Alzheimer

How protein misfolding may kickstart chemical evolution
Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative conditions involving abnormal folding of proteins, may help explain the emergence of life—and how to create it.

fotoluminiscerende stoffer

Let it glow: Researchers design new photoluminescent compounds
Chemical compounds that emit light are used in a variety of different materials, from glow-in-the-dark children’s toys to LED lights to light-emitting sensors. As the demand for these compounds increases, finding new efficient methods for their production is essential. New research describes a new strategy for producing photoluminescent (PL) compounds with increased capabilities.

gen for at lugte asparges

Genes for Smelling Asparagus Metabolites Determine Urine Luck
Genome analysis pinpoints the DNA that gives some people an asparagus edge

hash

Medical Marijuana Faces Fed's Catch-22
Doing large studies of marijuana's potential as medicine means getting it removed from an official federal list of substances with no official medical use--which requires more proof of its potential...

klimaændring - drivhuseffekt kommer fra brødproduktion

Half the greenhouse gas from bread comes from 1 thing
Analysis of the production of a loaf of bread—growing wheat, milling flour, baking, etc.—reveals which part of the process contributes the most greenhouse gas. The findings, published in the journal Nature Plants , show ammonium nitrate fertilizer used in wheat cultivation contributes almost half (43 percent) of the greenhouse gas emissions—dwarfing all other processes in the supply chain. “Consu

mursten dannes ved stuetemperatur

Sustainable ceramics without a kiln
The manufacture of cement, bricks, bathroom tiles and porcelain crockery normally requires a great deal of heat: a kiln is used to fire the ceramic materials at temperatures well in excess of 1,000°C. Now, material scientists from ETH Zurich have developed what seems at first glance to be an astonishingly simple method of manufacture that works at room temperature. The scientists used a calcium ca

svampegifte

Matching up fruit flies, mushroom toxins and human health
Pulling data from 180 different lines of fruit flies, researchers from Michigan Technological University compared resistance to a toxin found in mushrooms like the Death Cap and Destroying Angel. Their results were published by PLOS ONE this week.

svampegifte

Matching up fruit flies, mushroom toxins and human health
Some fruit flies build up tolerance to the toxin alpha-amanitin; the genetic mechanisms behind this adaptation link to an important metabolic pathway. Scientists have now used genome-wide association mapping to draw the connections for 180 fruit fly lines.

antibiotikaresistens

WHO Releases List of World's Most Dangerous Superbugs
The U.N. agency’s first-ever such list names 12 bacterial threats as the highest-priority needs for antibiotics

atomaffald

Research aims to prevent nuclear waste seepage
Nuclear waste is a reality, whether remnants of nuclear weapons or the byproducts of nuclear power plants. While we aren't at risk of an attack from a giant radioactive lizard, nuclear waste can still pose threats to human health.

Azheimer

Human neurons in mouse brains are more susceptible to Alzheimer's pathology
Cells behave differently when removed from their environments, just as cells that develop in cultures do not behave like cells in living creatures. To study the effects of Alzheimer’s disease in a more natural environment, scientists have successfully circumscribed this challenge by transplanting human neural cells into mouse brains containing amyloid plaques, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s d

biologisk ur

Study shows stem cells fiercely abide by innate developmental timing
The mystery of what controls the range of developmental clocks in mammals—from 22 months for an elephant to 12 days for a opossum—may lie in the strict time-keeping of pluripotent stem cells for each unique species.

Candida auris i hospitaler dødelig

First systematic study of deadly, antibiotic-resistant fungus reported
The deadly fungus, Candida auris, which has been found in hospitals, is resistant to entire classes of antimicrobial drugs, limiting treatment options for those infected. Microbiologists have provided previously uninvestigated details pertaining to C. auris drug resistance and growth patterns.

chimpanser har færre sociale færdigheder end hunde

Dogs and toddlers outdo chimps at social skills
Dogs and two-year-olds share similar patterns in social intelligence—much more so than children and their close relatives, chimpanzees. These findings, published in the journal Animal Behavior , could help scientists better understand how humans evolved socially. Evan MacLean, director of the Arizona Canine Cognition Center at the University of Arizona, and his colleagues looked at how two-year-o

CRISPR

First CRISPR single-nucleotide edited transgenic mice
Cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, Huntington's disease and phenylketonuria are all examples of disorders caused by the mutation of a single nucleotide, a building block of DNA. The human DNA consists of approximately 3 billion nucleotides of four types: Adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T). In some cases, the difference of just one nucleotide can bring serious consequences. S

CRISPR

Startup Aims to Treat Muscular Dystrophy with CRISPR
Patients groups are backing gene-editing as potential “home run” against disease.


DNA som elektrisk ledning

DNA acts like electrical wire to replicate itself
DNA’s ability to act like an electrical wire plays a part in how it replicates, new research shows. In the early 1990s, Jacqueline Barton, professor of chemistry at Caltech, discovered an unexpected property of DNA—that it can act like an electrical wire to transfer electrons quickly across long distances. Later, she and colleagues showed that cells take advantage of this trait to help locate and

dyrke menneskeceller på æbler

Scientists have found a way of growing human tissue on apples
Scientists at the University of Ottawa have developed a way of growing human cells and tissue on apples.

fødevareproduktion i 2050

Double food production by 2050? Not so fast
“Food production must double by 2050 to feed the world’s growing population,” is a popular idea, but an inaccurate one, according to new research. Production likely will need to increase between 25 percent and 70 percent to meet 2050 food demand, a study in Bioscience suggests. The data don’t support the assertion that we need to double global crop and animal production by 2050, argues Mitch Hunt

havsvamp fjerner arsen

Sponge bacterium found to encapsulate arsenic drawn from environment
Arsenic is the leading freshwater contaminant on the planet, affecting millions of people worldwide and causing an untold number of deaths every year. Removing arsenic from groundwater and freshwater is a major challenge still facing scientists and policymakers. Now a new Tel Aviv University study published in Nature Communications sheds light on a unique biological model of arsenic detoxification

hurtig peptidsyntese

New technology offers fast peptide synthesis
Manufacturing small proteins known as peptides is usually very time-consuming, which has slowed development of new peptide drugs for diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infections.

kæmpepingviner

Giant Prehistoric Penguins Evolved During the Dinosaur Age
Penguins that walked the Earth 61 million years ago might have been giants, growing to nearly 5 feet tall, according to the oldest fossils of these penguins unearthed to date.

metallisk hydrogen forsvundet

Omdiskuteret metallisk hydrogen forsvinder sporløst
Skeptikerne var flere, da forskere fra Harvard University fremviste, hvad de mener, var verdens første metalliske hydrogen. Nu er metallet gået tabt uden at efterlade spor af sin eksistens.

methan drivhusgas

First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
A major source of an important greenhouse gas has been discovered in the Tropical Pacific Ocean for the first time.

Parkinson

Kinase discovery sheds new light on several disease processes
New light on a key factor involved in diseases such as Parkinson's disease, gastric cancer and melanoma has been cast through latest University of Otago, New Zealand, research carried out in collaboration with Australian scientists.

pesticider behøves mindre end antaget

Crops in France found to thrive despite reduced use of pesticides
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in France has found that lowering the amount of pesticides applied to crops does not have to mean lessening expected yields. In their paper published in the journal Nature Plants, the team describes their study of hundreds of French farms where pesticide use was varied to find out how much was actually needed. Vasil

plast

New polymer additive could revolutionize plastics recycling
Only 2 percent of the 78 million tons of manufactured plastics are currently recycled into similar products because polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), which account for two-thirds of the world's plastics, have different chemical structures and cannot be efficiently repurposed together. That could all change with a new discovery.

schizofreni

Changes in RNA splicing: A new mechanism for genetic risk in schizophrenia
New research has identified sections of DNA associated with altered regulation of gene expression underlying schizophrenia. The implicated loci contribute to schizophrenia risk by affecting alternative splicing, part of the process that translates the same DNA code into multiple different proteins.

silkefibre

Bioinspired process makes materials light, robust, programmable at nano- to macro-scale
Researchers at Tufts University's School of Engineering have developed a new bioinspired technique that transforms silk protein into complex materials that are easily programmable at the nano-, micro- and macro-scales as well as ultralight and robust. Among the varied structures generated was a web of silk nano fibers able to withstand a load 4,000 times its own weight. The research is published o

skadedyr kontrol biologisk

Towards more sustainable control of insect and mite pests
Anisoplin, a new protein produced by a pathogenic fungus of insects and mites that provides new possibilities for the design of biotechnological tools to control pests, researchers have discovered.

statin-bivirkninger

Bivirkninger hindrer hjerte­patienter fra at nå behandlingsmål
Statinbivirkninger er væsentligste årsag til, at hjertepatienter ikke når behandlingsmål for LDL-kolesterol, antyder norsk undersøgelse.

svampeangreb udnyttes

Understanding how brown rot fungi degrade wood could lead to new tools for more efficient biofuel production
Wood's complex structure makes it highly resistant to biological or chemical decomposition. The structure includes cellulose, long chains of linked sugar molecules, embedded in a scaffolding of a chemical known as lignin. Brown rot fungi, however, possess a unique ability to attack the cellulose fraction of wood while avoiding the surrounding lignin. This study provides evidence that brown rot fun

test for gigt

New assay may lead to a cure for debilitating inflammatory joint disease
Current treatments for rheumatoid arthritis relieve the inflammation that leads to joint destruction, but the immunologic defect that triggers the inflammation persists to cause relapses. Known as autoantibodies and produced by the immune system's B cells, these defective molecules mistakenly attack the body's own proteins in an example of autoimmune disease.

Trump - energi

The Government’s Green Energy Incubator Fights for Survival in the Age of Trump
This week, ARPA-E is showing off far-out ways to cool, heat, convert, conserve, and invent energy—all of which could be on the chopping block

tuberkulosebakterie

TB bacteria can elude immune response by living inside dead macrophages
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered that the bacterium responsible for tuberculosis (TB) can hide and live on inside the very immune cells that are sent to hunt and kill it.

ultralyd

Optical generation of ultrasound via photoacoustic effect
Limitations of the piezoelectric array technologies conventionally used for ultrasonics inspired a group of University College London researchers to explore an alternative mechanism for generating ultrasound via light, also known as the photoacoustic effect. Coupling this with 3-D printing, the group was able to generate sounds fields with specific shapes for potential use in biological cell manip

Wolbachia

New tool for combating mosquito-borne disease: Insect parasite genes
Discovery of the genes the insect parasite Wolbachia uses to control its hosts' reproduction provides a powerful new tool for enhancing biological control efforts for mosquito-borne diseases like dengue, Zika and malaria.

Wolbachia

New tool for combating mosquito-borne disease: Insect parasite genes
Wolbachia is the most successful parasite the world has ever known. You've never heard of it because it only infects bugs: millions upon millions of species of insects, spiders, centipedes and other arthropods all around the globe.

Wolbachia

A Bizarre Bacteria Could Be the Key to Controlling Mosquitoes
For 50 years, scientists have known that Wolbachia can cause sterility in mosquitoes and other insects. But now they finally understand exactly how it works

Researchers find new clues for nuclear waste cleanup
A new study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods.

Melting polar ice, rising sea levels not only climate change dangers
Climate change from political and ecological standpoints is a constant in the media and with good reason, suggests a new study, but proof of its impact is sometimes found in unlikely places.

Novel amyloid structure could lead to new types of antibiotics
Researchers have discovered unique amyloid fibers used by the highly drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (which causes MRSA). The findings could lead to new types of antibiotics with a novel mechanism of action for attacking bacterial toxins, they say.

Study supports change to FAST mnemonic for stroke
A retrospective study indicates that missed stroke diagnoses can be significantly reduced by adding balance and vision problems to the list of presenting symptoms commonly known as FAST.

High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats
A study has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes.

Size matters... and structure too! New tool predicts the interaction of proteins and RNA
Researchers have developed Global Score, a method that allows, for the first time, to predict protein interactions with long non-coding RNAs. This algorithm helps scientists prioritize binding partners for experimental validation, which will contribute to our understanding of the role of long non-coding RNAs in normal cell function and in disease.

Controversial test could be leading to unnecessary open heart operations
An approved international test to check whether people need open heart surgery could be sending twice as many people under the knife unnecessarily, at a cost of nearly £75m, research has suggested.

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) detected with brain training game
Researchers demonstrated the potential of a self-administered virtual supermarket cognitive training game for remotely detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI), without the need for an examiner, among a sample of older adults. MCI patients suffer from cognitive problems and often encounter difficulties in performing complex activities such as financial planning. They are at a high risk for progre

Mars More Earth-like than moon-like
Mars' mantle may be more complicated than previously thought, report researchers. Their report documents geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major martian volcanic province.

In first, scientists forecast West Nile Virus outbreaks
Scientists, for the first time, are reporting a method to accurately predict the timing and intensity of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks.

New 'tougher-than-metal' fiber-reinforced hydrogels
Scientists have succeeded in creating 'fiber-reinforced soft composites,' or tough hydrogels combined with woven fiber fabric. These fabrics are highly flexible, tougher than metals, and have a wide range of potential applications.

Saturn's rings viewed in the mid-infrared show bright Cassini division
Researchers has succeeded in measuring the brightnesses and temperatures of Saturn's rings using the mid-infrared images taken by the Subaru Telescope in 2008. They reveal that, at that time, the Cassini Division and the C ring were brighter than the other rings in the mid-infrared light and that the brightness contrast appeared to be the inverse of that seen in the visible light. The data give im

Electrons use DNA like a wire for signaling DNA replication
A new study has shown that the electrical wire-like behavior of DNA is involved in the molecule's replication.

Bored by physical therapy? Focus on citizen science instead
Researchers have devised a method by which patients improved their repetitive rehabilitative exercises by contributing to scientific projects in which massive data collection and analysis is needed. The citizen science activity entailed the environmental mapping of a polluted body of water with a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled through physical gestures tracked by the Mi

Men with superior higher cognitive ability better at taking heart medication
After a heart attack, it is important for patients to take medication that lowers cholesterol levels. In a new study, researchers found that general cognitive ability (intelligence) has a bearing, in the first year and two years after the heart attack, on how well men take statins prescribed for them.

Elevated stress levels among Norway's youngest children in childcare
Norwegian researchers measured the stress hormone cortisol in 112 toddlers from 85 different childcare centers in six municipalities, approximately five months after they started attending. Children with the longest childcare days (8-9 hours) showed increases in cortisol during the day.

Exploding ice droplets
A droplet of water freezing from the outside in shows an exciting series of rapid changes until it violently explodes, a new study demonstrates.

New antiviral drug cuts cytomegalovirus infection, improves survival in patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant
In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation.

New therapeutic targets identified for tropical disease leishmaniasis
Each year, about 2 million people contract leishmaniasis, which results in disfiguring skin ulcers that may take months or years to heal and in rare cases can become metastatic, causing major tissue damage. Now a team of researchers has a promising target for treatment.

Molecular 'on switch' could point to treatments for pediatric brain tumor
Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have identified a mechanism that controls the expression of genes regulating the growth of the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor.

Public may be more accepting of advocacy by climate scientists than previously thought
Research suggests that scientists may have more freedom than previously thought to engage in certain forms of climate change advocacy without risking harm to their credibility.

Living with children may mean less sleep for women, but not for men
New research backs up what many women already know: They're sleep deprived. Unlike men, a good night's sleep for women is affected by having children in the house, according to a preliminary study.

Archeologists at the vanguard of environmental research
The history of people and landscapes, whether natural or cultural, is fundamentally connected. Answering key historical questions about this relation will allow us to approach our most important environmental issues in novel ways. Archeologists now present a list of 50 priority issues for historical ecology.

Ketogenic diet shown safe, effective option for some with rare and severest form of epilepsy
In a small phase I and II clinical trial, researchers and colleagues elsewhere found that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was a safe and effective treatment option for the majority of adults experiencing a relatively rare, often fatal and always severe form of epilepsy marked by prolonged seizures that require medically induced comas to prevent them from further damaging the body and

Sound-shaping super-material invented
A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists, outlines a new report.

Study reveals ways powerful 'master gene' regulates physical differences between sexes
The master gene that regulates differences between males and females plays a complex role in matching the right physical trait to the right sex, scientists have found. The research reveals new details about the behavior of the gene called 'doublesex,' or dsx.

Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth
A first-ever guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care on tobacco use by children and youth aged 5 to 18 years recommends that physicians should play a more active role in the prevention and treatment of cigarette smoking in this age group.

Brain imaging headband measures how our minds align when we communicate
Past research has revealed that our brains synchronize when listening to the same idea or story. Now, biomedical engineers have developed a tool to better understand this phenomenon.

Planned protection area would help basking sharks
A proposed Marine Protected Area off Scotland's west coast would help basking sharks, researchers say. Scientists satellite tracked 36 basking sharks in summer months of 2012-2014 and found 86% showed "some degree of residency" in the proposed Sea of the Hebrides MPA.

New mech­an­ism un­der­ly­ing epi­lepsy found
Prolonged epileptic seizures may cause serious problems that will continue for the rest of a patient’s life. As a result of a seizure, neural connections of the brain may be rewired in an incorrect way. This may result in seizures that are difficult to control with medication. Mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not entirely known, which makes current therapies ineffective in some patients.

Materials that emit rainbows
Mechanochromic luminescent (MCL) materials change their color in response to a change in their environment, like pressure and temperature. To date, most MCL materials only change between two colors, limiting their applications. A international research team has developed tricolor-changing MLC materials. Not only that, the developed materials exhibited efficient thermally activated delayed fluoresc

High-performance computation is available by cloud computing
A group of researchers has developed the world's first system for flexibly providing high-performance computation by cloud computing.

New insights into the mechanisms into how ungulates got bigger in the Neogene
The observed increase of body size in ungulates during the 20 million years before the Pleistocene is driven by the process of species selection, according to researchers. Bigger ungulate species became more common because of a higher origination and lower extinction rate. The study is the first to compare the evolution of two mammalian clades during the Neogene on two continents. The researchers

New evidence on the diet of the 'Homo antecessor' from Atapuerca
The Homo antecessor , a hominin species that inhabited the Iberian Peninsula around 800,000 years ago, would have a mechanically more demanding diet than other hominin species in Europe and the African continent. This unique pattern, which would be characterized by the consumption of hard and abrasive foods, may be explained by the differences in food processing in a very demanding environment wit

Involuntary urinary incontinence can discourage sufferers from exercise
Urinary incontinence symptoms in middle-aged woman are linked to lower levels of exercise, research shows. Involuntary urinary incontinence symptoms can discourage sufferers from partaking in exercise. However, exercise can ease symptoms by, for example, reducing obesity – as obesity increases pressure on the urethra – and strengthening pelvic floor muscles.

Tracking the movement of cyborg cockroaches
New research offers insights into how far and how fast cyborg cockroaches -- or biobots -- move when exploring new spaces. The work moves researchers closer to their goal of using biobots to explore collapsed buildings and other spaces in order to identify survivors.

Given the choice, patients will reach for cannabis over prescribed opioids
Chronic pain sufferers and those taking mental health meds would rather turn to cannabis instead of their prescribed opioid medication, according to new research.

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils associated with bushwillows in northeastern Gabon. Given the tiny insect is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers decided to assign the wasp a name to celebrate its origin.

New standards for better water quality in Europe
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is due to be revised by 2019. The necessary work process is already in full swing and scientific research is providing important input. In a recent study, an international team of researchers formulated recommendations designed to improve the monitoring, assessment and management of pollutants.

Do you look like your name? People can match names to faces of strangers with surprising accuracy
If your name is Fred, do you look like a Fred? You might -- and others might think so, too. New research has found that people appear to be better than chance at correctly matching people's names to their faces, and it may have something to do with cultural stereotypes we attach to names.

How after-hours trading sheds light on investor sentiment
Overnight market activity -- between the time the market closes and re-opens the next day -- provides a goldmine of information about investor sentiment at the firm level, or pertaining to specific stocks rather than the broader market, suggests a new report.

Puzzle of the Maya pendant
An archaeologist found a jade pendant once belonging to an ancient Maya king in what we think of as the provinces of that world. Why was it buried? And might its inscriptions change our understanding of Maya migrations and political history?

Coming soon: Oil spill-mapping swarms of flying drones
Partly inspired by the dynamics of a flock of birds, engineers devised a computational method for drones to quickly record whether they are over water, oil or the edge of the spill. This simple information is shared with the other drones in the swarm, as opposed to sharing actual images or video, which would require too much bandwidth.

New technology offers fast peptide synthesis
Researchers have designed a machine that can rapidly produce large quantities of customized peptides. This technology could help researchers rapidly generate new peptide drugs to test on diseases including cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infections.

Triboelectric nanogenerators boost mass spectrometry performance
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) convert mechanical energy harvested from the environment to electricity for powering small devices such as sensors or for recharging consumer electronics. Now, researchers have harnessed these devices to improve the charging of molecules in a way that dramatically boosts the sensitivity of a widely-used chemical analysis technique.

Genetic variant of p53 gene linked to breast cancer risk in premenopausal African American women
Scientists have found a significant association between a rare genetic variant of the p53 gene present in African American women and their risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal age.

New use for paper industry's sludge and fly ash in plastics
Researchers examined whether new industrial applications could be developed for various types of sludge and fly ash generated by the paper and board industry.

Earth probably began with a solid shell
Plate tectonics -- a defining feature of modern Earth and the driving force behind earthquakes, volcanoes and mid-ocean spreading ridges -- did not start until later in Earth's history, new research suggests. The work is the latest salvo in a long-standing geological debate: did plate tectonics start right away, or did Earth begin with a solid shell covering the entire planet? The new results sugg

Molecule stops fatal pediatric brain tumor
Scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. The tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old.

Research could lead to better vaccines and new antivirals
Scientists have identified a new regulator of the innate immune response—the immediate, natural immune response to foreign invaders. The study suggests that therapeutics that modulate the regulator—an immune checkpoint—may represent the next generation of antiviral drugs, vaccine adjuvants, cancer immunotherapies, and treatments for autoimmune disease.

Lack of oxygen, not excessive stimulation, cause for half of seizure-related brain damage in epilepsy
Neuronal degeneration is the most severe long-term consequence of repetitive seizures in patients with epilepsy, which until now was thought to be primarily caused by excitotoxicity, or over-stimulation of the neurons. New findings indicate hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, due to abnormal blood flow may be to blame for as much as half the neuronal death caused by the condition.

Research advances energy savings for oil, gas industries
A research team has improved an important catalytic reaction commonly used in the oil and gas industries. The innovation could lead to dramatic energy savings and reduced pollution, they say.

New studies illustrate how gamers get good
Researchers used data from online video games to study what kinds of practice and habits help people acquire skill. Beyond simply learning about what makes gamers good, the investigators hope that the work will shed light more generally on the ways in which people can optimize their performance in other domains.

Sponge bacterium found to encapsulate arsenic drawn from environment
A new study sheds light on a unique biological model of arsenic detoxification. According to the new research, the Entotheonella bacterium that inhabits the Theonella swinhoei sponge is one of the only known cases of a bacterium protecting its host from metal poisoning.

Woodstoves are good for the soul, bad for the heart
The risk of acute myocardial infarction for the elderly living in and around small cities is increased by air pollution caused by biomass burning from woodstoves.

Recovering predators and prey
Researchers show how simultaneously restoring predators and prey is much faster and more effective than doing so one at a time.

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties
Nanoclusters of magnesium oxide sandwiched between layers of graphene make a compound with unique electronic and optical properties, according to researchers who built computer simulations of the material.

Invasive, native marsh grasses may provide similar benefits to protected wetlands
An invasive species of marsh grass that spreads, kudzu-like, throughout North American wetlands, may provide similar benefits to protected wetlands as native marsh grasses. According to new research, the invasive marsh grass's effects on carbon storage, erosion prevention and plant diversity in protected wetlands are neutral.

How your brain makes articles go viral
Activity in the self-related, mentalizing, and positive valuation regions of the brain combine unconsciously in our thoughts to determine what we want to read and share, such that brain scans from a small group of people can predict large-scale virality, say researchers. New fMRI research reveals what goes on in the brain when people decide to share news articles with others. The researchers then

Wires and supercapacitors constructed inside living plants
A special structure for storing energy known as a supercapacitor has been constructed in a plant for the first time. The plant, a rose, can be charged and discharged hundreds of times.

Online security apps focus on parental control, not teen self-regulation
Mobile apps designed to keep teens safe online are overwhelmingly focused on parental control, which may be only a short-term solution that hinders a teen's ability to learn coping strategies in the long run. In a study of 74 Android mobile apps designed to promote adolescent online safety, the researchers said that 89 percent of security features on the apps are focused on parental control, while

Volcanic hydrogen spurs chances of finding exoplanet life
Hunting for habitable exoplanets now may be easier: astronomers report that hydrogen pouring from volcanic sources on planets throughout the universe could improve the chances of locating life in the cosmos.

Humans sparked 84 percent of US wildfires, increased fire season over two decades
Humans have dramatically increased the spatial and seasonal extent of wildfires across the US in recent decades and ignited more than 840,000 blazes in the spring, fall and winter seasons over a 21-year period, according to new research.

Doctors should discuss herbal medication use with heart disease patients
Physicians should be well-versed in the herbal medications heart disease patients may take to be able to effectively discuss their clinical implications, potential benefits and side effects—despite a lack of scientific evidence to support their use, according to a review paper.

New study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War Illness
An estimated 25 percent of the 700,000 troops who engaged in the fierce battles of Operation Desert Storm and related Gulf War combat during 1990-91 are fighting a different, but relentless foe: Gulf War illness. A new study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War illness.

Stem cells fiercely abide by innate developmental timing, study shows
A regenerative biology team is studying whether stem cell differentiation rates can be accelerated in the lab and made available to patients faster.

Limiting lung cancer's spread, growth in the brain
Researchers analyzed RNA from patients with disease that was limited to the lungs as well as cancers that had spread.

Preserving vision for astronauts
As NASA prepares for its journey to Mars, one researcher is investigating why so many astronauts suffer from poorer vision after they return to Earth.

Finer raw cotton best for oil spill remediation, collaborative research shows
Cotton, a longtime staple crop on the South Plains and major part of the region’s economy, is growing into a new sector: environmental cleanup following oil spills. Now a new study concludes that finer raw cotton in loose form performs best for absorbing oil.

Drug combination defeats dengue, Ebola in mice, study finds
A combination of two cancer drugs inhibited both dengue and Ebola virus infections in mice in a study, despite the fact that these two viruses are vastly different from each other.

Taking aim at a key malaria molecule
A team of biological engineers has developed a method to measure levels of heme, a critical iron-containing molecule, inside the parasite that causes malaria. This could eventually help scientists develop better drugs to combat the disease.

Inactivity, excess weight linked to hard-to-treat heart failures
Lack of exercise and excessive weight are strongly associated with a type of heart failure that has a particularly poor prognosis, researchers determined in an analysis of data from three large studies.

Banded mongooses go to war over sex, territory
Gang warfare is not unique to humans -- banded mongooses do it too. Now researchers have shed light on the causes of the fights -- and found they are most common when females are receptive to breeding and when there is competition over food and territory.

Kids want parental help with online risk, but fear parental freak outs
In a study, teens rarely talked to their parents about potentially risky online experiences. Parents and children often have much different perceptions of and reactions to the same online situations. Some of these situations may include cyberbullying, sexual exchanges and viewing inappropriate content online.

Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated
How do molecules rotate in a solvent? Answering this question is a complicated task since the rotation is perturbed by a large number of surrounding atoms, requiring large-scale computer simulations which are sometimes infeasible. Now, scientists have proven that angulons -- quasiparticles he proposed two years ago -- do in fact form when a molecule is immersed in superfluid helium. This offers a

Spontaneous 'dust traps:' Astronomers discover a missing link in planet formation
Planets are thought to form in the disks of dust and gas found around young stars. But astronomers have struggled to assemble a complete theory of their origin that explains how the initial dust develops into planetary systems. A team now think they have the answer, with their simulations showing the formation of 'dust traps' where pebble-sized fragments collect and stick together, to grow into th

Mammography trends show improved cancer detection, more biopsies
The shift from film to digital technology appears to have improved cancer detection rates for diagnostic mammography, but also has increased the abnormal interpretation rate, which may lead to more women undergoing biopsies for benign conditions, according to a new study.

Newfound primate teeth take a big bite out of the evolutionary tree of life
Fossil hunters have found part of an ancient primate jawbone related to lemurs -- the primitive primate group distantly connected to monkeys, apes and humans, a researcher reports. Scientists named the new species Ramadapis sahnii and said that it existed 11 to 14 million years ago. It is a member of the ancient Sivaladapidae primate family, consumed leaves and was about the size of a house cat.

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies
When the universe was young, a supermassive black hole heaved out a jet of particle-infused energy that raced through space at nearly the speed of light. Billions of years later, scientists has identified this black hole and four others similar to it that range in age from 1.4 billion to 1.9 billion years old.

Ski helmets lessens severity of injuries, research finds
New research focused on helmet safety and injury prevention among young skiers and snowboarders. The research found that children who wear a helmet while skiing or snowboarding sustain less severe head injuries and lower overall injury severity, compared to children who do not wear a helmet.

EPA Chief Promises "Aggressive" Rollback of Regulations Soon
In a speech, the agency head mentioned the Clean Power Plan, methane standards and the Waters of the United States rule as targets

Giant Neuron Found Wrapped around an Entire Mouse Brain
3-D reconstructions show a "crown of thorns" shape stemming from a region linked to consciousness

How Genetic Analyses Might Get to the Masses
New tools are helping democratize bioinformatics

Humans Start Most Wildfires
People are responsible for much of the rising cost and ecological damage that wildfires impose

India Tackles Superbug Menace with New Antibiotic Guidelines
The national plan aims to change the way drugs are prescribed

Inside the Quest to Monitor Countries' CO2 Emissions
The world needs a way to verify that nations have made their promised carbon cuts in order to make the Paris agreement effective

Lucid Dream Analysis Could Tap the Creative Unconscious
Becoming aware of your sleeping self could relieve anxiety or tap the creative unconscious

Nameless No Longer: Pluto's Geography to Receive Official Titles
An international group of astronomers is set to codify a crop of informal names for the dwarf planet's geographical features

SpaceX to Fly Humans around the Moon as Soon as 2018
Two private citizens have already paid a "significant deposit" to reserve seats on the spaceflight company's nascent Falcon Heavy rocket

The Search for a New Test of Artificial Intelligence
Researchers need new ways to distinguish artificial intelligence from the natural kind

Trump Adviser Urges NASA to Fly Crew on Crucial Test Flight
The space agency is considering adding astronauts to the first lunar voyage of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule

Unveiling the Real Evil Genius
Creative people are better at rationalizing small ethical lapses that can spiral out of control

A Radically New Theory of how the Brain Represents and Computes with Probabilities
The brain is believed to implement probabilistic reasoning and to represent information via population, or distributed, coding. Most previous population-based probabilistic (PPC) theories share several basic properties: 1) continuous-valued neurons; 2) fully(densely)-distributed codes, i.e., all(most) units participate in every code; 3) graded synapses; 4) rate coding; 5) units have innate unimoda

Reconfiguring motor circuits for a joint manual and BCI task
Designing brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that can be used in conjunction with ongoing motor behavior requires an understanding of how neural activity co-opted for brain-control interacts with existing neural circuits. BCIs may be used to regain lost motor function after stroke or traumatic brain injury, for instance, provided that a neural control signal can be extracted from a single spared hem

Control of the Correlation of Spontaneous Neuron Activity in Biological and Noise-activated CMOS Artificial Neural Microcircuits
There are several indications that brain is organized not on a basis of individual unreliable neurons, but on a micro-circuital scale providing Lego blocks employed to create complex architectures. At such an intermediate scale, the firing activity in the microcircuits is governed by collective effects emerging by the background noise soliciting spontaneous firing, the degree of mutual connections

Criticality, stability, competition, and consolidation of new representations in brain networks
The brain forms and stores distributed representations from sparse external input that compete for neuronal resources with already stored memory traces. It is unclear what dynamical properties of neural systems allow formation and subsequent consolidation of new, distributed memory representations under these conditions. Here we use analytical, computational, and experimental approaches to show th

The role of the observer in goal-directed behavior
In goal-directed behavior, a large number of possible initial states end up in the pursued goal. The accompanying information loss implies that goal-oriented behavior is in one-to-one correspondence with an open subsystem whose entropy decreases in time. Yet ultimately, the laws of physics are reversible, so systems capable of yielding goal-directed behavior must transfer the information about ini

There Is No Such Thing as Alternative Medicine
There’s only medicine that works and medicine that does not, writes Paul Offit

For $700, You Can Make Your Car Self-Driving
Self-driving hobbyists and researchers can now build a self-driving vehicle for around $700. Utilizing free software and hardware plans from George Hotz's startup Comma, brave enthusiasts are crowdsourcing solutions as we move towards more autonomous vehicles

Ancient Atomic Logic Shows Reality Is Relational, Not Objective.
Loop quantum gravity gets the ancient atomist back into the loop, showing how black holes might explode, and that the Big Bang might be a Big Bounce

"Calling Bullshit" Is the College Course for Our Times - Here's How You Can Take It Online
A college course on how to recognize "bullshit" addresses fake news, memes, clickbaiting and misleading advertising

Jobs of the Future Will Come From the Marijuana Industry, Not Manufacturing
A new report shows the marijuana industry is poised to have a major economic impact

Here’s Everything You’ll Need to Know If You Want to Help Colonize Mars
Risks abound for those plucky few willing to put their lives on the line to populate the Red Planet

Succesfuldt forsøg med Brystsmerteklinik bliver permanent
En klinik til patienter med akut opståede brystsmerter, der sidste år startede op som et forsøg på Akutmodtagelsen på Nordsjællands Sygehus, har haft så stor succes, at den nu bliver permanent.

DSAM-formand: Oversolgte forsknings­resultater skaber mistillid hos patienter
Forskere præsenterer deres forskning for unuanceret. Det skaber mistillid hos patienterne og flere konsultationer hos lægerne, mener Anders Beich, formand for DSAM.

EMA vil udvide godkendelse af Darzalex
Kræftmiddel kan fremover bruges i kombination med andre midler mod knoglemarvskræft.

Nyt middel mod lungekræft får europæisk godkendelse
Alecensa fra Roche kan bruges som andenlinjebehandling til patienter med fremskreden ALK-positiv ikke-småcellet lungekræft.

Region Midtjylland kræver svar om genomcenter
Politikerne i Region Midtjylland ønsker svar på, i hvilken grad det kommende Nationale Genom Center vil blive forankret i Aarhus

Stort fase 3-studie af NOAK-middel afbrudt før tid
De detaljerede data er ventet med spænding, siger dansk professor om nyt studie af effekt og sikkerhed af NOAK-midlet Xarelto, der er afbrudt ét år før tid.

Svenske myndigheder anbefaler NOAK frem for warfarin
Läkemedelvärket klar med ny behandlingsvejledning for antikoagulerende behandling.

Behandling af ondartet hjernetumor hos børn rykker nærmere
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har kortlagt vigtige mekanismer bag, hvordan en særlig...

Klimaekspert John R. Porter er aldrig holdt op med at undre sig
John R. Porter takker af efter 35 år i afgrødevidenskabens tjeneste. Den 67-årige...

Nyt projekt skal lære unge at forstå mekanismerne bag digital mobning
Digital (Ud)Dannelse hedder et nyt forsknings- og undervisningsprojekt, som skal lære elever i...

Universitetet skal svare på høring om akkreditering
Et akkrediteringspanel lægger i første omgang op til, at Københavns Universitets...

Smelfies, and other experiments in synthetic biology | Ani Liu
What if you could take a smell selfie, a smelfie? What if you had a lipstick that caused plants to grow where you kiss? Ani Liu explores the intersection of technology and sensory perception, and her work is wedged somewhere between science, design and art. In this swift, smart talk, she shares dreams, wonderings and experiments, asking: What happens when science fiction becomes science fact?

This app makes it fun to pick up litter | Jeff Kirschner
The earth is a big place to keep clean. With Litterati -- an app for users to identify, collect and geotag the world's litter -- TED Resident Jeff Kirschner has created a community that's crowdsource-cleaning the planet. After tracking trash in more than 100 countries, Kirschner hopes to use the data he's collected to work with brands and organizations to stop litter before it reaches the ground.

UK 'must insulate 25 million homes'
Huge numbers of draughty homes could stop it meeting emissions targets by 2050, a report says.

Can Spraybot make your home warmer?
Spraybot can fit under floorboards to help insulate homes.

Nest-boxes no substitute for tree cavities, says study
Artificial nests have a markedly different microclimate from tree cavities, a study suggests.

Bread's environmental costs are counted
The environmental impact of producing a loaf of bread has been analysed in depth - from the farm to the supermarket shelf.

SpaceX to fly two tourists around Moon in 2018
The US rocket company says the customers have already paid for the flight planned for late 2018.

Nobel winner: Attack on experts 'undermines science'
One of UK's top scientists, Sir Paul Nurse, says experts are being "derided and pushed back".

Fears for environment as automatic legal 'cost cap' scrapped
Environmental groups have launched a legal challenge to the government's rule change.

'Oldest' Iron Age gold work in Britain found in Staffordshire
A British Museum expert says the Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs are of international importance.

Fly me to the moon: SpaceX vil sende to personer rundt om månen næste år
Turen vil vare omkring en uge, siger SpaceX’ grundlægger, Elon Musk.

Marsvinet udvikler superhørelse på ét døgn
Det er nemlig nødvendigt for overlevelse.

Nyt liv i den døde mose
Sjældne planter og en fremtid med græssende kvæg. Dele af Utterslev Moser får rettet op på naturen. Det giver nyt liv i mosen, der døde af forurening i 1970'erne.

How ‘doublesex’ gene puts horns on male beetles
A “master gene,” called the doublesex or dsx, plays a complex role in matching the right physical trait to the right sex, report researchers. “We want to know more about this gene because it helps us answer a major question about development and evolution: How do animals with similar genomes—such as males and females of the same species—produce different versions of the same trait?” says Cris Led

Drug could let babies ‘forget’ mom’s high blood pressure
A new study with rats shows it is possible to reverse high blood pressure in offspring born to hypertensive mothers. Scientists say the results, though preliminary, may offer promise toward addressing “fetal programming,” or the in utero transfer of certain health risks from mothers to children. In humans, gestational hypertension affects up to 15 percent of pregnancies. That percentage may rise

You might not want a really friendly health app
Just like real doctors and nurses, online health tools with good communication skills can promote healthier lifestyles. But being too conversational could lull users into a false sense of comfort. A new study shows that people who experience a back-and-forth interaction with an online health risk assessment website are more likely to follow the health behaviors suggested by the tool. “This shows

Nose swabs could one day detect lung cancer
New research points to a better way to diagnose lung cancer: a genomic test that could eventually require only a swab of the nose. Lung cancer is the deadliest form of cancer in the United States and in the world. According to the National Cancer Institute, it accounts for more than a quarter of cancer deaths in this country, killing about 158,000 people in 2016. Because lung cancer is so lethal,

Spit can carry bacteria into your lungs
Tiny droplets of saliva can carry bacteria from the mouth to the lungs, a new study shows. That means bacteria are able to avoid the epiglottis, the movable tissue barrier that keeps most saliva from getting into the lower respiratory tract. By studying the DNA of these bacteria in the lungs of healthy volunteers, researchers confirmed that the population of microbes in the lungs closely resemble

Black holes kill more stars than astronomers expected
Supermassive black holes rip apart stars 100 times more often than previously thought, report researchers. Until now, such stellar cannibalism—known as Tidal Distruption Events, or TDEs—had only been found in surveys which observed many thousands of galaxies, leading astronomers to believe they were exceptionally rare: only one event every 10,000 to 100,000 years per galaxy. However, new study re

The tone of your tweets can predict diet success
Researchers predicted dieting success—or failure—with an accuracy rate of 77 percent based on the sentiment of the words and phrases people used on Twitter. “We see that those who are more successful at sticking to their daily dieting goals express more positive sentiments and have a greater sense of achievement in their social interactions,” says Munmun De Choudhury, assistant professor at Georg

Do volcanoes boost our odds of finding alien life?
Hydrogen pouring from volcanic sources on planets throughout the universe could improve the chances of locating life in the cosmos, say astronomers. Planets located great distances from stars freeze over. “On frozen planets, any potential life would be buried under layers of ice, which would make it really hard to spot with telescopes,” says lead

The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics
The more we learn about the universe, the more questions seem to arise. Our picks for the biggest open questions remaining in physics.

Is Back Pain Linked to Your Risk of Death?
An aching back is a major cause of disability, and now, a new study finds that back pain may be linked to an increased risk of death in older adults.

4 Million Solar Panels Seen from Space
On the Tibetan Plateau in eastern China, 4 million solar panels silently soak up the sun as part of the Longyangxia Dam Solar Park.


First Solid Sign that Matter Doesn't Behave Like Antimatter
Matter and antimatter should look the same. For the first time, physicists have experimental evidence that they don't.

Here's How Much Less Sleep Women Get Once They Have Kids
For moms with kids at home, it’s not in your head: You are getting less sleep than your husband.

Reviving Extinct Species: Is It Worth the Cost?
Bringing back animals from extinction might end up costing biodiversity.

Live Science Talks 'Cannibalism' with [[@http://www.livescience.com/58029-big-cats-and-wild-dogs-get-along.html|How Big Cats and Wild Dogs Coexist in India's Mountains
India's big cats and wilds dogs get along surprisingly well.

Robotic Arm Turns Your Digital Doodles into Good Old-Fashioned Sketches
A small robotic arm can bring your digital sketches to life.

Blue Tarantula Hair Inspires Nonfading Color Pigment
The new color pigment could be used in everything from clothing to computer screens.

Palaces of Ancient Persia Were Built with 'Fire Temple' Wood
Cypress wood might have been used in ancient palaces in Persia partly because of its sacred value in a religion known for its "fire temples," a new study finds.

What Makes a Viral Story? Study Takes a Look into Readers' Brains
A new look into readers' brains helps scientists understand why some articles go viral.

Earth's Outer Shell: Was It Once Solid?
Earth had a hard outer shell before its tectonic plates.

Why Some People Look Like Their Names
If you've ever caught yourself thinking, "She looks like a Sue," or "He doesn't look like a Dave," a new study may back up your instincts.

Are Any Fad Diets Actually Healthy? What the Research Shows
A new review attempts to dispel the hype surrounding some popular diet trends, and outline what experts really known about a heart-healthy diet.

SpaceX to Fly Passengers On Private Trip Around the Moon in 2018
SpaceX, the private spaceflight company founded by billionaire Elon Musk, will launch two paying customers on a week-long trip around the moon and back to Earth in 2018.

Penicillin: Discovery, Benefits and Resistance
Penicillin is a drug used to fight bacterial infection. After its accidental discovery, it was hailed as a "miracle drug." However, over the years, some bacteria have become resistant to penicillin, making some infections difficult to treat.

Shona People: History & Culture
The Shona's ancestors built great stone cities in southern Africa over a thousand years ago. Their artists are well known for their finely carved wooden headrests and stone sculptures.

Royal Maya Pendant Possibly Used in Rain God Ritual
Archaeologists are pondering the meaning of a carved jade pendant from a royal Maya ruler that was discovered in southern Belize.

An Anti-Trump Incantation: What's in a Magic Spell?
The "binding spell" cast on Donald Trump by a group billing itself as the Magical Resistance goes way back to ancient Greece.

Colorectal Cancer Rates Rise Sharply in Younger US Adults
Colorectal cancer rates are on the rise in Millennials and Gen X’ers, a new study finds. The findings come as rates of the disease have continued to decline in adults ages 55 and up, according to the study.

Don’t let useful data go to waste
Researchers must seek out others’ deposited biological sequences in community databases, urges Franziska Denk

How to kill wild animals humanely for conservation
An international group offers guidance to help reduce pain and suffering in animals destined for culling

The drug-resistant bacteria that pose the greatest health threats
World Health Organization publishes list that it hopes will focus development of antibiotics

Fearing Climate Change Policy Under Trump, STEM Group Works To Get Scientists Elected
Scientists across the country are planning to go to Washington — and take office. Shaughnessy Naughton is the founder of 314 Action a non profit that helps scientists run for office.

Photographer Builds A 'Photo Ark' For 6,500 Animal Species And Counting
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to document every captive animal species in the world. He talks about getting an arctic fox to hold still, and Photoshopping out poop.

A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back
Naltrexone was approved to treat alcohol disorders more than 20 years ago. But many doctors still don't know that when combined with counseling it can help people resist the urge to drink too much.

Your Name Might Shape Your Face, Researchers Say
Do you look like a Joy? Genes and culture may make it more likely that names and faces align. But researchers say people also may adjust their expressions to match social expectations of their name.

Why Are More Young Americans Getting Colon Cancer?
Data suggests that the rate of colon cancer among people under 50 is on the rise, but there are lots of possible explanations for that. Scientists say teasing out the truth will be tricky.

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know
New research calculates the greenhouse gas emissions involved in making bread, from wheat field to bakery. The vast majority of emissions come from one step in the process: farming.

What's The Leading Cause Of Wildfires In The U.S.? Humans
More than 8 in 10 fires are started by people. Researchers say humans are not only causing the vast majority of wildfires, they're extending the normal fire season around the U.S. by three months.

SpaceX Announces Plans To Send Two Customers To The Moon
It would be the first time humans have traveled beyond low Earth orbit since the days of Apollo. The mission would be manned and financed by two private, anonymous customers.

Coal Industry Casts Itself as a Clean Energy Player
Companies are joining with environmental groups to lobby for expanded subsidies to encourage technologies to reduce carbon emissions from coal plants.

‘Ring of Fire’ Eclipse Travels Across South America and Africa
Skywatchers in South America and Africa tweeted their experiences on Sunday, though some complained that overcast weather dampened their views.

Global Health: Life Span of South Korean Women Is Headed Toward 90
If current trends persist, women born in South Korea in 2030 will live perhaps 90 years on average, researchers said, the longest life span in the world.

Take a Number: For Some Arctic Plants, Spring Arrives Almost a Month Earlier
Many plants in Greenland are beginning to bud earlier, with possible consequences for the low Arctic ecosystem, scientists find.

SpaceX Plans to Send 2 Tourists Around Moon in 2018
If the mission proceeds as planned, the private space travelers would be the first humans to venture that far into space in more than 40 years.

Q&A: Pregnancy Upon Pregnancy
Though rare among humans, it is possible for a second fertilization to occur when one pregnancy is already progressing.

Before Vaquitas Vanish, a Desperate Bid to Save Them
No more than 30 vaquitas are left in Mexico’s Gulf of California. Experts propose keeping some in captivity as a last resort.

In California, a Move to Ease the Pressures on Aging Dams
A tract of farmland, inadvertently flooded, shows a “softer” path to managing the state’s immense water system in an era of climate change.

A Facebook-Style Shift in How Science Is Shared
ResearchGate, a Berlin-based social network growing in influence and funding, links scientists worldwide, providing real-time feedback on research.

The best ways to back up all your photos to the cloud
DIY Keep your digital memories safe Worried about losing your precious pictures? Make sure they're saved for posterity on the web—whether you're using iOS, Android, macOS, or Windows—with these leading…

Black holes might devour stars much more often than we thought
Space Like, 100 times more How do supermassive black holes get so supermassive? A new study suggests they might be chowing down on stars. Read on.

Drones, lasers, and tanks: China shows off its latest weapons
From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal A peek at the arsenal at an arms fair in Dubai. China displays a whole bunch of high-tech and homemade weapons at the IDEX 2017 arms fair in Dubai. Read on.

This is what happens to your body as you die of dehydration
Health Caution: this article may cause thirst Dehydration is different for everybody, but it can get dangerous quick.

Earth’s first continent? Probably a giant continental crust
Science It was not filled with chocolate New research casts light on how earth’s first continents formed – and a key theory of geology…

Half of your bread’s environmental impact comes from fertilizer
Environment Your morning loaf holds a C02 intensive surprise Recent study says that half of the greenhouse gas emissions from a loaf of bread comes from fertilizer.

This rare disorder leaves some people without kneecaps
Health But rare diseases don't get a lot of research funding Rare diseases don't get a lot of research funding. But studying them can help more than the select few who have symptoms. Read on.

Humans are responsible for the vast majority of wildfires in the U.S.
Environment Only you can prevent forest fires. For real. In the past 20 years, thousands of wildfires have raged across the United States, and most of them are our fault.

Professional shaving brush and stand 75 percent off? I'd buy it.
Gadgets Make every shave feel like a barber shave. It's only $15. Professional shaving brush and stand 75 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.

4 ways to quick-charge your phone during a busy day
DIY Get the most juice in the shortest time The days when your phone's battery is likely to die most quickly are also the days when you need it the most. Here are four ways to get your phone charged faster.

Resurrecting extinct animals might do more harm than good
Animals But it depends on the species and the context A study concludes that de-extinction could actually lead to a net loss of biodiversity. Read on.

SpaceX wants to send two rich people to the moon by 2018
Space Two private citizens have reportedly paid up for a lunar jaunt SpaceX CEO Elon Musk announced today that the company is planning to send two private citizens into orbit around the moon.

What case should you get for your phone?
Gadgets A quick guide to the most common typologies. What case should you get for your phone? Read on.

Wikipedia bots spent years fighting silent, tiny battles with each other
Technology And no one even noticed Bots waging war for years on end, silently and endlessly arguing over tiny details on Wikipedia is, let’s be honest, pretty funny. Automatons with vendettas against each…

Why Is It Significant That the White House Tours Resume?
The tradition of an open house at the White House dates back to the administration of Thomas Jefferson. Why is this an important aspect of the American democratic process?

A Woman Survives Ebola but Not Pregnancy in Africa
Salome Karwah fought past civil war and a deadly virus. But in Liberia, becoming a mother is too often a killer

How to Defeat Those Who are Waging War on Science
Here are five meaningful steps you can take

Staring Down a Star in Search of Giant Rings
Astronomers will soon start looking at Beta Pictoris for 200 days without blinking to find out what's responsible for a mysterious series of dimmings

The Rise of Evidence-Based Psychiatry
The way we’ve traditionally assessed, understood and treated mental illness is abysmally primitive

5G - det er da til Internet of Things
5G er allevegne på Mobile World Congress. Men det vigtigste salgsargument er, at netværket skal være rygraden i Internet of Things.

Nasa undersøger muligheden for at fremskynde bemanding af Mars-fartøj
Nasas teknikere gennemgår nu fordele og ulemper ved at bemande rumfartøjet Orion ved første testflyvning i 2018. Oprindeligt var den bemandede test planlagt til 2021.

Nedsat hastighed i regnvejr skal forlænge livet for vindmøllevinger
Med vindmøllers tiltagende størrelse er vingeerosion blevet et alvorligt problem og en stor udgift for vindmølleejerne. Det vil DTU Vindenergi forsøge at løse gennem kontrol af vingehastigheden i regnvejr.

Norsk opfinder vil erstatte kinesiske kulkraftværker med geotermi
Stop kulværket, bor et hul til geotermi og flyt boremaskinen ned i hullet lyder det fra norsk idemand.

Rumforsker: Månerejsen er en taktisk manøvre af SpaceX
Hvis Elon Musks firma overhaler Nasas SLS-system til bemandet rumfart, vil det vise, at man sagtens kan overlade tunge løfteopgaver til en kommerciel partner.

Samlet opposition: Regeringen vil brænde for meget af vores affald af
Oppositionen protesterer over, at regeringen vil slappe EU-Kommissionens mål om at genanvende 65 pct. af affaldet. 'Vi er præget af grøn realisme, ikke grøn naivisme', lyder miljøministerens svar.

Spørg Scientariet: Hvad ville der ske, hvis Jorden overførte vand til Mars?
En læser tænker på, om det ville ændre Mars, hvis planeten fik tilført vand fra Jorden. Det svarer planetforsker på.

Vismænd: Sænk elafgiften, og læg afgift på biomasse
De miljøøkonomiske vismænd anbefaler ensartede afgifter på alle brændsler, som både virksomheder og private skal betale. Og så vil de sætte afgiften ned på el og vand.

The accuracy of the flowmeter calibration factor
Last year, upwards of 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas were delivered to customers in the United States, and when it changed hands, nearly every cubic foot was measured using gas flowmeters. The accuracy of those meters has enormous commercial importance, and NIST has a long-standing research program to improve flowmeter calibration. The scope of that program has now literally expanded in the

ADB says Asia needs to double infrastructure spending
Developing countries in Asia and the Pacific will need to spend up to $1.7 trillion a year, or $26 trillion through 2030, to meet their infrastructure needs and to maintain the region's growth momentum, the Asian Development Bank said in a report Tuesday.

Study advances understanding the stories of ancient climate told by tiny shells
How can we know anything about the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere in earth's deep past? Tiny bubbles trapped in ice provide samples of ancient air but this record goes back only 800,000 years. To reach further back, scientists must depend on climate proxies, or measurable parameters that vary systematically with climate conditions.

Public may be more accepting of advocacy by climate scientists than previously thought
Research published today in Environmental Communication suggests that scientists may have more freedom than previously thought to engage in certain forms of climate change advocacy without risking harm to their credibility.

S. Africa rhino poaching dipped in 2016, stays above 1,000
Poachers killed 1,054 South African rhinos for their horns in 2016, a 10 percent dip on a year earlier, the environment ministry said Monday, as officials struggle to quell the slaughter.

How after-hours trading sheds light on investor sentiment
During the day, the stock market is a busy place but according to a new study, paying attention to overnight returns may help investors develop profitable trading strategies.

Taking aim at a key malaria molecule
The iron-containing molecule heme is necessary for life. Cells require heme to perform the chemical reactions that produce energy, among other critical tasks.

Comparative analysis of Aspergillus species provides genus-wide view of fungal diversity
In the world of fungi, Aspergillus is an industrial superstar. Aspergillus niger, for example, has been used for decades to produce citric acid—a compound frequently added to foods and pharmaceuticals —through fermentation at an industrial scale. Other species in this genus play critical roles in biofuel production, and plant and human health. Since the majority of its 350 species have yet to be s

Will naming the Anthropocene lead to acceptance of our planet-level impact?
"What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." This phrase—from William Shakespeare's tragic play Romeo & Juliet—is among the most famous acknowledgements in Western culture of the power of naming to shape human perception.

Antimicrobial silicone for medical purposes
Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) laboratories often serve as birthplaces of unique products, such as antimicrobial silicone invented by a KTU PhD student Aiste Lisauskaite and her supervisor Dr Virginija Jankauskaite. The researchers believe that the new product will be extremely useful both for household and medical purposes.

Aquarium of Niagara expanding to protect threatened penguins
A Niagara Falls aquarium is expanding so it can breed and protect the threatened Humboldt penguin.

Archaeologists excavate 1,000-year-old toy boat in abandoned well
A thousand-year-old toy boat from an abandoned water well gives archaeologists tantalizing clues about the culture that produced the object.

Archeologists at the vanguard of environmental and climate research
The history of people and landscapes, whether natural or cultural, is fundamentally connected. Answering key historical questions about this relation will allow us to approach our most important environmental issues in novel ways. Today in the open access journal PLOS ONE archeologists present a list of 50 priority issues for historical ecology.

Planned protection area would help basking sharks
A proposed Marine Protected Area (MPA) off Scotland's west coast would help basking sharks, researchers say.

Asiacell to offer free access to Wikipedia in Iraq
The Wikimedia Foundation, which runs online encyclopaedia Wikipedia, said Tuesday that telecoms operator Asiacell will offer free access to the website to its nearly 12 million mobile phone customers in war-torn Iraq.

Atacama Desert people found to have evolved greater tolerance of arsenic
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Chile has found that some people living in a part of the Atacama Desert have evolved over time for survival despite drinking water that contains 100 times the suggested maximum safe limit of arsenic as set by the World Health Organization. In their paper published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, the team des

Study opens new questions on how the atmosphere and oceans formed
A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found seawater cycles throughout the Earth's interior down to 2,900km, much deeper than previously thought, reopening questions about how the atmosphere and oceans formed.

Banded mongooses go to war over sex and territory
Gang warfare is not unique to humans - banded mongooses do it too.

Bashful Tokyo pandas mate after four-year hiatus
Two giant pandas at Tokyo's Ueno Zoo mated for the first time in four years Monday—a 52-second effort that boosted hopes for a baby as well as shares in a nearby Chinese restaurant.

Biofuel produced by microalgae
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have identified unique lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases as being the central enzymes for triacylglycerol synthesis by oleaginous alga Nannochloropsis, thus uncovering the mechanisms of biofuel production in microalgae.

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery
A University of Central Florida professor has invented a way to use light to continuously monitor a surgical patient's blood, for the first time providing a real-time status during life-and-death operations.

5 bn mobile phone users in 2017: study
The number of mobile phone users globally will surpass five billion by the middle of this year, according to a study released Monday by GSMA, the association of mobile operators.

Breakthrough research for testing and arranging vertical axis wind turbines
The sight of propeller-like rotating blades positioned high up the pole of a tall horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) may be familiar to many. Often grouped in wind farms, HAWTs provide significant amounts of energy for local communities. One drawback to HAWTs is the large space they take up, needing to be placed far apart from each other. If placed too close together, the turbulence and wind velo

Buffett's bite of Apple even bigger than was thought
Warren Buffett says he's investing heavily in Apple, believing that once consumers begin using the company's products they aren't likely to stop.

Transforming the carbon economy
Most strategies to combat climate change concentrate on reducing greenhouse gas emissions by substituting non-carbon energy sources for fossil fuels, but a task force commissioned in June 2016 by former U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz proposed a framework in December 2016 for evaluating research and development on two additional strategies: recycling carbon dioxide and removing large amounts

Cathode material with high energy density for all-solid lithium-ion batteries
FDK Corporation and Fujitsu Laboratories today announced that they have jointly developed lithium cobalt pyrophosphate (Li2CoP2O7), which has high energy density, for the cathode material of all-solid lithium-ion batteries ("all-solid-state batteries"). This material enables the development of all-solid-state batteries with higher voltage and higher capacity. In recent years, the specifications re

Do cells have exotic vibrational properties?
A little-understood biological property that appears to allow cell components to store energy on their outer edges is the possible key to developing a new class of materials and devices to collect, store and manage energy for a variety of applications, a team of researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Yeshiva University has proposed.

Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
Mammalian cells are optimally adapted to gravity. But what happens in the microgravity environment of space if the earth's pull disappears? Previously, many experiments exhibited cell changes – after hours or even days in zero gravity. Astronauts, however, returned to Earth without any severe health problems after long missions in space, which begs the question as to how capable cells are of adapt

Chatting robots and music: fun gadgets on show in Barcelona
While smartphones get top billing at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, it's the quirky, under-the-radar products that are getting a lot of the visitors' attention.

Chemoselective acetalization by a bifuncional cerium phosphate catalyst
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a bifunctional cerium phosphate catalyst for the chemoselective acetalization of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with alcohols. This research demonstrates potential as the heterogeneous catalyst system is reusable, widely applicable to various substrates (16 examples), and affords high chemoselectivity.

Children and youth learning English require better support for academic success
Despite their potential, many English learners (ELs)—who account for more than 9 percent of K-12 enrollment in the U.S.—lag behind their English-speaking monolingual peers in educational achievement, in part because schools do not provide adequate instruction and social-emotional support to acquire English proficiency or access to academic subjects at the appropriate grade level, says a new report

China says coal consumption falls for third year
China's world-leading coal consumption fell for the third straight year in 2016, government data showed Tuesday, as the planet's biggest carbon emitter struggles to break its addiction to the heavily polluting fuel.

Chiral superconductivity experimentally demonstrated for the first time
(Phys.org)—Scientists have found that a superconducting current flows in only one direction through a chiral nanotube, marking the first observation of the effects of chirality on superconductivity. Until now, superconductivity has only been demonstrated in achiral materials, in which the current flows in both directions equally.

Constraining the chemistry of carbon-chain molecules in space
The interstellar medium of the Milky Way contains 5-10% of the total mass of the galaxy (excluding its dark matter) and consists primarily of hydrogen gas. There are small but important contributions from other gases as well, including carbon-bearing molecules both simple, like carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and complex like ethene, benzene, propynal, methanol and other alcohols, and cyanides

Keeping our cool in space
As spacecraft become larger, the heat they produce also increases. That means vehicles built for long-term space exploration need more efficient cooling systems.

Counterfeiters, hackers cost US up to $600 billion a year
Counterfeit goods, software piracy and the theft of trade secrets cost the American economy as much as $600 billion a year, a private watchdog says.

Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
An international team of researchers has demonstrated that key processes in models used for the global assessment of water resources for climate change are currently missing. This could mean climate change impact models are wrong in some parts of the world and cannot yet be used to guide water management.

Shining a light on the darkness of soot in air pollution
Researchers are a step closer to understanding the relationship between the colour of soot particles and the effect of such atmospheric pollution on climate.

Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin's 'abominable mystery'
The mystery that is the origin of flowering plants has been partially solved thanks to a team from the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes), in collaboration with the Reproduction et Développement des Plantes laboratory (CNRS/ENS Lyon/Inra/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1) and Kew Gardens (UK). Their discovery, published in the journal New Phy

Declining Arctic sea ice influences European weather—but isn't a cause of colder winters
The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice through climate change is unlikely to lead to more severe winter weather across Northern Europe, new research has shown.

New model for deep mantle conveyor belt system at the core of the Earth
Geophysicists at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology report in Nature Geoscience a new model for the existence of a deep mantle conveyor belt system that may have operated inside the Earth since its formation about 4.5 billion years ago.

Destabilized solitons perform a disappearing act
When your heart beats, blood courses through your veins in waves of pressure. These pressure waves manifest as your pulse, a regular rhythm unperturbed by the complex internal structure of the body. Scientists call such robust waves solitons, and in many ways they behave more like discrete particles than waves. Soliton theory may aid in the understanding of tsunamis, which—unlike other water waves

Deuterium and tritium separated using a functionalized metal-organic framework compound
Deuterium and tritium are substances with a future - but they are rare. The heavy isotopes of hydrogen not only have numerous applications in science but could also contribute to the energy mix of tomorrow as fuels for nuclear fusion. Deuterium is also contained in some drugs that are currently undergoing regulatory approval in the US. However, the process of filtering deuterium out of the natural

Device generates UV spectrum laser pulses at record-breaking efficiency
A group of researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw has just published the a report on their development of a miniature tripler device for generating femtosecond laser pulses in the UV spectrum. The device has three times higher efficiency than previously used setups, and fits on a finger tip, thanks to a unique software package developed in Warsaw during the design stag

3-D computer models of gigantic archaeological objects
Archeological artefacts, such as the Jupiter Column of Ladenburg, a town with an impressive Roman history, hold many as yet undiscovered secrets. Discovered in 1973, the history of the monument that is more than 1800 years old is still unclear. The HEiKA MUSIEKE project is aimed at uncovering some of these secrets and making the cultural heritage of Ladenburg visible and perceptible. For this purp

Researchers use DNA-based nano-tweezers to measure the forces between nucleosomes
The mode of packaging of the genomic DNA in the cell nucleus determines patterns of gene expression. Munich researchers have used DNA-based nano-tweezers to measure the forces between nucleosomes, the basic packing units of nuclear DNA.

Dogs, toddlers show similarities in social intelligence
Most dog owners will tell you they consider their beloved pets to be members of their families. Now new research suggests that dogs may be even more like us than previously thought.

How donut-shaped fusion plasmas managed to decrease adverse turbulence
Fusion research has been dominated by the search for a suitable way of ensuring confinement as part of the research into using fusion to generate energy. In a recent paper published in EPJ H, Fritz Wagner from the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Germany, gives a historical perspective outlining how our gradual understanding of improved confinement regimes for what are referred to as tor

New droplet-on-tape method assists biochemical research at X-ray lasers
Biological samples studied with intense X-rays at free-electron lasers are destroyed within nanoseconds after they are exposed. Because of this, the samples need to be continually refreshed to allow the many images needed for an experiment to be obtained. Conventional methods use jets that supply a continuous stream of samples, but this can be very wasteful as the X-rays only interact with a tiny

Earth probably began with a solid shell
Today's Earth is a dynamic planet with an outer layer composed of giant plates that grind together, sliding past or dipping beneath one another, giving rise to earthquakes and volcanoes. Others separate at undersea mountain ridges, where molten rock spreads out from the centers of major ocean basins.

More efficient production for photoluminescent chemical compounds
Chemical compounds that emit light are used in a variety of different materials, from glow-in-the-dark children's toys to LED lights to light-emitting sensors. As the demand for these compounds increases, finding new efficient methods for their production is essential. New research from the Coordination Chemistry and Catalysis Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate Univer

Why we need an 'energy Landcare' to tackle rising power prices
Rising electricity prices have become a fact of life in Australia – and are likely to be so for a few years to come.

How to reduce the environmental impact of a loaf of bread?
With an estimated 12 million loaves sold in the UK every year, bread remains a staple of the British diet. In a groundbreaking study researchers from the University of Sheffield have now calculated the environmental impact of a loaf of bread and which part of its production contributes the most greenhouse gas.

New evidence on the diet of the 'Homo antecessor' from Atapuerca
The Homo antecessor, a hominin species that inhabited the Iberian Peninsula around 800,000 years ago, had a mechanically more demanding diet than other hominin species in Europe and the African continent. This unique pattern, characterized by the consumption of hard and abrasive foods, may be explained by the differences in food processing in a very demanding environment with fluctuations in clima

First evidence of rocky planet formation in Tatooine system
Evidence of planetary debris surrounding a double sun, 'Tatooine-like' system has been found for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers.

Exploring the mysteries of supercooled water
There are few things more central to life on earth than water. It dominates the physical landscape, covering much of the planet as oceans. It's also a major component of the human body, comprising, for example, more than 70% of the mass of a newborn baby.

The predicted failure of the 'Arab Spring'
Can the outcome of revolutions be predicted? At the beginning of 2011, riots and revolutions broke out across North Africa and the Middle East in a number of countries. Widely considered a rebellion against bad autocratic regimes, many in the international community optimistically called this movement the "Arab Spring," seeing it as the beginning of a new era of democracy for the region. Researche

FLASHForward accelerates first electron bunches
The plasma accelerator project FLASHForward achieved an important milestone in January: for the first time, the facility's high-power laser accelerated electron bunches in a plasma cell. Later in the operational phase, the laser will control the formation of the plasma at FLASH. The group of scientists around DESY's Jens Osterhoff used the laser to ignite a plasma, from which electrons were accele

A flesh-eating parasite returns to Florida
A flesh-eating parasite that has re-emerged in the United States after more than a half-century has killed a fifth of the endangered Key deer on the Florida Keys since last fall. In January, a stray dog near Miami was successfully treated for these New World screwworm parasites, fly larvae that feast on open wounds in warm-blooded animals.

Foliage-penetrating ladar technology may improve border surveillance
The United States shares 5,525 miles of land border with Canada and 1,989 miles with Mexico. Monitoring these borders, which is the responsibility of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), is an enormous task. Detecting, and responding to, illegal activity while facilitating lawful commerce and travel is made more difficult by the expansive, rugged, diverse, and thickly vegetated geography that

Forests to play major role in meeting Paris climate targets
Forests are set to play a major role in meeting the objectives of the Paris Climate Agreement - however, accurately monitoring progress toward the "below 2°C" target requires a consistent approach to measuring the impact of forests on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Researchers detail genetic mechanisms that govern growth and drought response in plants
New research from an Iowa State University scientist identifies a genetic mechanism that governs growth and drought tolerance in plants, a development that could lead to better performing traits in crops.

Gold nano-antennas reveal single molecules' electrochemical properties
Individual molecules are extremely hard to see through feeble fluorescence. Leiden physicists have managed to use tiny gold nanorods as antennas to intensify their signal 500 times. They have published their results in Angewandte Chemie.

Using Google to map our ecosystem
Researchers in the Singapore-ETH Centre's Future Cities Laboratory developed a method to quantify ecosystem services of street trees. Using nearly 100,000 images from Google Street View, the study helps further understanding on how green spaces contribute to urban sustainability.

Greater prairie chickens cannot persist in Illinois without help, researchers report
An iconic bird whose booming mating calls once reverberated across "the Prairie State" can survive in Illinois with the help of periodic human interventions, researchers report.

Gumtree bans donkey sales in S.Africa over skin trade
Online sales website Gumtree said Monday that it had banned advertisements offering donkeys in South Africa to prevent inhumane killings of the animals to meet Chinese demand for their skins.

Hawaiian Airlines joins international climate change study
Hawaiian Airlines says it has become the first U.S. airline to join an international research project on climate change and air quality.

High-performance computation is available by cloud computing
A group of researchers led by Visiting Professor Takashi Yoshikawa developed the world's first system for flexibly providing high-performance computation by cloud computing.

Hubble cooperates on galaxy cluster and cosmic background
The events surrounding the Big Bang were so cataclysmic that they left an indelible imprint on the fabric of the cosmos. We can detect these scars today by observing the oldest light in the universe. As it was created nearly 14 billion years ago, this light—which exists now as weak microwave radiation and is thus named the cosmic microwave background (CMB)—permeates the entire cosmos, filling it w

Humans sparked 84 percent of US wildfires, increased fire season over two decades
Humans have dramatically increased the spatial and seasonal extent of wildfires across the U.S. in recent decades and ignited more than 840,000 blazes in the spring, fall and winter seasons over a 21-year period, according to new research.

Hydro storage can secure 100 percent renewable electricity
Pumped hydro storage can be used to help build a secure and cheap Australian electricity grid with 100 per cent renewable energy, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found.

First public data release by the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program
Figuring out the fate of the Universe is one step closer. The first massive dataset of a "cosmic census" is released using the largest digital camera on the Subaru Telescope. Beautiful images are available for public at large.

Image: The evolution of supernova 1987A
Thirty years ago, on 23 February 1987, the light from a stellar explosion marking the death of a massive star arrived at Earth to shine in Southern Hemisphere skies.

Image: NASA satellite spots moon's shadow over Patagonia
On Feb. 26, 2017, an annular eclipse of the sun was visible along a narrow path that stretched from the southern tip of South America, across the Atlantic Ocean and into southern Africa. Those lucky enough to find themselves in the eclipse's path saw a fiery ring in the sky. Meanwhile, NASA's Terra satellite saw the eclipse from space.

Image: Orion spacecraft progresses with installation of module to test propulsion systems
On Feb. 22, engineers successfully installed ESA's European Service Module Propulsion Qualification Module (PQM) at NASA's White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico that was delivered by Airbus – ESA's prime contractor for the Service Module.

Images of the sun from the GOES-16 satellite
These images of the sun were captured at the same time on January 29, 2017 by the six channels on the Solar Ultraviolet Imager or SUVI instrument aboard NOAA's GOES-16 satellite. They show a large coronal hole in the sun's southern hemisphere. Data from SUVI will provide an estimation of coronal plasma temperatures and emission measurements which are important to space weather forecasting.


New insights into how ungulates got bigger in the Neogene
The observed increase of body size in ungulates during the 20 million years before the Pleistocene is driven by the process of species selection, according to researchers from the Senckenberg, Germany. Bigger ungulate species became more common because of a higher origination and lower extinction rate. The study, published recently in Proceedings of Royal Society B, is the first to compare the evo

International team reports ocean acidification spreading rapidly in Arctic Ocean
Ocean acidification (OA) is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, according to new interdisciplinary research reported in Nature Climate Change by a team of international collaborators, including University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai.

Invasive and native marsh grasses may provide similar benefits to protected wetlands
An invasive species of marsh grass that spreads, kudzu-like, throughout North American wetlands, may provide similar benefits to protected wetlands as native marsh grasses. According to new research from North Carolina State University, the invasive marsh grass's effects on carbon storage, erosion prevention and plant diversity in protected wetlands are neutral. The findings could impact managemen

Better communication key to cutting earthquake death toll, experts say
Communicating earthquake risk has long been a major challenge for scientists. Yet the right messages at the right time can and will save lives, say U.S. Communication scholars in an article published in the Journal of Applied Communication Research, a National Communication Association publication. The

Kids want parental help with online risk, but fear parental freak outs
Although it may come as no surprise to the Fresh Prince, kids think that parents just don't understand what it is like to be a teen in an internet-connected world and this lack of understanding may hinder the development of skills necessary to safely navigate online, according to a team of researchers.

Detailed Las Vegas earthquake site classifications could lower construction costs
Results of a massive new project to map and classify the earthquake shaking potential across most of the Las Vegas metropolitan area will help developers there build in safer and less expensive ways.

It may not have been too late to save 'extinct' pigeon
The Passenger Pigeon, a species of pigeon that died out in the early years of the 20th century, could have been saved even after it was considered doomed to extinction.

Linking climate change, air pollution and public health
We often view climate change and air pollution as two separate entities. But, the two issues are united by one common driving factor: human emissions. Nicholas School of the Environment Earth Sciences Professor Drew Shindell reminds us how interconnected these issues truly are, and how we must begin viewing them as such to create change.

Research links aquatic ecosystem changes in the Chinese Loess Plateau to anthropogenic climate change
New research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, has determined that aerosol-weakened summer monsoons have triggered changes in aquatic ecosystems of the Chinese Loess Plateau region.

Using magnetic gates to track slalom skiers' performance
EPFL researchers can now measure a slalom skier's exact time at each gate all the way down the slope. Their system also calculates the skiers' speed and trajectory more accurately than GPS.

Marshall Islands first to ratify HFC greenhouse gas deal
The Marshall Islands, a Pacific archipelago highly exposed to climate-induced sea level rise, said Tuesday it was the first country to ratify a global pact to phase out planet-warming gases called HFCs.

Martian winds carve mountains, move dust, raise dust
On Mars, wind rules. Wind has been shaping the Red Planet's landscapes for billions of years and continues to do so today. Studies using both a NASA orbiter and a rover reveal its effects on scales grand to tiny on the strangely structured landscapes within Gale Crater.

Blind matchmaking for more efficient wireless networks
Anonymously pairing network users could expand the capability of the next generation of wireless networks

Materials that emit rainbows
Mechanochromic luminescent (MCL) materials change their color in response to a change in their environment, like pressure and temperature. To date, most MCL materials only change between two colors, limiting their applications. The international research team comprising of chemists at Osaka University and physicists at Durham University has developed tricolor-changing MLC materials. Not only that,

Proposed method to cause an atom to emit the same light as another atom
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Princeton University has found a way to cause any atom to mimic the light emissions of any other atom. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team reveals how they uncovered this trick and suggest some applications that might benefit from its use.

Microstructure and micromechanics of the interface between bone and tendon
Walking, running, sprinting—every movement of the foot stretches the Achilles' tendon. When jumping, the loads can approach ten times the body weight. Amazingly, the connection between the heel bone and Achilles' tendon withstands theses tremendous loads. A team of doctors, physicists, chemists and engineers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered why.

Final milestone for the upgraded H.E.S.S. telescopes in Namibia
The newly refurbished cameras of the H.E.S.S. gamma-ray telescopes in Namibia have detected their first signals from a cosmic particle accelerator: The new cameras recorded Markarian 421 as their first target, a well-known blazar in the constellation of Ursa Major. The active galactic nucleus, 400 million light years away, was detected during an active state and at high significance. After four ye

Millennials in PR don't feel ready to give companies advice on moral dilemmas, study finds
Millennials pursuing careers in public relations don't feel ready to give advice on moral dilemmas to their companies. In fact, they don't expect to face ethical dilemmas at work, according to a Baylor University study.

Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents
The most prevalent method for obtaining images of clogged coronary vessels is coronary angiography. For some patients, however, the contrast agents used in this process can cause health problems. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now demonstrated that the required quantity of these substances can be significantly reduced if monoenergetic X-rays from a miniature particle accele

Mystery of the dark solitons
When your heart beats, blood courses through your arteries in waves of pressure. These pressure waves manifest as your pulse, a regular rhythm unperturbed by the complex internal structure of the body. Scientists call such robust waves solitons, and in many ways they behave more like discrete particles than waves. Soliton theory may aid in the understanding of tsunamis, which—unlike other water wa

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties
Rice University researchers have modeled a nanoscale sandwich, the first in what they hope will become a molecular deli for materials scientists.

Former NASA mathematician, 98, gets her moment at Oscars
She said only "thank you," but it was one of the more moving moments of Sunday's Oscars ceremony.

NASA wind tunnel tests X-plane design for a quieter supersonic jet
Supersonic passenger airplanes are another step closer to reality as NASA and Lockheed Martin begin the first high-speed wind tunnel tests for the Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) X-plane preliminary design at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

Nerve wrapping nanofiber mesh promoting regeneration
A research team consisting of Mitsuhiro Ebara, MANA associate principal investigator, Mechanobiology Group, NIMS, and Hiroyuki Tanaka, assistant professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, developed a mesh which can be wrapped around injured peripheral nerves to facilitate their regeneration and restore their functions. This mesh incorporates vitamin B12—a substan

Netflix boss predicts mobile operators will soon offer unlimited video
Netflix head Reed Hastings predicted Monday that mobile carriers will soon offer data plans that give users unlimited video streaming to meet the rising popularity of watching TV and movies on mobile devices.

Netflix CEO: co-workers were affected by Trump travel ban
Netflix employees were personally affected by U.S. President Donald Trump's attempt to ban people entering from seven Muslim countries, its CEO said Tuesday.

Neutrons, simulation analysis of tRNA-nanodiamond combo could transform drug delivery design principles
It's not enough to design new drugs. For drugs to be effective, they have to be delivered safely and intact to affected areas of the body. And drug delivery, much like drug design, is an immensely complex task. Cutting-edge research and development like that conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory can help solve some of the challenges associated with drug deliver

Newfound primate teeth take a big bite out of the evolutionary tree of life
Fossil hunters have found part of an ancient primate jawbone related to lemurs—the primitive primate group distantly connected to monkeys, apes and humans, a USC researcher said.

Nokia relaunches iconic 3310 mobile model
Finnish brand Nokia, a former mobile star, on Sunday launched three new Android smartphones and unveiled a revamped version of its iconic 3310 model more than a decade after it was phased out.

Direct numerical simulations in turbulent swirling premixed flames
Intensive pressure oscillations by thermoacoustic instabilities are critical for the operation of practical gas turbine combustors. However, it is difficult to investigate interactions between turbulent flames and acoustic modes of combustors due to the existence of complex dynamics and their three-dimensional nature.

Offline AI revolution awaits smartphones
The smartphone revolution is poised to go onto the next level—with "superphones" equipped with artificial intelligence now on the horizon.

Coming soon: Oil spill-mapping swarms of flying drones
Thousands of ants converge to follow the most direct path from their colony to their food and back. A swarm of inexpensive, unmanned drones quickly map an offshore oil spill.

OneWeb, Intelsat merge to advance satellite internet
Satellite telecom firms OneWeb and Intelsat announced plans Tuesday to merge, and a fresh $1.7 billion investment from Japan's SoftBank to advance an ambitious "internet in the sky" plan.

Online security apps focus on parental control, not teen self-regulation
Mobile apps designed to keep teens safe online are overwhelmingly focused on parental control, which may be only a short-term solution that hinders a teen's ability to learn coping strategies in the long run, according to a team of researchers.

Oroville Dam crisis could be sign of things to come
Communities near Oroville Dam just got an unenviable front-row seat to what happens when climactic forces and man-made infrastructure clash. It was also a preview of what could happen as California's climate continues to change.

New use for paper industry's sludge and fly ash in plastics
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland examined, as part of the EU's Reffibre project, whether new industrial applications could be developed for various types of sludge and fly ash generated by the paper and board industry. Laboratory tests showed that these side streams can replace up to 50 percent of oil-based polypropylene. They can be used as a raw material in plastic composites made using

PICO dark matter detector more sensitive than expected
Although invisible to our telescopes, dark matter is known by its gravitational effects throughout the universe. The nature of dark matter is unknown, but the consensus of the astrophysics and particle physics communities is that the dark matter is composed of new fundamental particles, associated with an unknown area of physics. To detect this dark matter, scientists are using instruments called

Study finds police use out of court resolutions in over 5,000 domestic abuse cases
A study published in the British Journal of Criminology investigated the nature and extent of UK police use of 'out of court resolutions' in cases of domestic abuse and found that many forces are potentially putting lives at risk. The researchers call for an immediate stop to street level resolutions in cases of domestic abuse involving partners or ex-partners.

Study: Less pollution in New Jersey streams, but more salt
A new federal study shows less pollution in most New Jersey streams, but salt levels rising in some places.

Experiments may help assess risks posed by falling space rocks
Four years ago, a brilliant fireball streaked across the dawn sky over Russia, then fractured with the force of about 500,000 tons of TNT. The shock wave blew out windows and damaged thousands of buildings across several cities in Russia's Chelyabinsk Oblast region, injuring about 1,500 people.

Growing problem: Pot lights give ham radio operators a buzz
Retired Coast Guard officer Roger Johnson sometimes notices a harsh buzz when he turns on his amateur radio, and he blames high-powered lighting used to grow pot.

Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated
How do molecules rotate in a solvent? Answering this question is complicated, since molecular rotation is perturbed by a very large number of surrounding atoms. For a long time, large-scale computer simulations have been the main approach to model molecule-solvent interactions. However, they are extremely time consuming and sometimes infeasible. Now, Mikhail Lemeshko from the Institute of Science

Rare proteins collapse earlier
Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. ETH researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell.

Study suggests we reclassify the moon as a planet—reopening a centuries-old debate
Every now and then a scientific paper makes a real splash. We had one recently, to judge from recent headlines. "Moon rises to claim its place as a planet" said The Sunday Times on February 19, while the Mail Online asked "Is this lunarcy?". The articles were among many responding to the humble paper: "A Geophysical Planet Definition", which suggested that the criteria for determining what constit

Recovering predators and prey
If you build it, they will come. That's historically been a common approach to species recovery: Grow the prey population first and predators will quickly return. As it turns out, that's not quite the case. A new study has found that restoring predator and prey species simultaneously speeds the recovery efforts of both.

Resurrecting extinct species might come at a terrible cost
Bringing back extinct species could lead to biodiversity loss rather than gain, according to work featuring University of Queensland researchers.

Study reveals ways powerful 'master gene' regulates physical differences between sexes
Physical differences between males and females in species are common, but there remains much to learn about the genetic mechanisms behind these differences.

Next generation of robots for use in nuclear sites
The University of Manchester is to lead a consortium to build the next generation of robots that are more durable and perceptive for use in nuclear sites.

A rose to store energy: In vivo polymerization and manufacturing of wires and supercapacitors in plants
A special structure for storing energy known as a supercapacitor has been constructed in a plant for the first time. The plant, a rose, can be charged and discharged hundreds of times. This breakthrough is the result of research at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University.

Safe and ethical ways to edit the human genome
The National Academies of Science and Medicine (NASEM) released a report on Feb. 14 exploring the implications of new technologies that can alter the genome of living organisms, including humans.

Science builds bridges, not walls, diplomacy experts tell UA audience
In times of diplomatic turmoil and combative negotiations, scientists and engineers will continue solving problems and seeking the truth, speakers affirmed at a recent University of Arizona summit on science diplomacy and policy.

Scientists create electric circuits inside plants
Plants power life on Earth. They are the original food source supplying energy to almost all living organisms and the basis of the fossil fuels that feed the power demands of the modern world. But burning the remnants of long-dead forests is changing the world in dangerous ways. Can we better harness the power of living plants today?

Scientists find evidence for light-by-light scattering, long standing prediction of the Standard Model
Scientists from the ATLAS collaboration at the LHC have found evidence for light-by-light scattering, in which two photons interact and change their trajectory. Researchers from DESY, the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow performed the study.

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies
When the universe was young, a supermassive black hole—bloated to the bursting point with stupendous power—heaved out a jet of particle-infused energy that raced through the vastness of space at nearly the speed of light.

Scientists develop new tool to reduce risk of triggering manmade earthquakes
A new, freely available software tool developed by Stanford scientists will enable energy companies and regulatory agencies to calculate the probability of triggering manmade earthquakes from wastewater injection and other activities associated with oil and gas production.

Researcher battles Scotch broom
The shrub Scotch broom is more than resilient—when it moves into a region it annihilates the long-established ecosystems and takes over the landscape.

Did seaweed make us who we are today?
Millions of years ago something happened, allowing early Homo sapiens to branch out from the primitive hominoid family tree. Was this crucial turn in human evolution partly driven by seaweed and its particular content of essential nutrients?

Study finds secret to diverse forests' super success
We've long known that diverse stands of trees tend to be more productive than monocultures. What we haven't known is why. In a paper published today in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers from the University of Minnesota and Université du Québec à Montréal show the talent behind the trait: Thanks to their natural different growth forms and ability to modify their shape t

Review showcases unique south west estuaries
The unique characteristics of estuaries in the south west of Australia have been highlighted by Murdoch University scientists.

Singapore defence ministry reports cyber breach
Singapore's defence ministry said Tuesday that hackers had stolen the personal details of hundreds of staff and soldiers in what appeared to be a "targeted" cyber attack on its computer systems.

Slower snowmelt in a warming world
As the world warms, mountain snowpack will not only melt earlier, it will also melt more slowly, according to a new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Smart data analysis for transport in Stuttgart
The overburdening of city transport systems is becoming an increasing challenge. But before cities can take concrete action, they need to gather precise traffic data. This is often very time consuming and expensive. A study by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO in cooperation with Telefónica NEXT and the data analysis specialist Teralytics found that mobile network data can ma

Smarter routers reduce latency in the Internet
Excessive latency affects the experienced quality of internet services: online games lag, streaming video buffers, and video conversations are choppy or even interrupted. Toke Høiland-Jørgensen is a researcher at Karlstad University in Sweden, working to improve network performance. In his thesis, "On the Bleeding Edge" he describes what can cause latency and how smart routers can help reduce dela

'Smart handpumps' predict depths of groundwater in Africa
Researchers from the University's Department of Engineering Science and the School of Geography and the Environment believe they have discovered a new way of accurately estimating ground water resources in Africa, using low-cost mobile technologies fitted to existing hand pumps.

Smart multi-layered magnetic material acts as an electric switch
The nanometric-size islands of magnetic metal sporadically spread between vacuum gaps display unique conductive properties under a magnetic field. In a recent study published in EPJ Plus, Anatoliy Chornous from Sumy State University in Ukraine and colleagues found that the vacuum gaps impede the direct magnetic alignment between the adjacent islands—which depends on the external magnetic field—whi

Sound-shaping metamaterial invented
A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists.

In South Korea, the race is on for Olympics 5G next year
Tech-savvy sports enthusiasts will get their money's worth at next year's Pyeongchang Winter Olympics where South Korea's KT mobile operator wants to give spectators what it hopes will be their first 5G experience.

SpaceX says it will fly 2 people to moon next year (Update)
SpaceX said Monday it will fly two people to the moon next year, a feat not attempted since NASA's Apollo heyday close to half a century ago.

Special education teachers should think critically before investing in unproven practices, professor says
Special education is a field in which teachers are constantly trying to find new methods to help their students learn. In doing so, educators may be tempted to try untested, unproven and even pseudoscientific interventions, all with the best intentions. Using such practices not only often fails to help students with disabilities but can have harmful effects, waste limited school resources and stud

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils, associated with bushwillows, collected and identified by Dr. Silvano Biondi. Given the tiny insect from northeastern Gabon is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers Dr. Stefania Laudonia and Dr. Gennaro Viggiani, both affiliated with Italy's University of Naples Federico II, decided to celeb

Spontaneous 'dust traps': Astronomers discover a missing link in planet formation
Planets are thought to form in the disks of dust and gas found around young stars. But astronomers have struggled to assemble a complete theory of their origin that explains how the initial dust develops into planetary systems. A French-UK-Australian team now think they have the answer, with their simulations showing the formation of 'dust traps' where pebble-sized fragments collect and stick toge

Stars regularly ripped apart by black holes in colliding galaxies
Astronomers based at the University of Sheffield have found evidence that stars are ripped apart by supermassive black holes 100 times more often than previously thought.

Statistical technique for automatically cleaning erroneous data from weather-balloon observations
Twice a day, weather balloons are released into the atmosphere from 700 locations around the world to observe conditions in the upper atmosphere. Since the 1920s, there have been tens of millions of these radiosonde launches, producing an enormous archive of data that is critical to weather forecasting and climate modeling. In such a large data set, inevitable errors can significantly affect model

Rings in stomach could be key to telling lobsters' ages
Researchers are testing a technique they say could determine the age of lobsters.

Storm chasers honor "Twister" star with GPS tribute
Nearly 200 storm chasers paid tribute Sunday to the late actor Bill Paxton by spelling out his initials using GPS coordinates on a map depicting the heart of Tornado Alley.

Streaming industry in historic win at Oscars
In a first for the streaming industry, Amazon Studios and Netflix walked away with Oscars, underlining their emergence as major players in the entertainment business.

Strong polynomiality of the simplex method for totally unimodular linear programming problems
Linear programming is the most fundamental optimization problem with applications in many areas including engineering, management, and economics.

Students test prototype of a magnetic cloak
In December, five students from Stony Brook University in New York and their research professor, Nils Feege, loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away.

Super resolution imaging helps determine a stem cell's future
Scientists at Rutgers and other universities have created a new way to identify the state and fate of stem cells earlier than previously possible.

A sustained and controllable insulin release system
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have developed an insulin release system with sustained and controllable delivery. The system combines two original technologies, SPRA and PPRX, which provide complimentary benefits for insulin delivery.

Telescope records massive explosion 12 billion light years away
The University of Western Australia's Zadko Telescope has captured the explosive birth of a black hole 12 billion light years away that took place before the Earth and sun existed.

Tension-based, wearable vibroacoustic device
Excitement felt when listening to music is due to both the sounds heard and, importantly, the vibrations felt by the body.

15 ton supercomputer provides access to water, energy and the internet
A new machine called the Watly offers solutions to three of society's most important challenges – ensuring access to clean water, sustainable energy generation and reaping the benefits of the evolving digital revolution. Supported by funds from the Horizon 2020 project, the innovative SME behind the project is now nearly ready to unveil its first full-scale Watly machine.

New tool gives apple farms hope in fight against spring freezes
This February's warm weather is nice in the Northeast, but apple farmers may pay a price if winter roars back. To help growers assess precarious temperatures in turbulent springs, the Cornell Institute for Climate Smart Solutions has developed a new Apple Freeze Risk decision tool.

From tools to trash: Marshall's payload stowage team tracks it
For many of us spring cleaning is an annual ritual and it will be here before we know it. Imagine trying to keep everything organized year-round in a five-bedroom house where everything floats. And that house is moving 17,500 miles per hour orbiting the Earth 250 miles above us. That's exactly the job of a small team at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Study finds toxic mine discharge flowing into Blue Mountains World Heritage Area
Toxic discharge from an underground Blue Mountains coalmine is causing major damage to protected local waterways, raising concerns about the regulation of mining in local heritage areas, according to a Western Sydney University study.

Tracking the movement of cyborg cockroaches
New research from North Carolina State University offers insights into how far and how fast cyborg cockroaches - or biobots - move when exploring new spaces. The work moves researchers closer to their goal of using biobots to explore collapsed buildings and other spaces in order to identify survivors.

A traffic cop for the cell surface: Researchers illuminate a basic biological process
On the surfaces of our trillions of cells is a complex crowd of molecules moving around, talking to each other, occasionally segregating themselves, and triggering basic functions ranging from pain sensation to insulin release.

Triboelectric nanogenerators boost mass spectrometry performance
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) convert mechanical energy harvested from the environment to electricity for powering small devices such as sensors or for recharging consumer electronics. Now, researchers have harnessed these devices to improve the charging of molecules in a way that dramatically boosts the sensitivity of a widely-used chemical analysis technique.

First ultra-compact dwarf galaxy in the group NGC 5044 found
(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Favio Faifer of the National University of La Plata, Argentina, has discovered the first ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxy in an X-ray bright galaxy group designated NGC 5044. The finding was presented Feb. 21 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print repository.

New urgency in fight to restore Florida Everglades
Rising seas, polluted coastlines and the specter of more frequent droughts and storms have lent new urgency to efforts to restore the ecosystem of the Florida Everglades, the largest freshwater wetland in the United States.

Engineers respond to UXO crisis with low-cost EOD robot
Starting in 1965 and continuing for three decades, Cambodia was embroiled in armed conflict. US bombings during the Vietnam War made Cambodia perhaps the most bombed country in history. Many of these bombs did not explode, leaving UXO throughout the country. Following this period, the Khmer Rouge came to power resulting in the Cambodian genocide. The Khmer Rouge were eventually pushed to the Cambo

Video: The farm of the future?
There's a new trend in agriculture called vertical farming. As humans learned to farm, we arranged plants outside in horizontal fields, and invented irrigation and fertilizer to grow bumper crops.

Preserving vision for astronauts
Many astronauts who come back from space experience poorer vision after flight, some even years after, and researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are working to see why.

Volcanic hydrogen spurs chances of finding exoplanet life
Hunting for habitable exoplanets now may be easier: Cornell University astronomers report that hydrogen pouring from volcanic sources on planets throughout the universe could improve the chances of locating life in the cosmos.

Wearable gadgets seek permanent place in users' lives
Consumers are snapping up fitness trackers, smartwatches and other connected wearable gadgets—but huge numbers wind up in drawers unused after just a few months once the novelty wears off.

WSU research advances energy savings for oil, gas industries
A Washington State University research team has improved an important catalytic reaction commonly used in the oil and gas industries. The innovation could lead to dramatic energy savings and reduced pollution.

YouTube showing a billion hours of online video daily
YouTube on Monday said that a billion hours of video is being watched daily at the Google-owned online viewing venue in "big milestone" for the service.

Corrigendum. The Week in Review for 02/26/2017.
I get the month right. Mumps cases, like an infected parotid gland, grow. Acupuncture graduates will not have gainful employment. Hypno-Reiki. The one true cause of all disease. And more.

Google delists Mike Adams’ Natural News website. Was it because of fake news?
Last week, in a surprise move Google delisted Mike Adams' Natural News website. Predictably, Adams immediately cried "Conspiracy!" and accused Google of punishing him for his support for "natural health" and Donald Trump. The truth appears to be that Adams violated one of Google's rules, leaving the question: What's the best way to fight fake news and fake medicine on the Internet?

Why Do Things That Are Unlikely to Harm Us Get the Most Attention?
We are very bad at assessing risk, often giving the most attention to the things that are least likely to harm us. Geoffrey Kabat's new book teaches us how to think more clearly about scientific studies of environmental health risks.

Why we are so bad at spotting if our kids are overweight
At least 80 per cent of parents of overweight children think their kids are a healthy weight, and the reasons for this blind spot are complex

Snow will melt more slowly in a warmer world – here’s why
Snowmelt will start earlier but happen more slowly, depriving river systems and reservoirs of the big gush of water they rely on

Try these simple mental tests to see if you’re a good athlete
Your brain’s mental flexibility and capacity to focus could give you the skills to help make you a world class athlete

As Brexit looms, a soundbite strategy for UK science won’t do
The government is still failing to offer detail on how it will counter the many risks to UK science posed by quitting the EU, says campaigner Mike Galsworthy

Caterpillars vibrate anuses to send food and shelter alerts
Tiny birch caterpillars send messages by making a complex range of sounds – buzzing their bodies and drumming and scraping their mouths and anuses against leaf surfaces

A loaf of bread emits half a kilo of CO2, mainly from fertiliser
Fertiliser use accounts for 40 per cent of greenhouse gases emitted to make bread, and bread production accounts for half a per cent of all UK emissions

De-extinction dilemma: reviving dead species may doom the living
Diverting precious conservation resources into de-extinction projects could simply mean more threatened species are wiped out, warns Olive Heffernan

UTIs could soon be life-threatening without new antibiotics
For the first time, the World Health Organization has named which bacteria we most urgently need new antibiotics to fight, and common gut microbes top the list

Game theory says publicly shaming cyberattackers could backfire
A model explains why publicly identifying the perpetrators of a cyberattack without hitting back could make them seem even more of a threat

SpaceX plans to send two civilians around the moon next year
The private space flight company has already received a deposit from two would-be space tourists who hope to fly in late 2018 – if the spacecraft is ready

The feeling you get when nails scratch a blackboard has a name
Spanish speakers use the word “grima” to describe the feeling when a knife scratches a plate. Now it seems English-speakers react in the same way

BPA-free water bottles may contain another harmful chemical
A compound called BPA is being phased out of plastic packaging due to fears it may disrupt our hormones – but a replacement for it may be just as harmful

Does a networked world need a new approach to doing good?
The "effective altruism" movement aims to make the most of our generous urges – but it may not have all the answers

Inside the Knotty World of ‘Anyon’ Particles
I. Prior to the emergence of quantum mechanics, fundamental physics was marked by a peculiar dualism. On the one hand, we had electric and magnetic fields, governed by Maxwell’s equations. The fields filled all of space and were continuous. On the other hand, we had atoms, governed by Newtonian mechanics. The atoms were spatially limited — indeed, quite small — discrete objects. At the heart of t

My first paper in just got published in j Neuroscience! I'm turning it into a video game that simulates simple behavioral circuits. (x-post from /neuroscience)
submitted by /u/wickworks [link] [comments]

How Language Could Have Evolved (draft)
submitted by /u/pseudocoder1 [link] [comments]

Any good observation you guys recommend like this one?
submitted by /u/jackielarson [link] [comments]

Molecular Psychiatry - GWAS meta-analysis reveals novel loci and genetic correlates for general cognitive function: a report from the COGENT consortium
submitted by /u/LtCmdrData [link] [comments]

A paper in Psychological Science explores things people do psychologically to recover from disasters.
submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]

New Subreddit for cogsci experiments /r/selfexperiment
submitted by /u/inventor5 [link] [comments]

The Startup That’s in Charge of the Biggest Private Satellite Fleet
Planet Labs is using its herd of orbiting cameras to take a new picture of the entire Earth each day.

Home Assistants Like Amazon Echo Could Be a Boon for Assisted Living
Elliptic Labs says it can use the speakers and mics on smart home assistants to detect if you’re there.

Insect-Zapping Laser “Fence” Prepares for First Enemy Contact
A device that cooks unwanted flying bugs with a laser beam will be tested against an insect that has decimated Florida’s orange production.

The Download, Feb 27, 2017: Nuclear Claims Fall Flat, Smartphone Crossroads, and a Morphing Drone
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

Your Next Phone Could Be Simple, Not Smart
As many manufacturers show off their most advanced mobile technologies, some companies think you’ll prefer refinement or retro styling over gimmicky gadgets.

The Right-Wing Propaganda Machine May Not Be as Smart as You Think
Artificial intelligence and big data could be helping to fuel an unprecedented propaganda campaign—but there’s little hard evidence to prove it so far.

AI is the New Black
Artificial intelligence no longer exists just in the realm of science fiction. Enterprise AI is coming of age and cognitive computing is now actively improving business processes and strategies.

The Download, Feb 28, 2017: SpaceX’s Moonshot, Insect-Blasting Lasers, and the Superbug Wanted List
The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

SpaceX Plans to Fly Tourists to the Moon—but 2018 Is Ambitious
The company isn’t known for meeting its own deadlines, and there’s a lot of testing yet to be done.

Kunstig intelligens laver nye programmer med offentlige kodestumper
Programmet kan indtil videre kun løse mindre opgaver meget lig dem, der stilles i programmeringskonkurrencer. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kunstig-intelligens-laver-nye-programmer-med-offentlige-kodestumper-1073820 Version2

Læge og blogger: Sundhedsplatformen ligner en IT-katastrofe under opsejling
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/laege-blogger-sundhedsplatformen-ligner-it-katastrofe-under-opsejling-1073860 Tidligere kunne en hospitalslæge på en stuegang tilse 25 patienter på en tung medicinsk afdeling inden frokost. Med indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen er kadencen under det halve, skriver lægeblogger. Version2

Sådan får du kastet hade-opgaverne over på robot-medarbejderen
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-faar-du-kastet-hade-opgaverne-paa-robot-medarbejderen-1073402 Her er syv råd til at få effektivisering ud af simple softwarerobotter. Version2

Bamse-security: Børns samtaler med deres IoT-bamser lagt på nettet
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/to-millioner-optagelser-boerns-samtaler-gennem-iot-teddybjoerne-laekket-1073892 To millioner stemmeoptagelser sendt mellem børn og forældre gennem et IOT-tøjdyr produceret af SpiralToys er lækket sammen med 820.000 brugerkonti. Årsagen er jammerlige sikkerhed. Version2

Graphic: 500 Designs That Matter Is Like Time Travel for Design Nerds
The book lays bare the interconnectedness of the visual world, spanning time and geography and bridging hundreds of seemingly unrelated subjects

A Fascinating Glimpse at How We’ll All Carpool in 2027
Ideo reimagined the carpooling experience for 10 years in the future

A (Kinda) Joint Bank Account for More-Than-Venmo-Serious Couples
Not ready to tie the financial knot but hate getting your partner back for every taco? Simple's new feature lets you share just some of your money

Meet the Self-Driving Car Built for Human-Free Racing
If it looks sci-fi, that's on purpose

Are Some Animals So Smart You Shouldn’t Eat Them?
Even if you like meat, it's hard not to wonder if animals understand what happens to them

A Murder Case Tests Alexa’s Devotion to Your Privacy
Opinion: An Arkansas legal case is testing whether Amazon can be forced to share information collected by Alexa with law enforcement

No, Cellphones Don’t Cause Cancer. Probably
This is the first entry in our new series Is That a Thing, in which we explore tech's biggest myths, misconceptions, and---every so often---actual truths

The Tricky Art of Podcast Ads Is About to Get Even Trickier
Is there an ethical issue with raving about Blue Apron? What if your podcast is about food startups

Samsung Gear Finally Gets a Controller for Awesomer VR
Designed by Samsung and Oculus, it touches and swipes and clicks and shoots

This Brilliant Plan Could Stop Drone Terrorism. Too Bad It’s Illegal
Black Sage Technologies' track-and-jam system guards against airborne attacks on sporting events and other large-crowd gatherings. Just one hitch: US law

SpaceX Plans to Launch Humans Around the Moon in 2018
The mission will use two of SpaceX's long-awaited technologies: a crew-rated capsule, the Crew Dragon, and the high-powered Falcon Heavy rocket

I Am Groot*
A Guardians of the Galaxy helmet with built-in Bluetooth headphones is the new way to chillax on the subway

Inside the Bizarre, Euro-Themed Towns of Shanghai
You can visit Spain, Italy, and even Canda without ever leaving China

Is Trump Hate-Tweeting You? Find Out if It’s Really a Crisis
Big brands studiously seek to avoid politics, but few seem nimble enough to escape the presidential vortex

How to Use Dark Matter Detectors to Catch a Uranium Thief
It turns out, the tools for hunting dark matter help nuclear watchdogs look inside nuclear reactors

Waze Digs Into Your Car’s Dashboard
It will run on your in-car navigation system—and learn a lot more about you

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.