20% spild af mad

Fifth of world's food lost to over-eating and waste, study finds
Almost 20 per cent of the food made available to consumers is lost through over-eating or waste, a study suggests.

aktiv dødshjælp

Læge-netværk hjælper patienter med at dø
Et nyt netværk af læger yder aktiv dødshjælp til syge patienter. Det er dybt problematisk, at en gruppe læger udfører et arbejde, der er i strid med loven, mener Lægeforeningen.

antibiotikaresistens gener

Scientists find genetic mutations that drive antibiotic resistance
Scientists from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have identified novel mutations in bacteria that promote the evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance.

antimikrobelle stoffer i varan

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
In a land where survival is precarious, Komodo dragons thrive despite being exposed to scads of bacteria that would kill less hardy creatures. Now in a study, scientists report that they have detected antimicrobial protein fragments in the lizard's blood that appear to help them resist deadly infections. The discovery could lead to the development of new drugs capable of combating bacteria that ha

antimikrobelle stoffer i varan

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
In a land where survival is precarious, Komodo dragons thrive despite being exposed to scads of bacteria that would kill less hardy creatures. Now in a study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that they have detected antimicrobial protein fragments in the lizard's blood that appear to help them resist deadly infections. The discovery could lead to the development of n

astmamedicin mod lungeinfektion

Asthma drugs could prevent prevent deadly form of pneumonia, research suggests
Two drugs used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 percent of people who contract it, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found.

atmosfæriske floder

Atmosfæriske floder giver anledning til store stormskader
Vandtransport i smalle korridorer i atmosfæren er et vejrfænomen, der får voksende opmærksomhed. Det medfører både oversvømmelser og ekstreme vindhastigheder.

autisme schizofreni

Drugs that alter inhibitory targets offer therapeutic strategies for Autism, Schizophrenia
Memories are formed at structures in the brain known as dendritic spines, which communicate with other brain cells through 'synapses.' Researchers recently discovered that an inhibitory brain receptor triggers synaptic pruning in adolescence. Now, a new article shows that drugs that selectively target these receptors, when administered during adolescence, can alter synapse number, with possible im

Aztek døde af salmonella måske

Two studies offer evidence suggesting salmonella may have killed off the Aztecs
(Phys.org)—Two separate studies conducted by two teams of researchers has led to evidence suggesting that salmonella infections may have been one of the factors that led to the deaths of the vast majority of the Aztecs living in Mexico after the arrival of the Spaniards. Both studies were conducted by teams with members from around the globe and both resulted in papers that have been uploaded to t

Bakterier i 50k krystaller

50,000 Year Old Microbes Have Just Been Found In Crystals. Alive.
NASA finds 50,000 year-old bacteria alive inside gigantic crystals in a Mexican mine.

Batterier

Ny chip skal gøre det af med standbyforbrug
En ny chip skal få batterier i sensorer til at holde op til 10.000 gange længere og eliminere standbyforbrug i elektriske apparater.

brystkræft efter kemoterapi

Scientists identify chain reaction that shields breast cancer stem cells from chemotherapy
Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, researchers say they have identified a biochemical pathway that triggers the regrowth of breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy.

brystkræft og gener

Breast cancer genes could predict best treatment
Effective breast cancer treatment options are predictable based on the way certain genes act or express themselves, new research shows. The findings, published in the journal Oncogene , offer proof that gene expression patterns can help direct the type of therapy a patient receives, paving the way for more targeted and personalized approaches to care. “Breast cancer has numerous subtypes,” says E

brystkræft og gener

The way breast cancer genes act could predict your treatment
Effective treatment options for breast cancer can be predicted based on the way certain breast cancer genes act or express themselves, a researcher has concluded.

bør læger ikke have skæg?

Should Doctors Have Beards?
The hygiene of facial hair in health care is a controversy that dates back at least to the 1800s --

Chimpanse med Down syndrom

Second case of 'Down syndrome' in chimps
Japanese researchers have confirmed the second case known to science of a chimpanzee born with trisomy 22, a chromosomal defect similar to that of Down syndrome (or trisomy 21) in humans.

Chimpanse med Down syndrom

Researchers document second case of 'Down syndrome' in chimps
Japanese researchers have confirmed the second case known to science of a chimpanzee born with trisomy 22, a chromosomal defect similar to that of Down syndrome (or trisomy 21) in humans. The report on Kanako, a 24-year-old female chimp born into captivity, was led by Satoshi Hirata of Kyoto University in Japan, and appears in the journal Primates, published by Springer. The authors also describe

CRISPR

CAR T cells more powerful when built with CRISPR, researchers find
Researchers have harnessed the power of CRISPR/Cas9 to create more-potent chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that enhance tumor rejection in mice.

CRISPR

Will phages complicate quest for designer gut bacteria?
Researchers planning to use the CRISPR genome-editing system to produce designer gut bacteria may need to account for the dynamic evolution of the microbial immune system. CRISPR is an acquired immune system that allows bacteria and other single-celled organisms to store snippets of DNA to protect themselves from viruses called phages. The system allows a cell to “remember” and mount a defense ag

CRISPR

The Long-Shot Bid to Put Crispr in the Hands of the People
Legal experts are filing a petition. They want the federal government to step in and bring Crispr back to the people.

CRISPR

Microbe, virus co-evolution: Model of CRISPR, phage co-evolution explains confusing experimental results
A new study suggests that researchers planning to use the CRISPR genome-editing system to produce designer gut bacteria may need to account for the dynamic evolution of the microbial immune system.

CRISPR

Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date
Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with KIM Eunji (ToolGen Inc.) and KIM Jeong Hun (Seoul National University) have engineered the smallest CRISPR-Cas9 to date, delivered it to the muscle cells and in the eyes of mice via adeno-associated viruses (AAV) and used it to modify a gene causing blindness. Published on Nature Co

Dolly klonet får

8 Mammals That Have Been Cloned Since Dolly the Sheep
It was 20 years ago this week that scientists announced the first successful cloning of a mammal — the now-famous sheep Dolly.

Dolly klonet får

20 Years After Dolly the Sheep, What Have We Learned About Cloning?
Today marks the 20th anniversary of the announcement of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal cloned from an adult cell.

Epigenetik

An epigenetics gold rush: new controls for gene expression
How rediscovered chemical tags on DNA and RNA are shaking up the field.

epilepsi gen

Significant epilepsy gene discovery in dogs
Research groups have described in collaboration a novel myoclonic epilepsy in dogs and identified its genetic cause. The study reveals a novel candidate gene for human myoclonic epilepsies, one of the most common forms of epilepsy. As a result, a genetic test was developed for veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs.

fedt og muskelstamceller

Obesity reprograms muscle stem cells
Obesity is associated with reduced muscle mass and impaired metabolism. Epigenetic changes that affect the formation of new muscle cells may be a contributing factor, according to new research.

fluorescens viser kviksølvforurening i fisk

Fluorescence method detects mercury contamination in fish
Researchers have developed a fluorescent polymer that lights up in contact with mercury that may be present in fish. High levels of the metal were detected in samples of swordfish and tuna. According to the conclusions of another study, mercury exposure is linked to reduced fetal and placental growth in pregnant women.

frygt hukommelse

How the brain remembers fearful experiences
Scientists reveal for the first time the specific patterns of electrical activity in rat brains that are associated with specific memories, in this case a fearful experience.

havbund minedrift

Should we mine the deep ocean?
Environment Behind the deep sea “gold rush” for increasingly rare minerals Is the deep sea the next frontier for mining or a search for fool’s gold?

herpes og autisme

What pregnant women actually need to know about herpes
Health A reported link between herpes and autism isn't as scary as it sounds A new study reports a link between herpes and autism. But there's more to it than that. And having a baby isn't as scary as many HSV-positive women are led to believe.

herpes og autisme

Autism risk linked to herpes infection during pregnancy
Women actively infected with genital herpes during early pregnancy had twice the odds of giving birth to a child later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study.

HIV vaccine

HIV vaccine therapy lets five people control virus without drugs
The therapy gives the immune system the tools to flush out HIV, meaning daily drugs can be ditched – one man has been free of them for seven months

hjernekirurgi af hjernekræft ved brug af supervæske til ultralyd

Superfluid is now helping brain surgeons
A superfluid, which resembles brain tissue, makes ultrasound images easier to interpret during an operation. This will make it easier for surgeons to remove brain tumors more accurately, say researchers.

hjernens belønningssystem

Researchers uncover brain circuitry central to reward-seeking behavior
Scientists have found that as mice learn to associate a particular sound with a rewarding sugary drink, one set of prefrontal neurons becomes more active and promotes reward-seeking behavior while other prefrontal neurons are silenced, and those neurons act like a brake on reward-seeking.

hvorfor er billers skelet så let

Scientists decipher the nanoscale architecture of a beetle's shell
Beetles wear a body armor that should weigh them down—think medieval knights and turtles. In fact, those hard shells protecting delicate wings are surprisingly light, allowing even flight.

hvorfor er billers skelet så let

Scientists decipher the nanoscale architecture of a beetle's shell
A professor of mechanical and materials engineering has found a way to analyze the fibrous nanostructure of a beetle's lightweight but durable shell.

influenzatest

Proteins in your runny nose could reveal a viral infection
It may seem obvious, but the key to confirming whether someone is suffering from a cold or flu virus might lie at the misery's source -- the inflamed passages of the nose and throat. Scientists have identified a group of proteins that, when detected in specific quantities in the mucous, are 86 percent accurate in confirming the infection is from a cold or flu virus, according to a small, proof-of-

informationskrig Rusland

Russia military acknowledges new branch: info warfare troops
Along with a steady flow of new missiles, planes and tanks, Russia's defense minister said Wednesday his nation also has built up its muscle by forming a new branch of the military—information warfare troops.

jordlignende planet

Nearby Star Hosts 7 Earth-Size Planets [Video]
Astronomers say at least three of the worlds may be habitable, and could be studied for signs of life within a decade --

katteparasit og psykosesmitte

Despite 'Mind-Controlling' Parasite, Cat Owners Not at Risk for Psychosis
Cats are known to carry a parasite linked to symptoms of psychosis in humans, but despite this, a new study finds no connection between cat ownership and symptoms of psychosis.

katteparasit og psykosesmitte

Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems
New research has found no link between cat ownership and psychotic symptoms, casting doubt on previous suggestions that people who grew up with cats are at higher risk of mental illness.

katteparasit og psykosesmitte

Cat poop parasites don't actually make you psychotic
Animals Correlation and causation get mixed up again Cat owners can sleep easy tonight. Well, maybe they can’t if their cat likes to wake them up at 4am by gently clawing their cheeks, but they can at least put their minds…

kemoterapi-bivirkninger og muskelmasse

Measuring patients' muscles to predict chemotherapy side effects
Measuring patients' muscle mass and quality could potentially help doctors better identify patients at high risk for toxic side effects that could require hospitalizations, researchers report.

kreative hjerner

Creative people have better-connected brains
Seemingly countless self-help books and seminars tell you to tap into the right side of your brain to stimulate creativity. But forget the "right-brain" myth -- a new study suggests it's how well the two brain hemispheres communicate that sets highly creative people apart.

kunstig nedfrysning af Arktis

Tiny, Wind-Powered Pumps Could Help Replenish Arctic Ice
Tens of thousands of wind-powered pumps could freeze more sea ice during the Arctic winter, thereby preserving more summer sea ice, researchers propose.

kunstigt ben

Brain-machine interfaces: Bidirectional communication at last
A prosthetic limb controlled by brain activity can partially recover the lost motor function. Neuroscientists asked whether it was possible to transmit the missing sensation back to the brain by stimulating neural activity in the cortex. They discovered that not only was it possible to create an artificial sensation of neuroprosthetic movements, but that the underlying learning process occurs very

lodret farming

Den vertikale farm: Landbrug uden jord og naturligt sollys
Dyrkning uden jord og naturligt lys har stort potentiale til at forsyne verdens storbyer med lokalt producerede fødevarer. En mulighed virksomheden Aerofarms har fået øjnene op for med deres vertikale farm i New Jersey, som er verdens hidtil største af sin slags.

metan fra CO2

Scientists discover how essential methane catalyst is made
New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in global warming. However, because the bacteria that can convert CO2 into methane, methanogens, are notoriously

metan fra CO2

Scientists discover how essential methane catalyst is made
New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process.

nanotrampoline

Scientists create a nano-trampoline to probe quantum behavior
For the first time, scientists have measured quantum criticality by developing a thin membrane suspended in air by very narrow bridges, thereby forming a 'nano-trampoline'. This enabled specific heat measurements of thin films through a quantum phase transition from a superconducting state to an electrically insulating state close to absolute zero temperature, and is expected to be a milestone in

ny måde at teste farmaceutiske stoffer

Study says drugs could be developed cheaper and faster
Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market.

oxytoxin og fædre pleje

Oxytocin may drive dads to nurture their toddlers
Fathers given boosts of the hormone oxytocin show increased activity in brain regions associated with reward and empathy when viewing photos of their toddlers, new research shows. “Our findings add to the evidence that fathers, and not just mothers, undergo hormonal changes that are likely to facilitate increased empathy and motivation to care for their children,” says lead author James Rilling,

prostata kræft

New approach for the capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line
In a new paper in Springer's Journal of Materials Science, researchers at Washington State University report a new approach for the effective capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line. Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that play a key role in intercellular communication and cancer progression.

Ranunkel blomst

Buttercups focus light to heat their flowers and attract insects
A special layer of cells inside the petals makes them act together like a parabolic reflector, focusing visible and infrared light on the flower centre

Ranunkel blomst

Sophisticated optical secrets revealed in glossy buttercup flowers
Buttercup flowers are known for their intense, shiny yellow colour. For over a century, biologists have sought to understand why the buttercup stands out. University of Groningen scientists have now brought together all that was known about the buttercup and added some new information too. The results will be published by the Journal of the Royal Society Interface on 22 February 2017.

resveratrol mod lungesygdom

Resveratrol may be an effective intervention for lung aging
Researchers demonstrate, for the first time that inhaled resveratrol treatments slow aging-related degenerative changes in mouse lung. Lung aging, characterized by airspace enlargement and decreasing lung function, is a significant risk factor for chronic human lung diseases.

sandheder og løgne

Learn to spot ‘alternative facts’ in science
The Volkswagen emissions scandal and past promotions of tobacco are two examples of “alternative facts” in science’s past, a researcher warns. “In everyday life, we recognize that we should think twice about trusting someone’s decision if they have a significant vested interest that could skew their judgment,” says Kevin Elliott, an associate professor at Michigan State University who specializes

signal fra hjernen

Tiny fibers open new windows into the brain
For the first time, a single multifunction flexible fiber no bigger than a human hair, has successfully delivered a combination of optical, electrical and chemical signals back and forth into the brain.

smertefølelse

Itch neurons play a role in managing pain
There are neurons in your skin that are wired to sense itchy things. These neurons are separate from the ones that detect pain, and yet, chemical-induced itch is often accompanied by mild pain such as burning and stinging sensations. But when it comes to sending signals toward your brain through your spinal cord, itch and mild pain can go through the same set of spinal cord neurons.

smugling af fisk

Hidden no more: First-ever global view of transshipment in commercial fishing industry
Transshipment, the transfer of goods from one boat to another, is a major pathway for illegally caught and unreported fish to enter the global seafood market. It has also been associated with drug smuggling and slave labor. Illegal in many cases, transshipment has been largely invisible and nearly impossible to manage, because it often occurs far from shore and out of sight. Until now.

stamceller og lægevidenskab

Researchers take broad look at stem cells
Scientists have focused recent work on the study of and utility of adult-derived stem cells. The team put together the review after recognizing that the medical and general communities have limited knowledge about the various types of stem cells and how they could be used in medicine.

Stevia og diabetes

Dansk forsker udvikler diabetesmedicin af stevia
Lektor på Aarhus Universitet har arbejdet med stevia i 25 år og er klar med kliniske studier af sin diabetesmedicin.

testosteronbehandling

Testosterone treatment improves bone density and anemia, may lead to cardiac risk
Testosterone treatment improved bone density and anemia for men over 65 with unequivocally low testosterone, a new study has concluded. However, testosterone treatment did not improve cognitive function, and it increased the amount of plaque buildup in participants' coronary arteries.

Trump og science klima

How 'Guerrilla Archivists' Have Rescued Data Throughout History
Activists today are racing to save climate records from the Trump administration. Secret archives were a powerful way to fight hostile political climates throughout history – from the Nazis to the Islamic State.

ulve

VIDEO: Frivillige samler DNA-prøver fra dræbte dyr
Ulveentusiaster undersøger en død kronhjortekalv, der er dræbt af bid fra noget, der formodentlig er en ulv.

ulve

Sporhunden Novo er specialist i at opsnuse ulve
Hyrdehunden Novo er en af syv hunde i verden, der er specialtrænede i at opspore rovdyr som ulve. Han har bl.a. været med til at snuse sig ind på ulvene i Vestjylland.

ulve

VIDEO: Ulvepar lever efter alt at dømme i Vestjylland
En lang række indicier peger på, at et ulvepar trives i det vestlige Jylland - og måske er flyttet permanent hertil. Dyrene er blevet spottet af flere kamerafælder. Ulveunger kan være på vej.

ulve

DNA bekræfter ulveangreb i Vestjylland
Angreb på får har i lang tid plaget husdyrejere omkring Holstebro. DNA-prøver viser nu, at en ulv i mindst ét tilfælde er skyldig.

zika virus

Zika may cause miscarriages, thin brain tissue in babies carried to term
In early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta -- intended to protect the developing fetus -- and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells, report scientists.

ørkenfolk der tåler arsen

Unravelling the atomic and nuclear structure of the heaviest elements
Little is known about the heaviest, radioactive elements in Mendeleev's table. But an extremely sensitive technique involving laser light and gas jets makes it possible for the very first time to gain insight into their atomic and nuclear structure.

Historic Manhattan cathedral activates eco-friendly power
The historic St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan has activated a geothermal plant—part of a series of environmentally friendly upgrades.

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists
For the first African-American woman in space, her path to spaceflight and beyond includes trying to pave the way for more girls of color to follow in her footsteps.

Protesters Leave Dakota Access Pipeline Area; Some Stay And Are Arrested
The governor of North Dakota had set Wednesday as the evacuation deadline for the largest protest camp. The Trump administration is allowing the pipeline to be built, despite the protests.

Saving Simba and Lula, last two survivors of Mosul zoo
Simba the lion and Lula the bear are the Mosul zoo's only survivors—the other animals were killed by shelling, starved to death or ate each other during the fighting.

NASA Discovers 7 New Exoplanets That Could Sustain Life
TRAPPIST-1 is 40 light years from Earth. It would take us millions of years to get there.

What is high lipoprotein(a), and should I be concerned?
Elevations in a unusual form of cholesterol, called Lipoprotein(a) or Lp(a), as responsible for 1 in 14 heart attacks and 1 in 7 cases of aortic valve disease, research has found.

Low snowpacks of 2014, 2015 may become increasingly common with warmer conditions
Oregon experienced very low snowpack levels in 2014 and historically low snowpack levels in 2015; now a new study suggests that these occurrences may not be anomalous in the future and could become much more common if average temperatures warm just two degrees (Celsius).

Get Out’s Stars Bravely Take Us on a Tour of Their Phones
Allison Williams' most frequently used emoji are pretty basic, in case you were wondering.

Tesla slips back into red but revenue grows
Tesla on Wednesday slipped back into the red in the recently ended quarter while revenue revved up, with orders for some of its electric car models hitting record highs.

Exoplanets 101: Looking for life beyond our Solar System
Seven Earth-like planets orbiting a small star in our Galaxy called Trappist-1, revealed Wednesday, are the most recent—and arguably the most spectacular—in a string of exoplanet discoveries going back 20 years.

A Tasty Trove of Exoplanets at TRAPPIST-1
A baker’s half-dozen of Earth-size worlds is orbiting a (relatively) nearby star—and some could be habitable --

I.Coast hosting bid to save its last chimpanzees
Ivory Coast, which has seen a 90 percent decrease in its chimpanzees in just 20 years, is to host international talks in July in a bid to save the primates.

In hot water: Climate change harms hot spots of ocean life
The six ocean hot spots that teem with the biggest mix of species are also getting hit hardest by global warming and industrial fishing, a new study finds.

Sum of their parts: Researchers use math to foster environmental restoration
The oft-quoted proverb, "Too many cooks spoil the broth," is apt wisdom for describing challenges facing policy makers, public resource managers, ag producers, industry, residents and other stakeholders in attempts to jointly tackle major environmental restoration projects. The myriad of varied interests—some conflicting; some aligning - results in a confusing tangle of authority and responsibilit

Key Moments In The Dakota Access Pipeline Fight
An overview of multiple legal challenges and protests since the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers considered approving a section of the pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.

Cameras can steal data from computer hard drive LED lights: study
Researchers at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Cyber Security Research Center have demonstrated that data can be stolen from an isolated "air-gapped" computer's hard drive reading the pulses of light on the LED drive using various types of cameras and light sensors.

Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'
The activist campaigned to change rules, so that people with disabilities could get nursing care and other support at home past the age of 21, and get married without losing Medicaid benefits.

Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
Almost one year ago, borophene didn't even exist.

NASA spies Tropical Cyclone 08P's formation
NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone 08P as it was developing in the South Pacific Ocean. Tropical Cyclone 08P, or 08P formed east of Extra-tropical cyclone Bart.

Desert people evolve to drink water poisoned with deadly arsenic
People living in the Atacama desert of Chile evolved specific gene mutations over the past 7000 years that make them better at detoxifying the heavy metal

7 New Planets Could Host Alien Life
These new Earth-size planets orbit a dwarf star named Trappist-1 about 40 light years from Earth. Some of them could have water on their surfaces.

Behold: 4 New Species Of Tiny Frogs Smaller Than A Fingernail
Scientists in India say the frogs are actually fairly common but have eluded discovery likely because of their extremely small size, secretive habitats and unusual calls.

Successful Russian launch re-paves the way to space station
Russia's Soyuz rocket - currently the only way to get to the International Space Station - has had its first successful trip since a failed launch in December, restoring astronauts' ability to get to space

This one simple trick predicts when an ice age will pause
Environment And it all started with an e-mail Researchers are trying to understand interglacials—the pauses that occur between ice ages. Technically, we're living in one now. But when will the next ice age come?

What the Pop Sci folks are reading right now
Gadgets Should we start a book club? From Sci Fi to Toni Morrison, these are the books we're reading now. Onward!

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Helped Resurrect Tarkin for Rogue One
Here's how the heroes in a half shell saved the Star Wars standalone film.

Trilobites: Lake Berryessa’s Spiraling Floodwater Mesmerizes the Locals
Heavy rain is causing about two million gallons of water a minute to flow into the California lake’s bellmouth spillway.

These pests use bacteria to keep plants clueless
What looks like a caterpillar chewing on a leaf or a beetle consuming fruit is likely a three-way battle that benefits most, if not all of the players involved, research shows. “Plants are subject to attack by an onslaught of microbes and herbivores, yet are able to specifically perceive the threat and mount appropriate defenses,” says Gary W. Felton, professor and head of entomology at Penn Stat

Female fish mate 200 times but save eggs for the perfect male
Lampreys engage in prolonged sex sessions where the females pretend to mate with 10 or more males – all the while waiting for "the one"

Skulls reveals that ancient Americans didn’t mix with neighbours
Skull shape tells us that some early inhabitants of the Americas kept to themselves, and that South America saw at least two distinct waves of colonisation

Seven Earth-size planets found around nearby star may have water
The small, cool star TRAPPIST-1 is one of the best places to look for life in the Milky Way: its seven rocky planets might all have water and atmospheres

Historic cultural records inform scientific perspectives on woodland uses
Scientists have investigated how cultural records dating back 300 years could help improve understanding of the ways in which science interprets the many uses of woodland areas.

Birds of a feather mob together
Dive bombing a much larger bird isn't just a courageous act by often smaller bird species to keep predators at bay. It also gives male birds the chance to show off their physical qualities in order to impress females, according to new research on predator mobbing behavior of birds where potential prey approach and harass would-be predators such as owls.

Hidden no more: First-ever global view of transshipment in commercial fishing industry
A new report released today presents the first global map of transshipment, a major pathway for illegally caught and unreported fish to enter the seafood market. Also associated with drug smuggling and slave labor, it is Illegal in many cases, and has been largely invisible until now. Using an artificial intelligence system developed by Global Fishing Watch, data scientists have developed an autom

What do your co-workers really think of you?
Everyday in the workplace, colleagues actively compete for a limited amount of perks, including raises, promotions, bonuses and recognition. But new research shows that, more than often than not, people fall short in determining which co-workers might be trying to edge them out on the job.

Ancient Kennewick Man Finally Laid to Rest
Two decades after he was first discovered, the Kennewick Man has finally been laid to rest not far from the Columbia River.

Hand Over the Data
Governments get more user data from Internet companies every year. Here are the figures that prove it.

I'm David Chalmers, philosopher interested in consciousness, technology, and many other things. AMA. • r/philosophy


Changing the environment within bone marrow alters blood cell development
Researchers report they can alter blood cell development through the use of biomaterials designed to mimic characteristics of the bone marrow.

We read emotions based on how the eye sees
We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research. The research reveals, for example, that people consistently associate narrowed eyes -- which can enhance visual discrimination -- with discrimination-related emotions including disgust and suspicion.

Study reveals ways to improve outcomes, reduce costs for common heart procedure
Hospitals can improve patient care and reduce costs associated with coronary angioplasty if cardiologists perform more of these procedures through an artery in the wrist and if they take steps to discharge such patients on the same day, according to a new study.

How cathedral termites got to Australia to build their 'sky-scrapers'
They build among the tallest non-human structures (proportionately speaking) in the world and now a pioneering study has found the termites that live in Australia's remote Top End originated from overseas -- rafting vast distances and migrating from tree-tops to the ground, as humans later did. They adapted to significant environmental changes, including increasingly arid conditions and changed fr

Making it harder to 'outsmart' concussion tests
Concussion testing on the athletic field depends upon comparing an athlete's post-concussion neurocognitive performance with the results of a previously administered baseline test. Experts believe some athletes, in hopes of a quicker post-injury return to play, may 'sandbag' the concussion test by giving a lackadaisical baseline performance. A researcher has developed a statistical technique to de



Insight into a physical phenomenon that leads to earthquakes
Researchers provide insight into a phenomenon called ageing that leads to more powerful earthquakes.

Pre-eclampsia significantly increases risk of heart disease in later life, study reveals
Women who suffered pre-eclampsia during pregnancy are four times more likely to have heart failure in later life, new research shows.

Unlocking the heart-protective benefits of soy
A product of digesting a micronutrient found in soy may hold the key to why some people seem to derive a heart-protective benefit from eating soy foods, while others do not.

Sketching the Beginnings of Life, One Cell at a Time
How did a scientist create incredibly detailed drawings of embryo development a century ago? --

Red State America Acts on Climate Change--but Calls It Other Names
Surveys of Great Plains mayors show policies push “conservation,” “air quality,” “energy savings” --

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun. The finding is important because it provides the first hard proof for what scientists call the ''chaotic solar system.'

'Quartz' crystals at Earth's core power its magnetic field
Scientists at the Earth-Life Science Institute at the Tokyo Institute of Technology report in Nature (Fen. 22, 2017) unexpected discoveries about the Earth's core. The findings include insights into the source of energy driving the Earth's magnetic field, factors governing the cooling of the core and its chemical composition, and conditions that existed during the formation of the Earth.

Study suggests new therapy for Gaucher disease
Scientists propose that blocking a molecule that drives inflammation and organ damage in Gaucher, and maybe other lysosomal storage diseases, as a possible treatment with fewer risks and lower costs than current therapies. The team conducted the study in mouse models of lysosomal storage disease and in cells from blood samples donated by people with Gaucher disease.

Farther from forest: 'Eye-opening' study says rural US loses forests faster than cities
Americans are spending their lives farther from forests than they did at the end of the 20th century and, contrary to popular wisdom, the change is more pronounced in rural areas than in urban settings.

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends
A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth's climate warms out of an ice age, according to new research.

To stop foot-and-mouth in cows, count vaccines
To contain and eradicate foot-and-mouth disease in cows, research suggests establishing how many animals can be vaccinated per day and tailoring controls accordingly. A 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak cost the UK economy an estimated £8 billion and led to the culling of approximately seven million animals. “There is always uncertainty in the likely effectiveness of any control strategy

7 Earth-Size Planets Orbit Dwarf Star, NASA and European Astronomers Say
Astronomers are excited by the discovery, which suggests that some of these exoplanets — planets around stars other than the sun — could support life and may be awash in oceans.

Major Discovery! 7 Earth-Size Alien Planets Circle Nearby Star
Astronomers have never seen anything like this before: Seven Earth-size alien worlds orbit the same tiny, dim star, and all of them may be capable of supporting life as we know it, a new study reports.

An adjustable coffee grinder for 81 percent off? I'd buy it.
Gadgets Grind for any machine for only $9 bucks. An adjustable coffee grinder for 81 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.

What Happens When Robots Become Role Models
Children can find their behavior shaped by robotic companions—so let’s not screw them up.

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field
The Earth's core consists mostly of a huge ball of liquid metal lying at 3000 km beneath its surface, surrounded by a mantle of hot rock. Notably, at such great depths, both the core and mantle are subject to extremely high pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, research indicates that the slow creeping flow of hot buoyant rocks—moving several centimeters per year—carries heat away from the core

Simple rule predicts when an ice age ends
A simple rule can accurately predict when Earth's climate warms out of an ice age, according to new research led by UCL.

TRAPPIST-1 System Has 7 Earth-Sized Exoplanets, 3 In Habitable Zone | Video
An dwarf star named TRAPPIST-1, which is located about 39 light-years from Earth, harbors more planets than previously observed.

Brutally Murdered Pictish Man's Face Gets Digitally Recreated
The face of a 1,400-year-old murder victim is seeing the light of day, now that scientists have digitally reconstructed his features.

Stjernesystem med rekordmange jordlignende planeter fundet
Opdagelsen er det næste vigtige skridt i jagten på liv i rummet, fortæller dansk forsker.

These seven alien worlds could help explain how planets form
The Earth-sized astronomical bounty circles a dim star that flew under the radar of exoplanet researchers.

Life expectancy set to hit 90 in South Korea
By 2030, nation’s girls can expect to live to 91, says statistical analysis.

NASA telescope reveals largest batch of Earth-size, habitable-zone planets around single star
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where a rocky planet is most likely to have liquid water.

GMC cuts size and cost of Acadia mid-size SUV for 2017
GMC has given the Acadia the biggest makeover in its 10-year history, shrinking the size and the price of its best-selling SUV while making it more fuel efficient and giving it new technology.

DC-based for decades, Apollo 11 capsule to go on road trip
The Apollo 11 command module, which traveled more than 950,000 miles to take Americans to the moon and back in 1969, is going on a road trip, leaving the Smithsonian for the first time in more than four decades.

Researchers aim to disrupt egg production in dengue- and Zika-spreading mosquito
The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever virus, requires a blood meal to develop eggs. One way to control the spread of these diseases is to tamper with the reproductive events that follow this mosquito's blood meal.

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun.

Spørg Scientariet: I hvilke baneplaner kan man spotte exoplaneter?
En læser vil gerne vide, hvor vigtig en exoplanets bane omkring værtsstjernen er, for at man kan se den. Det svarer lektor fra Aarhus Universitet på.

Astronomer jubler: Syv jordlignende planeter er bedste bud på liv i rummet
Forholdene i et solsystem 40 lysår væk ser så ideelle ud, at forskerne opjusterer deres forhåbninger om, at der kan være liv.

7 Earth-Like Worlds Orbit a Star So Cool, You Didn’t Know It Existed
But scientists have no idea what they look like.

A whopping seven Earth-size planets were just found orbiting a nearby star
Space Three of them may be habitable Scientists have hit the jackpot, discovering seven Earth-size exoplanets orbiting a star just 39 light-years away. Read on.

Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct
Survival instinct does not influence species cooperative breeding decisions, a new study has found. Instead, it has found communal living and helping behavior, to be a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups. Siblings with full biological ties are more likely than others to stay with their family, than they are to break away. This is particula

Benefits of cognitive training in dementia patients unclear
Positive effects of cognitive training in healthy elderly people have been reported, but data regarding its effects in patients with dementia is unclear, say investigators.

Temperate earth-sized worlds found in extraordinarily rich planetary system (Update)
Astronomers have found a system of seven Earth-sized planets just 40 light-years away. They were detected as they passed in front of their parent star, the dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. Three of them lie in the habitable zone and could harbour water, increasing the possibility that the system could play host to life. It has both the largest number of Earth-sized planets yet found and the largest number o

Amazon resists request for Echo info in Arkansas slaying
Amazon is resisting an effort by Arkansas prosecutors to obtain potential recordings from a slaying suspect's Amazon Echo smart speaker, saying authorities haven't established that their investigation is more important than a customer's privacy rights.

Star's seven Earth-sized worlds set record
Astronomers have discovered seven Earth-sized planets orbiting a single star - a record number.

Elon Musk - 2 Things Humans Need to Do to Have a “Good Future”
Elon Musk, Sam Harris, Ray Kurzweil and other visionaries discuss AI superintelligence at a recent conference.

Has the Large Hadron Collider Disproved the Existence of Ghosts?
At least one physicist contends that the Large Hadron Collider has, in fact, disproved the existence of ghosts.

Astronomers Find 7 Earth-Size Planets Around A Nearby Star
Some of the planets could be home to liquid water, but it remains unclear whether life could exist on such strange worlds.

'Smart' bacteria remodel their genes to infect our intestines
Researchers have described how infectious bacteria can sense they’re attached to our intestinal cells, and then remodel their expression of specific genes, including those involved in virulence and metabolism, to exploit our cells and colonize our gut.

LIVE NASA præsenterer nye fund
NASA afholder pressemøde om nyt fund af rekordmange jordligende planeter i et fremmed stjernesystem.

Risk of Ross River virus global epidemic
Australia’s Ross River Virus (RRV) could be the next mosquito-borne global epidemic, according to a new research study.

Cultivating cool-for-cash-crop
When deciding what crops to grow during a season, growers look at several factors. Do the crops have a good yield in their area? Does the area currently have the resources—usually water—to grow that crop? Will the crop give a return on the investment? And, what are the future effects that growing that crop might have on the growers' fields?

Teens Say Heroin Is 'Probably Impossible' to Get
Although the opioid epidemic continues to affect Americans across the country, an increasing percentage of teens think it would not be possible for them to get heroin, even if they wanted to, a new study finds.

Apollo 11 Space Capsule Is Going On Another Mission
The capsule called Columbia hasn't left the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., since 1976. It's heading out on tour to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

Battles of the Heart: Heart of Steel wins!
It was a heartfelt battle indeed, but in the end only one heart could reign victorious. In the end the unflappable Steel Hearts mustered up the strength to (ironically) capture the gold! Congrats to all participants! Leaderboard below: Share This:

‘Equol’ may determine if soy protects your heart
New research clarifies why some people seem to derive a heart-protective benefit from eating soy foods and others don’t. Japanese men who are able to produce equol—a substance made by some types of “good” gut bacteria when they metabolize isoflavones (micronutrients found in dietary soy)—have lower levels of a risk factor for heart disease than people that can’t produce it, according to a new stu

Researchers find potential bugs to eat invasive cogongrass
Cogongrass displaces pasture grass, golf course greens and valuable ecosystems. Now researchers are focusing on the Orseolia javani ca midge that causes cogongrass to produce linear galls at the expense of leaves.

The first Iberian lynx infected by the pseudorabies virus
Matojo, the nine-month-old Iberian lynx cub found dead in 2015 in Extremadura, did not die from natural causes. His necropsy shows that it was the pseudorabies virus that triggered his sudden demise. Before this case, contagion of this infectious disease was only known in one wild cat in the world, a Florida panther.

Play console video games on your computer
DIY And take your gaming anywhere Both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 consoles can stream games to a laptop or desktop over the web. Here's how to get everything set up.

Device will rapidly, accurately and inexpensively detect zika virus at airports and other sites
About the size of a tablet, a portable device that could be used in a host of environments like a busy airport or even a remote location in South America, may hold the key to detecting the dreaded Zika virus accurately, rapidly and inexpensively using just a saliva sample. For about $2 and within 15 minutes, researchers hope to accurately determine whether or not an individual has an active infect

Life Expectancy Study Suggests U.S. Will Lag behind
New analysis shows many likely to live beyond 90 by 2030, but not Americans --

No spoilers! Most people don't want to know their future
Given the chance to see into the future, most people would rather not know what life has in store for them, even if they think those events could make them happy, according to new research.

Up to 600 waterfowl die in western Idaho from avian cholera
An estimated 500 to 600 ducks and geese have died due to avian cholera in western Idaho.

CubeSats: Shaping possibilities in space
For more than a decade, CubeSats, or small satellites, have paved the way to low-Earth orbit for commercial companies, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations. These small satellites offer opportunities to conduct scientific investigations and technology demonstrations in space in such a way that is cost-effective, timely and relatively easy to accomplish.

Science versus the 'Horatio Alger myth'
In a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have taken a condensed matter physics concept usually applied to the way substances such as ice freeze, called "frustration," and applied it to a simple social network model of frustrated components. They show that inequality of wealth can emerge spontaneously and more equality can be gained by pure i

Creative people have better-connected brains: Highly creative people have significantly more white matter connections between the right and left hemispheres of the brain, according to a new analysis.


Plane flies along Antarctica's giant Larsen crack
New video is released of the Antarctic ice crack that promises to produce a giant berg.

Explore the Amazon Rainforest with New Virtual-Reality Film
Experience the Amazon rainforest's beauty and biodiversity via a new virtual-reality film.

Snap's IPO builds an 'impregnable fortress' where only the founders have power
The founders of Snap Inc. want to take the company public. But that doesn't mean they want to run a public company.

High court ruling limits international reach of patent laws
The Supreme Court on Wednesday sided with California-based Life Technologies Corp. in a patent infringement case that limits the international reach of U.S. patent laws.

Apple 'spaceship' headquarters readies for boarding (Update)
Apple on Wednesday announced that workers will start boarding its futuristic new "spaceship" campus in Silicon Valley in April, fulfilling a vision set out by late founder Steve Jobs.

Gene Catalogues Aim to Help Crops Survive Climate Change
Scientists want to give the farming community better information about which crop strains are better suited to changing weather and soil conditions --

Social information from friends, experts could help reduce uncertainty in crowdfunding
Social information gathered from friends and experts, depending on the complexity of the product, can decrease uncertainty in crowdfunding campaigns, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Critters, plants and waste offer a more sustainable supply of catalysts
From earthworm guts to mining waste, scientists are exploring a wide range of new sources of catalysts that could help us make medicines, fuels and electronics in a more sustainable way. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports on the search.

Researchers gain insight into a physical phenomenon that leads to earthquakes
Scientists have gotten better at predicting where earthquakes will occur, but they're still in the dark about when they will strike and how devastating they will be.

The genetics behind being Not Like Daddy
A common strategy to create high-yielding plants is hybrid breeding - crossing two different inbred lines to obtain characteristics superior to each parent. However, getting the inbred lines in the first place can be a hassle. Inbred lines consist of genetically uniform individuals and are created through numerous generations of self-crossing. In maize, the use of so-called "haploid inducers" prov

Historic cultural records inform scientific perspectives on woodland uses
Scientists at the University of York and University College Cork have investigated how cultural records dating back 300 years could help improve understanding of the ways in which science interprets the many uses of woodland areas.

A robot that eats pollution | Jonathan Rossiter
Meet the "Row-bot," a robot that cleans up pollution and generates the electricity needed to power itself by swallowing dirty water. Roboticist Jonathan Rossiter explains how this special swimming machine, which uses a microbial fuel cell to neutralize algal blooms and oil slicks, could be a precursor to biodegradable, autonomous pollution-fighting robots.

Alphabet’s Nascent Ride-Sharing Service Ups the Ante Against Uber
It’s less flexible and lacks enough drivers—but it’s also far cheaper.

Birds of a feather mob together
Dive bombing a much larger bird isn't just a courageous act by often smaller bird species to keep predators at bay. It also gives male birds the chance to show off their physical qualities in order to impress females. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology on predator mobbing behavior of birds where potential prey approach and harass would-be predato

Cannibal Corpse Worm: 3-Foot-Long Creature Had Monster Jaws
A newly discovered ancient worm that would have grown to more than 3 feet (1 meter) long is the oldest "Bobbit worm" ever discovered.

Alphabet’s Nascent Ride-Sharing Service Squares Up to Uber
It’s less flexible and lacking driver supply—but also far cheaper.

NASA spies Tropical Cyclone Bart's end
NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone Bart as it was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone in the South Pacific Ocean.

Uncertainty perception drives public's trust, mistrust of science
Many policies—from medicine to terrorism—depend on how the general public accepts and understands scientific evidence. People view different branches of sciences as having different amounts of uncertainty, which may not reflect the actual uncertainty of the field. Yet public perceptions determine action, allocation of funding resources and the direction of public policies. It is therefore necessar

Widely accepted vision for agriculture may be inaccurate, misleading
"Food production must double by 2050 to feed the world's growing population." This truism has been repeated so often in recent years that it has become widely accepted among academics, policymakers and farmers, but now researchers are challenging this assertion and suggesting a new vision for the future of agriculture.

Inside the Race to Build the Battery of Tomorrow
Liquid batteries. Batteries of molten metal that run as hot as a car engine. Batteries whose secret ingredient is saltwater.

Instagram Galleries Are Yet Another Reason to Never Leave Instagram
Starting in the next few days, you'll be able to share up to 10 photos or videos at once on Instagram. The new feature is called Galleries.

Face It, Meatsack: Pro Gamer Will Be the Only Job Left
Videogame are the grim future of work.

Smog may force FIFA U-17 World Cup out of Delhi
FIFA could pull Under-17 World Cup matches out of New Delhi because of concerns over air quality in the world's most polluted capital city, the tournament director said.

What do your co-workers really think of you?
Everyday in the workplace, colleagues actively compete for a limited amount of perks, including raises, promotions, bonuses and recognition. But new research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that, more than often than not, people fall short in determining which co-workers might be trying to edge them out on the job.

Brain scans could predict teens’ problem drug use before it starts
There's an idea out there of what a drug-addled teen is supposed to look like: impulsive, unconscientious, smart, perhaps -- but not the most engaged. While personality traits like that could signal danger, not every adolescent who fits that description becomes a problem drug user. So how do you tell who's who?

A close look at sharp vision in eye structure seen only in humans and other primates
Found only in the retinas of humans and other primates, the fovea is responsible for visual experiences that are rich in colorful, spatial detail. Some reasons behind the fovea's unusual perceptual qualities have now been uncovered. Understanding these functions would be essential to designing visual prosthetics for central vision loss.

Ants stomp, termites tiptoe: Predator detection by a cryptic prey
Secretive and destructive, termites live in close proximity to predatory ants yet still outsmart them. New research shows why -- termites have evolved the capability to sense vibrations of their enemies in the substrate while moving quickly, quietly and efficiently.

Hybrid plant breeding: Secrets behind haploid inducers, a powerful tool in maize breeding
A common strategy to create high-yielding plants is hybrid breeding. However, getting the inbred lines in the first place can be a hassle. In maize, the use of so-called 'haploid inducers' provides a short cut to this cumbersome procedure, allowing to produce inbred lines in just one generation. A study now sheds light on the genetics behind haploid induction.

Nanostraws sample a cell's contents without damage
Tiny nanostraws that sample the contents of a cell without causing damage may improve our ability to understand cellular processes and lead to safer medical treatments.

Middle Eastern seed bank re-deposits backups into Svalbard's doomsday vault
Environment Just two years after tumultuous withdrawal Today, 49,000 varieties of crops including cabbages, wheat, lentils, sweet peas, and many other important agricultural crops will be wheeled into a vault in a…

SpaceX Cargo Craft Fails To Dock With Space Station, Will Try Again
The private spaceflight company launched its Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday, only to have the rocket's cargo capsule encounter an error in its navigation system on Wednesday during a docking attempt.

Pluto is still an ex-planet, no matter what its fans think
A fresh attempt to revive full planet status for Pluto is a non-starter. Astronomer Michael Brown explains why hopes of a comeback are futile

You could find Planet 9 in these ‘flipbook’ movies
Elusive planets and dim failed stars may be lurking around the edges of our solar system, and astronomers want the public’s help to hunt them down. By using a new website called Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 , anyone can help search for objects far beyond the orbit of our farthest planet, Neptune, by viewing brief “flipbook” movies made from images captured by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explor

Støtte til landvindmøller skal fremover i udbud
Politisk enighed om, at fremtidens støttemodel til landvindmøllerne efter 20. februar 2018 hedder udbud. Hvilken slags udbud er der ikke enighed om – ej heller hvad der skal ske frem til 2018.

New tool developed to help avoid adverse drug reactions
Medicines are an important part of treating and preventing disease in adults and children. Now researchers have developed a new tool to help avoid adverse reactions to medicines.

A problem shared can be a problem doubled
Customers perceive one and the same service problem very differently, depending on whether they are affected as individuals or in a group, investigators have found. Service failures that affect a group of customers cause them to be more annoyed with the provider than problems that impact an individual.

China to Permit Lab Poised to Study World's Most Dangerous Pathogens
Maximum-security biolab is part of a plan to build more of these facilities across the country --

Hormonal maintenance therapy may improve survival in women with chemo-resistant rare ovarian or peritoneum cancer
For women with a rare subtype of epithelial ovarian or peritoneum cancer, known as low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSC), hormone maintenance therapy (HMT) may significantly improve survival, according to a new study.

T-cells support long-lived antibody-producing cells, team finds
A group of researchers has come to a better understanding of how long-lived, antibody-producing plasma cells are maintained.

Team sees heat flow in atom-thick gold at room temp
As you stretch gold into a strand one atom thick, an expressway for heat opens up. It’s called a quantum of thermal conductance and researchers have now observed it for the first time at room temperature. A quantum of thermal conductance represents the largest possible heat flow through a channel in a material. You can think of the channel as a highway for the flow of heat. The researchers proved

Reduction of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions: Promotion or steering?
Policy interventions to reduce energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions have a variety of effects on the economy and on households. A study has provided the first detailed impact assessment of the efficiency and social balance of the energy policy measures “steering” and “promotion.”

Estrogen therapy shown effective in reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women
Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage an array of menopause-related issues, including reducing hot flashes, improving heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction. Now a new study suggests that the same estrogen therapy used to treat osteoporosis can actually lead to healthier teeth and gums.

Popular heartburn drugs linked to gradual yet 'silent' kidney damage
The sudden onset of kidney problems often serves as a warning for doctors to discontinue patients' use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), sold under brand names Prevacid, Prilosec, Nexium and Protonix, among others. But a new study indicates that more than half of patients who develop chronic kidney damage while taking the drugs don't experience acute kidney problems beforehand, according to resear

The never-ending story: Chemicals that outlive, and harm, us
Chemical manufacturers have agreed to pay $670 million in damages to people with cancer and other health harm from exposure to a recently phased-out highly fluorinated chemical. In a peer-reviewed feature article, researchers highlight that thousands of related chemicals continue to provide water-repellant, stain-resistant, and non-stick properties to furniture, carpets, outdoor gear, clothing, co

Against a snowy death: predicting avalanches with self-driving car technology
It's a bountiful winter in the snowy Sierra Nevada, with the biggest snowpack in 22 years. That's great news for skiers and snowboarders, but all that snow can transform in an instant from a beautiful blanket to a deadly shroud when an avalanche hits.

The Real Reason Dystopian Fiction Is Roaring Back
1984 's resurgence isn't about scaring yourself—it's about making sense of the world around you.

Comcast, Facebook, and Apple Music are making mobile video moves
With Xfinity Stream, Comcast has some new ammunition in the ever-escalating war for mobile viewers' eyeballs.

Daring deep-sea explorers, armyworm offensive and GM-rice theft
The week in science: 17–23 February 2017.

GOP Considers Trimming Health Law's 10 Essential Benefits
The woman set to run the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services told senators that maternity coverage should be optional in individual and small group plans. Other services could be cut entirely.

Cannibalism: It's 'Perfectly Natural,' A New Scientific History Argues
It's gruesome, but from a scientific standpoint, there's a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal, a new book says. And who knew European aristocrats ate body parts as medicine? (Image credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Zika can breach placenta to cause miscarriage
Zika virus can penetrate the placenta in early pregnancy, causing miscarriages, studies with mice suggest. In addition, the virus—already known to cause a birth defect involving smaller-than-normal heads and brains—can also lead to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells. The virus that causes the mosquito-borne disease appears to create disorganization in cellular laye

DNA suggest Chaco culture passed on power via mom
Radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA suggest that a matrilineal dynasty likely ruled Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico for more than 300 years. “We are not saying that this was a state-level society,” says Douglas J. Kennett, head and professor of anthropology at Penn State, “but we don’t think it was egalitarian either.” Archaeologists have described the Chaco Phenomenon as anything from an egalitarian

Here's how to defend net neutrality
Net neutrality is under threat, but you can do something to defend it.

New method reveals how proteins stabilize the cell surface
To withstand external mechanical stress and handle trafficking of various substances, a cell needs to adjust its surrounding membrane. This is done through small indentations on the cell surface called caveolae. In order to stabilize its membrane, cells use the protein EHD2, which can be turned on and off to alternate between an inactive closed form and an active open form. The discovery, made by

What Are Personality Disorders?
Have you ever wondered if your coworker or estranged family member could possibly be suffering from a clinical personality disorder? Why are they so difficult to deal with? --

A problem shared can be a problem doubled
Customers perceive one and the same service problem very differently, depending on whether they are affected as individuals or in a group. Service failures that affect a group of customers cause them to be more annoyed with the provider than problems that impact an individual, according to a recent study of economists at University of Jena (Germany).

Honey bee parasite genome sequenced to aid in fight against bee colony destruction
Published today in the open-access journal GigaScience is an article that presents the genome of a parasitic mite, Tropilaelaps mercedesae, that infects bee colonies, which are facing wide-spread devastation across the entire world. The research was carried out by an international team of researchers at Jiaotong-Liverpool University and Liverpool University and focused on mites as they are one of

Why can whale nerves stretch and turn like bungee cords?
Animals We could use their twisted secrets to treat nerve damage One group of researchers thinks they’ve figured out how: nerve cells are coiled and coated in two different layers of waviness. A better understanding of how this works…

Reduction of energy consumption and CO2 emissions—promotion or steering?
Policy interventions to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions have a variety of effects on the economy and on households. A study carried out as part of the National Research Programme "Managing Energy Consumption" (NRP 71) has provided the first detailed impact assessment of the efficiency and social balance of the energy policy measures "steering" and "promotion".

How proteins find one another
Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been studying two proteins that play a vital role in many bodily processes. The aim of the research was to establish how G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and arrestin form complexes. The human GPCR family consists of nearly one thousand different types of membrane proteins, with the majority involved in sensory and neuronal processes. R

Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct
Cooperative breeding, when adults in a group team up to care for offspring, is not a survival strategy for animals living in extreme environments. It is instead a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups. Siblings with full biological ties are more likely than others to stay with their family and help day to day, a new Oxford University study h

How migratory birds respond to balmier autumns?
Around the world, no matter where we are, we can usually expect the weather to change from one season to the next. In North America, the warm days of summer eventually turn into the cooler days of autumn, and these changes are vital to a lot of the animals that inhabit the region as they trigger the urge of animals to prepare for winter. Migratory animals, like songbirds, use these predictable wea

Earbuds That Give You More Selective Hearing
The earbuds of the future let you manipulate all kinds of noise. They’re a work in progress, though.

New EU environmental standards for large poultry and pig farms
New standards on resources and emissions will help national authorities across the EU to lower the environmental impact of around 20 000 large poultry and pig farms. The new specifications stem from the review of the Best Available Techniques (BAT) Reference Document for the intensive rearing of poultry and pigs (IRPP), the so-called IRPP BREF, whose conclusions were published on 21 February 2017

Animals know when they are being treated unfairly (and they don't like it)
Humans beings appear to be hardwired to have a sense of fairness. This is puzzling from an evolutionary perspective, which you would have thought would mean we were predisposed to seek advantage for ourselves and our families wherever possible. But in fact a sense of fairness is important for humans to be able to help each other. Human cooperation is based on reciprocal altruism – we help people b

Artificial intelligence in quantum systems, too
Quantum biomimetics consists of reproducing in quantum systems certain properties exclusive to living organisms. Researchers at University of the Basque Country have imitated natural selection, learning and memory in a new study. The mechanisms developed could give quantum computation a boost and facilitate the learning process in machines.

Physicists investigate erasing information at zero energy cost
(Phys.org)—A few years ago, physicists showed that it's possible to erase information without using any energy, in contrast to the assumption at the time that erasing information must require energy. Instead, the scientists showed that the cost of erasure could be paid in terms of an arbitrary physical quantity such as spin angular momentum—suggesting that heat energy is not the only conserved qua

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor
Gas sensors used for leakage alerts and air quality monitoring are essential in our daily lives. Towards a ubiquitous society, smart gas sensors, which perform signal processing and communication besides sensing, have attracted much attention. In addition, integrating these functions into a single chip leads to low-cost and miniature smart gas-sensing systems.

Rare fossils of giant rodents raise questions
Adult and juvenile remains of a giant rodent species (Isostylomys laurdillardi) have been uncovered by researchers, in the Río de la Plata coastal region of southern Uruguay, raising questions about classification within dinomids.

Study finds consumers willing to pay more for 'all-natural' labeled foods
A study published in the Journal of Food Science found that expectations of product quality, nutritional content and the amount of money consumers were willing to pay increased when consumers saw a product labeled "all-natural" as compared to the same product without the label.

Improved polymer and new assembly method for ultra-conformable 'electronic tattoo' devices
A group of researchers at Waseda University has developed processes and materials for ultrathin stick-on electronic devices using elastomeric "nanosheet" film, achieving ease of production while also preserving high elasticity and flexibility fifty times better than previously reported polymer nanosheets.

Automated cafe sets up shop in tech-crazy, fancy coffee-loving San Francisco
As Katy Franco waited for her morning coffee, passersby pulled out their phones and snapped photos and video of her barista.

A close look at sharp vision in eye structure seen only in humans and other primates
Vision scientists have uncovered some of the reasons behind the unusual perceptual properties of the eye's fovea. Only humans and other primates have this dimple-like structure in their retinas. It is responsible for visual experiences that are rich in colorful spatial detail.

The first Iberian lynx infected by the pseudorabies virus
Matojo, the nine-month-old Iberian lynx cub found dead in 2015 in Extremadura, did not die from natural causes. His necropsy shows that it was the pseudorabies virus that triggered his sudden demise. Before this case, contagion of this infectious disease was only known in one wild cat in the world, a Florida panther.

Uenighed om hvorvidt hacking skal på skoleskemaet
Sikkerhedsekpert siger 'ja', mens forsker tvivler på, at det er den rette vej at gå.

New report details accomplishments of U.S. global change research program
The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) has made significant accomplishments to advance the science of global environmental change and improve the understanding of its impact on society through activities such as developing Earth-observing systems, improving Earth-system modeling capabilities, and advancing understanding of carbon-cycle processes, says a new report from the National Acade

B3NO2 ring system serves as a versatile catalyst for amide bond formation
(Phys.org)—Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as graphene, have several potential uses as its π-conjugated structure lends itself to high stability and conductivity. Researchers are interested in exploring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with boron and nitrogen atoms in an effort to explore the functionality and potential uses for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Real-time imaging of cell components including DNA
Optical microscopes that use lenses to bounce photons off objects have trouble distinguishing nanometer-scale objects smaller than the imaging beam's wavelength, such as proteins and DNA. An innovative 'hyperlens' designed at A*STAR can overcome optical diffraction limits by capturing high-resolution information held by short-lived or evanescent waves lurking near a target's surface.

Why British universities are unlikely to accept invitation to set up campuses in France
Paris consortium hopes to lure UK institutions with promise of access to European research funds after Brexit.

How Politics Could Put the Reliability of Future Elections at Risk
Eliminating the Election Assistance Commission would likely delay the process of replacing the nation’s aging and insecure elections infrastructure.

Precise inactivation of neural messenger receptor wipes out fear memory in mice
Research combines antibody precision with toxic oxygen burst to inactivate neural protein and temporarily abolish fear memory in mice.

Lowest-frequency accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar found
(Phys.org)—Astronomers have found the lowest-frequency accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar in the X-ray source known as IGR J17062−6143. By analyzing the data provided by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spacecraft, the researchers detected 163.65 Hz X-ray pulsations from this source. The findings were presented Feb. 17 in a paper published on arXiv.org.

Reducing animal testing through better knowledge sharing
The Joint Research Centre (JRC), science and knowledge service of the European Commission, has carried out a study of available knowledge on the replacement, reduction and refinement (the 3Rs) of animal procedures used in research and testing to understand how supply of such knowledge can better meet demand. Findings show that although much 3Rs knowledge exists, its sharing can be improved through

Using waste biomass for the sustainable production of industrial chemicals
Each year more than half a billion tons of oil—more than an eighth of the total global oil consumption—are used to produce chemicals and plastics. The demand for oil leaves the petrochemical industry, with a market value slated to exceed US$758 Billion by 2022, critically exposed to oil price fluctuations and the uncertainty of dependence on a finite fossil resource. Researchers and chemical engin

Computer model predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds
A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. These include global temperature rise sufficient to lose the Greenland Ice Sheet and generate seven meters of long-term sea level rise, or tropical region warming to a level that is deadly to humans and other mammals.

A geophysical planet definition
In 2006, during their 26th General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) adopted a formal definition of the term "planet". This was done in the hopes of dispelling ambiguity over which bodies should be designated as "planets", an issue that had plagued astronomers ever since they discovered objects beyond the orbit of Neptune that were comparable in size to Pluto.

The Internet Gave Us Milo. The Internet Can Take Him Away
What becomes of an internet troll with a rapidly shrinking island on the internet to call home? Milo Yiannopoulos is about to find out.

Hasbro’s New Star Wars Toys Come in Sicknasty Old-School Packaging
You must use the Force to avoid opening these awesome throwback Star Wars toys.

Possible dark matter ties in Andromeda Galaxy
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy.

Surprising dunes on comet Chury
Surprising images from the Rosetta spacecraft show the presence of dune-like patterns on the surface of comet Chury. Researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes (CNRS/ESPCI Paris/UPMC/Université Paris Diderot) studied the available images and modeled the outgassing of vapor to try to explain the phenomenon. They show that the strong pressure difference between t

Persistent drought leads to major food security crisis in Somalia
A failed 2016 rainy season linked to the climate phenomenon La Niña, combined with exceptionally warm sea surface temperatures in the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans, have led to extreme drought in the Horn of Africa and a more intense drought than that of 2010 in Somalia. These extreme weather conditions, combined with factors including high food prices, trade disruption, population dis

Laser heating hits the spot
A method for accurately measuring the thermomagnetic properties of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media reveals what the minimum bit size and ultimate data density might be for this next generation storage technology.

Scientists develop new high-precision method for analysing and comparing functioning and structure of complex networks
Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) and the University of Barcelona (UB) published a paper in Nature Communications presenting a scientific method for identifying, comparing and precisely determining objective differences between large nodes of complex networks.

Time crystals—how scientists created a new state of matter
Some of the most profound predictions in theoretical physics, such as Einstein's gravitational waves or Higgs' boson, have taken decades to prove with experiments. But every now and then, a prediction can become established fact in an astonishingly short time. This is what happened with "time crystals", a new and strange state of matter that was theorised, disproved, revamped and finally created i

Megamovie project to crowdsource images of August solar eclipse
With only six months to go before one of the most anticipated solar eclipses in a lifetime, the University of California, Berkeley, and Google are looking for citizen scientists to document and memorialize the event in a "megamovie," and help scientists learn about the sun in the process.

'Smart' bacteria remodel their genes to infect our intestines
Infectious diarrhea, a common disease of children, is responsible for over 2 million infant deaths annually in developing counties alone. A primary cause of this and other devastating conditions is enteropathogenic bacteria, which attack the intestinal tract when contaminated food is consumed.

The Download, Feb 22, 2017: 10 Breakthrough Technologies, Life Gets Longer, and Robot Role Models
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

Surprising dunes on comet Chury
Surprising images from the Rosetta spacecraft show the presence of dune-like patterns on the surface of comet Chury. Researchers have studied the available images and modeled the outgassing of vapor to try to explain the phenomenon. They show that the strong pressure difference between the sunlit side of the comet and that in shadow generates winds able to transport grains and form dunes.

Giving weight to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'
Scientists studying the 'living fossil' Sphenodon -- or tuatara -- have identified a new way to measure the evolutionary rate of these enigmatic creatures, giving credence to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils.'

Image: Fires in southeast United States both wild and prescribed
Fires both wild and prescribed dot the landscape of the southeastern portion of the United States. Wildfires are those that occur naturally with lightning strikes or are set by careless humans. Prescribed fires are those deliberately set by land management authorities to take out underlying brush and dead grass so that in the event of a wildfire there is not sufficient fuel for that fire to spread

Seabirds foraging habits revealed
A study of seabirds' foraging habits has found that they have strong long term preferences for the habitat in which they forage, and that those that can repeatedly go to the same place to find food have a better chance of fledging a chick than those who have to visit many locations.

Audio engineering is making call center robots more 'human' and less annoying
Science There's more to it than smarter A.I. Filler sound can make customer support computers seem friendlier and more helpful.

Social scientist discusses the realities of eviction
"Eviction" is a term that has become increasingly familiar to Americans over the past decade as one of the most visible symbols of poverty and economic misfortune. But research by social scientist and ethnographer Matthew Desmond shows that the reality of eviction is more complicated than traditional narratives might indicate.

Studying dusty air has both local and global significance
Understanding the unique characteristics of the Arabian atmosphere has much to offer global research. Pollution, weather, climate change, human health, agriculture and fisheries are all affected by the suspended particles in the atmosphere collectively known as aerosols. This is especially significant in the Middle East, as part of the Earth's notorious dust belt.

Fathers face negative bias over quest for work-life balance, study suggests
Fathers face 'forfeits' when applying for part-time employment and in the workplace, with questions over their commitment and suspicion regarding their quest for a work-life balance, a new study suggests.

Biogeochemical links across Greenland key to understanding Arctic
The Kangerlussuaq region of southwest Greenland is a 3,728-square-mile corridor stretching from the ice sheet to the Labrador Sea. In this area near the top of the world, landscape and ecosystem diversity abounds. Flora and fauna range from microbes in the ice sheet to large herbivores—caribou and musk oxen—living on the tundra, and aquatic plants and animals in the diverse bodies of water, includ

New polymer nanocomposites could improve solar cell durability
The Polymer Nanocomposites Laboratory at Texas A&M University, directed by Dr. Jaime Grunlan, is working with scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory to reduce or eliminate arc faults and corrosion in solar cells. Corrosion in photovoltaic cells, which convert light into electricity, can damage connections and reduce or destroy the ability to generate electricity.

Laws crucial to preserve biodiversity threatened
The mounting threats posed to the global environment by harmful human activities cannot be averted without effective legislation controlling those activities. However, the environmental laws designed for this purpose are themselves under global attack, warns an international team of scientists including Arie Trouwborst of Tilburg University in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Labs Can Now Grow Your Guts
Functional intestine becomes the latest lab-grown organ --

Human Activity Will Heat Alaskan Skies--Deliberately and Picturesquely
This week powerful radio waves will disturb the ionosphere to probe satellite disruptions and create strange glows --

Tilsyn rammer snart de første praksis
I begyndelsen af marts vil de første praktiserende læger få besked om, at deres praksis er udtaget til risikobaseret tilsyn. Hos PLO er man meget kritisk over for den nye ordning.

Atmospheric rivers found to carry more wind than thought
(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the California Institute of Technology and the University of California has found evidence that suggests atmospheric rivers carry wind speeds higher than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Duane Waliser and Bin Guan describe their analyses of atmospheric river events that occurred over the years 1997 to 2014.

This ancient society passed power down from woman to woman
Science The evidence lies in a Chaco Canyon crypt In a colossal 650-room structure built over a millennia ago in present-day New Mexico, women ruled.

Acupuncture and Migraine – New JAMA Study
Yet another poorly designed acupuncture study with dubious results is being presented as if it were compelling evidence.

10 Ways the GOP Overhaul Could Cut Essential Health Services
How Congress might keep the Affordable Care Act, but "skinny up” its requirements --

Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
Israeli researchers show that innocent LED indicator on your computer can leak your deepest secrets.

The Brilliant Drone That’ll Deliver Medicine—Then Rot Away
The origami-like Apsara delivery drone is made of scored and laser-cut cardboard sheets that take about an hour to fold and tape together.

SpaceX cargo ship aborts rendezvous with space station
SpaceX aborted a planned rendezvous between an unmanned Dragon cargo ship and the International Space Station Wednesday because of a GPS problem.

Rare fossil discovery raises questions
Adult and juvenile remains of a giant rodent species (Isostylomys laurdillardi) have been uncovered by researchers, in the Río de la Plata coastal region of southern Uruguay, raising questions about classification within dinomids.

New study gives weight to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol studying the 'living fossil' Sphenodon - or tuatara - have identified a new way to measure the evolutionary rate of these enigmatic creatures, giving credence to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'.

Trove of Dazzling Bronze Age Weapons Unearthed in Scotland
A gold-decorated spearhead and a notched sword were found in a rare Bronze Age weapon hoard.

Photos: Gilded Bronze Age Weaponry from Scotland
A hoard of Bronze Age weapons was discovered ahead of construction for two soccer fields in Scotland. Here's a look at the glittery treasure.

How Buttercups Get Their Yellow Gloss
If you've ever played the childhood game of holding a buttercup under your chin to see if you like butter, you might have wondered why the cheery little flowers are the only type that provide the requisite reflection on your skin.

Extinct Giant Rodents' Family Tree Rewritten by New Fossil Finds
Scientists have found a near-complete skull and a jaw from a pair of giant rodents belonging to a group that lived millions of years ago in South America.

Video: Terraformer wind tunnel takes hazards engineering research to a new level
Wind engineer and 13th generation Floridian Forrest Masters knows how to ride out a hurricane. In fact, hurricanes have become his life's work. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Masters and a team at the University of Florida are developing a world-class facility with new technology to help engineers and scientists better understand the high wind storms that batter communiti

Ancient DNA Yields Unprecedented Insights into Mysterious Chaco Civilization
The results suggest that a maternal “dynasty” ruled the society’s greatest mansion for more than 300 years, but concerns over research ethics cast a shadow on the technical...

New method helps researchers piece together the puzzle of antibiotic resistance
Researchers from The University of Queensland's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) have developed a faster and more accurate method for assembling genomes which could help clinicians rapidly identify antibiotic-resistant infections.

IBM training Watson to identify eye retina abnormalities
IBM Research has today announced new research developments in IBM Watson's ability to detect abnormalities of the eye's retina. The Melbourne based IBM researchers have trained a research version of Watson to recognize abnormalities in retina images, which could in the future offer doctors greater insights and speed in their early identification of patients who may be at risk of eye diseases – suc

Ants stomp, termites tiptoe—predator detection by a cryptic prey
Termites and ants are mortal enemies and will fight to the death if necessary. Yet armies of sightless termites carry out their work within millimetres of ant nests thanks to an incredible talent that could be of interest to the defence and counter-espionage industries.

The Thinking Behind the 10 Breakthrough Technologies
Here’s what we look for, and what we hope to avoid.

40 Years Ago: Electronic Money Is Too Easy
In 1977, a writer worried that people might lose control if cash went away and transactions went digital.

Paper Problem
Cash is passé. But digital money makes you easier to track.

Playtime’s Over
Getting computers to beat humans at games is impressive. But now the real work begins.

Drivers Wanted
Self-driving trucks are an experiment, and we’re the guinea pigs.

Image: European Service Module component of the Orion spacecraft
Even the most complex of systems comes down to properly configured wires and cables, such as those pictured here on the Propulsion Qualification Model of the Orion service module.

How to Get Back to the Moon in 4 Years--This Time to Stay
The answer is pretty straightforward: turn to private industry --

Unravelling the atomic and nuclear structure of the heaviest elements
Little is known about the heaviest, radioactive elements in Mendeleev's table. But an extremely sensitive technique involving laser light and gas jets makes it possible for the very first time to gain insight into their atomic and nuclear structure. An international team led by scientists from the Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics at KU Leuven report these findings in Nature Communicatio

Flere praktiserende læger indfører booking af tid samme dag
Et stigende antal lægepraksis er gået væk fra traditionel tidsbestilling for at kunne tilse patienterne samme dag, som de henvender sig. På den måde afskaffer man ventetid og får bedre tid til at løse opgaverne i praksis, lyder det fra to af de læger, der bruger konceptet.

Derfor har næsten alle digitale assistenter kvindestemmer
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/digitale-assistenter-naesten-alle-feminine-hvorfor-har-de-overhovedet-koen-1073654 Standarden for Alexa, Cortana, Siri og Googles Assistant er en kvindestemme. Det er hvad folk vil have, lyder det fra producenterne. Version2

Hvorfor skal digitale assistenter være feminine?
Standarden for Alexa, Cortana, Siri og Googles Assistant er en kvindestemme. Det er hvad folk vil have, lyder det fra producenterne. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/digitale-assistenter-naesten-alle-feminine-hvorfor-har-de-overhovedet-koen-1073654 Version2

Sådan programmeres Internet of Things
Billige enheder giver gang i produktionen af IoT. Men værktøjsfeltet er broget og sikkerheden spøger i kulissen. Der er meget at holde styr på, når der skal kodes og udrulles. To danske udviklere giver deres bud på hvordan kagen skal skæres. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-programmeres-internet-of-things-1073516 Version2

Scientists develop cell-analysis method much faster than robotic workstations
Researchers at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have collaborated with colleagues from other research institutions and created a microfluidic system for ultra-high-performance screening in double emulsion droplets. This technique can be used when studying the unique properties of single living cells, and is 30,000 times more productive than robotic workstati

Dansker finder Solkongens hustrus gemte notesbøger med breve
Madame de Maintenon havde en unik position i centrum af en stormagt som Ludvig D. 14.s hemmelige hustru....

Scalable 100 percent yield production of conductive graphene inks
Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics such as radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas, transistors or photovoltaic cells. The advent of the internet of things is predicted to lead to new connectivity within everyday objects, including in food packaging. There is a clear need for cheap and efficient production of electronic devices

Inner Spark: Using Music to Study Creativity
A hearing specialist and sax player says that studying the brain during flights of improvisation may provide new understanding of creativity—as well as insight into the musical genius of John...

NASA's Europa flyby mission moves into design phase
A mission to examine the habitability of Jupiter's ocean-bearing moon Europa is taking one step closer to the launchpad, with the recent completion of a major NASA review.

Astronomers track changes around supermassive black hole in the NGC 2617 galaxy
Members of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have been studying changes in the appearance of emissions from around the supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy called NGC 2617. The center of this galaxy underwent dramatic changes in appearance several years ago, becoming much brighter; astronomers were able to make groundbreaking observations. T

Using kinetics, not temperature, to make ceramic coatings
Researcher Pylin Sarobol explains an elegant process for ultrafine-grained ceramic coatings in a somewhat inelegant way: sub-micron particles splatting onto a surface.

Vis mig dit klistermærke, og jeg skal sige dig....
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/vis-os-dine-klistermaerker-eller-hvordan-din-angular-sticker-kan-spores-tilbage-victoria Klistermærkerne på den bærbare computer signalerer til omverdenen, hvad du interesserer dig for og arbejder med - men der er konkurrerende skoler for at bruge dem. Version2

The Recluse Who Hunts Assassins (the Insect Variety)
Most of the citizen scientists helping Texas A&M University researchers are quite ordinary. But not Hugh Brown.

Worst-ever coral bleaching event continues into fourth year
NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch is predicting that many reefs will bleach in the next three months as sea temperatures remain high despite the recent El Niño coming to an end

Toiletvand i hanerne: Brintoverilte og adskilte opvaskemaskiner
Samtlige vandhaner, vaskemaskiner og opvaskemaskiner i 13 hjem er blevet renset med brintoverilte for at bekæmpe forurening efter kloakvand i vandforsyningen.

Efterforskere bag MH370 flyulykke: Her er alle tal - hjælp os med gåden
Ny rapport om MH370 lader folk selv undersøge, om der er regnet rigtigt eller overset vigtige elementer i efterforskningen.

Scientists create a nano-trampoline to probe quantum behavior
A research group from Bar-Ilan University, in collaboration with French colleagues at CNRS Grenoble, has developed a unique experiment to detect quantum events in ultra-thin films. This novel research, to be published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, enhances the understanding of basic phenomena that occur in nano-sized systems close to absolute zero temperature.

Luftforurening giver for tidligt fødte børn
Ny forskning viser, at 18 procent af alle fødsler, som sker før uge 37, skyldes partikler. Partiklerne kommer fra en række forskellige kilder, blandt andet dieselbiler og afbrænding af biomasse.

Dårligt mobilsignal kan udløse øget stressniveau
Stressen kan være særligt voldsom, hvis opgaven er vigtig for at kunne deltage i samfundet, forklarer ITU-forsker.

Bayer says Monsanto deal on track, eyes record 2017
German pharmaceuticals and chemicals giant Bayer on Wednesday reported record sales and profits for 2016 and said it expected further growth in 2017, as its goal to seal a mammoth takeover of US seedmaker Monsanto remains on track.

Wintering ducks connect isolated wetlands by dispersing plant seeds
Plant populations in wetland areas face increasing isolation as wetlands are globally under threat from habitat loss and fragmentation. Erik Kleyheeg and Merel Soons of Utrecht University show that the daily movement behaviour of wintering mallards is highly predictable from the landscape they live in and that their daily flights contribute to maintaining the connections between wetland plant popu

US children's hospital helps save life of baby hippo
Doctors from a children's hospital have saved the life of a premature baby hippo.

Estonian robots headed for US must master crosswalks
A knee-high, black-and-white buggy rolls down a snowy pavement in Estonia's capital Tallinn and, carefully avoiding pedestrians, stops obediently at the red traffic light of a large road junction.

Tiny plastic particles from clothing, tyres clogging oceans: report
Invisible particles washed off products like synthetic clothing and car tyres account for up to a third of the plastic polluting oceans, impacting eco-systems and human health, a top conservationist body warned Wednesday.

China selfie-app leader seeks to 'beautify the world'
Strolling a tree-lined Shanghai street with friends, Hu Dongyuan pulls out her smartphone and does what millions of Chinese women do daily: take a selfie, digitally "beautify" their faces, and pop it on social media.

Russia successfully launches space freighter after crash
Russia on Wednesday successfully launched an unmanned spacecraft taking food and equipment to the International Space Station after the previous such ship crashed to Earth shortly after launch in December.

Professor med speciale i infertile mænd
Sandro Esteves er ny adjungeret professor i endokrinologi i Aarhus.

Hæmatologisk klinik fordobler konsultationsrum
Hæmatologisk Klinik på Rigshospitalet har fordobler antallet af konsultationsrum for at skabe bedre forhold for patientsamtaler.

Uforklarligt mange dødsbrande i danske pleje- og ældreboliger
I 2014 kostede brande ti gange så mange liv i danske pleje- og ældreboliger, som i svenske og norske. Det viser en ny undersøgelse fra DTU. Årsagen til den store forskel er imidlertid svær at fastslå.

A Sunken Treasure Will Appear in New York Despite Its Controversial Excavation
An earlier show featuring the treasure, from a ship believed to have sunk in the 9th century, was called off over ethical concerns over how the trove was collected.

New species of bushbaby found in disappearing forests of Angola
The Angolan dwarf galago is the fifth new primate species found in mainland Africa since 2000, but its habitat is under threat

Facts About Piranhas
Piranhas are South American fish with razor-sharp teeth and a reputation, somewhat undeserved, for feeding frenzies.

Plastic from tyres 'major source' of ocean pollution
Particles of debris from car tyres are ending up in the ocean as "plastic soup", a conservationist group warns.

Thulamela: Iron-Age Kingdom in South Africa
The city of Thulamela flourished in South Africa between the 13th and 17th centuries. Its inhabitants imported goods from as far away as China.

Bao Bao the Panda Leaves the Beltway Behind to Breed in China
The National Zoo gave Bao Bao a Washington send-off, with her own motorcade. As part of an agreement, pandas born in the zoo must leave for China by age 4.

Vision Needed to Curb Nearsightedness Epidemic
In urban Asian areas myopia among teenagers is topping 90 percent—but foresight may be able to bring those numbers way down.

Cusps Enable Line Attractors for Neural Computation
Line attractors in neural networks have been suggested to be the basis of many brain functions, such as working memory, oculomotor control, head direction, locomotion, and sensory processing. In recent work, we incorporated pulse gating into feedforward neural networks and showed that the transmission of graded information can be viewed as a line attractor in the firing rate of transiently synchro

Predicting non-linear dynamics: a stable local learning scheme for recurrent spiking neural networks
Brains need to predict how our muscles and body react to motor commands. How networks of spiking neurons can learn to reproduce these non-linear dynamics, using local, online and stable learning rules, is an important, open question. Here, we present a supervised learning scheme for the feedforward and recurrent connections in a network of heterogeneous spiking neurons. The error in the output is

Interactive Web Application for Exploring Matrices of Neural Connectivity
We present here a browser-based application for visualizing patterns of connectivity in 3D stacked data matrices with large numbers of pairwise relations. Visualizing a connectivity matrix, looking for trends and patterns, and dynamically manipulating these values is a challenge for scientists from diverse fields, including neuroscience and genomics. In particular, high-dimensional neural data inc

The network concept of creativity and deep thinking. Applications to social opinion formation and talent support
Our century has unprecedented new challenges, which need creative solutions and deep thinking. Contemplative, deep thinking became an "endangered species" in our rushing world of Tweets, elevator pitches and fast decisions. Here we describe that important aspects of both creativity and deep thinking can be understood as network phenomena of conceptual and social networks. "Creative nodes" occupy h

Electrocorticographic Dynamics Predict Visually Guided Motor Imagery of Grasp Shaping
Identification of intended movement type and movement phase of hand grasp shaping are critical features for the control of volitional neuroprosthetics. We demonstrate that neural dynamics during visually-guided imagined grasp shaping can encode intended movement. We apply Procrustes analysis and LASSO regression to achieve 72% accuracy (chance = 25%) in distinguishing between visually-guided imagi

Effective synaptic interactions in subsampled nonlinear networks with strong coupling
A major obstacle to understanding neural coding and computation is the fact that experimental recordings typically sample only a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit. Measured neural properties are skewed by interactions between recorded neurons and the "hidden" portion of the network. To properly interpret neural data, we thus need a better understanding of the relationships between measure

Counting sharks
Researchers have recalibrated shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll.

Model helps explain why some patients with multiple sclerosis have seizures
MS patients are three to six times more likely to develop seizures. Using a mouse model, a team of scientists has found for the first time that chronic demyelination is closely linked to, and is likely the cause of, these seizures. A new study could lead to the development of drugs aimed at reducing seizures in multiple sclerosis, potentially benefiting epilepsy patients as well.

Likelihood of dieting success lies within your tweets
There is a direct link between a person's attitude on social media and the likelihood that their dieting efforts will succeed. In fact, researchers have now determined that dieting success ­-- or failure -- can be predicted with an accuracy rate of 77 percent based on the sentiment of the words and phrases one uses on Twitter.

The smallest Cas9 genetic scissors (so far)
Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date and show that it can fit inside adeno-associated viruses and mutate blindness-causing genes

Genetic data show mainly men migrated from the Pontic steppe to Europe 5,000 years ago
A new study, looking at the sex-specifically inherited X chromosome of prehistoric human remains, shows that hardly any women took part in the extensive migration from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe approximately 5,000 years ago. The great migration that brought farming practices to Europe 4,000 years earlier, on the other hand, consisted of both women and men. The difference in sex bias suggests that

Mediterranean diet may decrease pain associated with obesity
Eating a Mediterranean diet could decrease the chances an overweight person will experience regular pain, new research suggests.

In great shape: Metamaterial is world's first to achieve performance predicted by theoretical bounds
Isomax is now proved to be the world's first to achieve the performance predicted by theoretical bounds, reports a new study.

Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change
As humans build roads, construct buildings and develop land for agriculture, freshwater ecosystems respond ? but not always in the ways one might expect.

Researcher using kinetics, not temperature, to make ceramic coatings
A new study lays down ceramic coatings kinetically at room temperature. Coating at room temperature makes microelectronics design and fabrication more flexible and could someday lead to better, less expensive microelectronics components that underpin modern technology.

Same-Sex Marriage May Reduce Teen Suicide Attempts
Laws permitting same-sex marriage may help to reduce teen suicide attempts, a new report suggests.

Inside the Chinese lab poised to study world's most dangerous pathogens
Maximum-security biolab is part of plan to build network of BSL-4 facilities across China.

It takes two to tango: Beetles are equal partners in mating behavior
Beetles that copulate with the same mate as opposed to different partners will repeat the same behaviour, debunking previous suggestions that one sex exerts control over the other in copulation, new research has found.

David Cassidy Has Dementia: Here's What That Means
Actor and singer David Cassidy recently revealed he has dementia, but what exactly does this term mean?

How cathedral termites got to Australia to build their 'sky-scrapers'
They build among the tallest non-human structures (proportionately speaking) in the world and now it's been discovered the termites that live in Australia's remote Top End originated from overseas - rafting vast distances and migrating from tree-tops to the ground, as humans later did.

Life Expectancy in South Korea May Reach 90 by 2030
Life expectancy is expected to rise in many countries around the world, but in the United States, that increase is predicted to be smaller than in other countries, a new study finds.

Under Pressure to Prove Its Ads Actually Work, Google Opens Up
Google has convinced the world that its way of advertising is the best way. But a new period of doubt is setting in.

Remembering Mildred Dresselhaus
The MIT professor who helped pioneer nanoscience and launched a new field of energy research.

Bye Bye, Bao Bao: Panda leaves Washington for China
One of Washington's most popular residents left town on Tuesday: Bao Bao, the National Zoo's uber-popular young female panda, headed to her new home in China.

South Dakota bill leaves evolution skepticism up to teachers
South Dakota legislators are weighing whether to let teachers decide how much skepticism to work into lessons on contentious scientific topics such as evolution and climate change.

The Example of Easter Island Shows Why Humanity Will Be Extinct Within 100 Years
We’re about to kick off the sixth great extinction event. And we’ll follow shortly after.

Famous Scientists' Early Works Stolen in $2.5 Million Heist of Rare Books
The stolen works include a 1566 edition of Copernicus' book, and early works by Galileo, Isaac Newton and more.

Is Empathy Overrated?
Yale psychologist Paul Bloom suggests a bit of reason in your feeling in his new book, Against Empathy .

Are Cyborgs In Our Future? 'Homo Deus' Author Thinks So
Yuval Noah Harari expects we'll soon engineer our bodies in the same way we design products. "I think in general medicine ... will switch from healing the sick to upgrading the healthy," he says.

Can we blame climate change for February's record-breaking heat?
From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Oklahoma just saw temperatures close to triple digits It is extremely unusual to see such sweltering temperatures in the dead of winter, but climate change is loading the dice for severe heat.

Patienter har fortsat gavn af immunterapi efter afbrudt behandling
Et nyt studie stiller spørgsmål ved den standardiserede fremgangsmåde, hvor behandling med immunterapi fortsættes indtil sygdommen progredierer, mener overlæge fra Aarhus Universitetshospital.

Photos: Pueblo Society Chose Rulers Based on Mother's Line
The prehistoric rulers at Chaco Canyon's Pueblo Bonito had their mothers, but not their fathers, to thank for their high positions.

New metamaterial is proved to be the world's first to achieve the performance predicted by theoretical bounds
In 2015 UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer and materials scientist Jonathan Berger developed an idea that could change the way people think about high-performance structural materials. Two years later, his concept is paying research dividends.

Genetic data show mainly men migrated from the Pontic steppe to Europe 5,000 years ago
A new study, looking at the sex-specifically inherited X chromosome of prehistoric human remains, shows that hardly any women took part in the extensive migration from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe approximately 5,000 years ago. The great migration that brought farming practices to Europe 4,000 years earlier, on the other hand, consisted of both women and men. The difference in sex bias suggests that

US grid can handle more offshore wind power, cutting pollution and power costs
Injecting large amounts of offshore wind power into the US electrical grid is manageable, will cut electricity costs, and will reduce pollution compared to current fossil fuel sources, according to researchers who have completed a first-of-its-kind simulation with the electric power industry.

Brightest neutron star yet has a multipolar magnetic field
Scientists have identified a neutron star that is consuming material so fast it emits more x-rays than any other. Its extreme brightness can only be explained if the star has a complex multipolar magnetic field, the researchers say.

Using a rabbit virus to treat multiple myeloma
Treating multiple myeloma (MM) with myxoma virus (MYXV) eliminated a majority of malignant cells in preclinical studies, report investigators. Furthermore, introduction of MYXV had no impact on the bone marrow compartment and elicited a strong immune response that eradicated disease in some animals.

New peptide to combat a disorder that causes heart attacks at early age
Some people inherit a condition that elevates their cholesterol to an excessive degree, and no amount of diet or exercise can bring the numbers down. Researchers are developing and testing a new peptide that may lead to better treatment options.

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic
Low levels of iron in the blood may indicate a serious but treatable medical condition if caught early, but patients in a testosterone trial were not informed, a bioethicist finds.

Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change
As humans build roads, construct buildings and develop land for agriculture, freshwater ecosystems respond ? but not always in the ways one might expect.

Neural Network Learns to Synthetically Age Faces, and Make Them Look Younger, Too
Deep-learning machines can make faces look older but often lose their identity in the process. Now computer scientists have solved this problem.

Fermi finds possible dark matter ties in Andromeda galaxy
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy.

Tweaked DNA Snippets Could Become Tiny Electrical 'On' Switches
By slipping a chemical group in between the letters of DNA, scientists have created a tiny electrical switch that could be used in miniscule electronic devices.

Moms Rule! Excavation at Chaco Canyon Reveals Maternal Lineage
Hundreds of years before Christopher Columbus landed in the New World, a complex society in what is now New Mexico passed down power through its maternal line, a new study finds.

Hear This: Scientists Regrow Sound-Sensing Cells
Scientists recently regrew sound-sensing "hair cells" in high volumes to test drugs for hearing loss.

Likelihood of dieting success lies within your tweets
There is a direct link between a person's attitude on social media and the likelihood that their dieting efforts will succeed.

New design for longer lasting night-vision cameras
With the amazing ability to survey areas in complete darkness, night-vision cameras have revolutionized the security industry. But the materials and technology embodied in current cameras tend to degrade under temperature stress, causing night-vision devices to frequently break.

Chemists reveal novel biocatalysts for bioactive alkaloid synthesis
Alkaloids are natural nitrogen-containing compounds produced by plants and microbes. These molecules, such as morphine and quinine, are important human medicines. Alkaloids are typically polycyclic in nature. While the polycyclic characteristics are important for their bioactivities, these features impede their chemical syntheses in the laboratory and their applications as pharmaceuticals.

Researchers implicate suspect in heart disease linked to diabetes
Scientists have struggled to trace the specific biology behind diabetes-associated heart disease risk or find ways to intervene. Now, researchers have hunted down a possible culprit -- a protein called IRS-1, which is crucial for the smooth muscle cells that make up veins and arteries.

Over time, nuisance flooding can cost more than extreme, infrequent events
Global climate change is being felt in many coastal communities of the United States, not always in the form of big weather disasters but as a steady drip, drip, drip of nuisance flooding.

New studies quantify the impacts of water use on diversity of fish and aquatic insects in NC streams
The health of fish and aquatic insects could be significantly affected by withdrawals of fresh water from the rivers and streams across North Carolina according to a new scientific assessment.

Collaborative care provides improvement for older adults with mild depression
Among older adults with subthreshold depression (insufficient levels of depressive symptoms to meet diagnostic criteria), collaborative care compared with usual care resulted in an improvement in depressive symptoms after four months, although it is of uncertain clinical importance, according to a study.

NASA sees development of South Pacific's Tropical Cyclone Bart
Tropical Cyclone Bart has developed in the Southern Pacific Ocean, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm early on Feb. 21.

Zimbabwe’s Rulers Use a Monument’s Walls to Build a Legacy
The Great Zimbabwe, the ruined city in Zimbabwe once used to justify white domination, is now a focus of the ZANU-PF party’s efforts to retain power.

Stabilizing energy storage
Chemists predict a better future for these types of batteries, called redox flow batteries. Using a predictive model of molecules and their properties, the team has developed a charge-storing molecule around 1,000 times more stable than current compounds.

When rocket science meets x-ray science
Researchers are exploring next-generation spacecraft materials at the microscale using an X-ray technique that produces 3-D images. This work could help ensure future spacecraft survive the rigors of otherworldly atmospheres.

Brain–Computer Interface Allows Speediest Typing to Date
A new interface system allowed three paralyzed individuals to type words up to four times faster than the speed that had been demonstrated in earlier studies --

Maths and maps make you nervous? It could be in your genes
Our genes play a significant role in how anxious we feel when faced with spatial and mathematical tasks, such as reading a map or solving a geometry problem, according to a new study.

Scientists remove reliance on seasonality in new lines of broccoli, potentially doubling crop production
Scientists are developing a new line of fast-growing sprouting broccoli that goes from seed to harvest in 8-10 weeks. It has the potential to deliver two full crops a season in-field or it can be grown all year round in protected conditions, which could help with continuity of supply, as growers would no longer be reliant on seasonal weather conditions.

Legal marijuana sales creating escalating damage to the environment
Marijuana sales have created an economic boom in U.S. states that have fully or partially relaxed their cannabis laws, but is the increased cultivation and sale of this crop also creating escalating environmental damage and a threat to public health?

A portable jump-starter for 71 percent off? I'd buy it.
Gadgets It can charge your phone. It's $170 off. A portable jump starter for my car, 71 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.

Science vs. the sea lamprey
A promising -- and natural -- solution to curb destructive the sea lamprey population has been developed by a team of researchers.

Colorado River flows will keep shrinking as climate warms
Warming in the 21st century reduced Colorado River flows by at least 0.5 million acre-feet, about the amount of water used by 2 million people for one year, according to new research. Climate change models project increasing temperatures, but future precipitation projections have more uncertainty. A new report, the first to quantify the different effects of temperature and precipitation on recent

ORC as loader of the rings: Study details ringed structure of ORC in DNA replication
An international collaboration of life scientists has described in exquisite detail the critical first steps of DNA replication, which allows cells to divide and most advanced life, including human, to propagate.

Risk factors for B cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma discovered
Israeli and Palestinian researchers have conducted a large scale epidemiological study examining risk factors for a form of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in these two populations. In both groups, recreational sun exposure, black hair-dye use, a history of hospitalization for infection, and having a first-degree relative with a blood cancer were associated with B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Each group had un

A paper in JPSP explores how status in a group influences people's generosity towards that group.


Prostate cancer cells grow with malfunction of cholesterol control in cells
Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem. Now a team of researchers has identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to

Why some diversity training fails to get past awareness
Diversity training programs at work can build awareness of cultural differences, but often fall short at changing attitudes and behaviors. Published in Psychological Bulletin , the study finds diversity training can be successful—but that results vary widely based on the content and length of training and whether it was accompanied by other related initiatives. “In today’s political climate, dive

Sorry, Y’All—Humanity’s Nearing an Upgrade to Irrelevance
As we become increasingly skilled at deploying AI, says author Yuval Harari in a conversation with WIRED, we'll transform into a new breed of superhuman.

Russisk svævecykel vil indtage markedet for ekstrem-sport
Den er blot et af de seneste eksempler på nye, flyvende enheder inden for det seneste år.

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
New planetary formation models indicate that there may be an undiscovered population of gas giant planets orbiting around Sun-like stars at distances similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn.

Prides, protection and parks: Africa's protected areas can support four times as many lions
Africa's protected parks and reserves are capable of supporting three to four times as many wild lions if well funded and managed, according to a new report. The study shows that populations of the African lion and its prey species are drastically below their natural potential inside most of Africa's protected areas (PA).

Osteopathic technique helps locate ectopic pregnancies when imaging fails
The location of an ectopic pregnancy can be determined quickly and easily with a simple, noninvasive physical examination technique used by osteopathic physicians. The method can be helpful in emergency situations, like ruptured ectopic pregnancies, when bleeding obscures traditional imaging. Ectopic pregnancies account for nearly 2 percent of all pregnancies in North America and are the leading c

NASA spots short-lived Tropical Cyclone Alfred
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the Southern Pacific Ocean's newly formed tropical cyclone in the Gulf of Carpentaria. By the next day Alfred made landfall and weakened to a remnant low pressure area.

Researchers recalibrate shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll
Many shark populations around the world are known to have declined over the past several decades, yet marine scientists lack important baseline information about what a healthy shark population looks like. A clearer picture is now coming into focus—thanks to a team of scientists who investigated the size of an unfished community of reef sharks.

'Sweet spot' where tissue stiffness drives cancer's spread
Researchers have now found that physical forces exerted between cancer cells and the ECM are enough to drive a shape change necessary for metastasis. Those forces converge on an optimal stiffness that allows cancer cells to spread.

Cars and chlamydia killing Queensland koalas
Being hit by cars and chlamydia were the top causes of a dramatic rise in south-east Queensland koala deaths over the past two decades, according to a new study. Scientists analyzed data about koala disease and death from 1997 to 2013.

Radiocarbon dating and DNA show ancient Puebloan leadership in the maternal line
Discovering who was a leader, or even if leaders existed, from the ruins of archaeological sites is difficult, but now a team of archaeologists and biological anthropologists, using a powerful combination of radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA, have shown that a matrilineal dynasty likely ruled Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico for more than 300 years.

Engineers overcome a hurdle in growing a revolutionary optical metamaterial
Engineers have now produced an elusive diamond crystal structure that could revolutionize photonics. This has put them on the path to achieving a material that is the 'holy grail of directed particle self-assembly.' Such materials could be used to make lenses, cameras and microscopes with better performance, or possibly even 'invisibility cloaks,' solid objects that would redirect all light rays a

Slot-machine addiction linked to immersion in the game
Gamblers who feel like they enter into a trance while playing slot machines are more likely to have gambling problems, according to new research.

Meet the frog that can sit on a thumbnail
Seven new species of night frog have been discovered in India, including four miniature forms.

Chemists reveal novel biocatalysts for bioactive alkaloid synthesis
Alkaloids are natural nitrogen-containing compounds produced by plants and microbes. These molecules, such as morphine and quinine, are important human medicines. Alkaloids are typically polycyclic in nature. While the polycyclic characteristics are important for their bioactivities, these features impede their chemical syntheses in the laboratory and their applications as pharmaceuticals.

Longevity-promoting superstar gets revealed in Caenorhabditis reproducibility project
The amyloid dye Thioflavin T emerged as the superstar when age researchers in three independent laboratories tested ten already-promising pro-longevity chemicals across a range of distinctive strains and species of tiny nematode worms known as Caenorhabditis. The project, dubbed the Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program (CITP), tackled reproducibility, which has been a lingering problem in a

Online daters ignore wish list when choosing a match
Despite having a 'wish list' stating their preference for potential ideal matches, most online daters contact people bearing no resemblance to the characteristics they say they want in a mate, according to new research. The finding was revealed by researchers who analyzed the online dating preferences and contact behavior of more than 41,000 Australians aged between 18-80.

Cocaine addiction leads to build-up of iron in brain
Cocaine addiction may affect how the body processes iron, leading to a build-up of the mineral in the brain, according to new research. The study raises hopes that there may be a biomarker -- a biological measure of addiction -- that could be used as a target for future treatments.

Discovery could help doctors to spot cardiovascular disease at an earlier stage
Screening methods for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes could be improved by measuring different biological signposts to those currently being tested, a new study suggests. The study could allow doctors to better predict the development of cardiovascular disease at an earlier stage.

The secret of scientists who impact policy
Researchers analyzed 15 policy decisions worldwide, with outcomes ranging from new coastal preservation laws to improved species protections, to produce the first quantitative analysis of how environmental knowledge impacts the attitudes and decisions of conservation policymakers.

Einstein's Greatest Blunder?
He abandoned the idea of a static, nonexpanding universe in 1929—but some physicists are beginning to reconsider it --

Quantum Computers Finally Go Head-to-Head
Researchers have directly tested two competing quantum computing technologies against each other for the first time.

How to take a screenshot on any device
DIY Grab that screengrab Whether you're on Windows, macOS, Android, or iOS, here are the button combinations you need to capture an image of your screen and save it for posterity.

Engineers overcome a hurdle in growing a revolutionary optical metamaterial
When John Crocker, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science was a graduate student, his advisor gathered together everyone in his lab to "throw down the gauntlet" on a new challenge in the field.

Science vs. the sea lamprey
Of all the fishy predators in the Great Lakes, few are more destructive than the sea lamprey. There's something of a horror movie in their approach: jawless, they attach to prey such as salmon, whitefish or trout with a sucker mouth and drain the victim of its blood and lymph.

Colorado River flows will keep shrinking as climate warms
Warming in the 21st century reduced Colorado River flows by at least 0.5 million acre-feet, about the amount of water used by 2 million people for one year, according to new research from the University of Arizona and Colorado State University.

New studies quantify the impacts of water use on diversity of fish and aquatic insects in NC streams
The health of fish and aquatic insects could be significantly affected by withdrawals of fresh water from the rivers and streams across North Carolina according to a new scientific assessment.

NASA's SnowEx challenges the sensing techniques... 'until they break'
A NASA-led team will kick off an ambitious airborne campaign to determine which combination of sensors would work best at collecting global snow-water measurements from space—critical for understanding and managing the world's freshwater resources. Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland are providing technology to the mission.

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
New planetary formation models from Carnegie's Alan Boss indicate that there may be an undiscovered population of gas giant planets orbiting around Sun-like stars at distances similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. His work is published by The Astrophysical Journal.

New type of immunological treatment of cancer?
Researchers have found an important piece of the puzzle leading towards an understanding of how our innate immune system reacts against viral infections and recognises foreign DNA, for example from dying cancer cells. The discovery may prove to be of great importance for immunological treatment of cancer as well as autoimmune diseases in the future.

Fifth of world's food lost to over-eating and waste, study finds
Almost 20 per cent of the food made available to consumers is lost through over-eating or waste, a study suggests. The world population consumes around 10 per cent more food than it needs, while almost nine per cent is thrown away or left to spoil, researchers say.

Humans are hard-wired to follow the path of least resistance
The amount of effort required to do something influences what we think we see, finds a new study, suggesting we're biased towards perceiving anything challenging to be less appealing.

Exercise reduces death from breast cancer relapse by 40 per cent
A quarter of women with breast cancer will die from cancer spreading around the body – exercise is the most important lifestyle factor in preventing this

Radiocarbon dating and DNA show ancient Puebloan leadership in the maternal line
Discovering who was a leader, or even if leaders existed, from the ruins of archaeological sites is difficult, but now a team of archaeologists and biological anthropologists, using a powerful combination of radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA, have shown that a matrilineal dynasty likely ruled Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico for more than 300 years.

Scientists combine the ultra-fast with the ultra-small to pioneer microscopy at terahertz frequencies
For the first time ever, scientists have captured images of terahertz electron dynamics of a semiconductor surface on the atomic scale. The successful experiment indicates a bright future for the new and quickly growing sub-field called terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM), pioneered by the University of Alberta in Canada. THz-STM allows researchers to image electron behaviour at extr

Model of CRISPR, phage co-evolution explains confusing experimental results
A Rice University study suggests that researchers planning to use the CRISPR genome-editing system to produce designer gut bacteria may need to account for the dynamic evolution of the microbial immune system.

Prides, protection and parks: Africa's protected areas can support four times as many lions
New York, NY-Africa's protected parks and reserves are capable of supporting three to four times as many wild lions if well funded and managed, according to a new report led by Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization.

Study details ringed structure of ORC in DNA replication
An international collaboration of life scientists, including experts at Van Andel Research Institute, has described in exquisite detail the critical first steps of DNA replication, which allows cells to divide and most advanced life, including human, to propagate.

New data about two distant asteroids give a clue to the possible 'Planet Nine'
The dynamical properties of these asteroids, observed spectroscopiccally for the first time using the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, suggest a possible common origin and give a clue to the existence of a planet beyond Pluto, the so-called 'Planet Nine.'

Professor examines effects of climate change on coral reefs, shellfish
Professor is studying how a variety of marine organisms are responding to changes in their environment. Focusing on reef-building corals and other shelled creatures that are threatened by increasing temperatures and ocean acidification, she is testing them to determine how species may acclimatize to the new circumstances.

Tune your radio: Galaxies sing when forming stars
A team led from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has found the most precise way ever to measure the rate at which stars form in galaxies using their radio emission at 1-10 Gigahertz frequency range.

Scientists remove reliance on seasonality in new broccoli line, potentially doubling yield
Scientists at the John Innes Centre are developing a new line of fast-growing sprouting broccoli that goes from seed to harvest in 8-10 weeks. It has the potential to deliver two full crops a season in-field or it can be grown all year round in protected conditions, which could help with continuity of supply, as growers would no longer be reliant on seasonal weather conditions.

Anti-epilepsy medicine taken by pregnant women does not harm the child's overall health
Previous studies have shown that anti-epilepsy medicine may lead to congenital malformations in the fetus and that the use of anti-epilepsy medicine during pregnancy affects the development of the brain among the children. There is still a lack of knowledge in the area about the general health of children who are exposed to anti-epilepsy medicine in fetal life. But this new study is generally reas

Youth handball players get injured by sudden increases in training volume
With extra training sessions in the sports hall and more matches on the program, youth handball players risk getting shoulder injuries, conclude investigators.

Drug treatment could combat hearing loss
A combination of drugs has been discovered that induces supporting cells in the ear to differentiate into hair cells, offering a potential new way to treat hearing loss.

Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents
Researchers have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic and social success.

New approach to measure fluid drag on the body during swimming
A key factor to improve swimming performance is reducing resistance that water exerts on the moving body. This resistance, known as drag, is influenced by factors including the stroke rate, swimmer's size, and swimming speed. The range of factors, along with the motion of the swimmer, have made it difficult to measure drag accurately.

DOOMED is new online learning approach to robotics modeling
Robotics researchers have developed a novel adaptive control approach based on online learning that allows for the correction of dynamics errors in real time using the data stream from the robot. The strategy is described in an article published in Big Data.

Exercise most important lifestyle change to help reduce risk of breast cancer recurrence
For patients with breast cancer, physical activity and avoiding weight gain are the most important lifestyle choices that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and death, according to an evidence-based review.

Expert calls for shorter radiation use in prostate cancer treatment
Men with prostate cancer can receive shorter courses of radiation therapy than what is currently considered standard, according to scientists.

Leaping into Corruption
The path to wrongdoing is sometimes more like a cliff than a slippery slope --

Mapping the family tree of stars
Astronomers are borrowing principles applied in biology and archaeology to build a family tree of the stars in the galaxy. By studying chemical signatures found in the stars, they are piecing together these evolutionary trees looking at how the stars formed and how they are connected to each other. The signatures act as a proxy for DNA sequences. It's akin to chemical tagging of stars and forms th

Radial access, same-day cardiac procedure could save $300 million annually
If hospitals can perform more transradial, same-day percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCIs, not only will patients benefit because it is associated with have less complications, but collectively, hospitals across the U.S. could save $300 million each year, according to new research.

Satellitter skal tegne første ensartede kort over Grønland
Udvides et pilotprojekt kan hele Grønland kortægges via højtopløselige satellitfotos. De nye kort gør overvågningen af klimaforandringer nemmere, gavner beredskabet og forvaltningen af råstoffer.

Pixar Has a Free Storytelling Course You Can Take Online, Right Now
In one of the best examples of free education this year, Pixar has released a six-part online course called 'The Art of Storytelling'.

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed
Warming seawaters, caused by climate change and extreme climatic events, threaten the stability of tropical coral reefs, with potentially devastating implications for many reef species and the human communities that reefs support.

New computer model explores how proteins are controlled 'at a distance'
Scientists have created a new computer model that can help better design of allosteric drugs, which control proteins 'at a distance.'

Drivhus og dyrehold rykker ind på taget af Fields
Bæredygtigt landbrug skal op på taget af storcentret Fields på Amager. Fødevareproduktionen skal udnytte overskudsvarme fra supermarked og madaffald fra restaurant. Kunderne kan dermed få lokale og friske råvarer.

Experiments call origin of Earth's iron into question
New research reveals that the Earth's unique iron composition isn't linked to the formation of the planet's core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years.

Family focused interventions for at risk children and youth
Experts discuss how interventions can be developed to maximize resilience among children experiencing adversity and improve outcomes for their families as well.

Workshop identifies complex health problems among Zika-affected infants
Children exposed to Zika virus in the womb may face complex health and developmental problems as they grow older, according to discussions at a National Institutes of Health workshop.

Live Science Book Giveaway: 'Cannibalism' by Bill Schutt
Cannibalism is more widespread and "perfectly natural" than you might suspect.

The Race to Map the Human Body--1 Cell at a Time
A host of detailed cell atlases could revolutionize understanding of cancer and other diseases --

Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins
Dolphins have been recorded in rarely-seen activities of mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviors like flipper-rubbing through the use of largely non-invasive new cameras.

Novel plasma jet offshoot phenomenon explains blue atmospheric jets
Physicists working with plasma jets, made of a stream of ionised matter, have discovered a new phenomenon. They found a new type of discharge phenomenon in an atmospheric pressure plasma. Their findings are particularly relevant for the development of novel applications in medicine, health care and materials processing.

Anyone can be backyard scientist, mole study shows
Scientific findings are awaiting discovery in your backyard. The requirement? A keen sense of observation and patience. A researcher recently completed a study on moles' behavior that proves the concept. His laboratory? A molehill-dotted city lawn in downtown Chico, California.

3,000 steps in 30 minutes improves the prognosis for heart failure, study suggests
Contrary to what was previously assumed, physical exercise does not lead to harmful ventricular enlargement. Researchers have new evidence against this earlier hypothesis and have issued recommendations for designing a training program for persons with congestive heart failure.

Monitoring Snow Changes: NASA Scientist Dalia Kirschbaum Explains | Video
Got snow? NASA’s new SnowEx campaign is taking a closer look at snow, an important source of freshwater for 60 million people in the U.S., and for 1.2 billion people worldwide.

Growing number of teens think getting heroin is 'probably impossible'
How easy do adolescents think it is to get heroin? A researcher examines how their perceptions have changed from 2002 to 2014.

How habitat destruction figures in long-term survival plans
Some organisms might have an interesting strategy for long-term survival: switching between two unsustainable forms of behaviour that, when kept unchecked, can actually cause them to wipe out their own homes.

Genetic mutations that drive antibiotic resistance in bacteria
Scientists have identified novel mutations in bacteria that promote the evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance.

Three-way dance between herbivores, plants and microbes unveiled
What looks like a caterpillar chewing on a leaf or a beetle consuming fruit is likely a three-way battle that benefits most, if not all of the players involved, according to an entomologist.

Waste silicon sawdust recycled into anode for lithium-ion battery
By recycling silicon sawdust, researchers have created a high performance anode material.

Mindfulness shows promise as we age, but study results are mixed
Mindfulness is all the rage, but studies on the elderly have so far been mixed. More investigation is needed to determine how best to apply mindfulness in that population, a new review has found.

‘Resurrected’ eggs reveal odd evolution of water fleas
Combining techniques from a field called “resurrection ecology” with a look at lake sediments reveals surprising evolutionary responses to heavy-metal contamination over the past 75 years. Mary Rogalski hatched long-dormant eggs of Daphnia , tiny freshwater crustaceans also known as water fleas, that accumulated in the lake sediments over time. After rearing the critters in the lab, she exposed t

Technology-Induced Distracted Driving Is Pushing Up Insurance Prices
Smartphones are driving premiums upward—and semi-autonomous driving systems may do the same.

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought
A central tenet of biology may need updating given new measurements of start codons.

‘Sensor tags’ track a day in the life of a bumble bee
Bumble bees tagged with microchips are offering insights into the daily lives of a colony. While most bees are generalists collecting both pollen and nectar over the course of their lifetime, individual workers tend to specialize on one of the two during any given day, dedicating more than 90 percent of their foraging sorties to either pollen or nectar. The observations also reveal that individua

Scalable 100% yield production of conductive graphene inks
Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics such as radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas, transistors or photovoltaic cells. The advent of the internet of things is predicted to lead to new connectivity within everyday objects, including in food packaging. There is a clear need for cheap and efficient production of electronic devices

The racial politics of time | Brittney Cooper
Cultural theorist Brittney Cooper examines racism through the lens of time, showing us how historically it has been stolen from people of color, resulting in lost moments of joy and connection, lost years of healthy quality of life and the delay of progress. A candid, thought-provoking take on history and race that may make you reconsider your understanding of time, and your place in it.

Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins
A world-first study testing new underwater cameras on wild dolphins has given researchers the best view yet into their hidden marine world.

Review: Here One Wireless Earbuds
Doppler Labs takes a stab at the newest trend in wearables, the in-ear computer.

A Drone-Slinging UPS Van Delivers the Future
The delivery company is using drones to complement trucks, not replace them.

400 million year old gigantic extinct monster worm discovered in Canadian museum
A previously undiscovered species of an extinct primordial giant worm with terrifying snapping jaws has been identified by an international team of scientists.

Pluto might be a planet again. Let’s talk about why this matters.
Space Scientists aren’t just jerking you around—this is about something more than your childhood nostalgia Prepare yourself—the Pluto debate has returned and people are not going to be able to shut up about it. They’re going to have a lot of opinions and they’re going to need…

Waste silicon sawdust recycled into anode for lithium-ion battery
Researchers have created a high performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) using waste silicon (Si) sawdust.

More black police won't result in fewer police-involved homicides of black citizens
Hiring more black police officers is not a viable strategy for reducing police-involved homicides of black citizens in most cities, according to new Indiana University research that is the first in-depth study of this increasingly urgent public policy question.

Dream of energy-collecting windows is one step closer to reality
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca are bringing the dream of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy one step closer to reality thanks to high tech silicon nanoparticles.

Researchers helping intelligence analysts make smart decisions
Researchers at George Mason University are developing a tool combining intelligent computer software and high-level crowdsourcing that will allow intelligence analysts to give sound advice to decision makers in high-pressure situations.

Experiments call origin of Earth's iron into question
New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth's unique iron composition isn't linked to the formation of the planet's core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years.

Giant Antarctic Ice Shelf Crack Threatens to Become a Massive Iceberg
Rift through Larsen C ice shelf has grown to 175 kilometers, and collapse of nearby ice shelves could offer a glimpse of its future --

Kuldsejlet tricorder afføder succesfulde spinoffs
Chipproducenten Qualcomm udlodder store pengesummer i en international konkurrence om at producere en medicinsk tricorder. Et dansk hold måtte trække sig efter en prækvalifikationsrunde, men har sidenhen lanceret produkter, der indsamler sundhedsdata med nye metoder.

Search For Alien Life - Exploring Saturn's Moon Enceladus Has Major Impact | Video
NASA’s Cassini mission discovered active geysers at the south pole of Saturn’s moon and after several flybys it was determined that an ocean lies beneath its icy surface that has the potential to support life.

Understanding 'glass relaxation' and why it's important for next-generation displays
Next-generation displays will feature increased resolution and performance, but getting there will require a shift to smaller individual pixel sizes and a tightening of the tolerance for glass relaxation. Display manufacturers can account for a certain level of relaxation in the glass, referring to the intermolecular rearrangement, if it's known and reproducible. But fluctuations in this relaxatio

Earbuds: The Next Generation
The earbuds of the future let you manipulate all kinds of noise. They’re a work in progress, though.

Hundreds of Babies Harmed by Homeopathic Remedies, Families Say
10 years of FDA data paint a grim picture of teething product complaints --

Behold the Cactus Wren! Amazing Photos of the Desert-Dwelling Birds
Across the desert regions of the southwestern United States southward into central Mexico, a feisty little bird called the cactus wren thrives.

Water 'Walls' Spur Evolution of New Colorful Fish Species
Intense rapids turn the lower Congo River into a biodiversity breeding ground.

In Mathematics, ‘You Cannot Be Lied To’
A few years back, a prospective doctoral student sought out Sylvia Serfaty with some existential questions about the apparent uselessness of pure math. Serfaty, then newly decorated with the prestigious Henri Poincaré Prize, won him over simply by being honest and nice. “She was very warm and understanding and human,” said Thomas Leblé, now an instructor at the Courant Institute of Mathematical S

Crowdsourcing effort helps researchers predict how a molecule will smell
While it's possible to anticipate the color of light or the pitch of sound, odor defies prediction. New research has taken an important step toward decoding smell, by linking a scent back to a molecule's chemistry.

Molecular biology: Fingerprinting cell identities
Every cell has its own individual molecular fingerprint, which is informative for its functions and regulatory states. Researchers have now carried out a comprehensive comparison of methodologies that quantify RNAs of single cells.

New behavioral therapy to support Japanese mothers of children with ADHD
Researchers have successfully adapted a parent-training program for ADHD for use with families in Japan, where ADHD-specific behavioral interventions are limited.

Seven new species of night frogs from India including four miniature forms
Scientists from India have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus, commonly known as Night Frogs. This find is a result of five years of extensive explorations in the Western Ghats global biodiversity hotspot in India. Four out of seven of the new species are miniature-sized frogs (12.2-15.4 mm), which can comfortably sit on a coin or a thumbnail. These are among t

Winners and losers: Climate change will shift vegetation
Projected global warming will likely decrease the extent of temperate drylands by one-third over the remainder of the 21st century coupled with an increase in dry deep soil conditions during agricultural growing season.

Tiny nanoclusters could solve big problems for lithium-ion batteries
As devices become smaller and more powerful, they require faster, smaller, more stable batteries. University of Illinois chemists have developed a superionic solid that could be the basis of next-generation lithium-ion batteries.

How same-sex marriage laws may save teens’ lives
State laws legalizing same-sex marriage led to a significant reduction in suicide attempts among high school students and an even steeper decline among gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents, research suggests. “It’s not easy to be an adolescent, and for adolescents who are just realizing they are sexual minorities, it can be even harder…” State-level same-sex marriage policies enacted before the

Scientists release final report, recommendations from the 2016 US National Ocean Exploration Forum
Ocean explorers need to think "beyond the ships" and plan ahead to an age of SuBastian and the Roboats—a new world of marine technology characterized by autonomy, sensors, precision, miniaturization, machine learning and artificial intelligence, telepresence, better forms of energy storage, and sharing to boost asset utilization.

Sniper Elite 4 Makes Nazi-Fighting Gruesomely Satisfying
The lavishly violent WWII videogame is gory enough to be off-putting, but there's still surprising therapeutic value in beating the bad guys.

How habitat destruction figures in long-term survival plans
Some organisms might have an interesting strategy for long-term survival: switching between two unsustainable forms of behaviour that, when kept unchecked, can actually cause them to wipe out their own homes.

Ny ITU-professor vil gøre sundhedsdata mere værdifulde
ITU har udnævnt Minna Isomursu til professor i interaktionsdesign og co-design ved Institut for Digital Design. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyudnaevnt-itu-professor-vil-goere-sundhedsdata-mere-vaerdifulde-1073618 Version2

London på vej med ekstra afgifter på forurenende biler
Hvis det står til Londons borgmester, så skal ejere af forurenende biler fra oktober måned betale ekstra 87,5 kroner for at køre ind i byen.

Oil Industry, in Court, Claims Ignorance about CO2
Industry attorney tells judge he "does not know" what atmospheric CO2 levels are, even though data from scientists worldwide are crystal clear --

VTT's vision of the era of smart and consumer-centric food production
We are moving into the era, where food production and digitalisation will merge to form a new food economy. The transition is already under way - led by consumers. Together with companies in the sector, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has created three change paths towards the Food Economy 4.0. They are based on identifed drivers and emerging technologies.

6,600 spills from fracking in just four states
Each year, 2 to 16 percent of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill hydrocarbons, chemical-laden water, hydraulic fracturing fluids and other substances, according to a new study. The analysis identified 6,648 spills reported across Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania during a 10-year period.

Treatment strategy for anorexia
New research conducted in adolescent rodents provides insights on the mechanisms behind anorexia nervosa and points to a potential treatment strategy.

Body and brain timing can be trained
Good timing is vital in many situations of daily life, but is rarely something we consider. In a new dissertation, a researcher shows that our ability for timing is something that can be trained and it seems to be connected with our cognitive capacity.

A novel principle to mobilize neurons for brain repair
Restorative neuroscience is a rapidly advancing scientific field considering our progressively aging society. Redirecting immature neurons that reside in specific brain areas towards the sites of brain damage is an appealing strategy for the therapy of acute brain injury or stroke. A collaborative effort has revealed that some mature neurons are able to reconfigure their local microenvironment suc

New approach to measure fluid drag on the body during swimming
A key factor to improve swimming performance is reducing resistance that water exerts on the moving body. This resistance, known as drag, is influenced by factors including the stroke rate, swimmer's size, and swimming speed. The range of factors, along with the motion of the swimmer, have made it difficult to measure drag accurately. Researchers have now developed a method for accurately determin

Pest ant control improved with water-resistant bait
Pest ants like the red imported fire ant could be controlled more effectively with insecticide baits that can withstand moisture, say researchers. A comparison study shows a water-resistant ant bait offers a significant advantage over currently available baits, which break down when wet.

New hydronium-ion battery presents opportunity for more sustainable energy storage
A new type of battery shows promise for sustainable, high-power energy storage.It's the world's first battery to use only hydronium ions as the charge carrier.

Decision-making suffers when cancer patients avoid math
Many of the toughest decisions faced by cancer patients involve knowing how to use numbers -- calculating risks, evaluating treatment options and figuring odds of medication side effects. But for patients who aren’t good at math, decision science research can offer evidence-based advice on how to assess numeric information and ask the right questions to make informed choices.

Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
Autonomous driving, automatic speech recognition, and the game Go: Deep Learning is generating more and more public awareness. Scientists have now used it to determine the development of hematopoietic stem cells in advance. In a new article, they describe how their software predicts the future cell type based on microscopy images.

Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis
A brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date, a clinical research publication has demonstrated.

Many cancer survivors change their prescription drug use for financial reasons
A new analysis indicates that many cancer survivors change their prescription drug use (including skipping doses or requesting cheaper medications) for financial reasons.

Premature death in delinquent youth
Researchers have found alarming premature mortality rates for delinquent youth.

Switched-on DNA: Sparking nano-electronic applications
DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices. Much like flipping your light switch at home -- only on a scale 1,000 times smaller than a human hair -- a team has now developed the first controllable DNA switch to regulate the flow of electricity within a single, atomic-sized molecule.

Novel plasma jet offshoot phenomenon explains blue atmospheric jets
Ionised matter, like plasma, still holds secrets. Physicists working with plasma jets, made of a stream of ionised matter, have just discovered a new phenomenon. Indeed, Eduard Sosnin from the Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk, Russia, and colleagues found a new type of discharge phenomenon in an atmospheric pressure plasma. It has been dubbed apokamp - fr

What color are these squiggly shapes?
Science The watercolor illusion takes advantage of how our brains perceive shapes and colors When you glance at the four rippled rectangles in front of you, do the spaces inside look light blue? They’re not. They’re white. Here's why you might think it's blue.

Proposed test would offer strongest evidence yet that the quantum state is real
(Phys.org)—Physicists are getting a little bit closer to answering one of the oldest and most basic questions of quantum theory: does the quantum state represent reality or just our knowledge of reality?

Going Bananas: The Real Story of Kepler, Copernicus and the Church
The story of Copernicus' clash with the Church over the arrangement of heavenly bodies is often painted in black and white, but at the time, philosophy, science and religion were all mixed up.

Listeria may be serious miscarriage threat early in pregnancy
Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, according to researchers studying how pathogens affect fetal development and change the outcome of pregnancy.

Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions
Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study.

Origin of spooky meteor noises reappraised
Sound travels more slowly than light. Then why do sounds of meteors entering Earth's atmosphere precede or accompany the sight of them? Researchers believe they have an answer.

16 Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Stream Right Now
Before you sit down for Sunday's telecast, make sure to watch these nominated films.

Bird flu strain hitting China may be getting more dangerous
Already this winter H7N9 has caused 424 known cases in humans, and it seems to be acquiring a deadly mutation that will make it sp

Mind-reading typing tool for paralysed people is fastest yet
Three people with paralysis have learned to type by thought alone using a brain implant – at almost half the speed at which people with no motor disability can text

Inviter den vilde natur ind bag ligusterhækken
Det må gerne rode i haven og pindsvinet skal have lov til at bo under legehuset. Biolog Rikke Milbak rådgiver sine naboer om, hvordan de får masser af dyre- og planteliv i parcelhushaven.

Dansk software skal vise vej i indendørs navigation
Danske MapsPeople er eksperter i indendørs navigation, og nu skal de hjælpe med netop det ved Mobile World Congress 2017 med over 100.000 besøgende.

Kronik: Banedanmarks signalsystem ligner en ny it-skandale
Intelligent trafikstyring Jernbane Tog

Hot Dispute Emerges over First Land Bridge from North to South America
New dates push the age back millions of years, creating a mystery about ice ages and animal migrations—if scientists are right --

Why does this straw look like it's broken?
Science Understand this and you'll be a master spearfisher. Place a straw in a glass of water, and behold: It looks broken. What’s tricking your brain?

Flint: a day by the bottle
Health In the wake of the city's water crisis, residents have turned to bottled H2O. Here’s a glimpse of what it’s like to live life in the midst of a water crisis, bottle by bottle. Read on.

Rigsrevisionen kritiserer byggeprojekter i Region Hovedstaden
Et notat fra Rigsrevisionen revser Region Hovedstaden for ikke i tilstrækkeligt omfang dokumenteret, at den arbejder med at effektivisere driften på de sygehusbyggerier, der er finansieret af kvalitetsfonden.

Yahoo salvages Verizon deal with $350 million discount
Yahoo is taking a $350 million hit on its previously announced $4.8 billion sale to Verizon in a concession for security lapses that exposed personal information stored in more than 1 billion Yahoo user accounts.

Data from Mars probe suggests possibility of proto-ring development
(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the Physical Research Laboratory in India studying data sent back from NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) probe has found possible evidence of the development of rings around the planet. In their paper published in the journal Icarus, Jayesh Pabari and P. J. Bhalodi describe the data, what the probe has measured, and the likelihood that some

Surprisingly few homes with kids store opioids safely
Nearly 70 percent of prescription opioid drugs in US homes with children are not stored safely, a study found. In a national survey of 681 adults who used opioid pain relievers in the previous year and lived with children 17 and younger, only 31 percent reported safely storing them away from their children. Of homes with older children, ages 7 to 17, just 12 percent reported safe storage. Researc

Lemur facial recognition tool developed
A method that can identify individual lemurs could improve the way the endangered species is tracked.

The Download, Feb 21, 2017: DIY Autonomous Cars, Quantum Computer Duel, and a Real Hover Bike
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

If AI Can Fix Peer Review in Science, AI Can Do Anything
Reading a scientific paper is not the same as understanding Shakespeare.

Study finds 6,600 spills from fracking in just four states
Each year, 2 to 16 percent of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill hydrocarbons, chemical-laden water, hydraulic fracturing fluids and other substances, according to a new study.The analysis, which appears Feb. 21 in Environmental Science & Technology, identified 6,648 spills reported across Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania during a 10-year period.

What is causing these black and white bars to change direction?
Science A quick physics lesson should clear things up Why do the black and white bars on this piece of patterned paper seemingly switch direction? The answer lies in the shape of the glass—and what’s inside.

Løhde: Sundheds-platformen må ikke tage lægernes tid
Innovationsminister Sophie Løhde sætter spørgsmålstegn ved, om det er klogt at pålægge klinikerne at skrive journalerne i Sundhedsplatformen, når de oplever, at det stjæler tid fra deres patientkontakt. Hun opfordrer til at tage klinikernes bekymringer alvorligt.

Robot companion’s can-do attitude rubs off on children
Children using a companion robot to help solve puzzles or listen to them tell stories tried harder when it was programmed to have a can-do attitude

Thousands of spills at US oil and gas fracking sites
Up to 16% of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill liquids each year, according to new data.

Skywire: Ticking Timeathon
You finally manage to answer enough questions correctly to gain passage through Timeflies. However, you’ve certainly lost a lot of time, and now must speedily ride towards your destination. Only 24 hours remain to deliver G.R.’s letter on time, or else risk tarnishing the good name of the Wiring Eye, and putting your newly acquired job on the line! Hurry now messenger, before the sands of time ru

So Tiny! Miniature Frog Species Are Among World's Smallest (Photos)
Some of the smallest known frogs in the world were recently discovered following a five-year survey in India.

Frogs Fit on a Fingertip: Tiny New Species Discovered in India
Four newly discovered frog species from India are small enough to perch on a thumbnail with room to spare.

Why Emotional Snap Judgments Are Often Wrong
When reading people's emotions, careful thinking may pay off --

The science of saying sorry
There is almost always a cringeworthy public apology to watch. Most recently, it was YouTube star PewDiePie, who had to apologise for alleged anti-semitic content in his video posts. In the same week, the London Dungeon issued a public apology over an abhorrant Valentine's Day promotion, joking about violence against prostitutes among other things.

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought
For decades, scientists working with genetic material have labored with a few basic rules in mind. To start, DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA), and mRNA is translated into proteins, which are essential for almost all biological functions. The central principle regarding that translation has long held that only a small number of three-letter sequences in mRNA, known as start codons, coul

Seven new species of night frogs from India including four miniature forms
Scientists from India have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus, commonly known as Night Frogs. This find is a result of five years of extensive explorations in the Western Ghats global biodiversity hotspot in India. Four out of seven of the new species are miniature-sized frogs (12.2-15.4 mm), which can comfortably sit on a coin or a thumbnail. These are among t

Secret lives of microbats investigated
The secret lives of microbats in the mid-west region of Western Australia are being revealed through a new research project at Murdoch University.

400 million year old gigantic extinct monster worm discovered in Canadian museum
A previously undiscovered species of an extinct primordial giant worm with terrifying snapping jaws has been identified by an international team of scientists.

Tully the Spineless Monster? Experts Say Ancient Beast Had No Backbone
The 307-million-year-old Tully monster — a marine animal with eyes like a hammerhead's and a pincer-like mouth — was likely a spineless creature, a new study finds.

When Apps Get Too Human, They Tumble into the Uncanny Valley
The more personalized apps get, the more people like them—until they got too personalized. Then they seem freaky.

Motorcycle Sleds + Vodka = A Very Russian Bike Rally
Once a year, thousands of riders come together to race DIY motorcycles on the ice and get drunk. It's great.

Virtual Singapore Looks Just Like Singapore IRL—But With More Data
The island city-state's simulated version of itself is scheduled to be up and running by the end of the year.

Deep learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
Autonomous driving, automatic speech recognition, and the game Go: Deep Learning is generating more and more public awareness. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and their partners at ETH Zurich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now used it to determine the development of hematopoietic stem cells in advance. In 'Nature Methods' they describe how their software predicts the

Legal marijuana sales creating escalating damage to the environment
Marijuana sales have created an economic boom in U.S. states that have fully or partially relaxed their cannabis laws, but is the increased cultivation and sale of this crop also creating escalating environmental damage and a threat to public health?

Unlocking crop diversity by manipulating plant sex
Researchers have discovered a key gene that influences genetic recombination during sexual reproduction in wild plant populations. Adding extra copies of this gene resulted in a massive boost to recombination and diversity in plant offspring. This finding could enable plant breeders to unlock crop variation, improve harvests and help ensure future food security.

A simple test to verify olive oil-related health claims
The fact that olive oil polyphenols contribute to the protection of blood lipids from oxidative stress—a physiological stress in the body that can cause DNA mutations and lead to diseases such as cancer, heart and blood disorders, diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders—is well documented.

Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents
Parental involvement is commonly viewed as vital to student academic success by most education experts and researchers; however, the quality of research on how to measure and improve parental involvement is lacking. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic an

The Eye of the Beholder: How Rorschach’s Inkblots Turned Personality Testing Into an Art


Make Earth Great Again!--Here's How
Political conservatives are more likely to care about the environment if climate messages focus on restoring the planet to its past state, a study shows --

Misbehavior and negative attitudes cannot explain why black students are more likely to be suspended
In recent years, research has found that black high school students across the country are at least three times more likely to be suspended from school compared to white students. However, social scientists have been unsure as to the reasons why this happens. Now, two new studies from a University of Missouri researcher have determined that differences in misbehavior and negative attitudes cannot

La Paz adapts to a world without water
Environment The city is high and dry after losing its glaciers When the glaciers that fed La Paz, Bolivia, its water vanished, citizens woke to dry taps, civil unrest—and a Water General’s reign.

Elektronikken redder os: Laveste antal døde ved brand i 40 år
Sidste år omkom 52 personer i brande. Det er det laveste antal siden 1977. Elektronikken er blevet mere sikker, mens rygning fortsat udgør en meget stor risiko.

Brain Imaging Identifies Different Types of Depression
Biological markers could enable tailored therapies that target individual differences in symptoms --

Hospital saves dehydrated baby hippo at Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati Zoo's premature baby hippo Fiona needed urgent treatment for dehydration.

Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?
Social science research finds that students who are taught classical economics about how humans act in their rational self-interest, become more likely to act selfishly after learning those lessons.

Energy scientists must show their workings
Public trust demands greater openness from those whose research is used to set policy, argues Stefan Pfenninger.

Mole study shows anyone can be backyard scientist
Scientific findings are awaiting discovery in your backyard. The requirement? A keen sense of observation and patience.

Praktiserende læge får kritik for manglende information om erstatning
For første gang nogensinde rejser Sundhedsvæsenets Disciplinærudvalg kritik af en praktiserende læge, der ikke informerede en patient om muligheden for at søge erstatning for en behandlingsskade, oplyser Patienterstatningen.

Minister skal fjerne tvivl om SSRI-medicin
Usikkerhed om hvorvidt depressionsmedicin af typen SSRI overhovedet virker efter hensigten, får nu Enhedslisten til at indkalde sundhedsministeren til samråd.

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

An AI Hedge Fund Created a New Currency to Make Wall Street Work Like Open Source
Wall Street is a Darwinian battle for the almighty dollar. But Richard Craib thinks his AI-powered hedge fund will soar if everyone can just get along.

Smart buildings: energy efficiency at what price?
Automating heating and other environmental controls can bring huge savings to commercial buildings. To what extent is it possible to achieve the same results in residential homes? What is the difference between so called domotics and inmotics?

Cars and chlamydia killing Queensland koalas
Cars and chlamydia were the top causes of a dramatic rise in south-east Queensland koala deaths over the past two decades, according to a new University of Queensland-led study.



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