[søvn og indlæring]


[Er det lettere for småbørn at lære ord når de får en søvnpause? Ifølge en undersøgese lærer børn under skolealderen bedst når de får en nap. ]

Preschoolers learn words best if they have a nap
Naps play an important role in helping babies hang onto what they learn. Now, a new study suggests naptime could have a similar effect on language learning in preschoolers. Researchers studied verb learning in three-year-olds and found that those who napped after learning new verbs had a better understanding of the words when tested 24 hours later. The findings, which will appear in the journal C

[]


[Er udslip af gashydrater en klimarisiko?: Gashydrater næppe risiko for udslip ved klimaændringer, ifølge rapport. ]

Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release
A recent interpretive review of scientific literature sheds light on the interactions of gas hydrates and climate.

[magnetisk sans]


[Har insekter magnetisk sans? Et studie viser at kakerlakker har forskellige magnetiske egenskaber når de er døde end når de er levende. ]

The Curious Case of Cockroach Magnetization
The discovery that living and dead cockroaches have strikingly different magnetic properties could help bioengineers design new magnetic sensors.

[]


[Hvad er forskellen på forkølelse og influenza?: Hvordan kan man skene forkølelse fra influenza?]

Winter Sickness: How to Tell If It's a Cold or the Flu
Catching a cold or the flu can make you feel miserable. But how can you tell which one you have?

[]


[Hvad kan en selv-energidrevet fotodetektor bruges til?: Forskere har udviklet en fotodetektor, der selv skaffer sig energi, og som kan bruges inden for kemiske analyser, kommunikation, astronomiske studier og meget andet. ]

A new sensitive and stable self-powered photodetector
Researchers have developed a self-powered photodetector that can be used in a wide range of applications such as chemical analysis, communications, astronomical investigations and much more.

[]


[Hvor hurtigt smelter Grønlands is?: Data viser en dramatisk stigning i hvor hurtigt Grønlands is smelter nedefra.]

UCI, NASA reveal new details of Greenland ice loss
Less than a year after the first research flight kicked off NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign, data from the new program are providing a dramatic increase in knowledge of how Greenland's ice sheet is melting from below. Two new research papers in the journal Oceanography, including one by UCI Earth system scientist Mathieu Morlighem, use OMG observations to document how meltwater and ocean

[blodforgiftning]


[Hvordan kan blodforgiftning behandles?: Orexin er et muligt lægemiddel mod hidtil ikke behandlelig blodforgiftning der giver septic shock]

Orexin as a potential drug for treating septic shock
Sepsis is a life-threatening condition due to excessive immune responses to infection that damages the patient's own tissues and organs. In septic shock, the severest stage of sepsis, the blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level, often leading to multiple organ failure and death. To date, there is no effective therapy yet available for septic shock. Recent findings may be a breakthrough in

[hjerte 3d]


[Hvordan kan man få forskellige hjerteceller til at slå samlet?: Forskere har samlet tre hjertecelletyper som velcro og derved frembragt hjertevæv der slår som et væv. ]

Matters of the heart: Researchers create 3-D beating heart
Matters of the heart can be complicated, but scientists have now found a way to create 3-D heart tissue that beats in synchronized harmony, like a heart in love, that will lead to better understanding of cardiac health and improved treatments. Researchers have devised a way to stick three different types of cardiac cells together, like Velcro, to make heart tissue that beats as one.

[3d]


[Hvordan kan man lave organ-simulationer?: For første gang har man lavet 2D biochips "colliding" med 3D miniorganer og det frembringer nogle af de bedste organsimulationer man har opnået.]

Scientists Are Trading In Lab Mice for Hundreds of Mini-Brains on a Chip
For the first time, 2-D biochips are colliding with 3-D mini-organs—and together they're making some of the best organ simulations ever. The post Scientists Are Trading In Lab Mice for Hundreds of Mini-Brains on a Chip appeared first on WIRED .

[]


[Hvorfor foretrækker malariamyg at suge blod fra mennesker med malaria?]

Why malaria mosquitoes like people with malaria
Malaria mosquitoes prefer to feed -- and feed more -- on blood from people infected with malaria. Researchers have now discovered why. The findings can lead to new ways to fight malaria without using poisonous chemicals.

[bestøvning med droner]


[I Japan bestøver med liljer med droner i insektstørrelse]

Robo-Bees Could Aid Insects with Pollination Duties
Mini drones sporting horsehair coated in a sticky gel could one day take the pressure off beleaguered bee populations by transporting pollen from plant to plant, researchers said.

samme emne:

Robotic bee could help pollinate crops as real bees decline
With bee populations tumbling, an autonomous drone just 4 centimetres wide could help pollinate crops by flying from flower to flower

This long-forgotten gel could help robots pollinate all our crops
Animals Taking some of the burden off the bees In 2007, chemist Eijiro Miyako created a thick, viscous sticky gel that could conduct electricity. He hoped that it could be used in batteries or actuators, but the gel…

Watch This $100 Drone Try to Do a Bumblebee’s Job
Japanese tinkerers created a tiny, flower-pollinating drone for a world without insects.

Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators
As bees slip onto the endangered species list in the United States, researchers in Japan are pollinating lilies with insect-sized drones. The undersides of these artificial pollinators are coated with horse hairs and an ionic gel just sticky enough to pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it onto another. Far from replacing bees, the drones' designers are hopeful that their invention could so

Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators
As bees slip onto the endangered species lists, researchers in Japan are pollinating lilies with insect-sized drones. The undersides of these artificial pollinators are coated with horse hairs and an ionic gel just sticky enough to pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it onto another. The drones' designers are hopeful that their invention could someday help carry the burden that modern agric

[fiskeolie]


[Kan fiskeolie være et værn mod astma?: Froskere har opdaget af omega-3 olier kan anvendes til astmapatienter. ]

Evidence points to fish oil to fight asthma
Scientists have discovered new essential information about omega 3 fatty acids contained in fish oil and how they could be used for asthma patients.

[ nano]


[]

Researchers publish study on rare-earth garnets
Researchers in the Physics Department and Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering recently published findings that may advance the understanding of rare-earth garnets, a promising material useful as a magnetic insulator in applications including magnetic recording devices, thermoelectric generation, microwave devices and in optical telecommunications.

[ nano]


[]

Lattice of nanotraps and line narrowing in Raman gas
Decreasing the emission linewidth from a molecule is one of the key aims in precision spectroscopy. One approach is based on cooling molecules to near absolute zero. An alternative way is to localize the molecules on subwavelength scale. A novel approach in this direction uses a standing wave in a gas-filled hollow fibre. It creates an array of deep, nanometer-scale traps for Raman-active molecule

[3D print]


[]

Most stretchable elastomer for 3-D printing
Due to its excellent material properties of elasticity, resilience, and electrical and thermal insulation, elastomers have been used in a myriad of applications. They are especially ideal for fabricating soft robots, flexible electronics and smart biomedical devices which require soft and deformable material properties to establish safe and smooth interactions with humans externally and internally

[airbagskandale]


[]

Producent bag livsfarlige airbags erklærer sig skyldig og forbereder milliarderstatning
Den japanske airbagproducent bag verdenshistoriens største biltilbagekaldelse kommer til at betale seks milliarder kroner i forlig med amerikanske myndigheder.

[alligatorer]


[]

Extending the history of crocs in California
If you think of crocodylians in the United States (you do think about them, don't you?), your mind probably settles on the alligators of the southeast. The extra-enthusiastic croc buff might even remember the American crocodile native to southern Florida (and a good chunk of Central and South America). The extra-extra-extra-enthusiastic croc buff (I am purposefully not using the word "nerd" here),

[AML]


[]

Computer trained to predict which AML patients will go into remission, which will relapse
Researchers have developed the first computer machine-learning model to accurately predict which patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, will go into remission following treatment for their disease and which will relapse.

[amøbe]


[]

New species of amoeba named after Gandalf from "The Lord of the Rings"
Thecamoebians are amoebae that have evolved the ability to produce a varyingly shaped outer carapace or shell in which to protect themselves. A collaborative of researchers has now identified a species of thecamoeba with a carapace that resembles the wizard's hat worn by Gandalf, a major character in The Lord of the Rings, a trilogy by author J.R.R. Tolkien.

[antibiotikaresistens]


[]

Bacteria sleep, then rapidly evolve, to survive antibiotic treatments
Antibiotic resistance is a major and growing problem worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is rising to dangerously high levels in all parts of the world, and new resistance mechanisms are emerging and spreading globally, threatening our ability to treat common infectious diseases. But how these bacterial resistance mechanisms occur, and whether we can predic

[Antropocæn]


[]

Calculating the Day Humans Began Changing the Earth Forever
A pair of scientists believe they have an equation that can pinpoint the year the Anthropocene began.

[arktis]


[]

Old aerial photos can help monitor glacier change, study shows
Old aerial photographs of Arctic glaciers can be used to assess and measure changes to their surface over time, according to a new study.

[astronomi]


[]

NASA team looks to ancient Earth first to study hazy exoplanets
For astronomers trying to understand which distant planets might have habitable conditions, the role of atmospheric haze has been hazy. To help sort it out, a team of researchers has been looking to Earth – specifically Earth during the Archean era, an epic 1-1/2-billion-year period early in our planet's history.

[atomkraftværk]


[]

Eksplosion i fransk atomkraftværk - ingen risiko for udslip
En eksplosion i et fransk atomkraftanlæg har såret flere, men skaber ikke risiko for stråling.

[autofagi]


[]

[Report] A switch from canonical to noncanonical autophagy shapes B cell responses
Autophagy is important in a variety of cellular and pathophysiological situations; however, its role in immune responses remains elusive. Here, we show that among B cells, germinal center (GC) cells exhibited the highest rate of autophagy during viral infection. In contrast to mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1–dependent canonical autophagy, GC B cell autophagy occurred predominantly throug

[axolotl]


[]

[Editors' Choice] Regrow like an axolotl
Author: Beverly A. Purnell

[Batteri]


[]

Battery can be recharged with carbon dioxide
(Phys.org)—Researchers have developed a type of rechargeable battery called a flow cell that can be recharged with a water-based solution containing dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from fossil fuel power plants. The device works by taking advantage of the CO2 concentration difference between CO2 emissions and ambient air, which can ultimately be used to generate electricity.

[bier]


[]

Despite few taste genes, honey bees seek out essential nutrients based on floral resources
Despite having few taste genes, honey bees are fine-tuned to know what minerals the colony may lack and proactively seek out nutrients in conjunction with the season when their floral diet varies.

[bioluminescens]


[]

Behavioral biology: The firefly among fish
The flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron, which inhabits the coral reefs of the Pacific, uses flashing signals to forage for food at night. The moment it finds food, the flashing signal changes to a permanent glow while the fish is feeding. In addition to the lighting conditions in its surroundings, the presence of food also determines the bioluminescence of the fish.

[biphenol A]


[]

[Feature] Rules of evidence
A common plastic additive called bisphenol A (BPA) has become the focus of major controversy. It can weakly mimic the human hormone estrogen, and leach out of products—including plastic drinking bottles and medical supplies—in small quantities. As a result, some companies and governments have moved to remove BPA from certain products, even though there is still fierce debate among regulators over

[bison]


[]

Bison Reintroduced to Canadian Wild After a Century of Conservation Efforts
Bison have returned to a Canadian park after the animals' near extinction in the 1800s.

[chip]


[]

Chipmaker Infineon says US could block Wolfspeed deal
German semiconductor giant Infineon has said its proposed acquisition of US computer chip specialist Wolfspeed has run into opposition from US regulators over security concerns.

[Crohns sygdom]


[]

Bacteria links Crohn's disease to arthritis
Patients with Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes abdominal pain and diarrhea, can also experience joint pain. In Crohn's disease, which affects about 800,000 Americans, the immune system can attack not only the bowels, but the musculoskeletal system as well, leading to spondyloarthritis, a painful condition that affects the spine and joints.

[dans]


[]

What Makes a Woman a Good Dancer? Watch the Hips, a Study Says
Researchers found that big hip swings and asymmetric arm and thigh movements give the impression of being a better dancer.

[Deccan Traps]


[]

[This Week in Science] Double trouble for the Deccan Traps
Author: Brent Grocholski

[dieselbiler]


[]

'Dieselgate' fallout leads to score-settling at Volkswagen
Volkswagen's "dieselgate" crisis turned personal this week, as the German auto giant's patriarch and ex-boss Ferdinand Piech implicated his successors in the cheating scandal.

[DNA shuffling]


[]

An 'ignition key' revs up DNA shuffling to make antibodies
Rearranging the genome is a risky endeavor, and human cells reserve it for special occasions, like making egg and sperm cells.

[droner]


[]

No one knows the best way to stop a drone
Military Is there a way to knock drones out of the sky that’s just as cheap as the drone itself? There are many proposed ways to stop a drone and none of them are great. Read on.

[evolution]


[]

Researchers cast into doubt a tenet of the dominant evolutionary biology model
A team of Université Laval researchers has cast into doubt a tenet of evolutionary biology according to which organisms with more than one copy of the same gene in their genome are more resilient to genetic perturbations. In an article to be published tomorrow in Science, the researchers show that this genetic redundancy can also make the genome more fragile, leaving organisms more vulnerable to t

[evolution]


[]

Autocatalytic biodiversity hypothesis aims to supplant Darwin's 'war of the species'
If competition is the main evolutionary driver, why do so many species coexist within the same ecosystem? This a central question in ecology. Many ideas have been suggested in an attempt to explain this evolutionary paradox. Most of them are based on the importance of ecological niches for the maintenance of differentiated environments versus dominated environments.

[falske nyheder]


[]

Wikipedia editors ban 'unreliable' Daily Mail as source
Wikipedia editors have voted to ban the use of articles from British tabloid The Daily Mail and its globally popular website as sources, calling them "unreliable", according to a statement.

[fedtforbrænding]


[]

Skip Dinner? Evening Fast May Burn Fat
Looking to burn more fat? You could give fasting a try, according to results from a preliminary study.

[flyvende biler]


[]

Uber brings in NASA engineer to build flying cars
Flying cars have become something of a hot ticket item of late. In the past few years, companies like Terrafugia, Aeromobil and Moller International have all grabbed headlines with their particular designs. And soon enough, international transportation giant Uber could be joining the ranks of those looking to turn a popular staple of science fiction into science fact.

[forbold]


[]

Soccer success in the young can be measured in the brain
The working memory and other cognitive functions in children and young people can be associated with how successful they are on the soccer pitch, a new study shows. Soccer clubs that focus too much on physical attributes therefore risk overlooking future stars.

[fotodetektor]


[]

A new sensitive and stable self-powered photodetector
Researchers in Singapore and China have collaborated to develop a self-powered photodetector that can be used in a wide range of applications such as chemical analysis, communications, astronomical investigations and much more.

[fotoner]


[]

Large groups of photons on demand—an equivalent of photonic 'integrated circuit'
Physicists from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw have developed a holographic atomic memory device capable of generating single photons on demand in groups of several dozen or more. The device, successfully demonstrated in practice, overcomes one of the fundamental obstacles towards the construction of a quantum computer.

[galakser]


[]

Astronomers find faintest early galaxies yet, probe how the early universe lit up
Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a new technique to discover the faintest galaxies yet seen in the early universe —10 times fainter than any previously seen. These galaxies will help astronomers probe a little-understood, but important period in cosmic history. Their new technique helps probe the time a billion years after the Big Bang, when the early, dark universe

[games]


[]

[Book Review] Game changers
Board games are growing as a popular hobby in mainstream culture and academic circles, thanks, in part, to the rise of "Eurogames," which emphasize strategy and individual development over luck and conflict. Given their wide appeal, board games also represent a media form ripe with potential for science education. This review presents two games with environmentally themed expansions that can help

[gashydrat]


[]

Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release
The breakdown of methane hydrates due to warming climate is unlikely to lead to massive amounts of methane being released to the atmosphere, according to a recent interpretive review of scientific literature performed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Rochester.

[GMO]


[]

[Feature] Genetic divide
How much evidence is enough evidence? When it comes to genetically modified (GM) organisms, the answer depends on where you live—and what it is. In the United States and Canada, for example, farmers, consumers, and regulators have been largely persuaded by studies showing that GM crops and foods are safe to eat and pose little risk to the environment. Chinese officials are taking a similar stance.

[graviditet]


[]

Glands in the uterus may keep pregnancy healthy
The discovery of new roles for uterine glands could clarify how pregnancies develop and lead to better prevention of miscarriage and complications such as preeclampsia. The majority of pregnancy losses occur during the first trimester, when biological communication between embryo and mother is critical for the establishment of the pregnancy. Scientists and doctors have known for several years tha

[Grønland smelter]


[]

Greenland ice sheet melting can cool subtropics, alter climate
A new study finds evidence that the last time Earth was as warm as it is today, cold freshwater from a melting Greenland ice sheet circulated in the Atlantic Ocean as far south as Bermuda, elevating sea levels and altering the ocean's climate and ecosystems.

[hackere]


[]

Russian hackers get burned in deal with Russia's spy agency
For several years a group of hackers have been posting letters and documents stolen from senior Russian officials with impunity. And then the nation's spy agency tracked them down and offered them a deal.

[hackere]


[]

Russian election hacks exploited legal grey zone: lawyers
Russia's alleged computer hacking to interfere in US elections was no act of war, but exploited a legal grey zone that makes justifying retaliation hard, international lawyers specializing in cyber issues said Wednesday.

[hestens evolution]


[]

Climate change responsible for the great diversity in horses
Changing environments and ecosystems were driving the evolution of horses over the past 20 million years. This is the main conclusion of a new study by paleontologists. The team analyzed 140 species of horses, most of them extinct, synthesizing decades of research on the fossil history of this popular group of mammals.

[hestens evolution]


[]

Climate change responsible for rapid expansion of horse species over last 20 million years
Changing environments and ecosystems were driving the evolution of horses over the past 20 million years. This is the main conclusion of a new study published in Science by a team of palaeontologists from Spain and Argentina. The team analysed 140 species of horses, most of them extinct, synthesising decades of research on the fossil history of this popular group of mammals.

[HIV]


[]

[Feature] Politics vs. data on needle swaps
After Hungary's conservative Fidesz party took power in 2010, it began cutting funding for needle exchange programs, which aim to prevent the spread of blood-borne diseases such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis among users of heroin and other injectable drugs. Study after study has shown that giving drug users clean needles, and collecting dirty ones, can be a cost-effective way of preventing disease and

[hjerneforskning]


[]

Er hjerneforskningen på vildspor – og kan en kontroversiel kvantecomputer bruges til noget?
Reservoir computing er et nyt forsøg på at efterligne hjernens beregninger, men samtidig viser en ny undersøgelse, at de metoder, hjerneforskere bruger til at forstå neurale processer, ikke kan bruges på en 'hjerne', vi kender i alle detaljer – en lille CPU.

[hjernen]


[]

The Internet and your brain are more alike than you think
Although we spend a lot of our time online nowadays—streaming music and video, checking email and social media, or obsessively reading the news—few of us know about the mathematical algorithms that manage how our content is delivered. But deciding how to route information fairly and efficiently through a distributed system with no central authority was a priority for the Internet's founders. Now,

[huler]


[]

Scientists just found signs of a stolen Dead Sea Scroll
Science A cave looks like it once held more scrolls, but they're long gone "Dead Sea Scrolls" have been found in 11 caves. Now scientists think they've found a 12th—but the scroll itself was stolen decades ago.

[indlæring]


[]

What Science Says about How to Get Preschool Right
The push for rigorous prekindergarten education has overlooked the evidence on how young kids really learn bestm

[klimaændring]


[]

Increase in the number of extremely strong fronts over Europe?
A new research finds an increase of strong and extremely strong fronts in summertime and autumn over Europe. If this is a trend or caused by climate change remains to be seen, according to a new report.

[kolera]


[]

Could stabby bacteria one day fight infections?
Scientists have observed as two armies of cholera bacteria stabbed each other with poisonous, harpoon-like appendages, rupturing victims like water balloons. Their insights could eventually lead to new, targeted therapies to fight infections. The dueling bacteria wouldn’t be the infectors in that scenario, though; they’d be the remedy. Conceivably, specially engineered assassin bacteria friendly

[kræft, gigt og psoreasis]


[]

Nyt hybrid-præparat til behandling af kræft- og gigtsygdomme får anbefaling
CHMP har på sit seneste møde indstillet til, at hybrid-præparatet Jylamvo til behandling af Akut Lymfoblastisk Leukæmi, gigt og psoriasis tildeles markedsføringstilladelse i Europa.

[kvantefysik]


[]

AI learns to solve quantum state of many particles at once
The same kind of artificial intelligence that beat a top human player at Go could help grapple with the astonishing complexity of large quantum systems

[kviksølv]


[]

New study identifies organic matter composition as a critical factor controlling mercury methylation
The biological formation of neurotoxic methyl mercury is an enigmatic process underpinning mercury-related health and environmental hazards. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms and the factors controlling the process are still not well understood. In a collaborative effort, researchers at Uppsala and Umeå University now show that the formation of methylmercury in sediment is controlled by the molec

[La Nina]


[]

Weak and short La Nina fades away; climate shifts to neutral
La Nina, we hardly knew ye.

[LED]


[]

Dual-function nanorod LEDs could make multifunctional displays
Cellphones and other devices could soon be controlled with touchless gestures and charge themselves using ambient light, thanks to new LED arrays that can both emit and detect light.

[LED]


[]

New design tools bring large-area LED products on the market with speed, quality and lower costs
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland develops novel LED light sources based on large, flexible and transparent substrates in collaboration with the Finnish companies Flexbright and Lighting Design Collective. An easy-to-customise LED foil suitable for mass production enables the introduction of the large area lighting and display technologies to applications such as vehicles, greenhouses, shop

[lægemangel]


[]

Politisk aftale om lægedækning på plads
Samtlige politiske partier er enige om en aftale, der skal være med til at sikre lægedækningen. Men aftalen kommer ikke til at afhjælpe problemerne, siger PLO

[lægemangel]


[]

Aftale åbner for regionsklinikker uden forudgående udbud
Med den politiske aftale om lægedækning får regionerne mulighed for at oprette klinikker, uden et ydernummer først har været sendt i udbud. Hele ideen med almen praksis vil blive alvorligt truet af det her, siger PLO-formand.

[magnetiske meteoritter]


[]

Magnetic meteorites narrow down solar system’s birthdate
Magnetic fields in 4-billion-year-old rocks suggest the dust and gas cloud that spawned the solar system had gone by 3.8 million years after the sun formed

[magnetisme]


[]

Novel quantum state in strange insulating materials
Experiments show how electrons in Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling arrange themselves to make the materials magnetic at low temperatures. The work helps bring us closer to a more complete quantum theory of magnetism.

[magnetisme]


[]

Research reveals novel quantum state in strange insulating materials
Researchers from Brown University have shown experimentally how a unique form of magnetism arises in an odd class of materials called Mott insulators. The findings are a step toward a better understanding the quantum states of these materials, which have generated much interest among scientists in recent years.

[malaria]


[]

Why malaria mosquitoes like people with malaria
Malaria mosquitoes prefer to feed—and feed more—on blood from people infected with malaria. Researchers from Stockholm University, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and KTH Royal Institute of Technology have discovered why. The findings can lead to new ways to fight malaria without using poisonous chemicals. The results will be published in the next issue of the journal Science.

[Mars]


[]

Mars orbiter seeks future landing sites
At an international workshop this week about where NASA's next Mars rover should land, most of the information comes from a prolific spacecraft that's been orbiting Mars since 2006.

[maskinlæring]


[]

[Perspective] Machine learning for quantum physics
Machine learning has been used to beat a human competitor in a game of Go (1), a game that has long been viewed as the most challenging of board games for artificial intelligence. Research is now under way to investigate whether machine learning can be used to solve long outstanding problems in quantum science. On page 602 of this issue, Carleo and Troyer (2) use machine learning on one of quantum

[maskinlæring]


[]

[This Week in Science] Machine learning and quantum physics
Author: Jelena Stajic

[mikrobiomet]


[]

[Perspective] Finding enzymes in the gut metagenome
The human gut microbiome consists of trillions of microorganisms that colonize the colon (1). The composition of this microbiome has profound effects on human health: It not only influences normal processes, like maturation of the immune system, but it is also associated with cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and other diseases (2). Understanding these influences requires knowledge of the biochemi

[mikroplast]


[]

UK's proposed ban could miss important products containing microplastics
A survey led by the microbeads coalition has revealed that limitations of the U.K. government's proposed ban could let microplastics slip through loopholes.

[miRNA]


[]

[Report] Activity-dependent spatially localized miRNA maturation in neuronal dendrites
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and preventing their translation. In general, the number of potential mRNA targets in a cell is much greater than the miRNA copy number, complicating high-fidelity miRNA-target interactions. We developed an inducible fluorescent probe to explore whether the maturation of a miRNA could be regulated in space and

[mælkeproduktion]


[]

Subsea mining moves closer to shore
The demand for raw materials is rising continuously, forcing mining companies to use lower-grade ores and to explore at greater depths. This could lead to a decline in production in the coming decades. Many industrialized economies also depend on imports of metals for their high-tech industries. Some of these metals occur in ore deposits that are found only in a few countries. In order to ensure a

[månen Europa]


[]

NASA receives science report on Europa lander concept
A report on the potential science value of a lander on the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa has been delivered to NASA, and the agency is now engaging the broader science community to open a discussion about its findings.

[nano]


[]

[Perspective] Flipping nanoscopy on its head
About the smallest object we can see with the naked eye is our own hair. With a magnifying glass, we can see about 10 times better, and light microscopy, until relatively recently, could resolve features about 300 times thinner than human hair (∼250 nm). Recent developments in fluorescence “nanoscopy” made it possible to routinely image cellular structures at 20- to 30-nm resolution (1), but a gap

[nano]


[]

Team takes deeper look at unconventional oil and gas
Understanding how oil and gas molecules, water and rocks interact at the nanoscale will help make extraction of hydrocarbons through hydraulic fracturing more efficient, according to Rice University researchers.

[nano]


[]

Directly radiolabeled nanographene materials without chelators are suitable for bioimaging applications
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used The replacement

[nano]


[]

Forskere vil finde strukturen af de mindste byggeklodser i nanokemien
Struktur og funktion på nanoskala: To unge forskere fra Københavns Universitet har modtaget...

[Nissan-skandale]


[]

Nissan taber retssag om emissionssvindel
Den japanske bilproducent har tabt sin retssag mod den sydkoreanske regering, som har anklaget Nissan for svindel med producentens firehjulstrækkere. Nissan står nu over for milliardbøde.



[NMRI]


[]

Peter Mansfield, Nobel winner for work on MRI, dies at 83
Physicist Peter Mansfield, who won the Nobel Prize for helping to invent MRI scanners, has died at the age of 83.

[nyrer]


[]

Researchers develop device that emulates human kidney function
Instead of running tests on live kidneys, researchers at Binghamton, University State University of New York have developed a model kidney for working out the kinks in medicines and treatments.

[næsehorn]


[]

Why we need to save rare black rhino genes
The first comparison of the genes of all living and extinct black rhinoceros populations uncovers a massive decline in genetic diversity, with 44 of 64 genetic lineages no longer existing. The new data suggest that the future is bleak for the black rhinoceros unless the conservation of genetically distinct populations is made a priority. “The new genetic data we have collected will allow us to id

[parkinson]


[]

Diagnostic potential for blood-based NfL in Parkinson's disease
(HealthDay)—Measuring blood neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels may help distinguish Parkinson's disease (PD) from atypical parkinsonian disorders (APD), according to a study published online Feb. 8 in Neurology.

[pingviner]


[]

Endangered African penguins are falling into an 'ecological trap'
As the climate changes and fisheries transform the oceans, the world's African penguins are in trouble. Young penguins aren't able to take all the changes into account and are finding themselves 'trapped' in parts of the sea that can no longer support them even as better options are available.

[pingviner]


[]

Klimaforandringer sender pingviner i sulte-fælde
Pingvinerne fanges i "økologisk fælde", når de søger hen, hvor føden burde være rigelig, men i virkeligheden er sparsom.

[pingviner]


[]

Climate change and overfishing set a deadly trap for young penguins
Environment Human influence on their habitats sends penguins mixed signals Ecological traps happen when environmental signals suggesting a great place to eat, drink, or have babies, actually point to places that are the opposite.

[planter i rummet]


[]

Primitive plants survive almost two years in outer space
Searing temperatures, radiation and lack of air didn't kill algae kept outside the International Space Station – so maybe life from space could colonise worlds

[polymerer]


[]

Decreasing the mass of aircraft with polymer composites
Members of the Department of Chemistry of Lomonosov Moscow State University have created unique polymer matrices for polymer composites based on novel phthalonitrile monomers. The materials are stronger than metals, which helps to decrease the mass of aircraft parts that operate at high temperatures. Scientists have published the project results in the Journal of Applied Polymer Science.

[proteinekspression]


[]

[This Week in Science] Intraneuronal control of protein expression
Author: Stella M. Hurtley

[proteiner]


[]

Chemicals hitch a ride onto new protein for better compounds
Chemists have developed a powerful new method of selectively linking chemicals to proteins, a major advance in the manipulation of biomolecules that could transform the way drugs are developed, proteins are probed, and molecules are tracked and imaged.

[proteinnetværk]


[]

[This Week in Science] Robustness of protein networks
Author: Laura M. Zahn

[psykisk syge]


[]

Apps til psykisk syge er det rene Wild West: Kan i værste fald skade patienterne
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/wild-west-marked-psyk-apps-kan-skade-patienterne-1073309 Danmark kan næppe dæmme op for det hurtigt voksende marked og tilbyde en tilstrækkelig teknisk og funktionel afprøvning og garanti af de mange apps til psykisk syge, lyder det.

[Rorschach test]


[]

[Book Review] Revealing Rorschach
We're all familiar with the inkblots that make up the Rorschach test: black and white, bilaterally symmetrical figures that hover close to familiarity. Or, at least, we think we are. In modern times, the term "Rorschach test" often serves as a metaphor for our divisiveness, as shorthand for an encoded message, or as a warning that appearances can be deceiving. But we may not know as much as we thi

[satellitter]


[]

New support for British spaceports
Plans to launch satellites - and even people - from the UK get a boost from government.

[schizofreni]


[]

Technique to measure oxidative stress in blood samples offers potential aid in schizophrenia diagnosis
Researchers from the University of Maryland College Park (UMD) and Baltimore (UMB) campuses have developed a blood test that could help doctors more quickly diagnose schizophrenia and other disorders. Their study, "Redox Probing for Chemical Information of Oxidative Stress," was recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

[seglcellemutation]


[]

How a sickle cell gene mutation hides diabetes
A routine diabetes test produces lower blood sugar readings in African Americans with sickle cell trait than in those without, new research shows. Patients may then remain untreated or have a mistaken sense of blood sugar control. Sickle cell trait (SCT) is a genetic hemoglobin variant found in 8 to 10 percent of African Americans. It occurs in people with one copy of the mutation that, if they h

[sklerose]


[]

New cause of brain defects in tuberous sclerosis complex
A new molecular pathway that inhibits the myelination of neurons in the brains of patients with the rare genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has been discovered by researchers. The study suggests new ways to treat some of the neurological symptoms associated with TSC, including autism and epilepsy.

[skovbrande]


[]

Suburbs Are Increasingly Threatened by Wildfires Due to Climate Change
Warmer winters, prolonged drought, and other effects of global warming multiply the threat of fire in these communitiesm

[smagssans]


[]

Despite few taste genes, honey bees seek out essential nutrients based on floral resources
Despite having few taste genes, honey bees are fine-tuned to know what minerals the colony may lack and proactively seek out nutrients in conjunction with the season when their floral diet varies.

[smerteopfattelse]


[]

Malaria mosquitos sensitive to horseradish
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have taken an important step on the road to understanding the underlying mechanism of how and why animals can feel pain in connection with cold or heat. However, according to the study, temperature is just one triggering factor – horseradish, mustard, cinnamon and wasabi have a similar effect.

[smerteopfattelse]


[]

Do anti-inflammatory drugs effectively treat spinal pain?
While anti-inflammatory drugs are commonly used to treat back pain, a new review suggests that they may not provide meaningful benefits to most people.

[sneleopard]


[]

Livestock Make Up a Quarter of Snow Leopards' Meals
A new study could help explain why so many snow leopards get killed in retaliation for eating domestic animals.

[solens nebula]


[]

Scientists estimate solar nebula's lifetime
About 4.6 billion years ago, an enormous cloud of hydrogen gas and dust collapsed under its own weight, eventually flattening into a disk called the solar nebula. Most of this interstellar material contracted at the disk's center to form the sun, and part of the solar nebula's remaining gas and dust condensed to form the planets and the rest of our solar system.

[sorte huller]


[]

Midsize Black Hole Found Hiding in Globular Cluster
The discovery brings the number of known "intermediate-mass" black holes to about a dozenm

[stamceller]


[]

[Perspective] Mobile elements control stem cell potency
Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are of great interest for tissue replacement therapies and for the study of mammalian development. Cultured ESCs as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are generated from somatic cells, can self-renew indefinitely and give rise to all cell types of the body including the germline. However, such stem cells are not totipotent because they are inefficient

[stamceller]


[]

[This Week in Science] Limiting potential for totipotency
Author: Beverly A. Purnell

[storm]


[]

NASA spots Tropical Cyclone Carlos south of La Reunion Island
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Carlos as it moved south of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean.

[søstjerner]


[]

We save coral reefs and then sea stars eat them
A study that may sound a new alarm for endangered corals shows that small marine protected areas may be especially vulnerable to attack by crown-of-thorns sea stars ( Acanthaster species), which can devastate reefs. The findings, published in the journal PLOS ONE , don’t diminish the importance of protected areas, but point to a new threat that may emerge from the degraded areas that often surrou

[telomer]


[]

[Report] TZAP: A telomere-associated protein involved in telomere length control
Telomeres are found at the end of chromosomes and are important for chromosome stability. Here we describe a specific telomere-associated protein: TZAP (telomeric zinc finger–associated protein). TZAP binds preferentially to long telomeres that have a low concentration of shelterin complex, competing with the telomeric-repeat binding factors TRF1 and TRF2. When localized at telomeres, TZAP trigger

[telomerer]


[]

[Perspective] TZAP or not to zap telomeres
Telomeres play vital roles in genome stability, protecting chromosome ends from degradation and rearrangements. Telomere erosion with aging occurs in most human somatic cells. This limits cellular life span and suppresses uncontrolled proliferation of premalignant cells. On the other hand, short telomeres may prevent continued tissue renewal and contribute to organismal aging. Therefore, maintaini

[tidligt solsystem]


[]

[This Week in Science] Meteorite magnetism in the early solar system
Author: Keith T. Smith

[tog]


[]

Nye signaler på S-banen stopper togene
Togene mellem Gentofte og Hillerød holder i øjeblikket stille på grund af signalproblemer, mens Banedanmark forsøger at finde årsagen. Strækningen er den første med nyt signalsystem.

[tog]


[]

It-opdatering hos Banedanmark skyld i tomme skærme og tavse højttalere
En opdatering af Banedanmarks it-system var skyld i fejl på skærme og skilte på landets togstationer tidligt i morges. Banedanmark ved endnu ikke, hvorfor opdateringen gik galt.

[trafikdrab]


[]

To Win the War on Cars, San Francisco Weaponizes Real Estate
New rules for developers won't kill traffic, but should make life better. The post To Win the War on Cars, San Francisco Weaponizes Real Estate appeared first on WIRED .

[Trump]


[]

[Policy Forum] Science advice in the Trump White House
As President Trump takes office, he has the enormous undertaking of making thousands of political appointments across the federal government, including nearly 800 nominations requiring Senate confirmation. Among his top priorities should be to nominate a science adviser and to staff the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the single agency in the government responsible for the health o

[Trump]


[]

The rusty patched bumblebee is probably doomed
Environment Trump administration freezes endangered species act protections In an executive order, President Trump has frozen protections for the first bumblebee ever listed as an endangered species.

[Trump]


[]

Science stood apart from politics for a long time, not any more
A march for science to protest at Donald Trump's presidency has sparked debate about researchers getting too political. Why the fuss, wonders Michael Brooks

[Trump]


[]

Donald Trump might end net neutrality
Donald Trump wants to build another wall. Not a physical wall to keep out illegal immigrants, like his proposed Mexican border project, but a virtual wall around the internet. And just as with Mexico, he wants the people behind the wall to pay for it.

[Trump]


[]

Little Learners, Trump's Appeal and Brain Soup
A look inside the March/April issue of Scientific American Mindm

[Trump]


[]

Trump’s Cybersecurity Chief Could Be a ‘Voice of Reason’
Homeland security advisor Tom Bossert stands out in Trump's cabinet as a cautious wonk among hotheads. The post Trump's Cybersecurity Chief Could Be a 'Voice of Reason' appeared first on WIRED .

[Trump]


[]

Trump Can’t Stop the Globalization of Work—the Internet Will See to That
If immigration bans threaten the tech industry, it will route around the problem---like the internet itself. The post Trump Can't Stop the Globalization of Work—the Internet Will See to That appeared first on WIRED .

[Twitter]


[]

Forget New Users. Twitter Needs to Find New Ads
Twitter still can't figure out its business---or how to make money.

[Twitter]


[]

Twitter woes deepen as loss widens, user growth sputters
Twitter came under fresh pressure Thursday as the social network reported sluggish revenue and user growth, and widening losses in the past quarter.

[vandkraftværker]


[]

Wind Power Surpasses Hydroelectric in a Crucial Measure
The generating capacity of the nation’s wind turbines surpassed that of hydroelectric dams last year for the first time. Here’s a look at wind’s rise.

[Venus]


[]

Ny NASA-chip kan holde til Venus' ekstreme forhold
En mission til vores ugæstfri nabo er måske rykket et skridt tættere på.

[vindkraft]


[]

EU-dom kan stoppe alle danske vindprojekter
Danske kommuner kan blive tvunget til sætte alle igangværende projekter i bero, fordi man ikke har fulgt den gældende lovgivning på området. Miljøstyrelsen er i gang med at undersøge konsekvenserne.

[vindmøller]


[]

Nu har EU's vindmøller større kapacitet end kulkraftværkerne
Udbygning med 12,5 GW vindkraft i hele EU i 2016 har ført til, at der nu er mere vindkapacitet end kulkapacitet i Europa. Den største kapacitet findes dog stadig på de naturgasdrevne kraftværker.

[virtuel valuta]


[]

China tightens controls on Bitcoin trading platforms
Chinese bitcoin trading platforms risk closure if they breach new controls on the virtual currency, the central bank said Thursday, as authorities step up efforts to curb the flow of money offshore.

[økosystemer]


[]

Researchers discuss the future of conservation
Conservationists need to adopt a critical shift in thinking to keep the Earth's ecosystems diverse and useful in an increasingly "unnatural" world.
---

[]

Sound of crickets 'could become a thing of the past'
A quarter of Europe's cricket and grasshopper species are being driven to extinction, say experts.
---

[]

Antibiotic use for travelers' diarrhea favors particularly resistant super bacteria
Every year, millions of travelers visit countries with poor hygiene, and approximately one third of them return home carrying antibiotic-resistant ESBL intestinal bacteria. A traveler who resorts to using antibiotics will pick up the most resistant strains of common 'super bacteria.'
---

[]

Deeper look at unconventional oil and gas
Chemical engineers build simulations based on samples from unconventional, organic shale formations that can help predict how much oil and gas a well might produce and how best to extract it.
---

[]

We like taking selfies but not looking at them
An online survey has found that although taking and posting selfies is hugely popular, 82% of participants would prefer fewer selfies on social media. Interestingly, people perceived their own selfies as more self-ironic and authentic, and selfies taken by others as more self-presentational and less authentic.
---

[]

Making strides in schizophrenia diagnosis research
Researchers have developed a blood test that could help doctors more quickly diagnose schizophrenia and other disorders.
---

[]

Ancient Earth as a model for studying hazy exoplanets
For astronomers trying to understand which distant planets might have habitable conditions, the role of atmospheric haze has been hazy. To help sort it out, a team of researchers has been looking to Earth - specifically Earth during the Archean era, an epic 1-1/2-billion-year period early in our planet's history.
---

[]

Meta-lenses bring benchtop performance to small, hand-held spectrometer
Physicists have developed new hand-held spectrometers capable of the same performance as large, benchtop instruments. The researchers' innovation derives from their groundbreaking work in meta-lenses. The hand-held spectrometers offer real promise for applications ranging from health care diagnostics to environmental and food monitoring.
---

[]

Two investigational antitumor agents work better together against MPNST and neuroblastoma
A new study demonstrates that the combined usage of Aurora A kinase inhibitor (alisertib) and HSV1716 results in significantly increased antitumor efficacy in models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and neuroblastoma.
---

[]

Say Hello to the Super-Stealthy Malware That’s Going Mainstream
Banks are being hit by a type of stealthy malware attack that doesn't leave a file trace. Anyone could be next.
---

[]

AMIGOS: A dataset for Mood, personality and affect research on Individuals and GrOupS
We present a database for research on affect, personality traits and mood by means of neuro-physiological signals. Different to other databases, we elicited affect using both short and long videos in two settings, one with individual viewers and one with groups of viewers. The database allows the multimodal study of the affective responses of individuals in relation to their personality and mood,
---

[]

Apoorva Mehta had 20 failed startups before Instacart
The gig: Apoorva Mehta, 30, is the founder and chief executive of San Francisco grocery delivery startup Instacart. Over the last four years, he has grown the company to more than 300 full-time employees and tens of thousands of part-time grocery shoppers. The startup offers on-demand and same-day grocery delivery in hundreds of cities in 20 states.
---

[]

Harvesting sharks could be key to saving them
Sustainable fishing of some species for products including fins is feasible, and can avoid cruel practices, study finds.
---

[]

The Endangered Species Act Is on the Chopping Block. Would Privatizing Wildlife Protect Them?
The radical idea has a track record of success in some sense. But there are lot of concerns as well.
---

[]

Snapchat's young users are at once its greatest asset and one of its biggest risks
Kids don't use email any more. Facebook is for Mom and Dad. And Yik Yak is so 2015. When it comes to communication in 2017, Snapchat is where it's at.
---

[]

Kuri: Startup's personal robot designed to touch your emotions
If you've been dreaming for years about having your own R2-D2 or BB-8, get ready. Just don't expect your new robot companion to do too much, because you might be disappointed.
---

[]

By Demanding Too Much from Science, We Became a Post-Truth Society
Reading popular science articles is a fun pastime for many people, and can help everybody understand the world of science. But is there a downside to making this information so easy to understand?
---

[]

Microsoft lawsuit vs. secret government searches moves ahead
A judge refused the U.S. government's request to throw out a lawsuit from Microsoft that claims a federal law is unconstitutional because it prohibits technology companies from telling customers when the government demands their electronic data.
---

[]

Celebrity megaphone fails to lure ordinary users to Twitter
Many people have heard of Twitter. Not enough of them are signing up to use it.
---

[]

Fossil record should help guide conservation in a changing world
A group of biologists, paleobiologists, lawyers, policymakers and writers is urging conservationists not only to save species, but also to preserve a diverse array of ecosystem structures and functions in the face of rising populations and changing climate. This could include allowing some species to disappear from some areas if that means a more resilient environment able to respond to warming te
---

[]

Methane levels have increased in Marcellus Shale region despite dip in well installation
Despite a slow down in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last decade, revealed a subst
---

[]

Dwarf star 200 light years away contains life's building blocks
Many scientists believe the Earth was initially dry and that water, carbon and nitrogen -- the building blocks for life -- likely came as a result of collisions with objects that began their lives in the cold outer reaches of our solar system. Today, scientists report discovery of the existence of just such an object -- one that once orbited a neighboring star.
---

[]

Magma Power: Scientists Drill into Volcano to Harness its Energy
The project could open the door to volcano-powered electricity.
---

[]

In an Age of Alternative Facts, Bill Nye’s New Show Brings Real Ones
The Science Guy is optimistic about his new talk show, “Bill Nye Saves the World,” which will premiere April 21 on Netflix.
---

[]

NASA spacecraft prepares to fly to new heights
NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission begins a three-month long journey into a new orbit, taking it twice as far out as it has previously flown, to areas where magnetic reconnection is thought to trigger auroras.
---

[]

Massive comet-like object pollutes atmosphere of a white dwarf
For the first time, scientists have witnessed a massive object with the makeup of a comet being ripped apart and scattered in the atmosphere of a white dwarf, the burned-out remains of a compact star.
---

[]

Device emulates human kidney function
Instead of running tests on live kidneys, researchers have developed a model kidney for working out the kinks in medicines and treatments. The reusable, multi-layered and microfluidic device incorporates a porous growth substrate, with a physiological fluid flow, and the passive filtration of the capillaries around the end of a kidney, called the glomerulus, where waste is filtered from blood.
---

[]

Nation's tallest dam, Lake Oroville, damaged amid storms
State engineers on Thursday discovered new damage to the Oroville Dam spillway in Northern California, the tallest in the United States.
---

[]

Infection defense: Call for support by the killer cells
A few days after a viral infection, countless killer cells swarm out to track down and kill infected body cells. In this way, they are highly effective at preventing pathogens from being able to spread further. An international research team has now explained an important mechanism behind building this army.
---

[]

Are Alexa, Siri, and Their Pals Teaching Kids to Be Rude?
Are virtual assistants teaching children to be nasty?
---

[]

Why Is Texting and Driving Not Considered an Epidemic?
A California man is suing Apple for not enabling a lockout feature on iPhones. He's not the only one.
---

[]

Virtual assistant Cortana holds people to promises
Microsoft virtual assistant Cortana began holding people to their promises on Thursday.
---

[]

Boy’s Broken Bones Had Unusual Cause
Broken bones are a common occurrence for kids, but for one 7-year-old boy, his frequent fractures turned out to have an underlying cause: celiac disease, according to a recent report of his case from Portugal.
---

[]

Newfound Amoeba Looks Just Like Gandalf the Wizard's Hat
A newfound amoeba species whose funnel-shaped shell resembles a wizard's hat has been named after one of the most famous warlocks: Gandalf, of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.
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[]

Assembly of micro-/meso-/macroporous carbon optimized for Li-S batteries
High volume ratio of carbon micropores combined with the assembly of meso-/macropores remarkably improve the capabilities of Li-S batteries, which relieve shuttle effect by strong physical absorption from micropores, increase sulfur content and supply abundant avenue for electrolyte infiltration and ion transportation by meso-/macropores.
---

[]

Infectious outbreak in critically ill children leads to recall of contaminated medication
Infection prevention and control experts halted a 24-patient outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia in critically ill children after identifying docusate, a liquid stool softener, as the underlying source of the bacteria. Details of the six-month investigation led to a national recall of all liquid products manufactured by PharmTech.
---

[]

Brain damage is not always damaging
Strokes are usually, but not always, debilitating. This case report documents the extraordinary resilience of a woman in Argentina who endured multiple strokes. Despite these traumas her daily functioning continued in many ways as though nothing had happened. In addition to being an inspiring individual story of resilience, this episode highlights how much we still have to learn about the way the
---

[]

A hi-fidelity LED speaker with a subwoofer for 70 percent off? Yeah, I'd buy it
Gadgets Good speakers—with lights!—for $30. Good speakers—with lights!—for $30. Read on.
---

[]

UTIA project named Project of the Year for DoD Environmental Security Technology
A project to identify and track threatened, endangered and at-risk avian species on U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) facilities has been named the DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) project of the year for 2016 for resource conservation and resiliency. The effort by a team of University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture researchers was led by David Buehler, p
---

[]

New method of genetic engineering indispensable tool in biotechnological applications
Research by Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Huimin Zhao and graduate student Behnam Enghiad at the University of Illinois is pioneering a new method of genetic engineering for basic and applied biological research and medicine. Their work, reported in ACS Synthetic Biology on February 6, has the potential to open new doors in genomic research by improving the precision and adher
---

[]

Older adults embracing 'living apart together'
Since 1990, the divorce rate among adults 50 years and older has doubled. This trend, along with longer life expectancy, has resulted in many adults forming new partnerships later in life. A new phenomenon called 'Living Apart Together' (LAT)—an intimate relationship without a shared residence—is gaining popularity as an alternative form of commitment.
---

[]

Methane levels have increased in Marcellus Shale region despite dip in well installation
Despite a slow down in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research led by Drexel University finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last
---

[]

A Star Engineer Just Launched His Own Hyperloop Outfit, ‘Arrivo’
It's called Arrivo, and it plans to put you---or at least your stuff---in a working hyperloop in just three years. The post A Star Engineer Just Launched His Own Hyperloop Outfit, 'Arrivo' appeared first on WIRED .
---

[]

New research to help preserve the benefits people receive from nature
Humans rely on things that come from nature -- including clean air, water, food, and timber. But how can we tell if these natural services that people rely on, are at risk of being lost, potentially permanently?
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[]

Want to help your mate beat the blues? Show them the love
The more depressed your romantic partner may be, the more love you should give them, according to new research.
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[]

Study provides new insight into different forms of heart failure
Using a novel noninvasive technique, a team of researchers has been able to measure oxygen consumption in the legs of heart failure patients, providing additional insight into this syndrome.
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[]

Drilling Resumes on the Dakota Access Pipeline
Legal experts have said the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe faces long odds in convincing courts to halt work on the pipelinem
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[]

Sick Beats: Scientists Revive Hearts to Study Erratic Rhythms
Researchers are reviving donated hearts for up to 12 hours to find sources of irregular beats.
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[]

Emphysema treatment could be optimized using network modelling
A unique engineering perspective of emphysema progression in the lung suggests how mechanisms operating at the micromechanical scale could help to predict patient survival and quality of life following treatment -- according to new research.
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[]

Genetics of both virus and patient work together to influence the course of HIV infection
Viral and human genetics together account for about one third of the differences in disease progression rates seen among people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), according to new research. The findings suggest that patient genetics influences disease progression by triggering mutations in the HIV viral genome.
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[]

How best to treat infections and tumors: Containment versus aggressive treatment
A new mathematical analysis identifies the factors that determine whether aggressive treatments or containment strategies will perform best in treating infections and tumors, providing physicians and patients with new information to help them make difficult treatment decisions.
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[]

Another hurdle to quantum computers cleared: Sorting machine for atoms
Physicists have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms.
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[]

Subsea mining moves closer to shore
Mining in the deep sea is technically very challenging and at present not economically feasible. However, deposits in coastal areas beneath the shallow, more accessible continental shelf could help to meet the growing demand for mineral resources, conclude researchers.
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[]

Words can sound 'round' or 'sharp' without us realizing it
Our tendency to match specific sounds with specific shapes, even abstract shapes, is so fundamental that it guides perception before we are consciously aware of it, according to new research.
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[]

Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as scientists now report. The replacement of chelator-based labeling by intrins
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[]

Some animals are more equal than others: new study shows some animal welfare issues get more media
Researchers have published the first review of how wild animal welfare is reported in the UK media. The research suggests that an animal welfare issue is more likely to attract media coverage if it involves either deliberate intention to harm an animal, or breaking a law. The media are also less likely to report on animal welfare issues occurring in the marine environment.
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[]

How to decrease the mass of aircrafts
Scientists have created unique polymer matrices for polymer composites based on novel phthalonitrile monomers. The developed materials possess higher strength than metals, which helps to sufficiently decrease the mass of aircraft parts that operate at high temperatures.
---

[]

Scientists identify aggressive pancreatic cancer cells and their vulnerability
A series of preclinical experiments using patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) and mouse models point to potential treatments for patients with a rapidly-progressing and resistant subgroup of tumor cells.
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[]

Research reveals novel quantum state in strange insulating materials
Experiments show how electrons in Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling arrange themselves to make the materials magnetic at low temperatures. The work helps bring us closer to a more complete quantum theory of magnetism.
---

[]

Older adults embracing 'living apart together'
Since 1990, the divorce rate among adults 50 years and older has doubled. This trend, along with longer life expectancy, has resulted in many adults forming new partnerships later in life. A new phenomenon called 'Living Apart Together' (LAT)--an intimate relationship without a shared residence--is gaining popularity as an alternative form of commitment. Researchers say that while the trend is wel
---

[]

Earth-Size Telescope Will Make Black Holes Say "Cheese!"
Nobel laureate Robert Wilson discusses how a network of telescopes might illumine a black hole, after the 92nd Street Y’s Bang! Bang! event.m
---

[]

Genetic study identifies a new form of congenital muscular dystrophy
A new form of congenital muscular dystrophy has been discovered which is caused by mutations in a previously un-linked gene.
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[]

Brain stem volume linked to aggression in autism
New research from autism experts is providing clues into the link between aggression and autism -- clues the team hopes will eventually lead to more effective intervention.
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[]

Genetic 'switch' in animals offers clues to evolutionary origins of fine motor skills
Researchers have identified a genetic signature found exclusively in the nerve cells that supply, or innervate, the muscles of an organism's outermost extremities: the hands and feet. The findings suggest that the evolution of the extremities may be related to the emergence of fine motor control, such as grasping -- one of biology's most essential adaptations.
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[]

Are Trees Vegetarian?
Humans can be vegetarians, choosing to forgo meat, but what about trees? After all, trees need only soil, sunlight and water to survive, right?
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[]

Amazing Blue Jets From Thunderstorms Seen From Space | Video
In September 2015, ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen captured the storm above India through the International Space Station’s cupola windows for Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) experiment. He witnessed red sprites above the storm and blue jets stream
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[]

New engineered material can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption
Engineers have developed a scalable manufactured metamaterial -- an engineered material with extraordinary properties not found in nature -- to act as a kind of air conditioning system for structures. It has the ability to cool objects even under direct sunlight with zero energy and water consumption.
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[]

MRI pioneer and Nobel laureate Sir Peter Mansfield dies
Professor Sir Peter Mansfield, who left school at 15 and won the Nobel prize, dies aged 83.
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[]

[Research Article] A prominent glycyl radical enzyme in human gut microbiomes metabolizes trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline
The human microbiome encodes vast numbers of uncharacterized enzymes, limiting our functional understanding of this community and its effects on host health and disease. By incorporating information about enzymatic chemistry into quantitative metagenomics, we determined the abundance and distribution of individual members of the glycyl radical enzyme superfamily among the microbiomes of healthy hu
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[]

[Errata] Erratum for the Letter “The promise of negative emissions” by K. S. Lackner and 45 additional signatories
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[Research Article] Deficiency of microRNA miR-34a expands cell fate potential in pluripotent stem cells
Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) efficiently generate all embryonic cell lineages but rarely generate extraembryonic cell types. We found that microRNA miR-34a deficiency expands the developmental potential of mouse pluripotent stem cells, yielding both embryonic and extraembryonic lineages and strongly inducing MuERV-L (MERVL) endogenous retroviruses, similar
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[Review] Merging paleobiology with conservation biology to guide the future of terrestrial ecosystems
Conservation of species and ecosystems is increasingly difficult because anthropogenic impacts are pervasive and accelerating. Under this rapid global change, maximizing conservation success requires a paradigm shift from maintaining ecosystems in idealized past states toward facilitating their adaptive and functional capacities, even as species ebb and flow individually. Developing effective stra
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[Editorial] Act for science
This year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science) Annual Meeting in Boston (16 to 20 February) promises again to be one of the world's most recognized forums for communicating the excitement, beauty, power, and relevance of science. Attendees from dozens of countries, from nearly every field of study, and from all sectors will share ideas and build co
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[In Brief] News at a glance
In science news around the world, the U.S. Department of Agriculture faces a lawsuit after pulling animal welfare records from its website, a study of liver transplantations revives concerns that China has in the past allowed the use of organs from executed prisoners for transplants, Venezuela faces a shortage of medicines including anti-HIV drugs, a Japanese space probe fails to deploy technology
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[In Depth] From a tweet, a March for Science is born
It started with a tweet, but now it's an international movement. Spurred by concerns about the impact President Donald Trump's administration might have on research, the March for Science is "a call to support and safeguard the scientific community." Slated for 22 April, the march has hundreds of thousands of followers pledging to turn out in more than 100 countries around the world. But not every
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[In Depth] Grad students, postdocs with U.S. visas face uncertainty
As U.S. courts temporarily shut down President Donald Trump's ban on immigration from seven majority-Muslim countries last week, graduates and postdoctoral students now in the United States weighed their options and tried to plan rationally in an unpredictable situation. Many are on student visas, which, depending on what the courts decide, may not be renewable. Others are part of a post-Ph.D. pro
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[In Depth] World's most endangered marine mammal down to 30
Only 30 vaquitas, a small porpoise in Mexico's Gulf of California, remain. A just-released report shows that the cetacean's numbers dropped by almost half from 2015 to 2016 because of gillnets. Scientists expect the vaquita to be extinct in a few years' time, unless they intervene. If that happens, the vaquita will become the second marine mammal species to go extinct in this century. To save the
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[In Depth] New Zealand's endemic dolphins are hanging by a thread
Like Mexico's embattled vaquita porpoise, the Maui's dolphin may be making its last stand. The world's smallest and rarest dolphin, the Maui's lives off the west coast of New Zealand's North Island and is down to about 60 individuals, from 2000 in the 1970s. Scientists and nongovernmental organizations blame its death spiral on gillnets and bottom trawlers: legal fishing methods that snare it by a
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[In Depth] Debate heats up over black holes as dark matter
Could dark matter consist of primordial black holes, as numerous as the stars? It's an old, improbable idea, but it made a Lazarus-like comeback a year ago, when the discovery of gravitational waves suggested that the cosmos abounds with unexpectedly heavy black holes. Last February physicists with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) announced that they had detected ripp
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[In Depth] Why are grizzlies dying on Canada's railway tracks?
In Banff National Park in Canada, grizzlies have used the railroad tracks since the park was created in 1885, gorging on the buffaloberries that thrive along the right-of-way and the occasional carcass of an elk hit by a train. Nearly 2 decades ago, the behavior turned risky, as trains began striking and killing the bears. At least 17 grizzlies have died since 2000—a major hit to the local populat
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[Feature] A matter of fact
This is a worrying time for those who believe government policies should be based on the best evidence. Pundits claim we've entered a postfactual era. Viral fake news stories spread alternative facts. On some issues, such as climate change and childhood vaccinations, many scientists worry their hard-won research findings have lost sway with politicians and the public, and feel their veracity is un
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[Feature] Clear findings, smoggy debate
Proposed rules to cut air pollution regulations often prompt fierce debate, despite decades of studies showing that dirtier air contributes to heart, lung, and other health problems that shorten lives, and that as air gets cleaner, premature deaths decline. The World Health Organization, for instance, has estimated that nations could prevent some 3 million premature deaths annually by 2050 if they
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[Feature] No easy answers
Bill de Blasio ran for mayor of New York City in 2013 on the promise of providing free preschool to every 4-year-old in the city. After he won, his administration went looking for a high-quality prekindergarten math curriculum, one vetted by researchers, that has improved the math skills of young children in other cities. In short, the mayor wanted something that "worked." In the end, school offic
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[Feature] Putting the brakes on highway deaths
Thank an imaginary moose for a major but little-heralded improvement in auto safety. In 1997, a European journalist test driving a new Mercedes-Benz hatchback tried the so-called moose maneuver—an S-shaped swerve to avoid an animal—and flipped the car. He survived, but the high-profile wreck drew attention to rollover risks. And it ultimately led automakers and regulators in Europe and the United
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[Feature] A simple recipe for saving lives
A liter of water. A fistful of sugar. A half-teaspoon of salt. Years of basic biochemical research and field trials. Widespread adoption of findings by public health agencies and funders. That's the recipe for one major evidence-based public health breakthrough: oral rehydration therapy (ORT), which has helped cut childhood deaths from diarrhea and dehydration in half and saved millions of lives.
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[Feature] How to be heard
Paul Cairney, a political scientist at the University of Stirling in the United Kingdom, has a message for those who want facts and research findings to guide policy. "'Evidence based policy making' is a good political slogan, but not a good description of the policy process," he writes on his blog, which has become a popular read for policy wonks (paulcairney.wordpress.com). "If you expect to see
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[Feature] Data for all?
Researchers say they could paint a better picture of the American experience if they had greater access to the trove of personal information collected by government surveys and program offices, such as tax and census data. Policymakers say that crunching the data, called administrative records, could help them make better decisions. A new federal panel has been asked to recommend ways to make both
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[Perspective] Measurement error and the replication crisis
Measurement error adds noise to predictions, increases uncertainty in parameter estimates, and makes it more difficult to discover new phenomena or to distinguish among competing theories. A common view is that any study finding an effect under noisy conditions provides evidence that the underlying effect is particularly strong and robust. Yet, statistical significance conveys very little informat
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[Retrospective] M. G. K. Menon (1928–2016)
Mambillikalathil Govind Kumar Menon (MGK or Goku to friends) passed away peacefully on 22 November 2016 at his residence in New Delhi, India. He was 88 years old. Menon made pioneering contributions to particle physics and successfully implemented a grand vision for the scientific and technological growth of India. Authors: Badanaval Venkatasubba Sreekantan, Ram Cowsik
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[Letter] Convergence: The future of health
Authors: Phil Sharp, Susan Hockfield
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[Letter] Precaution: Open gene drive research
Author: Kevin M. Esvelt
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[Letter] Precaution: Risks of public participation
Author: Marcel Kuntz
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[This Week in Science] What drives divergence?
Author: Sacha Vignieri
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[This Week in Science] A target for intracranial aneurysms
Author: Wei Wong
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[This Week in Science] Starving the pathogen
Author: Anand Balasubramani
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[This Week in Science] Transitional approach to entanglement
Author: Jelena Stajic
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[This Week in Science] A protein to trim too-long telomeres
Authors: Guy Riddihough, Stella M. Hurtley
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[This Week in Science] A radical idea for blood pressure control
Author: Yevgeniya Nusinovich
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[This Week in Science] Change for good
Author: Stella M. Hurtley
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[This Week in Science] Looking back to move forward
Author: Sacha Vignieri
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[This Week in Science] Superresolution imaging in sharper focus
Author: Valda Vinson
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[This Week in Science] Chemically guided functional profiling
Author: Caroline Ash
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[This Week in Science] Targeting proteins at the other sulfur
Author: Jake Yeston
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[This Week in Science] Misconceptions about measurement error
Author: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink
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[This Week in Science] Multifunctional displays
Author: Ian S. Osborne
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[Editors' Choice] Interfering with bad cholesterol
Author: Paula A. Kiberstis
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[Editors' Choice] Gluing up hemagglutinin
Author: Caroline Ash
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[Editors' Choice] Child growth sensitivity to rainfall variability
Author: Caroline Ash
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[Editors' Choice] Fluorine frolicking with eight friends
Author: Jake Yeston
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[Editors' Choice] Skills to pay the bills?
Author: Melissa McCartney
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[Editors' Choice] Cliff driving
Author: H. Jesse Smith
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[Research Article] Redox-based reagents for chemoselective methionine bioconjugation
Cysteine can be specifically functionalized by a myriad of acid-base conjugation strategies for applications ranging from probing protein function to antibody-drug conjugates and proteomics. In contrast, selective ligation to the other sulfur-containing amino acid, methionine, has been precluded by its intrinsically weaker nucleophilicity. Here, we report a strategy for chemoselective methionine b
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[Research Article] Solving the quantum many-body problem with artificial neural networks
The challenge posed by the many-body problem in quantum physics originates from the difficulty of describing the nontrivial correlations encoded in the exponential complexity of the many-body wave function. Here we demonstrate that systematic machine learning of the wave function can reduce this complexity to a tractable computational form for some notable cases of physical interest. We introduce
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[Research Article] Nanometer resolution imaging and tracking of fluorescent molecules with minimal photon fluxes
We introduce MINFLUX, a concept for localizing photon emitters in space. By probing the emitter with a local intensity minimum of excitation light, MINFLUX minimizes the fluorescence photons needed for high localization precision. In our experiments, 22 times fewer fluorescence photons are required as compared to popular centroid localization. In superresolution microscopy, MINFLUX attained ~1-nm
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[Report] On the deep-mantle origin of the Deccan Traps
The Deccan Traps in west-central India constitute one of Earth’s largest continental flood basalt provinces, whose eruption played a role in the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event. The unknown mantle structure under the Indian Ocean at the start of the Cenozoic presents a challenge for connecting the event to a deep mantle origin. We used a back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed conv
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[Report] Double-heterojunction nanorod light-responsive LEDs for display applications
Dual-functioning displays, which can simultaneously transmit and receive information and energy through visible light, would enable enhanced user interfaces and device-to-device interactivity. We demonstrate that double heterojunctions designed into colloidal semiconductor nanorods allow both efficient photocurrent generation through a photovoltaic response and electroluminescence within a single
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[Report] Deterministic entanglement generation from driving through quantum phase transitions
Many-body entanglement is often created through the system evolution, aided by nonlinear interactions between the constituting particles. These very dynamics, however, can also lead to fluctuations and degradation of the entanglement if the interactions cannot be controlled. Here, we demonstrate near-deterministic generation of an entangled twin-Fock condensate of ~11,000 atoms by driving a arubid
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[Report] Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism
A key stage in planet formation is the evolution of a gaseous and magnetized solar nebula. However, the lifetime of the nebular magnetic field and nebula are poorly constrained. We present paleomagnetic analyses of volcanic angrites demonstrating that they formed in a near-zero magnetic field (<0.6 microtesla) at 4563.5 ± 0.1 million years ago, ~3.8 million years after solar system formation. This
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[Report] Decoupled ecomorphological evolution and diversification in Neogene-Quaternary horses
Evolutionary theory has long proposed a connection between trait evolution and diversification rates. In this work, we used phylogenetic methods to evaluate the relationship of lineage-specific speciation rates and the mode of evolution of body size and tooth morphology in the Neogene and Quaternary radiation of horses (7 living and 131 extinct species). We show that diversification pulses are a r
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[Report] Gene duplication can impart fragility, not robustness, in the yeast protein interaction network
The maintenance of duplicated genes is thought to protect cells from genetic perturbations, but the molecular basis of this robustness is largely unknown. By measuring the interaction of yeast proteins with their partners in wild-type cells and in cells lacking a paralog, we found that 22 out of 56 paralog pairs compensate for the lost interactions. An equivalent number of pairs exhibit the opposi
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[New Products] New Products
A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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[Working Life] Coping with class in science
Author: Curtis D. Holder
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Hottest Dance Moves Revealed by Science
A new study reveals how we judge the best dancers. Turns out, hips don't lie.
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Here's what NASA's Europa lander could look like
Space It's designed to search for life on Jupiter's icy moon NASA just dropped a 264-page report outlining the goals of the Europa mission and which instruments they might send.
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Deeper origin of gill evolution suggests 'active lifestyle' link in early vertebrates
Fish embryo study indicates that the last common ancestor of vertebrates was a complex animal complete with gills -- overturning prior scientific understanding and complementing recent fossil finds. The work places gill evolution concurrent with shift to self-propulsion in our earliest ancestors.
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The Internet and your brain are more alike than you think
A similar rule governs traffic flow in engineered and biological systems, reports a researcher. An algorithm used for the Internet is also at work in the human brain, says the report, an insight that improves our understanding of engineered and neural networks and potentially even learning disabilities.
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Bacteria fed synthetic iron-containing molecules turn into electrical generators
The bacterial world is rife with unusual talents, among them a knack for producing electricity. In the wild, 'electrogenic' bacteria generate current as part of their metabolism, and now researchers have found a way to confer that ability upon non-electrogenic bacteria. This technique could have applications for sustainable electricity generation and wastewater treatment.
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A Forgotten Group Of Grains Might Help Indian Farmers – And Improve Diets, Too
Once a staple in India, millets have fallen out of fashion in recent years. Now, faced with water shortages, one Indian state is re-introducing these drought tolerant cereals to people's diets.
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Malaria mosquitoes sensitive to horseradish
Researchers have taken an important step on the road to understanding the underlying mechanism of how and why animals can feel pain in connection with cold or heat. However, according to the study, temperature is just one triggering factor -- horseradish, mustard, cinnamon and wasabi have a similar effect.
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Orphaned dik-dik raised by keepers
He's only 19cm (7.4 in) tall and has been named Thanos.
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How a raised hand from a pedestrian could stop driverless cars
An LED display for the windscreens of driverless cars could tap into sensors to show pedestrians whether the car is aware of their presence and make it stop
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A Fight to Fix Geometry’s Foundations
In the 1830s, the Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton reformulated Newton’s laws of motion, finding deep mathematical symmetries between an object’s position and its momentum. Then in the mid-1980s the mathematician Mikhail Gromov developed a set of techniques that transformed Hamilton’s idea into a full-blown area of mathematical research. Within a decade, mathematicians from a broad rang
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Digital photography could be a key factor in rural health care
Photographs may lead to better treatment and care for patients in rural communities, a new study shows.
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The Secret to Doctor Strange’s Astral Forms? Not Going Ghostly
Here's how the film's VFX team made the Sorcerer Supreme's astral projection.
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Great lettuce crisis is a taste of climate crop chaos to come
The UK's lettuce shortage is a stark warning of how even the world's wealthy will find their food supply disrupted by climate change
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Secrets of Life in a Spoonful of Blood
The intricate development of the fetus is yielding its long-held secrets to state-of-the-art molecular technologies that can make use of the mother's bloodm
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Sorting machine for atoms
Physicists at the University of Bonn have cleared a further hurdle on the path to creating quantum computers: in a recent study, they present a method with which they can very quickly and precisely sort large numbers of atoms. .
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Teens and Screens: How Much Is OK?
For parents, trying to separate teens from their screens may seem like a daily battle. But now, some parents can rest easy: A new study suggests that lots of screen time isn't all that bad for teens.
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Daily Low-Dose Aspirin May Boost Chances of Successful Pregnancy
For some women who are trying to get pregnant, taking a low dose of aspirin daily may boost their chances of having a baby.
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Full-go for NC wind farm that politicians claimed is threat
North Carolina's first large-scale wind farm is fully operational despite efforts by some of the state's most powerful politicians to shut down the $400 million project as a possible national security threat.
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Monarch butterfly numbers drop by 27 percent in Mexico
The number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico dropped by 27 percent this year, reversing last year's recovery from historically low numbers, according to a study by government and independent experts released Thursday.
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NASA spacecraft prepares to fly to new heights
On Feb. 9, 2017, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, known as MMS, began a three-month long journey into a new orbit. MMS flies in a highly elliptical orbit around Earth and the new orbit will take MMS twice as far out as it has previously flown. In the new orbit, which begins the second phase of its mission, MMS will continue to map out the fundamental characteristics of space around Earth,
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Primeval Reservoirs Under Earth's Mantle May Be Older Than the Moon
The Earth's mantle retains traces of primeval materials that are older than the moon, which formed a scant 100 million years after the solar system's coalescence.
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Researchers studying mouse proteins uncover part of 'choreography of immunity'
Rearranging the genome is a risky endeavor, and human cells reserve it for special occasions, like making egg and sperm cells. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine announce they've learned how an enzyme that reshuffles DNA on one of those rare occasions—during the birth of new white blood cells—helps ensure the process doesn't go haywire. Their results are described online this week in the P
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What Makes for the Hottest Dance Moves? Hips Don't Lie [Video]
A new study reveals how we judge the best dancersm
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In Studying Sick Fish, Scientists Trace History Of Fevers
Carp are a major food source, but they've been plagued by viruses. Scientists now say they have a simple solution. And along the way, they hit on an ancient commonality between fish and people. (Image credit: Jean-Louis Wertz/University of Liege)
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While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential
Carmen Bachmann, a professor in Leipzig, is building an online network to help political refugees who are scientists or social scientists connect with professional peers in Germany — their new home.
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Snapshot of Hawaii: Why NASA Is Studying Islands' Volcanoes & Reefs
Hawaii's ecosystems are under scientific scrutiny this month.
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Deeper origin of gill evolution suggests 'active lifestyle' link in early vertebrates
A new study has revealed that gills originated much deeper in evolutionary history than previously believed. The findings support the idea that gills evolved before the last common ancestor of all vertebrates, helping facilitate a "lifestyle transition" from immobile filter-feeder to actively swimming predator.
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New research to help preserve the benefits people receive from nature
Humans rely on things that come from nature—including clean air, water, food, and timber. But how can we tell if these natural services that people rely on, are at risk of being lost, potentially permanently?
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Climate change and fishing create 'trap' for penguins
Endangered penguins are foraging for food in the wrong places due to fishing and climate change, research led by the University of Exeter and the University of Cape Town has revealed.
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Bacteria fed synthetic iron-containing molecules turn into electrical generators
The bacterial world is rife with unusual talents, among them a knack for producing electricity. In the wild, "electrogenic" bacteria generate current as part of their metabolism, and now researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), have found a way to confer that ability upon non-electrogenic bacteria. This technique could have applications for sustainable electricity generat
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Cleaner robot pulled from Fukushima reactor due to radiation
A remote-controlled cleaning robot sent into a damaged reactor at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant had to be removed Thursday before it completed its work because of camera problems most likely caused by high radiation levels.
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Face of Orkney's St Magnus reconstructed
A facial reconstruction has been made of Orkney's St Magnus by a forensic artist to help mark the 900th anniversary of his death.
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Partnered-Up Men More Attractive to Women
Women rate a man they see with an attractive woman as more desirable than an unattached man. Erika Beras reports.m
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Get ready for February Promotions!
Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mods , and Mentors is approaching. Fill out the form here to be considered by HQ for promotion following our next major competition. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy overall, with some flexibility if you’re really close Partici
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4 ways to make a city more walkable | Jeff Speck
Freedom from cars, freedom from sprawl, freedom to walk your city! City planner Jeff Speck shares his "general theory of walkability" -- four planning principles to transform sprawling cities of six-lane highways and 600-foot blocks into safe, walkable oases full of bike lanes and tree-lined streets.
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Meta-lenses bring benchtop performance to small, hand-held spectrometer
A research team of physicists from Harvard University has developed new hand-held spectrometers capable of the same performance as large, benchtop instruments. The researchers' innovation explained this week in APL Photonics, derives from their groundbreaking work in meta-lenses. The hand-held spectrometers offer real promise for applications ranging from health care diagnostics to environmental a
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NASA wants to put a lander on Europa’s surface to look for life
If it goes ahead, the proposed lander mission would be NASA’s first search for life on the surface of another planet since the Mars Viking missions in the late seventies
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Svenske virksomheder giver Sverige baghjul i klimakapløbet
I kølvandet på Sveriges ambitiøse klimaplan om i 2045 at være uafhængigt af fossile energikilder satser en række større virksomheder i Sverige nu på at nå målet 15 år tidligere end staten.
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Crikey! Australian Python Engulfs Tennis Ball
A python in Queensland, Australia, got quite a scratchy surprise when the 5-foot-long (1.5 meters) snake gulped down a tennis ball this week.
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Out on the Texas Ranch Where Scientists Study Death (NSFW)
There are more than 50 decomposing bodies out at Freeman Ranch. It's necessary, grisly work to help better identify victims long after they die. The post Out on the Texas Ranch Where Scientists Study Death (NSFW) appeared first on WIRED .
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Dwarf star 200 light-years away contains life's building blocks
Many scientists believe the Earth was dry when it first formed, and that the building blocks for life on our planet—carbon, nitrogen and water—appeared only later as a result of collisions with other objects in our solar system that had those elements.
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EU must shut coal plants by 2030 to meet climate pledge: study
The European Union must close all 315 of its coal-fired power plants by 2030 in order to meet its commitments under the Paris climate agreement, a research institute said Thursday.
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Metamaterial: Mail armor inspires physicists
The Middle Ages certainly were far from being science-friendly: Whoever looked for new findings off the beaten track faced the threat of being burned at the stake. Hence, the contribution of this era to technical progress is deemed to be rather small. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), however, were inspired by medieval mail armor when producing a new metamaterial with novel pr
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Industrial maintenance is becoming knowledge work
Virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mobile social media will soon be part of everyday work for service technicians. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland coordinated a sub-project forming part of the DIMECC S-STEP (Smart technologies for lifecycle performance) program. In the sub-project researchers and industry jointly developed new digital solutions and tools for industrial main
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Extended lactation does not impair the quality or cheese-making property of milk
On average, a Danish dairy cow calve once a year. However, there are many indications that fewer calvings and extended milking periods have more advantages.
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Most stretchable elastomer for 3-D printing
Researchers have developed a family of highly stretchable and UV curable (SUV) elastomers that can be stretched by up to 1100%, and are suitable for UV curing based 3-D printing techniques. Using high resolution 3-D printing with the SUV elastomer compositions enables the direct creation of complex 3-D lattices or hollow structures that exhibit extremely large deformation. Fabrication time for suc
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Broken pebbles offer clues to Paleolithic funeral rituals
Researchers from Canada, the US and Italy uncover evidence that people in the Upper Paleolithic Period used stone spatulas to decorate the bodies of the dead with ochre.
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Wave of the future: Terahertz chips a new way of seeing through matter
Electromagnetic pulses lasting one millionth of a millionth of a second may hold the key to advances in medical imaging, communications and drug development. But the pulses, called terahertz waves, have long required elaborate and expensive equipment to use. Now, researchers have drastically shrunk much of that equipment: moving from a tabletop setup with lasers and mirrors to a pair of microchips
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Scientists make new high-tech liquid materials that can manipulate micro-organisms
Scientists have controlled wave-generated currents to make previously unimaginable liquid materials for new technological innovations, including techniques to manipulate micro-organisms.
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NASA bets the farm on the long-term viability of space agriculture
Space A new plant habitat is on its way to the space station This food problem has been on NASA’s mind since its earliest missions. But more recently, astronauts have been trying to grow their own in orbit.
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'Dogs mirror owners' personalities'
Dogs mirror the personalities of their human companions, according to research.
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Review: 2017 Lamborghini Aventador S
The range topping Lambo gets some schooling, but doesn't lose its bite. The post Review: 2017 Lamborghini Aventador S appeared first on WIRED .
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Endangered snow leopards dine on livestock like goats and horses
In the Himalayas, goats and horses are especially prominent on the diet of endangered snow leopards, and male leopards tend to attack livestock more
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Divers pull amazing tortoise skeleton from sinkhole
An extinct tortoise species accidentally tumbled into a water-filled limestone sinkhole in the Bahamas about 1,000 years ago. It’s finally made its way out—with much of its DNA intact. As the first sample of ancient DNA retrieved from an extinct tropical species, scientists say the genetic material could provide insight into the history of the Caribbean tropics and the reptiles that dominated the
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App targets severe stress among cab drivers
A new app aims to combat high levels of psychological distress among cab drivers, who face long shifts, stress, and lack of exercise. “Taxi drivers are a highly vulnerable population, reporting high rates of psychological distress,” says Sandra Davidson, a senior research fellow at the department of general practice within the University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, and Health S
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Javan leopard sighting raises hopes for rare big cat
Four Javan leopards have been spotted in an Indonesian national park where they were previously thought to have died out, raising hopes for the future of the rare big cat.
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Belgium: US youth linked to cyberattack on Brussels airport
Belgian authorities say that a U.S. youth in Pittsburgh tried to hack into the Brussels airport computer system and disable it the night after the March 22 attacks that killed 32 people.
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Scientists make new high-tech liquid materials
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have controlled wave-generated currents to make previously unimaginable liquid materials for new technological innovations, including techniques to manipulate micro-organisms.
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Image: Entrance to Hertz chamber
The doorway out of ESA's Hertz test chamber, used to test the radio performance of large space antennas, as captured by photographer Edgar Martin.
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Changing our attitudes towards invasive 'alien' species
We often hear that complex environmental problems need to be communicated better – that scientists need to tell 'arresting stories' before governments and the public will act. But arresting stories can also be profoundly damaging – they are often arresting because they tie-in with taken-for-granted fears, prejudices, and premature judgments. To address and manage environmental change, we need to p
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Organic CMOS image sensor with electrically controllable near-infrared light sensitivity
Panasonic Corporation today announced that it has developed a new technology, electrical control of the near infrared (NIR) light sensitivity of the same pixel in an organic CMOS image sensor. The sensitivity of all the pixels in the image sensor, which has directly stacked organic films, is simultaneously controlled by changing the applied voltage to the organic films.
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Possible increase in the number of extremely strong fronts over Europe
A new study finds an increase of strong and extremely strong fronts in summertime and autumn over Europe. Whether this is a trend or caused by climate change remains to be seen, according to lead author Sebastian Schemm.
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These dance moves are scientifically proven to be sexy
Science It's all in the hip, thigh, and arm movements Science has determined the most attractive female dance moves, and I'm sorry to say that the lawnmower, the sprinkler, and "noodle arms" did not make the list.
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Noncompetes dent wages, mobility, study reports
High-tech employees working in states that enforce noncompete agreements suffer for it in lower wages and reduced job mobility.
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January was wetter and warmer than average for the U.S.
By many accounts, winter seemed to stay mostly offstage in January. Rain was the star event, with warmer temperatures in the East having played a supporting role. Except for California: Parts of the Golden State saw more than 15 feet of snow, while mountain areas of the interior West, such as Colorado, Nevada and Utah, experienced higher-than-normal snowfall overall.
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New study identifies 'disconnect' between media and public
Recently, mainstream media have faced heavy criticism from all sides of the political spectrum regarding coverage of the presidential election and other political issues. Now, researchers at the have found that many national journalists have views of democracy that are different than many Americans. The researchers believe this difference in philosophy m
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Synchronised swimming seems to make dolphins more optimistic
Having a mate to swim with – and mirror their movements – appears to make zoo dolphins feel more positive about their prospects in life
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Watch the bright star Regulus hide behind the full moon
Across Australia, on the evening of February 11/12, the full moon will travel directly in front of the bright star Regulus. For about an hour, the star will be hidden from view as the moon passes by.
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Video: Satellite views of severe storm that generated Michoud tornado
This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Feb. 6 to Feb. 7 at 2115 UTC (4:15 p.m EST) shows the severe weather system that spawned a tornado that affected NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans. You can see the system as a sideways wedge shaped ("V") cloud .
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Banedanmark: Det var en aktiv beslutning at stoppe S-togene
Problemer med det nye signalsystem fik her til eftermiddag Banedanmark til at standse togdriften mellem Gentofte og Hillerød for at genstarte systemet.
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Tre gange hurtigere end vinden: R1 skal vinde Americas Cup for briterne
Mission: Kodenavn R1 - Bring pokalen hjem til England. Fartøj: 2,4 ton katamaran fyldt med 1.200 meter elkabler og 130 meter hydraulik. Pris: 870 mio. kroner.
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What Makes Resident Evil 7 So Terrifying? The Humble Videotape
The haunted VHS cassettes play with perspective and ramp up the horror, becoming the best part of an already excellent videogame. The post What Makes Resident Evil 7 So Terrifying? The Humble Videotape appeared first on WIRED .
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Meet the Record-Pressing Robot Fueling Vinyl’s Comeback
The first new record-pressing machines built in over 30 years are finally online. The post Meet the Record-Pressing Robot Fueling Vinyl's Comeback appeared first on WIRED .
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New eco-battery that runs on seawater
Researchers at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea will be working to develop a new battery, using abundant and readily available seawater.
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Ancestry.com analyses user DNA samples to build migration maps of North America
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Ancestry, the people behind Ancestry.com, has used genotype data gathered from user kit samples and family tree information to create maps of post-colonial North American migration patterns. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes how they gathered information from their databases, analyzed it, and used it to plot the co
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Brilliance Comes in More Than 1 Gender
But most people assume it's reserved mostly for men—and that stereotype begins at an early agem
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A Strange Green Comet Is Heading Our Way
Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova, returning to the inner solar system after more than five years, will be visible this week with binoculars or a small telescope.
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New software for increasingly flexible factory processes
Industrial manufacturing usually follows rigidly programmed processes, in which individual work steps and machines are tightly scheduled. This makes production inflexible and causes problems if devices fail or unscheduled com- ponents need to be processed at short notice. At the Hannover Messe Preview on February 9, 2017, Fraunhofer developers will be presenting new software that allows each indiv
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Arbejde med nationale kliniske retningslinjer er en succes
I fire år har man arbejdet på sikre ensartede behandlinger og høj faglig kvalitet i hele landet ved hjælp af nationale kliniske retningslinjer. De tilbagemeldinger Sundhedsstyrelsen nu har fået, er i høj grad positive.
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Kronik: Sådan effektiviserer vi forsyningerne uden tab af kvalitet
El Fjernvarme Naturgas
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Virtual twin controls production
With an innovative new concept, researchers of the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK want to turn the vision of Industrie 4.0 into reality. A digital twin models the entire production process and permits direct intervention into manufacturing at all times. Real and virtual production merge into an intelligent overall system.
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Arctic 2.0: What Happens after All the Ice Goes?
Researchers look into the future of the far North for clues to save species and maybe even bring back sea icem
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Looking inside materials the smart way
Aircraft, trains and power plants have to be inspected regularly. Detecting damage too late could pose safety risks and often results in expensive downtimes. Now, researchers are using the 3-D SmartInspect sensor and inspection system to transfer established testing routines into tomorrow's digital world.
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Famous tagged elephant seal returns after record-shattering swim
It was a tense two weeks for researchers at the Dan Costa Lab at UC Santa Cruz.
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NASA-led campaign studies Hawaii's iconic volcanoes
Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawaii is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, drawing scientists and tourists alike from all over the world to study and witness its spectacular displays of nature. This month, a NASA-led science team is exploring Kilauea and the adjacent volcano Mauna Loa from the air, ground and space. Their goal: to better understand volcanic processes and hazards.
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NASA studies a rarity— growing Louisiana deltas
The Louisiana coastline is sinking under the Gulf of Mexico at the rate of about one football field of land every hour (about 18 square miles of land lost in a year). But within this sinking region, two river deltas are growing. The Atchafalaya River and its diversion channel, Wax Lake Outlet, are gaining about one football field of new land every 11 and 8 hours, respectively (1.5 and 2 square mil
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Researchers demonstrate evolutionary parental environmental effect
Biologists from the University of Tübingen have successfully demonstrated parental environmental effect – and how this arises through evolution.
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Guideline issued on molecular biomarkers for CRC tissues
(HealthDay)—A guideline, published online Feb. 6 in the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, has been developed in relation to molecular biomarker testing of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues.
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25 Visualizations Spin the Same Data Into 25 Different Tales
Designer Nathan Yau shows how different one data set can look The post 25 Visualizations Spin the Same Data Into 25 Different Tales appeared first on WIRED .
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Earth’s Best Defense Against Killer Asteroids Needs Cash
The Arecibo Radio Telescope faces extinction—just like humans, if we can't see the space rocks about to hit us.
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US court suspends ban on Sanofi, Regeneron cholesterol drug
A US appeals court on Wednesday temporarily suspended an order blocking the French pharmaceutical group Sanofi and its American partner Regeneron from selling their anti-cholesterol drug Praluent.
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Blue jets studied from ISS
For years, their existence has been debated: elusive electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere that sport names such as red sprites, blue jets, pixies and elves. Reported by pilots, they are difficult to study as they occur above thunderstorms.
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A Big Data approach to cataloging galaxies
Astronomers at Lomonosov Moscow State University and collaborators have released "The Reference Catalog of galaxy SEDs" (RCSED), which contains value-added information about 800,000 galaxies. The catalog is accessible online, and the researchers have reported on their development in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement. Two co-authors are undergraduate students at the Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov
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3 New Malayan Tiger Cubs: Cute, and Genetically Valuable
Cute and critically endangered, the cubs will bring genetic diversity to the species.
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Cutting-edge analytics allows health to be improved through nutrition
The company Lipigenia, which specialises in setting out guidelines on appropriate nutrition to achieve well-being on the basis of state-of-the-art blood analytics, has partnered with AZTI, the Italian enterprise CNR-ISOF and Intermedical Solutions Worldwide. Users will be given access to membrane lipidomics, a new healthcare tool that analyzes the fatty acid profile of the cell membrane.
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When Man's Best Friend Is The Worst At Truffle Hunting
Truffles are a culinary delicacy that sell for big bucks — and some dogs have long been bred specifically to sniff them out. But could any old dog be trained to pick up this lucrative new trick?
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Nyt udspil til offentlig it-arkitektur: Slut med siloer i den digitale borgerbetjening
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyt-udspil-regler-offentlig-it-arkitektur-vi-gider-ikke-flere-spaghetti-integrationer Nye regler for it-arkitektur skal sikre sammenhæng mellem offentlige systemer. På sigt kan reglerne blive kanon for hele den offentlige sektor.
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Forget Me Not: The Harrowing Tale of H. M.'s Brain [Excerpt]
Michael D. Lemonick explains how a postmortem study of the most celebrated amnesic in history went awrym
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Overraskende fototrick får dig til at fremstå som en stærkere jobsøger
https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/overraskende-fototrick-faar-dig-at-fremstaa-staerkere-jobsoeger-6344 Du ønsker at se tjekket og professionel ud på de professionelle fotos, du bruger i din jobjagt. Måske skulle du lure dette forbløffende fif af Jobfinder
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How Biases Affect Stock Analyst Predictions
Research shows that financial analysts have biases in things like gender and names when it comes to evaluating companies.
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Nokia to acquire software firm Comptel for $370 million
In a move to further focus on software technology, Nokia says it has offered to acquire software company Comptel for some 347 million euros ($370 million).
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Sydvestjysk Sygehus har fundet ny lægelig direktør
Region Syddanmark har ansat Alan Kimper-Karl som lægelig direktør på Sydvestjysk Sygehus, hvor han siden november 2016 har været konstitueret i stillingen.

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