Science : NPR

52 Million-Year-Old Tomatillo Fossil Rewrites Veggie History Potatoes, tomatoes and bell peppers belong to the nightshade family. A newly discovered fossil in Patagonia suggests that family started much earlier than believed, perhaps when dinosaurs roamed. (Image credit: Peter Wilf, Penn State University)
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WIRED

Russia Hacked ‘Older’ Republican Emails, FBI Director Says FBI Director James Comey tells Congress the same hackers who breached the DNC also penetrated the RNC's older email domains and state-level GOP targets. The post Russia Hacked 'Older' Republican Emails, FBI Director Says appeared first on WIRED .
29min
ArXiv Query

Morphognosis: the shape of knowledge in space and timeArtificial intelligence research to a great degree focuses on the brain and behaviors that the brain generates. But the brain, an extremely complex structure resulting from millions of years of evolution, can be viewed as a solution to problems posed by an environment existing in space and time. The environment generates signals that produce sensory events within an organism. Building an internal
58min
Scientific American Content: Global

Vast Shadow Sweeps Across Young Exoplanetary System18 years of Hubble Telescope data on a star system reveals a surprising phenomenon spanning tens of billions of miles
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pretty in pink: Some algae like it coldScientific efforts are aimed at learning more about the effects of pink snow algae on glaciers and snowfields covering Pacific Northwest stratovolcanoes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plus-sized fly: A model to understand the mechanisms underlying human obesityA new fly model sheds light on how the brain acts to signal 'fullness' and the possibility of conferring resilience against the impact of high-fat diets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique gene signature predicts potentially lethal prostate cancersStandard therapy for prostate cancer, the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men, is based on blocking androgens, the male sex hormones. However, for some men, prostate cancer recurs despite androgen-deprivation therapy. A team of scientists has identified an 11-gene signature unique to advanced recurrent prostate cancer that they believe will help to identify these aggressiv
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WIRED

How to Watch President Obama’s Farewell Address Tonight A president looking to leave a tech-forward legacy has made it easy to watch his parting remarks online. The post How to Watch President Obama's Farewell Address Tonight appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wastewater treatment upgrades result in major reduction of intersex fishUpgrades to a wastewater treatment plant along Ontario's Grand River, led to a 70 per cent drop of fish that have both male and female characteristics within one year and a full recovery of the fish population within three years, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Postdoc jobs in biomedicine don't yield positive returns in the labor marketPostdoc jobs don't yield a positive return in the labor market, research has concluded. Additionally, the investigators found that these positions likely cost graduates roughly three years' worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers.
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Futurity.org

Shedding mutations may let cancer evade immunotherapy Cancer cells may develop resistance to drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors by simply getting rid of mutations that would otherwise trigger the body’s disease-fighting immune system, research suggests. Researchers conducted the study, aimed at determining why so-called immunotherapy can become ineffective over time, on cells from five lung cancer and head and neck cancer patients. A summary appea
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Futurity.org

Snails that carry disease can travel surprisingly far Parasite-carrying snails can travel long distances, spreading a deadly disease along the way, according to new research. The study is the first to find genetic evidence for long-distance movements—as far as 30 miles—among snails that pose an important public health threat. Where and how snails move is of concern in many developing countries because freshwater snails transmit schistosomiasis, a pa
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Viden

Kunstig uintelligens: Amazons Alexa køber dukkehuse af sig selvEn familie fik pludselig et dukkehus tilsendt, som enheden havde bestilt.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Japanese monkey tries to mate with deerA male Japanese monkey has been filmed trying to mount and mate with a Sika deer.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Donald Trump win 'won't sway world on climate'Targets on CO2 will continue despite a climate change sceptic becoming president, a UK minister says.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Brazil: Clash of cultures over Amazon damsIndigenous groups and river dwellers are battling the government and big corporations over the huge dams being built to meet Brazil's energy needs.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Chimp drinking culture caught on videoCritically endangered chimpanzees craft absorbent drinking sticks, remote cameras reveal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA-evidence needs statistical back-upHow do forensic scientists deal with complex DNA-evidence found at crime scenes? A researcher has now developed new statistical models to analyze them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suppressing a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumorsInhibiting a DNA-repairing protein in brain could be key to treating aggressive tumors, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What kind of selfie taker are you?Taking and posting pictures of yourself doesn't necessarily mean you're a narcissist, new research suggests. People also take selfies to engage in conversations and chronicle their lives.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The String and Paper CentrifugeThis toy-inspired centrifuge could enable medical testing in remote locations, and costs just 20 cents to make. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on January 10,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find protein that weakens severe sepsis immune reactionNo effective therapy exists today for sepsis, an inflammatory storm that afflicts about 3 million Americans a year, killing up to half. But now, investigators have identified a key molecule that, in mice, helps protect the body’s central nervous system against the runaway inflammation of sepsis bacteria-in-blood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surf and Earth: How prawn shopping bags could save the planetBioengineers are trialing how to use shrimp shells to make biodegradable shopping bags, as a ‘green’ alternative to oil-based plastic, and as a new food packaging material to extend product shelf life.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Vaccine Critic Kennedy Set to Chair Trump Panel on Vaccination SafetyLike the president-elect, Robert Kennedy Jr. has pushed arguments of a link to autism
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily folic acid supplementation remains important for prevention of birth defectsDespite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to a new editorial.
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Popular Science

This super-cheap paper centrifuge can spin 125,000 times per minute Health The hand-powered device could help detect malaria A paper centrifuge powered only by human hands could perform super-cheap blood tests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?Researchers examined the characteristics of HIV-1 strains that were successful in traversing the genital mucosa that forms a boundary to entry by viruses and bacteria. Studying viral isolates from the blood and genital secretions of eight chronically HIV-1 infected donors and their matched recipients, the researchers identified a sub-population of HIV-1 strains with biological properties that pred
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Summer heat for the winterCan thermal solar energy be stored until wintertime? Within a European research consortium, scientists have spent four years studying this question by pitting three different techniques against each other.
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Popular Science

Could you walk to the moon in a lifetime? Space An amazing video shows you how, and David Bowie is there (for some amazing reason) Amazing 360-video from NPR's Skunk Bear walks us to the moon with David Bowie…
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Viden

Obama: Selv Trump kan ikke stoppe skiftet til grøn energiI en artikel i Science argumenterer den afgående præsident for, at vedvarende energikilder er kommet for at blive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather's not to blame for your aches and painsThe weather plays no part in the symptoms associated with either back pain or osteoarthritis, new research reveals. It's long been thought episodes of both back pain and arthritis can be triggered by changes in the weather, including temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ancient Retroviruses Emerged Half a Billion Years AgoThis viral group (ancient retrovirus) appeared hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously thought
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Housekeepers' of the brain renew themselves more quickly than first thoughtCells in the brain responsible for detecting and fixing minor damage renew themselves more quickly than previously thought, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older adults with obesity less responsive to memory training than those with lower BMIsIn first study to compare results of cognitive training by BMI category, scientists found that memory training provided only one-third the benefit to older adults with obesity than benefit it provided to older adults without obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Couch potatoes face same chance of dementia as those with genetic risk factors: ResearchSedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Current controls on alcohol marketing are not protecting youth, warn public health expertsYouth around the world are exposed to extensive alcohol marketing, experts warn, adding that current controls on that marketing appear ineffective in blocking the association between youth exposure and subsequent drinking.
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Viden

Forskere får ødelagte tænder til at gendanne sig selvMetoden kan revolutionere den måde, tandlæger lapper huller i tænderne på - ved at forskerne får ødelagte tænder til at gendanne sig selv.
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Popular Science

#DoesItFart is the burning science question you never knew you had Animals And Twitter is here to answer it A gassier, more informative version of “does it blend?”…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers develop new compound to fight cytomegalovirusA Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Testing how species respond to climate changePredicting how species will respond to climate change is a critical part of efforts to prevent widespread climate-driven extinction, or to predict its consequences for ecosystems, say scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA study finds a connection between wildfires, droughtFor centuries drought has come and gone across northern sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, water shortages have been most severe in the Sahel -- a band of semi-arid land situated just south of the Sahara Desert and stretching coast-to-coast across the continent, from Senegal and Mauritania in the west to Sudan and Eritrea in the east.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of skin cancer doesn't deter most college students who tan indoors, study showsWhite female college students in Indiana who tan indoors know they are placing themselves at risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging, but most continue to tan indoors anyway, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach to managing warfarin patients improves care, cuts costsNew performance measures have been developed for patients on warfarin that may save lives and money, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cell therapy reverses blindness in animals with end-stage retinal degenerationA stem cell-based transplantation approach that restores vision in blind mice moves closer to being tested in patients with end-stage retinal degeneration, according to a study. The researchers showed that retinal tissue derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established connections with neighboring cells and responded to light stimulation after transplantation into the host ret
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glia, not neurons, are most affected by brain agingThe difference between an old brain and a young brain isn't so much the number of neurons but the presence and function of supporting cells called glia. In a new article, researchers who examined postmortem brain samples from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 found that the state of someone's glia is so consistent through the years that it can be used to predict someone's age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark studyA landmark study has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warmer West Coast ocean conditions linked to increased risk of toxic shellfishHazardous levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin that accumulates in shellfish, have been linked to warmer ocean conditions in waters off Oregon and Washington for the first time, report scientists.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump and Space: Panel Forecasts Changes to ComeAs Trump’s “landing team” touches down at NASA, science community members mull ways to interact with politics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rate of elevated systolic blood pressure increases globally, along with associated deathsAn analysis that included 8.7 million participants finds that the rate of elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased substantially globally between 1990 and 2015, and that in 2015 an estimated 3.5 billion adults had systolic blood pressure of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg, and 874 million adults had SBP of 140 mm Hg or higher, according to a study.
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WIRED

California Floods Its Fields to Keep Its Cities From Flooding Opening the Sacramento Weir means flooding the plains to protect the state's capital from the same fate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cultural differences may leave their mark on DNASignatures of ethnicity in the genome appear to reflect an ethnic group's shared culture and environment, rather than their common genetic ancestry, report scientists. Epigenetic signatures distinguishing Mexican and Puerto Rican children in this study cannot be explained by genetic ancestry alone, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Byzantine skeleton yields 800-year-old genomes from a fatal infectionNew insight has been gained into the everyday hazards of life in the late Byzantine Empire, sometime around the early 13th century, as well as the evolution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a common bacterial pathogen.
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Viden

Sorte huller sender "spytklatter" afsted med 30 millioner km/tStjernerester som slynges væk fra det sorte hul i Mælkevejens galakse, samler sig i planetstore klatter, viser ny forskning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rise of personal technology in criminal proceedings poses risks to individuals' rightsPersonal technology such as fitness trackers and smartphones have become common companions in our daily lives. But those same devices increasingly will be used in criminal proceedings to gather evidence of criminal activity by their owners, raising questions about individuals' rights that the legal system is not yet fully prepared to address, according to a new study.
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Popular Science

Certain kinds of vaginal bacteria can actually boost HIV riskThe balance of microbes can change your susceptibility Certain bacteria that dwell in the vagina can make a woman more vulnerable to HIV.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid Arctic warming has in the past shifted Southern Ocean windsIce core records from the two poles show that during the last ice age, sharp spikes in Arctic temperatures shifted the position of winds around Antarctica - during the last ice age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Changing rainfall patterns linked to water security in IndiaChanges in precipitation, which are linked to the warming of the Indian Ocean, are the main reason for recent changes in groundwater storage in India.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Goldilocks' drug prevents chronic kidney disease in primatesA research team has developed a way to avoid ischemia/reperfusion injury of the kidney with a new monoclonal antibody that binds its target receptor in a way that is 'just right.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Retroviruses 'almost half a billion years old'Retroviruses -- the family of viruses that includes HIV -- are almost half a billion years old, according to new research. That's several hundred million years older than previously thought and suggests retroviruses have ancient marine origins, having been with their animal hosts through the evolutionary transition from sea to land. The findings will help us understand more about the continuing 'a (se tidligere artikel)
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Ancient retroviruses emerged half a billion years ago This group of viruses is hundreds of millions of years older than previously thought. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21274
(se tidligere artikel)

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alcohol prevents ability to extinguish fearful memories in miceIf the goal is to ease or extinguish fearful emotional memories like those associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol may make things worse, not better, experiments in mice suggest that. Results of their study demonstrate, they say, that alcohol strengthens emotional memories associated with fearful experiences and prevents mice from pushing aside their fears (Alcohol is bad for stress-preventing).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Consumption of low-calorie sweeteners jumps by 200 percent in US childrenAbout 25 percent of children and more than 41 percent of adults in the United States reported consuming foods and beverages containing low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) such as aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin in a recent nationwide nutritional survey, according to a study out today. Those numbers represent a 200 percent increase in LCS consumption for children and a 54 percent jump for adults from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gravitational biology: Real time imaging and transcriptome analysis of fish aboard space stationScientists report that live-imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka fish transgenic lines lead to immediate alteration of cells responsible for bone structure formation. These findings are important for assessing the effects of microgravity on long term human space missions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wearable sensor device helps visually impaired to sense their environmentA wearable assistive device has been developed for thesensor device for visually impaired, which enables them to sense their environment and move around more safely. The device, which is worn like a heart rate monitor, has been clinically tested.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New framework could help online addicts reduce their usageResearch has shown that internet addicts do not always feel guilty about their usage, and in many cases, they do not even perceive their usage as problematic. A new model could help addicts realize that their usage is a problem and reduce it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The strange double life of Dab2A scientist discovered Dab2 more than 20 years ago and has been studying its relationship to cancer ever since. But now he's found that Dab2 has been living a secret life all along -- one that could have public health implications for fighting obesity.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Chinese AI company plans to mine health data faster than rivals iCarbonX believes its cutting-edge partners and generous funding give it the upper hand. Nature 541 141 doi: 10.1038/541141a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

American effort reduced risky opioid prescriptions for veterans, study findsFewer veterans received prescriptions for risky dosages of opioid painkillers after a national initiative took aim at reducing high doses and potentially dangerous drug combinations, a new study finds. Over a two-year period, high-dose opioid prescribing declined by 16 percent, and very-high-dose opioid prescribing dropped by 24 percent. The number of patients receiving both opioids and sedatives,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggestsCDC guidelines for who should be on Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) don't go far enough because current standards could miss some people who should be on it, report experts who have developed an online PrEP risk calculator that may fill that gap.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The importance of the glutamine metabolism in colon cancerThe importance of glutamine has been made clear as a colon cancer specific metabolism. It is known that glutamine metabolism is important for pancreatic cancer, but the importance of glutamine metabolism for colon cancer has been unclear. In this study, researchers showed the importance of glutamine metabolism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Difficulty in noticing that white people are white, new study findsAs part of a new study, people had to guess what a group of three white or black actors had in common. When the common feature was race, it was discovered in a few minutes by almost all participants considering the group of black actors, but only by a few presented with the white actors.
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Futurity.org

Drop in urban density by 2050 could drive up energy use Population densities in urban areas worldwide will continue to drop until 2050 with significant consequences for energy use in buildings, according to a new forecast. “This is the first global-scale analysis of future urban densities and associated building energy use under different scenarios of urban population densities and demand for buildings,” says Burak Güneralp, research assistant profess
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Viden

Fem dimser sikrer din cykel mod tyveriOver 55.000 cykler om året bliver meldt stjålet i Danmark. Her er fem måde at sikre cyklerne bedre.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Hazardous Marine Toxin Could Rise with Warming WaterDomoic acid, occasionally found in shellfish, is a serious health risk and researchers have linked its presence with climatic phenomena (se tidligere artikel)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study reveals best states for loversIs Virginia really for lovers? Other states may have something to say about that, finds a new American study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First study to show parents' concerns about neighborhood restrict kids' outdoor playParents who are concerned about their neighborhoods restrict their children's outdoor play, new research has found for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers concerned about young people's responsibility for their work abilityYoung people in working life see themselves as solo players responsible for maintaining their own work ability. They regard themselves as holding the ball when the job requires new knowledge and motivation, according to research.
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TEDTalks (video)

The next step in nanotechnology | George TulevskiEvery year the silicon computer chip shrinks in size by half and doubles in power, enabling our devices to become more mobile and accessible. But what happens when our chips can't get any smaller? George Tulevski researches the unseen and untapped world of nanomaterials. His current work: developing chemical processes to compel billions of carbon nanotubes to assemble themselves into the patterns
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Futurity.org

Even a little heat can keep bugs from making babies Exposure to mild heat as juveniles negatively affects fruit flies’ chances of producing offspring as adults, report researchers. The findings suggest that insects are already feeling the effects of climate change, as 2016 is reported to be the hottest year on record. “While these insects don’t die because of the mild heat—they produce fewer offspring.” The research also reveals that the extent of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printing and nanotechnology, a mighty alliance to detect toxic liquidsCarbon nanotubes have made headlines in scientific journals for a long time, as has 3-D printing. But when both combine with the right polymer, in this case a thermoplastic, something special occurs: electrical conductivity increases and makes it possible to monitor liquids in real time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Criminology study links NFL players' misbehavior on, off fieldNew research has found NFL players who drew the most penalties also had more criminal arrests than their teammates.
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WIRED

And the Winner of the Volcanic Event of 2016 Is… You voted. Now let's count down the top 10 volcanic events of 2016.
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Quanta Magazine

Infant Brains Reveal How the Mind Gets Built Rebecca Saxe ’s first son, Arthur, was just a month old when he first entered the bore of an MRI machine to have his brain scanned. Saxe, a cognitive scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, went headfirst with him: lying uncomfortably on her stomach, her face near his diaper, she stroked and soothed him as the three-tesla magnet whirred around them. Arthur, unfazed, promptly fell
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Scientific American Content: Global

Drunk Mice Get the MunchiesA study in mice reveals that alcohol activates brain cells linked to hunger

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Ingeniøren

Geologer finder 52 millioner år gammel forfader til kartoflenFundet af et fossil af en 52 millioner år gammel plante fra natskyggefamilien giver forskere ny indsigt i udviklingen af nogle af vores mest basale fødevarer.
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Ingeniøren

Autoudfyldte tekstfelter i browseren kan udnyttes til at stjæle personoplysninger https://www.version2.dk/artikel/autoudfyldte-tekstfelter-browseren-kan-udnyttes-at-stjaele-personoplysninger-1071865 Brugere kan uforvarende udlevere oplysninger i Chrome, Safari og Opera-browsere. Version2
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Viden

Forskere finder 52 millioner år gamle "tomat"-fossilerFundet af to gamle fossiler af bær, der er i familie med nutidens tomater, kan være nøglen til at forstå almindelige planters udvikling.(se tidligere artikel)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biological changes could underlie higher psychosis risk in immigrantsA new study could explain how migrating to another country increases a person's risk of developing schizophrenia, by altering brain chemistry. Immigrants had higher levels of the brain chemical dopamine than non-immigrants in the study; abnormal dopamine levels are linked to symptoms of schizophrenia, say the researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More individual therapy for blood cancer patientsBecause it is impossible to predict which acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients will benefit, all patients are routinely treated with chemotherapy although only some will respond to the treatment. Researchers have now discovered a novel biomarker that enables the detection of therapy responders and non-responders with high accuracy. In addition, their research reveals new hope for patients who cu
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Scientific American Content: Global

Obama versus Trump: 5 Medical and Science StancesIn some areas the next administration's approach may be more of the same
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Legendary radio telescope hangs in the balance US National Science Foundation looks to slash funding for Puerto Rico’s Arecibo Observatory. Nature 541 143 doi: 10.1038/541143a
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New Scientist - News

Wild monkey filmed mounting deer and trying to have sex with itThe unusual inter-species sex may be down to a lack of females pushing Japanese macaques to search for pleasure elsewhere – on the backs of furry Sika deer
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Ingeniøren

Verdens største solfangeranlæg i drift i SilkeborgMed et areal på 156.694 kvadratmeter er Silkeborg Forsynings nye solfangeranlæg verdens hidtil største. Anlægget blev taget i brug kort før nytår.
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Ingeniøren

Glyphosat fundet i seks gange så mange tyske urinprøver som for 15 år sidenFra 2001 til 2015 er koncentrationen af sprøjtemidlet glyphosat steget markant i især mænds urin, viser tal fra det tyske miljøagentur UPB.
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Futurity.org

Could better sleep prevent gestational diabetes? A new study links short sleep during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus—suggesting that addressing sleep concerns during pregnancy could potentially reduce the risk of developing GDM diabetes. GDM, which is diagnosed by high blood glucose levels, is one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. Unmanaged high glucose levels in pregnancy can result in complications that can affect both
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-invasive screening method reveals important properties of pharmaceutical tabletsInformation on significant properties of pharmaceutical tablets, such as their mechanical strength and dissolution, can now be obtained without resorting to the conventional, time-consuming and destructive testing methods, according to a new study. A new structural descriptive parameter based on terahertz (THz) time-domain techniques allow for a non-invasive detection of pharmaceutical tablet para
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

2D materials enhance a 3D worldIn the past decade 2D materials have captured the fascination of a steadily increasing number of scientists. These materials, whose defining feature is having a thickness of only one to very few atoms, can be made of a variety of different elements or combinations thereof. Scientists’ enchantment with 2D materials began with a winning experiment: creating a 2D material using a lump of graphite and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insects feel the heat: Scientists reveal rise in temperature affects ability to reproduceEven a mild rise in temperature damages insect's ability to reproduce, new research indicates. Insect populations in high latitude countries are the worst affected. Identifying genes linked to increased and decreased reproduction may help understand how insects cope with climate change and controlling insect pests, say the scientists. (se tidligere artikel)
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Spinning toy reinvented as low-tech centrifuge Hand-powered device can process blood samples and separate out parasites such as those that cause malaria. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21273 (se tidligere artikel)
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Futurity.org

Deepest X-ray image ever is chock-full of black holes Astronomers are getting their best look yet at black holes by studying the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. About 70 percent of the objects in the new image, from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory , are supermassive black holes. “With this one amazing picture, we can explore the earliest days of black holes in the universe and see how they change over billions of years.” “With this one amazing p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurons modulate the growth of blood vesselsA team of researchers shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. By detailed series of experiments, they proved that blood vessel growth is modulated by neurons and not, as assumed so far, through a control mechanism of the vessel cells among each other. The results are groundbreaking for research into and treatment of vascular diseases, tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identification of autophagy-dependent secretion machineryA group of researchers identified a molecular machinery by which autophagy mediates secretion. These results underscore an important role of autophagy other than degradation, and will bring us to future translational research of medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease may benefit from boosting niacin in diet, research suggestsA new study is strengthening the therapeutic potential for dietary interventions in Parkinson's disease, - these patients may benefit from a boost in niacin, which is found in some nuts and meat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cocaine users make riskier decisions after losing a gamblePeople addicted to cocaine make riskier decisions than healthy people after losing a potential reward, according to a study. In the study, researchers show that this heightened sensitivity to loss (losing a potential reward) displayed by the cocaine users correlated with an exaggerated decrease in a part of the brain that processes rewards.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scrapping excessive neural connection helps build new connectionsNeural activity that retracts excessive early innervation in a certain pathway helps make late neural connections in a different pathway, research has found. This may provide a self-organizing mechanism of neural connections, and additionally, early excessive innervation may serve as a guide for making late neural connections.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Polar Bear Conservation Plan Calls Climate Change "the Primary Threat" to Their SurvivalThe new plan from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also addresses human-polarbear conflict, subsistence hunting and oil spills
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WIRED

Let’s Learn Some Physics Playing With Compound Pulleys Humans use compound pulleys all the time. They are based on the work-energy principle. Here is a physics based explanation of this type of simple machine.
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Ingeniøren

Svindel med grøn støtteordning skaber politisk kaos i NordirlandMisbrug af støtteordning til grøn varme kan udløse nyvalg i Nordirland.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Hubble Charts Cosmic Course for Voyager ProbesAnalysis reveals gas clouds the spacecraft will encounter in thousands of years --
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Videnskabens Verden

Et par gange hver millioner år sker der noget virkelig drastisk på vores jord når polerne bytter plads. Med en ny computersimulation har vi fået et bedre indblik i hvordan det sker. Tilrettelæggelse: Kristoffer Frøkjær-Jensen og Marie Hougaard. www.dr.dk/p1/videnskabensverden
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump and Congress Could Halt State Action on ClimateThe new Republican-controlled federal government could use “preemption” to restrict state and local environmental protections -
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Scientific American Content: Global

Your Dog Remembers Even More about What You Do Than You ThinkA canine demonstration of “episodic memory”
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Dagens Medicin

Overlæge får fængselsstraf for voldtægt af reservelægeEn enig domsmandsret har i dag kendt en tidligere overlæge på Slagelse Sygehus skyldig for voldtægter af en yngre reservelæge. Dommen er anket.
9h
Ingeniøren

Alle Sikorsky S-92 får flyveforbudHelikopterproducenten har tirsdag eftermiddag udsendt et inspektionsdirektiv for samtlige Sikorsky S-92 på verdensplan, efter at problemer med halerotoren fik en norsk helikopter til at rotere 180 grader under en nødlanding.
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Where science and nonsense collide After a decade of progress, Argentina’s scientists are battling a government bent on twisting public conceptions of their role, writes Alberto Kornblihtt. Nature 541 135 doi: 10.1038/541135a
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Must Learn How to Talk about Science--FastBetter explanations and more facts don’t lead to understanding, so communicators need research to figure out what actually works --
9h
New Scientist - News

Norway is first country to turn off FM radio and go digital-onlyFrom this week, Norway will start switching off its national FM network, forcing people to switch to digital audio broadcasting (DAB) or miss out
10h
WIRED

Pop a Wheelie With the Daredevil Bikers of London Wheelies, burnouts and more—all without a helmet. And the photographer wasn't any safer.
10h
WIRED

Luxembourg’s Bid to Become the Silicon Valley of Space Mining In 2016, Luxembourg began taking steps toward dominating the asteroid mining industry, and so potentially the flow of cash and commodities beyond Earth. /
10h
WIRED

Car Dealers Are Dangerously Uneducated About New Safety Features A new report says that's a big problem for safety.
10h
WIRED

How ‘Dumpster Fire’ Became 2016’s Word of the Year At a loss for words to encapsulate the last 12 months? The linguists are here to help.
10h
WIRED

Jeff Sessions’ Attorney General Hearing: 3 Questions Senators Must Ask If history is a predictor, today's confirmation hearing of Sen. Jeff Sessions won't go as smoothly as President-elect Trump would hope.
10h
WIRED

John Kelly’s Homeland Security Hearing: 3 Questions Congress Must Ask President-elect Trump's pick for Homeland Security head gets grilled by the Senate today. Here's what they need to ask first.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

U.N. Climate Fund Could Take a Big Hit if Trump Keeps Election PromiseThe U.S. has only handed over $500 million of its $3-billion pledge to help developing countries deal with global warming
10h
Science : NPR

Warming Oceans Could Boost Dangerous Toxin In Your Shellfish Dinner A new study finds a link between warming waters and a dangerous neurotoxin that builds up in species like Dungeness crabs, clams and mussels — and can be hazardous, even fatal in people who eat them (se tidligere artikel)
10h
Dagens Medicin

Projekt for psykisk syge skal finde bedste model på tværs af sektorerNyt projekt skal finde den bedste samarbejdsmodel på tværs af sektorer for at reducere overdødelighed blandt borgere med psykisk lidelse.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Kvote 2-test sorterer kvinder fra medicinstudietSelvom dobbelt så mange kvinder som mænd søger optagelse via kvote 2 på medicinstudiet på SDU, ender studiet med at optage lidt flere mænd end kvinder. Det er en test i optagelsesrunden, der sorterer kvinderne fra og som er diskriminerende, mener chef i Danmarks Evalueringsinstitut.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Do DIY Brain-Booster Devices Work?Zapping the cranium may juice up neuron circuits, and use is rising—but there might be a cognitive price -- (se tidligere artikel)
10h
Ingeniøren

Center for Cybersikkerhed: Ingen har overblik over angreb rettet mod Danmark I Sverige blev det for nylig opgjort, at over 100.000 hackerangreb fra andre stater rammer landet hvert år. Men i Danmark er der ingen, der på samme måde kan lave et overslag over angreb mod landet, siger chefen for Center for Cybersikkerhed. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/center-cybersikkerhed-ingen-har-overblik-angreb-rettet-mod-danmark-1071859 Version2
11h
Ingeniøren

Nytårsaftens skudsekund lammede canadiske nødradioerRadioerne hos politi og beredskab i Montreal gik ned nytårsaften, fordi årsskiftet medførte et skudsekund.
11h
WIRED

The Paperfuge: A 20-Cent Device That Could Transform Health Care The Paperfuge is a hand-powered centrifuge made of paper, string, and plastic that can spin biological samples at up to 125,000 rpm.
11h
WIRED

Jean Jullien, Creator of the ‘Peace for Paris’ Symbol, Drops a Clever Book If the book has a meta-narrative, it has to do with the inescapable silliness that comes with being human.
11h
New Scientist - News

Mini-brains made from teeth help reveal what makes us sociableTiny balls of brain tissue made from donated stem cells from children with autism or a condition that makes them hyper-sociable show intriguing differences
11h
Science : NPR

Travel To The Moon With David Bowie (360° Video) See panoramic views of a trip to the moon in Skunk Bear's latest video. It's a journey that spans David Bowie's long career — and his greatest hits serve as the soundtrack
11h
Dagens Medicin

Danskernes alkoholforbrug koster kommuner milliarderNy rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen viser, at udover at et højt alkoholforbrug har store omkostninger for den, der drikker, så koster det kommunerne mange penge.
11h
Ingeniøren

IPhone fylder 10: Er gamechangeren blevet en bremse for Apple? https://www.version2.dk/artikel/steve-jobs-fremviste-foerste-iphone-10-aar-siden-1071531 Det er 10 år siden, Steve Jobs første gang holdt en iPhone op i strakt arm. Han forandrede dermed hele smartphone-markedet. Men spørgsmålet er, om det er forandret så meget, at Apple nu bliver hægtet af. Version2
12h
Ingeniøren

Verdens letteste og stærkeste materiale med grafenMed en tæthed på bare 5 procent af stål, men 10 gange større styrke - et nyt svampelignende materiale er skabt ved at sammenpresse små flager af grafen.
12h
Viden

Forskere finder Jordens "manglende" grundstofJapanske forskere har identificeret det manglende grundstof i Jordens kerne: Silicium.
12h
Viden

Googles selvkørende biler kommer på vejene i denne månedSelskabets bildivision Waymo har annonceret, at deres selvkørende minivans lanceres i USA snart.
12h
Science : NPR

Humans Worry About Self-Driving Cars. Maybe It Should Be The Reverse Self-driving cars will perform rationally. For example: stop when someone is in their way. Research suggests humans will take advantage, and step into an intersection when they know they shouldn't.
12h
New Scientist - News

Why Uber’s human drivers aren’t out of a job just yetUber is racing to make autonomous cabs a reality, but public confidence about safety is stuck in the slow lane, says Uber driver Daniel Matthews
12h
Dagens Medicin

Første biosimilære version af Mabthera tættere på europæisk lanceringTruxima har samme effekt, kvalitet og sikkerhed som Mabthera, mener EMA’s komité for humane lægemidler, CHMP.
13h
Ingeniøren

Varmere og varmere - 2016 satte ny rekordJordens gennemsnitstemperatur var 0,2 grader højere i 2016 end i 2015 - det hidtil varmeste år.
13h
Ingeniøren


14h
Ingeniøren

Fremtidens traktorer kører på dataDigitaliseringen er nødvendig, hvis levestandarden skal fastholdes. Data, satellitter og robotter bliver landmandens nye værktøjer.
15h
Ingeniøren

App-firma: Rigide udbudsrammer avler en helt forkert måde at lave it på https://www.version2.dk/artikel/appfirma-rigide-udbudsrammer-avler-helt-forkert-maade-at-lave-it-paa-1071287 Det offentlige er ofte alt for lammet af rigide udbud, mener app-firma, der rutinemæssigt undgår fastpris-projekter hos staten. Version2
16h
Ingeniøren

Forsinket signaludstyr redder DSB fra pladsmangel og aflysningerMangel på IC4-tog betyder pladsmangel og aflysninger i 2017. Men den elektronik til nye signaler, der skal installeres på alle DSB-tog, er sideløbende blevet forsinket - og det redder paradoksalt nok situationen.
18h
ArXiv Query

Deep driven fMRI decoding of visual categoriesDeep neural networks have been developed drawing inspiration from the brain visual pathway, implementing an end-to-end approach: from image data to video object classes. However building an fMRI decoder with the typical structure of Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), i.e. learning multiple level of representations, seems impractical due to lack of brain data. As a possible solution, this work pre
20h
ArXiv Query

How Mathematics can help in sensing instantaneous physiological information from photoplethysmography in a fast and reliable wayDespite the population of the noninvasive, economic, comfortable, and easy-to-install photoplethysmography (PPG) sensor, a mathematically rigorous and stable algorithm to simultaneously extract the fundamental physiological information, including the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) and the instantaneous respiratory rate (IRR), from the single-channel PPG signal is lacking. A novel signal processing
20h
ArXiv Query

Associative pattern recognition through macro-molecular self-assemblyWe show that macro-molecular self-assembly can recognize and classify high-dimensional patterns in the concentrations of $N$ distinct molecular species. Similar to associative neural networks, the recognition here leverages dynamical attractors to recognize and reconstruct partially corrupted patterns. Traditional parameters of pattern recognition theory, such as sparsity, fidelity, and capacity a
20h
ArXiv Query

Extracting the Groupwise Core Structural Connectivity Network: Bridging Statistical and Graph-Theoretical ApproachesFinding the common structural brain connectivity network for a given population is an open problem, crucial for current neuro-science. Recent evidence suggests there's a tightly connected network shared between humans. Obtaining this network will, among many advantages , allow us to focus cognitive and clinical analyses on common connections, thus increasing their statistical power. In turn, knowl
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Warming world harming insects' reproduction, says studyA warming world is harming insects ability to reproduce, which could have long-term consequences, scientists warn.(se tidligere artikel)
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Primate tool-use: Chimpanzees make drinking sticksCritically endangered chimpanzees in Ivory Coast craft extra-absorbent drinking sticks, researchers observe.
(se tidligere artikel)

20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

New candidate for 'missing element' in Earth's coreScientists believe they have established the identity of a "missing element" (silicium) in the Earth's core.
(se tidligere artikel om silicium)

20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two years, multiple doctors often needed to diagnose polycystic ovary syndrome, study showsPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder – and most common cause of infertility – affecting 9 to 18 percent of women around the world. Despite the prevalence of the complex and chronic condition, one-third of women diagnosed with PCOS saw at least three health professionals over the course of two years before receiving a diagnosis, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What teeth reveal about the lives of modern humansWhen anthropologists of the future find our fossilized teeth, what will they be able to conclude about our lives? One researcher has an idea.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What did Big Data find when it analysed 150 years of British history?What could be learned about the world if you could read the news from over 100 local newspapers for a period of 150 years? This is what a team of Artificial Intelligence (AI) researchers have done, together with a social scientist and a historian, who had access to 150 years of British regional newspapers.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain cell powerhouses appear good treatment target for stroke, TBI recoveryCell powerhouses are typically long and lean, but with brain injury such as stroke or trauma, they can quickly become bloated and dysfunctional, say scientists who documented the phenomena in real time for the first time in a living brain.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly proposed reference datasets improve weather satellite data qualityResearchers have proposed in-orbit reference datasets for calibrating weather satellites. A recent presentation demonstrated that using these references reduced errors in microwave and infrared weather satellites to fractions of a degree Celsius.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Short-lived greenhouse gases cause centuries of sea-level riseEven if there comes a day when the world completely stops emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, coastal regions and island nations will continue to experience rising sea levels for centuries afterward, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transfusions of 'old' blood may harm some patientsBlood transfusions with the oldest blood available could be harmful for some patients, finds a team of researchers. Old blood not good - investigators recommend reducing the maximum blood storage limit from six to five weeks.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a moon slows the decay of Pluto's atmosphereA new study provides additional insight into relationship between Pluto and its moon, Charon, and how it affects the continuous stripping of Pluto's atmosphere by solar wind. When Charon is positioned between the sun and Pluto, the research indicates that the moon can significantly reduce atmospheric loss.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Model sheds light on inhibitory neurons' computational roleResearchers have developed a new computational model of a neural circuit in the brain, which could shed light on the biological role of inhibitory neurons -- neurons that keep other neurons from firing.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Appendix may have important function, new research suggestsThe human appendix, a narrow pouch that projects off the cecum in the digestive system, has a notorious reputation for its tendency to become inflamed (appendicitis), often resulting in surgical removal. Although it is widely viewed as a vestigial organ with little known function, recent research suggests that the appendix (blindtarmen) may serve an important purpose. In particular, it may serve as a reservoir





21h
Futurity.org

This app uses a game to fight depression A game-based app for phones and tablets called Project: EVO seems to help older adults with depression feel better by targeting underlying cognitive conditions, such as attention and focus, according to two recent studies. “We found that moderately depressed people do better with apps like this because they address or treat correlates of depression,” says Patricia Areán, a University of Washingto


22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prostate cancer treatment rates drop, reflecting change in screening recommendationsAs some national guidelines now recommend against routine prostate cancer screening, the overall rate of men receiving treatment for the disease declined 42 percent, a new study finds.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some catalysts contribute their own oxygen for reactionsNew research shows that metal-oxide catalysts can sometimes release oxygen from within their structure, enhancing chemical activity.
22h
WIRED

Why Trello, a Simple To-Do App, Is Worth $425 Million Atlassian will pay nearly a half-billion dollars for the popular project management app Trello. It's worth every penny.
23h
Science : NPR

Scientists Predict Star Collision Visible To The Naked Eye In 2022 If it happens, it would be the first time such an event was predicted by scientists. They say two stars in the constellation Cygnus will eventually merge and explode. (Image credit: NASA/IPAC/MSX )
23h
cognitive science

Patrick Winston: Brains, Minds and Machines submitted by /u/Transhumanist45
1d
WIRED

The Internet Won’t Let Trump Get Away With Insulting Meryl Streep There are certain things you just can't do.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Obama Makes the Case for His Clean Energy Legacy"Near-term politics aside" President expresses confidence that shift toward low-carbon fuels will continue --

1dWIRED

Lego’s Boost Kit Turns Your Bricks Into Robots. Robots We'll repeat that: Lego robots.
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Futurity.org

How invasive species are like drunk people walking A theory that uses the mathematics of a drunken walk may describe ecological invasions better than waves do. The ability to predict the movement of an ecological invasion is important because it determines how resources should be spent to stop an invasion in its tracks. The spread of disease such as the black plague in Europe or the spread of an invasive species such as the gypsy moth from Asia a
1d
WIRED

A Mysterious Killer Algae Just Got a Little Less Puzzling A new study makes a pivotal connection: A killer algae gets particularly toxic in masses of warm Pacific waters like El Niño.
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Popular Science

Cramming in all your exercise on the weekend is still good for your health Health ‘Weekend warriors’ are still getting healthy According to a study published this week in JAMA, getting the recommended hours of exercise that the World Health Organization recommends in just two days still provides…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists report E-selective macrocyclic ring-closing metathesisUsing ring-closing metathesis to exploit the properties of carbon-carbon double bonds, researchers have developed a new catalytic approach for the preparation of compounds essential to drug discovery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fear of diagnostic low-dose radiation exposure is overstated, experts assertResearchers assert that exposure to medical radiation does not increase a person's risk of getting cancer. The long-held belief that even low doses of radiation, such as those received in diagnostic imaging, increase cancer risk is based on an inaccurate, 70-year-old hypothesis, according to the authors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older adults with arthritis need just 45 minutes of activity per weekOlder adults who suffer from arthritis need to keep moving to be functionally independent. But in an examination of a goal that is daunting for most of this aging population, a new study found that performing even a third (45 minutes) of the recommended activity is beneficial, and those who did improved function in their lower arthritic limbs by 80 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New findings detail structure of immature Zika virusResearchers have determined the high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus, a step toward better understanding how the virus infects host cells and spreads.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crohn's disease risk and prognosis determined by different genesResearchers have identified a series of genetic variants that affect the severity of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease -- but surprisingly, none of these variants appear to be related to an individual's risk of developing the condition in the first place.
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Popular Science

Warmer oceans are now linked to dangerous neurotoxins in shellfish Environment New research could help forecast deadly toxin outbreaks New research could help forecast deadly outbreaks of the neurotoxin domoic acid, which is produced by algal blooms in warm water…(se tidligere artikel om warmer oceans)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientist probes tiny world of the fruit fly to discover sleep/eating/activity connectionThe humble fruit fly has proved to be a fruitful research subject for a neuroscientist team. The collaborators’ research into their behavior has helped expand our understanding of some important neurobiological connections between eating and sleep — including the infamous “food coma” felt after a big meal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recognize sepsis as a separate cause of illness and deathSepsis should be recognized as a separate cause of illness and death around the world. This focus would help efforts to prevent sepsis by improving hygiene, nutrition and vaccination rates and also lead to timely treatment, better outcomes and quality of life for people with sepsis, argue researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Weekend warriors' have lower risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular diseasePhysical activity patterns characterized by just one or two sessions a week may be enough to reduce deaths in men and women from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, regardless of adherence to physical activity guidelines, a new study of over 63,000 adults reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Place matters in late diagnosis of colorectal cancer, study findsIn addition to a person's race or ethnicity, where they live can matter in terms of whether they are diagnosed at a late stage for colorectal cancer, according to a recent study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A possible solution to a long-standing riddle in materials scienceAn international team of scientists may have solved the 30-year-old riddle of why certain ferroelectric crystals exhibit extremely strong piezoelectric responses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children are more apt to confess misdeeds if they think parents will react positivelyEven if they believe they could be punished, older kids are more likely than younger children to view confessing to a misdeed as the right thing to do.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered phytoplankton groups appear to favor warmer oceansAn international research team has discovered two phytoplankton groups -- unlike any known species -- in climate-sensitive areas around the world. While they appear relatively rare compared to other phytoplankton, scientists say their prevalence in warm waters suggests they could be important in future ocean ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers reveal how cancer cells cope with genetic chaosScientists have uncovered how tumors are able to grow despite significant damage to the structure and number of their chromosomes, the storage units of DNA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New model predicts when people are willing to try new thingsA new model to predict when people are most likely to try different products and try new things has been developed by scientists. The research could help to direct public health interventions aimed at encouraging healthier choices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can big data yield big ideas? Blend novel and familiar, new study findsStruggling to get your creative juices flowing for a new idea or project? A new study sheds light on the secret sauce to developing creative ideas, and it all comes down to word choice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secret new weapon of insect-transmitted viruses exposedFindings by a team of scientists could provide critical knowledge to attack deadly viruses transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitoes and aphids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reducing drug dosage, and hearing loss in TB patients without reducing efficacyAminoglycosides, recommended by the World Health Organization to treat multidrug resistant tuberculosis, cause hearing loss and kidney damage in a dose dependent manner. Now, by reducing the dose in a carefully calculated fashion, clinician researchers have been able to greatly reduce the numbers of patients suffering hearing loss (from aminoglycoside treatment), without compromising effectiveness against tuberculosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Massive genetic study of humpback whales to inform conservation assessmentsScientists have published one of the largest genetic studies ever conducted on the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) for the purpose of clarifying management decisions in the Southern Hemisphere and supporting calls to protect unique and threatened populations, according to experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Role of common risk factors in ER-positive, ER-negative breast cancerResearchers have examined the role of common risk factors in the development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. The study sheds new light on how a woman’s age, weight, and menopausal status affect her risk for breast cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prostate cancer team cracks genetic code to show why inherited disease can turn lethalProstate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why high-dose vitamin C kills cancer cellsCancer researchers have homed in on how high-dose vitamin C kills cancer cells. Vitamin C breaks down to generate hydrogen peroxide, which can damage tissue and DNA. The new study shows that tumor cells with low levels of catalase enzyme activity are much less capable of removing hydrogen peroxide than normal cells, and are more susceptible to damage and death when they are exposed to high doses o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain impairments in premature infants may begin in the wombEven before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Obama says shift to green energy is 'irreversible' despite TrumpRenewable energy will continue to grow in the US despite the antipathy of the incoming Trump administration.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Asian Dove That Ate Europe AliveThe story behind one of Europe's most familiar columbiforms...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Practical and versatile microscopic optomechanical device createdResearchers have developed a new type of optomechanical device that uses a microscopic silicon disk to confine optical and mechanical waves. The new device is highly customizable and compatible with commercial manufacturing processes, making it a practical solution for improving sensors that detect force and movement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Caribbean bats need 8 million years to recover from recent extinction wavesCan nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain bat diversity as before human arrival ? To answer these questions, a research team compiled data on Caribbean bats and their close relatives.
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Viden

Nu skal fodbold hjælpe kvinder med brystkræftFodbold gavner mænd med prostatakræft. Nyt forskningsprojekt skal vise, om kræftramte kvinder også kan få gavn af driblinger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Barriers to sexual health among male teens and young menResearchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population’s use of sexual and reproductive health care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neural connection keeps instincts in checkScientists have identified the physical connection through which the prefrontal cortex inhibits instinctive behavior, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insights into mechanisms of breast cancer development and resistance to therapyWhy does breast cancer develop and how come certain patients are resistant to established therapies? Researchers have gained new insights into the molecular processes in breast tissue. They identified the tumor suppressor LATS as a key player in the development and treatment of breast cancer.


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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How Earth's previous moons collided to form the moon: New theoryA new theory suggests the Moon we see every night is not Earth's first moon, but rather the last in a series of moons that orbited our planet. Moons formed through the process could cross orbits, collide and merge, slowly building the bigger moon we see today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hidden seeds reveal Canary Islands historyHave you tried the national dish gofio while on holiday on the Canary Islands? If so, you have eaten the same food as the original inhabitants ate, nearly 2,000 years ago. The island farmers of Canary Island have cultivated the same types of grain for over a thousand years.
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WIRED

Thanks to AI, Computers Can Now See Your Health Problems Machine learning is helping doctors diagnose things like genetic disorders, Alzheimer's, and autism faster than ever before. The post Thanks to AI, Computers Can Now See Your Health Problems appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Crystallization method offers new option for carbon capture from ambient airScientists have found a simple, reliable process to capture carbon dioxide directly from ambient air, offering a new option for carbon capture and storage strategies to combat global warming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spinning spider silk is now possibleBeing able to produce artificial spider silk has long been a dream of many scientists, but all attempts have until now involved harsh chemicals and have resulted in fibers of limited use. Now, a team of researchers has, step by step, developed a method that works. Today they report that they can produce kilometer long threads of artificial spider silk that for the first time resemble real spider silk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How on Earth does geotagging work?Computing science researchers are using automated geotagging models to put a place to online data and documents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

GaN-on-Silicon for scalable high electron mobility transistorsScientists have advanced gallium nitride (GaN)-on-silicon transistor technology by optimizing the composition of the semiconductor layers that make up the device. The team created the high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure on a 200 mm silicon substrate with a process that will scale to larger industry-standard wafer sizes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uunique microbial photosynthesis discoveredResearchers have discovered a new type of cooperative photosynthesis that could be used in engineering microbial communities for waste treatment and bioenergy production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heartburn pills in pregnancy may be linked to childhood asthmaChildren born to mothers who take heartburn medication during pregnancy may have a greater risk of developing asthma, research suggests. Advice for expectant moms should not change based on these findings, the researchers say, but further studies are needed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bilingualism may save brain resources as you ageA research team established that years of bilingualism change how the brain carries out tasks that require concentrating on one piece of information without becoming distracted by other information. This makes the brain more efficient and economical with its resources.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Exoplanet Revolution Turns 25Astronomers confirmed the first planets beyond our solar system a quarter-century ago5
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Landmark global scale study reveals potential future impact of ocean acidificationOcean acidification and the extent to which marine species are able to deal with low pH levels in the Earth's seas, could have a significant influence on shifting the distribution of marine animals in response to climate warming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Backpackers demonstrated resounding leadership in aftermath of Nepal earthquakeA first-of-its-kind study exploring the experiences of tourists exposed to a natural disaster immediately in its aftermath reveals four dominant themes: emotional turmoil, quick recovery, springing into action, and connection to the army.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hydropower in China impacts the flow of the Mekong RiverThe hydropower projects in China have caused major river flow changes to the Mekong River since the year 2011. An analysis of river flows in Northern Thailand indicates that the hydropower operations considerably increased dry season flows and decreased wet season flows. Furthermore, the study shows that the dry season flows have also become increasingly variable.
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New Scientist - News

Nissan uses NASA rover tech to remotely oversee autonomous carCar-maker Nissan demonstrates an autonomous driving system developed with NASA that calls on human teleoperators to help when unexpected situations arise
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Findings showing Roundup causes disease puts glyphosate back under the spotlightCutting edge techniques show low-dose, long-term exposure to Roundup (glyphosate) causes liver disease in rats, new research confirms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Catheter safeguards at hospitals reduce infections and save money, study showsU.S. hospitals are reducing bloodstream infections related to catheters by implementing rigorous safeguards that also save millions of healthcare dollars each year, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wanting to stay in education is 'not main reason why women delay having children'Researchers calculate that for every extra year of educational enrollment after the age of 12, a woman delayed motherhood by an average of six months. However, strikingly, they also find that the main influence on whether a woman postpones having children is largely associated with her family background. Education alone contributes to only 1.5 months, they say.
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Popular Science

These adorable birds are sexual nomads—and that helps protect their speciesWhy compete for a lady’s love when you can travel hundreds of miles and find a new one? They’ll go the whole wide world…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Brexit May Spark British Brain DrainBreak from EU drives U.K. academics to think about leaving, survey finds

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Futurity.org

It’s not clear why extreme tornado outbreaks are on the rise The increase in large-scale tornado outbreaks in the US doesn’t appear to be clearly linked to climate change, a new study suggests. The new findings tie the growth in frequency to trends in the vertical wind shear found in certain supercells—a change not so far associated with a warmer climate. “Either the recent increases are not due to a warming climate, or a warming climate has implications f (se tidligere artikel - tornado)
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Viden

Fuglenørden Sebastian Klein er besat af sjældne fugleSom barn ville Sebastian Klein se rovdyr. En tur ud i naturen lærte ham, at det var nemmere at spotte fugle.
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Futurity.org

Watch nanotubes wriggle to form a bridge Researchers inspired by a high-wire act and fly fishing have coaxed strings of synthetic DNA to build microscopic bridges between molecules on the surface of a lab dish. They describe this process, which could someday be used to connect electronic medical devices to living cells, in the journal Nature Nanotechnology . Senior author Rebecca Schulman, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecula
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The science of baby's first sightScientists have found more clues about the evolving brains of baby mammals as eyesight comes online. Using an imaging system to get neuron-level resolution, they showed how one specific brain circuit -- the 'ventral stream' -- in mice came online immediately after birth, but another circuit -- the 'dorsal stream' -- needed visual stimuli in order to mature. The experiments have helped to unveil ho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High rates of PTSD and other mental health problems after great east Japan earthquakeThe devastating 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and resulting nuclear disaster in Japan had a high mental health impact -- with some effects persisting several years later, according to a comprehensive research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For chemicals, mega is out and bio is inEngineers propose that the future of chemical production lies in decentralized biomanufacturing facilities that will push innovation and achieve efficiency not possible at today's megaplants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Epigenetic changes promote development of fatty liver in mouse and humanMice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. Such changes in DNA methylation are also detectable in humans with fatty liver and suggest a similar causal chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough in MS treatmentThree studies have discovered that ocrelizumab can significantly reduce new attacks in patients with relapsing MS sclerosis, as well as slow the progression of symptoms caused by primary progressive MS.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nonsurgical and surgical treatments provide successful outcomes for an Achilles tearSuccessful outcomes for an Achilles tendon tear with either minimally invasive surgery or nonsurgical bracing with a removable boot, especially in recreational athletes.
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Popular Science

We might get to watch a new star explode into the sky in 2022 Space Scientists predict a new star will be born in a massive cosmic collision Scientists think that we may see a new star in the sky in five years, thanks to a massive cosmic explosion…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An ecological invasion mimics a drunken walkA theory that uses the mathematics of a drunken walk describes ecological invasions better than waves, according to a new study.
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Popular Science

The iPhone was announced 10 years ago. Here's how Twitter reacted back then. Gadgets From iLoveIt to iThinkIt'sTooBig 10 years ago, Steve Jobs showed off the first iPhone to the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impact of parent physical activity, sedentary behavior on their preschool childrenYoung children do follow in their parents' footsteps. Literally. That's the conclusion of researchers who found that in underserved populations, parents' physical activity -- and their sedentary behavior -- directly correlates with the activity level of their preschoolers. Researchers say these findings could lead to interventions that focus more on helping parents model -- not just encourage -- a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Rich Countries Dominate Climate ResearchThe imbalance may make it harder for poorer nations to participate effectively in the Paris climate agreement --
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TEDTalks (video)

A better way to talk about love | Mandy Len CatronIn love, we fall. We're struck, we're crushed, we swoon. We burn with passion. Love makes us crazy and makes us sick. Our hearts ache, and then they break. Talking about love in this way fundamentally shapes how we experience it, says writer Mandy Len Catron. In this talk for anyone who's ever felt crazy in love, Catron highlights a different metaphor for love that may help us find more joy -- and
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New Scientist - News

Gene-silencing spray lets us modify plants without changing DNAA single application keeps working for nearly a month, which could allow us to modify plants without actually altering their DNA
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New Scientist - News

Why mums and babies prefer to keep to one side of each otherMothers prefer to hold children on the left, and animal young prefer to approach their mother from one side, too. Asymmetry in the brain may explain why
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New Scientist - News

‘Alien megastructure’ signal may be due to star eating a planetTabby’s star’s odd blinking and fading has been put down to alien signals and swarms of comets, but devouring a planet could explain everything
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mother-baby bonding insight revealedScientists say mothers hold babies on the left to help in bonding - and this is not unique to humans.(se tidligere artikel - on the left)
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Scientific American Content: Global

Am I Addicted to Climbing Rocks?The science on that question is mixed, but for me it feels more like a form of meditation
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Ingeniøren

Omstridte Uber offentliggør trafikdata på nyt website https://www.version2.dk/1071528 Uber Movement skal ifølge Uber selv hjælpe lokale myndigheder med at forbedre de trafikale forhold i byerne. Version2
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemicals in ubiquitous Mediterranean plants may hold key to delaying neurodegenerative diseases, study suggestsChemicals extracted from the prickly pear and brown seaweed, two ubiquitous Mediterranean plants, eased symptoms in organisms suffering from neurodegenerative disease, according to new research. Small molecules from the plants interfere with the build-up of sticky protein clumps rendering them less toxic to neurons. The results of the study hold promise for ground-breaking treatment of age-related
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New categorization of food scares will help efficient development of strategies to prevent food chain being compromisedA new categorization of food scares has been developed by experts. Existing categorizations were found to be too simplistic, not recognizing contributing factors, they say. The researchers propose that the term ‘food scare’ is redefined to take into account consumers’ distrust in the food supply chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefitsThe rollout of Sweden’s first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use – namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.


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Futurity.org

Brain scans of kids overturn idea that tissue stops growing New research seems to contradict a central thought in neuroscience: the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives—from too much to just enough. For the first time, scientists found microscopic tissue growth in the brain continues in regions that also show changes in function. The group made this finding by looking at the brains of an often-overlooked participant pool: chil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experiments in mice may help boost newly FDA-approved therapy for spinal muscular atrophyAcademic and drug industry investigators say they have identified a new biological target for treating spinal muscular atrophy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The fly reveals a new signal involved in limb growthMany of the secrets of life, such as how we become a certain size and shape, have been uncovered in studies performed over more than 100 years and involving animal models such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Now, researchers disclose a new signal that participates in the specification and growth of fly wings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fixing overuse, underuse of medical care can improve health and save moneyInternational experts have pinpointed how reforming the overuse and underuse of health and medical services around the world can improve health outcomes and stem spiraling costs of health care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychology essential to achieving goals of patient-centered medical homesPsychologists can offer critical experience and expertise in strengthening the increasingly common model of coordinated health care, the patient-centered medical home, helping to achieve the 'triple aim' of improved outcomes, decreased cost and enhanced patient experience, according to new research.
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WIRED

Fiddler Crabs Use Their Giant Claw For the Two F’s: Fightin’ And Flirtin’ One of fiddler crab's claws comes way, way bigger than the other—totally naturally. So it can fight and flirt, of course.
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Ingeniøren

Pacemakere skal drives af solceller placeret under hudenSchweiziske læger og fysikere har testet solceller, der kan lægges under huden og generere en effekt, der langt overgår behovet for at drive eksempelvis en pacemaker. Det kan gøre batterier overflødige.


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Viden

Størstedelen af verdens koralrev risikerer at dø inden år 210099 procent af klodens koralrev vil inden udgangen af dette århundrede være døende på grund af koralblegning, viser ny forskning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast fine art: 19th century painting tricks revealedTo paint quickly while creating exceptional texture and volume effects, J. M. W. Turner and other English artists of his generation relied on the development of innovative gels. All the rage in the 19th century -- and still in use today--these compounds alter the properties of the oil paints they are combined with. Now, researchers have finally learned the chemical secrets behind these mixtures. L
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High cholesterol intake and eggs do not increase risk of memory disordersA relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, no association was found in persons carrying the APOE4 gene variant that affects cholesterol metabolism and increases the risk of memory disorders, report researchers at conclusion of a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Rise and Fall of a Shrimp BiologistWhen you mix science and politics and disrupt the social order, you had better be ready for some lowbrow playground antics -
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New Scientist - News

The trunk trick that lets elephants pick up almost anythingKelly the elephant has shown how trunks can grip and lift anything from fine granules to 350-kilogram logs – it’s all in the kink
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New unknown risk factor for arteriosclerosis identifiedFollowing a blood infection, the first class of antibodies produced by the immune system are IgM antibodies. They form the "vanguard" of the immune response, before other cells are activated to fight the infection. Some people are deficient or completely lack these antibodies, so that they develop congenital immune deficiency. Researchers have now discovered how this deficiency can also lead to an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How phishing scams thrive on overconfidenceA new study examines overconfidence in detecting phishing e-mails. According to the research, most people believe they're smarter than the criminals behind these schemes, which is why so many fall easily into a trap.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Species diversity reduces chances of crop failure in algal biofuel systemsWhen growing algae in outdoor ponds as a next-generation biofuel, a naturally diverse mix of species will help reduce the chance of crop failure, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicians can better predict outcomes for kidney transplant patients with key data, study findsKidney transplant patients have a better chance of survival if physicians use all the data that's available to them -- including data that's tracked over time -- to predict the likelihood of organ failure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural tooth repair method, using Alzheimer's drug, could revolutionize dental treatmentsA new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp (dental treatment) using an Alzheimer's drug has been discovered by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New potential treatment for cancer metastasis identifiedBreast cancer metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads, may be prevented through the new use of a class of drugs already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, say investigators.
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Futurity.org

‘Breathalyzer’ ignitions may cut fatal car crashes Requiring ignition interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers appears to cut fatal alcohol-related car crashes more than less strict interlock laws do, report researchers. The study—published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine —finds that mandatory interlock laws were associated with a 7 percent decrease in the rate of fatal crashes involving at least one driver with blood alcohol ove
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Scientific American Content: Global

What to Say to a Climate Change SkepticWhat should you say to a climate change skeptic? -
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Futurity.org

Moms of juvenile offenders lack legal know-how Teenagers who commit crimes for the first time are more likely to re-offend if their mothers don’t participate in their legal process, new research finds. Unfortunately, their mothers are widely unfamiliar with the juvenile justice system—and those who know the least about the system also participate the least. A new study suggests a dire need for more legal education for parents of juvenile offe 1d

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