their magical essence. Science has progressed over two ceæææ
Arctic 2.0: What happens after all the ice goes? Researchers look into the future of the far North for clues to save species and maybe even bring back sea ice. Nature 542 152 doi: 10.1038/542152aæææ
Electrons play a key role in heat transport through 2-D tin sheetsHeat travels through atom-thin sheets of tin in a very unusual way, A*STAR researchers have found. The discovery could help develop applications for the material, including thermoelectric refrigeration or power generation.æææ
Hack my car? Most believe it can happenMost Americans have some concerns that self-driving cars can be hacked to cause crashes, disable the vehicle in some way or even be used as weapons by terrorists, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.æææ
Ancient undersea landslide discovered in AustraliaScientists say the collapse next to the Great Barrier Reef dates back more than 300,000 years.æææ
Sundhedspolitikerne forhandler om lægedæknings-aftale Ellen Trane Nørby (V) og Folketingets sundhedsordførere forsøger at blive enige om en aftale, der der kan være med til at sikre lægedækning. Blandt andet diskuteres regionernes muligheder for at oprette klinikker.æææ
OK-forhandlinger med PLO når ikke i mål til tiden Forhandlingerne mellem Regionernes Lønnings- og Takstnævn og Praktiserende lægers Organisationer skrider fremad, men kommer ikke til at være færdige til 1. marts, som planlagt.æææ
Cabbies' health the focus of smartphone app trialStressed at work? Tired of sitting down? You could go for a run or a long walk, or maybe just lie in a park. But it's not so easy if you are a taxi driver and any time out means missing the chance of a fare. Taxi drivers can spend as much as eight hours simply waiting around during any 12 hour shift, but it's difficult to relax when the clock is ticking and you can't ever be far from the car and aæææ
Dropping the carbon from a key battery component could enable long-life, low-cost renewable energy storageZinc-air batteries are one of the most promising solutions for the large-scale storage of intermittently-generated renewable electricity from solar, wind or tidal: they are non-flammable, inexpensive and with a very high energy density.æææ
New circuit scheme would greatly increase the accuracy of high-density spin-based data storageWhile we aspire to store increasing amounts of digital data on ever smaller devices, conventional memory technologies based on electron charge are reaching a physical limit on how much they can store in a given space. Alternative storage methods are urgently needed.æææ
Bees give up searching for food when humans degrade their landA new study into honey bees has revealed the significant effect human impact has on a bee's metabolism, and ultimately its survival.æææ
Renewable fuels alone can't stop climate changeIn discussions about climate change, many people seem to think the only real problem is replacing fossil fuels, and once that's done nothing much really needs to change. "That's not only false, it's a really dangerous way of thinking," said Karen Pinkus, professor of Romance studies and comparative literature in the College of Arts and Sciences.æææ
Largest group of Australia's insects collaborate to avoid being eatenA group of insects that mimic each other in an effective golden sheen to fight predators has been discovered as the largest in Australia, a collaboration between Masaryk University and Macquarie University researchers has found.æææ
Surging Demand for Mental Health Care Jams College ServicesStudents may wait weeks for a basic consultation; sometimes even longer to see a psychiatrist -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Evolved instincts shaped democracy to resist bullies like TrumpTake heart America: US democracy's ability to stem autocracy is rooted in moral codes developed when we were all hunter-gatherers, says Christopher Boehmæææ
Image: Antarctica's changing Larsen Ice ShelfThe Larsen Ice Shelf is situated along the northeastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the fastest-warming places on the planet. In the past three decades, two large sections of the ice shelf (Larsen A and B) have collapsed. A third section (Larsen C) seems like it may be on a similar trajectory, with a new iceberg poised to break away soon.æææ
Study breathes new life into 2.3 billion year old 'Great Oxidation Event'Research led by the University of St Andrews and published yesterday (Monday 6 February) in Nature – provides new insight into how life evolved alongside changes in the chemistry of Earth's surface. These researchers examined geochemical records of Earth's 'Great Oxidation Event' 2.3 billion years ago, and captured for the first time the response of the nitrogen cycle to this major transition in Eæææ
Angling up for Mars scienceESA's latest Mars orbiter has moved itself into a new path on its way to achieving the final orbit for probing the Red Planet.æææ
The Super Bowl and the Black Swanning of America When a team comes back from insurmountable odds, is it because the world is fundamentally chaotic -- or because our mental models are wrong?
The Secret to Running a Faster Marathon? Slow Down The counterintuitive secret to your best marathon yet...
Your Brain on Music: Why Certain Songs Bring PleasureThe chemicals in the brain linked to the pleasure people get from things like sex and drugs also play a role in how people enjoy music, a new, small study from Canada finds.æææ
Collapsing Beauty: Image of Antarctica's Larsen Ice ShelfA new satellite image shows the disappearing Larsen Ice Shelf of Antarctica.æææ
Florida Has Seen Bad Effects from Trump-Like Climate Gag OrdersThe state, and North Carolina, had trouble planning for damaging erosion after orders similar to White House moves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Study measures psychological support provided by service dogsThe physical benefits service dogs provide in assisting people with disabilities are well-known, but a new study conducted by a Purdue University research team reveals that service dogs also contribute significantly to emotional and psychosocial well-being.æææ
Green buildings make for higher performance in workplaceThe key to working better, sleeping better, and feeling better could be rooted in the design, maintenance, and operation of the buildings where we spend the majority of our time, a new Harvard study has found.æææ
Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug developmentMany scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells.æææ
Video: Fly your satellite!ESA's Fly Your Satellite! (FYS) programme is a recurring, hands-on programme designed and managed by the ESA Education Office in close collaboration with universities from ESA Member States, with the objective to complement academic education and inspire, engage, and better prepare university students for a more effective introduction to their future professions in the space sector.æææ
Project drawing on recovery lessons from Hurricane Sandy to improve U.S. resilience and disaster preparednessPurdue University will lead research to determine why some communities recover from natural disasters more quickly than others, an effort aimed at addressing the nation's critical need for more resilient infrastructure and to enhance preparedness.æææ
Forkerte zink-tal blev gemt vækDen officielle statistik over forbruget af resistensskabende zink til svin viste et stagnerende forbrug, selv om det i virkeligheden steg. Det var der bare ingen, som sagde højt.æææ
Strid om samtaleterapi sparket til hjørneI adskillige måneder har Region Midtjylland og de praktiserende læger i regionen diskuteret, om regionen har ret til at kræve honorarer retur for samtaleterapi. Nu er sagen sat i beroæææ
Bohr's quantum theory revisedNiels Bohr's atomic model was utterly revolutionary when it was presented in 1913. Although it is still taught in schools, it became obsolete decades ago. However, its creator also developed a much wider-ranging and less known quantum theory, the principles of which changed over time. Researchers at the University of Barcelona have now analysed the development in the Danish physicist's thought – aæææ
Students recreate 5,000-year-old Chinese beer recipeOn a recent afternoon, a small group of students gathered around a large table in one of the rooms at the Stanford Archaeology Center.æææ
Electronic depositary of living systems createdLomonosov Moscow State University has developed an information system within the framework of the Noah's Ark project that includes data about samples from biological collections of the University and project partners. There are no comparable information systems in the world using information concerning biological samples of various origin and managing depositaries of biomaterial. The actual versioæææ
Pharmaceutical company launches product to produce rare disease-fighting compoundsA pharmaceutical company based on Purdue University intellectual property has launched a product line that will allow researchers and medical professionals the ability to produce larger amounts of compounds that could lead to new disease-fighting drugs.æææ
Why nature restoration takes time: fungi grow 'relationships''Relationships' in the soil become stronger during the process of nature restoration. Although all major groups of soil life are already present in former agricultural soils, they are not really 'connected' at first. These connections need time to (literally) grow, and fungi are the star performers here. A European research team led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) has shown theæææ
Rethink needed to save critically endangered black rhinocerosA new strategy of conservation must be adopted if the black rhinoceros is to be saved from extinction, concludes a study involving scientists from Cardiff University.æææ
Viking VIP: Grave Belonging to 'Warrior of High Status' UncoveredAbout 1,000 years ago, Vikings dug a grave for a "warrior of high status" and buried him in a boat that was overflowing with grave goods, including a hefty sword and a broad-bladed ax, according to a new study.æææ
Bear Necessities: Andean Bears Call Machu Picchu HomeMachu Picchu, site of historic Incan ruins and a popular destination for tourists, is also a favorite destination for South America's only native bear species — the Andean bear.æææ
LIGO’s underdog cousin ready to enhance gravitational-wave hunt It missed the historic discovery, but the Virgo lab in Italy is now primed to extend LIGO’s reach and precision. Nature 542 146 doi: 10.1038/542146aæææ
Fremtidens almen­medicinere tøver med at købe praksisCirka en tredjedel af kommende praktiserende læger forventer at starte deres karriere som ansatte i en praksis.æææ
KU vinder 4 ud af 7 kategorier til Venture Cup ChallengeDen årlige Venture Cup Challenge, hvor iværksætterstuderende fra universiteterne kan...æææ
Stik imod hensigten: Landmændenes brug af resistensfremkaldende zink er stegetFra 2010 til 2015 steg forbruget af zinkmedicin, der forhindrer diarré hos danske grise, med 16 procent. Det opvejer fordelen ved, at landmændene bruger mindre antibiotika, advarer forskere.æææ
Treaty to stop biopiracy threatens to delay flu vaccines Industry and public-health experts concerned about ramifications of Nagoya Protocol. Nature 542 148 doi: 10.1038/542148aæææ
Cisco-routere dør efter 18 månederEn komponent i flere typer netværksudstyr fra Cisco er ramt af en fejl, der gør udstyret ubrugeligt efter 18 måneder. Udstyret står også i danske virksomheder, bekræfter Cisco.æææ
Topledere: Diesel er død - brændselsceller leverOver halvdelen af toplederne i bilindustrien tror, at diesel som den første af de traditionelle motorteknologier er på vej ud. 76 procent af lederne tror stadig, at forbrændingsmotoren vil være vigtig i mange år fremover.æææ
The late Hans Rosling tells the modern world's storyHans Rosling, who has died in Sweden aged 68, tells 200 years of world history in four minutes.æææ
Dummy mummy comes to the rescue of tiger cubs in IndiaPark rangers in India are using a cuddly toy tigress to help three traumatised cubs spring back to their feet after the death of their mother.æææ

Dyster forudsigelse for 2017: Flertallet af forbrugerne vil blive ramt af DDoS-angreb https://www.version2.dk/artikel/deloitte-flertallet-forbrugerne-vil-blive-ramt-ddos-angreb-1073266 Hackere har fået bedre software til styre store mængder af kompromitterede enheder, og de mange hurtige bredbåndsforbindelser i bl.a. Danmark gør de cyberkriminelle i stand til at sende horder af data på meget kort tid. Version2æææ
Sådan fandt IT-udvikler frem til over 3000 kunders oplysninger i Rema 1000 app https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-fandt-it-udvikler-frem-3000-kunders-oplysninger-rema-1000-app-1073033 Blandt andet ved at udnytte manglen på verificering i Rema 1000’s norske app ’Æ’, var Hallvard Nygård i stand i løbet af en aften blandt andet at hente over 3000 kunders telefonnumre Version2æææ

GOP-backed measures seek to rein in science used at EPAPondering new restrictions on how the Environmental Protection Agency can use scientific data, congressional Republicans are seeking advice from the chemical and fossil fuel industries.æææ
Iran displays ancient Persian artifacts returned from the USIran is displaying hundreds of ancient and Persian artifacts, some dating back as far as 3,500 years and all of them recently brought back home from museums and collections in Western countries.æææ
Efter Trump-chok: Skal forskere holde sig væk fra demonstrationer?March for Science-bevægelsen breder sig og giver panderynker hos forskere, der er i tvivl om det smarte i at deltage. Hvad mener Ingeniørens læsere?æææ
Parter vil stille krav til lægers samarbejde med kommunale akutfunktioner t kommunalt akutteam skal altid kunne komme i kontakt med en læge, mener flere parter, der har indsendt høringssvar angående kvalitetsstandarder for kommunale akutfunktioner.æææ
DARPA is Funding Paper Airplanes for Some Cool PurposesDARPA, the U.S. Department of Defense military research agency, whose work has resulted in staples of modern life such as the Internet and GPS systems, is now working with a San Francisco-based R&D lab – Otherlab – to develop the world’s most advanced industrial paper airplanes. The project is ... Read Moreæææ
The most powerful man in UK science on his new role Mark Walport will be the first head of a £6-billion “super-agency”.
Cassava carrier bags: Indonesian entrepreneur tackles plastic scourgeFrom bags washing up on Bali's beaches to food packaging scattered across roads and clogging waterways in cities, Indonesia is facing a plastic waste crisis driven by years of rapid economic growth.æææ
China tightens smog data controls amid public angerChina has established a single network to monitor air pollution levels across the country, as the government attempts to control the spread of information about the country's toxic smog in response to rising public anger.æææ
Measuring time without a clockEPFL scientists have been able to measure the ultrashort time delay in electron photoemission without using a clock. The discovery has important implications for fundamental research and cutting-edge technology.æææ
Data guru Hans Rosling dies at 68Data guru Hans Rosling, a Swedish public health expert famous for combating scientific ignorance with catchy YouTube videos in his mission to promote a "fact-based world", has died at the age of 68, his foundation announced.æææ
'Ghost skier' leads Winter Olympic Games data revolutionA "ghost skier" hurtling down the slope, an athlete's glucose levels flashing across the screen along with his heart rate—it is all part of an Olympic data revolution awaiting television viewers.æææ
GOP senior statesmen making push for a carbon taxA group of Republican senior statesmen are pushing for a carbon tax to combat the effects of climate change, and hoping to sell their plan to the White House.æææ
Facebook employees to get 20 days off for family bereavementFacebook says it is extending its bereavement policies and will also allow employees paid time off when a family member is sick.æææ
Onkologer: Keytruda som førstelinje­behandling er et stort og vigtigt skridt Europa Kommissionen har godkendt det immunterapeutiske middel Keytruda som monoterapi til førstelinjebehandling af voksne patienter med fremskreden ikke-småcellet lungekræft. Et stort fremskridt for behandlingen af danske lungekræftpatienter, konkluderer flere onkologeræææ
Erik Jorgensen (U. Utah / HHMI) 1: Synaptic transmission https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/synaptic-transmission.html Part 1: Synaptic Transmission: Jorgensen describes the historic experiments in electrophysiology and microscopy that led to our current understanding of synaptic transmission. Part 2: Recycling Synaptic Vesicles: Ultrafast Endocytosis: Two mechanisms exist for recycling synaptic vesicles: clathrin-mediated and ultrafast endocytosis.æææ
Erik Jorgensen (U. Utah / HHMI) 2: Recycling synaptic vesicles: Ultrafast endocytosis https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/recycling-synaptic-vesicles-ultrafast-endocytosis.html Part 1: Synaptic Transmission: Jorgensen describes the historic experiments in electrophysiology and microscopy that led to our current understanding of synaptic transmission. Part 2: Recycling Synaptic Vesicles: Ultrafast Endocytosis: Two mechanisms exist for recycling synaptic vesicles: clathrin-mediateæææ
The US Needs Real Data to Confront Bias in Police Shootings Researchers learned police were twice as likely to fatally shoot unarmed black civilians. Those findings are terrible—and too hard to come by.
Helium-forbindelse kan skrive kemibøgerne omUnder ekstremt højt tryk kan ædelgassen helium gå i forbindelse med natrium. Noget, vi troede, var umuligt.æææ
'Riskiest ideas' win $50 million from Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Initiative's first grants will fund a medley of wild ideas from top San Francisco Bay Area biologists, engineers and programmers.
Likely New EPA Head Will Imperil Climate GoalsScott Pruitt’s confirmation as EPA director would put at risk the nation’s ability to meet its Paris climate commitments.æææ
Analysis uncovers racial bias in fatal shootings by policeA recent analysis found that among 990 individuals fatally shot by US police officers in 2015, Black civilians were more than twice as likely as White civilians to have been unarmed, and civilians from "other" minority groups were significantly more likely than White civilians to have not posed an imminent threat to the officer(s) or other civilians.æææ
Combined count data reveals shifts in hawks' migratory behaviorBird species' distributions and migratory behavior are shifting in response to changes in climate and land-use, but surveys that focus on a particular season can cause scientists to miss trends in the bigger picture. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tackles this problem by combining Red-tailed Hawk counts from both migration and winter, and finds that while the hawks' numbeæææ
For youth of color, losing trust in teachers may mean losing the chance to make it to collegeIn a time of increased concern about how minorities are treated by police, teachers, and other authorities, it is critical to examine whether students of color have experiences in school that lead to mistrust of authorities and what the long-term implications are for young people.æææ
Allen's Hummingbird boom missed by breeding bird surveysAllen's Hummingbird has been placed on several conservation watchlists, as breeding bird surveys indicating population declines have spurred concerns that climate change may push it out of Southern California. However, local birdwatchers have reported at the same time that the non-migratory subspecies of Allen's Hummingbird, once restricted to the Channel Islands, is now a common sight at feedersæææ
Greater sage-grouse more mobile than previously suspectedGreater Sage-Grouse are thought to return to the same breeding ground, or "lek," every spring—but how do populations avoid becoming isolated and inbred? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications used thousands of DNA samples collected at leks across four states to reveal that some sage-grouse travel more widely than anyone suspected and, in doing so, may temper inbreeding and isolatæææ
Students who enjoy or take pride in math have better long-term math achievementResearch has shown that students' learning and cognitive performance can be influenced by emotional reactions to learning, like enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom. Most studies on this topic have been done in labs. Now a new longitudinal study out of Germany investigates how students' emotions in a school context relate to their achievement. The study focused on achievement in math, which is not onlyæææ
Et succesfuldt offentligt it-projekt: Udvikler-engagement har været afgørende https://www.version2.dk/artikel/succesfuldt-offentligt-it-projekt-brugernes-engagement-har-vaeret-afgoerende-1072887 En system med adressetjeneste, der kan anvendes af f.eks. webshops, har gået trinvis til værks i udviklingen og prioriteret en intensiv dialog med it-udviklere. Det har skabt en succes, der roses af Version2-blogger Version2æææ
Uddannelsesloft: Minister holder fast i positivlisteSøren Pind har stadig ikke svaret på, hvorfor uddannelsesloftets positivliste skal udelukke nye og efterspurgte ingeniøruddannelser.æææ
Host birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often then blue-green eggsScientists have long thought that host birds accept or reject parasitic eggs according to how closely they resemble their own eggs in color. However, a new study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that both robins and blackbirds tended to reject brown eggs and accept blue-green eggs regardless of the color differences between their own eggs and the foreign eggs.æææ
Teachers may be cause of 'obesity penalty' on girls' gradesWhile obesity is often thought of as a health problem, a new study suggests that discrimination by body weight may be the more important factor for obese white female students' lower success in school.æææ
New clues to causes of heart failureOf the more than 700,000 Americans who suffer a heart attack each year, about a quarter go on to develop heart failure. Scientists don’t fully understand how one condition leads to the other, but researchers have now discovered a significant clue—which ultimately could lead new therapies for preventing the condition.æææ
Alzheimer's disease researchers solve mystery of beguiling proteinLeading neuroscientists have clarified the role of a controversial immune system protein in Alzheimer’s disease, showing it has opposing effects in early and late stages of the disease. Their discovery unites previous studies that left researchers conflicted and showed the protein both exacerbates and ameliorates disease symptoms. The updated model of disease progression also highlights the need tæææ
Malaria control efforts can benefit from forecasting using satellitesLinks between patterns of malaria in Kenya and environmental factors (temperature, rainfall and land cover) are measurable by satellite imagery, says a researcher. In his doctoral dissertation, the researcher shows that conducive environmental conditions occur before increases in hospital admissions and mortality due to malaria, indicating that the satellite information is useful for the developmeæææ
Automatically darkening windows in a wide range of colorsElectrochromic glass darkens automatically when the sun shines and keeps the heat out. Previously it was available only in blue, and switching times were also long. Now, a new process makes it possible to manufacture other glass colors for the first time. And compared to previous models, switching is nearly ten times faster.æææ
Deep Learning Models of the Retinal Response to Natural ScenesA central challenge in neuroscience is to understand neural computations and circuit mechanisms that underlie the encoding of ethologically relevant, natural stimuli. In multilayered neural circuits, nonlinear processes such as synaptic transmission and spiking dynamics present a significant obstacle to the creation of accurate computational models of responses to natural stimuli. Here we demonstræææ
Normative theory of visual receptive fieldsThis article gives an overview of a normative computational theory of visual receptive fields, by which idealized functional models of early spatial, spatio-chromatic and spatio-temporal receptive fields can be derived in an axiomatic way based on structural properties of the environment in combination with assumptions about the internal structure of a vision system to guarantee consistent handlinæææ
How To Stop Your Smart TV From Spying on You If your TV is hooked up to the internet, it's probably tracking you somehow. Here's how to get a little bit of control back.

‘A Conservative Climate Solution’: Republican Group Calls for Carbon TaxA group of senior Republican figures, led by James A. Baker III, says that taxing carbon emissions is the fairest way to address a warming climate.æææ
Desk stuff to make your workday more productive, cheerful, and disaster-proof Gadgets Eleven seriously thoughtful picks for your workspace When you start a job, you begin with a blank slate. Let your desk be a reflection of your work and yourself.æææ
A bridge of stars connects two dwarf galaxiesThe Magellanic Clouds, the two largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, appear to be connected by a bridge stretching across 43,000 light years, according to an international team of astronomers led by researchers from the University of Cambridge. The discovery is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) and is based on the Galactic stellar census beingæææ
Why grey wolves kill less prey when brown bears are aroundWe’ve long assumed wolf packs are forced to kill more often to make up for having meals stolen by scavenging bears – but the opposite is true, they kill lessæææ
Bird lookouts make alarm calls to save themselves, not the groupArabian babbler birds that go it alone continue to sound alarm calls when they see threats, showing there must be selfish motives behind sentinel behaviouræææ
Drought identified as key to severity of West Nile virus epidemicsA study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers has found that drought dramatically increases the severity of West Nile virus epidemics in the United States, although populations affected by large outbreaks acquire immunity that limits the size of subsequent epidemics.æææ
Wolfing it down: Brown bears reduce wolf kill ratesIf you've ever been elbowed out of the way at the dinner table by older, stronger siblings, you'll identify with wolves competing with larger bears for food. A study by Utah State University ecologist Aimee Tallian and colleagues reveals wolves might be at more of a disadvantage than previously thought.æææ
Blue-bellied insects may play a role in the fight against citrus greeningWhile searching for a potential Achilles' heel in the insect responsible for spreading the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease, researchers have uncovered a protein that makes their bellies blue and may impact how easily they spread the pathogen.æææ
Researchers identify protein essential for healthy gut cell developmentScientists have uncovered key processes in the healthy development of cells which line the human gut, furthering their understanding about the development of cancer.æææ
Protostar displays a strange geometryUsing observations of molecules in the protostar L1527 taken by the ALMA observatory in northern Chile, a group of researchers have uncovered new clues to understanding how dust in a collapsing molecular cloud can shed angular momentum and penetrate beyond an area known as the 'centrifugal barrier' to find its way to the surface of the forming star.æææ
Heavy Lifting at Work Linked to Decreased Fertility in WomenWomen who lift or move heavy objects at work may be at increased risk for fertility problems, a new study suggests.æææ
E-Cig Risk: Teens Who Vape More Likely to Start Smoking TobaccoTeens who "vape" in high school are at increased risk for using tobacco cigarettes in the future.æææ
Raw Video: Tornado Hits NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility In New OrleansThe facility was impacted by a large tornado on Feb. 7, 2017. “Only minor injuries have been reported and NASA employees and other tenants are being accounted for,” according to NASAæææ
Researchers May Have Located the Neurological Origins of Misophonia Certain sounds, like chewing, drive misophonia sufferers mad. New research might have found a neural misfiring. Read Moreæææ
From 'CRISPR' to 'EpiPen': Dictionary Adds Slew of Scientific WordsThe lexicographers at Merriam-Webster announced today that they have added more than 1,000 new words to the dictionary, including many that are related to science, technology and medicine.æææ
Largest undersea landslide revealed on the Great Barrier ReefJames Cook University scientists have helped discover the remnants of a massive undersea landslide on the Great Barrier Reef, approximately 30 times the volume of Uluru.æææ
Studies point way to precision therapies for common class of genetic disordersTwo studies are opening important new windows into understanding an untreatable group of common genetic disorders known as RASopathies that are characterized by distinct facial features, developmental delays, cognitive impairment and heart problems. The findings could help point the way toward personalized precision therapies for these conditions.æææ
The heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at home, study findsThe heavier someone is, the less likely they are to have what many people might call a "good death," with hospice care and a chance to die at home, a new study finds. And that difference comes with a financial, as well as a personal, cost, the research shows.æææ
'In 50 years, reading will be much easier—for computers and humans alike'Have you ever been told you have writing like chicken scratch? It turns out this might not only bother your grade four teacher—your computer could be confused too.æææ
Teachers may be cause of 'obesity penalty' on girls' gradesWhile obesity is often thought of as a health problem, a new study by a University of Illinois at Chicago sociologist suggests that discrimination by body weight may be the more important factor for obese white female students' lower success in school.æææ
A paper in JPSP explores how much evidence people need in a trend to decide it is getting better or worse. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]æææ
New method improves accuracy of imaging systemsNew research provides scientists looking at single molecules or into deep space a more accurate way to analyze imaging data captured by microscopes, telescopes and other devices.æææ
Why we underestimate time when we're having fun on FacebookUpdating your Facebook status can be a fun way to while away the hours -- but now it seems it really is making us lose track of time as we do it.æææ
Prenatal bisphenol A exposure weakens body's fullness cuesAn expectant mother's exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) can raise her offspring's risk of obesity by reducing sensitivity to a hormone responsible for controlling appetite, according to a mouse study.æææ
Plain Old Vaping Gives Way to ‘Dripping’ Among Teenagers, Study SaysOne in four Connecticut high school students who use e-cigarettes have used the method to produce thicker clouds of nicotine vapor, a Yale study found.æææ
The Debunker: No Data Manipulation in 2015 Climate Study, Researchers SayA British tabloid said American government scientists overstated global temperatures to influence climate talks. Other scientists say that did not happen.æææ
Human intuition added to planning algorithmsResearchers are trying to improve automated planners by giving them the benefit of human intuition. By encoding the strategies of high-performing human planners in a machine-readable form, they were able to improve the performance of planning algorithms by 10 to 15 percent on a challenging set of problems.æææ
Why male immune cells are from Mars and female cells are from VenusA research team is the first to uncover reasons why a specific type of immune cell acts very differently in females compared to males while under stress, resulting in women being more susceptible to certain diseases.æææ
Immune system plays dual role in breast cancerThe immune system plays a paradoxical role in the spread of breast cancer. Some immune cells contribute to metastasis, while other cells can be activated to strengthen the effect of chemotherapy, outlines new research.æææ
Toxic metals found in e-cigarette liquidsHigh levels of toxic metals have been found in the liquid that creates the aerosol that e-cigarette users inhale when they vape.æææ
Study outlines steps that growing startups must follow to succeedBy using more than three decades of experience as an entrepreneur and turnaround executive, a researcher lays out a road map for the founding entrepreneur who seeks to retain the CEO position as a company gains market traction and begins a period of rapid growth.æææ
Facebook takes search warrant challenge to NY's top courtFacebook has told New York's highest court that it must be allowed to object when law enforcement seeks search warrants for its users' information.æææ
Endangered antelope 'may be wiped out'Disease has killed up to a quarter of Critically Endangered Saiga antelope in Mongolia, scientists say.æææ
Army Corps Of Engineers Grants Easement For Dakota Access Pipeline The Army Corps of Engineers has granted the final easement needed to finish the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, according to a court filing Tuesday.æææ
Army Approves Dakota Access Pipeline Route, Paving Way For The Project's Completion The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it will allow the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River, cutting short an environmental impact assessment and removing the final barrier to construction.
Sitting not linked to incident diabetes, new research suggestsSitting may not be as deadly as previously thought, with new research ruling out sitting as a direct cause of diabetes.æææ
Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming worldClimate change is likely to increase US electricity costs over the next century by billions of dollars more than economists previously forecast, according to a new study.æææ
Research pinpoints promise of polycrystalline perovskitesA team of scientists has determined that surface recombination limits the performance of polycrystalline perovskite solar cells.æææ
New study is an advance toward preventing a 'post-antibiotic era'New research may help to overcome life-threatening antibiotic-resistant bacteria in what the World Health Organization warns could become a 'post-antibiotic era.' Biologists combined different classes of antibiotics to kill E. coli bacteria in their laboratory and found that certain combinations of three antibiotics are surprisingly effective in killing the bacteria and may be helpful in slowing tæææ
Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatmentThe new gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, it must be delivered across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a process that can trigger cell defenses and 'trap' CRISPR/Cas9, reducing its treatment potential. Now, a research team has designed a delivery system using nanoparæææ
YouTube adds mobile video streaming for top talentYouTube on Tuesday began letting popular online video personalities broadcast on the go using mobile devices, ramping up a challenge to Facebook and Twitter in the live-streaming arena.æææ
Major global warming study again questioned, again defendedAnother round of bickering is boiling over about temperature readings used in a 2015 study to show how the planet is warming.æææ
Coal ash selenium found in fish in N.C. lakesA new Duke University study has found high levels of selenium in fish in three North Carolina lakes receiving power plants' coal ash waste.æææ
Bradley Tusk: How Uber and Michael Bloomberg Won Their Big Battles Bradley Tusk is the founder and CEO of Tusk Holdings. In conversation with Data4America, he discusses fighting regulatory battles for Uber and other disruptive companies. Read Moreæææ
Hans Rosling: Data visionary and educator dies aged 68Mr Rosling was known for lively, data-driven presentations debunking myths about global development.æææ
Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hailStrong updrafts—currents of rising air—in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to Penn State meteorologists.æææ
New scientific approach assesses land recovery following oil and gas drillingA new scientific approach can now provide regional assessments of land recovery following oil and gas drilling activities, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.æææ
How life survives: Researchers confirm basic mechanism of DNA repairDay in and day out, in our bodies, the DNA in cells is damaged for a variety of reasons, and thus intercellular DNA-repair systems are fundamental to the maintenance of life. Now scientists from the UNC School of Medicine have confirmed and clarified key molecular details of one of these repair systems, known as nucleotide excision repair.æææ
Video: Milk versus dark chocolate: A scientific showdownValentine's Day is nearly here. Whether you're spending it with your significant other or flying solo, chocolate is often in the mix. But which is the better choice: milk or dark chocolate?æææ
This cheap and easy lab-on-a-chip could save lives Technology Diagnosing diseases quickly and easily in poor regions Stanford University researchers design a low-cost lab-on-a chip to tackle preventable deaths in the developing world.æææ
MAP: Find Out What New Viruses Are Emerging In Your Backyard Over the past 60 years, the number of new diseases cropping up in a decade has almost quadrupled. "We're in a hyperinfectious world," says one scientist.
Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hailStrong updrafts -- currents of rising air -- in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to meteorologists.æææ
Whale of an Idea: Satellites Help Monitor Migrating HumpbacksScientists are turning to high-flying help in efforts to count humpback whales.æææ
Air pollution linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes in obese Latino childrenLatino children who live in areas with higher levels of air pollution have a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Scientists tracked children's health and respective levels of residential air pollution for about 3.5 years before associating chronic unhealthy air exposure to a breakdown in beta cells, special pancreatic cells that secrete insulin and maintain theæææ
Genetic defects in tooth enamel conducive to development of cavitiesBacteria are not the sole cause of cavities; tooth resistance also plays an instrumental role. Researchers demonstrate that mutated genes lead to defects in the tooth enamel and can therefore encourage the development of cavities.æææ
Pariser-pissoir bruger tissetrængende mænds urin til blomsterjordDet offentlige toilet opsamler urin i et halmmagasin og bruger tisset i produktionen af kompost.æææ
New way to discover structures of membrane proteinsScientists have discovered a better way to extract proteins from the membranes that encase them, making it easier to study how cells communicate with each other to create human health and disease.æææ
Why are men overlooking the benefits of marriage?The marriage rate in the U.S. continues to decline and the view that marriage entails a “lack of freedom” is becoming more entrenched, particularly among younger men, according to researchers.æææ
Successful application of VasalgelTM male contraceptive in monkeysResults of a study of Vasalgel in rhesus macaques have been published. Vasalgel is being developed by a social venture as a non-hormonal, long-acting, potentially reversible male contraceptive. It is a polymer hydrogel that works by blocking sperm in the vas deferens. Injection of Vasalgel in sexually mature adult male rhesus monkeys was effective in preventing conception throughout the one-plus yæææ
Algae survive heat, cold and cosmic radiationIn a long-term experiment on the International Space Station, researchers studied how the extreme conditions in space affect algae. These research findings could benefit industrial applications and perhaps a mission to Mars.æææ
Approach removes thyroid gland with no neck scar or need for special equipmentA surgical approach to perform thryroidectomies without scarring the neck appears to be just as successful using standard surgery. Originally, using robotics and endoscopic technology, surgeons made an incision behind the ear instead of in the neck. A new study shows that the same approach can be employed using standard surgical equipment and techniques.æææ
Giant Amazonian Catfish Is a Record-Breaking TravelerThe dorado catfish migrates most of the length of the Amazon River basin.æææ
Watch a squishy robot oh-so-gently catch a fish Technology The design could lead to better surgical tools Soft robot catches a fish, could lead to better surgical tools.æææ
After Tornadoes Hit In And Around New Orleans, Wall Of Storms Moves East The National Weather Service says multiple tornadoes touched down in southern Louisiana on Tuesday, and severe weather moving east threatened other Southern states.
Stars align in test supporting 'spooky action at a distance'Physicists address a loophole in tests of Bell's inequality with 600-year-old starlight. Results show strong evidence for Einstein's quantum spooky action at a distance.æææ
E-cigarettes safer than smoking says long-term studyE-cigarettes are less toxic and safer to use compared to conventional cigarettes, according to new research.æææ
Varme storme sender temperatur i Arktis på himmelflugtVarmen truer med at begrænse havisens i forvejen rekordlave udbredelse yderligere.æææ
Scientists find clue to why Zika, but not its close relatives, causes birth defectsThe most frightening aspect of Zika virus has been its ability to produce severe fetal birth defects during pregnancy, especially microcephaly—a small head. Now, scientists have uncovered the details behind the virus’s unique ability to cross the placental barrier and expose the fetus to a range of birth defects that often go beyond microcephaly to include eye and joint injury, and even other typeæææ
Winning the war: How to persuade children to eat more veggiesAn associate professor of food, nutrition, dietetics and health offers parents research-based advice for appealing to children's emotional and behavioral appetites to help them eat the vegetables they need.æææ
Picking teams and picking music in P.E.Some physical education practices can help kids have better experiences: listening to music and picking teams privately, suggests a new report.æææ
Alpha-lipoic acid prevents kidney stones in mouse model of rare genetic diseaseAlpha-lipoic acid, a dietary supplement widely available to consumers, prevented stone formation in a mouse model of cystinuria, a rare inherited disease that causes recurrent formation of painful and damaging kidney stones. This research has led to the initiation of a clinical trial in patients suffering from the condition.æææ
SNAP can actually raise spending on food The cash equivalent of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits wouldn’t increase food spending as much, new research shows. “For every $100 in SNAP benefits that a household receives, the household spends just over $50 more on food each month,” says Jesse Shapiro, an economics professor at Brown University and the Rhode Island Innovative Policy Lab who authored the study witæææ
For cops, exposure to stressful situations dysregulates cortisol patternA study of more than 300 members of the Buffalo Police Department suggests that police events or conditions considered highly stressful by the officers may be associated with disturbances of the normal awakening cortisol pattern.æææ
Scientists Are Developing Flu Shots for Dogs, Which Will Help Protect Us Too In severe cases, a dog can develop pneumonia and even die. Read Moreæææ
Fewer obese seniors get to die at home The heavier someone is, the less likely they are to receive quality end-of-life care, including in hospice and the opportunity to die at home. For a new study, researchers analyzed records from more than 5,600 senior citizens who took part in the long-running national Health and Retirement Study (HRS), examining how their body mass index (BMI) related to end-of-life measures, such as their use ofæææ
Concerns over wasting doctor's time may affect decision to see GPWorries over wasting their doctor's time, particularly at a time when NHS resources are stretched, may influence when and whether patients choose to see their GP, according to a study.æææ
Mysterious white dwarf pulsar discoveredAn exotic binary star system 380 light-years away has been identified as an elusive white dwarf pulsar, the first of its kind ever to be discovered in the universe,æææ
DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic deliveryUsing tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.æææ
Sixteen aplastic anemia patients free of disease after bone marrow transplant and chemoPhysicians report they have successfully treated 16 patients with a rare and lethal form of bone marrow failure called severe aplastic anemia using partially matched bone marrow transplants followed by two high doses of a common chemotherapy drug.æææ
6 DIY gifts for Valentine's Day DIY For all the nerdy sweeties out there 6 DIY projects you can give your loved ones this Valentine's Day…æææ
More screen time for kids isn't all that badChances are that your children will turn out OK even though they spend hours playing video games or watching TV, according to a new study that found that there is only a negligibly small association between excessive screen time and higher levels of depression and delinquency among teenagers.æææ
Squid Communicate With a Secret, Skin-Powered Alphabet Once they get over being creeped out, maybe scientists will figure out what cephalopods are saying.
Trilobites: Newly Discovered Gecko Escapes Danger Naked and AliveWhen snatched by an attacker, the lizard rips off its scales and skin so it can slip away unscathed.æææ
Rullende robot-tønde skal slæbe dine indkøbVespa-producenten Piaggio har udviklet en fortovsrobot, der følger i hælene på sin ejer.æææ
Your favorite travel mug is bad Gadgets Here's one we actually love America’s darling deserves to die.æææ
Male Birth Control Gel Inches Toward a BreakthroughDespite a plethora of birth control options for women, men have typically had far fewer choices available to them.æææ
Biotech industry blasts 'misguided' Trump travel banBosses of more than 150 US biotech companies Tuesday criticised US President Donald Trump's travel ban against seven Muslim-majority countries, saying the sector stood to lose talented workers and its global dominance.æææ
Vienna's famed late panda gets stuffed for final journeyLong Hui, a giant panda feted for having fathered five cubs in captivity and who succumbed to a stomach tumour in December, will be stuffed and returned to China for posterity, the Vienna Zoo said Tuesday.æææ
Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of daysEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details theæææ
NASA sees Tropical Storm Carlos west of La Reunion IslandNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Carlos as its center moved just to the west of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean.æææ
From Utah with love and thanks for all the uraniumThree new minerals discovered by a Michigan Tech alumnus are secondary crusts found in old uranium mines. They're bright, yellow and hard to find.æææ
Newfound Gecko Species Jumps Out of Its Own SkinA newly discovered gecko species belongs to a group with an unusual defensive strategy that might make your skin crawl.æææ
Scientists—and Imogen Heap—Construct a Perfect Song for Babies Scientists and Imogen Heap team up to create the perfect song to make a baby happy. Read Moreæææ
A new way to discover structures of membrane proteinsUniversity of Toronto scientists have discovered a better way to extract proteins from the membranes that encase them, making it easier to study how cells communicate with each other to create human health and disease.æææ
Enzyme key to learning in fruit fliesAn animal's reaction to an odor or food or other stimuli depends largely on past experiences and how they have been entered into memory.æææ
How hydras know where to regrow lost body partsFew animals can match the humble hydra's resilience. The small, tentacled freshwater animals can be literally shredded into pieces and regrow into healthy animals. A study published February 7 in Cell Reports suggests that pieces of hydras have structural memory that helps them shape their new body plan according to the pattern inherited by the animal's "skeleton." Previously, scientists thought tæææ
Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatmentMore and more scientists are using the powerful new gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9, a technology isolated from bacteria, that holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, the new gene-clipping tool must be delivered safely across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a difficult process that can triggeræææ
Why Snap Is Worried About Net NeutralityA repeal of the FCC’s “open Internet” rules could hurt business for upstart video services like Snapchat.æææ
Goth Sloth vs. Punk Skunk For this week’s VS, we present to you some animals on the fringe. Which do you choose? Goth or punk? Sloth or skunk? The usual bonuses Earn 5,000 points – 2,500 bonus Earn 15,000 points – 5,000 bonus Earn 25,000 points – 10,000 bonus For every 25,000 points above 25,000 – 5,000 bonus Member of winning team (if you’ve scored at least 2,500 points) – 10,000 bonus Highest scorer on each team – 5,000æææ
Moment’s Snap-on iPhone Lenses Get Their Own Battery Case Moment's new high-capacity battery case is built to accept the company's excellent lens attachments.
See the Evolution of the Famed Porsche 911 in 7 Photos How the German sports car met modernity without ditching the past.
What Warmed Ancient Mars?New data from NASA's Curiosity rover suggest a surprising dearth of greenhouse gases in the Red Planet's distant past -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Israel edges out South Korea for top spot in research investment Two countries vie to invest more of their economy into research than anyone else.
New technique slashes diagnosis time during brain surgeryNeurosurgeons want the quickest, most accurate information to help them make decisions during brain tumor surgery. A new technique could help, say experts.æææ
The Privacy Paradox: An Interview with Manoush Zomorodi An interview with Manoush Zomorodi, host of WNYC's Note to Self, about The Privacy Paradox campaign. She discusses an ethical code needed for technologists, why the typical ad-based business model online is not sustainable, and why it's time for internet users to be "digitally woke." Read Moreæææ
Scientists catalogue 'parts list' of brain cell types in a major appetite centerUsing new technology, scientists have catalogued more than 20,000 brain cells in one region of the mouse hypothalamus. The study revealed some 50 distinct cell types, including a previously undescribed neuron type that may underlie some of the genetic risk of human obesity. This catalog of cell types marks the first time neuroscientists have established a comprehensive "parts list" for this area oæææ
Dansk vindmølle sætter verdensrekord i energiproduktionKonkurrencen er dog hård, og ekspert fra DTU mener, at flere og større vindmøller er på vej.æææ
A New Way to Remember: The Power of Quirky Memory JogsResearch shows that a quirky, well-placed physical reminder can do wonders -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Why big data can’t predict the next armed conflict The expectation that big data alone will be enough to predict armed conflict is unrealistic, according a recent Science essay coauthored by Lars-Erik Cederman, professor of international conflict research at ETH Zurich. He explains why in this recent interview with ETH News.
Airbnb imposes limits on rentals in BarcelonaHomeowners in central Barcelona will only be able to rent out one place on Airbnb as part of new rules announced Tuesday by the home rentals website, at loggerheads with local authorities.æææ
Bacterium lassoes its way from the mouth to the heart to cause diseaseThe human mouth can harbour more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist with us as part of our resident oral microbiota. But when bacteria spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic.æææ
Den berømte statistiker Hans Rosling er dødHans Rosling brugte meget af sin tid på at fortælle, at medierne ofte viderebringer misforståelser - og han elskede at forklare "virkeligheden" med for eksempel æbler.æææ
Making a scavenger—the meat-thieving traits that have stood the test of timeTake a look at the teeth of any animal. The chances are you'll then have a good idea if it's a meat eater or a vegetarian. Sharp canines? Easy. All the better to eat you with. But how would you find out whether your chosen species got by on dead meat, or if it survived and thrived by catching live prey? To answer that kind of question you have to go beyond teeth and look at many other aspects of iæææ
Study offers new insights into receptor that regulates Staphylococcal virulenceA recent study published in Cell Chemical Biology has revealed new insights into a molecular pathway that leads to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Using a tool that mimics the cellular environment, Princeton University researchers reconstituted a key receptor protein responsible for regulating S. aureus virulence. These bacterial infections can cause a range of human illnesses from skin infectionæææ
Material can turn sunlight, heat and movement into electricity—all at onceMany forms of energy surround you: sunlight, the heat in your room and even your own movements. All that energy—normally wasted—can potentially help power your portable and wearable gadgets, from biometric sensors to smart watches. Now, researchers from the University of Oulu in Finland have found that a mineral with the perovskite crystal structure has the right properties to extract energy fromæææ
The Debunker: Was Data Manipulated in a Widely Cited 2015 Climate Study?A British tabloid says American government scientists overstated global temperatures to influence climate talks. Respected researchers say that did not happen.æææ
Tarantulas inspire new structural color with the greatest viewing angleInspired by the hair of blue tarantulas, researchers from The University of Akron lead a team that made a structural-colored material that shows consistent color from all viewing directions. This finding overturns the conventional wisdom that long-range order photonic structures are always iridescent, opening new potential to mass produce structural colors because highly ordered designs are easy tæææ
NASA advances first-ever silicon-based X-ray opticNASA scientist William Zhang has created and proven a technique for manufacturing lightweight, high-resolution X-ray mirrors using silicon—a material commonly associated with computer chips.æææ
Portable superconductivity systems for small motorsSuperconductivity, where electrical currents course unhindered through a material, is one of modern physics' most intriguing scientific discoveries. It has many practical uses. Governments, industries, and health care and science centers all make use of superconductivity in applications extending from MRIs in hospitals to the cavities of particle accelerators, where scientists explore the fundamenæææ
Women With Breast Cancer Miss Out On Recommended Genetic Testing Most women with breast cancer say they want testing to know if they carry BRCA gene mutations that increase cancer risk, but only around half of women at high risk actually get tested.
Exhibition charts 500 years of evolution of robotsInspired by his belief that human beings are essentially terrified of robots, Ben Russell set about charting the evolution of automatons for an exhibition he hopes will force people to think about how androids and other robotic forms can enhance their lives.æææ
Human DNA softer than DNA single-celled lifeSingle-celled organisms have stiffer DNA than multicellular lifeforms like humans and rice. Theoretical physicists managed to simulate the folding in full genomes for the first time to reach this conclusion. Publication in Biophysical Journal on February 7.æææ
Iron Fist Trailer: The Final Defender Has Arrived The show hits Netflix on March 17.
Squid Communicate With a Secret, Skin-Powered Alphabet Once they get over being creeped out, maybe scientists will figure out what cephalopods are saying.
770,000 Tubes of Spit Help Map America’s Great Migrations With their massive database of DNA, Ancestry has mapped how culture and geography has shaped the genetic structure of the US population over the last 200 years.
Starlight test shows quantum world has been weird for 600 yearsUnknown physics that could undermine quantum theory has been ruled out in a measurement guided by starlight emitted at least six centuries agoæææ
Black Hole Binges on Record-Setting Stellar MealA trio of x-ray observatories has spied a supermassive black hole feasting on a giant star for more than a decade -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Anyone (even you) can become a troll Internet trolls, by definition, are disruptive, combative, and often unpleasant with their offensive or provocative online posts designed to disturb and upset. The common assumption is that people who troll are different from the rest of us, giving us the freedom to dismiss them and their behavior. But a new study suggests otherwise—under the right circumstances, anyone can become a troll. “We waæææ
Medicare could overpay medicare advantage plans by $200 billion over ten yearsCurrent trends in diagnostic coding for patient risk scores will lead to Medicare overpaying Medicare Advantage (MA) plans substantially through 2026-likely to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars, suggests a new report.æææ
Despite Whistleblower's Concerns, Climate Change Study Called SoundClimate change doubters have seized upon a new accusation suggesting that scientists with NOAA manipulated temperature data in a 2015 study on climate change to reach a desired conclusion. The accusations, scientists said, are off-base.æææ
Researchers use tiny 3D spheres to combat tuberculosisA new 3D system has been used to study human infection in the laboratory. The team, which includes infection researchers, engineers and bioinformaticians have used an electrostatic encapsulation technique to make tiny 3D spheres within which human cells are infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacteria to generate conditions that more closely reflect events in patients.æææ
Researchers find chemical switch that may decrease symptoms of schizophreniaIn mice, adjusting levels of a compound called kynurenic acid can have significant effects on schizophrenia-like behavior, research has found. In recent years, scientists have identified kynurenic acid as a potential key player in schizophrenia.æææ
Rewards treat alcohol abuse in those with mental illnessOffering prizes- - from simple shampoo to DVD players -- can be an effective, low-cost treatment for alcohol abuse, the nation's third leading preventable cause of death, suggests a new report.æææ
Experiment Reaffirms Quantum Weirdness There might be no getting around what Albert Einstein called “spooky action at a distance.” With an experiment described today in Physical Review Letters — a feat that involved harnessing starlight to control measurements of particles shot between buildings in Vienna — some of the world’s leading cosmologists and quantum physicists are closing the door on an intriguing alternative to “quantum entæææ
Little diatoms have big influence on ocean nutrients Diatoms are each just single cells, but they have a significant impact on the dispersal of nutrients and trace elements in global marine waters, report researchers. Diatoms are a very common group of algae found not only in freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes, but also in marine waters, particularly the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. Given an adequate supply of nutrients and light, diatoms cæææ
Show of Shipwrecked Treasures Raises Scientists' IreArchaeologists worry that a museum exhibition will encourage exploitation of priceless historical sites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans People with sickle cell trait, which includes about 10 percent of African-Americans, can get erroneous readings on a common blood glucose test. That could mean they miss out on diabetes treatment.
New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries, and our understanding of lifeA new set of machine learning algorithms that can generate 3-D structures of tiny protein molecules may revolutionize the development of drug therapies for a range of diseases, from Alzheimer's to cancer.æææ
Genomes in flux: New study reveals hidden dynamics of bird and mammal DNA evolutionEvolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. But in some instance it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater amount was added, report scientists. Until now, the extent to which our genome has expanded and contractæææ
Size matters for marine protected areas designed to aid coralFor marine protected areas established to help coral reefs recover from overfishing, size really does seem to make a difference, say experts.æææ
How do you reintroduce a herd of bison into the wild?A herd of plains bison have been successfully reintroduced to Canada's oldest national park, more than 100 years after they were nearly hunted out of existence.æææ
MRSA-bakterier i hver anden pakke dansk svinekød48 procent af det danske svinekød i supermarkederne indeholder resistente bakterier, viser ny undersøgelse fra Fødevarestyrelsen, mens det kun gælder 28 procent af det udenlandske kød.æææ
Ny svensk klimalov inspireret af dansk lovgivningSvensk klimalov skal sikre landet negativ CO2-udledning i 2045. Forslaget bygger på danske og britiske modeller, hvor politikken bliver holdt op mod kvantificerbare mål.æææ
Dashboard Camera Captures Bright Green Fireball Streaking Over U.S. Midwest [Video]The 300-kilogram meteor created a sonic boom, and may have dropped fragments into Lake Michigan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
What happened to the sun over 7,000 years ago?By analyzing the level of a carbon isotope in tree rings from a specimen of an ancient bristlecone pine, researchers have revealed that the sun exhibited a unique pattern of activity in 5480 BC. By comparing this event with other similar but more recent phenomena, they reported that this event may have involved a change in the sun's magnetic activity, or a number of successive solar burst emissionæææ
Collection of 13,500 Nastygrams Could Advance War on TrollsThe nonprofit behind Wikipedia is teaming up with Google to work on algorithmic discussion monitors.æææ
Hysterectomy tied to early death if ovaries are removed Scientists say removing ovaries during a hysterectomy could increase a woman’s risk for heart disease, cancer, and premature death. A 10-year study, the largest of its kind, compared women who were treated for a benign disease who had both ovaries removed with those who had one or none removed. Researchers looked at 113,679 cases of women aged 35-45 from April 2004 to March 2014. A third of the pæææ
Can This Song Really Make Babies Happy?Two scientists set out to create a song that was scientifically proven to make babies happy.æææ
DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic deliveryUsing tiny snippets of DNA as "barcodes," researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.æææ
Dinosaurs: Juvenile, adult or senior?How old were the oldest dinosaurs? This question remains largely unanswered. The natural life span of these long-extinct giants is of interest to scientists, in combination with questions regarding how fast they could grow and how they could obtain sufficient nutrients from their habitat. Palaeontologists at the University of Bonn estimate by means of bone structures whether a particular dinosauræææ
Did a Changing Climate Wipe Out the Giant Kangaroo?New research suggests that as weather patterns changed some 30,000 years ago in Australia, megafauna went extinct -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Harvesting Sharks Could Be Key to Saving ThemSustainable fishing of some species for products including fins is feasible, and can avoid cruel practices, study finds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
US conservative bill aims to axe EPA – here’s why it won’t workThe bill is latest in a series of signals that the US Environmental Protection Agency will be reined in under President Trump, but it might not end it just yetæææ
Bohr's quantum theory revisedBohr’s atomic model was utterly revolutionary when it was presented in 1913 but, although it is still taught in schools, it became obsolete decades ago. However, its creator also developed a much wider-ranging and less known quantum theory, the principles of which changed over time. Researchers have now analyzed the development in the Danish physicist’s thought – a real example of how scientific tæææ
iOS-apps er sårbare over for man-in-the-middle angreb https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ios-apps-saarbare-overfor-man-in-the-middle-angreb-1073038 iOS-applikationer er i risikozonen for at blive ofre for man-in-the-middle angreb. Dette kan i værste fald give dem adgang til personfølsomme oplysninger og brugeres login. Version2æææ
Hey Eco-Warriors: Now You Can Buy Ink Made of Car Exhaust Air Ink is the first ink made from air pollution.
Watch Darpa’s Creepy ‘Project SideArm’ Pluck a Drone Out of the Air Instead of relying on heavy infrastructure, deploy drones out the back of a truck.
Stunning Portraits of the Showiest Show Birds on Earth If you think of birds, you probably picture a pigeon. But they're so much prettier than that.
Ground-breaking research on the side effects of therapyWhile many people who suffer from depression and anxiety are helped by seeing a psychologist, others don't get better or actually get worse. Psychological treatment can have negative side effects, like any medicine.æææ
Hundreds of ancient earthworks built in the AmazonThe Amazonian rainforest was transformed over 2,000 years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.æææ
Pride: Sin or incentive?Humans correctly forecast the personal qualities valued in their local population, and generate pride accordingly, suggests new research.æææ
Longtime Autodesk CEO stepping downThe longtime CEO of the design software company Autodesk is stepping down after reaching an agreement with activist investors.æææ
Twitter broadens its campaign against hate and abuseTwitter has broadened its campaign against hate speech and abuse.æææ
Computational methods applied to big datasets are compelling tools for historical linguisticsDigital approaches applied to big data play an increasingly important role in the humanities. However, there is skepticism about the accuracy and potential of computational methods for historical linguistics. A key task is the identification of etymologically related words (cognates) with a common ancestor, such as stone in English and Stein in German. Up to now, cognate detection is exclusively cæææ
Efficient approach to leaching lithium and cobalt from recycled batteriesRechargeable lithium ion batteries power our phones and tablets they drive us from A to B in electric vehicles, and have many applications besides. Unfortunately, the devices that they power can fail and the batteries themselves are commonly only usable for two to three years. As such, there are millions batteries that must be recycled. Research published in the International Journal of Energy Tecæææ
Detecting early onset of metastatic disease using FAST discA new research, affiliated with UNIST has been highlighted on the front cover of the January 2017 issue of the prestigious journal Analytical Chemistry. The key finding of this study is the development of a new technique that seperates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood at a liquid-liquid interface.æææ
Departure of migratory birds from stopover sites is hormone-controlledMigratory birds often stop along their long journeys to replenish their fat stores. The purpose of these stopovers – rest and refuelling – is clear. To date, however, it had been unclear which physiological signals triggered the birds' decision to continue their flight. A team led by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna has now identified, for the first time, the hormone ghrelin as a signal for the bæææ
More order with less judgment: An optimal theory of the evolution of cooperationA research team led by mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation. This team proves that the practice of making moral assessments conditionally is very effective in establishing cooperation in terms of evolutionary game theory. 'Our study also demonstrates the evolutionary disadvantage of seeking reputatæææ
Powerful change: A profile of today's solar consumerPeople with higher incomes and better education no longer dominate demand for the domestic solar market in Queensland with a new study revealing the highest uptake in solar PV systems comes from families on medium to lower incomes.æææ
The Download, Feb 7, 2017: There Is a Troll in All of Us, TVs That Spy On You, and Automating Wall StreetThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.æææ
See the fossil of a spiny slug with a tiny helmet Scientists have discovered the 480-million-year-old remains of a spiny little slug with tiny teeth and a helmet. It may be the earliest stage in the evolution of mollusks, a diverse group of invertebrates that includes squids, octopuses, snails, and clams. The animal—named Calvapilosa which means “hairy scalp”—was discovered in a fossil-rich deposit in Morocco known as the Ordovician Fezouata Foræææ
US child-health study rises from ashes of high-profile failure The government’s cancelled National Children’s Study has a successor that may sidestep earlier challenges. Nature 542 149 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21367æææ
Persistent tropical foraging in the highlands of terminal Pleistocene/Holocene New GuineaThe development of agriculture is frequently seen as one of the major economic, social, and demographic thresholds in human history. From the perspective of the modern world it is often seen as an inevitable, desirable subsistence strategy, allowing larger populations, settled life, and the development of cities. Likewise it has even been argued that long-term human survival in tropical forests muæææ
This newly discovered gecko can literally squirm right out of its skin Animals Naked mole rat, eat your heart out Fish-scale geckos can tear away their large scales to escape predators…æææ
How it feels when people see you as less human The “Ascent of Man” diagram spans ape-like human ancestor to modern human. In a recent study, American participants placed Muslims and Mexican immigrants significantly closer to the ape-like ancestor than Americans as a whole. The experiment comes from a study on Americans’ dehumanization of Muslims and Mexican immigrants during the 2016 US Republican Primaries, and the consequence that feeling dæææ
Doctors Are Speaking Out against TrumpPhysicians must walk a careful line between medical practice and political activism, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t stand up for their beliefs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Powerful change: Team profiles of today's solar consumerPeople with higher incomes and better education no longer dominate demand for the domestic solar market in Queensland with a new QUT study revealing the highest uptake in solar PV systems comes from families on medium to lower incomes.æææ
Building a better model of human-automation interactionPeople generally make decisions using two ways of thinking: They think consciously, deliberate for a while, and try to use logic to figure out what action to take—referred to as analytical cognition. Or people unconsciously recognize patterns in certain situations, get a "gut feeling," and take action based on that feeling; in other words, they use intuitive cognition. In his February Human Factoræææ
Tiny organisms with massive impactDiatoms are a very common group of algae found not only in freshwater streams, rivers and lakes, but also in marine waters. These unicellular organisms are particularly prevalent in the waters of the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. Given an adequate supply of nutrients and light, diatoms can multiply with such explosive force that they create an algal "bloom".æææ
Bacterial survival strategy: Splitting into virulent and non-virulent subtypesScientists have discovered a long-term epigenetic memory switch that controls different modes of bacterial virulence, a bacterial survival strategy for outsmarting the human immune response. The study sheds new light on bacterial virulence strategies, resulting in increased disease severity, higher infection persistence, and improved host-to-host spreading.æææ
New species of gecko has massive scales and tear-away skinMany lizards can drop their tails when grabbed, but one group of geckos has gone to particularly extreme lengths to escape predation. Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis have large scales that tear away with ease, leaving them free to escape whilst the predator is left with a mouth full of scales. Scientists have now described a new species (Geckolepis megalepis) that is the master of this aæææ
Scientists develop 'lab on a chip' that costs 1 cent to makeMicrofluidics, electronics and inkjet technology underlie a newly developed all-in-one biochip that can analyze cells for research and clinical applications.æææ
Printed ‘lab on a chip’ costs a penny and catches disease earlyThe cheap diagnostic kit is made using a regular inkjet printer and could catch signs of malaria, tuberculosis and cancer earlier in the developing worldæææ
Radioaktivitet fra Fukushima sætter ny målerekordTæt på reaktorkernen er målt en abnormt høj stråling, der kan reducere undersøgelsesrobotternes levetid til få timer. Uden for bygningen er strålingsniveauet ikke steget.æææ
Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3D printingNature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being compressed. The plant’s hardiness comes from a combination of its hollow, tubular macrostructure and porous, or cellular, microstructure. These architectural features work together to give grass its robust mechanical properties. Inspired by natæææ
Twitter Says It’s Trying Three Things to Combat TrollsFor starters, once you’ve been banned for abusive content, you won’t be allowed back.æææ
Gecko eludes foes with tearaway skinA newly discovered species of gecko has tearaway skin that leaves predators with nothing but a mouthful of scales when attacked.æææ
Never-before-seen topological solitons experimentally realized in liquid crystals(Phys.org)—Physicists have discovered that dozens of 3-D knotted structures called "topological solitons," which have remained experimentally elusive for hundreds of years, can be created and frozen for long periods of time in liquid crystals like those used in electronic displays. Until now, topological solitons have been realized only in a few experiments, and for such a short time that it has bæææ
Myopia cell discovered in retina: Dysfunction of cell may be linked to amount of time a child spends indoorsScientists have discovered a cell in the retina that may cause myopia when it dysfunctions. The dysfunction may be linked to the amount of time a child spends indoors and away from natural light. This discovery could lead to a new therapeutic target to control myopia. More than a billion people in the world have myopia, whose incidence is rising and is linked to how much time people spend indoorsæææ
Trilobites: Meteor Puts on a Light Show Over Midwest, and for the CamerasThe fiery object streaked across the Midwest sky early Monday morning. It was seen as far west as Nebraska and as far east as New York.æææ
EU-ekspert: Danmark er egnet til at huse EMARegeringens ambitioner om at få EMA til Danmark er realistiske, vurderer EU-professor Dorte Sindbjerg Martinsen. Danmark har en veludviklet sundhedssektor og en stor medicinalindustri, og det er umiddelbart stærke kort at have på hånden, lyder det.æææ
Want to Keep Hackers Out of Gadgets? Try International Law Opinion: A Yale cyberlaw expert explains how international law could make it harder for hackers to hamper IoT devices.
With Legion, the X-Men Finally Triumph Where They Belong: TV The new Fox show isn't just a promising series; it's an argument for why the mutants of Marvel Comics are perfect for longform TV.
10 års dødskamp er slut: Sort hul sluger stjerneSorte huller fortærer al masse, der kommer i nærheden, men kampen mod én stjerne har vist sig hård.æææ
Why Humans Prefer to Be the Center of the UniverseScience contemplates the incomprehensible -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Undersøgelse: Virksomheder lader fejlslagne projekter køre videre Et fåtal af virksomheder lukker it-projekterne ned, hvis businesscasen ikke holder, viser undersøgelse. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/undersoegelse-virksomheder-lader-fejlslagne-projekter-koere-videre-1073032 Version2æææ
Keeping the lights on in GhanaWhen Ghanaian Abu Yaya wondered why his country imports all of its electroporcelain – a small but crucial component for electrical power transmission – it led to a collaboration with Cambridge materials scientist Kevin Knowles that might one day result in Ghana being able to reduce its frequent blackouts.æææ
Immune system defence force captured in actionHow the natural defence force within our immune system attacks and destroys harmful invaders such as virus-infected and cancerous cells has been visualised in microscopic detail by scientists from UCL, Birkbeck, University of London, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Monash University, Australia.æææ
Biologists identify drug combinations that may be highly effective at reducing growth of deadly bacteriaA landmark report by the World Health Organization in 2014 observed that antibiotic resistance—long thought to be a health threat of the future—had finally become a serious threat to public health around the world. A top WHO official called for an immediate and aggressive response to prevent what he called a "post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treataæææ
Speciallæge mistænkes for svindel med lægeerklæringerEn speciallæge har angiveligt udfærdiget lægeerklæringer, der i 135 tilfælde givet udlændinge direkte indfødsret uden forudgående indfødsretsprøve.æææ
First Euclid flight hardware deliveredAn important milestone has been passed in the development of Euclid, a pioneering ESA mission to observe billions of faint galaxies and investigate the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The first flight hardware, in the form of four detectors known as Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), has been delivered to Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) by UK company e2v. The remaining flight CCDs (36 iæææ
Maternal social skills found to play a factor in infanticide in capuchin monkeys(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Canada, Japan and the U.S. has found that social skills in capuchin monkey mothers plays a role in the survivability of her offspring. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe their study of the monkeys in their native Costa Rica and behavioral traits they observed that might be translatæææ
E-cigarettes might actually be a safe tool for quitting smoking Health A study suggests that longterm e-cigarette use is safer than traditional smoking The study, which is the first one to directly compare these two groups over a long-term period, suggests that e-cigarettes may be a safe and effective way to quit…æææ
11 Immigrant Scientists Who Made Great Contributions to AmericaFrom Albert Einstein and Enrico Fermi to Elizabeth Stern, scientists of all types have numbered among those pursuing a new life in America.æææ
Ancient Chinese recipe makes lumpy, tasty beer Researchers have discovered a 5,000-year-old beer recipe by studying the residue on the inner walls of pottery vessels found in an excavated site in northeast China. It’s the earliest evidence of beer production in China so far. On a recent afternoon, a small group of students gathered around a large table in one of the rooms at the Stanford Archaeology Center. Li Liu, a professor in Chinese archæææ
Residential heating tops sources of PM2.5 in Danube region's urban areasThe European Commission's science and knowledge service, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) has evaluated sources of air pollutants in the Danube macro-region, a necessary step for the design of action plans to improve air quality. The related study showed residential heating contributed up to 35 percent of PM2.5 pollution in the main cities in the Danube macro-region, followed by agriculture (up toæææ
Evidence of uncharacteristic shoaling found to play a role in great die-off 250 million years ago(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from several institutions in China and the U.S. has found evidence of uncharacteristic shoaling before, during and after the great die-off 250 million years ago and suggest it could be the cause of so many species going extinct. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes evidence they found in rocksæææ
Austrian officials say parliament target of Turkish hackersAustrian officials say the country's Parliament was the target of a hacker attack on the weekend, and a Turkish group has claimed responsibility.æææ
Landmark EU-US data privacy court case opens in DublinA campaign by Austrian privacy lawyer Max Schrems against Facebook's transfer of personal data from Europe to the US is being heard in an Irish court from Tuesday, the latest twist in a long legal battle.æææ
French firm to design Shanghai wetland to clean factory waterFrench wastewater treatment company Suez said Tuesday it had been awarded a contract to design an artificial wetland to clean water from a petrochemical industrial zone outside Shanghai.æææ
Sådan ved Netflix, hvad du skal se næste gang Streamingtjenesterne gør brug af relativt simple tilgange til at give dig dine anbefalinger https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-ved-netflix-hvad-du-skal-se-naeste-gang-1073029 Version2æææ
Mange spørgsmål til gigantudvidelse af CPH - læs svarene fra piloter og ingeniørerDe tekniske, de kritiske og de hypotetiske. Lufthavnsingeniører og piloter svarer på alle jeres spørgsmål om den omfattende udvidelse af Københavns Lufthavn.æææ
A new species of gecko with massive scales and tear-away skinMany lizards can drop their tails when grabbed, but one group of geckos has gone to particularly extreme lengths to escape predation. Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis have large scales that tear away with ease, leaving them free to escape whilst the predator is left with a mouth full of scales. Scientists have now described a new species (Geckolepis megalepis) that is the master of this aæææ
Researchers apply textile fabrication principles to the production of microactuatorsThe EU funded POLYACT project applied textile fabrication principles to the production of microactuators, offering a range of biomedical applications both inside and outside the body.æææ
New research on why plant tissues have a sense of directionScientists at the John Innes Centre, Norwich have published new evidence that plant tissues can have a preferred direction of growth and that this characteristic is essential for producing complex plant shapes.æææ
Mysterious white dwarf pulsar discoveredAn exotic binary star system 380 light-years away has been identified as an elusive white dwarf pulsar – the first of its kind ever to be discovered in the universe – thanks to research by the University of Warwick.æææ
Novel LED street lights reduce costsResearchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a novel type of LED street light of increased efficiency. Compared to conventional LEDs, power consumption may be reduced by up to 20%. This will also decrease costs and CO2 emission. Conventional high-power diodes are replaced by a special array of LEDs. This enhances efficiency, increases service life and safety, and producesæææ
First measurement of nitrogen removal by local shellfishTowns along Cape Cod and the Islands are looking to shellfish not only as tasty culinary treats, but also for help cleaning up waters degraded by excess nitrogen in the region.æææ
Mobile phone and satellite data to map povertyAn international team has, for the first time, developed a way of combining anonymised data from mobile phones and satellite imagery data to create high resolution maps to measure poverty.æææ
The hidden cost of buying fresh vegetables all year roundShortages of lettuces, courgettes, broccoli and other unseasonal vegetables due to bad weather in the Murcia and Andalucia regions of Spain have caused a predictable number of column inches about the UK's reliance on imported fresh produce. Typically, the distress and devastation of torrential rains and flash floods in the region has been less reported.æææ
Should scientists engage in activism?Have you heard that scientists are planning a march on Washington? The move is not being billed as a protest, but rather as a "celebration of our passion for science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community," although it comes as a direct response to recent policy changes and statements by the Trump administration.æææ
What Everyone Gets Wrong about Black History in the Space AgeAfrican-American astronauts have been another group of hidden figures in the U.S. space program -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Fireball Hissing: Weird Cause of Noises Made by Meteors FoundThe popping, sizzling, rustling, and hissing sounds made by fireballs reportedly occur almost instantly to earthly onlookers. Here's why.æææ
Expert discusses definition and effects of populismJohn Abromeit, associate professor of history and social studies education, is an intellectual historian; he studies the history of ideas. One such idea is populism, a widely used term that is hard to define.æææ
Analysis of tree rings reveals highly abnormal solar activity in the mid-holoceneBy analyzing the level of a carbon isotope in tree rings from a specimen of an ancient bristlecone pine, a team led by Nagoya University researchers has revealed that the sun exhibited a unique pattern of activity in 5480 BC. By comparing this event with other similar but more recent phenomena, they reported that this event may have involved a change in the sun's magnetic activity, or a number ofæææ
Smart-meter data could improve the performance and efficiency of national power gridsPower generators face the constant challenge of matching the amount of power produced at any given time with the demand from consumers. Excess generation is wasteful and expensive, while undergeneration can cause brownouts. For this reason, accurately predicting power demand hours or even days in advance is critical for the reliable and sustainable operation of the electricity grid.æææ
Model accurately predicts the electronic properties of a combination of 2-D semiconductorsThe defining property of a semiconductor is its so-called bandgap: the barrier that prevents electrons within a specific energy range from flowing through a material. Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Professor of Material Science and Engineering Lance Li and his team collaborated with colleagues from Taiwan and used a simple model to determine the band aligæææ
Microbiology expert highlights importance of developing rapid diagnostic tests to combat drug resistanceDeveloping new ways to quickly diagnose illnesses in farm animals – allowing vets to administer effective, targeted treatment – could play a key role in helping to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, according to a Kingston University microbiology expert.æææ
Believe in the American dream? You're less likely impulse buy, study findsWhen materialistic consumers believe in the American dream—that it's possible to improve their economic status through hard work—they are less likely to spend impulsively, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.æææ
Secrets of life in a spoonful of blood The intricate development of the fetus is yielding its long-held secrets to state-of-the-art molecular technologies that can make use of the mother's blood. Nature 542 156 doi: 10.1038/542156aæææ
What animal has the craziest camouflage? Animals Some caterpillars look exactly like poop The animal world is full of trickery and concealment.æææ
Sinosphere: Debate Flares Over China’s Inclusion at Vatican Organ Trafficking MeetingA group of ethicists have expressed concern that China will use the meeting to convince the world that it no longer harvests organs from prisoners.æææ
Study outlines steps to success for growing startupsMany entrepreneurs dream of leading a successful company. But launching a startup is only the first step.æææ
Image: Potentially hospitable EnceladusSeen from outside, Enceladus appears to be like most of its sibling moons: cold, icy and inhospitable. But under that forbidding exterior may exist the very conditions needed for life.æææ
Forest 'islands' offer refuge to wintering birdsThe polar vortex of 2013 and 2014 brought the coldest winter many parts of the Midwest had experienced in decades. In Dane County, Wisconsin, it was the coldest it had been in 35 years.æææ
Deer change the landscape indirectlyIt is widely known that the white-tailed deer is a nonstop eater. Unless it is sleeping or fleeing from a predator, the keystone North American herbivore is nearly always nibbling.æææ
Physicists address loophole in tests of Bell's inequality using 600-year-old starlightQuantum entanglement may appear to be closer to science fiction than anything in our physical reality. But according to the laws of quantum mechanics—a branch of physics that describes the world at the scale of atoms and subatomic particles—quantum entanglement, which Einstein once skeptically viewed as "spooky action at a distance," is, in fact, real.æææ
New technology could help neuroscientists understand how dopamine influences brain activityMIT chemical engineers have developed an extremely sensitive detector that can track single cells' secretion of dopamine, a brain chemical responsible for carrying messages involved in reward-motivated behavior, learning, and memory.æææ
Child's Best Friend: Kids Prefer Their Pets Over SiblingsDogs may be man's best friend, but a new study finds that pets are children's best friends, too — more so than their own siblings.æææ
Should Scientists Engage in Activism?In the wake of the Flint water crisis and with a new notably anti-science president, U.S. scientists are reevaluating how to navigate the tension between speaking out and a fear of losing research funding.æææ
Research shows that anyone can become an internet trollInternet trolls, by definition, are disruptive, combative and often unpleasant with their offensive or provocative online posts designed to disturb and upset.æææ
Minister vil droppe hjertepakkerne »Vi udfaser hjertepakkerne, fordi de ikke fungerer optimalt og ikke sikrer den bedste sundhed for pengene,« siger sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).æææ
Scientists categorize Earth as a 'toxic planet'Humans emit more than 250 billion tonnes of chemical substances a year, in a toxic avalanche that is harming people and life everywhere on the planet.æææ
Findings suggest most people use their cell phones to pass waiting timesWhen queued up for an event, to buy a latte or waiting for a bus, most people whip out their phones to pass the time—most often within seconds of arriving.æææ
Study rehabilitates climate modelsWith new methods of reconstruction, climate researchers in Bern have been able to demonstrate that some 9,000 to 5,000 years ago, the Mediterranean climate was considerably warmer than previous studies had suggested. Among other things, previous concerns regarding the reliability of climate models could thus be dispelled.æææ
Immigrants Do Not Increase Crime, Research ShowsA group of criminologists show the claim of a link is false -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comæææ
Nike’s Iconic Gas Slipper, the Air, Gets a Minimal Reboot At just 8.8 ounces, the VaporMax is strides ahead of the bulky Air Max shoes of yesteryear but still delivers the legendary bounce.
Ride Your Bike Like a Kid—and Make It Fun Again Get back in the saddle with these tips.
Gun Violence Researchers Race to Protect Data From Trump It's not only climate data that's at risk.
Shred the Mountain to Pieces With This Backcountry Ski Gear When it's steep and deep on the back side, strap on this mountain-crushing outfit.
Pace Yourself With These 3 Sweatproof Workout Headphones Each of these sweatproof buds will push you—and your budget—a little harder.
A Controversial Minister Makes Peace With Techies in the Battle for SF’s Soul In San Francisco's Tenderloin, tension simmers between wealthy techies and the city's most needy. An 87-year-old minister is trying to heal the divide.
Synbio and biosecurityThe world in 1918 was emerging from under the pall of a World War that had claimed 38 million lives, and yet in the span of only one year, just as many lives would be lost to the Spanish Flu—an influenza pandemic that is still regarded the single deadliest epidemic in recorded history. The disease reached all corners of the world, from the Antipodes to Europe and Asia, eventually claiming 20–50 miæææ
Male Contraceptive 'Hydrogel' Passes Test in Rhesus MonkeysA new type of male contraceptive that blocks the flow of sperm effectively prevented pregnancy in female monkeys, a new study finds.æææ
Our story of rape and reconciliation | Tom Stranger / Thordis ElvaIn 1996, Thordis Elva shared a teenage romance with Tom Stranger, an exchange student from Australia. After a school dance, Tom raped Thordis, after which they parted ways for many years. In this extraordinary talk, Elva and Stranger move through a years-long chronology of shame and silence, and invite us to discuss the omnipresent global issue of sexual violence in a new, honest way. For a Q&A wiæææ
US government takes animal-welfare data offline The US Department of Agriculture will no longer make lab inspection results and violations publicly available, citing privacy concerns.
Just 6 rad kites for celebrating National Kite Flying Dayæææ Gadgets Let out some slack and take flight. If you have a chance to go outside, make sure to fly a kite for us. We wish we could join you.
In a Rare Zoo Escape, Sunny the Red Panda Is Still at LargeæææAbout a half-dozen animals a year escape from major zoos in the United States, but they are usually found quickly.
Researchers determine why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decadeæææWith the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past decade, less of the greenhouse gas is reaching the Earth's atmosphere. That's decidedly good news, but it comes with a catch: Rising levels of CO2 in the ocean promote acidification, which breaks down the calcium carbonate shells of some marine organisms.
Better scaffolds help scientists study canceræææTesting treatments for bone cancer tumors may get easier with new enhancements to sophisticated support structures that mimic their biological environment, according to Rice University scientists.
A trust gap may hinder academic success for minoritiesæææMiddle school students of color who lose trust in their teachers due to perceptions of mistreatment from school authorities are less likely to attend college even if they generally had good grades, according to psychology research at The University of Texas at Austin published in the journal Child Development.
Grow, mow, mulch: Finding lawn's valueæææCranking up the lawn mower on a Saturday afternoon may be a child's most dreaded chore. But little does he or she know that it also affects how much carbon and nitrogen are present in the soil below the grass.
For better skin grafts, take just one layeræææ Research shows that a skin-graft harvesting system aids chronic wound recovery and reduces care costs by accelerating the healing process. More than six million cases of chronic wounds cost $20 billion each year in the United States. Diabetic ulcers, pressure sores, surgical site wounds, and traumatic injuries to high-risk patients account for most wounds that won’t heal. “Chronic wounds occur wh
Republicans Offer to Tax Carbon EmissionsæææBut would a price of $40 per ton hold back climate change as much as Obama policies would have? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why plant tissues have a sense of directionæææScientists have published new evidence that plant tissues can have a preferred direction of growth and that this characteristic is essential for producing complex plant shapes.
Scientists create organs-on-chips for large-scale drug screeningæææLed by UCI professor of molecular biology & biochemistry Christopher C.W. Hughes, the research team successfully established multiple vascularized micro-organs on an industry-standard 96-well plate. Hughes and the study's first author, Duc T. T. Phan, showed that these miniature tissues are much better at reproducing human drug responses than previous model systems. Hughes and his group have shown
Penn researchers among first to grow versatile 2-D material tungsten ditellurideæææUniversity of Pennsylvania researchers are now among the first to produce a single, three-atom-thick layer of a unique two-dimensional material called tungsten ditelluride. Their findings have been published in 2-D Materials.
Mysterious geoglyphs can teach us about the Amazon's past—and its worrisome futureæææ Environment Enormous shapes etched onto the Earth Large geometric shapes found in the Amazon rainforest suggest that humans have been altering forests there for thousands of years…
US national anthem mentions slaves: Racist?æææ People have questioned why the national anthem of the United States mentions slavery. Is the song racist, patriotic, or both? In this 90-second video, Nicole Eustace, professor of history at New York University, puts the song and its lyrics in context. The national anthem lyrics in question are: “No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave: And
Poopy Situation Down Under: Why 36 Australian Beaches Were ClosedæææMelbourne's beaches are in an icky situation at the moment.
World's First Atomic Blast Tests Theories of Moon's FormationæææRadioactive glass from the Trinity nuclear test site resembles ancient moon rocks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Alternative theory on how aspirin may thwart canceræææMany studies have pointed to a role for aspirin in cancer prevention. Scientists have been unsure how the drug works in this regard, although they usually cite aspirin's anti-inflammatory effect. Now, lab studies point to a different mechanism. It involves aspirin's action against platelets, the blood cells that play a role in forming clots -- and new blood vessels, which can aid tumor growth.
This Bra Offers Emergency SupportæææIg Nobel Prize creator Marc Abrahams shows off this unusual disaster-preparedness device before a night discussing humor and science at the 92nd Street Y. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Chimpanzee feet allow scientists a new grasp on human foot evolutionæææAn investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper.
Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variabilityæææChanges in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to hydrologists. The researchers found that responses to climate variations can be detected in deep groundwater aquifers faster than expected -- in many cases within a year.
Youth soccer coaches can prevent injuries with just 90-minutes of trainingæææProfessional preventive training programs can be expensive and difficult to implement. A new study shows that when coaches receive even a small amount of education about preventive training, they can be as effective as professional athletic trainers at mitigating poor movement behavior and preventing injury in young soccer athletes.
Three new uranium minerals from UtahæææThree new minerals recently found are secondary crusts found in old uranium mines in southern Utah. They're bright, yellow and hard to find. Meet leesite, leószilárdite and redcanyonite.
This male birth control worked for over a year (in monkeys)æææ Health It gives ‘are you gellin’?’ a whole new meaning Nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended. We can do better.
Teens tend to explore in a more ‘random’ wayæææ The strategies people use for exploration change during the transition from teen to young adult, research suggests. Young adults are more likely to engage in “directed exploration,” or exploration driven by information-seeking, than teenagers are. At the same time, teens seem to be more comfortable with uncertainty overall. The study differentiates between two distinct types of exploration: direc
Wolfing it down: Brown bears reduce wolf kill rates says usu ecologistæææThe influence of predation on an ecosystem may depend on the composition of the predator community, researchers report.
Researchers quantify immune cells associated with future breast cancer riskæææResearchers have quantified the numbers of various types of immune cells associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, outlines a new report.
Flat lens opens a broad world of coloræææThe first flat lens that works within a continual bandwidth of colors, from blue to green, has now been developed by researchers. This bandwidth, close to that of an LED, paves the way for new applications in imaging, spectroscopy and sensing.
Study reveals how melanoma spreadsæææNewly identified genes and genetic pathways in primary melanoma -- a type of skin cancer -- could give researchers new targets for developing new personalized treatments for melanoma, and potentially other cancers. Learning how the genes are expressed (turned on or off) could be used in the future to predict how and when the cancer cells will spread to other parts of the body and how fast they wil
Researchers discover reason for permanent vision loss after head injuryæææResearch has shed new light on what causes the permanent vision loss sometimes seen in the wake of a head injury, report investigators.
Satellite Sees Louisiana Tornado Storm System from SpaceæææSevere thunderstorms and several tornadoes struck the state of Louisiana on Tuesday (Feb. 7). A weather satellite operated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) captured an overhead view of the weather system responsible.
Device Turns Air Pollution Into Printing InkæææThe Kaalink device can capture up to 93 percent of the emitted pollution from standard internal combustion engines.
Rethink’s Sawyer Robot Just Got a Whole Lot SmarteræææThe company that makes robots meant to collaborate with people has just added a slew of features in a big software upgrade.
Underwater Volcanic Eruption Could Create Temporary Island (Photo)æææAn undersea volcanic eruption caused a bright turquoise spot in the ocean.
12th Dead Sea Scrolls Cave Found in IsraelæææA cave that held Dead Sea Scrolls before they were stolen in the mid-20th century has been discovered in Qumran, Israel.
House Science Committee May Soon Try to Weaken the EPAæææPanel will likely push reforms that many fear will meddle with the scientific process -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Research will shift how cancer diversity and resistance are understood, studiedæææCircular DNA, once thought to be rare in tumor cells, is actually very common and seems to play a fundamental role in tumor evolution, say researchers.
A middleweight black hole is hiding at the center of a giant star clusteræææAll known black holes fall into two categories: small, stellar-mass black holes weighing a few suns, and supermassive black holes weighing millions or billions of suns. Astronomers expect that intermediate-mass black holes weighing 100 -- 10,000 suns also exist, but so far no conclusive proof of such middleweights has been found. Today, astronomers are announcing new evidence that an intermediate-
Planets of red dwarf stars may face oxygen loss in habitable zonesæææScientists are expanding the definition of habitable zones (the area around a star where a life-sustaining planet might lurk), taking into account the effect of stellar activity that can threaten exoplanets' atmospheres with oxygen loss.
Calcified plaque raises heart disease risk for younger adultsæææThe mere presence of even a small amount of calcified coronary plaque, more commonly referred to as coronary artery calcium (CAC), in people under age 50 — even small amounts — was strongly associated with increased risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease over the ensuing decade, report researchers.
The only ice volcano on Ceres might vanishæææ Scientists are puzzled by the solitary existence of an ice volcano on the dwarf planet Ceres. “Imagine if there was just one volcano on all of Earth,” says Michael Sori of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona. “That would be puzzling.” NASA’s Dawn spacecraft discovered the 4-kilometer-tall (2.5-mile) Ahuna Mons cryovolcano in 2015. Other icy worlds in our solar system,
Analyzing gut microbes and their byproducts essential to understanding human healthæææTo best understand the potential of microbes in the gut to affect human health, clinicians need to look not just at the bacteria present in fecal samples but also at metabolites like amino acids that those bacteria produce, according to a new study.
A bridge of stars connects two dwarf galaxiesæææThe Magellanic Clouds, the two largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, appear to be connected by a bridge stretching across 43,000 light years, according to astronomers. The discovery is based on the galactic stellar census being conducted by the European Space Observatory, Gaia.
WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Fargoæææ Need a dark comedy with a little bit of horror, drama, and sci-fi thrown in? Look no further.
Glass from nuclear test site shows the moon was born dryæææExamining residue from the first detonation of a nuclear weapon has helped explain why the moon seems to have so few volatile elements like water and methane
Antibiotics might kill gut bacteria that protect newborn lungsæææA study in mice has found that gut bacteria send signals that protect young lungs from pneumonia, prompting concern over antibiotic use in Caesarean sections
2017 NYC Regional Brain Bee Championsæææ For the first-place winner of this year’s Regional Brain Bee, biology was always the high school senior’s favorite subject in school. But it wasn’t until she was 14 years old that Winsome Ching narrowed her focus to neuroscience. After visiting a museum celebrating Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud in Vienna, Ching was “hooked” by his theories on the brain, she says. Since then, she has transiti
Splitfin flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to illuminate planktonæææThe flashlight fish uses bioluminescent light to detect and feed on its planktonic prey, according to a study published February 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jens Hellinger from Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany, and colleagues.
First nuclear explosion helps test theory of moon's formationæææDecades-old radioactive glass found blanketing the ground after the first nuclear test bomb explosion is being used by scientists to examine theories about the Moon's formation some 4.5 billion years ago.
Innovative procedure to measure cell energy production developedæææCollaborative work between researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in development of a new software tool that enhances measurement and analysis of energy production generated by human immune cells.
Snow leopard and Himalayan wolf diets are about one-quarter livestockæææAround a quarter of Himalayan snow leopard and wolf diets are livestock, the rest being wild prey, according to a study published February 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madhu Chetri from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway, and colleagues.
Rethink needed to save critically endangered black rhinocerosæææA new strategy of conservation must be adopted if the black rhinoceros is to be saved from extinction, concludes a new study.
Measuring time without a clockæææScientists have been able to measure the ultrashort time delay in electron photoemission without using a clock. The discovery has important implications for fundamental research and cutting-edge technology.
New evidence in favor of dark matter: The bars in galaxies are spinning more slowly than we thoughtæææA new article show that bars in galaxies are rotating much more slowly than had been inferred by previous works.
Beliefs about better treatment for HIV leads gay men to engage in riskier sexæææA survey in the US notes a consistent increase in the occurrence of condomless anal sex among men, as well as a rise in how many sex partners they have. Although antiretroviral therapies (ART) have revolutionized the treatment and prevention of HIV infections, knowing that they have ART as a back-up makes people complacent. This can lead to increased risks.
Is it too late for me to get a flu shot?æææ Health Don’t throw away your shot It’s somehow already February, people in your office are succumbing to the flu one by one, and you’re wondering: is it too late for me to get my flu shot?
How to survive the 'Little House' booksæææ DIY The Ingalls family almost died. A lot. We chose one near-death experience from each Little House book and compared the family’s survival technique to today’s best practices.
French auditors criticize €5-billion science super-campus near Parisæææ Would-be rival to MIT lacks strategy and governance, report says.
The Fate of Environmental Law in a Trump-Era Supreme CourtæææGiven what we know now, those laws will almost inevitably be weakened in ways that are hard to predict -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How hydras know where to regrow lost body partsæææFew animals can match the humble hydra's resilience. The small, tentacled freshwater animals can be literally shredded into pieces and regrow into healthy animals. A new study suggests that pieces of hydras have structural memory that helps them shape their new body plan according to the pattern inherited by the animal's 'skeleton.' Previously, scientists thought that only chemical signals told a
PTSD symptoms may be prevented with ketamineæææResearchers have evidence that giving a small dose of ketamine one week before a psychologically traumatic event may help prevent PTSD. The study, in mice, may have implications for soldiers who are at risk for trauma and PTSD.
Diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaustæææA new study finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive -- these commuters breathe exhaust levels nine-times higher than on a busy city street.
The origin of stem cellsæææThe protein WOX2 is responsible for enabling plants to develop organs throughout their lives.
Designer compound may untangle damage leading to some dementiasæææScientists may be able to prevent and reverse some of the brain injury caused by the toxic form of a protein called tau.
A Tasty Program at the Rubinæææ The lady has an extraordinary palate, a palate of incredible finesse. She picks up hot ingredients, touches them, and she thinks about this image on the plate. She has the most disciplined execution on a plate that we’ve ever seen. But the palate is where it’s just extraordinary. And honestly, I know chefs with Michelin stars that don’t have palates like hers. –Chef Gordon Ramsay, MasterChef judg
Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites GlacieræææDrainage of four interconnected lakes below Thwaites Glacier in late 2013 caused only a 10 percent increase in the glacier's speed. The glacier's recent speedup is therefore not due to changes in meltwater flow along its underside.
How neuroscience insights could help architects judge designs and spaces, and fashion new onesæææ submitted by /u/erusso16 [link] [comments]
Quinoa genome could see 'super-food' prices tumbleæææScientists say that decoding the quinoa genome could cut the cost of this nutritious but underutilised crop.
Exercise, sleep are key to keeping employees from bringing home work frustrations, study showsæææA brisk walk or a long swim may be the key to preventing a bad day at the office from spilling over into the home. A study tracked participants' sleep patterns and daytime physical movements found employees who recorded more than 10,900 steps each day were less likely to perpetuate abuse at home.
Physically demanding jobs and shiftwork linked to lowered fertility in womenæææA physically demanding job or work schedules outside normal office hours may lower a woman's ability to conceive, suggests research.
Researchers identify protein essential for healthy gut cell developmentæææScientists have uncovered key processes in the healthy development of cells which line the human gut, furthering their understanding about the development of cancer. A new study shows that a protein called ninein is essential for normal tissue development in the gut.
Tech Still Doesn’t Get Diversity. Here’s How to Fix Itæææ Opinion: By failing to hire more women and people of color, tech companies do themselves---and their shareholders---a disservice.
The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Codingæææ What if we regarded code not as a high-stakes, sexy affair, but the equivalent of skilled work at a Chrysler plant?
"Død" stjerne styrer nabostjernen i mystisk solsystemæææForskere har fundet en slags dynamo i et sært solsystem 380 lysår fra Jorden.
Age verification for online porn will be a security disasteræææThe UK’s Digital Economy bill will force users to prove their age before they access porn. This is not only hard to do, it’s also a goldmine for blackmailers and hackers
Why some people with HIV can now ditch condomsæææIf you take your meds regularly, and you are monogamous, two new studies show a negligible chance of passing on HIV. How will this change lives?
More than 100 tech firms sign letter opposing Trump travel banæææApple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft claim the president’s ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries inflicts "substantial harm on US companies”
Rare mid-weight black hole found at heart of bright star clusteræææIntermediate-mass black holes – weighing a few hundred to a few thousand solar masses – are the Bigfoot of astronomy, but now we may have seen one in our galaxy
Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue more likely to develop contralateral diseaseæææBreast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research.
Bacterium lassoes its way from the mouth to the heart to cause diseaseæææThe human mouth can harbor more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist with us as part of our resident oral microbiota. But when bacteria spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic.
Researchers find brief, intense stair climbing is a practical way to boost fitnessæææThere are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health. The findings negate the two most common excuses of couch potatoes: no time and no access to the gym.
The quinoa genome could help scientists get it out of the health food aisleæææ Science It's the first step to bringing the super grain to the masses The genome of quinoa has been sequenced. Nutritious and grown in harsh environments, quinoa deserves more efforts to become a true commodity crop, researchers say.
Quinoa genome accelerates solutions for food securityæææQuinoa could hold the key to feeding the world's growing population because it can thrive in harsh environments and grows well on poor quality, marginal lands. KAUST researchers have now completed the first high-quality sequence of the Chenopodium quinoa genome, and they have begun pinpointing genes that could be manipulated to change the way the plant matures and produces food. This project broug
A middleweight black hole is hiding at the center of a giant star clusteræææAll known black holes fall into two categories: small, stellar-mass black holes weighing a few Suns, and supermassive black holes weighing millions or billions of Suns. Astronomers expect that intermediate-mass black holes weighing 100 - 10,000 Suns also exist, but so far no conclusive proof of such middleweights has been found. Today, astronomers are announcing new evidence that an intermediate-m
Saiga Antelopes Are Struck Again by a Plague in Central AsiaæææAn ancient species that once roamed grasslands with woolly mammoths is dying in great numbers in Mongolia, with harmful factors piling up.
Full moon, comet starring in night sky show this weekendæææA full moon and comet share double billing in a special night sky show this weekend.
Data on blue whales off California helps protect their distant relativesæææScientists know a great deal about blue whales off California, where the endangered species has been studied for decades.
Germanium tin laser could increase processing speed of computer chipsæææAn “optically pumped” laser made of the alloy germanium tin grown on silicon substrates has now been fabricated by a team of researchers. The augmented material could lead to the development of fully integrated silicon photonics, including both circuits and lasers, and thus faster micro-processing speed at much lower cost.
New class of drugs to combat aging diseases discoveredæææNew details of the aging process have been uncovered by a research team. They discovered an altered balance between certain signaling molecules in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels and the heart. The team also discovered a new class of drugs that combats an important part of the aging process.
Ultrasmall atom motions recorded with ultrashort x-ray pulsesæææPeriodic motions of atoms over a length of a billionth of a millionth of a meter are mapped by ultrashort x-ray pulses. In a novel type of experiment, regularly arranged atoms in a crystal are set into vibration by a laser pulse and a sequence of snapshots is generated via changes of x-ray absorption.
How to recycle lithium batteriesæææResearch describes a new way to extract the lithium and the cobalt that make up the bulk of the metal components of rechargeable lithium ion batteries.
European space agency to help NASA take humans beyond moonæææThe European Space Agency says it will contribute key components for a future NASA mission to take humans around the moon within the next few years.
Germany, France plan cross-border self-driving test zoneæææEuropean neighbours Germany and France plan to test self-driving vehicles on a stretch of road linking the two countries, the transport ministry in Berlin said Wednesday.
NY Times teams with Spotify for music-news offeringæææThe New York Times said Wednesday it had teamed up with the online service Spotify in bid to lure subscribers with a "news and music experience."
Some animals are more equal than others—new study shows some animal welfare issues get more media than othersæææAnimal welfare issues receive varying levels of UK media attention, with some species being more widely reported than others, a new University of Oxford study has found.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Carlos moving past La Reunion IslandæææNASA found heavy rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Carlos as it continued to move between Madagascar and La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Terra satellite imagery revealed a concentrated storm, while the GPM core satellite measured rainfall rates within the storm.
Chimpanzee feet allow scientists a new grasp on human foot evolutionæææAn investigation into the evolution of human walking by looking at how chimpanzees walk on two legs is the subject of a new research paper published in the March 2017 issue of Journal of Human Evolution.
Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variabilityæææChanges in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to Penn State and Columbia University hydrologists.
A 'bridge of stars' connects two of our closest galaxiesæææ Space Sadly it's not walkable Europe's Gaia spacecraft has spotted a 'bridge of stars' between two dwarf galaxies. The halo is 43,000 light-years long.
Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites GlacieræææThwaites Glacier on the edge of West Antarctica is one of the planet's fastest-moving glaciers. Research shows that it is sliding unstoppably into the ocean, mainly due to warmer seawater lapping at its underside.
Massive lake drained for hydropower leaves dry bed and no fishæææA large artificial lake in Bosnia’s Neretva valley has been emptied by an energy firm, leaving locals crying foul over damage to wildlife
Lattice of nanotraps and line narrowing in Raman gasæææDecreasing the emission linewidth from a molecule is one of the key aims in precision spectroscopy. One approach is based on cooling molecules to near absolute zero. An alternative way is to localize the molecules on subwavelength scale. A novel approach in this direction uses a standing wave in a gas-filled hollow fiber. It creates an array of deep, nanometer-scale traps for Raman-active molecule
Pioneering chip extends sensors' battery lifeæææA low-cost chip that enables batteries in sensors to last longer, in some cases by over ten times, has been developed by engineers.
Android Wear 2.0 Has Landed—Here Are All the New Featuresæææ With Wear 2.0, Google is sharpening its vision for wrist-worn wearables.
Review: LG Watch Style and Sportæææ To coincide with the new software launch, Google worked with LG to make two new smartwatches, the Watch Sport and Watch Style.
More Money, More Problems for the Commercial Space Launch Bizæææ SpaceX's mishaps and ULA's layoffs signal that the commercial launch market is getting way more competitive.
Math learned best when children moveæææChildren improve at math when instruction engages their own bodies, concludes a new study. The results also document that children require individualized learning strategies.
Key friendships vital for effective human social networksæææClose friendships facilitate the exchange of information and culture, making social networks more effective for cultural transmission, according to new research that used wireless tracking technology to map social interactions in remote hunter-gatherer populations.
Fish uses sneaking behavior as stealth mating strategyæææA researcher found and recorded the Cuatro Ciénegas cichlid, a rare fish by the scientific name of Herichthys minckleyi, using a stealth mating strategy called sneaking to slip his DNA into the next generation.
Energy Costs at Record LowsæææThe findings counter claims by some, including in the Trump administration, that the adoption of wind, solar and other forms of renewable energy are driving up U.S. energy costs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Higher water table is good for radishes and CO2 emissionsæææ Increasing the water table by just 20 centimeters in radish fields not only reduced soil CO 2 emissions, but also improved crop growth. Another perk: it slowed the rate of loss of valuable peat soils converted into agricultural fields. “We are losing our peat soils in the UK at a fast rate, and we need to find solutions to decrease this loss if we want to preserve our food security.” A significan
'It's Just A Mess.' New Orleans Residents Clean Up After Tornadoesæææ Tornadoes injured dozens of people as they moved through southeastern Louisiana on Tuesday. In New Orleans East, the National Guard was helping clear streets of debris and downed electrical wires.
'Edutainer' Hans Rosling, Who Taught Us About The World, Has Diedæææ With facts, toys and good humor, the Swedish doctor and statistician helped people understand what numbers tell us about the world.
Cheaper battery for solar made with pee ingredientæææ A battery made with urea, commonly found in fertilizers and mammal urine, could provide a low-cost way of storing energy produced through solar power or other forms of renewable energy for consumption during off hours. The battery is nonflammable and contains electrodes made from abundant aluminum and graphite. Its electrolyte’s main ingredient, urea, is already industrially produced by the ton f
The Download, Feb 8, 2017: Tesla’s Big Battery Spend, Feature Phones Are Back, and Pruitt’s EPAæææThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
Mars’s frozen pole, Sweden’s climate plan and a stem-cell trial in Japanæææ The week in science: 3–9 February 2017. Nature 542 142 doi: 10.1038/542142a
Svalbard's electric power could come from hydrogenæææThe energy supply to Longyearbyen, midway between continental Norway and the North Pole, is a hot topic in the climate debate. Longyearbyen is the largest settlement and the administrative centre of Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. Today, Longyearbyen obtains its electric power and district heating from its coal power plant, the only one in Norway.
Gulf Dead Zone Makes for Shrimpier ShrimpæææThe low-oxygen waters of the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico result in smaller shrimp, and a spike in large shrimp prices. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Huge Undersea Landslide Slammed Great Barrier Reef 300,000 Years AgoæææMore than 300,000 years ago, a behemoth undersea landslide sent huge amounts of debris sliding down the Great Barrier Reef, generating a 90-foot-high (27 meters) tsunami.
Silicon Valley Finally Gets Real About Troll Controlæææ Another week, another plan by Twitter to combat abuse. But this time feels a little different.
The Internet Won’t Let the Senate Censor Elizabeth Warrenæææ Senator Mitch McConnell, we present to you the Streisand effect.
Mixing opioids and alcohol may increase likelihood of dangerous respiratory complicationæææTaking one oxycodone tablet together with even a modest amount of alcohol increases the risk of a potentially life-threatening side effect known as respiratory depression, which causes breathing to become extremely shallow or stop altogether, reports a study. Elderly people were especially likely to experience this complication, the study found.
New nanotech to detect cancer early | Joshua SmithæææWhat if every home had an early-warning cancer detection system? Researcher Joshua Smith is developing a nanobiotechnology "cancer alarm" that scans for traces of disease in the form of special biomarkers called exosomes. In this forward-thinking talk, he shares his dream for how we might revolutionize cancer detection and, ultimately, save lives.
Women with a thicker brain cortex are more likely to have autismæææThe outer layer of the brain is usually thicker in men than in women. Brain scans have found that having a thicker cortex is linked to autism spectrum disorder
Physics explains why rock musicians prefer valve ampsæææFor many guitarists, the rich, warm sound of an overdriven valve amp – think AC/DC's crunchy Marshall rhythm tones or Carols Santana's singing Mesa Boogie-fuelled leads – can't be beaten.
One year of high-quality early education improves outcomes for low-income infants, toddlersæææInfants and toddlers from low-income families who attended a high-quality center-based early education program did better in language and social skills after only one year than children who do not attend the program, research shows. The program, included specific components that may contribute to the positive development of children from low-income families.
For youth of color, losing trust in teachers may mean losing the chance to make it to collegeæææIn a new set of longitudinal studies, minority youth perceived and experienced more biased treatment and lost more trust over the middle school years than their white peers. Minority students' growing lack of trust in turn predicted whether they acted out in school and even whether they made it to college years later.
Host birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often the blue-green eggsæææHost birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often the blue-green eggs, a new study has concluded.
Record-breaking material contracts when heatedæææResearchers have discovered a negative thermal expansion material that shrinks by a record-breaking amount when heated, and which could help control materials' thermal expansion. The volume of the reduced ruthenate material shrank by 6.7 percent, more than double that seen for the current record-holder, but this could not be explained by atomic changes. Microstructural effects resulting from highl
Preemies in neonatal intensive care units exposed to loud noisesæææPreemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics, suggests new research. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development.
To declaw cats or not? New Jersey could be first with banæææNew Jersey could become the first state to prohibit veterinarians from declawing cats.
Diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaustæææA new study from U of T Engineering finds that diesel trains may expose passengers to elevated levels of certain pollutants, especially if they are sitting directly behind the locomotive.
Key friendships vital for effective human social networksæææClose friendships facilitate the exchange of information and culture, making social networks more effective for cultural transmission, according to new UCL research that used wireless tracking technology to map social interactions in remote hunter-gatherer populations.
Army Corps Approves Controversial Dakota PipelineæææThe decision could enable the $3.8 billion pipeline to begin operation as soon as June -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Teen vaping 'one way bridge' to future smoking among non-smokers, say researchersæææTeen vaping acts as a 'one way bridge' to future smoking among those who have never smoked before, and may not stop those who have smoked before from returning to it, concludes a small US study.
The role of animal companions in the lives of homeless peopleæææPublished as 'Caring at the Borders of the Human: Companion animals and the homeless' in the book ReValuing Care: Cycles and Connections (Routledge), Professor Carr's research also reveals that homeless people often show a collective responsibility for the pets and, because of the close relationship between the pet and the homeless person, a collective responsibility for homelessness itself.
New study explores disparities between researchers who publish in high-and low-impact journalsæææA new study surveying authors from a range of countries investigates the crucial differences between authors who publish in high- and low-impact factor medical journals. This original research shows that the growth of open access hasn't significantly changed the publishing landscape as regards impact factor.
Researcher finds fish uses sneaking behavior as stealth mating strategyæææWhile a dominant male fish from northern Mexico mates with a female, a small fella bides his time in the offing. Suddenly, the little guy darts in ahead of Mr. Big and plants his seeds on freshly laid eggs.
Scientists argue current climate change models understate the problemæææA new study on the relationship between people and the planet shows that climate change is only one of many inter-related threats to the Earth's capacity to support human life.
Recycling yogurt waste to produce electricity, nutrients and more dairy foodsæææAmerica's appetite for Greek yogurt has skyrocketed over the past decade. But for every container of Greek yogurt consumed, you could fill two or three more with the acid whey it produces. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the interesting ways scientists are making use of the byproduct.
The origin of stem cellsæææFreiburg plant biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux and his research group have published an article in the journal Developmental Cell presenting initial findings on how shoot stem cells in plants form during embryogenesis, the process of embryonic development. Pluripotent stem cells can develop into any type of cell in an organism. In contrast to animals, plants can form completely new organs from the
Waivers help parents of kids with autism keep workingæææ Medicaid waivers that improve access to home and community-based services for children with autism also help their parents keep their jobs, research shows. It’s more challenging for families of children with autism spectrum disorder to find childcare and other services compared to families of children with other special needs, and waivers can help pay for expensive services that might have otherw
Beware: Most Mobile VPNs Aren’t as Safe as They Seemæææ Recent research suggests that many VPNs for Android have privacy and security flaws, and the problem of choosing a reliable VPN goes even further.
The Oddly Fascinating, Fantastical History of Eyeglassesæææ Overview , an exhibit currently up at the Design Museum Holon in Israel, charts eyewear's evolution.
Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSAæææA compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the 'super bug.' Researchers have named the antibiotic compound 'dragmacidin G' and have shown that it has a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of MRSA as w
Researchers study patients' genetic and susceptibility risk factors for lymphedemaæææGenetic variations may be one of the important factors that influence breast cancer survivors' responses to the inflammatory processes and vulnerability to lymphedema.
Engineers develop powerful millimeter-wave signal generatoræææYour doctor waves a hand-held scanner over your body and gets detailed, high-resolution images of your internal organs and tissues. Using the same device, the physician then sends gigabytes of data instantly to a remote server and just as rapidly receives information to make a diagnosis. Integrated circuit researchers have created a silicon microchip-based component that could make these and many
LIGO's Underdog Cousin Ready to Enhance Gravitational-Wave HuntæææIt missed the historic discovery, but the Virgo lab in Italy is now primed to extend LIGO’s reach and precision -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
'Corrective glass' for mass spectrometry imagingæææThe chemical analysis of biological tissues with three-dimensional shapes has been a major problem so far. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-bu
Insights on optimal treatment of Paget's disease of boneæææIn a study of patients with Paget's disease of bone -- a common skeletal disorder that can lead to bone deformity, fractures, osteoarthritis, and bone pain -- long-term intensive bisphosphonate therapy conferred no clinical benefit over giving bisphosphonates only when patients felt bone pain.
'Goldilocks' genes that tell the tale of human evolution hold clues to variety of diseasesæææA relatively short list of genes are candidates for a suite of diseases including autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and epilepsy.
Weight loss often follows divorce for older womenæææ There have been lots of studies on marriage that focus on younger women, so researchers wanted to take a closer look at the health effects of marriage and divorce on older women. “The interesting thing we found in our study is that with divorce in postmenopausal women, it’s not all negative, at least not in the short term,” says Randa Kutob, an associate professor of family and community medicine
Spørg Scientariet: Hvad sker der, hvis man spiser for lidt fedt?æææEn læser har noteret sig, at vi bør indtage 30 procent fedt i vores kost. Men hvorfor det? Hvad sker der, hvis vi spiser mindre? Det svarer lektor på Institut for Idræt og Ernæring på.
How Thailand eliminated mother-to-child HIV transmissionæææThailand has become the first Asian country to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, thanks to a pragmatic multi-sector response backed by strong political commitment and heavy government investment, a new study reports.
Bill Nye's new Netflix show finally has an airdateæææ Entertainment Coming to a screen near you on April 21 "Bill Nye Saves the World" will air on TKTK. And it can't come soon enough.
Students who enjoy or take pride in math have better long-term math achievementæææA study of 3,425 German students from grades 5 through 9 has found that students who enjoyed and took pride in math had even better achievement than students with higher intelligence.
How air on the rise creates giant hailæææ Strong updrafts—currents of rising air—in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to meteorologists. “Hail can have significant socioeconomic effects on communities,” says Matt Kumjian, assistant professor of meteorology and atmospheric science in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at
Styrelse: Danmark i førerfeltet i kampen om EMAæææ Regeringen har indledt kampen om at få EMA til Danmark, og ifølge Lægemiddelstyrelsen er det realistisk, at agenturet havner på danske hænder. Det betyder, at styrelsen får travlt med at gå i dialog og bygge relationer med europæiske kolleger
Why Does the Melting of Arctic Sea Ice Matter?æææDue to the clear link to their diminishing habitat, polar bears have become
Function of olfactory receptor in the human heart identifiedæææResearchers have identified the function of olfactory receptors in the human heart muscle, such as are also present in the nose. One of the receptors reacts to fatty acids that occur in the blood, in patients with diabetes significantly above the normal range. If a fatty acid activates the receptor, it triggers a negative effect: the heart rate and the force of muscular contraction are reduced.
Depressed patients with earlier and more severe symptoms have high genetic risk for major psychiatric disordersæææClinical features of major depressive disorder (MDD) may help identify specific subgroups of depressed patients based on associations with genetic risk for major psychiatric disorders, reports a study. The study found that patients with an early age at onset and higher symptom severity have an increased genetic risk for MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
It's hard to affect policymakers with climate science informationæææExposure to climate models’ predictions affects policymakers and climate negotiators less than the informed general public, a paper assesses. But the right presentation format can improve forecasts’ effectiveness
People with asthma are missing airway ‘muscle relaxer’æææ A protein that appears to play a vital role in airway function is virtually missing in people who have asthma. The discovery points to a potential new treatment. When the protein, called SPLUNC1, is low or missing, people experience airway constriction, mucus production, chest tightness, and breathing problems. “This protein could be a potentially new target to go after, and it could really benef
EU vil ikke begrænse CO2-udledning fra interkontinental luftfartæææEU-Kommissionen vil permanent fritage flyselskaber for CO2-kvoter på interkontinentale ruter. International luftfart skal i stedet reguleres af en FN-aftale. Problematisk, at EU ikke vil blande sig, siger forsker.
Oxygen content increased when Earth was covered in iceæææIn the beginning, planet Earth was a very inhospitable place with no oxygen and only single-celled bacteria as inhabitants. According to a new study, the oxygen content in the air began to increase about 2.4 billion years ago, at the same time as the global glaciation and when all continents were gathered in a single huge landmass, or supercontinent. How to explain the exact connection between the
Novel LED street lights reduce costsæææResearchers have developed a novel type of LED street light of increased efficiency. Compared to conventional LEDs, power consumption may be reduced by up to 20%. This will also decrease costs and carbon dioxide emission. Conventional high-power diodes are replaced by a special array of LEDs. This enhances efficiency, increases service life and safety, and produces a better light.
Dinosaurs: Juvenile, adult or senior?æææHow old were the oldest dinosaurs? This question remains largely unanswered. The natural life span of these long-extinct giants is of interest to scientists, in combination with questions regarding how fast they could grow and how they could obtain sufficient nutrients from their habitat. Palaeontologists estimate by means of bone structures whether a particular dinosaur fossil is a young, adult o
How Much Damage Could Scott Pruitt Really Do at EPA?æææDonald Trump’s choice for EPA director would put at risk the nation’s ability to meet its Paris climate commitments.
Bill Nye Saves the World, the Anti-Anti-Science Show, Hits Netflix in Aprilæææ Watch the first trailer here.
Your Guide to the Long, Strange Comic-Book Backstory of FX’s Legionæææ It took nearly three decades for the world to finally be ready for the most powerful—and most interesting—member of the extended X-Men family.
Flipboard’s New App Learns What You Like, Then Crafts You a Zineæææ Today, Flipboard is rolling out a brand-new version of its platform that introduces what it calls "Smart Magazines."
White dwarf pulsar unlike anything ever seenæææ Scientists have identified an exotic binary star system 380 light-years away as a white dwarf pulsar—the first of its kind to be discovered in the universe. The new system, AR Scorpii (AR Sco), contains a rapidly spinning, burnt-out stellar remnant called a white dwarf, which lashes its neighbor—a red dwarf—with powerful beams of electrical particles and radiation, causing the entire system to br
Carnivorous plants aren’t as cool as you thinkæææ Science But their evolutionary history is Carnivorous plants aren't all that cool—they're just desperate.
Her er metallet, der leder elektricitet, men ikke varmeæææVanadiumdioxid har den usædvanlige egenskab, at varmeledning forårsaget af en elektrisk strøm er ca. 10 gange mindre end forventet. Det åbner for interessante anvendelser til kontrolleret bortledning af varme fra motorer eller vinduer.
Lock-out on the building siteæææEthambutol has long been part of the standard therapy for tuberculosis. Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers now describe how the antibiotic acts on the bacterium that causes the disease: It specifically inhibits growth of the cell wall from the cell poles.
Team engineers oxide semiconductor just single atom thickæææA new study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel method for fabrication of world's thinnest oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick. This may open up new possibilities for thin, transparent, and flexible electronic devices, such as ultra-small sensors.
Carnivores more seriously threatened by roads than previously acknowledgedæææLeipzig/Halle (Saale)/Porto. The effects of roads on carnivores have obviously been underestimated in worldwide species conservation. This is the conclusion of the first comprehensive global study on this topic, which has been published in the scientific journal Global Ecology and Biogeography by an international research team from Germany and Portugal. The protection status of several species tha
Compound from deep-water marine sponge could provide antibacterial solutions for MRSAæææA compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Also called the "super bug," MRSA bacteria are resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics such as methicillin, penicillin, oxacillin and amoxicillin and can be fatal. According to the Centers f
New evidence in favor of dark matter: The bars in galaxies are spinning more slowly than we thoughtæææAn article recently published in the Astrophysical Journal by a team of IAC researchers show that bars in galaxies are rotating much more slowly than had been inferred by previous works.
Engineering dream diodes with a graphene interlayeræææA team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has created a new technique that greatly enhances the performance of Schottky Diodes (metal-semiconductor junction) used in electronic devices. Their research findings have attracted considerable attention within the scientific community by solving the contact resistance problem of metal-semiconductor, which had remained unsolved for almost 50 years.
Real-time feedback helps save energy and wateræææThose who take long showers use a great deal of water and energy. Yet people who enjoy taking long showers do not usually realize to what extent they are damaging the environment. However, if a clever measuring system shows current consumption, this immediately leads to increased efficiency. The consumption information available on the display is incentive enough to reduce water and energy consump
Collapsed chloroplasts are targeted in self-eating processæææResearchers at Tohoku University have identified a previously uncharacterized type of autophagy, during which an autophagic process termed chlorophagy removes collapsed chloroplasts in plant leaves. The findings could lead to new methods for controlling the aging of plants.
Surprising spin behavior at room temperatureæææThe field of spintronics focuses on spin transport behavior in magnetic metals, and the major findings in this area have important implications for the field of electronics. This is because conventional electronics primarily considers the electron charge, whereas spintronics allows the electron spin to be exploited. One of the most significant advancements in spintronics has been the introduction
EU to phase out China solar panel dutiesæææThe EU said Wednesday it aimed to phase out anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar panel imports after 18 months, ending a bitter dispute with one of its largest trading partners.
Facebook adds tool for helping in times of crisisæææFacebook on Wednesday updated its Safety Check feature with a way for people to lend, or get, helping hands after disasters.
New study on how shellfish create their shellsæææA new study describing how shellfish create their shells in response to their environment is published today (Wednesday 8 February) in the journal Royal Society Open Science.
NASA finds planets of red dwarf stars may face oxygen loss in habitable zonesæææThe search for life beyond Earth starts in habitable zones, the regions around stars where conditions could potentially allow liquid water – which is essential for life as we know it – to pool on a planet's surface. New NASA research suggests some of these zones might not actually be able to support life due to frequent stellar eruptions – which spew huge amounts of stellar material and radiation
Towards equal access to digital coinsæææScientists at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) of the University of Luxembourg have developed an important mathematical algorithm called "Equihash." Equihash is a core component for the new cryptocurrency Zcash, which offers more privacy and equality than the famous Bitcoin. Zcash came into operation as an experimental technology for a community-driven digital
Digital relay baton enables remote crowd cheering of athletesæææThe loneliness of the long distance runner could soon be a thing of the past as new technology allows crowds to cheer on athletes from anywhere in the world.
Flat lens to work across a continuous bandwidth allows new control of lightæææLast summer, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) announced a new, flat lens that could focus light with high efficiency within the visible spectrum. The lens used an ultrathin array of nanopillars to bend and focus light as it passed.
New research finds timing is the key to success for science startupsæææTiming is essential when it comes to achieving commercial success for science-based companies according to a new research paper by faculty at SFU's Beedie School of Business. The study, published in leading journal
70 Years After Dead Sea Scrolls Were Found, New Discoveries AwaitæææIn 1947, or late 1946, the first batch of Dead Sea Scrolls was found in a cave located near the site of Qumran in what is now the West Bank. These bits of biblical history continue to perplex archaeologists to this day.
Who Invented the Refrigerator?æææMethods for preserving food by cooling have been around for thousands of years, but the modern refrigerator is a recent invention.
Inside the Pristine Factory Where Bugatti Crafts the $2.6M Chironæææ They spend days just polishing the damn thing.
Droughts actually make West Nile virus worseæææ Animals An itch we can’t scratch Droughts bring a whole host of problems to humanity; limited water supplies, more wildfires, and also the perfect conditions for a West Nile virus epidemic.
Farvel til en elsket statistiker: Her er hans bedste videoeræææMed banebrydende grafer og kreative metoder inden for visualisering forvandlede svenske Hans Rosling tørre tal om alt fra elektricitet til befolkningsvækst og miljø til nogle af internettets mest populære videoer.
Do absent users blindside architects?æææA visionary edifice, a revolutionary feat of engineering, a blot on the landscape, a brutalist carbuncle. Rarely does architecture lead to subtle superlatives. But, sometimes architects design with only a vague notion of the users of their constructions. In the absence of personal profiles of the people that will swing through those grand front doors and ride the escalator to the giddy heights of
New species discovered in AntarcticaæææA team of Japanese scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan's Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments.
Historical copper trapped in iceæææSouth America's mining industry supplies half the world with copper. The world's largest mines are located in the Andes. Yet just when copper production began there has remained unclear, until now. Very few artefacts from the early high cultures in Peru, Chile, and Bolivia have been preserved. Now, however, researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, are on the trail o
Archaeologists find 12th Dead Sea Scrolls caveæææxcavations in a cave on the cliffs west of Qumran, near the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, prove that Dead Sea scrolls from the Second Temple period were hidden in the cave, and were looted by Bedouins in the middle of the last century. With the discovery of this cave, scholars now suggest that it should be numbered as Cave 12.
Sandia researchers offer explanation for hissing and popping noises heard from meteorsæææ(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico has found an explanation for the variety of sounds people hear when witnessing a falling meteor—sounds that should not be heard until minutes later due to the long distances involved. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the team describes experiments they conducted with transducer materials and what
Ultrasmall atom motions recorded with ultrashort x-ray pulsesæææPeriodic motions of atoms over a length of a billionth of a millionth of a meter (10-15 m) are mapped by ultrashort x-ray pulses. In a novel type of experiment, regularly arranged atoms in a crystal are set into vibration by a laser pulse and a sequence of snapshots is generated via changes of x-ray absorption.
Astronomers discover a very hot Jupiter exoplanet orbiting a bright, hot staræææ(Phys.org)—Using the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) astronomers have detected a new gas giant alien world. The newly discovered exoplanet, designated KELT-18b, turns out to be a highly inflated "hot Jupiter" orbiting a bright, hot star. The findings were presented in a paper published Feb. 6 on the arXiv pre-print server.
Men are from Clash of Clans, women are from Candy CrushæææIf anyone knows whether "there's an app for that," it's older men who happen to live in eastern Europe or North Dakota.
Deciphering social justice language in modern musicæææPhrases and colloquialisms rarely heard in casual conversation are the bedrock of new linguistic research at The University of New Mexico.
Record-breaking material that contracts when heatedæææResearchers based at Nagoya University discover ceramic material that contracts on heating by more than twice the previous record-holding material.
NASA sent a twin to space to study nature versus nurture – and we're starting to get resultsæææNASA astronaut Scott Kelly recently spent one year in space, while his identical twin brother Mark (a former NASA astronaut himself) stayed on Earth. The mission was part of an important health experiment, looking at how being in space affects our bodies. While the data are still being studied carefully, NASA recently released some intriguing preliminary findings.
Fear of sea turtle extinction due to female bias in warm water unwarranted study suggestsæææ(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with members from Australia, Greece and the U.K. has found evidence that suggests the unlikelihood of quick extinction of sea turtles due to warming waters due to overlooked factors. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team explains their findings and why they believe sea turtles will survive current ocean temperatu
Humans are driving a new burst of evolution including possibly our ownæææThe unprecedented impact that humans are having on the planet is well known to us all. Scarcely a day passes by without a media report or two on the effects of human economic activity on the world's climate or some charismatic species under threat because of illegal wildlife trade or logging.
Random radiation clouds found in atmosphere at flight altitudesæææ(Phys.org)—A large team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S., Korea, and the U.K. has found evidence of random radiation clouds in the Earth's atmosphere at elevations used by aircraft. In their paper published in the journal Space Weather, the team describes how they discovered the clouds and offers a theory for their existence.
3-D television is dead... so what next?æææBack in 2010 Sony Australia's Paul Colley forecasted that a large percentage of Australian viewers would have 3-D televisions by 2014.
Russian police arrest 9 hacking suspectsæææRussia's interior ministry says it has arrested nine members of a major hacking group suspected of stealing millions of dollars from Russian bank accounts.
New system makes it harder to track Bitcoin transactionsæææResearchers from North Carolina State University, Boston University and George Mason University have developed a Bitcoin-compatible system that could make it significantly more difficult for observers to identify or track the parties involved in any given Bitcoin transaction.
Exposure to a newer flame retardant has been on the riseæææOut of concern that flame retardants - polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) - cause health problems, the U.S. government worked with manufacturers to start phasing them out in 2004. But evidence has been building that PBDE replacements, including organophosphate flame retardants, are in the environment and in our bodies. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology L
Pure iron grains are rare in the universeæææPure iron grains in interstellar space are far rarer than previously thought, shedding new light on the evolution history of matters in the universe.
New kit helps researchers make sense of mass cytometry datasets to uncover cell subsetsæææA new software package offers easier analysis and interpretation of experiments that use mass cytometry, a sophisticated method for determining the properties of cells. The tool—called cytofkit—enables scientists to identify different subpopulations of cells within a sample of immune cells, cancer cells or other tissue types.
Controlling the way cracks form and spread to make a coating for electrochromic materialsæææCracks in a material typically compromise its strength and integrity, so research focus has traditionally been on preventing their occurrence and spread. An A*STAR team has now taken a different approach, prompting and directing the propagation of cracks on thin films to make highly-ordered patterned coatings for electrochromic materials.
Stjernebro forbinder Mælkevejens nabo-galakseræææ“Broen” strækker sig over 43.000 lysår.
Facts About BromineæææProperties, sources and uses of the element bromine.
Dirty Doctors Finished What an Assassin's Bullet StartedæææDisregarding new scientific information can be deadly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Let’s Use Physics to Model the Gaps in Saturn’s Ringsæææ When a planet has a ring system, you will often see gaps in the rings. Can these ring gaps be modeled numerically?
Ings læsere: Snyd med NOx-filtrering i lastbiler skal løses elektroniskæææTak til de læsere, der bidrog med løsninger til at opdage snyd med NOx-filtrerende teknologi i lastbiler. Ingeniøren har fået en ekspertvurdering af de forskellige kommentarer.
Teaching plants to be better spendersæææEnergy is an all-important currency for plants, and scientists from The University of Western Australia have now calculated the cost of one of their biggest expenses. The knowledge could be a key to creating more energy efficient crops.
Russian Academy of Sciences Calls Homeopathy PseudoscienceæææThat homeopathy is pure pseudoscience is not news. Its basic principles are essentially magic, and the preparation of homeopathic products is indistinguishable from brewing a magic potion. Its two core principles, as the commission states, are a priori dogma - that like cures like, and that diluting substances out of existence leaves behind their magical essence. Science has progressed over two ce
Arctic 2.0: What happens after all the ice goes?æææ Researchers look into the future of the far North for clues to save species and maybe even bring back sea ice. Nature 542 152 doi: 10.1038/542152a
Electrons play a key role in heat transport through 2-D tin sheetsæææHeat travels through atom-thin sheets of tin in a very unusual way, A*STAR researchers have found. The discovery could help develop applications for the material, including thermoelectric refrigeration or power generation.
Hack my car? Most believe it can happenæææMost Americans have some concerns that self-driving cars can be hacked to cause crashes, disable the vehicle in some way or even be used as weapons by terrorists, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.
Ancient undersea landslide discovered in AustraliaæææScientists say the collapse next to the Great Barrier Reef dates back more than 300,000 years.
Sundhedspolitikerne forhandler om lægedæknings-aftaleæææ Ellen Trane Nørby (V) og Folketingets sundhedsordførere forsøger at blive enige om en aftale, der der kan være med til at sikre lægedækning. Blandt andet diskuteres regionernes muligheder for at oprette klinikker.
OK-forhandlinger med PLO når ikke i mål til tidenæææ Forhandlingerne mellem Regionernes Lønnings- og Takstnævn og Praktiserende lægers Organisationer skrider fremad, men kommer ikke til at være færdige til 1. marts, som planlagt.
Cabbies' health the focus of smartphone app trialæææStressed at work? Tired of sitting down? You could go for a run or a long walk, or maybe just lie in a park. But it's not so easy if you are a taxi driver and any time out means missing the chance of a fare. Taxi drivers can spend as much as eight hours simply waiting around during any 12 hour shift, but it's difficult to relax when the clock is ticking and you can't ever be far from the car and a
Dropping the carbon from a key battery component could enable long-life, low-cost renewable energy storageæææZinc-air batteries are one of the most promising solutions for the large-scale storage of intermittently-generated renewable electricity from solar, wind or tidal: they are non-flammable, inexpensive and with a very high energy density.
New circuit scheme would greatly increase the accuracy of high-density spin-based data storageæææWhile we aspire to store increasing amounts of digital data on ever smaller devices, conventional memory technologies based on electron charge are reaching a physical limit on how much they can store in a given space. Alternative storage methods are urgently needed.
Bees give up searching for food when humans degrade their landæææA new study into honey bees has revealed the significant effect human impact has on a bee's metabolism, and ultimately its survival.
Renewable fuels alone can't stop climate changeæææIn discussions about climate change, many people seem to think the only real problem is replacing fossil fuels, and once that's done nothing much really needs to change. "That's not only false, it's a really dangerous way of thinking," said Karen Pinkus, professor of Romance studies and comparative literature in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Largest group of Australia's insects collaborate to avoid being eatenæææA group of insects that mimic each other in an effective golden sheen to fight predators has been discovered as the largest in Australia, a collaboration between Masaryk University and Macquarie University researchers has found.
Surging Demand for Mental Health Care Jams College ServicesæææStudents may wait weeks for a basic consultation; sometimes even longer to see a psychiatrist -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Evolved instincts shaped democracy to resist bullies like TrumpæææTake heart America: US democracy's ability to stem autocracy is rooted in moral codes developed when we were all hunter-gatherers, says Christopher Boehm
Image: Antarctica's changing Larsen Ice ShelfæææThe Larsen Ice Shelf is situated along the northeastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the fastest-warming places on the planet. In the past three decades, two large sections of the ice shelf (Larsen A and B) have collapsed. A third section (Larsen C) seems like it may be on a similar trajectory, with a new iceberg poised to break away soon.
Study breathes new life into 2.3 billion year old 'Great Oxidation Event'æææResearch led by the University of St Andrews and published yesterday (Monday 6 February) in Nature – provides new insight into how life evolved alongside changes in the chemistry of Earth's surface. These researchers examined geochemical records of Earth's 'Great Oxidation Event' 2.3 billion years ago, and captured for the first time the response of the nitrogen cycle to this major transition in E
Angling up for Mars scienceæææESA's latest Mars orbiter has moved itself into a new path on its way to achieving the final orbit for probing the Red Planet.
The Super Bowl and the Black Swanning of Americaæææ When a team comes back from insurmountable odds, is it because the world is fundamentally chaotic -- or because our mental models are wrong?
The Secret to Running a Faster Marathon? Slow Downæææ The counterintuitive secret to your best marathon yet...
Your Brain on Music: Why Certain Songs Bring PleasureæææThe chemicals in the brain linked to the pleasure people get from things like sex and drugs also play a role in how people enjoy music, a new, small study from Canada finds.
Collapsing Beauty: Image of Antarctica's Larsen Ice ShelfæææA new satellite image shows the disappearing Larsen Ice Shelf of Antarctica.
Florida Has Seen Bad Effects from Trump-Like Climate Gag OrdersæææThe state, and North Carolina, had trouble planning for damaging erosion after orders similar to White House moves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Study measures psychological support provided by service dogsæææThe physical benefits service dogs provide in assisting people with disabilities are well-known, but a new study conducted by a Purdue University research team reveals that service dogs also contribute significantly to emotional and psychosocial well-being.
Green buildings make for higher performance in workplaceæææThe key to working better, sleeping better, and feeling better could be rooted in the design, maintenance, and operation of the buildings where we spend the majority of our time, a new Harvard study has found.
Nanoparticle screen could speed up drug developmentæææMany scientists are pursuing ways to treat disease by delivering DNA or RNA that can turn a gene on or off. However, a major obstacle to progress in this field has been finding ways to safely deliver that genetic material to the correct cells.
Video: Fly your satellite!æææESA's Fly Your Satellite! (FYS) programme is a recurring, hands-on programme designed and managed by the ESA Education Office in close collaboration with universities from ESA Member States, with the objective to complement academic education and inspire, engage, and better prepare university students for a more effective introduction to their future professions in the space sector.
Project drawing on recovery lessons from Hurricane Sandy to improve U.S. resilience and disaster preparednessæææPurdue University will lead research to determine why some communities recover from natural disasters more quickly than others, an effort aimed at addressing the nation's critical need for more resilient infrastructure and to enhance preparedness.
Forkerte zink-tal blev gemt vækæææDen officielle statistik over forbruget af resistensskabende zink til svin viste et stagnerende forbrug, selv om det i virkeligheden steg. Det var der bare ingen, som sagde højt.
Strid om samtaleterapi sparket til hjørneæææI adskillige måneder har Region Midtjylland og de praktiserende læger i regionen diskuteret, om regionen har ret til at kræve honorarer retur for samtaleterapi. Nu er sagen sat i bero
Bohr's quantum theory revisedæææNiels Bohr's atomic model was utterly revolutionary when it was presented in 1913. Although it is still taught in schools, it became obsolete decades ago. However, its creator also developed a much wider-ranging and less known quantum theory, the principles of which changed over time. Researchers at the University of Barcelona have now analysed the development in the Danish physicist's thought – a
Students recreate 5,000-year-old Chinese beer recipeæææOn a recent afternoon, a small group of students gathered around a large table in one of the rooms at the Stanford Archaeology Center.
Electronic depositary of living systems createdæææLomonosov Moscow State University has developed an information system within the framework of the Noah's Ark project that includes data about samples from biological collections of the University and project partners. There are no comparable information systems in the world using information concerning biological samples of various origin and managing depositaries of biomaterial. The actual versio
Pharmaceutical company launches product to produce rare disease-fighting compoundsæææA pharmaceutical company based on Purdue University intellectual property has launched a product line that will allow researchers and medical professionals the ability to produce larger amounts of compounds that could lead to new disease-fighting drugs.
Why nature restoration takes time: fungi grow 'relationships'æææ'Relationships' in the soil become stronger during the process of nature restoration. Although all major groups of soil life are already present in former agricultural soils, they are not really 'connected' at first. These connections need time to (literally) grow, and fungi are the star performers here. A European research team led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) has shown the
Rethink needed to save critically endangered black rhinocerosæææA new strategy of conservation must be adopted if the black rhinoceros is to be saved from extinction, concludes a study involving scientists from Cardiff University.
Viking VIP: Grave Belonging to 'Warrior of High Status' UncoveredæææAbout 1,000 years ago, Vikings dug a grave for a "warrior of high status" and buried him in a boat that was overflowing with grave goods, including a hefty sword and a broad-bladed ax, according to a new study.
Bear Necessities: Andean Bears Call Machu Picchu HomeæææMachu Picchu, site of historic Incan ruins and a popular destination for tourists, is also a favorite destination for South America's only native bear species — the Andean bear.
LIGO’s underdog cousin ready to enhance gravitational-wave huntæææ It missed the historic discovery, but the Virgo lab in Italy is now primed to extend LIGO’s reach and precision. Nature 542 146 doi: 10.1038/542146a
Fremtidens almen­medicinere tøver med at købe praksisæææCirka en tredjedel af kommende praktiserende læger forventer at starte deres karriere som ansatte i en praksis.
KU vinder 4 ud af 7 kategorier til Venture Cup ChallengeæææDen årlige Venture Cup Challenge, hvor iværksætterstuderende fra universiteterne kan...
Stik imod hensigten: Landmændenes brug af resistensfremkaldende zink er stegetæææFra 2010 til 2015 steg forbruget af zinkmedicin, der forhindrer diarré hos danske grise, med 16 procent. Det opvejer fordelen ved, at landmændene bruger mindre antibiotika, advarer forskere.
Treaty to stop biopiracy threatens to delay flu vaccinesæææ Industry and public-health experts concerned about ramifications of Nagoya Protocol. Nature 542 148 doi: 10.1038/542148a
Cisco-routere dør efter 18 månederæææEn komponent i flere typer netværksudstyr fra Cisco er ramt af en fejl, der gør udstyret ubrugeligt efter 18 måneder. Udstyret står også i danske virksomheder, bekræfter Cisco.
Topledere: Diesel er død - brændselsceller leveræææOver halvdelen af toplederne i bilindustrien tror, at diesel som den første af de traditionelle motorteknologier er på vej ud. 76 procent af lederne tror stadig, at forbrændingsmotoren vil være vigtig i mange år fremover.
The late Hans Rosling tells the modern world's storyæææHans Rosling, who has died in Sweden aged 68, tells 200 years of world history in four minutes.
Dummy mummy comes to the rescue of tiger cubs in IndiaæææPark rangers in India are using a cuddly toy tigress to help three traumatised cubs spring back to their feet after the death of their mother.

Dyster forudsigelse for 2017: Flertallet af forbrugerne vil blive ramt af DDoS-angrebæææ https://www.version2.dk/artikel/deloitte-flertallet-forbrugerne-vil-blive-ramt-ddos-angreb-1073266 Hackere har fået bedre software til styre store mængder af kompromitterede enheder, og de mange hurtige bredbåndsforbindelser i bl.a. Danmark gør de cyberkriminelle i stand til at sende horder af data på meget kort tid. Version2
Sådan fandt IT-udvikler frem til over 3000 kunders oplysninger i Rema 1000 appæææ https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-fandt-it-udvikler-frem-3000-kunders-oplysninger-rema-1000-app-1073033 Blandt andet ved at udnytte manglen på verificering i Rema 1000’s norske app ’Æ’, var Hallvard Nygård i stand i løbet af en aften blandt andet at hente over 3000 kunders telefonnumre Version2

GOP-backed measures seek to rein in science used at EPAæææPondering new restrictions on how the Environmental Protection Agency can use scientific data, congressional Republicans are seeking advice from the chemical and fossil fuel industries.
Iran displays ancient Persian artifacts returned from the USæææIran is displaying hundreds of ancient and Persian artifacts, some dating back as far as 3,500 years and all of them recently brought back home from museums and collections in Western countries.
Efter Trump-chok: Skal forskere holde sig væk fra demonstrationer?æææMarch for Science-bevægelsen breder sig og giver panderynker hos forskere, der er i tvivl om det smarte i at deltage. Hvad mener Ingeniørens læsere?
Parter vil stille krav til lægers samarbejde med kommunale akutfunktioneræææ t kommunalt akutteam skal altid kunne komme i kontakt med en læge, mener flere parter, der har indsendt høringssvar angående kvalitetsstandarder for kommunale akutfunktioner.
DARPA is Funding Paper Airplanes for Some Cool PurposesæææDARPA, the U.S. Department of Defense military research agency, whose work has resulted in staples of modern life such as the Internet and GPS systems, is now working with a San Francisco-based R&D lab – Otherlab – to develop the world’s most advanced industrial paper airplanes. The project is ... Read More
The most powerful man in UK science on his new roleæææ Mark Walport will be the first head of a £6-billion “super-agency”.
Cassava carrier bags: Indonesian entrepreneur tackles plastic scourgeæææFrom bags washing up on Bali's beaches to food packaging scattered across roads and clogging waterways in cities, Indonesia is facing a plastic waste crisis driven by years of rapid economic growth.
China tightens smog data controls amid public angeræææChina has established a single network to monitor air pollution levels across the country, as the government attempts to control the spread of information about the country's toxic smog in response to rising public anger.
Measuring time without a clockæææEPFL scientists have been able to measure the ultrashort time delay in electron photoemission without using a clock. The discovery has important implications for fundamental research and cutting-edge technology.
Data guru Hans Rosling dies at 68æææData guru Hans Rosling, a Swedish public health expert famous for combating scientific ignorance with catchy YouTube videos in his mission to promote a "fact-based world", has died at the age of 68, his foundation announced.
'Ghost skier' leads Winter Olympic Games data revolutionæææA "ghost skier" hurtling down the slope, an athlete's glucose levels flashing across the screen along with his heart rate—it is all part of an Olympic data revolution awaiting television viewers.
GOP senior statesmen making push for a carbon taxæææA group of Republican senior statesmen are pushing for a carbon tax to combat the effects of climate change, and hoping to sell their plan to the White House.
Facebook employees to get 20 days off for family bereavementæææFacebook says it is extending its bereavement policies and will also allow employees paid time off when a family member is sick.
Onkologer: Keytruda som førstelinje­behandling er et stort og vigtigt skridtæææ Europa Kommissionen har godkendt det immunterapeutiske middel Keytruda som monoterapi til førstelinjebehandling af voksne patienter med fremskreden ikke-småcellet lungekræft. Et stort fremskridt for behandlingen af danske lungekræftpatienter, konkluderer flere onkologer
Erik Jorgensen (U. Utah / HHMI) 1: Synaptic transmissionæææ https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/synaptic-transmission.html Part 1: Synaptic Transmission: Jorgensen describes the historic experiments in electrophysiology and microscopy that led to our current understanding of synaptic transmission. Part 2: Recycling Synaptic Vesicles: Ultrafast Endocytosis: Two mechanisms exist for recycling synaptic vesicles: clathrin-mediated and ultrafast endocytosis.
Erik Jorgensen (U. Utah / HHMI) 2: Recycling synaptic vesicles: Ultrafast endocytosisæææ https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/recycling-synaptic-vesicles-ultrafast-endocytosis.html Part 1: Synaptic Transmission: Jorgensen describes the historic experiments in electrophysiology and microscopy that led to our current understanding of synaptic transmission. Part 2: Recycling Synaptic Vesicles: Ultrafast Endocytosis: Two mechanisms exist for recycling synaptic vesicles: clathrin-mediate
The US Needs Real Data to Confront Bias in Police Shootingsæææ Researchers learned police were twice as likely to fatally shoot unarmed black civilians. Those findings are terrible—and too hard to come by.
Helium-forbindelse kan skrive kemibøgerne omæææUnder ekstremt højt tryk kan ædelgassen helium gå i forbindelse med natrium. Noget, vi troede, var umuligt.
'Riskiest ideas' win $50 million from Chan Zuckerberg Biohubæææ Initiative's first grants will fund a medley of wild ideas from top San Francisco Bay Area biologists, engineers and programmers.
Likely New EPA Head Will Imperil Climate GoalsæææScott Pruitt’s confirmation as EPA director would put at risk the nation’s ability to meet its Paris climate commitments.
Analysis uncovers racial bias in fatal shootings by policeæææA recent analysis found that among 990 individuals fatally shot by US police officers in 2015, Black civilians were more than twice as likely as White civilians to have been unarmed, and civilians from "other" minority groups were significantly more likely than White civilians to have not posed an imminent threat to the officer(s) or other civilians.
Combined count data reveals shifts in hawks' migratory behavioræææBird species' distributions and migratory behavior are shifting in response to changes in climate and land-use, but surveys that focus on a particular season can cause scientists to miss trends in the bigger picture. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications tackles this problem by combining Red-tailed Hawk counts from both migration and winter, and finds that while the hawks' numbe
For youth of color, losing trust in teachers may mean losing the chance to make it to collegeæææIn a time of increased concern about how minorities are treated by police, teachers, and other authorities, it is critical to examine whether students of color have experiences in school that lead to mistrust of authorities and what the long-term implications are for young people.
Allen's Hummingbird boom missed by breeding bird surveysæææAllen's Hummingbird has been placed on several conservation watchlists, as breeding bird surveys indicating population declines have spurred concerns that climate change may push it out of Southern California. However, local birdwatchers have reported at the same time that the non-migratory subspecies of Allen's Hummingbird, once restricted to the Channel Islands, is now a common sight at feeders
Greater sage-grouse more mobile than previously suspectedæææGreater Sage-Grouse are thought to return to the same breeding ground, or "lek," every spring—but how do populations avoid becoming isolated and inbred? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications used thousands of DNA samples collected at leks across four states to reveal that some sage-grouse travel more widely than anyone suspected and, in doing so, may temper inbreeding and isolat
Students who enjoy or take pride in math have better long-term math achievementæææResearch has shown that students' learning and cognitive performance can be influenced by emotional reactions to learning, like enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom. Most studies on this topic have been done in labs. Now a new longitudinal study out of Germany investigates how students' emotions in a school context relate to their achievement. The study focused on achievement in math, which is not only
Et succesfuldt offentligt it-projekt: Udvikler-engagement har været afgørendeæææ https://www.version2.dk/artikel/succesfuldt-offentligt-it-projekt-brugernes-engagement-har-vaeret-afgoerende-1072887 En system med adressetjeneste, der kan anvendes af f.eks. webshops, har gået trinvis til værks i udviklingen og prioriteret en intensiv dialog med it-udviklere. Det har skabt en succes, der roses af Version2-blogger Version2
Uddannelsesloft: Minister holder fast i positivlisteæææSøren Pind har stadig ikke svaret på, hvorfor uddannelsesloftets positivliste skal udelukke nye og efterspurgte ingeniøruddannelser.
Host birds reject brown parasitic eggs more often then blue-green eggsæææScientists have long thought that host birds accept or reject parasitic eggs according to how closely they resemble their own eggs in color. However, a new study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows that both robins and blackbirds tended to reject brown eggs and accept blue-green eggs regardless of the color differences between their own eggs and the foreign eggs.
Teachers may be cause of 'obesity penalty' on girls' gradesæææWhile obesity is often thought of as a health problem, a new study suggests that discrimination by body weight may be the more important factor for obese white female students' lower success in school.
New clues to causes of heart failureæææOf the more than 700,000 Americans who suffer a heart attack each year, about a quarter go on to develop heart failure. Scientists don’t fully understand how one condition leads to the other, but researchers have now discovered a significant clue—which ultimately could lead new therapies for preventing the condition.
Alzheimer's disease researchers solve mystery of beguiling proteinæææLeading neuroscientists have clarified the role of a controversial immune system protein in Alzheimer’s disease, showing it has opposing effects in early and late stages of the disease. Their discovery unites previous studies that left researchers conflicted and showed the protein both exacerbates and ameliorates disease symptoms. The updated model of disease progression also highlights the need t
Malaria control efforts can benefit from forecasting using satellitesæææLinks between patterns of malaria in Kenya and environmental factors (temperature, rainfall and land cover) are measurable by satellite imagery, says a researcher. In his doctoral dissertation, the researcher shows that conducive environmental conditions occur before increases in hospital admissions and mortality due to malaria, indicating that the satellite information is useful for the developme
Automatically darkening windows in a wide range of colorsæææElectrochromic glass darkens automatically when the sun shines and keeps the heat out. Previously it was available only in blue, and switching times were also long. Now, a new process makes it possible to manufacture other glass colors for the first time. And compared to previous models, switching is nearly ten times faster.
Deep Learning Models of the Retinal Response to Natural ScenesæææA central challenge in neuroscience is to understand neural computations and circuit mechanisms that underlie the encoding of ethologically relevant, natural stimuli. In multilayered neural circuits, nonlinear processes such as synaptic transmission and spiking dynamics present a significant obstacle to the creation of accurate computational models of responses to natural stimuli. Here we demonstr
Normative theory of visual receptive fieldsæææThis article gives an overview of a normative computational theory of visual receptive fields, by which idealized functional models of early spatial, spatio-chromatic and spatio-temporal receptive fields can be derived in an axiomatic way based on structural properties of the environment in combination with assumptions about the internal structure of a vision system to guarantee consistent handlin
How To Stop Your Smart TV From Spying on Youæææ If your TV is hooked up to the internet, it's probably tracking you somehow. Here's how to get a little bit of control back.

‘A Conservative Climate Solution’: Republican Group Calls for Carbon TaxæææA group of senior Republican figures, led by James A. Baker III, says that taxing carbon emissions is the fairest way to address a warming climate.
Desk stuff to make your workday more productive, cheerful, and disaster-proofæææ Gadgets Eleven seriously thoughtful picks for your workspace When you start a job, you begin with a blank slate. Let your desk be a reflection of your work and yourself.
A bridge of stars connects two dwarf galaxiesæææThe Magellanic Clouds, the two largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, appear to be connected by a bridge stretching across 43,000 light years, according to an international team of astronomers led by researchers from the University of Cambridge. The discovery is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) and is based on the Galactic stellar census being
Why grey wolves kill less prey when brown bears are aroundæææWe’ve long assumed wolf packs are forced to kill more often to make up for having meals stolen by scavenging bears – but the opposite is true, they kill less
Bird lookouts make alarm calls to save themselves, not the groupæææArabian babbler birds that go it alone continue to sound alarm calls when they see threats, showing there must be selfish motives behind sentinel behaviour
Drought identified as key to severity of West Nile virus epidemicsæææA study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers has found that drought dramatically increases the severity of West Nile virus epidemics in the United States, although populations affected by large outbreaks acquire immunity that limits the size of subsequent epidemics.
Wolfing it down: Brown bears reduce wolf kill ratesæææIf you've ever been elbowed out of the way at the dinner table by older, stronger siblings, you'll identify with wolves competing with larger bears for food. A study by Utah State University ecologist Aimee Tallian and colleagues reveals wolves might be at more of a disadvantage than previously thought.
Blue-bellied insects may play a role in the fight against citrus greeningæææWhile searching for a potential Achilles' heel in the insect responsible for spreading the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease, researchers have uncovered a protein that makes their bellies blue and may impact how easily they spread the pathogen.
Researchers identify protein essential for healthy gut cell developmentæææScientists have uncovered key processes in the healthy development of cells which line the human gut, furthering their understanding about the development of cancer.
Protostar displays a strange geometryæææUsing observations of molecules in the protostar L1527 taken by the ALMA observatory in northern Chile, a group of researchers have uncovered new clues to understanding how dust in a collapsing molecular cloud can shed angular momentum and penetrate beyond an area known as the 'centrifugal barrier' to find its way to the surface of the forming star.
Heavy Lifting at Work Linked to Decreased Fertility in WomenæææWomen who lift or move heavy objects at work may be at increased risk for fertility problems, a new study suggests.
E-Cig Risk: Teens Who Vape More Likely to Start Smoking TobaccoæææTeens who "vape" in high school are at increased risk for using tobacco cigarettes in the future.
Raw Video: Tornado Hits NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility In New OrleansæææThe facility was impacted by a large tornado on Feb. 7, 2017. “Only minor injuries have been reported and NASA employees and other tenants are being accounted for,” according to NASA
Researchers May Have Located the Neurological Origins of Misophoniaæææ Certain sounds, like chewing, drive misophonia sufferers mad. New research might have found a neural misfiring. Read More
From 'CRISPR' to 'EpiPen': Dictionary Adds Slew of Scientific WordsæææThe lexicographers at Merriam-Webster announced today that they have added more than 1,000 new words to the dictionary, including many that are related to science, technology and medicine.
Largest undersea landslide revealed on the Great Barrier ReefæææJames Cook University scientists have helped discover the remnants of a massive undersea landslide on the Great Barrier Reef, approximately 30 times the volume of Uluru.
Studies point way to precision therapies for common class of genetic disordersæææTwo studies are opening important new windows into understanding an untreatable group of common genetic disorders known as RASopathies that are characterized by distinct facial features, developmental delays, cognitive impairment and heart problems. The findings could help point the way toward personalized precision therapies for these conditions.
The heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at home, study findsæææThe heavier someone is, the less likely they are to have what many people might call a "good death," with hospice care and a chance to die at home, a new study finds. And that difference comes with a financial, as well as a personal, cost, the research shows.
'In 50 years, reading will be much easier—for computers and humans alike'æææHave you ever been told you have writing like chicken scratch? It turns out this might not only bother your grade four teacher—your computer could be confused too.
Teachers may be cause of 'obesity penalty' on girls' gradesæææWhile obesity is often thought of as a health problem, a new study by a University of Illinois at Chicago sociologist suggests that discrimination by body weight may be the more important factor for obese white female students' lower success in school.
A paper in JPSP explores how much evidence people need in a trend to decide it is getting better or worse.æææ submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
New method improves accuracy of imaging systemsæææNew research provides scientists looking at single molecules or into deep space a more accurate way to analyze imaging data captured by microscopes, telescopes and other devices.
Why we underestimate time when we're having fun on FacebookæææUpdating your Facebook status can be a fun way to while away the hours -- but now it seems it really is making us lose track of time as we do it.
Prenatal bisphenol A exposure weakens body's fullness cuesæææAn expectant mother's exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) can raise her offspring's risk of obesity by reducing sensitivity to a hormone responsible for controlling appetite, according to a mouse study.
Plain Old Vaping Gives Way to ‘Dripping’ Among Teenagers, Study SaysæææOne in four Connecticut high school students who use e-cigarettes have used the method to produce thicker clouds of nicotine vapor, a Yale study found.
The Debunker: No Data Manipulation in 2015 Climate Study, Researchers SayæææA British tabloid said American government scientists overstated global temperatures to influence climate talks. Other scientists say that did not happen.
Human intuition added to planning algorithmsæææResearchers are trying to improve automated planners by giving them the benefit of human intuition. By encoding the strategies of high-performing human planners in a machine-readable form, they were able to improve the performance of planning algorithms by 10 to 15 percent on a challenging set of problems.
Why male immune cells are from Mars and female cells are from VenusæææA research team is the first to uncover reasons why a specific type of immune cell acts very differently in females compared to males while under stress, resulting in women being more susceptible to certain diseases.
Immune system plays dual role in breast canceræææThe immune system plays a paradoxical role in the spread of breast cancer. Some immune cells contribute to metastasis, while other cells can be activated to strengthen the effect of chemotherapy, outlines new research.
Toxic metals found in e-cigarette liquidsæææHigh levels of toxic metals have been found in the liquid that creates the aerosol that e-cigarette users inhale when they vape.
Study outlines steps that growing startups must follow to succeedæææBy using more than three decades of experience as an entrepreneur and turnaround executive, a researcher lays out a road map for the founding entrepreneur who seeks to retain the CEO position as a company gains market traction and begins a period of rapid growth.
Facebook takes search warrant challenge to NY's top courtæææFacebook has told New York's highest court that it must be allowed to object when law enforcement seeks search warrants for its users' information.
Endangered antelope 'may be wiped out'æææDisease has killed up to a quarter of Critically Endangered Saiga antelope in Mongolia, scientists say.
Army Corps Of Engineers Grants Easement For Dakota Access Pipelineæææ The Army Corps of Engineers has granted the final easement needed to finish the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, according to a court filing Tuesday.
Army Approves Dakota Access Pipeline Route, Paving Way For The Project's Completionæææ The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it will allow the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River, cutting short an environmental impact assessment and removing the final barrier to construction.
Sitting not linked to incident diabetes, new research suggestsæææSitting may not be as deadly as previously thought, with new research ruling out sitting as a direct cause of diabetes.
Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming worldæææClimate change is likely to increase US electricity costs over the next century by billions of dollars more than economists previously forecast, according to a new study.
Research pinpoints promise of polycrystalline perovskitesæææA team of scientists has determined that surface recombination limits the performance of polycrystalline perovskite solar cells.
New study is an advance toward preventing a 'post-antibiotic era'æææNew research may help to overcome life-threatening antibiotic-resistant bacteria in what the World Health Organization warns could become a 'post-antibiotic era.' Biologists combined different classes of antibiotics to kill E. coli bacteria in their laboratory and found that certain combinations of three antibiotics are surprisingly effective in killing the bacteria and may be helpful in slowing t
Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatmentæææThe new gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, it must be delivered across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a process that can trigger cell defenses and 'trap' CRISPR/Cas9, reducing its treatment potential. Now, a research team has designed a delivery system using nanopar
YouTube adds mobile video streaming for top talentæææYouTube on Tuesday began letting popular online video personalities broadcast on the go using mobile devices, ramping up a challenge to Facebook and Twitter in the live-streaming arena.
Major global warming study again questioned, again defendedæææAnother round of bickering is boiling over about temperature readings used in a 2015 study to show how the planet is warming.
Coal ash selenium found in fish in N.C. lakesæææA new Duke University study has found high levels of selenium in fish in three North Carolina lakes receiving power plants' coal ash waste.
Bradley Tusk: How Uber and Michael Bloomberg Won Their Big Battlesæææ Bradley Tusk is the founder and CEO of Tusk Holdings. In conversation with Data4America, he discusses fighting regulatory battles for Uber and other disruptive companies. Read More
Hans Rosling: Data visionary and educator dies aged 68æææMr Rosling was known for lively, data-driven presentations debunking myths about global development.
Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hailæææStrong updrafts—currents of rising air—in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to Penn State meteorologists.
New scientific approach assesses land recovery following oil and gas drillingæææA new scientific approach can now provide regional assessments of land recovery following oil and gas drilling activities, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.
How life survives: Researchers confirm basic mechanism of DNA repairæææDay in and day out, in our bodies, the DNA in cells is damaged for a variety of reasons, and thus intercellular DNA-repair systems are fundamental to the maintenance of life. Now scientists from the UNC School of Medicine have confirmed and clarified key molecular details of one of these repair systems, known as nucleotide excision repair.
Video: Milk versus dark chocolate: A scientific showdownæææValentine's Day is nearly here. Whether you're spending it with your significant other or flying solo, chocolate is often in the mix. But which is the better choice: milk or dark chocolate?
This cheap and easy lab-on-a-chip could save livesæææ Technology Diagnosing diseases quickly and easily in poor regions Stanford University researchers design a low-cost lab-on-a chip to tackle preventable deaths in the developing world.
MAP: Find Out What New Viruses Are Emerging In Your Backyardæææ Over the past 60 years, the number of new diseases cropping up in a decade has almost quadrupled. "We're in a hyperinfectious world," says one scientist.
Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hailæææStrong updrafts -- currents of rising air -- in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to meteorologists.
Whale of an Idea: Satellites Help Monitor Migrating HumpbacksæææScientists are turning to high-flying help in efforts to count humpback whales.
Air pollution linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes in obese Latino childrenæææLatino children who live in areas with higher levels of air pollution have a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Scientists tracked children's health and respective levels of residential air pollution for about 3.5 years before associating chronic unhealthy air exposure to a breakdown in beta cells, special pancreatic cells that secrete insulin and maintain the
Genetic defects in tooth enamel conducive to development of cavitiesæææBacteria are not the sole cause of cavities; tooth resistance also plays an instrumental role. Researchers demonstrate that mutated genes lead to defects in the tooth enamel and can therefore encourage the development of cavities.
Pariser-pissoir bruger tissetrængende mænds urin til blomsterjordæææDet offentlige toilet opsamler urin i et halmmagasin og bruger tisset i produktionen af kompost.
New way to discover structures of membrane proteinsæææScientists have discovered a better way to extract proteins from the membranes that encase them, making it easier to study how cells communicate with each other to create human health and disease.
Why are men overlooking the benefits of marriage?æææThe marriage rate in the U.S. continues to decline and the view that marriage entails a “lack of freedom” is becoming more entrenched, particularly among younger men, according to researchers.
Successful application of VasalgelTM male contraceptive in monkeysæææResults of a study of Vasalgel in rhesus macaques have been published. Vasalgel is being developed by a social venture as a non-hormonal, long-acting, potentially reversible male contraceptive. It is a polymer hydrogel that works by blocking sperm in the vas deferens. Injection of Vasalgel in sexually mature adult male rhesus monkeys was effective in preventing conception throughout the one-plus y
Algae survive heat, cold and cosmic radiationæææIn a long-term experiment on the International Space Station, researchers studied how the extreme conditions in space affect algae. These research findings could benefit industrial applications and perhaps a mission to Mars.
Approach removes thyroid gland with no neck scar or need for special equipmentæææA surgical approach to perform thryroidectomies without scarring the neck appears to be just as successful using standard surgery. Originally, using robotics and endoscopic technology, surgeons made an incision behind the ear instead of in the neck. A new study shows that the same approach can be employed using standard surgical equipment and techniques.
Giant Amazonian Catfish Is a Record-Breaking TraveleræææThe dorado catfish migrates most of the length of the Amazon River basin.
Watch a squishy robot oh-so-gently catch a fishæææ Technology The design could lead to better surgical tools Soft robot catches a fish, could lead to better surgical tools.
After Tornadoes Hit In And Around New Orleans, Wall Of Storms Moves Eastæææ The National Weather Service says multiple tornadoes touched down in southern Louisiana on Tuesday, and severe weather moving east threatened other Southern states.
Stars align in test supporting 'spooky action at a distance'æææPhysicists address a loophole in tests of Bell's inequality with 600-year-old starlight. Results show strong evidence for Einstein's quantum spooky action at a distance.
E-cigarettes safer than smoking says long-term studyæææE-cigarettes are less toxic and safer to use compared to conventional cigarettes, according to new research.
Varme storme sender temperatur i Arktis på himmelflugtæææVarmen truer med at begrænse havisens i forvejen rekordlave udbredelse yderligere.
Scientists find clue to why Zika, but not its close relatives, causes birth defectsæææThe most frightening aspect of Zika virus has been its ability to produce severe fetal birth defects during pregnancy, especially microcephaly—a small head. Now, scientists have uncovered the details behind the virus’s unique ability to cross the placental barrier and expose the fetus to a range of birth defects that often go beyond microcephaly to include eye and joint injury, and even other type
Winning the war: How to persuade children to eat more veggiesæææAn associate professor of food, nutrition, dietetics and health offers parents research-based advice for appealing to children's emotional and behavioral appetites to help them eat the vegetables they need.
Picking teams and picking music in P.E.æææSome physical education practices can help kids have better experiences: listening to music and picking teams privately, suggests a new report.
Alpha-lipoic acid prevents kidney stones in mouse model of rare genetic diseaseæææAlpha-lipoic acid, a dietary supplement widely available to consumers, prevented stone formation in a mouse model of cystinuria, a rare inherited disease that causes recurrent formation of painful and damaging kidney stones. This research has led to the initiation of a clinical trial in patients suffering from the condition.
SNAP can actually raise spending on foodæææ The cash equivalent of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits wouldn’t increase food spending as much, new research shows. “For every $100 in SNAP benefits that a household receives, the household spends just over $50 more on food each month,” says Jesse Shapiro, an economics professor at Brown University and the Rhode Island Innovative Policy Lab who authored the study wit
For cops, exposure to stressful situations dysregulates cortisol patternæææA study of more than 300 members of the Buffalo Police Department suggests that police events or conditions considered highly stressful by the officers may be associated with disturbances of the normal awakening cortisol pattern.
Scientists Are Developing Flu Shots for Dogs, Which Will Help Protect Us Tooæææ In severe cases, a dog can develop pneumonia and even die. Read More
Fewer obese seniors get to die at homeæææ The heavier someone is, the less likely they are to receive quality end-of-life care, including in hospice and the opportunity to die at home. For a new study, researchers analyzed records from more than 5,600 senior citizens who took part in the long-running national Health and Retirement Study (HRS), examining how their body mass index (BMI) related to end-of-life measures, such as their use of
Concerns over wasting doctor's time may affect decision to see GPæææWorries over wasting their doctor's time, particularly at a time when NHS resources are stretched, may influence when and whether patients choose to see their GP, according to a study.
Mysterious white dwarf pulsar discoveredæææAn exotic binary star system 380 light-years away has been identified as an elusive white dwarf pulsar, the first of its kind ever to be discovered in the universe,
DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic deliveryæææUsing tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
Sixteen aplastic anemia patients free of disease after bone marrow transplant and chemoæææPhysicians report they have successfully treated 16 patients with a rare and lethal form of bone marrow failure called severe aplastic anemia using partially matched bone marrow transplants followed by two high doses of a common chemotherapy drug.
6 DIY gifts for Valentine's Dayæææ DIY For all the nerdy sweeties out there 6 DIY projects you can give your loved ones this Valentine's Day…
More screen time for kids isn't all that badæææChances are that your children will turn out OK even though they spend hours playing video games or watching TV, according to a new study that found that there is only a negligibly small association between excessive screen time and higher levels of depression and delinquency among teenagers.
Squid Communicate With a Secret, Skin-Powered Alphabetæææ Once they get over being creeped out, maybe scientists will figure out what cephalopods are saying.
Trilobites: Newly Discovered Gecko Escapes Danger Naked and AliveæææWhen snatched by an attacker, the lizard rips off its scales and skin so it can slip away unscathed.
Rullende robot-tønde skal slæbe dine indkøbæææVespa-producenten Piaggio har udviklet en fortovsrobot, der følger i hælene på sin ejer.
Your favorite travel mug is badæææ Gadgets Here's one we actually love America’s darling deserves to die.
Male Birth Control Gel Inches Toward a BreakthroughæææDespite a plethora of birth control options for women, men have typically had far fewer choices available to them.
Biotech industry blasts 'misguided' Trump travel banæææBosses of more than 150 US biotech companies Tuesday criticised US President Donald Trump's travel ban against seven Muslim-majority countries, saying the sector stood to lose talented workers and its global dominance.
Vienna's famed late panda gets stuffed for final journeyæææLong Hui, a giant panda feted for having fathered five cubs in captivity and who succumbed to a stomach tumour in December, will be stuffed and returned to China for posterity, the Vienna Zoo said Tuesday.
Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of daysæææEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details the
NASA sees Tropical Storm Carlos west of La Reunion IslandæææNASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Carlos as its center moved just to the west of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean.
From Utah with love and thanks for all the uraniumæææThree new minerals discovered by a Michigan Tech alumnus are secondary crusts found in old uranium mines. They're bright, yellow and hard to find.
Newfound Gecko Species Jumps Out of Its Own SkinæææA newly discovered gecko species belongs to a group with an unusual defensive strategy that might make your skin crawl.
Scientists—and Imogen Heap—Construct a Perfect Song for Babiesæææ Scientists and Imogen Heap team up to create the perfect song to make a baby happy. Read More
A new way to discover structures of membrane proteinsæææUniversity of Toronto scientists have discovered a better way to extract proteins from the membranes that encase them, making it easier to study how cells communicate with each other to create human health and disease.
Enzyme key to learning in fruit fliesæææAn animal's reaction to an odor or food or other stimuli depends largely on past experiences and how they have been entered into memory.
How hydras know where to regrow lost body partsæææFew animals can match the humble hydra's resilience. The small, tentacled freshwater animals can be literally shredded into pieces and regrow into healthy animals. A study published February 7 in Cell Reports suggests that pieces of hydras have structural memory that helps them shape their new body plan according to the pattern inherited by the animal's "skeleton." Previously, scientists thought t
Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatmentæææMore and more scientists are using the powerful new gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9, a technology isolated from bacteria, that holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, the new gene-clipping tool must be delivered safely across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a difficult process that can trigger
Why Snap Is Worried About Net NeutralityæææA repeal of the FCC’s “open Internet” rules could hurt business for upstart video services like Snapchat.
Goth Sloth vs. Punk Skunkæææ For this week’s VS, we present to you some animals on the fringe. Which do you choose? Goth or punk? Sloth or skunk? The usual bonuses Earn 5,000 points – 2,500 bonus Earn 15,000 points – 5,000 bonus Earn 25,000 points – 10,000 bonus For every 25,000 points above 25,000 – 5,000 bonus Member of winning team (if you’ve scored at least 2,500 points) – 10,000 bonus Highest scorer on each team – 5,000
Moment’s Snap-on iPhone Lenses Get Their Own Battery Caseæææ Moment's new high-capacity battery case is built to accept the company's excellent lens attachments.
See the Evolution of the Famed Porsche 911 in 7 Photosæææ How the German sports car met modernity without ditching the past.
What Warmed Ancient Mars?æææNew data from NASA's Curiosity rover suggest a surprising dearth of greenhouse gases in the Red Planet's distant past -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Israel edges out South Korea for top spot in research investmentæææ Two countries vie to invest more of their economy into research than anyone else.
New technique slashes diagnosis time during brain surgeryæææNeurosurgeons want the quickest, most accurate information to help them make decisions during brain tumor surgery. A new technique could help, say experts.
The Privacy Paradox: An Interview with Manoush Zomorodiæææ An interview with Manoush Zomorodi, host of WNYC's Note to Self, about The Privacy Paradox campaign. She discusses an ethical code needed for technologists, why the typical ad-based business model online is not sustainable, and why it's time for internet users to be "digitally woke." Read More
Scientists catalogue 'parts list' of brain cell types in a major appetite centeræææUsing new technology, scientists have catalogued more than 20,000 brain cells in one region of the mouse hypothalamus. The study revealed some 50 distinct cell types, including a previously undescribed neuron type that may underlie some of the genetic risk of human obesity. This catalog of cell types marks the first time neuroscientists have established a comprehensive "parts list" for this area o
Dansk vindmølle sætter verdensrekord i energiproduktionæææKonkurrencen er dog hård, og ekspert fra DTU mener, at flere og større vindmøller er på vej.
A New Way to Remember: The Power of Quirky Memory JogsæææResearch shows that a quirky, well-placed physical reminder can do wonders -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why big data can’t predict the next armed conflictæææ The expectation that big data alone will be enough to predict armed conflict is unrealistic, according a recent Science essay coauthored by Lars-Erik Cederman, professor of international conflict research at ETH Zurich. He explains why in this recent interview with ETH News.
Airbnb imposes limits on rentals in BarcelonaæææHomeowners in central Barcelona will only be able to rent out one place on Airbnb as part of new rules announced Tuesday by the home rentals website, at loggerheads with local authorities.
Bacterium lassoes its way from the mouth to the heart to cause diseaseæææThe human mouth can harbour more than 700 different species of bacteria. Under normal circumstances these microbes co-exist with us as part of our resident oral microbiota. But when bacteria spread to other tissues via the blood stream, the results can be catastrophic.
Den berømte statistiker Hans Rosling er dødæææHans Rosling brugte meget af sin tid på at fortælle, at medierne ofte viderebringer misforståelser - og han elskede at forklare "virkeligheden" med for eksempel æbler.
Making a scavenger—the meat-thieving traits that have stood the test of timeæææTake a look at the teeth of any animal. The chances are you'll then have a good idea if it's a meat eater or a vegetarian. Sharp canines? Easy. All the better to eat you with. But how would you find out whether your chosen species got by on dead meat, or if it survived and thrived by catching live prey? To answer that kind of question you have to go beyond teeth and look at many other aspects of i
Study offers new insights into receptor that regulates Staphylococcal virulenceæææA recent study published in Cell Chemical Biology has revealed new insights into a molecular pathway that leads to Staphylococcus aureus virulence. Using a tool that mimics the cellular environment, Princeton University researchers reconstituted a key receptor protein responsible for regulating S. aureus virulence. These bacterial infections can cause a range of human illnesses from skin infection
Material can turn sunlight, heat and movement into electricity—all at onceæææMany forms of energy surround you: sunlight, the heat in your room and even your own movements. All that energy—normally wasted—can potentially help power your portable and wearable gadgets, from biometric sensors to smart watches. Now, researchers from the University of Oulu in Finland have found that a mineral with the perovskite crystal structure has the right properties to extract energy from
The Debunker: Was Data Manipulated in a Widely Cited 2015 Climate Study?æææA British tabloid says American government scientists overstated global temperatures to influence climate talks. Respected researchers say that did not happen.
Tarantulas inspire new structural color with the greatest viewing angleæææInspired by the hair of blue tarantulas, researchers from The University of Akron lead a team that made a structural-colored material that shows consistent color from all viewing directions. This finding overturns the conventional wisdom that long-range order photonic structures are always iridescent, opening new potential to mass produce structural colors because highly ordered designs are easy t
NASA advances first-ever silicon-based X-ray opticæææNASA scientist William Zhang has created and proven a technique for manufacturing lightweight, high-resolution X-ray mirrors using silicon—a material commonly associated with computer chips.
Portable superconductivity systems for small motorsæææSuperconductivity, where electrical currents course unhindered through a material, is one of modern physics' most intriguing scientific discoveries. It has many practical uses. Governments, industries, and health care and science centers all make use of superconductivity in applications extending from MRIs in hospitals to the cavities of particle accelerators, where scientists explore the fundamen
Women With Breast Cancer Miss Out On Recommended Genetic Testingæææ Most women with breast cancer say they want testing to know if they carry BRCA gene mutations that increase cancer risk, but only around half of women at high risk actually get tested.
Exhibition charts 500 years of evolution of robotsæææInspired by his belief that human beings are essentially terrified of robots, Ben Russell set about charting the evolution of automatons for an exhibition he hopes will force people to think about how androids and other robotic forms can enhance their lives.
Human DNA softer than DNA single-celled lifeæææSingle-celled organisms have stiffer DNA than multicellular lifeforms like humans and rice. Theoretical physicists managed to simulate the folding in full genomes for the first time to reach this conclusion. Publication in Biophysical Journal on February 7.
Iron Fist Trailer: The Final Defender Has Arrivedæææ The show hits Netflix on March 17.
Squid Communicate With a Secret, Skin-Powered Alphabetæææ Once they get over being creeped out, maybe scientists will figure out what cephalopods are saying.
770,000 Tubes of Spit Help Map America’s Great Migrationsæææ With their massive database of DNA, Ancestry has mapped how culture and geography has shaped the genetic structure of the US population over the last 200 years.
Starlight test shows quantum world has been weird for 600 yearsæææUnknown physics that could undermine quantum theory has been ruled out in a measurement guided by starlight emitted at least six centuries ago
Black Hole Binges on Record-Setting Stellar MealæææA trio of x-ray observatories has spied a supermassive black hole feasting on a giant star for more than a decade -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Anyone (even you) can become a trollæææ Internet trolls, by definition, are disruptive, combative, and often unpleasant with their offensive or provocative online posts designed to disturb and upset. The common assumption is that people who troll are different from the rest of us, giving us the freedom to dismiss them and their behavior. But a new study suggests otherwise—under the right circumstances, anyone can become a troll. “We wa
Medicare could overpay medicare advantage plans by $200 billion over ten yearsæææCurrent trends in diagnostic coding for patient risk scores will lead to Medicare overpaying Medicare Advantage (MA) plans substantially through 2026-likely to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars, suggests a new report.
Despite Whistleblower's Concerns, Climate Change Study Called SoundæææClimate change doubters have seized upon a new accusation suggesting that scientists with NOAA manipulated temperature data in a 2015 study on climate change to reach a desired conclusion. The accusations, scientists said, are off-base.
Researchers use tiny 3D spheres to combat tuberculosisæææA new 3D system has been used to study human infection in the laboratory. The team, which includes infection researchers, engineers and bioinformaticians have used an electrostatic encapsulation technique to make tiny 3D spheres within which human cells are infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacteria to generate conditions that more closely reflect events in patients.
Researchers find chemical switch that may decrease symptoms of schizophreniaæææIn mice, adjusting levels of a compound called kynurenic acid can have significant effects on schizophrenia-like behavior, research has found. In recent years, scientists have identified kynurenic acid as a potential key player in schizophrenia.
Rewards treat alcohol abuse in those with mental illnessæææOffering prizes- - from simple shampoo to DVD players -- can be an effective, low-cost treatment for alcohol abuse, the nation's third leading preventable cause of death, suggests a new report.
Experiment Reaffirms Quantum Weirdnessæææ There might be no getting around what Albert Einstein called “spooky action at a distance.” With an experiment described today in Physical Review Letters — a feat that involved harnessing starlight to control measurements of particles shot between buildings in Vienna — some of the world’s leading cosmologists and quantum physicists are closing the door on an intriguing alternative to “quantum ent
Little diatoms have big influence on ocean nutrientsæææ Diatoms are each just single cells, but they have a significant impact on the dispersal of nutrients and trace elements in global marine waters, report researchers. Diatoms are a very common group of algae found not only in freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes, but also in marine waters, particularly the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. Given an adequate supply of nutrients and light, diatoms c
Show of Shipwrecked Treasures Raises Scientists' IreæææArchaeologists worry that a museum exhibition will encourage exploitation of priceless historical sites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americansæææ People with sickle cell trait, which includes about 10 percent of African-Americans, can get erroneous readings on a common blood glucose test. That could mean they miss out on diabetes treatment.
New algorithms may revolutionize drug discoveries, and our understanding of lifeæææA new set of machine learning algorithms that can generate 3-D structures of tiny protein molecules may revolutionize the development of drug therapies for a range of diseases, from Alzheimer's to cancer.
Genomes in flux: New study reveals hidden dynamics of bird and mammal DNA evolutionæææEvolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. But in some instance it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater amount was added, report scientists. Until now, the extent to which our genome has expanded and contract
Size matters for marine protected areas designed to aid coralæææFor marine protected areas established to help coral reefs recover from overfishing, size really does seem to make a difference, say experts.
How do you reintroduce a herd of bison into the wild?æææA herd of plains bison have been successfully reintroduced to Canada's oldest national park, more than 100 years after they were nearly hunted out of existence.
MRSA-bakterier i hver anden pakke dansk svinekødæææ48 procent af det danske svinekød i supermarkederne indeholder resistente bakterier, viser ny undersøgelse fra Fødevarestyrelsen, mens det kun gælder 28 procent af det udenlandske kød.
Ny svensk klimalov inspireret af dansk lovgivningæææSvensk klimalov skal sikre landet negativ CO2-udledning i 2045. Forslaget bygger på danske og britiske modeller, hvor politikken bliver holdt op mod kvantificerbare mål.
Dashboard Camera Captures Bright Green Fireball Streaking Over U.S. Midwest [Video]æææThe 300-kilogram meteor created a sonic boom, and may have dropped fragments into Lake Michigan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
What happened to the sun over 7,000 years ago?æææBy analyzing the level of a carbon isotope in tree rings from a specimen of an ancient bristlecone pine, researchers have revealed that the sun exhibited a unique pattern of activity in 5480 BC. By comparing this event with other similar but more recent phenomena, they reported that this event may have involved a change in the sun's magnetic activity, or a number of successive solar burst emission
Collection of 13,500 Nastygrams Could Advance War on TrollsæææThe nonprofit behind Wikipedia is teaming up with Google to work on algorithmic discussion monitors.
Hysterectomy tied to early death if ovaries are removedæææ Scientists say removing ovaries during a hysterectomy could increase a woman’s risk for heart disease, cancer, and premature death. A 10-year study, the largest of its kind, compared women who were treated for a benign disease who had both ovaries removed with those who had one or none removed. Researchers looked at 113,679 cases of women aged 35-45 from April 2004 to March 2014. A third of the p
Can This Song Really Make Babies Happy?æææTwo scientists set out to create a song that was scientifically proven to make babies happy.
DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic deliveryæææUsing tiny snippets of DNA as "barcodes," researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
Dinosaurs: Juvenile, adult or senior?æææHow old were the oldest dinosaurs? This question remains largely unanswered. The natural life span of these long-extinct giants is of interest to scientists, in combination with questions regarding how fast they could grow and how they could obtain sufficient nutrients from their habitat. Palaeontologists at the University of Bonn estimate by means of bone structures whether a particular dinosaur
Did a Changing Climate Wipe Out the Giant Kangaroo?æææNew research suggests that as weather patterns changed some 30,000 years ago in Australia, megafauna went extinct -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Harvesting Sharks Could Be Key to Saving ThemæææSustainable fishing of some species for products including fins is feasible, and can avoid cruel practices, study finds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
US conservative bill aims to axe EPA – here’s why it won’t workæææThe bill is latest in a series of signals that the US Environmental Protection Agency will be reined in under President Trump, but it might not end it just yet
Bohr's quantum theory revisedæææBohr’s atomic model was utterly revolutionary when it was presented in 1913 but, although it is still taught in schools, it became obsolete decades ago. However, its creator also developed a much wider-ranging and less known quantum theory, the principles of which changed over time. Researchers have now analyzed the development in the Danish physicist’s thought – a real example of how scientific t
iOS-apps er sårbare over for man-in-the-middle angrebæææ https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ios-apps-saarbare-overfor-man-in-the-middle-angreb-1073038 iOS-applikationer er i risikozonen for at blive ofre for man-in-the-middle angreb. Dette kan i værste fald give dem adgang til personfølsomme oplysninger og brugeres login. Version2
Hey Eco-Warriors: Now You Can Buy Ink Made of Car Exhaustæææ Air Ink is the first ink made from air pollution.
Watch Darpa’s Creepy ‘Project SideArm’ Pluck a Drone Out of the Airæææ Instead of relying on heavy infrastructure, deploy drones out the back of a truck.
Stunning Portraits of the Showiest Show Birds on Earthæææ If you think of birds, you probably picture a pigeon. But they're so much prettier than that.
Ground-breaking research on the side effects of therapyæææWhile many people who suffer from depression and anxiety are helped by seeing a psychologist, others don't get better or actually get worse. Psychological treatment can have negative side effects, like any medicine.
Hundreds of ancient earthworks built in the AmazonæææThe Amazonian rainforest was transformed over 2,000 years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.
Pride: Sin or incentive?æææHumans correctly forecast the personal qualities valued in their local population, and generate pride accordingly, suggests new research.
Longtime Autodesk CEO stepping downæææThe longtime CEO of the design software company Autodesk is stepping down after reaching an agreement with activist investors.
Twitter broadens its campaign against hate and abuseæææTwitter has broadened its campaign against hate speech and abuse.
Computational methods applied to big datasets are compelling tools for historical linguisticsæææDigital approaches applied to big data play an increasingly important role in the humanities. However, there is skepticism about the accuracy and potential of computational methods for historical linguistics. A key task is the identification of etymologically related words (cognates) with a common ancestor, such as stone in English and Stein in German. Up to now, cognate detection is exclusively c
Efficient approach to leaching lithium and cobalt from recycled batteriesæææRechargeable lithium ion batteries power our phones and tablets they drive us from A to B in electric vehicles, and have many applications besides. Unfortunately, the devices that they power can fail and the batteries themselves are commonly only usable for two to three years. As such, there are millions batteries that must be recycled. Research published in the International Journal of Energy Tec
Detecting early onset of metastatic disease using FAST discæææA new research, affiliated with UNIST has been highlighted on the front cover of the January 2017 issue of the prestigious journal Analytical Chemistry. The key finding of this study is the development of a new technique that seperates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood at a liquid-liquid interface.
Departure of migratory birds from stopover sites is hormone-controlledæææMigratory birds often stop along their long journeys to replenish their fat stores. The purpose of these stopovers – rest and refuelling – is clear. To date, however, it had been unclear which physiological signals triggered the birds' decision to continue their flight. A team led by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna has now identified, for the first time, the hormone ghrelin as a signal for the b
More order with less judgment: An optimal theory of the evolution of cooperationæææA research team led by mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation. This team proves that the practice of making moral assessments conditionally is very effective in establishing cooperation in terms of evolutionary game theory. 'Our study also demonstrates the evolutionary disadvantage of seeking reputat
Powerful change: A profile of today's solar consumeræææPeople with higher incomes and better education no longer dominate demand for the domestic solar market in Queensland with a new study revealing the highest uptake in solar PV systems comes from families on medium to lower incomes.
The Download, Feb 7, 2017: There Is a Troll in All of Us, TVs That Spy On You, and Automating Wall StreetæææThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
See the fossil of a spiny slug with a tiny helmetæææ Scientists have discovered the 480-million-year-old remains of a spiny little slug with tiny teeth and a helmet. It may be the earliest stage in the evolution of mollusks, a diverse group of invertebrates that includes squids, octopuses, snails, and clams. The animal—named Calvapilosa which means “hairy scalp”—was discovered in a fossil-rich deposit in Morocco known as the Ordovician Fezouata For
US child-health study rises from ashes of high-profile failureæææ The government’s cancelled National Children’s Study has a successor that may sidestep earlier challenges. Nature 542 149 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21367
Persistent tropical foraging in the highlands of terminal Pleistocene/Holocene New GuineaæææThe development of agriculture is frequently seen as one of the major economic, social, and demographic thresholds in human history. From the perspective of the modern world it is often seen as an inevitable, desirable subsistence strategy, allowing larger populations, settled life, and the development of cities. Likewise it has even been argued that long-term human survival in tropical forests mu
This newly discovered gecko can literally squirm right out of its skinæææ Animals Naked mole rat, eat your heart out Fish-scale geckos can tear away their large scales to escape predators…
How it feels when people see you as less humanæææ The “Ascent of Man” diagram spans ape-like human ancestor to modern human. In a recent study, American participants placed Muslims and Mexican immigrants significantly closer to the ape-like ancestor than Americans as a whole. The experiment comes from a study on Americans’ dehumanization of Muslims and Mexican immigrants during the 2016 US Republican Primaries, and the consequence that feeling d
Doctors Are Speaking Out against TrumpæææPhysicians must walk a careful line between medical practice and political activism, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t stand up for their beliefs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Powerful change: Team profiles of today's solar consumeræææPeople with higher incomes and better education no longer dominate demand for the domestic solar market in Queensland with a new QUT study revealing the highest uptake in solar PV systems comes from families on medium to lower incomes.
Building a better model of human-automation interactionæææPeople generally make decisions using two ways of thinking: They think consciously, deliberate for a while, and try to use logic to figure out what action to take—referred to as analytical cognition. Or people unconsciously recognize patterns in certain situations, get a "gut feeling," and take action based on that feeling; in other words, they use intuitive cognition. In his February Human Factor
Tiny organisms with massive impactæææDiatoms are a very common group of algae found not only in freshwater streams, rivers and lakes, but also in marine waters. These unicellular organisms are particularly prevalent in the waters of the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. Given an adequate supply of nutrients and light, diatoms can multiply with such explosive force that they create an algal "bloom".
Bacterial survival strategy: Splitting into virulent and non-virulent subtypesæææScientists have discovered a long-term epigenetic memory switch that controls different modes of bacterial virulence, a bacterial survival strategy for outsmarting the human immune response. The study sheds new light on bacterial virulence strategies, resulting in increased disease severity, higher infection persistence, and improved host-to-host spreading.
New species of gecko has massive scales and tear-away skinæææMany lizards can drop their tails when grabbed, but one group of geckos has gone to particularly extreme lengths to escape predation. Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis have large scales that tear away with ease, leaving them free to escape whilst the predator is left with a mouth full of scales. Scientists have now described a new species (Geckolepis megalepis) that is the master of this a
Scientists develop 'lab on a chip' that costs 1 cent to makeæææMicrofluidics, electronics and inkjet technology underlie a newly developed all-in-one biochip that can analyze cells for research and clinical applications.
Printed ‘lab on a chip’ costs a penny and catches disease earlyæææThe cheap diagnostic kit is made using a regular inkjet printer and could catch signs of malaria, tuberculosis and cancer earlier in the developing world
Radioaktivitet fra Fukushima sætter ny målerekordæææTæt på reaktorkernen er målt en abnormt høj stråling, der kan reducere undersøgelsesrobotternes levetid til få timer. Uden for bygningen er strålingsniveauet ikke steget.
Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3D printingæææNature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being compressed. The plant’s hardiness comes from a combination of its hollow, tubular macrostructure and porous, or cellular, microstructure. These architectural features work together to give grass its robust mechanical properties. Inspired by nat
Twitter Says It’s Trying Three Things to Combat TrollsæææFor starters, once you’ve been banned for abusive content, you won’t be allowed back.
Gecko eludes foes with tearaway skinæææA newly discovered species of gecko has tearaway skin that leaves predators with nothing but a mouthful of scales when attacked.
Never-before-seen topological solitons experimentally realized in liquid crystalsæææ(Phys.org)—Physicists have discovered that dozens of 3-D knotted structures called "topological solitons," which have remained experimentally elusive for hundreds of years, can be created and frozen for long periods of time in liquid crystals like those used in electronic displays. Until now, topological solitons have been realized only in a few experiments, and for such a short time that it has b
Myopia cell discovered in retina: Dysfunction of cell may be linked to amount of time a child spends indoorsæææScientists have discovered a cell in the retina that may cause myopia when it dysfunctions. The dysfunction may be linked to the amount of time a child spends indoors and away from natural light. This discovery could lead to a new therapeutic target to control myopia. More than a billion people in the world have myopia, whose incidence is rising and is linked to how much time people spend indoors
Trilobites: Meteor Puts on a Light Show Over Midwest, and for the CamerasæææThe fiery object streaked across the Midwest sky early Monday morning. It was seen as far west as Nebraska and as far east as New York.
EU-ekspert: Danmark er egnet til at huse EMAæææRegeringens ambitioner om at få EMA til Danmark er realistiske, vurderer EU-professor Dorte Sindbjerg Martinsen. Danmark har en veludviklet sundhedssektor og en stor medicinalindustri, og det er umiddelbart stærke kort at have på hånden, lyder det.
Want to Keep Hackers Out of Gadgets? Try International Lawæææ Opinion: A Yale cyberlaw expert explains how international law could make it harder for hackers to hamper IoT devices.
With Legion, the X-Men Finally Triumph Where They Belong: TVæææ The new Fox show isn't just a promising series; it's an argument for why the mutants of Marvel Comics are perfect for longform TV.
10 års dødskamp er slut: Sort hul sluger stjerneæææSorte huller fortærer al masse, der kommer i nærheden, men kampen mod én stjerne har vist sig hård.
Why Humans Prefer to Be the Center of the UniverseæææScience contemplates the incomprehensible -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Undersøgelse: Virksomheder lader fejlslagne projekter køre videreæææ Et fåtal af virksomheder lukker it-projekterne ned, hvis businesscasen ikke holder, viser undersøgelse. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/undersoegelse-virksomheder-lader-fejlslagne-projekter-koere-videre-1073032 Version2
Keeping the lights on in GhanaæææWhen Ghanaian Abu Yaya wondered why his country imports all of its electroporcelain – a small but crucial component for electrical power transmission – it led to a collaboration with Cambridge materials scientist Kevin Knowles that might one day result in Ghana being able to reduce its frequent blackouts.
Immune system defence force captured in actionæææHow the natural defence force within our immune system attacks and destroys harmful invaders such as virus-infected and cancerous cells has been visualised in microscopic detail by scientists from UCL, Birkbeck, University of London, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Monash University, Australia.
Biologists identify drug combinations that may be highly effective at reducing growth of deadly bacteriaæææA landmark report by the World Health Organization in 2014 observed that antibiotic resistance—long thought to be a health threat of the future—had finally become a serious threat to public health around the world. A top WHO official called for an immediate and aggressive response to prevent what he called a "post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treata
Speciallæge mistænkes for svindel med lægeerklæringeræææEn speciallæge har angiveligt udfærdiget lægeerklæringer, der i 135 tilfælde givet udlændinge direkte indfødsret uden forudgående indfødsretsprøve.
First Euclid flight hardware deliveredæææAn important milestone has been passed in the development of Euclid, a pioneering ESA mission to observe billions of faint galaxies and investigate the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The first flight hardware, in the form of four detectors known as Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), has been delivered to Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) by UK company e2v. The remaining flight CCDs (36 i
Maternal social skills found to play a factor in infanticide in capuchin monkeysæææ(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Canada, Japan and the U.S. has found that social skills in capuchin monkey mothers plays a role in the survivability of her offspring. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe their study of the monkeys in their native Costa Rica and behavioral traits they observed that might be translat
E-cigarettes might actually be a safe tool for quitting smokingæææ Health A study suggests that longterm e-cigarette use is safer than traditional smoking The study, which is the first one to directly compare these two groups over a long-term period, suggests that e-cigarettes may be a safe and effective way to quit…
11 Immigrant Scientists Who Made Great Contributions to AmericaæææFrom Albert Einstein and Enrico Fermi to Elizabeth Stern, scientists of all types have numbered among those pursuing a new life in America.
Ancient Chinese recipe makes lumpy, tasty beeræææ Researchers have discovered a 5,000-year-old beer recipe by studying the residue on the inner walls of pottery vessels found in an excavated site in northeast China. It’s the earliest evidence of beer production in China so far. On a recent afternoon, a small group of students gathered around a large table in one of the rooms at the Stanford Archaeology Center. Li Liu, a professor in Chinese arch
Residential heating tops sources of PM2.5 in Danube region's urban areasæææThe European Commission's science and knowledge service, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) has evaluated sources of air pollutants in the Danube macro-region, a necessary step for the design of action plans to improve air quality. The related study showed residential heating contributed up to 35 percent of PM2.5 pollution in the main cities in the Danube macro-region, followed by agriculture (up to
Evidence of uncharacteristic shoaling found to play a role in great die-off 250 million years agoæææ(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from several institutions in China and the U.S. has found evidence of uncharacteristic shoaling before, during and after the great die-off 250 million years ago and suggest it could be the cause of so many species going extinct. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes evidence they found in rocks
Austrian officials say parliament target of Turkish hackersæææAustrian officials say the country's Parliament was the target of a hacker attack on the weekend, and a Turkish group has claimed responsibility.
Landmark EU-US data privacy court case opens in DublinæææA campaign by Austrian privacy lawyer Max Schrems against Facebook's transfer of personal data from Europe to the US is being heard in an Irish court from Tuesday, the latest twist in a long legal battle.
French firm to design Shanghai wetland to clean factory wateræææFrench wastewater treatment company Suez said Tuesday it had been awarded a contract to design an artificial wetland to clean water from a petrochemical industrial zone outside Shanghai.
Sådan ved Netflix, hvad du skal se næste gangæææ Streamingtjenesterne gør brug af relativt simple tilgange til at give dig dine anbefalinger https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-ved-netflix-hvad-du-skal-se-naeste-gang-1073029 Version2
Mange spørgsmål til gigantudvidelse af CPH - læs svarene fra piloter og ingeniøreræææDe tekniske, de kritiske og de hypotetiske. Lufthavnsingeniører og piloter svarer på alle jeres spørgsmål om den omfattende udvidelse af Københavns Lufthavn.
A new species of gecko with massive scales and tear-away skinæææMany lizards can drop their tails when grabbed, but one group of geckos has gone to particularly extreme lengths to escape predation. Fish-scale geckos in the genus Geckolepis have large scales that tear away with ease, leaving them free to escape whilst the predator is left with a mouth full of scales. Scientists have now described a new species (Geckolepis megalepis) that is the master of this a
Researchers apply textile fabrication principles to the production of microactuatorsæææThe EU funded POLYACT project applied textile fabrication principles to the production of microactuators, offering a range of biomedical applications both inside and outside the body.
New research on why plant tissues have a sense of directionæææScientists at the John Innes Centre, Norwich have published new evidence that plant tissues can have a preferred direction of growth and that this characteristic is essential for producing complex plant shapes.
Mysterious white dwarf pulsar discoveredæææAn exotic binary star system 380 light-years away has been identified as an elusive white dwarf pulsar – the first of its kind ever to be discovered in the universe – thanks to research by the University of Warwick.
Novel LED street lights reduce costsæææResearchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a novel type of LED street light of increased efficiency. Compared to conventional LEDs, power consumption may be reduced by up to 20%. This will also decrease costs and CO2 emission. Conventional high-power diodes are replaced by a special array of LEDs. This enhances efficiency, increases service life and safety, and produces
First measurement of nitrogen removal by local shellfishæææTowns along Cape Cod and the Islands are looking to shellfish not only as tasty culinary treats, but also for help cleaning up waters degraded by excess nitrogen in the region.
Mobile phone and satellite data to map povertyæææAn international team has, for the first time, developed a way of combining anonymised data from mobile phones and satellite imagery data to create high resolution maps to measure poverty.
The hidden cost of buying fresh vegetables all year roundæææShortages of lettuces, courgettes, broccoli and other unseasonal vegetables due to bad weather in the Murcia and Andalucia regions of Spain have caused a predictable number of column inches about the UK's reliance on imported fresh produce. Typically, the distress and devastation of torrential rains and flash floods in the region has been less reported.
Should scientists engage in activism?æææHave you heard that scientists are planning a march on Washington? The move is not being billed as a protest, but rather as a "celebration of our passion for science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community," although it comes as a direct response to recent policy changes and statements by the Trump administration.
What Everyone Gets Wrong about Black History in the Space AgeæææAfrican-American astronauts have been another group of hidden figures in the U.S. space program -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Fireball Hissing: Weird Cause of Noises Made by Meteors FoundæææThe popping, sizzling, rustling, and hissing sounds made by fireballs reportedly occur almost instantly to earthly onlookers. Here's why.
Expert discusses definition and effects of populismæææJohn Abromeit, associate professor of history and social studies education, is an intellectual historian; he studies the history of ideas. One such idea is populism, a widely used term that is hard to define.
Analysis of tree rings reveals highly abnormal solar activity in the mid-holoceneæææBy analyzing the level of a carbon isotope in tree rings from a specimen of an ancient bristlecone pine, a team led by Nagoya University researchers has revealed that the sun exhibited a unique pattern of activity in 5480 BC. By comparing this event with other similar but more recent phenomena, they reported that this event may have involved a change in the sun's magnetic activity, or a number of
Smart-meter data could improve the performance and efficiency of national power gridsæææPower generators face the constant challenge of matching the amount of power produced at any given time with the demand from consumers. Excess generation is wasteful and expensive, while undergeneration can cause brownouts. For this reason, accurately predicting power demand hours or even days in advance is critical for the reliable and sustainable operation of the electricity grid.
Model accurately predicts the electronic properties of a combination of 2-D semiconductorsæææThe defining property of a semiconductor is its so-called bandgap: the barrier that prevents electrons within a specific energy range from flowing through a material. Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Professor of Material Science and Engineering Lance Li and his team collaborated with colleagues from Taiwan and used a simple model to determine the band alig
Microbiology expert highlights importance of developing rapid diagnostic tests to combat drug resistanceæææDeveloping new ways to quickly diagnose illnesses in farm animals – allowing vets to administer effective, targeted treatment – could play a key role in helping to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, according to a Kingston University microbiology expert.
Believe in the American dream? You're less likely impulse buy, study findsæææWhen materialistic consumers believe in the American dream—that it's possible to improve their economic status through hard work—they are less likely to spend impulsively, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
Secrets of life in a spoonful of bloodæææ The intricate development of the fetus is yielding its long-held secrets to state-of-the-art molecular technologies that can make use of the mother's blood. Nature 542 156 doi: 10.1038/542156a
What animal has the craziest camouflage?æææ Animals Some caterpillars look exactly like poop The animal world is full of trickery and concealment.
Sinosphere: Debate Flares Over China’s Inclusion at Vatican Organ Trafficking MeetingæææA group of ethicists have expressed concern that China will use the meeting to convince the world that it no longer harvests organs from prisoners.
Study outlines steps to success for growing startupsæææMany entrepreneurs dream of leading a successful company. But launching a startup is only the first step.
Image: Potentially hospitable EnceladusæææSeen from outside, Enceladus appears to be like most of its sibling moons: cold, icy and inhospitable. But under that forbidding exterior may exist the very conditions needed for life.
Forest 'islands' offer refuge to wintering birdsæææThe polar vortex of 2013 and 2014 brought the coldest winter many parts of the Midwest had experienced in decades. In Dane County, Wisconsin, it was the coldest it had been in 35 years.
Deer change the landscape indirectlyæææIt is widely known that the white-tailed deer is a nonstop eater. Unless it is sleeping or fleeing from a predator, the keystone North American herbivore is nearly always nibbling.
Physicists address loophole in tests of Bell's inequality using 600-year-old starlightæææQuantum entanglement may appear to be closer to science fiction than anything in our physical reality. But according to the laws of quantum mechanics—a branch of physics that describes the world at the scale of atoms and subatomic particles—quantum entanglement, which Einstein once skeptically viewed as "spooky action at a distance," is, in fact, real.
New technology could help neuroscientists understand how dopamine influences brain activityæææMIT chemical engineers have developed an extremely sensitive detector that can track single cells' secretion of dopamine, a brain chemical responsible for carrying messages involved in reward-motivated behavior, learning, and memory.
Child's Best Friend: Kids Prefer Their Pets Over SiblingsæææDogs may be man's best friend, but a new study finds that pets are children's best friends, too — more so than their own siblings.
Should Scientists Engage in Activism?æææIn the wake of the Flint water crisis and with a new notably anti-science president, U.S. scientists are reevaluating how to navigate the tension between speaking out and a fear of losing research funding.
Research shows that anyone can become an internet trollæææInternet trolls, by definition, are disruptive, combative and often unpleasant with their offensive or provocative online posts designed to disturb and upset.
Minister vil droppe hjertepakkerneæææ »Vi udfaser hjertepakkerne, fordi de ikke fungerer optimalt og ikke sikrer den bedste sundhed for pengene,« siger sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).
Scientists categorize Earth as a 'toxic planet'æææHumans emit more than 250 billion tonnes of chemical substances a year, in a toxic avalanche that is harming people and life everywhere on the planet.
Findings suggest most people use their cell phones to pass waiting timesæææWhen queued up for an event, to buy a latte or waiting for a bus, most people whip out their phones to pass the time—most often within seconds of arriving.
Study rehabilitates climate modelsæææWith new methods of reconstruction, climate researchers in Bern have been able to demonstrate that some 9,000 to 5,000 years ago, the Mediterranean climate was considerably warmer than previous studies had suggested. Among other things, previous concerns regarding the reliability of climate models could thus be dispelled.
Immigrants Do Not Increase Crime, Research ShowsæææA group of criminologists show the claim of a link is false -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Nike’s Iconic Gas Slipper, the Air, Gets a Minimal Rebootæææ At just 8.8 ounces, the VaporMax is strides ahead of the bulky Air Max shoes of yesteryear but still delivers the legendary bounce.
Ride Your Bike Like a Kid—and Make It Fun Againæææ Get back in the saddle with these tips.
Gun Violence Researchers Race to Protect Data From Trumpæææ It's not only climate data that's at risk.
Shred the Mountain to Pieces With This Backcountry Ski Gearæææ When it's steep and deep on the back side, strap on this mountain-crushing outfit.
Pace Yourself With These 3 Sweatproof Workout Headphonesæææ Each of these sweatproof buds will push you—and your budget—a little harder.
A Controversial Minister Makes Peace With Techies in the Battle for SF’s Soulæææ In San Francisco's Tenderloin, tension simmers between wealthy techies and the city's most needy. An 87-year-old minister is trying to heal the divide.
Synbio and biosecurityæææThe world in 1918 was emerging from under the pall of a World War that had claimed 38 million lives, and yet in the span of only one year, just as many lives would be lost to the Spanish Flu—an influenza pandemic that is still regarded the single deadliest epidemic in recorded history. The disease reached all corners of the world, from the Antipodes to Europe and Asia, eventually claiming 20–50 mi
Male Contraceptive 'Hydrogel' Passes Test in Rhesus MonkeysæææA new type of male contraceptive that blocks the flow of sperm effectively prevented pregnancy in female monkeys, a new study finds.
Our story of rape and reconciliation | Tom Stranger / Thordis ElvaæææIn 1996, Thordis Elva shared a teenage romance with Tom Stranger, an exchange student from Australia. After a school dance, Tom raped Thordis, after which they parted ways for many years. In this extraordinary talk, Elva and Stranger move through a years-long chronology of shame and silence, and invite us to discuss the omnipresent global issue of sexual violence in a new, honest way. For a Q&A wi
US government takes animal-welfare data offlineæææ The US Department of Agriculture will no longer make lab inspection results and violations publicly available, citing privacy concerns.