bio-bot som du selv kan bygge

Now you can 'build your own' bio-bot I'll bet you don't have one of these at home.

bio-bot som du selv kan bygge

Now you can 'build your own' bio-bot For the past several years, researchers have been developing a class of walking 'bio-bots' powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical and optical pulses. Now, a research group is sharing the recipe for the current generation of bio-bots.

dinoslægtning fødte levende unger

First live birth evidence in dinosaur relative Scientists have uncovered the first evidence of live births in the group of animals that includes dinosaurs, crocodiles and birds.

dinoslægtning fødte levende unger

Fossil af 245 mio. år gammelt havkrybdyr gemmer hemmelighed i maven Den fire meter lange dinosaur- og krokodillestamfader lagde ikke æg, men fødte levende unger.

dinoslægtning fødte levende unger

Crocodile's ancient cousin defied family norms, gave birth to live young Animals "Go suck an egg" This member of the Archosauromorpha family, which includes birds and crocodiles, was pregnant with live young.

dinoslægtning fødte levende unger

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution (Update) A remarkable 250 million-year-old "terrible-headed lizard" fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother—clear evidence for live birth.

dinoslægtning fødte levende unger

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth. The fossil unexpectedly provided the first evidence for live birth in an animal group previously thought to exclusively lay eggs.

Rare delta Scuti pulsating star 7,000 light years away is one of only 7 in Milky Way Astronomers are reporting a rare star as big—or bigger—than the Earth's sun that is expanding and contracting in a unique pattern in three different directions.

Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed technology known as "CatLignin" to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry byproducts to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives widely used in wood products and furniture.

Study rewrites the history of corn in corn country A new study contradicts decades of thought, research and teaching on the history of corn cultivation in the American Bottom, a floodplain of the Mississippi River in Illinois. The study refutes the notion that Indian corn, or maize, was cultivated in this region hundreds of years before its widespread adoption at about 1000 A.D.

Robotic descent into a frozen underworld Mt. Erebus is at the end of our world—and offers a portal to another.

Romanian skeleton puzzles archaeologists An unusual and 'confusing' grave site dug up in Romania by a student from The Australian National University (ANU) is helping provide evidence for the first official written history of the Székely people.

Looking at Sardinian DNA for genetic clues to an island's—and Europe's—past Sardinia sits at a crossroads in the Mediterranean Sea, the second largest island next to Sicily. Surrounded by sparkling turquoise waters, this Mediterranean jewel lies northwest of the toe of the Italian peninsula boot, about 350 kilometers due west of Rome.

A scanning-tunneling microscope provides a glimpse of entropy in action New research shows that a scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes. The study, appearing this week in the journal Nature Communications, demonstrates that the position of the tip of the STM relative to the molecule changes the energy requirements of the molecule to ma

Researchers warn scientists of costly impure chemicals Keele University researchers have published a paper recently warning fellow scientists of impure reagents that could skew results.

Scientists predict new high-energy compounds Using theoretical methods, an international group of scientists led by Artem R. Oganov, Professor of Skoltech, Stony Brook University and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology predicted unusual nitrides of hafnium and chromium with the chemical formulae HfN10 (and its zirconium analogue ZrN10) and CrN4. These compounds can be obtained at relatively low pressures and contain high-energy groups

Scientists investigate what breaks down permafrost carbon A Florida State University researcher is delving into the complexities of exactly how permafrost thawing in the Earth's most northern regions is cycling back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and further fueling climate change.

Scientists observe first planet-induced stellar pulsations For the first time, astronomers from MIT and elsewhere have observed a star pulsing in response to its orbiting planet.

Senators try to speed up deployment of self-driving cars In the first major congressional attempt to address the advent of self-driving cars, two senators said Monday they're launching a bipartisan effort to help to speed up the deployment of the vehicles on the nation's roads.

Senators launch query on Trump's smartphone security Two US senators have requested details on President Donald Trump's smartphone security, saying he could jeopardize national secrets if he is still using his old handset, as some reports say.

Sexual harassment in the fish world—male guppies suffer most Male guppies pay a high cost for their sexual harassment of female guppies – including much higher mortality rates – a new study from Macquarie University has found.

Improvements in short-term forecasting of air pollution levels A researcher at UPM has successfully predicted the daily maximum ozone threshold exceedances in the Hong Kong area. The results show that an accurate and prompt prediction of tropospheric ozone concentrations is of great importance to the management of the public pollution warning system.

Simple rule explains complex group swimming patterns Watching the smooth movement generated by hundreds of fish as they swim in unison is truly mesmerising. But it's not only its sheer beauty that makes it so hard to look away, for scientists, it's also the fact that its emergence is so difficult to explain. In an article published today (February 13, 2017) in the scientific journal PNAS, researchers from Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU), i

Making single-cell RNA sequencing widely available Sequencing messenger RNA molecules from individual cells offers a glimpse into the lives of those cells, revealing what they're doing at a particular time. However, the equipment required to do this kind of analysis is cumbersome and not widely available.

Softbank adds Fortress Investment to growing empire The $3.3 billion acquisition by SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese telecommunications, internet and solar energy giant, of Fortress Investment Group marks tycoon Masayoshi Son's latest step in building an investment empire.

New software will standardize data collection for great white sharks The lack of a standardized procedure for collecting data about elusive and hard to find species like the great white shark has to date seriously hampered efforts to manage and protect these animals.

Desert songbirds may face expanding threat of lethal dehydration A new study of songbird dehydration and survival risk during heat waves in the United States desert Southwest suggests that some birds are at risk of lethal dehydration and mass die-offs when water is scarce, and the risk is expected to increase as climate change advances.

On a South African farm, despair over armyworm attack Peeling back the maize plant's leaves reveals a small brown caterpillar—an armyworm that writhes as it burrows into the heart of the crop, producing a sticky dark paste.

Sperm-egg fusion proteins have same structure as those used by Zika and other viruses The protein that helps the sperm and egg fuse together in sexual reproduction can also fuse regular cells together. Recent findings by a team of biomedical researchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Argentina, Uruguay and the U.S. show this protein is part of a larger family of proteins that helps other cells bind together to create larger organs, and which also allows viruses l

Living standards lag behind economic growth As incomes rise in developing countries, access to basic amenities such as electricity, clean cooking energy, water, and sanitation, also improves—but not uniformly, and not as quickly as income growth, according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. The study looked at historical rates of energy access compared to other living standards and GDP.

'Strange black soot' blankets Nigeria's oil hub The Nigerian city of Port Harcourt used to be known as "The Garden City" because of its soaring palm trees and green open spaces.

Sub-Saharan Africa lags in sustainable energy policies: report Sub-Saharan Africa, where more than a half billion people live without electricity, trails the world in government policies that promote sustainable energy, according to a new World Bank report Wednesday.

Success by deception Theoretical physicists from ETH Zurich deliberately misled intelligent machines, and thus refined the process of machine learning. They created a new method that allows computers to categorize data—even when humans have no idea what this categorization might look like.

How to be a successful pest: Lessons from the green peach aphid UK Scientists, in collaboration with groups in Europe and the US, have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programmes to support pest control and aid global food security.

Sulfide-sensing mechanisms in purple bacteria Recent evidence demonstrates that the origins of photosynthesis can be found in deep sea hydrothermal vents, where microbes evolved to obtain energy from ejected hydrogen sulfide and methane gases. These microbes are capable of oxidizing sulfides and other gases and using them as electron donors to generate energy.

Turning sunshine into liquid gold Tiny metalic-gold particles are being used to convert sunlight into fuel. The technology is being developed in South Australia to store solar energy as an alternative to battery storage.

Superconductivity with two-fold symmetry—new evidence for topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 The study of topological superconductors (TSCs) is a hotspot in the field of condensed matter physics, and has drawn great attention in recent years. Now, Prof. Hai-Hu Wen's group from Nanjing University has succeeded in detecting the two-fold symmetry of superconductivity in SrxBi2Se3, which provides new evidence for the argument that SrxBi2Se3 is a TSC.

Taiwan's HTC posts seventh consecutive quarterly loss Taiwan's HTC on Tuesday announced worse than expected fourth-quarter results and analysts said its much-hyped virtual reality products had failed significantly to boost the struggling smartphone maker.

Team makes planet hunting a group effort, finds more than 100 candidates An international team of astronomers released the largest-ever compilation of exoplanet-detecting observations made using a technique called the radial velocity method. They demonstrated how these observations can be used to hunt for planets by detecting more than 100 potential exoplanets, including one orbiting the fourth-closest star to our own Solar System, which is about 8.1 light years away f

Level up and learn: Team teaches science through video game A University of Texas at Dallas team is exploring whether teaching real-world science through a popular computer game may offer a more engaging and effective educational approach than traditional concepts of instruction.

New technique for creation of entangled photon states Members of the Faculty of Physics at the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated a new technique for creating entangled photon states. They have described their research in an article published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Tesla takes on Gulf gas guzzlers Electric carmaker Tesla announced the opening of a new Gulf headquarters Monday in Dubai, aiming to conquer an oil-rich region better known for gas guzzlers than environmentally friendly motoring.

Thais in the mood for love as V-Day fever sweeps the nation Babies dressed as cupids, underwater weddings and a government vitamin giveaway to encourage procreation were all part of Thailand's imaginative and bizarre events Tuesday to mark Valentine's Day.

New theory explains how Earth's inner core remains solid despite extreme heat Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallized iron core of the Earth remains solid. A new study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that's possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet's poles than through the equator.

Researchers engineer 'thubber,' a stretchable rubber that packs a thermal conductive punch Carmel Majidi and Jonathan Malen of Carnegie Mellon University have developed a thermally conductive rubber material that represents a breakthrough for creating soft, stretchable machines and electronics. The findings were published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week.

Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant—the first of its kind in Canada—that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.

Tiny, soft, transparent nanofabricated devices turned into ultrasensitive microphones A tiny, transparent device that can fit into a contact lens has a bright future, potentially helping a range of scientific endeavors from biomedicine to geology.

New tool can help researchers identify enzymes—and their abundance—in microbiomes For researchers studying the possible connections between human health and the trillions of microbes that inhabit our digestive tract, what makes the work so exciting is also what makes it challenging.

Toshiba chairman resigns over huge nuclear business loss Toshiba Corp.'s chairman resigned Tuesday after the company logged such massive losses in its nuclear business that it must sell its lucrative computer-chip business to avoid going belly-up.

Toshiba warns of huge losses in US nuclear power unit Toshiba hinted at a possible fresh accounting scandal Tuesday as it delayed the release of financial results but warned it would lose billions of dollars in its US nuclear power unit.

Toyota recalls all fuel-cell Mirai vehicles Toyota said Wednesday it is recalling all the Mirai fuel-cell vehicles it has sold globally due to a software glitch that can shut off its hydrogen-powered system.

Toyota hopes revamped plug-in sells better than first model Toyota has revamped its plug-in hybrid with a longer cruising range and quicker charging, including from a regular home plug, hoping it will sell better than the first model from five years ago that officials acknowledged had flopped.

Tumor-targeting system uses cancer's own mechanisms to betray its location By hijacking a cancer cell's own metabolism, researchers have found a way to tag and target elusive cancers with small-molecule sugars. This opens treatment pathways for cancers that are not responsive to conventional targeted antibodies, such as triple-negative breast cancer.

Researchers explain the unique properties of hagfish slime Hagfish are marine fish shaped like eels, famous for releasing large quantities of "slime" that unfolds, assembles and expands into the surrounding water in response to a threat or a predator's attack. This defense mechanism even works against sharks by effectively clogging their gills or choking them.

Extending VCSEL wavelength coverage to the mid-infrared Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are small, semiconductor-based lasers that emit optical beams from their top surface, and one of their main applications is in gas sensing. Gases each have a unique set of energies they can absorb, derived from their molecular structure. These sets of absorption lines are akin to fingerprints, which enables unambiguous and sensitive detection with a

Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking, new research finds A new study by a team of researchers, including one from the University of California, Riverside, found that the fault under Ventura, Calif., would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected.

Verizon pulled back into unlimited data game Verizon, a longtime holdout, has joined other carriers in offering an unlimited data plan.

Squeezing of vesicles through narrow constrictions shows promise for targeted drug delivery Vesicles, like living cells, are membrane-enclosed "sacs" of fluid that can cushion molecular cargo such as pharmaceutical drugs. If a drug is successfully encapsulated into a vesicle carrier and the carrier remains intact, it can be delivered directly for therapeutic treatment. Inside the host, vesicles protect the drug cargo and can efficiently target recipient cells to deliver the drugs safely.

Video: Engineering team designs new solar-paneled walls that make greywater reusable Architect Maria Paz Gutierrez is a woman on a mission. In addition to mentoring student building designers at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, Paz Gutierrez is putting her own design skills to work to address a key environmental and socioeconomic issue around the world—water scarcity.

Researchers forecast lower 2017 violent and property crime rates in much of SoCal Researchers at the University of California, Irvine project double-digit reductions in both violent and property crimes across much of Southern California for 2017. Violent crime is estimated to drop by 21 percent in 82 percent of cities, and property crime is expected to decrease by 11 percent in 79 percent of cities.

Viral charity campaigns have a psychological 'recipe' and all-too-brief lifespan A University of Cambridge researcher has defined a recipe for the new breed of wildly successful online charity campaigns such as the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge - a phenomenon he has labelled "viral altruism" - and what might make them stick in people's minds.

Researchers pinpoint watery past on Mars Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a patch of land in an ancient valley on Mars that appears to have been flooded by water in the not-too-distant past. In doing so, they have pinpointed a prime target to begin searching for past life forms on the Red Planet.

Fears of exploding whales as New Zealand clears carcasses The grim task of clearing hundreds of washed-up whale carcasses was under way in New Zealand Tuesday, with the beach closed over fears the bodies will fill with gas and explode as they decompose.

Researchers enter the 'Wild West' of chemistry to reveal a surprise finding Researchers at The University of Manchester have entered the "Wild West" of the periodic table to finally solve a decades-old scientific challenge—and have revealed that an important but niche chemical bonding principle may be much more widely applicable than previously thought.

Seeing the world through fresh eyes There are many different structures in our eyes that work in conjunction to allow us to see. These structures are strikingly similar between different species, from zebrafish to humans. The growth of ocular tissues must be tightly controlled in order to maintain the correct eye size and shape that allow us to see. This tight regulation has intrigued developmental biologists for decades.

WWII shipwrecks off Malaysia broken for scrap: divers Three World War II shipwrecks off the coast of Malaysia—the final resting place of dozens of seamen—have almost disappeared, local divers say, with the finger pointing at possible scrap metal scavengers.

X-ray pulses reveal structure of viral cocoon: Scientists analyze smallest ever protein crystals An international team of scientists has used high-intensity X-ray pulses to determine the structure of the crystalline protein envelope of an insect virus. Their analysis reveals the fine details of the building blocks that make up the viral cocoon down to a scale of 0.2 nanometres (millionths of a millimetre) - approaching atom-scale resolution. The tiny viruses with their crystal casing are by f

Natural Remedies for Diabetes: Plavinol, Glucopure There is not enough evidence to support using dietary supplements in the treatment of diabetes. There is preliminary evidence that some herbs lower blood sugar by a modest amount, but it would be foolish to think they could replace conventional treatment of diabetes.

More people now believe human-made climate change is happening The proportion of people in the UK who accept climate change is happening and is largely human-made has risen from 57 per cent three years ago to 64 per cent now

Virtual reality weather add-ons let you feel the sun and wind You could soon get an even more immersive VR experience thanks to the Ambiotherm plug in, which exposes you to the elements of your virtual world

Metabolic switch may bring on chronic fatigue syndrome CFS, also known as ME, may be caused by the body switching from fully breaking down carbohydrates to using other energy sources, bringing on pain and exhaustion

NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions Apps that let patients monitor their conditions and send data directly to doctors are coming to selected NHS trusts this year in a bid to reduce hospital visits

Timing when you get pregnant could prevent a miscarriage A quarter of pregnancies end in miscarriage. A new explanation suggests there’s a window of opportunity when it’s best for some women to conceive

Climate change is already battering hundreds of animal species Almost half of all threatened land mammals and a quarter of threatened birds may be feeling the pinch as a result of habitat loss and other changes

Junk food tax and veg subsidies could add 500,000 years of life If Australia taxed junk food and subsidised fruit and veg, it would prolong healthy lives and save A$3 billion in future healthcare costs in the process

Mars landing sites for 2020 NASA mission down to the final three At a meeting in California, NASA scientists whittled down the landing sites for its next rover - which will search for signs of life

Human genome editing shouldn’t be used for enhancement – yet Gene editing can already treat human diseases, but while editing the germline and enhancing human traits might be acceptable one day, we’re not there yet, says report

Honeybees let out a ‘whoop’ when they bump into each other A vibrational pulse that was thought to be a “stop” signal between bees may actually be a startled response when they collide

Crews race to fix California dam before more rain falls Heavy rains caused erosion and a partial collapse of spillways at a California dam - and more rain is forecast, threatening to overflow it again and flood towns

How to build better sex robots: stop making them look human From a stimulating exoskeleton to a vibrating fist, innovators are ditching the sex-bomb stereotype. But can we ever fully escape the uncanny valley of the dolls?

Disorder-Specific Psychotherapy Effective for Chronic Depression submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]

A paper in JEP:General explores how uncertainty affects people's beliefs about sciences in general as well as about specific research findings. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]

Report lambasts signature-based detection as unfit for purpose and AI is the future, while others defend it as highly effective against most threats. submitted by /u/tuff_puff [link] [comments]

Very premature babies at risk of mental health problems – research. Studies reveal greater likelihood of attention disorders, shyness and anxiety in childhood and then adulthood for survivors with very low birth weight of 1kg. submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]

Inducing an identity crisis in liver cells may help diabetics It is now possible to reprogram cells from the liver into the precursor cells that give rise to the pancreas by altering the activity of a single gene. A team of researchers has now accomplished this feat in mice. Their results should make it feasible to help diabetic patients through cell therapy.

Cellular quality control process could be Huntington's disease drug target The loss of motor function and mental acuity associated with Huntington's disease might be treatable by restoring a cellular quality control process, which researchers have identified as a key factor in the degenerative illness.

New research shows that proteins are 'virtually' knotted Many of the processes essential to life involve proteins -- long molecules which 'fold' into three-dimensional shapes allowing them to perform their biological role.

Tough early life makes wild animals live longer Male banded mongooses that experienced poor conditions in their first year had longer lives, new research has found.

Passengers take mobile measure of comfort for railway companies Passengers could soon be using their mobile phones to help rail companies around the globe improve the ride quality on their trains, thanks to new research.

The ultimate green technology: Creating computers that use 10,000 times less energy Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry. A team of scientists has done just that, led by a world-renowned physicist and his up-and-coming protégé.

New data from NOAA GOES-16's Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) instrument The new Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) instrument onboard NOAA's GOES-16 is working and successfully sending data back to Earth.

Drug could prevent infertility in cancer patients A new study shows promising evidence that a medication previously used to prevent infections in cancer patients can also keep them from becoming infertile. Losing fertility is a frequent problem among cancer patients, as treatments for the disease often halt sperm production.

How evolution alters biological invasions Biological invasions pose major threats to biodiversity, but little is known about how evolution might alter their impacts over time. Now, Rutgers University scientists have performed the first study of how evolution unfolds after invasions change native systems. The experimental invasions -- elaborate experiments designed by doctoral student Cara A. Faillace and her adviser, Professor Peter J. Mo

Physicist improves method for designing fusion experiments A physicist has made an important revision to a software tool used to design fusion experiments known as stellarators. The new method results in designs that create a magnetic field suitable for confining blazing-hot plasma, while allowing better access for repairs and more places to install sensors.

'Anti-aging' hormone could unlock new treatments for kidney and heart disease A new study has found that patients with diabetes suffering from the early stages of kidney disease have a deficiency of the protective 'anti-aging' hormone, Klotho.

Mismatched eyes help squid survive ocean's twilight zone Biologists have gathered the first behavioral evidence that cockeyed squids' mismatched eyes evolved to spot two different sources of light available in the deep sea. Their one large eye is adapted for gazing upwards, searching for shadows of fellow sea creatures against fading sunlight, while their small eye is adapted for gazing downwards, scanning deeper water for bioluminescent flashes, accord

Nicotine exposure during and after pregnancy can cause hearing problems in children Nicotine exposure, before and after birth, can cause a child to have hearing problems due to abnormal development in the auditory brainstem.

Together we are unpredictable: Why sailfish hunt more successfully as a group Sailfish are large oceanic predatory fish that attack their prey with their long, sharp bills. When hunting, individuals increase their success rate by specializing in one attacking side, as a team has now been able to show. The crucial factor: Sailfish always hunt in groups containing roughly the same number of individuals that attack from the right as those that attack from the left. In this way

Link identified between nerve cell proteins and middle-age onset dementia New research identifies a role for neuronal protein interaction in preventing frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a dementia that starts in middle age.

New platform to study graphene's electronic properties Graphene's unusual electronic structure enables this extraordinary material to break many records of strength, electricity and heat conduction. Physicists have used a model to explain the electronic structure of graphene measured by a new spectroscopic platform. These techniques could promote future research on stable and accurate quantum measurements for new 2D electronics.

New record achieved in terahertz pulse generation A group of scientists has succeeded in their attempts to generate ultrashort terahertz light pulses. With lengths of just a few picoseconds, these pulses are ideally suited to spectroscopic applications and enable extremely precise frequency measurements to be taken.

Scientists uncover huge 1.8 million square kilometers reservoir of melting carbon under Western United States New research describes how scientists have used the world's largest array of seismic sensors to map a deep-Earth area of melting carbon covering 1.8 million square kilometers. Situated under the Western US, 350km beneath Earth's surface, the discovered melting region challenges accepted understanding of how much carbon Earth contains -- much more than previously understood.

Organo-metal compound seen killing cancer cells from inside Cancer cells have been observed being targeted and killed from the inside with metal-based compound, report researchers. The compound, Organo-Osmium FY26, attacks the weakest part of cancer cells. FY26 is 50x more active than metal drugs used in current cancer treatments, say researchers.

Dramatic turn-around in cognitive abilities of children born to older mothers In contrast to 40 years ago, children born to older mothers today are more likely to perform better in cognitive ability tests than those born to younger mothers, reveals new research.

Improvements in short-term forecasting of air pollution levels A new research project has successfully predicted the daily maximum ozone threshold exceedances in the Hong Kong area. The results show that an accurate and prompt prediction of tropospheric ozone concentrations is of great importance to the management of the public pollution warning system.

Game theorists devise 'catch-up rule' to make sports contests more competitive, and exciting, to watch A team of game theorists has devised a “Catch-Up Rule” that is designed to make sports such as volleyball, badminton, and squash more competitive—and more thrilling for spectators.

Kepler, don't give up on the hunt for exomoons Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible for a planetary collision to form a moon large enough for Kepler to detect. Scientists conducted a series of around 30 simulations to explore how various factors affect moon creation.

New theory explains how Earth's inner core remains solid despite extreme heat Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallized iron core of the Earth remains solid. A new study may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that's possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet's poles than through the equator.

Understanding the contact of contacts to beat dry eye syndrome Symptoms of dry eye syndrome -- dry, red, itchy, gritty, sore eyes -- are more common among contact lens wearers. But relief may be on the horizon, thanks to a group of researchers and their work exploring the mechanical interactions between the eye surface, the cornea and contact lenses.

Psychological 'recipe' identified for viral campaigns such as Ice Bucket Challenge New work focusing on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge reveals very brief shelf life of such viral campaigns, and suggests the nature of ‘virality’ and social tipping points themselves may be a stumbling block to deeper engagement with social issues that campaigns aim to promote.

Ubiquitous and influential Scientists have generated new insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling. Their results may provide new avenues for cancer therapy, they say.

Cultivated scallops populations develop distinct genetic structure The scallop is one of the largest edible molluscs, and gourmets consider it to be a great delicacy. To meet this demand, the fishing industry cultivates these shellfish in coastal aquafarms. In a new analysis, behavioural ecologists have confirmed that cultivated scallops developed their own genetic structure that differs from that of natural scallops. The biologists studied a total of nine popula

New study links 'mastermind' gene to rare cancer-causing tumor Scientists have discovered a new "mastermind fusion gene" may be associated with a rare cancer-causing tumor -- pheochromocytomas ("pheo") and paragangliomas -- according to a study. This breakthrough discovery could lead to more precise treatment as well as a better understanding of cancer itself.

Preventing hospital-related deaths due to medical errors How many patients die in the hospital as a result of preventable medical errors? While debate continues over estimates based on flawed data, the US healthcare system can and must implement effective strategies to reduce adverse events and deaths, according to a special perspective article.

Old into new: Geneticists track the evolution of parenting Researchers have confirmed that becoming a parent brings about more than just the obvious offspring—it also rewires the parents’ brain.

Use of multiple brain-affecting drugs is rising among seniors, despite risks, research finds The number of older Americans who take three or more medicines that affect their brains has more than doubled in just a decade, a new study finds. The sharpest rise occurred in seniors living in rural areas.

Non-invasive test offers quick skin cancer diagnosis A non-invasive imaging technique has been developed that accurately detects skin cancer without surgical biopsy. Multiphoton microscopy of mitochondria accurately identified melanomas and basal cell carcinomas by detecting abnormal clusters of mitochondria in both types of skin cancer.

Special properties of hagfish's defense 'slime' Hagfish are marine fish shaped like eels, famous for releasing large quantities of “slime” that unfolds, assembles and expands into the surrounding water in response to a threat. New research explores the hagfish’s slime formation and the special properties allowing it to assemble into a solid gel without dissolving into the surrounding water.

Bridging the gap between the mechanics of blast traumatic brian injuries and cell damage Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a largely silent epidemic that affects roughly two million people each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the scale at which blast TBI (bTBI) injuries -- in the spotlight as the signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan -- occur and manifest is unknown. Recent studies within this realm suggest that rapid cavitation

Feeding wild dolphins can hurt them, new study says Wild dolphins are more likely to be injured if humans feed them — even through unintentional means like discarding bait — reports a new study.

Eco-friendly concrete created In the future, wide-ranging composite materials are expected to be stronger, lighter, cheaper and greener for our planet, thanks to a new invention. Nine years ago, an American researcher invented an energy-efficient technology that harnesses largely low-temperature, water-based reactions.

Team makes planet hunting a group effort, finds more than 100 candidates An international team of astronomers released the largest-ever compilation of exoplanet-detecting observations made using a technique called the radial velocity method. They demonstrated how these observations can be used to hunt for planets by detecting more than 100 potential exoplanets, including one orbiting the fourth-closest star to our own Solar System, which is about 8.1 light years away f

How solid tumors resist immunotherapy Immunotherapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, offering hope to those whose malignancies have stubbornly survived other existing treatments. Yet solid tumor cancers are often resistant to these approaches. New findings untangle one of the ways tumors evade immune detection and show how immunotherapies can be modified to tackle even these solid tumors.

New study helps explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans A new study on how ocean currents transport floating marine debris is helping to explain how garbage patches form in the world's oceans. Researchers developed a mathematical model that simulates the motion of small spherical objects floating at the ocean surface.

Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in c

Researchers discover a new link to fight billion-dollar threat to soybean production Invisible to the naked eye, cyst nematodes are a major threat to agriculture, causing billions of dollars in global crop losses every year. A group of plant scientists recently found one of the mechanisms cyst nematodes use to invade and drain life-sustaining nutrients from soybean plants. Understanding the molecular basis of interactions between plants and nematodes could lead to the development

Researchers discover how the brain turns chronic stress into pathological anxiety In a new study, researchers have described how two important molecules in the brain work together to trigger intense anxiety.

Plant-made hemophilia therapy shows promise Researchers have developed a therapy to prevent a significant complication of hemophilia treatment. Results in dogs show promise.

New mechanical metamaterials can block symmetry of motion, findings suggest Engineers and scientists have invented the first mechanical metamaterials that easily transfer motion effortlessly in one direction while blocking it in the other.

Scientists isolate new antibodies to fight human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) Researchers have developed a new antiviral strategy to fight human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. The approach hinges on the use of single-domain antibodies, also known as Nanobodies®, which target and neutralize a vital protein in the virus, rendering it unable to enter lung cells.

Women in academic cardiology are significantly less likely to be full professors The first study to evaluate sex differences in academic ranking among academic cardiologists has found that women were significantly less likely than men to be full professors, even when adjusting for factors such as age, years of experience and research productivity that are traditionally associated with academic rank.

Gene that helps form trauma-related memories may also help prevent PTSD A specific gene that helps form memories from traumatic events can be manipulated, and in doing so may actually help prevent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study.

Depression linked to e-cigarette use among college students The emergence of e-cigarettes as a nicotine product has left scientists with many questions about their impact on health, including how the product interacts with depression. A new study has found a connection between depression and initiation of e-cigarette use among college students.

Married people have lower levels of stress hormone Married people are healthier than those who are single, divorced or widowed, research has found. Now a new study provides the first biological evidence to explain how marriage impacts health.

Simulated ransomware attack shows vulnerability of industrial controls Cybersecurity researchers have developed a new form of ransomware that can take over control of a simulated water treatment plant. After gaining access, they were able to command programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to shut valves, increase the amount of chlorine added to water, and display false readings.

How to be a successful pest: Lessons from the green peach aphid Scientists have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programs to support pest control and aid global food security.

Altmetric data analysis reveals how Parkinson's disease research affects the world Scientists have published an analysis of Parkinson's disease research papers with the highest Altmetric Attention Scores. The publication is the first in a series aimed at utilizing Altmetric data to provide a more nuanced understanding of how the announcements of new medical discoveries affect the wide-range of disease-specific stakeholders including researchers, funders, care providers, and pati

Understanding enzymes: New tool can help researchers identify enzymes, and their abundance, in microbiomes A new tool can help researchers more accurately identify enzymes present in microbiomes and quantify their relative abundances.

Surprise finding in 'Wild West' of chemistry Researchers have entered the 'Wild West' of the periodic table to finally solve a decades-old scientific challenge -- and have revealed that an important but niche chemical bonding principle may be much more widely applicable than previously thought.

Will androids dream of quantum sheep? Quantum replicants of responsive systems can be more efficient than classical models, say researchers, because classical models have to store more past information than is necessary to simulate the future.

Are drones disturbing marine mammals? Marine researchers have made sure that their research drones aren't disturbing their research subjects, shows a new report. And they're hoping that others will follow their example to help protect wildlife in the future.

Theoretical physicists deliberately misled intelligent machines Theoretical physicists deliberately misled intelligent machines, and thus refined the process of machine learning. They created a new method that allows computers to categorize data -- even when humans have no idea what this categorization might look like.

Gene discovery sheds light on growth defects linked to dwarfism A new study shows how errors in a specific gene can cause growth defects associated with a rare type of dwarfism.

New software will standardize data collection for great white sharks The lack of a standardized procedure for collecting data about elusive and hard to find species like the great white shark has to date seriously hampered efforts to manage and protect these animals. But now a marine biologist, an applied mathematician and a software developer joined expertise to develop a custom-made software package, called Identifin, which may offer a solution to this problem.

Ovarian hormones awaken newly discovered breast stem cells Researchers have used advanced cellular, bioinformatics and imaging technology to reveal a long-lived type of stem cell in the breast that is responsible for the growth of the mammary glands during pregnancy.

Kiss of death: Mammals were the first animals to produce venom The fossil of the Euchambersia therapsid (a pre-mammalian reptile), that lived in South Africa about 260 million years ago, is the first evidence of the oldest mammal to produce venom. CT scans of fossils of the pre-mammalian reptile shows anatomical features, designed for venom production.

Living standards lag behind economic growth Even as average incomes rise in developing countries, access to sanitation and clean energy have yet to reach the poorest people, a new study shows. But there is room for optimism.

Accelerated chlorophyll reaction in microdroplets to reveal secret of photosynthesis The natural control of chlorophyll activity has now been discovered by a team of scientists, outlines a new report.

Impact of climate change on mammals and birds 'greatly underestimated' Large numbers of threatened species have already been impacted by climate change, new research concludes. Alarmingly, this team of international researchers found evidence of observed responses to recent climate changes in almost 700 birds and mammal species.

Microbiomes more in flux in patients with inflammatory bowel disease Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to see dramatic shifts in the make-up of the community of microbes in their gut than healthy people, according to the results of a new study. The results help physicians and scientists understand the disease more fully and potentially offer new ways to track the disease and monitor patients.

Study describes drug that could prevent infertility in cancer patients A new study shows promising evidence that a medication previously used to prevent infections in cancer patients can also keep them from becoming infertile. Losing fertility is a frequent problem among cancer patients, as treatments for the disease often halt sperm production.

People are attracted to outward signs of health, not actual health, study finds Skin with yellow and red pigments is perceived as more attractive in Caucasian males, but this skin coloring does not necessarily signal actual good health, new research concludes.

Strong alcohol policies protect against drunk driving deaths among young people Stronger alcohol policies protect young people from dying in crashes caused by drunk driving according to researchers. The study supports the importance of comprehensive alcohol control policies to reduce the number of young people who die in alcohol-related crashes.

Marine bacteria produce an environmentally important molecule with links to climate Scientists have discovered that tiny marine bacteria can synthesize one of Earth's most abundant sulfur molecules, which affects atmospheric chemistry and potentially climate. This molecule, dimethylsulfoniopropionate is an important nutrient for marine microorganisms and is the major precursor for the climate-cooling gas, dimethyl sulfide.

New discovery could be a major advance for neurological diseases The discovery of a new mechanism that controls the way nerve cells in the brain communicate with each other to regulate our learning and long-term memory could have major benefits to understanding how the brain works and what goes wrong in neurodegenerative disorders such as epilepsy and dementia. The findings will have far-reaching implications in many aspects of neuroscience.

Examining different accountable care organization payment models Two new studies take a look at different accountable care organization (ACO) payment models.

Low birth weight babies at higher risk for mental health problems later in life Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years.

Banned chemicals from the '70s found in the deepest reaches of the ocean Crustaceans from the deepest ocean trenches found to contain ten times the level of industrial pollution than the average earthworm, scientists have shown.

Scientists create mouse that resists cocaine's lure Scientists have genetically engineered a mouse that resists addiction to cocaine.

Neurons support cancer growth throughout the body Cancer cells rely on the healthy cells that surround them for sustenance. Tumors reroute blood vessels to nourish themselves, secrete chemicals that scramble immune responses, and, according to recent studies, even recruit and manipulate neurons for their own gain. This pattern holds true not just for brain cancers, but also for prostate cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and stomach cancer.

'Achilles' heel' of key anti-cancer protein Researchers have discovered that a protein called Importin-11 protects the anti-cancer protein PTEN from destruction by transporting it into the cell nucleus. The research suggests that the loss of Importin-11 may destabilize PTEN, leading to the development of lung, prostate, and other cancers.

New species of marine worm discovered in Antarctica A team of scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan's Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments.

Desert songbirds may face expanding threat of lethal dehydration A new study of songbird dehydration and survival risk during heat waves in the desert Southwest suggests that some birds are at risk of lethal dehydration and mass die-offs when water is scarce, and the risk is expected to increase as climate change advances. Using physiological data, hourly temperature maps and modeling, researchers investigated how rates of evaporative water loss varied in five

Using high-resolution satellites to measure African farm yields By using high-res images taken by the latest generation of compact satellites, scientists have developed a new capability for estimating crop yields from space.

Potential new treatment combats COPD and other lung diseases New research reveals a potential drug to combat the life-threatening effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Possible key to regeneration found in planaria's origins A new chronicles the embryonic origins of planaria, providing new insight into the animal's remarkable regenerative abilities.

X-ray pulses reveal structure of viral cocoon Scientists have used high-intensity X-ray pulses to determine the structure of the crystalline protein envelope of an insect virus. The tiny viruses with their crystal casing are by far the smallest protein crystals ever analyzed using X-ray crystallography. This opens up new opportunities in the study of protein structures.

Surprising link between athletics and addiction While investigating the idealized benefits between sport and addiction, researchers found that the prevalence of substance abuse in some sports communities, in fact, creates a greater risk of addictions for people already vulnerable to them. Surprised by the number of participants, researchers interviewed a range of subjects including a gymnast, a rower, a martial artist and a significant number o

Nicotine changes how nicotinic receptors are grouped on brain cells Nicotine the primary compound found within tobacco smoke is known to change the grouping of some subtypes of nicotinic receptors, but the mechanisms for nicotine addiction remain unclear.

Exploring the role of blood flow during cardiac events While several circulatory system models are used today in an attempt to better understand blood flow, they still don’t account for the complex rheological behavior of blood. Because blood is a complex suspension of red and white blood cells and platelets suspended within a plasma that contains various proteins, it can exhibit complex flow behavior. Many of the models currently used ignore these co

Keeping up the pressure Besides the classic stress response – an acute reaction that gradually abates when the threat passes – our bodies appear to have a separate mechanism that deals only with chronic stress, research indicates. These findings may lead to better diagnosis of and treatment for anxiety and depression.

Sunlight or bacteria? Scientists investigate what breaks down permafrost carbon Researchers found sunlight converted little if any permafrost thawed carbon to carbon dioxide, whereas microbes were shown to rapidly convert permafrost carbon to carbon dioxide.

Chip could make voice control ubiquitous in electronics In anticipation of the age of voice-controlled electronics, researchers have built a low-power chip specialized for automatic speech recognition. Whereas a cellphone running speech-recognition software might require about 1 watt of power, the new chip requires between 0.2 and 10 milliwatts, depending on the number of words it has to recognize.

Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost 'good' cholesterol A Mediterranean diet, particularly when enriched with virgin olive oil, appears to improve the function of high-density lipoprotein, the so-called good cholesterol, in patients at high risk for heart disease. A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may help the body remove excess cholesterol from arteries, serve as an antioxidant and keep blood vessels open -- all of which are known to reduc

Intensive blood pressure control could prevent 100,000 early deaths each year Researchers have projected that aggressively lowering blood pressure could help prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the US each year. Experts from across the country built upon the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial which found that decreasing blood pressure to 120 mmHg compared to 140 mmHg reduced heart attack, stroke and death in people that were at high risk. Until now, the num

Sulfide-sensing mechanisms in purple bacteria Scientists have uncovered a sulfide-responsive protein that helps control photosynthesis in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

Drug increases survival in dogs with cancer A breakthrough trial testing a new drug resulted in improved survival rates for dogs diagnosed with a cancer called hemangiosarcoma (HSA).

Researchers apply machine learning to condensed matter physics New research demonstrates that machine learning algorithms might play an important role in identifying different phases of condensed matter.

Your brain on exercise Psychologists have designed an experiment to investigate whether human vision is more sensitive during physical activity.

New method to detect ultrasound with light A tiny, transparent device that fits into a contact lens can determine the speed of blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate at the back of the eye, helping to diagnose diseases such as macular degeneration.

Finding our way around DNA A new tool has been developed that maps functional areas of the genome to better understand disease.

Taking a high-priced cancer drug with a low-fat meal can cut cost by 75% Taking one-fourth the standard dose of a widely used drug for prostate cancer with a low-fat breakfast can be as effective – and four times less expensive – as taking the standard dose as recommended: on an empty stomach. The finding has significant financial implications.

Drug used to combat pain medication side effects may help with gastrointestinal recovery A drug given to reduce the side effects of strong post-surgery pain medications resulting in a reduced length of hospital stay for patients who have undergone major gastrointestinal or bladder cancer procedures is found to have similar benefit for some patients undergoing surgery for testicular cancer. An investigator explored the impact of alvimopan in those patients who underwent RPLND.

A theoretical physicist reassures the lovelorn Here, in celebration of Valentine's Day, we present another of the paradoxes, sometimes called the Picky Suitor problem: Can you guess the odds that you will find your one and only among the 9 billion people on the planet?

Sperm-egg fusion proteins have same structure as those used by Zika and other viruses The protein which helps the sperm and egg fuse together in sexual reproduction are part of a larger family of proteins that helps other cells bind together to create larger organs, and which also allows viruses like Zika and Dengue to invade healthy cells.

Seeing the world through fresh eyes New research provides insight into the development of zebrafish eyes using imaging and bioengineering techniques in live zebrafish embryos.

Population density pushes the 'slow life' One psychological effect of population density is for those people living in urban areas to adopt a 'slow life strategy.' This strategy focuses more on planning for the long-term future and includes tactics like preferring long-term romantic relationships, having fewer children and investing more in education.

Measuring entropy: Scanning-tunneling microscope gives glimpse of the mysterious property The scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), which is used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes, researchers have found.

Avoiding medications that promote weight gain when managing obesity While diet, exercise and behavior modification are essential components of obesity management, a successful long-term weight loss strategy should also include avoiding or minimizing medication-related weight gain, according to a new report.

Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method Researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant -- the first of its kind in Canada -- that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.

To please your friends, tell them what they already know We love to tell friends and family about experiences we've had and they haven't -- from exotic vacations to celebrity sightings -- but new research suggests that these stories don't thrill them quite as much as we imagine. A series of studies shows that both speakers and listeners expect novel stories to be bigger crowd pleasers, but that listeners end up enjoying familiar stories more.

Do children inherit drug protection from parents exposed to nicotine or drugs? A father's nicotine use may have a significant impact on children's risk of some diseases. In a study published in the online biomedical sciences journal eLife, Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, and colleagues at UMass Medical School, demonstrate that mice born of fathers who are habitually exposed to nicotine inherit enhanced chemical tolerance and drug clearance abilities.

Estrogen explains the exosome-carried messenger profile in the circulation among postmenopausal women In blood circulation, the exosome-carried messenger molecule profile differs between post- and premenopausal women, research shows. The differences were associated with circulating estrogen and cholesterol levels as well as body composition and other health indicators. These findings enable using the studied molecules in the evaluation of health status.

New peptide hormone aids waterproof barrier formation in plant roots Researchers have identified peptide hormones needed for formation and maintenance of plant root barrier to preserve ion homeostasis and adapt to harsh soil conditions.

New RNAi treatment targets eye inflammation Scientists have developed a new RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic agent that safely blocked ocular inflammation in mice, potentially making it a new treatment for human uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products Technology known as "CatLignin" has been created to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture.

Norwegian ice cap 'exceptionally sensitive' to climate change How will future climate change affect our glaciers? By looking into the past 4000 years, a new study finds an ice cap in southern Norway to be ‘exceptionally sensitive’ to climate change.

Children of patients with C9orf72 mutations are at a greater risk of frontotemporal dementia or ALS at a younger age The most common genetic cause of the brain diseases frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene. Researchers have demonstrated that if an affected parent passes on this mutation, the children will be affected at a younger age (than the parent). There are no indications that the disease progresses more quickly.

Combating iron in the brain: Researchers find anti-aging micromolecule The older we get, the more our brain ages. Cognitive abilities decline and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases like dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease or having a stroke steadily increases. A possible cause is the accumulation of iron molecules within neurons, which seems to be valid for all vertebrates. In a collaborative research project, scientists found that this iron

Supporting a caring and creative culture for hospital patients and staff through 'Being Human' Going into hospital, whether unexpectedly or planned, can be a very difficult time for patients and their families. Care and support from hospital staff can make a huge difference to their experiences, but when staff face increasing demands on their time, this is not always easy to deliver.

Developing knowledge of blowfly life cycles to improve accuracy of estimating post-mortem interval Post-mortems are an essential part of the investigative process after someone has died in suspicious circumstances, usually performed to establish cause of death. Definitively proving time of death later is extremely difficult. By using blowflies and sometimes other insects, forensic entomologists can provide an estimated window of time in which someone is likely to have died. This is calculated b

Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea Both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems, scientists have concluded in a new report.

Esophageal cancer: Loss of muscle mass represents a significant risk to survival Esophageal cancer patients who suffer loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) during neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy prior to surgery) survive, on average, 32 months less than patients with no sarcopenia, new research concludes.

Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy 25 years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as a system for delivering drugs. Now new work reviews the application of SLNs and NLCs in gene therapy since the group’s significant contributions made in this area have been included in various international scientific publications.

Radiation therapy continues to be gold standard for palliative care of painful bone metastases An updated clinical guideline has been published that underscores the safety and effectiveness of palliative radiation therapy (RT) for treating painful bone metastases.

Parenting significantly impacts development of children with Fragile X Syndrome A longitudinal study of children with Fragile X Syndrome, the leading genetic cause of autism, and their mothers found that sustained maternal responsivity had a significant positive impact on the children's development, even mitigating declines often reported in middle childhood.

Setting the record straight on some common beliefs about food and health When it comes to what certain foods can do to or for you, it’s probably best to take motherly advice, familiar sayings and other bits of conventional wisdom with a grain of salt.

Researchers identify a population of cells linked to the development of the heart's ventricular chambers New research findings could provide new insight and understanding of congenital heart defects.

Immune cell study prompts rethink on how to tackle infections Fresh insights into how immune cells are regulated could signal a new approach to tackling infections. Scientists say the findings pave the way for new therapies that target the immune response to infection, with the potential to boost existing antibiotic treatments.

Technology puts 'touch' into long-distance relationships Long-distance couples can share a walk, watch movies together, and even give each other a massage, using new technologies.

Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking, new research finds The fault under Ventura, California, would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected, researchers warn. The Ventura-Pitas Point fault in Southern California has been the focus of much recent attention because it is thought to be capable of magnitude 8 earthquakes. It underlies the city of Ventura and runs offshore, and thus could generate tsunamis

Just press print: How 3-D printing at home saves big bucks A new study shows that consumers who invest in an at-home 3-D printer can not only make their money back within six months, but may also see an almost 1,000 percent return on their investment over a five-year period.

New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is one of only seven in Milky Way The newest delta Scuti (SKOO-tee) star in our night sky is so rare it's only one of seven identified by astronomers in the Milky Way. The star -- like our sun -- is in the throes of stellar evolution, to conclude as a dying ember in millions of years. Until then, the exceptional star pulsates brightly, expanding and contracting from heating and cooling of hydrogen burning at its core.

With stringent oversight, heritable human genome editing could be allowed Clinical trials for genome editing of the human germline -- adding, removing, or replacing DNA base pairs in gametes or early embryos -- could be permitted in the future, but only for serious conditions under stringent oversight, says a new report.

The heart of a far-off star beats for its planet For the first time, astronomers have observed a star pulsing in response to its orbiting planet. The star, which goes by the name HAT-P-2, is about 400 light years from Earth and is circled by a gas giant measuring eight times the mass of Jupiter -- one of the most massive exoplanets known today.

Study rewrites the history of corn in corn country A new study contradicts decades of thought, research and teaching on the history of corn cultivation in the American Bottom, a floodplain of the Mississippi River in Illinois. The study refutes the notion that Indian corn, or maize, was cultivated in this region hundreds of years before its widespread adoption at about 1000 A.D.

Youth flag football may not be safer than tackle football The results of a study of injury rates in youth football leagues did not show that flag football is safer than tackle football, new research concludes. The study finds Injury is more likely to occur in youth flag football than in youth tackle football, but severe injuries and concussions were not significantly different between leagues

Ancient jars found in Judea reveal Earth's magnetic field is fluctuating, not diminishing Surprising new evidence derived from ancient ceramics proves that the Earth's geomagnetic force fluctuates -- not diminishes -- over time, researchers say.

Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035 By 2035, cardiovascular disease, the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation's financial and health care systems, a new study projects.

Astronomers propose a cell phone search for galactic fast radio bursts Fast radio bursts seem to come from distant galaxies, but there is no obvious reason that, every once in a while, an FRB wouldn't occur in our own Milky Way galaxy too. If it did, astronomers suggest that it would be 'loud' enough that a global network of cell phones or small radio receivers could 'hear' it.

Flirting on the 'fly:' what blow flies can tell us about attraction, dating apps The photoreceptors in blow fly eyes do more than help them navigate the environment, research shows. They're also used in an elaborate sexual communication system, aiding their quest to find the perfect mate by filtering out incompatible candidates.

Researchers develop 'living diode' using cardiac muscle cells Research brings scientists one step closer to developing new forms of biorobotics and novel treatment approaches for several muscle-related health problems such as muscular degenerative disorders, arrhythmia and limb loss.

Fractal edges shown to be key to imagery seen in Rorschach inkblots Researchers have unlocked the mystery of why people have seen so many different images in Rorschach inkblots. The image associations are induced by fractal characteristics at the edges of the blots and depend on the scaling parameters of the patterns, says researcher.

Shorter course of immunotherapy does not improve symptoms of allergic rhinitis long-term Among patients with moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis, two years of immunotherapy tablets was not significantly different from placebo in improving nasal symptoms at 3-year follow-up, according to a study.

Gene variants associated with body shape increase risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes A study has found that a pattern of gene variants associated with a body type, in which weight is deposited around the abdomen, rather than in the hips and thighs, increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, as well as the incidence of several cardiovascular risk factors. abdominal

Researchers warn scientists of costly impure chemicals Researchers are now warning fellow scientists of impure reagents that could skew results. The study found that commercial reagents, which were purchased from highly respected companies, were not pure but contained many contaminants which had a huge and potentially misleading effect on the scientists’ work.

Astronomers Spy Dusty "Traffic Jam" in Young Star System The newfound structures in disks of dust and gas around newborn stars could aid planet formation --
Broken California Dam Is a Sign of Emergencies to Come Climate change is leading to more extreme rainfalls that can overwhelm infrastructure --
Can Artificial Intelligence Predict Earthquakes? The ability to forecast temblors would be a tectonic shift in seismology. But is it a pipe dream? A seismologist is conducting machine-learning experiments to find out --
Congress Wants to Stop Coastal Erosion--with Mud The Army Corps will run 10 pilot projects in which dredged sediment will protect coastlines --
Elusive Triangulene Created for the First Time Researchers at IBM assembled the fragile molecule atom-by-atom using a specialized microscope --
How to Prevent Suicide with an Opioid Fascinating study suggests treating “psychache” --
How Trump's Travel Ban Can Upend Lives of Scientists Like Me --
Is Your Gut Making You Depressed or Anxious? This week Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen goes straight for the gut with three surprising mind-gut connections --
Marine Ecosystems Are Preparing for Climate Change Coral reefs, kelp forests and other ocean ecosystems may be more resilient than we think --
Maternal Health Care Is Disappearing in Rural America Many women must travel an hour or longer to find a hospital where they can deliver their babies --
Nerve Cells That Go Out on a Limb Show How the Ability to Tweet Evolved Fresh insight emerges into the complex genetics that dictate how the nervous system wires itself for fine-motor control, which gives humans the dexterity for everything from brain surgery to... --
New Zealand Warns of Exploding Whale Carcasses after Mass Stranding Authorities cut holes in 300 bodies to release decomposition pressure --
North Korea's Missile Threats to the U.S. May Not Be Empty for Long North Korea has always talked the talk, and now it seems to be walking the walk as never before --
Sea Ice Hits Record Lows at Both Poles The repeated bouts of warm weather this season have stunned polar researchers, and could push the Arctic to a record low winter peak for the third year in a row --
These Microscopic Bots Could Swim through the Bloodstream to Deliver Drugs Chemists create micro swimmers that can be controlled by light --
To Boldly Go to the Nearest Star and the Distant Past --
U.S. Science Advisers Outline Path to Genetically Modified Babies Edited embryos should be allowed in specific contexts, National Academies say --
Cool Coating Chills in Sunlight A thin film coating can chill a vat of water to 15 degress Fahrenheit cooler than its surroundings, by absorbing—and then emitting—the sun's infrared rays. Christopher Intagliata reports. --
Housing Boom Busts Birds' Valentine's Day A Pacific Northwest housing boom is encroaching on songbird habitat, forcing the birds to flee their homes—and their mates. --
Is Physics Funnier Than Biology? The Big Bang Theory writer and executive producer has a hypothesis why physics makes the funniest TV. --
Jumping Spiders See with Rose-Colored Glasses Human suitors may woo with red wine and roses, but these jumping spiders come courting with fancy dress and choreography. Now scientists know more about how spiders perceive their admirers'... --
Imagining the Future of VR at Google The search giant’s filmmaker on what the new medium does that film cannot.

AI Software Juggles Probabilities to Learn from Less Data Gamalon has developed a technique that lets machines learn to recognize concepts in images or text much more efficiently.

AI Software That Writes and Rewrites its Own Code Gamalon has developed a technique that lets machines learn from a lot less data, while using less computer power.

AI Software Writes, and Rewrites, Its Own Code Gamalon has developed a technique that lets machines learn from a lot less data, while using less computer power.

Companies Plan Tests of “Optogenetic Goggles” to Restore Sight Visor-like devices combined with gene therapy could help blind people.

Absorbent Beads Could Save Energy—and Lives Zeolite beads are a better, more efficient way to prevent crops from rotting in humid parts of the globe.

An AI-Fueled Credit Formula Might Help You Get a Loan Startup ZestFinance says it has built a machine-learning system that’s smart enough to find new borrowers and keep bias out of its credit analysis.

Siri May Get Smarter by Learning from Its Mistakes Conversational assistants can learn a lot through positive or negative feedback from humans.

The U.S. Chip Industry Is Growing in China American chip maker GlobalFoundries is defying President Trump to build a $10 billion fabrication facility in Chengdu.

The Jeff Bezos Retail Laboratory—or Seattle, as the Locals Say The city’s inhabitants are unwittingly part of a real-life commerce experiment orchestrated by Amazon.

U.S. Panel Endorses Designer Babies to Avoid Serious Disease Genetically modified children could be acceptable in narrow circumstances, according to National Academy of Sciences.

The Download, Feb 13, 2017: The Free Web in Danger, U.S. Chips in China, and Amazon’s Real-Life Retail Lab The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

Will Snapchat Be as Fleeting as Its Photos? As the disappearing-message maker prepares to go public, I’ve given it up for Instagram Stories.

Cameroon’s Internet Outage Is Draining Its Economy As many as 20 percent of the population is without access, and the service disruption is thought to be politically motivated.

The Download, Feb 14, 2017: VR Storytelling, iPhone 8 Lust, and Mariana Trench Pollution The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

Your Cubicle Has Ears—and Eyes, and a Brain Sensors and AI can keep tabs on employees better than any boss.

India Now Has the World’s Worst Air Pollution Industrialization, coal-fired power plants, and a lack of regulation mean the problem is just going to get worse, even as richer nations clean up their air.

Svagere adgangsbeskyttelse i flere netbanker sammenlignet med offentlige selvbetjeningsløsninger https://www.version2.dk/artikel/giraf1-uden-noeglekort-godt-nok-netbanken-1073430 Nøglekortet er obligatorisk ved login med NemID til offentlige tjenester. Mens det er muligt at logge på flere danske netbanker blot med simpelt password. Version2

IBM lancerer Watson for Cyber Security til at bekæmpe cybercrime Watson har været på skolebænken i mere end et år, men nu mener IBM, at han er klar til at bekæmpe sikkerhedstrusler. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ibm-lancerer-watson-security-nu-med-evner-at-bekaempe-cybercrime-1073409 Version2

75 procent af al ransomware bliver udviklet af russere https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kaspersky-lab-75-procent-al-ransomware-bliver-udviklet-russere-1073440 Russere eller russisk-talende personer står bag langt størstedelen af de ransomware pakker, som sidste år blev brugt til at udføre 1,4 millioner angreb. Det afslører Kaspersky Lab på en konference i San Fransisco. Version2

Rådet for Digital Sikkerhed: Ingen grund til panik efter CPR-tyveri hos teleselskabet 3 https://www.version2.dk/artikel/raadet-digital-sikkerhed-ingen-grund-panik-efter-cpr-tyveri-hos-teleselskabet-3-1073408 Konsekvenser for borgerne af gårsdagens udmelding om CPR-tyveri hos teleselskabet 3 er alvorlige, men ikke skelsættende, mener fagfolk. Version2

Dansk forsker: Bilfabrikker nedprioriterer sikkerheden https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedsforsker-sikkerhed-nedprioriteres-billige-iot-produkter-hos-visse-bilmaerker Ingen virksomheder, heller ikke bilfabrikker, producerer længere blot et fysisk produkt. De er også softwarevirksomheder, men for mange blæser på ansvaret for sikkerheden, mener Gert Læssøe Mikkelsen, head of Security Lab på Alexandra Instituttet. Version2

Supersygehus vil have styr på de ansatte: Udstyrer dem med RFID-chip https://www.version2.dk/artikel/supersygehus-aarhus-vil-udstyre-ansatte-med-chips-lokalisering-1073395 RFID-læsere, der er installeret på gange og i lokaler, bliver en del af Det Nye Universitetshospital i Aaarhus. Via et chipkort kan kolleger herefter spores på informationsskærme eller mobilapp.

88 New Satellites Will Watch Earth, All the Time, All the Places With the acquisition of Google's satellite company and 88 new satellites, Planet is poised to become the world's most powerful space surveillance company.
AI’s Factions Get Feisty. But Really, They’re All on the Same Team Artificial intelligence is not one thing—it's not really a thing at all. It's many technologies that span several schools of thought. Call them tribes.
Apple’s Original TV Shows Suggest It Doesn’t Need to Lure New Subscribers 'Carpool Karaoke' and something called 'Planet of the Apps' are coming to Apple Music.
These Commute-Friendly Apps Don’t Require a Data Connection The internet is a series of tubes, but it's useless when you're stuck in one.
The Best Way to Quash Fake News? Choke Off Its Ad Money Ad tech companies have a unique window on the way traffic flows on the web. They could use that view to choke off ad dollars to fake news.
Congress Could Make Self-Driving Cars Happen—or Ruin Everything It's legislation time.
Caavo’s Set-Top Box Fixes Everything You Hate About Watching TV Caavo's new device turns many devices, many remotes, many apps, into one.
Humans Killed the Aral Sea. Now, It’s Come Back to Life How one of the largest environmental disasters in Europe got turned around.
Diehard Coders Just Rescued NASA’s Earth Science Data Hackers are building up robust systems to monitor changes to government websites. And they're keeping track of data that's already been removed.
This Is My Hardest Editor’s Letter Yet—Because It’s My Last It's been a great four years leading WIRED. I hope you'll make the new editor, Nicholas Thompson, as welcome as you've made me.
The Best Encrypted Chat App Now Makes Video Calls Too You're about to be able to turn on new encrypted calling features. But you may also want to turn off one that could leak your metadata.
The Enormous Bird That Can Ride the Wind for 10,000 Miles The albatross has wings that span up to 11 feet, and it uses them to cross entire oceans.
The Weird and Wonderful Gas Stations of Iraq (Yes, Gas Stations) There are more than 70 gas stations along a 70-mile strip in Northern Iraq. You gotta stand out somehow.
The Expanse Isn’t Just Awesome TV—It’s Transforming TV Ty Franck and Daniel Abraham aren't just watching their books get adapted for the Syfy series—they're inside the writers' room, helping.
Facing the Horror of In-Flight Phone Calls, Americans Beg the Feds for Help Nononononono, says America.
A Chip Flaw Strips Away Hacking Protections for Millions of Devices A new attack cracks a key hacking protection known as address space layout randomization, leaving millions of computers vulnerable.
The 7-Hour, 166-Person Audiobook That Feels Like a Movie The audio version of 'Lincoln in the Bardo' recruits everyone from comedy stars to Academy Award winners to the author's elementary school teachers.
The Unbearable Tameness of This Year’s Grammys In room full of outspoken artists, this year's Grammys were surprisingly quiet on the political front.
Human Embryo Editing Gets the OK—But No Superbabies A National Academy of Sciences committee reviews the do's and don'ts for gene editing. Cures: good. Enhancements: Not right now.
Journalism Fights for Survival in the Post-Truth Era The ad-driven business model is on the brink of collapse. Trust in the press is at an all-time low. And now there's an even larger existential crisis.
How to Keep Your AI From Turning Into a Racist Monster Opinion: Algorithmic bias can turn bots into beasts. Tech can help.
Mail-Order STD Tests Make Sharing Results as Easy as Sending a Snap But they might have more of an impact on testing companies' bottom lines than on antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea rates.
Mercedes Somehow Makes the Ultra-Luxe G-Wagen Even Swankier A V12 biturbo engine, more screens than you can look at, and enough leather to put cattle on the endangered species list.
Millions Need the Broadband Program the FCC Just Put on Hold The FCC's new chairman says the program is overrun with waste and abuse. In the meantime, kids are going to McDonald's to get their homework done.
Pagani Chops the Top Off the Huayra Supercar, Demands $2.4 Million Now you can hear the wind whistle by.
The Most Insane Yacht on Earth Just Got Even Insaner When in doubt, call on the folks who make planes.
PewDiePie’s Anti-Semitic Videos Put YouTube’s Business in a Bind What do you do when your biggest star thinks making light of the Holocaust is satire? The post PewDiePie’s Anti-Semitic Videos Put YouTube's Business in a Bind appeared first on WIRED .

Physicists Teach AI to Identify Exotic States of Matter Physicists taught a computer how to look for superconductivity and topological states of matter.
6 Essential Podcasts for News, Tech, and Political Junkies As part of our special coverage on the future of journalism, we rounded up some of the best podcasts on the media business.
Edward Snowden’s New Job: Protecting Reporters From Spies As president of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, Snowden is helping the media beat state-¬sponsored hackers and government surveillance.
Robo-Telescopes Capture the Last Gasp of a Dying Star The discovery changes what astronomers thought they knew about how spectacularly large stars die.
Spanner, the Google Database That Mastered Time, Is Now Open to Everyone About a decade ago, a handful of Google's most talented engineers started building a system that seems to defy logic.
Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Has a Secure Room? Great! Then Use It A recent public display of high-level diplomacy at the president's resort should have happened in a SCIF instead.
The Unlimited Data Party Will Last Until the Big Four Become the Big Three Verizon is finally bringing back unlimited plans—at least as long as it has enough competition to keep up the pressure.
The Macedonian Teens Who Mastered Fake News These guys didn't care if Trump won or lost the White House. They only wanted pocket money. But the consequences of what they did shook the world.
Verizon’s Unlimited Data Plan Is Back. Here’s How It Compares to Other Carriers Now that Verizon has brought back its unlimited data plan, it's time to see how everyone's all-you-can-eat plan stacks up.
The Walking Dead Returns, Both to TV and Relevance The show returned to its usual Sunday-night perch, but it also seems to have regained its urgency—and maybe even its relevance.
Want Secure Elections? Then Maybe Don’t Cut Security Funding Opinion: Dropping funding for the crucial Election Administration Commission is a particularly bad way to save money.
Stephen P. Bell (MIT / HHMI) 2: Single-Molecule Studies of Eukaryotic DNA Replication https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/single-molecule-studies-of-eukaryotic-dna-replication.html Part 1a: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replication: The Replication Fork: For an organism to survive, its DNA must be accurately and completely copied during each cell division. Bell explains how replication begins at the DNA replication fork. Part 1b: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replication: Initia

Stephen P. Bell (MIT / HHMI) 1b: Chromosomal DNA Replication: Initiation of DNA Replication https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/mechanisms-chromosomal-dna-replication-initiation-dna-replication.html Part 1a: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replication: The Replication Fork: For an organism to survive, its DNA must be accurately and completely copied during each cell division. Bell explains how replication begins at the DNA replication fork. Part 1b: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replica

Stephen P. Bell (MIT / HHMI) 1a: Chromosomal DNA Replication: The DNA Replication Fork https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/dna-replication-fork.html Part 1a: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replication: The Replication Fork: For an organism to survive, its DNA must be accurately and completely copied during each cell division. Bell explains how replication begins at the DNA replication fork. Part 1b: Mechanisms of Chromosomal DNA Replication: Initiation of Replication: Bell describ



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